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Sample records for accuser staff outcome

  1. Improving Staff Performance through Clinician Application of Outcome Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Dennis H.; Parsons, Marsha B.; Lattimore, L. Perry; Towery, Donna L.; Reade, Kamara K.

    2005-01-01

    In two studies, three clinicians were assisted in using an outcome management approach to supervision for improving the work performance of their staff assistants. Using vocal and written instructions, feedback, and modeling, each clinician was assisted in specifying an area of staff performance (or consumer activity related to staff performance)…

  2. Improving staff performance through clinician application of outcome management.

    PubMed

    Reid, Dennis H; Parsons, Marsha B; Lattimore, L Perry; Towery, Donna L; Reade, Kamara K

    2005-01-01

    In two studies, three clinicians were assisted in using an outcome management approach to supervision for improving the work performance of their staff assistants. Using vocal and written instructions, feedback, and modeling, each clinician was assisted in specifying an area of staff performance (or consumer activity related to staff performance) to improve, developing and implementing a performance monitoring system, training staff in the targeted performances using performance- and competency-based training, and providing on-the-job supportive and corrective feedback. In Study 1, a senior job coach was assisted in using the outcome management steps to improve prompting procedures of three staff job coaches working with supported workers with autism in a community job. Correct prompting improved for all three job coaches following implementation of the outcome management process by the senior job coach. In Study 2, two teachers in two adult education classrooms were assisted in using the process to improve the degree to which their assistants involved students with severe disabilities in meal-preparation activities. Student participation in the activities increased in both classrooms when the teachers implemented the outcome management steps. In both studies, improved performances maintained for at least a 14-week period. Results are discussed in regard to working with supervisors as representing one step in promoting the adoption of research-based supervisory strategies within human service organizations.

  3. Professional Staff Contributions to Positive Student Outcomes: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2013-01-01

    Although professional staff comprise more than half the Australian higher education workforce, typically research has concentrated on the work of academic staff. Professional staff are increasingly researching the working lives of professional staff, adding to the understanding of the work of professional staff and the contributions they make…

  4. A Comparative Study of the Perceptions of Professional Staff on Their Contribution to Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie-Anne; Dollard, Emma; Banks, Nicci

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of professional staff on their contribution to student outcomes. An online Delphi survey method was used to collect data from two expert panels: professional staff based in faculties and professional staff based in central university departments. The aim of this method is for the panels to reach consensus. The…

  5. How To Involve Staff in Developing an Outcomes-Oriented Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Randy; Cairns, June M.; Brunk, Molly

    2000-01-01

    This article describes how to maximize clinician participation in outcome management systems: articulate the value of the outcomes management system, involve clinical staff in its design, make it relevant to treatment goals, assure clinicians it will not be used punitively, show how it will improve treatment, and obtain staff feedback. (Contains…

  6. Trainees versus Staff: Exploring Counseling Outcomes in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Mike; Sharp, Julia L.; Havice, Pamela; Ilagan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Investigators compared counseling outcomes among nonpaid graduate-level trainees and professional staff at a college counseling center. Counseling outcomes for 331 college student participants were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ45.2), employing a pretest--posttest design. The two groups of service providers did not differ…

  7. Associations between psychiatric patients' self-image, staff feelings towards them, and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Rolf; Armelius, Kerstin

    2004-08-30

    Interpersonal theory, as well as relational models of psychoanalytic and cognitive therapy, posits the importance for positive treatment outcome of the therapist's becoming emotionally involved in the patient's interpersonal patterns. Using the same data as in this study, we have previously found associations between psychiatric patients' self-image and the staff's feelings towards them, and differential associations between staff feelings and outcome for different diagnostic groups. The purpose of the present study was to analyze potential connections between patients' self-image, staff feelings, and outcome. Twice a year, staff at small psychiatric units reported their feelings towards 63 psychotic and 21 borderline patients who had rated their self-image at the beginning of the treatment using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) introject and parent images. Feelings reported on the two first occasions at the beginning of the treatment were used. Outcome was assessed after 5 years. Correlation analyses found different associations between patient self-image and staff feelings for patients with favorable and less favorable outcome. The results indicated for psychotic patients associations between positive outcome and less distant staff feelings connected with the patient's freedom-giving introject, less unfree staff feelings connected with a negative image of mother and less positive feelings connected with a positive image of father. For the borderline patients, positive outcome was associated with the fact that a negative image of mother did not evoke helpful staff feelings, a positive image of the patient himself or herself did not evoke helpful staff feelings and a controlling image of father-evoked distant feelings.

  8. Clinical staff development: planning and teaching for desired outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harton, Brenda B

    2007-01-01

    Nursing staff development educators facilitate learning activities to promote learner retention of knowledge: factual, conceptual, procedural, and meta-cognitive. The Revised Bloom's Taxonomy provides a modern framework for the cognitive process dimension of knowledge and guides the nursing educator in planning activities that will assure learner progress along the learning continuum.

  9. Effects of nursing care and staff skill mix on patient outcomes within acute care nursing units.

    PubMed

    Hart, Patricia; Davis, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study that evaluates the relationships between staffing indicators and patient outcomes at the hospital unit level. Nursing administrators should not only evaluate the impact staffing decisions have on patient outcomes at the hospital level but also examine these relationships at the unit level. The findings from this study have implications for nursing practice in the areas of staff orientation, education, and patient outcome monitoring.

  10. Blended versus lecture learning: outcomes for staff development.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Heidi; Comer, Linda; Putnam, Lorene; Freeman, Helen

    2012-07-01

    Critical care pharmacology education is crucial to safe patient care for nurses orienting to specialized areas. Although traditionally taught as a classroom lecture, it is important to consider effectiveness of alternative methods for education. This study provided experimentally derived evidence regarding effectiveness of blended versus traditional lecture for critical care pharmacology education. Regardless of learner demographics, the findings determined no significant differences in cognitive learning outcomes or learner satisfaction between blended versus lecture formats.

  11. Hearing the Voices of General Staff: A Delphi Study of the Contributions of General Staff to Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2010-01-01

    A university's key resource is its staff, both academic and general. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the work of general staff. Yet general staff comprise more than half the workforce in Australian universities and a more rigorous understanding of the contribution of general staff towards the strategic goals of their…

  12. Nurse Aide Empowerment Strategies and Staff Stability: Effects on Nursing Home Resident Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Theresa; Brannon, Diane; Mor, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the moderating effect of staff stability on the relationship between management practices used to empower nurse aides and resident outcomes in a multistate sample of nursing homes. An adaptation of Kanter's theory of structural power in organizations guided the framework for the model used in this study. Design and…

  13. Effects of a Preschool Staff Intervention on Children's Sun Protection: Outcomes of Sun Protection Is Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritz, Ellen R.; Tripp, Mary K.; James, Aimee S.; Harrist, Ronald B.; Mueller, Nancy H.; Chamberlain, Robert M.; Parcel, Guy S.

    2007-01-01

    The preschool is an important yet understudied setting for sun-protection interventions. This study evaluates the effects of Sun Protection is Fun! (SPF) on preschool staff behavioral and psychosocial outcomes related to protecting children from sun exposure. Twenty preschools participated in a 2-year, group-randomized trial to evaluate SPF, a…

  14. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including ‘communication’, ‘diagnosis’, and ‘referral’ to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff. PMID:27247676

  15. Exploring the Contribution of Professional Staff to Student Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Australian and UK Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll; Regan, Julie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the second stage of a comparative study between two higher education institutions: one in Australia and the other in the United Kingdom, which explored the contributions of professional staff to student outcomes. The first stage acted as a scoping exercise to ascertain how the contributions of professional staff to student…

  16. False Accusations of Nosocomial Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John

    1992-01-01

    Practitioners performing routine physical examination may be falsely accused of sexual abuse. Criminal justice system is incompatible with biomedical system of prevention. It is responsible for establishment of sexual abuse industry, practitioners of which have vested interest in maintaining status quo of sexual criminalization. They themselves…

  17. Legal Rights of the Criminally Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Young Lawyers Association, Austin.

    A brief review of the federal constitutional provisions and equivalent Texas Constitutional provisions for the criminally accused is provided in question and answer form. First Amendment rights related to such matters as freedom of the press, rights of students, picketing, distributing leaflets, state licensing, and obscenity are considered in the…

  18. Staff training and ambulatory tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a cluster randomized controlled trial in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Simon; Dick, Judy; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Lombard, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether adding a training intervention for clinic staff to the usual DOTS strategy (the internationally recommended control strategy for tuberculosis (TB)) would affect the outcomes of TB treatment in primary care clinics with treatment success rates below 70%. METHODS: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted from July 1996 to July 2000 in nurse-managed ambulatory primary care clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. Clinics with successful TB treatment completion rates of less than 70% and annual adult pulmonary TB loads of more than 40 patients per year were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 12) or control (n = 12) groups. All clinics completed follow-up. Treatment outcomes were measured in cohorts of adult, pulmonary TB patients before the intervention (n = 1200) and 9 months following the training (n = 1177). The intervention comprised an 18-hour experiential, participatory in-service training programme for clinic staff delivered by nurse facilitators and focusing on patient centredness, critical reflection on practice, and quality improvement. The main outcome measure was successful treatment, defined as patients who were cured and those who had completed tuberculosis treatment. FINDINGS: The estimated effect of the intervention was an increase in successful treatment rates of 4.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): -5.5% to 15.2%) and in bacteriological cure rates of 10.4% (CI: -1.2% to 22%). A treatment effect of 10% was envisaged, based on the views of policy-makers on the minimum effect size for large-scale implementation. CONCLUSION: This is the first evidence from a randomized controlled trial on the effects of experiential, participatory training on TB outcomes in primary care facilities in a developing country. Such training did not appear to improve TB outcomes. However, the results were inconclusive and further studies are required. PMID:15868015

  19. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lee-Fay; Fletcher, Jennifer; Goodenough, Belinda; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; MacAndrew, Margaret; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes. Methods Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure. Results Sixty-three unique studies were broadly grouped according to clinical domain—oral health (3 studies), hygiene and infection control (3 studies), nutrition (2 studies), nursing home acquired pneumonia (2 studies), depression (2 studies) appropriate prescribing (7 studies), reduction of physical restraints (3 studies), management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6 studies), falls reduction and prevention (11 studies), quality improvement (9 studies), philosophy of care (10 studies) and other (5 studies). No single intervention component, combination of, or increased number of components was associated with greater likelihood of positive outcomes. Studies with positive outcomes for residents also tended to change staff behavior, however changing staff behavior did not necessarily improve resident outcomes. Studies targeting specific care tasks (e.g. oral care, physical restraints) were more likely to produce positive outcomes than those requiring global practice changes (e.g. care philosophy). Studies using intervention theories were more likely to be successful. Program logic was rarely articulated, so it was often unclear whether there was a coherent connection between the intervention components and measured outcomes. Many studies reported barriers relating to staff (e.g. turnover, high workload, attitudes) or organizational factors (e.g. funding, resources, logistics). Conclusion Changing staff practice in nursing homes is possible but complex

  20. Assessing and Increasing Staff Preference for Job Tasks Using Concurrent-Chains Schedules and Probabilistic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.; Campisano, Natalie; Lacourse, Kristen; Azulay, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment and improvement of staff members' subjective valuation of nonpreferred work tasks may be one way to increase the quality of staff members' work life. The Task Enjoyment Motivation Protocol (Green, Reid, Passante, & Canipe, 2008) provides a process for supervisors to identify the aversive qualities of nonpreferred job tasks.…

  1. Promoting Shared Decision Making to strengthen outcome of young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: the role of staff competence.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kristin; Benvenuto, Arianna; Battan, Barbara; Siracusano, Martina; Terribili, Monica; Curatolo, Paolo; Fava, Leonardo

    2015-03-01

    Little is known on how the conceptual description of Shared Decision Making (SDM) accomplishes clinical practice in the context of lifetime disabilities as in particular Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), when intervention is long-lasting and requires constant family involvement. This study aimed mainly to investigate to what extent the staff's competence in SDM contributes to positive child and parent improvement when involving parents in Early Intensive Behavior Interventions (EIBI). It was also geared to verify whether SDM staff competence contributes to a child's treatment responsiveness. A total of 25 young children with ASD (23 male, 3 female, age range 34-92 months, mean age 51.4±13.6) were included in the study. Of these, nine children were allocated to a Parent Involvement condition accompanied by SDM Staff Training (PI-SDM), and eight children to a Parent Inclusion in Treatment Delivery Only condition without SDM Staff Training (PI-DO). Nine months treatment outcomes of severity, developmental and adaptive measures were compared to Treatment As Usual (n=8). PI-SDM was associated with improvement of autistic symptoms (p≤.05), adaptive functioning (p≤.01) and developmental outcome (p≤.01), as well as parent (p≤.05) and staff competence (p≤.001). The magnitude of outcome was inferior in the PI-PO and TAU group. A Reliable Change was identified in more than 40% of children included in PI-SDM, while PI-PO (>20%) and TAU (>12%) let to little Reliable Change and partially skill deterioration. Staff's SDM skill competence predicts reduced parental stress (β=-.500, p≤.05) and contributes significantly to a positive treatment responder trajectory (p≤.01), besides lower severity (p≤.05), higher adaptive (p≤.01) and communication skills (p≤.05). The study indicates that parent inclusion should be conceptualized as a collaborative partnership model rather than as adherence in treatment provision, based on a target SDM staff training that may

  2. Argentinian doctors accused of spreading AIDS.

    PubMed

    Dyer, E

    1993-09-04

    The provincial ministry of health has taken over a dialysis center in La Plata, Argentina, following the discovery that at least 20 of the clinic's 34 regular patients have been infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Catheters of the clinic's dialysis machines were found to be contaminated with HIV. The 5 physicians associated with the Centro Modelo de Dialisis have been discharged for negligence. 20 of the regular patients also contracted hepatitis C. Argentinian law stipulates that filters for the same patient must be changed after 4 times and prohibits the use of the same vessel to administer medication to more than 1 patient. Testimony from nurses at the La Plata clinic revealed that filters were reused for several patients and basic sanitary procedures were not followed. In 1990, 33 kidney disease patients at a dialysis center in Cordoba became infected with HIV and it was discovered that filters had been used up to 8 times for different patients. The 5 La Plata physicians stand accused of "the culpable propagation of dangerous diseases."

  3. Rewarding and Developing Staff in Higher Education: Outcome of Phase Two. Special Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This document provides feedback on the second phase of the initiative to reward and develop staff in higher education. It includes a preliminary analysis of institutions' human resource (HR) strategies and lists the higher education institutions (HEIs) that have submitted strategies classified as full or full with conditions. In 2001, institutions…

  4. Child-Staff Ratios in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings and Child Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Michal; Fletcher, Brooke; Falenchuk, Olesya; Brunsek, Ashley; McMullen, Evelyn; Shah, Prakesh S.

    2017-01-01

    Child-staff ratios are a key quality indicator in early childhood education and care (ECEC) programs. Better ratios are believed to improve child outcomes by increasing opportunities for individual interactions and educational instruction from staff. The purpose of this systematic review, and where possible, meta-analysis, was to evaluate the association between child-staff ratios in preschool ECEC programs and children’s outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted up to July 3, 2015. Cross-sectional or longitudinal studies that evaluated the relationship between child-staff ratios in ECEC classrooms serving preschool aged children and child outcomes were independently identified by two reviewers. Data were independently extracted from included studies by two raters and differences between raters were resolved by consensus. Searches revealed 29 eligible studies (31 samples). Child-staff ratios ranged from 5 to 14.5 preschool-aged children per adult with a mean of 8.65. All 29 studies were included in the systematic review. However, the only meta-analysis that could be conducted was based on three studies that explored associations between ratios and children’s receptive language. Results of this meta-analysis were not significant. Results of the qualitative systematic review revealed few significant relationships between child-staff ratios and child outcomes construed broadly. Thus, the available literature reveal few, if any, relationships between child-staff ratios in preschool ECEC programs and children’s developmental outcomes. Substantial heterogeneity in the assessment of ratios, outcomes measured, and statistics used to capture associations limited quantitative synthesis. Other methodological limitations of the research integrated in this synthesis are discussed. PMID:28103288

  5. Outcome in noncritically ill patients with acute kidney injury requiring dialysis: Effects of differing medical staffs and organizations.

    PubMed

    Fagugli, Riccardo Maria; Patera, Francesco; Battistoni, Sara; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) treatment has significantly increased in incidence over the years, with more than 400 new cases per million population/y, 2/3 of which concern noncritically ill patients. In these patients, there are little data on mortality or on information of care organization and its impact on outcome. Specialty training and integrated teams, as well as a high volume of activity, seem to be linked to better hospital outcome. The study investigates mortality of patients admitted to and in-care of nephrology (NEPHROpts), a closed-staff organization, and to other medical wards (MEDpts), representing a model of open-staff organization.This is a single center, case-control cohort study derived from a prospective epidemiology investigation on patients with AKI-D admitted to or in-care of the Hospital of Perugia during the period 2007 to 2014. Noncritically ill AKI-D patients were analyzed: inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined to avoid possible bias on the cause of hospital admittance and comorbidities, and a propensity score (PS) matching was performed.Six hundred fifty-four noncritically ill patients were observed and 296 fulfilled inclusion/exclusion criteria. PS matching resulted in 2 groups: 100 NEPHROpts and 100 MEDpts. Characteristics, comorbidities, acute kidney injury causes, risk-injury-failure acute kidney injury criteria, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS 2) were similar. Mortality was 36%, and a difference was reported between NEPHROpts and MEDpts (20% vs 52%, χ = 23.2, P < 0.001). Patients who died differed in age, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen/s.Creatinine ratio, dialysis urea reduction rate (URR), SAPS 2 and Charlson score; they presented a higher rate of heart disease, and a larger proportion required noradrenaline/dopamine for shock. After correction for mortality risk factors, multivariate Cox analysis revealed that site of treatment (medical vs nephrology wards) represents an

  6. Social Support and Outcomes for Staff Serving Individuals with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Sharon M.; Schellenberg, Richard P.

    Ninety-four persons employed in direct care positions in a community-based agency that serves adults with mental retardation completed self-report questionnaires assessing relationships between social support and the adaptive outcomes of mood, perceived competence, and self-efficacy. Findings indicated that: (1) negative mood was negatively…

  7. Newsworthy Accusations and the Privilege of Neutral Reportage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Theodore L.

    Recent rulings of the United States Supreme Court and other courts have tried to maintain a balance between a free and unintimidated press and some measure of protection for individuals against libelous accusations. The language of recent rulings suggests that the courts are focusing on impartiality and objectivity in reporting as a standard of…

  8. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures accorded the accused. 9.5 Section 9.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST...

  9. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures accorded the accused. 9.5 Section 9.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST...

  10. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedures accorded the accused. 9.5 Section 9.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST...

  11. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures accorded the accused. 9.5 Section 9.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST...

  12. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedures accorded the accused. 9.5 Section 9.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST...

  13. [Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice--the second victim].

    PubMed

    Wienke, A

    2013-04-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 [1]. Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decisions are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession and the actual requirements of the

  14. The Evidence Base for Mental Health Consultation in Early Childhood Settings: Research Synthesis Addressing Staff and Program Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Eileen M.; Bradley, Jennifer R.; Allen, Mary Dallas; Perry, Deborah F.

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: One strategy to support early childhood providers' work with children exhibiting challenging behavior is offering mental health consultation services in order to build staff skills and confidence and reduce staff stress and turnover. Through systematic search procedures, 26 recent studies were identified that addressed the…

  15. Improving smoking cessation outcomes in secondary care: Predictors of hospital staff willingness to provide smoking cessation referral.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yin-Yu; Yu, Shu-Man; Lai, Yun-Ju; Wu, Ping-Lun; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Huang, Hsien-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Since implementation of the New Smoking Cessation Policy in Taiwan, more patients are attending smoking cessation clinics. Many of these patients were referred by hospital staff. Thus, factors which influence the hospital staff's willingness to refer are important. In this study, we aim to understand the relation between smoking cessation knowledge and willingness for referral. A cross-sectional study using a questionnaire was conducted with staff of a community hospital during the year 2012-2013. Willingness to provide smoking cessation referral and relevant correlated variables including demographic data, knowledge of basic cigarette harm, and knowledge of resources and methods regarding smoking cessation were measured. A total of 848 of 1500 hospital staff returned the questionnaire: 249 physicians (29.4%), 402 nursing staff (47.4%), and 197 administration staff (23.2%). 790 (93.2%) staff members have never smoked, 19 (2.2%) had quit smoking, and 39 (4.6%) still smoke. 792 (93.4%) members had interest in receiving smoking cessation education. The mean total score (highest potential score of 6) of basic cigarette harm knowledge was 4.56 (± 1.25). The mean total score (highest potential score of 7) of resources and methods about smoking cessation was 4.79 (± 1.35). The significant variable correlated with willingness to refer was total score of resources and methods about smoking cessation. Hospital staff who knew more about resources and methods about smoking cessation were more willing to refer smoking patients to the smoking cessation service. Thus, continuing medical education for hospital staff should include resources and methods about smoking cessation to promote smoking cessation.

  16. Motivating Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tager, Shelley

    2002-01-01

    Camp directors can motivate staff by showing they are valued. Acknowledging positive actions, throwing a staff party, providing relief time, and being a good role model are all good motivators. Weekly staff meetings keep staff informed and provide time to air problems and get feedback. Keeping in touch with staff during the off-season is also…

  17. Protective factors and recidivism in accused juveniles who sexually offended.

    PubMed

    Klein, Verena; Rettenberger, Martin; Yoon, Dahlnym; Köhler, Nora; Briken, Peer

    2015-02-01

    To date, research on juvenile sexual offender recidivism has tended to focus on risk factors rather than protective factors. Therefore, very little is known about protective factors in the population of juveniles who sexually offended. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of protective factors on non-recidivism in a sample of accused juveniles who sexually offended (N = 71) in a mean follow-up period of 47.84 months. Protective factors were measured with the Protective Factor Scale of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY), and the Structured Assessment of PROtective Factors for violence risk (SAPROF). Criminal charges served as recidivism data. The internal scale of the SAPROF, in particular, yielded moderate predictive accuracy for the absence of violent and general recidivism, though not for the absence of sexual recidivism. No protective factor of the SAVRY did reveal predictive accuracy regarding various types of the absence of recidivism. Furthermore, protective factors failed to achieve any significant incremental predictive accuracy beyond that captured by the SAVRY risk factors alone. The potential therapeutic benefit of protective factors in juvenile sexual offender treatment is discussed.

  18. Prevalence of Formal Accusations of Murder and Euthanasia against Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lewis M.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goy, Elizabeth; Arons, Stephen; Ganzini, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about how often physicians are formally accused of hastening patient deaths while practicing palliative care. Methods We conducted an Internet-based survey on a random 50% sample of physician-members of a national hospice and palliative medicine society. Results The final sample consisted of 663 physicians (response rate 53%). Over half of the respondents had had at least one experience in the last 5 years in which a patient's family, another physician, or another health care professional had characterized palliative treatments as being euthanasia, murder, or killing. One in four stated that at least one friend or family member, or a patient had similarly characterized their treatments. Respondents rated palliative sedation and stopping artificial hydration/nutrition as treatments most likely to be misconstrued as euthanasia. Overall, 25 physicians (4%) had been formally investigated for hastening a patient's death when that had not been their intention—13 while using opiates for symptom relief and six for using medications while discontinuing mechanical ventilation. In eight (32%) cases, another member of the health care team had initiated the charges. At the time of the survey, none had been found guilty, but they reported experiencing substantial anger and worry. Conclusions Commonly used palliative care practices continue to be misconstrued as euthanasia or murder, despite this not being the intention of the treating physician. Further efforts are needed to explain to the health care community and the public that treatments often used to relieve patient suffering at the end of life are ethical and legal. PMID:22401355

  19. Canadian trends in filicide by gender of the accused, 1961-2011.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Myrna

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive historical and contemporary picture of filicide in Canada for more than half a century. Focusing on 1,612 children under age 18 that were killed by their parents between 1961 and 2011, regional and temporal trends in the gender of accused are examined as well as differences in maternal and paternal filicides by the gender and age of the victim, the age and marital status of the accused, type of parental relationship, cause of death, motive, history of family violence, and clearance status. Results show that there are significant differences in filicides by mothers and fathers. Five possible emerging trends were identified: an increasing gender gap in accused, increasing presence of relationship breakdown, growing number of cases involving stepfathers and a prior history of family violence, and declines in accused who committed suicide. Implications of these trends for interventions and prevention are discussed and future research priorities highlighted.

  20. 32 CFR 719.115 - Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and sex. (ii) The substance of the offenses of which the individual is accused or suspected. (iii) The... section), or guilt of the offense or offenses involved. (ii) The prior criminal record (including...

  1. From Bystander to Upstander Teacher for Gifted Black Students Accused of Acting White

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Tarek C.; Biddle, Winfred H.

    2014-01-01

    Gifted Black students experience many barriers that contribute to their under-representation in gifted and advanced programs. One of the greatest negative influences comes from peer accusations of acting White that undermine gifted and high-achieving Black students' academic motivation and their interest in challenging courses and programs.…

  2. The Acquisition of Accusative Object Clitics by IA Children from China: Evidence of Early Age Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delcenserie, Audrey; Genesee, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared the performance of twenty-seven French-speaking internationally adopted (IA) children from China to that of twenty-seven monolingual non-adopted French-speaking children (CTL) matched for age, gender, and socioeconomic status on a Clitic Elicitation task. The IA children omitted significantly more accusative object…

  3. 32 CFR 719.151 - Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement. 719.151 Section 719.151 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL...

  4. 32 CFR 719.151 - Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement. 719.151 Section 719.151 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL...

  5. 32 CFR 719.151 - Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement. 719.151 Section 719.151 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL...

  6. Etiology of Loss among Parents Falsely Accused of Abuse or Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeman, Laura

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of loss among parents whose children were in child protective custody that resulted from false accusations of abuse or neglect. In practice, child protective service assessments more times than not clear parents of charges of wrongdoing, however the impact of these investigations on parents has not yet been…

  7. 32 CFR 719.115 - Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions. 719.115 Section 719.115 National Defense Department of Defense... the public concerning the administration of military justice. The task of striking a fair...

  8. 32 CFR 719.115 - Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions. 719.115 Section 719.115 National Defense Department of Defense... the public concerning the administration of military justice. The task of striking a fair...

  9. 32 CFR 719.115 - Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions. 719.115 Section 719.115 National Defense Department of Defense... the public concerning the administration of military justice. The task of striking a fair...

  10. 32 CFR 719.115 - Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions. 719.115 Section 719.115 National Defense Department of Defense... the public concerning the administration of military justice. The task of striking a fair...

  11. Dissociative Experiences of Sexual Offenders: A Comparison between Two Outpatient Groups and Those Found to be Falsely Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, S. Margretta

    1992-01-01

    Administered Dissociative Experiences Scale, which distinguishes between subjects with dissociative disorder and those without, to 71 sex offenders and 14 men who were falsely accused of sexual abuse. Outpatient sex offenders scored in the range attributed to general population. Those falsely accused of child sexual abuse scored lower than…

  12. Staff Training Best Practices: Targeting Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Randall

    2001-01-01

    Enhancing the attitude of camp staff involves hiring staff that already have good attitudes, training staff in small groups that then train the rest, using the power of story, removing structural barriers, helping people understand how their actions influence organizational outcomes, identifying "termites," and placing a weak counselor…

  13. Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reusswig, James, Ed.; Ponzio, Richard, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Eight essays are presented which reflect current problems, issues, and practices related to the development of teacher and administrator expertise. The authors are school district and public school administrators, faculty of schools of education, and a director of staff development in a state department of education. The topics treated are: (1)…

  14. Errors and pitfalls: Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice – the second victim

    PubMed Central

    Wienke, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 (published at http://www.bundesaerztekammer.de). Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decision are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession

  15. Exploring the controversy in child abuse pediatrics and false accusations of abuse.

    PubMed

    Gabaeff, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    There is a controversy in child abuse pediatrics between an established corps of child abuse pediatricians aligned with hospital colleagues and law enforcement, and a multi-specialty challenger group of doctors and other medical professionals working with public interest lawyers. The latter group questions the scientific validity of the core beliefs of child abuse pediatricians and believes that there are a substantial number of false accusations of abuse occurring. An unproven primary hypothesis, crafted around 1975 by a small group of pediatricians with an interest in child abuse, lies at the foundation of child abuse pediatrics. With no scientific study, it was hypothesized that subdural hemorrhage (SDH) and retinal hemorrhage (RH) were diagnostic of shaking abuse. That hypothesis became the so-called "shaken baby syndrome." Through the period 1975-1985, in a coordinated manner, these child abuse specialists coalesced under the American Academy of Pediatrics and began working with district attorneys and social workers, informing them of the ways in which their hypothesis could be applied to prosecutions of child abuse and life-altering social service interventions. In a legal context, using then-prevailing evidentiary rules which treated scientific expert testimony as valid if it was "generally accepted" in the field, they represented falsely that there was general acceptance of their hypothesis and therefore it was valid science. As the ability to convict based on this unproven prime hypothesis (SDH and RH equals abuse) increased, some defense attorneys were professionally compelled by their own doubts to reach out to experts from other fields with experience with SDH and RH, trauma, and biomechanics, for second opinions. Medical and legal challenges to the established thinking soon emerged, based on both old and new evidenced-based literature. As the intensity of the controversy increased, the probability of false accusation became more apparent and the need

  16. Medico-legal implications of mobbing. A false accusation of psychological harassment at the workplace.

    PubMed

    Jarreta, Begoña Martínez; García-Campayo, Javier; Gascón, Santiago; Bolea, Miguel

    2004-12-02

    Mobbing, or psychological harassment at the workplace, is usually defined as a situation in which a person or a group of people engage in extreme psychological violence against another person. In Spain, the number of reports for mobbing has increased extraordinarily in the last years. The reports are increasing dramatically not only before the Labour Courts, but also before the Civil Courts, with claims for damages, and before the Penal Court for offences causing physical or moral injury, etc., since at the present time this figure is not typified as an offence in the Spanish Penal Code. The high degree of complexity of this situation has given rise to frequent misuse of the term and to a number of false accusations of mobbing. A recent European Parliament Resolution on harassment at the workplace addressed the devastating consequences of false accusations. In this paper we present a case in which the "false" victim was mentally ill (paranoia) but succeed in generating an extreme dangerous environment of great harassment against the "false" assailants that were "falsely" accused of mobbing. Forensic diagnosis of the psychiatric disorder suffered by the "false" victim was essential to clarify the issue at the Penal Court.

  17. Women as easy scapegoats: witchcraft accusations and women as targets in tea plantations of India.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Soma

    2012-10-01

    This article revisits a much-debated question: Why are women popular targets during witch hunts? By using in-depth interviews this article provides an answer. Women are easy targets or scapegoats for two reasons. First, it is widely believed in the community that was studied that witches do, in fact, exist, and the images of witches are always female. Second, tribal women hold lower positions than men in all social, political, and ritual matters, and this contributes to their vulnerability during the hunt for scapegoats. This article also highlights the roles that rumors play during manipulation of witchcraft accusations to gather support for witch hunts.

  18. Steps toward validity in active living research: research design that limits accusations of physical determinism.

    PubMed

    Riggs, William

    2014-03-01

    "Active living research" has been accused of being overly "physically deterministic" and this article argues that urban planners must continue to evolve research and address biases in this area. The article first provides background on how researchers have dealt with the relationship between the built environment and health over years. This leads to a presentation of how active living research might be described as overly deterministic. The article then offers lessons for researchers planning to embark in active-living studies as to how they might increase validity and minimize criticism of physical determinism.

  19. Intracultural accusations of assimilation and alcohol use severity among Hispanic emerging adults: Moderating effects of acculturation, enculturation, and gender.

    PubMed

    Cano, Miguel Ángel

    2016-12-01

    Individuals, including Hispanics, tend to drink most heavily during emerging adulthood (ages 18-25 years old). Research has suggested that intercultural stressors (e.g., ethnic discrimination) may increase levels of alcohol use among Hispanics. However, the relationship between intracultural stressors (e.g., accusations of assimilation-when Hispanics accuse a member of their heritage group of acculturating to U.S. culture) and alcohol use has been examined to a lesser extent. Accordingly, the present study aimed to (a) examine the association between family accusations of assimilation and alcohol use severity; and (b) examine if acculturation domains, enculturation domains, and gender moderated that association. A hierarchical multiple regression and moderation analyses were conducted on a cross-sectional sample of 181 Hispanic emerging adults. Results indicated that higher family accusations of assimilation were associated with higher levels of alcohol use severity (β = .18, p < .05), and all variables entered in the model accounted for ΔR2 = 15.1% of the variance of alcohol use severity. A moderation analysis indicated that higher family accusations of assimilation were associated with higher alcohol use severity among men, but not women. Of the four acculturation/enculturation domains, none had a moderation effect. However, there was a statistically significant three-way interaction among family accusations of assimilation, gender, and affective enculturation. This three-way interaction suggests that among men, higher family accusations of assimilation were associated with higher alcohol use severity at lower levels of affective enculturation. This study addresses a literature gap on intracultural stressors and substance use among Hispanics, and discusses recommendations for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Declarations, accusations and judgement: examining conflict of interest discourses as performative speech-acts.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Christopher; Lipworth, Wendy; Kerridge, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Concerns over conflicts of interest (COI) in academic research and medical practice continue to provoke a great deal of discussion. What is most obvious in this discourse is that when COIs are declared, or perceived to exist in others, there is a focus on both the descriptive question of whether there is a COI and, subsequently, the normative question of whether it is good, bad or neutral. We contend, however, that in addition to the descriptive and normative, COI declarations and accusations can be understood as performatives. In this article, we apply J.L. Austin's performative speech-act theory to COI discourses and illustrate how this works using a contemporary case study of COI in biomedical publishing. We argue that using Austin's theory of performative speech-acts serves to highlight the social arrangements and role of authorities in COI discourse and so provides a rich framework to examine declarations, accusations and judgements of COI that often arise in the context of biomedical research and practice.

  1. Staff Development for the Continuing Education Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hentschel, Doe

    1990-01-01

    Advocating development for all continuing education staff, the author asserts that staff who understand adult education theory, the goals and visions of the organization, the environmental context of continuing education, and the roles of other staff members will be more effective. Also essential are support mechanisms that facilitate change. (SK)

  2. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of a Measure of Staff/Child Interaction Quality (the Classroom Assessment Scoring System) in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings and Child Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Michal; Falenchuk, Olesya; Fletcher, Brooke; McMullen, Evelyn; Beyene, Joseph; Shah, Prakesh S

    2016-01-01

    The quality of staff/child interactions as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs is thought to be important for children's outcomes. The CLASS is made of three domains that assess Emotional Support, Classroom Organization and Instructional Support. It is a relatively new measure that is being used increasingly for research, quality monitoring/accountability and other applied purposes. Our objective was to evaluate the association between the CLASS and child outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted up to July 3, 2015. Studies that measured association between the CLASS and child outcomes for preschool-aged children who attended ECEC programs were included after screening by two independent reviewers. Searches and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Thirty-five studies were systematically reviewed of which 19 provided data for meta-analyses. Most studies had moderate to high risk of bias. Of the 14 meta-analyses we conducted, associations between Classroom Organization and Pencil Tapping and between Instructional Support and SSRS Social Skills were significant with pooled correlations of .06 and .09 respectively. All associations were in the expected direction. In the systematic review, significant correlations were reported mainly from one large dataset. Substantial heterogeneity in use of the CLASS, its dimensions, child outcomes and statistical measures was identified. Greater consistency in study methodology is urgently needed. Given the multitude of factors that impact child development it is encouraging that our analyses revealed some, although small, associations between the CLASS and children's outcomes.

  3. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of a Measure of Staff/Child Interaction Quality (the Classroom Assessment Scoring System) in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings and Child Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Michal; Falenchuk, Olesya; Fletcher, Brooke; McMullen, Evelyn; Beyene, Joseph; Shah, Prakesh S.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of staff/child interactions as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programs is thought to be important for children’s outcomes. The CLASS is made of three domains that assess Emotional Support, Classroom Organization and Instructional Support. It is a relatively new measure that is being used increasingly for research, quality monitoring/accountability and other applied purposes. Our objective was to evaluate the association between the CLASS and child outcomes. Searches of Medline, PsycINFO, ERIC, websites of large datasets and reference sections of all retrieved articles were conducted up to July 3, 2015. Studies that measured association between the CLASS and child outcomes for preschool-aged children who attended ECEC programs were included after screening by two independent reviewers. Searches and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Thirty-five studies were systematically reviewed of which 19 provided data for meta-analyses. Most studies had moderate to high risk of bias. Of the 14 meta-analyses we conducted, associations between Classroom Organization and Pencil Tapping and between Instructional Support and SSRS Social Skills were significant with pooled correlations of .06 and .09 respectively. All associations were in the expected direction. In the systematic review, significant correlations were reported mainly from one large dataset. Substantial heterogeneity in use of the CLASS, its dimensions, child outcomes and statistical measures was identified. Greater consistency in study methodology is urgently needed. Given the multitude of factors that impact child development it is encouraging that our analyses revealed some, although small, associations between the CLASS and children’s outcomes. PMID:28036333

  4. Rights of the Accused: Criminal Amendments in the Bill of Rights. A Compilation of Lessons by Minnesota Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Jennifer, Ed.

    The 36 lessons collected in this publication are designed to introduce students to the rights of the accused and provide a scholarly study of these rights, exploring historical development as well as current application. Lessons are provided for all grade levels. The topics covered include the Bill of Rights, criminal rights amendments, juvenile…

  5. The Perils of Being a Male Primary/Junior Teacher: Vulnerability and Accusations of Inappropriate Contact with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Michael; Gosse, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    There is a perceived shortage of male teachers in education, particularly at the primary/junior (P/J) level where male teachers in Canada account for a dwindling minority. Included among the many factors inhibiting males from becoming P/J teachers are perceptions that males might be unduly vulnerable to false accusations of inappropriate conduct…

  6. "How Could They Believe That?": Explaining to Students Why Accusation of Witchcraft Made Good Sense in Seventeenth-Century New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbeer, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Explains that students must understand that, due to the beliefs of the time in New England, accusing people of witchcraft during the seventeenth century was plausible. Provides background information on societal beliefs centered upon witchcraft and the supernatural, as well as the process of accusing people of being witches. (CMK)

  7. Staff Judge Advocate Handbook. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    working cooperation for keeping each other informed and ensuring service record entries are made, pay stops and starts as appropriate, division... Work closely with TC 1. Serve accused when he is aboard 2. Supply sufficient copies of charge sheet, etc. 3. Ensure that service record entries are...accurate 4. Make DC work through TC SJA-7 r. Accused works for- command, not for DC 1. Use check-in/check-out chits for visits to DC, and retain them in

  8. A collaborative perspective on nursing leadership in quality improvement. The foundation for outcomes management and patient/staff safety in health care environments.

    PubMed

    Gantz, Nancy Rollins; Sorenson, Lisa; Howard, Randy L

    2003-01-01

    By 2004, only organizations whose institutional operating strategies are built on a continual state of readiness and include performance improvement practices throughout the organization are going to successfully meet Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations standards. As stewards of patient care, nurses maintain a unique role in identifying and guiding the intervention processes central to quality care, which prepares them to become key players/designers of a paradigm that demonstrates commitment to establishing and maintaining quality care. However, without recognition and support from organization leadership and physicians, the opportunity to effectively use the capabilities of nursing may be lost. The collaborative perspectives offered here attest to the fact that mutual belief and vision, coupled with creativity, strategic planning, and implementation, can effectively mobilize resources to establish priority measures and achieve quality patient/safety outcomes within the organization. Shifting the paradigm from just meeting the standards to continual readiness and performance improvement throughout the organization then becomes mission and mantra.

  9. The Impact of Staff Turnover and Staff Density on Treatment Quality in a Psychiatric Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Wolfram A.; Bielitz, Christoph J.; Georgi, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Intuition suggests that improving stability of the health workforce brings benefits to staff, the organization and, most importantly, the patients. Unfortunately, there is limited research available to support this, and how health workforce stability can contribute to reduced costs and better treatment outcomes. To help to rectify this situation, we investigated the effects of staff turnover and staff density (staff members per patient) on the treatment outcome of inpatients in a psychiatric clinic. Our data come from the standard assessment of 1429 patients who sought treatment in our clinic from January 2011 to August 2013. Correlation analysis shows no significant effect of raw staff turnover (the total number of psychiatrists, physicians and psychologists starting or quitting work per month) on treatment quality. However, we do find two significant beneficial effects: first, a higher staff consistency (time without staff turnover) and second, a higher staff density lead to an improvement of treatment quality. Our findings underline the dire need for an extended effort to achieve optimal staff retention, both to improve patient’s outcomes and to reduce health expenses. PMID:27065925

  10. Power lines: Derrida, discursive psychology and the management of accusations of teacher bullying.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, A

    2000-12-01

    This study connects broad issues of classroom control and the disciplining of pupils by teachers with a detailed examination of the way teachers deal with an implied accusation that they have been bullying. The analysis of interviews develops with reference to discursive psychology and Derrida's development of deconstruction. Billig's (1992) insights into ways that participants' accounts can neutralize threats to established social arrangements are employed in relating detailed analytic points to the broader power relations between teacher and pupil. Interviews were conducted with Scottish secondary school teachers, and subjected to close textual analysis. This resulted in the development of three themes: (1) Subjectivity Construction, in which the functional role of the construction of mental entities is examined; (2) Normalizing Techniques, identifying strategies whereby intimidation can be constructed as normal; and (3) Figuration, examining the utility of figurative language--metaphors, maxims, and so on. These themes display the subtlety and complexity of teachers' strategies for distancing themselves from being held accountable for reported intimidation. To conclude, three broader features of the study are discussed: the contribution to discursive psychology that Derrida's deconstructive philosophy can make; the respecification of psychology and subjectivity as participants' resources for action; and the contribution that this type of detailed study can make to issues of power and social critique.

  11. Directions in Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela, Ed.

    This collection of readings is intended to provide a source book on best practices in staff development in higher education within a British context. The 13 papers are grouped into three parts: part 1 presents the educational development tradition which has focused on development of staff as teachers; part 2 considers development of staff in…

  12. Why Do Staff Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Connie

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 211 returning staff from 25 camps and interviewed 19 returning staff to study factors that influence a counselor's decision to return to camp. Examined the following dimensions of motivation and hygiene factors: (1) stimulation or inspiration; (2) personal; (3) job-related experience; (4) living conditions and camp life; (5) camp…

  13. Listening to Staff, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jane; Davies, Peter

    A 2002 staff satisfaction survey was administered to 100 sixth form colleges, general further education colleges, and beacon and specialist colleges in England. A questionnaire containing 38 positive statements concerning 6 broad areas one's own role; the staff of the college; style of senior management; communication; customers, including…

  14. Battle Command Staff Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    collective performance. There are a variety of ideas that need attention, ranging Lvm how * staffs should operate vertically , how to measure staff...4-12 Preparation for Vertical BCST .........................................lC S...1.1-1 Appendix 1.2- Vertical BCST-Fire Support ........................................ 1.2-1 Appendix 1.3- Conceptual Innovations in Battle

  15. Nurses using physical restraints: Are the accused also the victims? – A study using focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Claudia KY

    2007-01-01

    Background To date, the literature has provided an abundance of evidence on the adverse outcomes of restraint use on patients. Reportedly, nurses are often the personnel who initiate restraint use and attribute its use to ensuring the safety of the restrained and the others. A clinical trial using staff education and administrative input as the key components of a restraint reduction program was conducted in a rehabilitation setting to examine whether there were any significant differences in the prevalence of restraint use pre- and post-intervention. Subsequent to the implementation of the intervention program, focus group interviews were conducted to determine the perspective of the nursing staff on the use of restraints and their opinions of appropriate means to reduce their use. Method Registered nurses working in units involved in the study were invited to participate in focus group interviews on a voluntary basis. Twenty-two registered nurses (three males [13.6%] and nineteen females [86.4%]) attended the four sessions. All interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Other than the author, another member of the project team validated the findings from the data analysis. Results Four themes were identified. Participants experienced internal conflicts when applying physical restraints and were ambivalent about their use, but they would use restraints nonetheless, mainly to prevent falls and injuries to patients. They felt that nurse staffing was inadequate and that they were doing the best they could. They experienced pressure from the management level and would have liked better support. Communication among the various stakeholders was a problem. Each party may have a different notion about what constitutes a restraint and how it can be safely used, adding further weight to the burden shouldered by staff. Conclusion Studies about restraints and restraint use have mostly focused on nurses' inadequate and often inaccurate knowledge about the use of

  16. The use of neuroscientific evidence in the courtroom by those accused of criminal offenses in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Catley, Paul; Claydon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This examination of the extent of the use of neuroscientific evidence in England and Wales identifies 204 reported cases in which such evidence has been used by those accused of criminal offenses during the eight-year period from 2005–12. Based on the number of reported cases found, the use of such evidence appears well established with those accused of criminal offenses utilizing such evidence in approximately 1 per cent of cases in the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division). Neuroscientific evidence is used to quash convictions, to lead to convictions for lesser offenses and to lead to reduced sentences. In addition, cases are identified where neuroscientific evidence is used to avoid extradition, to challenge bail conditions and to resist prosecution appeals against unduly lenient sentences. The range of uses identified is wide: including challenging prosecution evidence as to the cause of death or injury, challenging the credibility of witnesses and arguing that those convicted were unfit to plead, lacked mens rea or were entitled to mental condition defenses. The acceptance of such evidence reflects the willingness of the courts in England and Wales to hear novel scientific argument, where it is valid and directly relevant to the issue(s) to be decided. Indeed, in some of the cases the courts expressed an expectation that structural brain scan evidence should have been presented to support the argument being made. PMID:27774211

  17. The cumulative influence of conflict on nursing home staff.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Anderson, James G; Anderson, Marilyn M; Suitor, J Jill; Pillemer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Nursing staff burnout is a significant challenge in the delivery of nursing home care. Using a representative sample of nursing staff working within the nursing home setting, our analysis addressed the influence of conflict with residents' families on the burnout experience of staff. Through the use of computer simulation modeling we were able to assess the cumulative effects of conflict between staff and families. Findings indicated that conflict with the residents' families increased both burnout and dissatisfaction among nursing staff. The burnout experience of nursing staff peaked with initial episodes of conflict, then leveled off as simulated conflict with family members continued. Because previous research has indicated that burnout tends to peak early in nurses' career cycle, the finding that initial episodes of conflict have a strong influence on nursing staff burnout highlights the importance of interpersonal conflict within nursing homes in both individual and institutional outcomes.

  18. Online Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pease, Pamela S.; Magnuson, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Describes the benefits for principals of online staff development for teachers. Sources of online courses and training include local and state departments of education, professional associations, colleges and universities, online universities, and commercial suppliers. (PKP)

  19. One American Perspective on the Rights of Accused: An Initial Survey of Miranda Rights in a Broader Context.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Richard; Sharf, Allyson J; Clark, John W; Drogin, Eric Y; Winningham, Darby B; Williams, Margot M

    2016-07-01

    In the wake of countless police dramas, commonly held misperceptions endure that the American public knows both Miranda warnings and concomitant rights. Past research has tested public knowledge of Miranda per se, without evaluating additional misconceptions. The current investigation utilizes the European Union's much more all-encompassing safeguards, as delineated in the EU's 2012 Directive and Letter of Rights. Besides knowledge of Miranda, the advisability of these enhanced rights and protections was also assessed. In order to obtain a cross-section of the community, 619 participants were recruited from actual jury pools. Interestingly, they believed that Miranda afforded arrestees many more protections than it actually does. In general, nearly all (>90%) agreed that the accused should be given accurate information (e.g., charges and alleged criminal acts) coupled with an absence of police deception. The potential implications of these findings are discussed as they relate to police practices and due process. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The Role of Explicit Information in Instructed SLA: An On-Line Study with Processing Instruction and German Accusative Case Inflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culman, Hillah; Henry, Nicholas; VanPatten, Bill

    2009-01-01

    The present study reports the findings of an experiment on the effects of explicit information on the learning of German case markings. Fifty-nine learners of first- and second-year German received computer-based processing instruction on German accusative case marking and word order. These learners were divided into two groups: one received…

  1. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 150 - Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15) B Appendix B to Part 150 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pt. 150, App. B Appendix B to Part 150—Format for Assignment of Errors...

  2. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 150 - Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15) B Appendix B to Part 150 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pt. 150, App. B Appendix B to Part 150—Format for Assignment of Errors...

  3. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 150 - Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15) B Appendix B to Part 150 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pt. 150, App. B Appendix B to Part 150—Format for Assignment of Errors...

  4. Effective Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Robert N.

    Beginning with the observation that educators are faced with rising public expectations, declining resources, and increased public criticism, this paper describes a six-fold model for determining how staff development is operating and how it can be made to operate more effectively, in a self-renewing manner. The six dimensions consist of the…

  5. Staff Development Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA. Office of Institutional Development.

    In September 1993, California's College of the Canyons surveyed a total of 415 faculty and staff regarding their satisfaction with their employment at the college and their perceptions of opportunities for development. Responses were received from 41% (n=170) of the employees, including 56 full-time and 58 part-time faculty and 41 full-time and 13…

  6. Ideas on Staff Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Suggests the use of timely communication through feedback for the purpose of boosting staff morale. Managers can cause employees to motivate themselves by restructuring jobs to satisfy employees' needs, by using artful criticism, and by asking employees about morale. Includes a list of key ingredients of a satisfying job. (SH)

  7. Staff Development and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Much is being emphasized in staff development in the area of reading instruction. It is important for teachers to study and think reflectively about what can be done to improve the elementary reading curriculum. One procedure that can be used is to hold a quality workshop based on the needs of reading teachers. Teachers might volunteer to serve on…

  8. The Staff of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  9. Battle Staff Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    This paper sets forth a research-based conceptual framework for understanding and addressing battle staff functioning and its relation to the...organizational theories and concepts is included, and the concept of team work and the characteristics of effective teams are discussed. A conceptual ... framework is presented for teamwork in problem-solving and decision-making activities within hierarchical organizations.

  10. Evaluating Staff Development Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Judy

    1983-01-01

    There are three phases in the process of introducing and establishing staff development. They may be characterized as: What is it? How do we get started? and How well are we doing? Sooner or later, an interest in some form of evaluation is inevitable. (Author/SSH)

  11. Listening to Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Owen, Jane

    Levels of staff satisfaction across the United Kingdom's post-16 sector were examined by distributing a questionnaire at more than 80 further education colleges. The questionnaire elicited 9,515 responses. Study participants rated 38 statements on a 4-point scale. The questions focused on the following areas: (1) faculty members' perceptions of…

  12. Staff Development and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Richard A.; Breyer, Norman L.

    An ongoing behavioral model for implementing staff development and evaluation procedures is proposed, which systematically focuses on assessing and facilitating behavioral change in the classroom and enables the educational executive to assess what is actually happening there. The administrator is thus provided with the necessary information to…

  13. The importance of performance appraisal and staff development: a graduating nurse's perspective.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, C

    2001-02-01

    This paper will discuss the importance of performance appraisal and staff development for graduate nurses. It argues that these strategies assist newly graduated nurses to enhance and consolidate knowledge and practice skills. Further, the net benefit for employers is improved quality outcomes, increased job satisfaction by staff and cost-effective usage of resources. The limitations of performance appraisal and staff development, however, occur when management and staff do not understand the principles of performance appraisal and the need for consultation with staff about staff development activity.

  14. Motivation and Outcomes for University Students in a Restorative Justice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher Dahl, Meghan; Meagher, Peter; Vander Velde, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    A restorative justice program (RJP) was developed at a large university in the housing student conduct office. Students accused of misconduct who participated in a restorative justice (RJ) conference completed surveys regarding their motivations and perceived outcomes. Results showed that students who were motivated to make reparations to others…

  15. Guidance to detect deception with the Aberdeen Report Judgment Scales: are verbal content cues useful to detect false accusations?

    PubMed

    Sporer, Siegfried L; Masip, Jaume; Cramer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In 2 studies we evaluated the efficiency of training raters with a short version of the Aberdeen Report Judgment Scales (ARJS-STV-S) in assessing the truthfulness of transcribed accounts. Participants told both truthful and deceptive accounts of either illegal or immoral actions. In the truthful accounts, the participants described their own misdeeds honestly (true confessions). In the deceptive accounts, the participants also described their own misdeeds but attributed them to someone else (false accusations). In Study 1, guided (n = 32) and unguided (n = 32) raters evaluated 64 transcribed accounts (16 per rater). Only a few ARJS-STV-S criteria differed significantly between false and true accounts. In Study 2 (N = 29), guided raters evaluated the same transcripts using only the most promising criteria of Study 1. Judgments in Study 2 were less biased (in terms of signal detection theory), and the classification of deceptive accounts was significantly better compared with a no-guidance control group and the guided group of Study 1. A Brunswikian lens model analysis showed that with the smaller set of cues there is a better correspondence between the ecological validities and the subjective utilities, which may explain the higher accuracy rates. When the criteria have little or no diagnostic value, or when true and false stories are very similar, providing raters with a larger set of truth criteria does not increase accuracy but instead may bias raters toward making truth judgments. Practical implications for content-based training programs are outlined.

  16. Occupational stress in veterinary support staff.

    PubMed

    Foster, Sandra Morales; Maples, Elizabeth H

    2014-01-01

    A mixed-method study was used to characterize the occupational stress, health status, and coping strategies of 104 members of the Alabama Veterinary Technician Association. A Web-based survey was used to administer three validated and reliable instruments to gather the quantitative data, and interviews were conducted to gather qualitative data. Quantitative and qualitative data validated each other in all aspects of mental health, indicating that veterinary support staff's mental health status was low. Participants' mental health scores were lower than the US norm of 50, and a correlation between health status and occupational stressors indicated that those with higher perceived stress had lower mental and physical health. Interviews supported this finding. The results suggest that workload, death and dying, and conflict with veterinarians were prominent sources of stress and that veterinary support staff experience high stress that affects their health. Coping strategies were found to be related to mental health status, and those used by this workforce have been linked to negative outcomes. This study's findings indicate that staff health may have negative economic implications for practice owners and staff members.

  17. Medical staff involvement in nursing homes: development of a conceptual model and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Shield, Renée; Rosenthal, Marsha; Wetle, Terrie; Tyler, Denise; Clark, Melissa; Intrator, Orna

    2014-02-01

    Medical staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants) involvement in nursing homes (NH) is limited by professional guidelines, government policies, regulations, and reimbursements, creating bureaucratic burden. The conceptual NH Medical Staff Involvement Model, based on our mixed-methods research, applies the Donabedian "structure-process-outcomes" framework to the NH, identifying measures for a coordinated research agenda. Quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews conducted with medical directors, administrators and directors of nursing, other experts, residents and family members and Minimum Data Set, the Online Certification and Reporting System and Medicare Part B claims data related to NH structure, process, and outcomes were analyzed. NH control of medical staff, or structure, affects medical staff involvement in care processes and is associated with better outcomes (e.g., symptom management, appropriate transitions, satisfaction). The model identifies measures clarifying the impact of NH medical staff involvement on care processes and resident outcomes and has strong potential to inform regulatory policies.

  18. Difficulty and Ability: Staff Member Perceptions of Seasonal Staff Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Bixler, Robert D. Switzer, Deborah M.; Hurtes, Karen P.

    New and returning camp staff were surveyed about the difficulty of camp-specific skills and knowledge and their own abilities. A summer-camp training inventory of 24 camp-specific skills and knowledge statements was administered to a total of 702 new and returning staff at eight camps on the first and last day of pre-season training sessions and…

  19. Flexible Calendar and Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlock, Jerry C.

    Three questionnaires were used at El Camino College to assess a flexible calendar that allowed ten days between semesters for staff development activities. A locally developed questionnaire on staff development drew responses from 245 instructors (68.6%), a state questionnaire on the flexible calendar was answered by 57% of full-time and 17% of…

  20. Staff Development Is Not Enough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammons, Jim

    Staff development activities that affect professional ability must be coupled with efforts toward organizational development if two additional determinants of performance, employee motivation and organizational climate, are to be significantly improved. Indeed, emphasis on staff development alone may have negative effects in that such an approach…

  1. Preparing Your Staff for Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer-Starks, Suanne

    2003-01-01

    Camps should have emergency protocols in place and involve appropriate personnel in their development. Staff should be certified in first aid and CPR, a recordkeeping system should be established, and mock emergencies should be practiced during staff orientation. It may also be advisable to involve campers in practice situations. First aid/CPR…

  2. Staff Bullying in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…

  3. Recruiting and Retaining Summer Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossen, Brian; Yerkes, Rita

    1998-01-01

    Recruiting of camp staff is challenged by economic and workplace restructuring, including business downsizing, part-time and temporary employment patterns, and generational attitude changes. Strategies for hiring and retaining staff include knowing what college-age workers want, marketing benefits, adopting new business strategies, and empowering…

  4. Evidence-based practice. The role of staff development.

    PubMed

    Krugman, Mary

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge and use of evidence-based practice are essential to ensure best practices and safe patient outcomes. Staff development specialists must be leaders in this initiative to support clinical nurses toward improved practice outcomes. This article describes the background for understanding the historical evolution from research utilization to evidence-based practice, defines some key concepts related to evidence-based practice, and suggests essential components for building evidence-based practice programs in healthcare institutions.

  5. Nursing Home Consultation: Difficult Residents and Frustrated Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Christopher; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Night shift nursing home aides who received in-service training in behavior therapy designed and implemented intervention programs for two of their most difficult residents. Describes programs and their outcomes. Discusses use of staff members as agents of behavior change. (Author/NB)

  6. Nursing Home Quality, Cost, Staffing, and Staff Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Hicks, Lanis; Grando, Victoria; Petroski, Gregory F.; Madsen, Richard W.; Mehr, David R.; Conn, Vicki; Zwygart-Staffacher, Mary; Scott, Jill; Flesner, Marcia; Bostick, Jane; Porter, Rose; Maas, Meridean

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the processes of care, organizational attributes, cost of care, staffing level, and staff mix in a sample of Missouri homes with good, average, and poor resident outcomes. Design and Methods: A three-group exploratory study design was used, with 92 nursing homes randomly selected from all nursing…

  7. A curriculum designed to decrease barriers related to scholarly writing by staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Shatzer, Melanie; Wolf, Gail A; Hravnak, Marilyn; Haugh, Amy; Kikutu, Julius; Hoffmann, Rosemary L

    2010-09-01

    Demonstrating professional development outcomes, such as scholarly publication, is critical as nurse leaders guide organizations seeking recognition as centers of excellence. However, personal and situational barriers often prevent staff nurses from achieving scholarly publication. This project tested a workshop and mentoring approach to decrease publication barriers with staff nurses in 2 community hospitals. Self-efficacy principles guided the curriculum that resulted in a statistically significant improvement in staff nurse perception of successful scholarly publication endeavors.

  8. SmartStaff: A Support Concept for Staff Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-01

    facilitated time management and decreased the ambiguities of the plans presented. However, the quality of the final plan did not improve. Team decision making, Team Planning, Group Support Systems, Task Group Staff

  9. [The biopolitical production "impaired" subjects within the scope of "Action T4" - a re-reading of "I accuse"].

    PubMed

    Offermann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The history of the Nazi "euthanasia programme" named "Aktion T4" has been examined from a biopolitical perspective for some time. However, these studies have not focused on the analytics of biopolitical practices of subjectivization as an essential element of the Foucaultian concept. The use of such a theoretical approach can be used in combination with new and substantial empirical research results. The Heidelberg DFG research programme evaluated the "T4" medical records statistically in order to conclusively determine which features had significant importance for selection by the "T4" experts. The inability to work or having an incurable mental illness were the criteria by which psychiatrists and "T4" experts subjectivized patients as "lives not worth living". Considering these new results and a biopolitical approach as starting point, it is time to reconsider the Nazi "euthanasia" propaganda movie "Ich klage an" ("I Accuse", 1941). When scholars began to study the production process of the movie in the 1980s, they looked at the narrative and the movie characters from an instrumental perspective. In other words, they examined how the "T4" protagonists and filmmakers sought to create a film which affected the viewers' opinion in a specific way intentionally influenced by them. According to that line of thought, the character Hanna was neglected because she was considered to be the morally inoffensive disguise of the intended propaganda massage. However, two works from the 1990s which were gender history-oriented finally focused on Hanna and the way the film narrative turns her into a subject "not worth living". Based on these considerations, this article states its thesis. The criteria of the film to subjectivize Hanna share many basic characteristics with those of the subjectivization process of the "T4" victims. To prove this statement, the analytics of the movie are combined with the results of the DFG project. Through the combination of both types of sources

  10. Continuing education for hospice staff.

    PubMed

    Conedera, F; Schoessler, M

    1985-06-01

    Hospice nursing is unique because of the philosophy and issues surrounding hospice care. Program planning for hospice staff follows basic principles. The real challenge in developing programs for orientation, continuing, and inservice education is using a format that will truly enable staff to meet the objectives. A lecture, programmed instruction, or video/slide format works well for the "nuts and bolts," but more creativity is needed for the other issues facing the hospice nurse--death, grief, symptom control, stress, team roles, and helping patients with options. Incorporating into the program some of the methods suggested will offer staff the opportunity to become involved in learning and make that learning more meaningful.

  11. Texas hospitals share creative uses of non-clinical staff to reduce ER costs.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Texas hospitals share creative uses of non-clinical staff to reduce ER costs. In central Texas, Christus Spohn Hospital and Seton Health Care are independently exploring the use of non-clinical staff to improve utilization of clinical and emergency services, but their existing programs employ different structures and outcomes measurements.

  12. Support Staff Working in Intellectual Disability Services: The Importance of Relationships and Positive Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    The quality of the work that paid support staff carry out within services for individuals with intellectual disability is clearly crucial to achieving positive quality of life outcomes for service users. Despite this fact, support staff have been relatively neglected as a focus for research within their field. That is not necessarily to say that…

  13. Staff- and School-Level Predictors of School Organizational Health: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevans, Katherine; Bradshaw, Catherine; Miech, Richard; Leaf, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Background: An organizationally healthy school environment is associated with favorable student and staff outcomes and thus is often targeted by school improvement initiatives. However, few studies have differentiated staff-level from school-level predictors of organizational health. Social disorganization theory suggests that school-level…

  14. Exploring Post-Program Psychological Adjustment for Adult Staff Facilitating a Wilderness Adventure Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence-Wood, Ellie; Raymond, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a pilot study of the post-program psychological adjustment outcomes of adult staff facilitating an Australian-based wilderness adventure program for youth at risk. The descriptive and correlational survey study (N = 62) examined the psychological adjustment processes staff underwent following program completion, and the factors…

  15. WTCSB [Wisconsin Technical College System Board]. Equity Staff Development Workshops and Services. Phase VII Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldus, Lorayne

    This document reports the outcomes of a project that was conducted for the following purposes: provide statewide equity staff development workshops for Wisconsin technical college staff, school-to-work personnel, K-12 teachers, and persons who work in state agencies and community-based organizations; establish a task force and facilitate…

  16. Conducting Effective Staff Development Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kay; Janczak, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Staff development workshops conducted by library media specialists can assist teachers to integrate information literacy skills and technology into their curricula. Guidelines are presented on the planning and implementation of such workshops.

  17. Managing Custodial and Maintenance Staffs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents some basic maintenance management techniques that can help schools meet their budgets, preserve staffing levels, meet productivity needs, and sustain quality services. Tips for staff recruitment, training, and retention are explored. (GR)

  18. Implementation of Mindfulness Training for Mental Health Staff: Organizational Context and Stakeholder Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Gerard; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; McGrath, Caroline; Frazier, Jean A.; deTorrijos, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Occupational stress and burnout adversely impacts mental health care staff well-being and patient outcomes. Mindfulness training reduces staff stress and may improve patient care. However, few studies explore mental health setting implementation. This qualitative study used focus groups to evaluate stakeholders’ perceptions of organizational factors affecting implementation of an adapted version of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) for staff on adolescent mental health units. Common facilitators included leadership securing buy-in with staff, allocating staff time to participate, and quiet space for training and practice. Other facilitators were past staff knowledge of mindfulness, local champions, and acculturating staff with mindfulness through a non-mandatory training attendance policy. Common barriers were limited staff time to attend training sessions and insufficient training coverage for some staff. Staff also reported improved focus when interacting with adolescents and improved social cohesion on the units. We conclude that a mindfulness-based program for reducing occupational stress can be successfully implemented on adolescent mental health units. Implementation appeared to change the social context of the units, including staff and patient interactions. More broadly, our findings highlight the importance of environmental factors in shaping attitudes, diffusion of innovation, and acculturation of wellness program implementations. PMID:26500708

  19. Staff Development: A Gestalt Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael H.

    Hagerstown Junior College, Maryland, has had a staff development program for the past five years. The major components have been evaluated, revised, and integrated into a gestalt paradigm--a total institutional thrust designed to insure that the goals of the college meet the challenges presented by the service area. Each component exists to foster…

  20. Psychological States and Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKibbin, Michael; Joyce, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    A study of a group of 21 teachers focused on the relationship between their psychological states and their utilization of professional growth activities and programs. The study's objective was to generate a practical way of applying Maslow's Theory of Personality to the study of staff development. (JN)

  1. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  2. Training of Direct Service Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue features articles on training of direct service staff working with persons with developmental disabilities in employment, education, and residential settings. The articles examine job training, delivery systems, training models, and implications of current approaches. The newsletter includes three articles presenting…

  3. Internet Staff Development: A Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1998-01-01

    Provides a synopsis of classes developed by the Winona (Minnesota) Middle School media center to provide staff with current Internet skills. Includes navigation techniques using browsers; e-mail; search engines; selecting and evaluating Web sites; Internet ethics and Netiquette; critical evaluation of Web sources; graphics; interactive video…

  4. Hampshire Country School Staff Commitments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampshire Country School, Rindge, NH.

    Intended for professional personnel of the Hampshire Country School, which treats gifted children with immobilizing emotional dysfunctions, the handbook specifies staff commitments. The Code of Ethics, adapted from the National Education Association Code as supplemented by The Council for Exceptional Children, sets forth four principles:…

  5. Staff Development: Enhancing Human Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlich, Donald C.

    In 10 chapters, this book offers a clear nonlinear vision for continuously preparing professional and classified staff for the purpose of improving schools and student academic achievement. Chapter 1 shows the importance of inservice education and provides a rationale for conducting systematic, if not empirically based, programs. Chapter 2 details…

  6. [Psychiatric examination of accused for the "United Nations International Tribunal for the prosecution of persons responsible for serious violations of International Humanitarian Law committed in the territory of the former Yugoslavia" (ICTY)].

    PubMed

    Soyka, M

    2002-02-01

    Psychiatric examination of accused for the International Tribunal is a new and challenging task for expert medical witness and forensic psychiatry. After a brief description of a case report relevant aspects of psychiatric evaluation of persons responsible for war crimes are outlined and possible implications for forensic research are discussed.

  7. Medical center staff attitudes about spanking.

    PubMed

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Font, Sarah A; Taylor, Catherine A; Foster, Rebecca H; Garza, Ann Budzak; Olson-Dorff, Denyse; Terreros, Amy; Nielsen-Parker, Monica; Spector, Lisa

    2016-11-01

    Several medical professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that parents avoid hitting children for disciplinary purposes (e.g., spanking) and that medical professionals advise parents to use alternative methods. The extent to which medical professionals continue to endorse spanking is unknown. This study is the first to examine attitudes about spanking among staff throughout medical settings, including non-direct care staff. A total of 2580 staff at a large general medical center and 733 staff at a children's hospital completed an online survey; respondents were roughly divided between staff who provide direct care to patients (e.g., physicians, nurses) and staff who do not (e.g., receptionists, lab technicians). Less than half (44% and 46%) of staff at each medical center agreed that spanking is harmful to children, although almost all (85% and 88%) acknowledged that spanking can lead to injury. Men, staff who report being religious, and staff who held non-direct care positions at the medical center reported stronger endorsement of spanking and perceived their co-workers to be more strongly in favor of spanking. Non-direct care staff were more supportive of spanking compared with direct care staff on every item assessed. All staff underestimated the extent to which their co-workers held negative views of spanking. If medical centers and other medical settings are to lead the charge in informing the community about the harms of spanking, comprehensive staff education about spanking is indicated.

  8. Strategies to Increase After-School Program Staff Skills to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin; Huberty, Jennifer; Moore, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Standards targeting children's healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) in after-school programs call for staff to display or refrain from HEPA-promoting or -discouraging behaviors that are linked to children's HEPA. This study evaluated strategies to align staff behaviors with HEPA Standards. Staff at four after-school programs serving approximately 500 children participated in professional development training from January 2012 to May 2013. Site leaders also attended workshops and received technical support during the same time frame. Changes in staff behaviors were evaluated using the System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition in a pre- (fall 2011) multiple-post (spring 2012, fall 2012, and spring 2013), no-control group study design. A total of 8,949 scans were completed across the four measurement periods. Of the 19 behaviors measured, 14 changed in the appropriate direction. For example, staff engaging in physical activity with children increased from 27% to 40% of scans and staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 56% to 14% of days. Ongoing training and technical assistance can have a measureable impact on staff behaviors linked to child-level HEPA outcomes. Future research should explore the feasibility of disseminating ongoing trainings to after-school program staff on a large scale.

  9. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  10. Competency assessment of nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the healthcare industry have created great challenges for leaders of acute-care organizations. One of the greatest challenges is ensuring a competent nursing staff to care for patients within this changing environment (Boylan & Westra, 1998). Patients are more acutely ill and have shorter lengths of stay, placing greater demands on nurses who must demonstrate competency in caring for increasingly complex patients in a continually changing healthcare environment. Competency is defined as "the knowledge, skills, ability and behaviors that a person possesses in order to perform tasks correctly and skillfully" (O'Shea, 2002, p. 175). Competency assessment involves more than a checklist and a test. Hospitals are required to assess, maintain, demonstrate, track, and improve the competence of the staff. Competency assessment is an ongoing process of initial development, maintenance of knowledge and skills, educational consultation, remediation, and redevelopment. Methods to assess competencies include competency fairs, Performance Based Development System and online programs. Certain key people should be involved in the development of competencies. The department managers can give input related to department-specific competencies. Experienced staff members can provide valuable insight into the competencies that need to be assessed. Educators should be involved for providing the input for the methods used to validate competencies. Competencies are an important part of the work world. They are a part of a continual process to help ensure that the organization provides a high-quality care to its customers and patients.

  11. Generating Large Unit Staffs during Wartime Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-10

    cohesive staff that could forecast and plan. The Mexico City campaign was a successful use of large unit staffs. To begin, Major General Gideon Pillow ...Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas Press, 2007), 274-290. 34 Ibid. 35 Ibid. 12 avenues of approach.36 Pillow used his staff to maintain

  12. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  13. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and...

  14. School Staff's Satisfaction with School Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winland, Julie; Shannon, Amy

    2004-01-01

    The School Nurse Impact Committee of the Columbus Public Schools in Columbus, Ohio, initiated a survey to determine staff satisfaction with the delivery of health services. School nurses need the cooperation and support of the staff to successfully deliver school health services, therefore, the staff's satisfaction with school health services is…

  15. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  16. Yes, We Can Improve Staff Morale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Dick B.

    A literature review and discussion the effect of school administrators on staff morale is presented in this paper. Four factors for improving staff morale include: a supportive workplace; meaningful incentives; a good working environment; and personal display of high morale by the administrator. Ten recommendations for improving staff relations…

  17. Staff Development: Finding the Right Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standerfer, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    Three years ago, when the author joined the staff of Agua Fria High School in Phoenix, Arizona, as an assistant principal, she was excited to find that the students' school day started an hour and a half later than normal each Wednesday to provide staff development time for the teaching staff. That first year, however, neither the principal, Bryce…

  18. Computer Literacy: Staff Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Elizabeth

    A computer-literacy staff training program was designed to provide adult basic education (ABE) instructors and staff with basic computer skills. A curriculum using both Apple IIe computers and IBM personal computers was developed and software obtained. Eight instructors and nine administrative staff members of local literacy programs completed 10…

  19. Workshop for Key Staff of Geriatric Education Centers (4th, Houston, Texas, April 21-24, 1988). Workshop Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Consortium of Geriatric Education Centers, Houston.

    This document contains an executive summary and the report of the workshop. An overview highlights major events and outcomes of the workshop. Major addresses and the staff development sessions that occurred at a workshop for key staff of geriatric education centers (GECs) are discussed. Summaries of presentations include the following:…

  20. Staff Stress and Morale in Community-Based Settings for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Janet; Hatton, Chris; Felce, David; Meek, Andrea; Carr, Deborah; Knapp, Martin; Hallam, Angela; Emerson, Eric; Pinkney, Lisa; Caesar, Emma; Lowe, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    Background: There are no studies that have compared outcomes for staff in different types of supported accommodation for people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. This study looked at stress, morale and intended job turnover in staff in two types of community-based residential supports: non-congregate settings where the…

  1. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D.

    2015-01-01

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning. PMID:26396280

  2. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    PubMed

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  3. Improving Staff Satisfaction Through Peer-Led Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Nurses in a community gastroenterology hospital and associated clinic in Waterloo, Iowa are expected to earn and maintain specialty certification. Barriers to staff recertification were identified as workshop availability, cost, and access. Limited evidence was available to determine whether education provided by staff at a unit level could be used to reduce or eliminate the identified barriers. An educational plan was developed to provide peer-led education sessions. A pilot program of three presentations delivered a total of 6.4 educational contact hours. Efficacy was measured by acceptance of delivered continuing education units/contact hours for recertification by the American Board of Certification for Gastroenterology Nurses. Satisfaction with the method of delivery, costs, and timing were evaluated with prepilot/postpilot surveys. The program continues as an ongoing part of the department's orientation and education plan. The aim of this pilot study was to explore whether education could be provided economically, by existing staff, and within working hours to meet the requirements of recertification and improve staff satisfaction. The pilot study demonstrates that peer-to-peer education can be provided on a unit level, meeting and advancing individual and institutional certification goals for best practices and patient outcomes.

  4. Eye dose to staff involved in interventional and procedural fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, D.; Hadaya, D.; Tse, J.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) lowered the occupational eye dose limit from 150 to 20 mSv/yr [1]. While international jurisdictions are in a process of adopting these substantial changes, medical physicists at the clinical level have been advising medical colleagues on specific situations based on dose measurements. Commissioned and calibrated TLDs mounted in commercially available holders designed to simulate the measurement of Hp(3), were applied to staff involved in x-ray procedures for a one month period. During this period clinical procedure data was concurrently collected and subject to audit. The use or not of eye personal protective equipment (PPE) was noted for all staff. Audits were conducted in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, the interventional angiography rooms and the procedural room where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures are performed. Significant levels of occupational dose were recorded in the cardiac and interventional procedures, with maximum reading exceeding the new limit for some interventional radiologists. No significant eye doses were measured for staff performing ERCP procedures. One outcome of the studies was increased use of eye PPE for operators of interventional equipment with increased availability also to nursing staff, when standing in close proximity to the patient during procedures.

  5. Preventing work-related stress among staff working in children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres in the UK: a brief survey of staff support systems and practices.

    PubMed

    Beresford, B; Gibson, F; Bayliss, J; Mukherjee, S

    2016-07-04

    Growing evidence of the association between health professionals' well-being and patient and organisational outcomes points to the need for effective staff support. This paper reports a brief survey of the UK's children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres (PTCs) regarding staff support systems and practices. A short on-line questionnaire, administered in 2012-2013, collected information about the availability of staff support interventions which seek to prevent work-related stress among different members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). It was completed by a member of staff with, where required, assistance from colleagues. All PTCs (n = 19) participated. Debriefs following a patient death was the most frequently reported staff support practice. Support groups were infrequently mentioned. There was wide variability between PTCs, and between professional groups, regarding the number and type of interventions available. Doctors appear to be least likely to have access to support. A few Centres routinely addressed work-related stress in wider staff management strategies. Two Centres had developed a bespoke intervention. Very few Centres were reported to actively raise awareness of support available from their hospital's Occupational Health department. A minority of PTCs had expert input regarding staff support from clinical psychology/liaison psychiatry.

  6. Measurement of staff empowerment within health service organizations.

    PubMed

    Irvine, D; Leatt, P; Evans, M G; Baker, R G

    1999-01-01

    A measure of empowerment was developed and its psychometric properties evaluated. Employees (n = 52) of two hospitals participated in semistructured interviews and a pilot test of the research instrument. A second study was undertaken with professional, support, and administrative staff (n = 405) of four community hospitals. Psychometric evaluation included factor analysis, reliability estimation, and validity assessment. Subjects responded to questionnaires measuring empowerment, leadership behavior, organizational citizenship behavior and job behaviors related to quality improvement. Factor analysis indicated three dimensions of empowerment: behavioral, verbal, and outcome empowerment. Coefficient alphas ranged from .83 to .87. The three dimensions were positively related to leadership behavior that encouraged self-leadership and negatively related to directive leadership. The three dimensions discriminated between the empowerment level of managers compared to that of nonmanagement staff. Empowerment predicted organizational citizenship behavior and job behaviors related to quality improvement.

  7. Concussion knowledge among rehabilitation staff

    PubMed Central

    Kolessar, Michael; Callender, Librada; Bennett, Monica

    2017-01-01

    A concussion knowledge survey was completed by 561 rehabilitation professionals across a wide range of disciplines in a nationwide rehabilitation hospital system. Item questions were structured to reflect key areas of concussion knowledge targeted in a prior consensus statement. The vast majority of staff provided responses consistent with the current concussion literature regarding concussion diagnosis and symptom presentation immediately after concussion. Greater variability was seen for items assessing beliefs about the typical recovery from concussion, best care practices, and long-term effects from concussion. Factors such as profession, years of experience, and work with concussion or traumatic brain injury were not consistently related to better performance on the survey. Prior concussion-focused education/training was related to better survey performance. This survey highlights the pressing need to educate frontline health providers regarding concussion recovery and best care practices. PMID:28127126

  8. Trial Rights of the Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodenhamer, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the origins of the U. S. Bill of Rights and constitutional guarantees, focusing on trial rights, tracing them to English antecedents and the colonial period. Explains changes in understanding and the application of trial rights, highlighting the U.S. Supreme Court's evolving influence since the nineteenth century. Outlines contemporary…

  9. Your Rights as an Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Bruce; Page, John P.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an instructive overview of the responsibilities of the police and the rights of the citizen concerning criminal investigations. Briefly describes the protections afforded by the fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and fourteenth amendments. Includes a learning activity involving a legal analysis of situations. (MJP)

  10. Beyond the Accusation of Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Qing; Brooks, Jane

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores the complexity of the notion of plagiarism from sociocultural and psychological perspectives. Plagiarism is a dynamic and multi-layered phenomenon [Russikoff, K., Fucaloro, L., Salkauskiene, D., 2003. "Plagiarism as a cross-cultural phenomenon." "The CAL Poly Pomona Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies" 16, 109-120.…

  11. Cuesta College All Staff Survey, Spring 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartnal, Ryan; Hagen, Peter F.

    The 1999 Cuesta College Faculty and Staff Survey examined ten functional areas: (1) safety/security/campus environment; (2) technology and equipment; (3) organizational structure; (4) college policies; (5) faculty/staff evaluations; (6) planning/decision-making; (7) communications/publications; (8) library/learning resources; (9) support services;…

  12. Management of Staff in a Registry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garretty, Helen

    1985-01-01

    The strategies used by the administrator of the University of Melbourne's central registration office to meet the multiple challenges of retraining staff for computerization, substantial reduction in staff, and a specific directive to improve services to users are outlined and discussed. (MSE)

  13. Restructure Staff Development for Systemic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systems approach based on the work of W. Edwards Deming to system wide, high impact staff development. Deming has pointed out the significance of structure in systems. By restructuring the process of staff development we can bring about cost effective improvement of the whole system. We can improve student achievement while…

  14. Managing Staff in Schools: Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Geoffrey; Stenning, Ron

    In five parts, this workbook provides training materials to enhance the effectiveness of headteachers in the process of managing school staff. The workbook's twofold purpose is to develop headteachers' knowledge about staff management matters and develop their skills in the management of interpersonal and group relationships. The training…

  15. Managing Staff in Schools: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Geoffrey; Stenning, Ron

    In five parts, this handbook provides training materials to enhance the effectiveness of headteachers in the process of managing school staff. The handbook's twofold purpose is to assist headteachers to develop knowledge about staff management matters and develop their skills in the management of interpersonal and group relationships. The handbook…

  16. Nursing home staff--nursing student partnership.

    PubMed

    Karam, S E; Nies, D M

    1995-10-01

    A partnership between a nursing home and a school of nursing provides both staff and students with creative opportunities for solving clinical problems. Through collaborative efforts of senior baccalaureate students and the staff administration of a long-term care facility in eastern Virginia, a successful bowel management program was developed and implemented.

  17. Staff Cuts Remake the Custodial Closet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that new cleaning and finishing materials and new equipment can help school facility departments cope with staff cuts, focusing on: chemicals and dispensers, safety training and information for custodial staff, cleaning tools and power equipment, and cleaner and more efficient schools. (SM)

  18. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  19. Staff Development: The Evolution of a Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, B. Barbara

    1980-01-01

    The team concept, in increased professionalism of admissions staffs, is the key to successful market positioning. Results show admission staffs increased recruitment efforts by 50 percent, decreased the budget by 10 percent, and, for the past two years, have exceeded new student goals. (Author)

  20. Self-Concept Change in Camp Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    The 1981 study ascertained whether the self-concept of 66 camp staff from 2 Wisconsin camps changed more than a control group of 18 college students attending summer school; if differences in self-concept were based on a particular characteristic (age, gender, staff position, years at camp); and in what ways, if any, self-concept of camp staff…

  1. Growing Teachers: Partnerships in Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Just as young children learn about the world around them by playing its scripts, teachers learn about teaching and learning by playing a teacher's script, observing what happens, and discussing all of the possibilities with other teachers. This book applies a constructivist model to staff development, describing staff development activities that…

  2. The Staff Educator as Process Consultant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurse Educator, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The staff educator has the broad and objective perspective, the analytical frame of reference, and the neutrality to help nurses see the gaps in their functioning. Staff educators can use their communication and assessment skills to help the nursing work group solve problems more effectively. (Author)

  3. Promoting Staff Support in Schools: Solution Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Emma; Henderson, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Solution Circle (SC) approach is a flexible tool which encourages participants to maintain a positive, creative approach to problem-solving. This project focussed on the introduction of this approach to staff in a primary and a secondary school. The rationale was to implement a problem-solving/discussion tool that would allow staff to utilise…

  4. Pamphlets involve staff in patient education.

    PubMed

    Matten, M R; McBride, L G

    1980-01-01

    Hospital staff involvement in a patient education program is critical to the program's success. Unfortunately, prepackaged programs, although attractive, ignore this important component. Pamphlet construction can be a convenient way to include various staff members in the development of a patient education program.

  5. Investing in Early Career General Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2009-01-01

    With the greying of the Australian population, it has been widely recognised that active career development for early career academics is essential to the future capacities of universities (Hugo, Daysh, Morris & Rudd, 2004). However, the same has not been acknowledged for general staff, despite general staff comprising more than 50% of staff…

  6. Staff Workshop: Exploring Science with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Carol; Rillero, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This article begins with a section entitled, "Involving Parents in Science Discovery" written by Carol Seefeldt. This section discusses staff workshop for exploring discovery science. Here, the author provides the staff workshop instructions. This is followed by a section entitled, "Exploring Science with Young Children" written by Peter Rillero.…

  7. Open Educational Resources: Staff Attitudes and Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfe, Vivien

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes towards "open educational resources" (OER) as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n = 6) were invited to participate in semi-structured…

  8. [Prevention of addiction in hospital staff].

    PubMed

    Picchiottino, Frédérique

    2012-11-01

    La Pitié-Salpêtrière-Charles Foix university hospital group (Paris) has set up a task force to help healthcare managers manage a member of staff suffering with addiction. An addiction awareness day is also organised, aimed at all staff, with information stands and a performance by a theatre company.

  9. Sources and Information: Developing Staff Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Andrew; Rinnander, Elizabeth

    1977-01-01

    In order to maximize the quality of educational services offered by community colleges, faculty and administrative staff development appears crucial. The needs of the institution, students, community, and graduate courses, as well as various staff development programs around the country are discussed. (LH)

  10. Staff Development Needs in Pakistan Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullah, Muhammad Hameed; Khan, Muhammad Naeem Ullah; Murtaza, Ali; Ud Din, Muhammad Naseer

    2011-01-01

    Staff development is very significant for the achievement of overall goals of higher education in Pakistan. The success of innovations depends largely upon the skills of instructors; but in Pakistan, the people with a simple masters degree (without any pedagogical training) are inducted as teaching staff at the university level, so it is time to…

  11. The Staff Development Maze: Where Are We?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Frank O.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a five-stage model for staff development used in a survey of professors and practitioners. The survey found that there is a disparity between what professors and practitioners believe is practiced and what is actually occurring in staff development. (MD)

  12. School Site Staff Development: Structures and Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solo, Leonard J.

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the importance of staff development (broadly defined as anything that enables teachers to learn) and considers different development structures. Describes the role and duties of staff developer at a Cambridge, Massachusetts, elementary school as well as its "teacher teams," groups of instructors who meet monthly to discuss…

  13. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training....

  14. Selected Evidence Supporting or Rejecting Eighteen Outcomes for Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Floyd L.; Fornash, Patricia

    This study was conducted to identify outcomes and to produce information to support them for vocational education selected from the myriad of outcomes ascribed to it by various publics. From a list of 252 outcome questions, the project staff, selected personnel from the National Center for Research in Vocational Education, and vocational educators…

  15. Quality of Care in the Nursing Home: Effects of Staff Assignment and Work Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Fairchild, J. Kaci; Scilley, Kay; Hardin, J. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a variety of resident and staff outcomes across two types of staffing patterns, permanent and rotating assignment, and work shift. Although studies have examined these staffing patterns as part of multicomponent intervention packages, few studies have examined the isolated effects of staffing…

  16. Linking User and Staff Perspectives in the Evaluation of Innovative Transition Projects for Youth with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnaney, Donal F.; Wynne, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    A key challenge in formative evaluation is to gather appropriate evidence to inform the continuous improvement of initiatives. In the absence of outcome data, the programme evaluator often must rely on the perceptions of beneficiaries and staff in generating insight into what is making a difference. The article describes the approach adopted in an…

  17. BE-ACTIV: A Staff-Assisted Behavioral Intervention for Depression in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Suzanne; Looney, Stephen W.; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Teri, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article (a) describes a 10-week, behavioral, activities-based intervention for depression that can be implemented in nursing homes collaboratively with nursing home activities staff and (b) presents data related to its development, feasibility, and preliminary outcomes. Design and Methods: We developed BE-ACTIV, which stands for…

  18. Faculty/Staff Perceptions of a Standards-Based Exit Portfolio System for Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Tena L.; Bailey, Rita L.

    2006-01-01

    New standards for certification were recently developed for speech-language pathology graduate training programs by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The new standards are outcomes-based rather than process-based. Using a collective case study approach, this article highlights the perceptions of faculty and staff regarding use of a…

  19. Wisconsin Technical College System Board Equity Staff Development Workshops and Services. Phase VI. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldus, Lorayne

    This report describes phase VI of the Equity Staff Development project, an ongoing project to achieve equity and diversity at Wisconsin technical colleges by creating an institutional climate supporting achievement by all students. Among the project's major activities and outcomes are the following: the existing train-the-trainer format of peer…

  20. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  1. From Thinking to Practice: School Staff Views on Disability Inclusion in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakiz, Halis; Woods, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents outcomes of a qualitative interview study conducted in four Turkish primary schools that had been identified by the Ministry of Education as engaging in the inclusion of disabled students. The main purpose of the study was to examine school staff views on inclusion in their schools. Data were collected through semi-structured…

  2. Perceptions of Staff on Embedding Speech and Language Therapy within a Youth Offending Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Karen; Gregory, Juliette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to ascertain the views of staff and managers within a youth offending team on their experiences of working with a speech and language therapist (SLT). The model of therapy provision was similar to the whole-systems approach used in schools. The impact of the service on language outcomes is reported elsewhere…

  3. Staff Acceptance of Tele-ICU Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Cram, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Remote coverage of ICUs is increasing, but staff acceptance of this new technology is incompletely characterized. We conducted a systematic review to summarize existing research on acceptance of tele-ICU coverage among ICU staff. Methods: We searched for published articles pertaining to critical care telemedicine systems (aka, tele-ICU) between January 1950 and March 2010 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library and abstracts and presentations delivered at national conferences. Studies were included if they provided original qualitative or quantitative data on staff perceptions of tele-ICU coverage. Studies were imported into content analysis software and coded by tele-ICU configuration, methodology, participants, and findings (eg, positive and negative staff evaluations). Results: Review of 3,086 citations yielded 23 eligible studies. Findings were grouped into four categories of staff evaluation: overall acceptance level of tele-ICU coverage (measured in 70% of studies), impact on patient care (measured in 96%), impact on staff (measured in 100%), and organizational impact (measured in 48%). Overall acceptance was high, despite initial ambivalence. Favorable impact on patient care was perceived by > 82% of participants. Staff impact referenced enhanced collaboration, autonomy, and training, although scrutiny, malfunctions, and contradictory advice were cited as potential barriers. Staff perceived the organizational impact to vary. An important limitation of available studies was a lack of rigorous methodology and validated survey instruments in many studies. Conclusions: Initial reports suggest high levels of staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage, but more rigorous methodologic study is required. PMID:21051386

  4. The Commander’s Battle Staff Handbook: An Introduction to Staff Functional Area Duties for New Battalion Staff Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    1990b). The current focus for the Infantry and Armor Advanced Courses (IOAC/ AOAC respectively) is on serving as company and troop commanders and as...of AOAC and IOAC officers showed that very few (15.2% and 18.7% respectively) had received any training to prepare them for staff duties. The majority...25 percent of the AOAC officers and 33 percent of the IOAC officers with staff experience felt that these methods adequately prepared them to perform

  5. Public Relations Strategies for Scholastic Publication Staffs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance to scholastic publications staffs of four public relations strategies: meticulous research, systematic planning, strengthening communication efforts, and evaluation. Notes internal and external factors crucial to good public relations. Lists activities to consider. (SR)

  6. Staff Development: The Problems of Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Andrea B.

    1982-01-01

    Inservice educators must incorporate humanistic approaches in their offerings. Nursing service administrators should delegate to staff development personnel only those activities that are clearly educational in nature. (Author/JOW)

  7. Students should befriend their library staff.

    PubMed

    Killington, Victoria; Perrett, Angela

    2017-01-04

    The article 'How to write a perfect essay' (students, 7 December) advises readers to 'make the library your friend'. However, it is not the library that students or researchers need to befriend, it is the library staff.

  8. Managing the Work of Support Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estabrook, Leigh; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the nature of support staff work in research libraries, changing authority structures, and the impact of technology on job responsibilities. A study considering work complexity, supervision, evaluation criteria, control and autonomy, and job satisfaction is reported. (17 references) (EA)

  9. Perception Survey. Staff and Faculty Development Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    a problem does exist, and if so, the nature and cause of the problem. (2) Staff and Faculty Development Division has responsi- bility for the overall...ability to perform the same 20 staff-related tasks that were rated by their supervisors. The following scale * was used: Their raings forNted tasks frare...much emphasis on stopping at just task, conditions , and standard. Of course we need to be concerned with these, but we must revitalize the thinking

  10. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Tracey L.; Kennerly, Susan; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention’s characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. Methods: This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members). One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. Results: The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity) described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled “brainstormed ideas”, focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Implications: Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs. PMID:27429278

  11. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Campbell, Ann-Mari; Andersson, Ewa Pilhammar

    2008-01-01

    Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence. PMID:18976475

  12. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    commander’s staff training program and funding for travel to a staff training site is generally not available. Thus, structured , computer - driven...messages. Developers learned that it is extremely time consuming to develop and thoroughly test the message database for structured computer -driven...Future developments of structured , computer -driven staff training systems must take into consideration field training needs and start with a front

  13. Staff Selection: What's Important for Out-Of-School Time Programs? Part 1 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Frontline Staff. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Bandy, Tawana; Burkhauser, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Research on successful out-of-school time programs repeatedly has found that the caliber of a program's staff is a critical feature of high-quality programs that achieve positive outcomes. Therefore, attracting, selecting, and retaining high-quality staff has become a major objective of out-of-school time programs. To expand what is known about…

  14. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization and 30-Day Rehospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Julie C.; Intrator, Orna; Karuza, Jurgis; Wetle, Terrie; Mor, Vincent; Katz, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between features of nursing home (NH) medical staff organization and residents’ 30-day rehospitalizations. Design Cross-sectional study combining primary data collected from a survey of medical directors, NH resident assessment data (minimum data set), Medicare claims, and the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Setting A total of 202 freestanding US nursing homes. Participants Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were hospitalized and subsequently admitted to a study nursing home. Measurements Medical staff organization dimensions derived from the survey, NH residents’ characteristics derived from minimum data set data, hospitalizations obtained from Part A Medicare claims, and NH characteristics from the OSCAR database and from www.ltcfocus.org. Study outcome defined within a 30-day window following an index hospitalization: rehospitalized, otherwise died, otherwise survived and not rehospitalized. Results Thirty-day rehospitalizations occurred for 3788 (20.3%) of the 18,680 initial hospitalizations. Death was observed for 884 (4.7%) of residents who were not rehospitalized. Adjusted by hospitalization, resident, and NH characteristics, nursing homes having a more formal appointment process for physicians were less likely to have 30-day rehospitalization (b = −0.43, SE = 0.17), whereas NHs in which a higher proportion of residents were cared for by a single physician were more likely to have rehospitalizations (b = 0.18, SE = 0.08). Conclusion This is the first study to show a direct relationship between features of NH medical staff organization and resident-level process of care. The relationship of a more strict appointment process and rehospitalizations might be a consequence of more formalized and dedicated medical practice with a sense of ownership and accountability. A higher volume of patients per physician does not appear to improve quality of care. PMID:22682694

  15. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  16. Model Learner Outcomes for Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cheryl, Ed.; And Others

    Chapter 1 of this document contains sets of statements adopted by either the Minnesota State Board of Education or the Minnesota State Legislature. They represent the hierarchy used by Department of Education staff as they develop model learner outcomes for each subject area. Contents include learner values, education system values, philosophy for…

  17. From Desk to Disk: Staff Development for VET Staff in Flexible Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Brisbane.

    A study was conducted to develop practical options that could help shape an Australian national staff development strategy for vocational education and training (VET) staff engaged in flexible delivery. Data were gathered from the following: analysis of the literature, evaluation of 15 case studies in two Australian states and one territory that…

  18. Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report. EMIS Staff ECE Units 2005. Report Documentation. Version 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report is twofold. First, it helps School Districts and Educational Service Centers (ESC) ensure accuracy and validity of preschool staff, student and program data submitted to the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) through the Education Management Information System (EMIS). From this report, school…

  19. 18 CFR 154.8 - Informal submission for staff suggestions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... staff suggestions. 154.8 Section 154.8 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... General Provisions and Conditions § 154.8 Informal submission for staff suggestions. Any natural gas... suggestions of the Commission staff prior to filing. Opinions of the Commission staff are not binding upon...

  20. 18 CFR 154.8 - Informal submission for staff suggestions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... staff suggestions. 154.8 Section 154.8 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... General Provisions and Conditions § 154.8 Informal submission for staff suggestions. Any natural gas... suggestions of the Commission staff prior to filing. Opinions of the Commission staff are not binding upon...

  1. Preventing Civil War: Integrating Program and Service Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, Robert Ray

    1996-01-01

    Camp program staff and service staff can "war" and negatively affect campers. Frequent causes are misunderstood roles, conflicting expectations, jealousy, and feelings of being undervalued. Presents ideas for integrating program and service staff in the off season, when staff arrive, and during camp, and for dealing with a "civil…

  2. Staff Development As a Function of Organizational Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, M. D.; And Others

    Skills required for developing staff evaluation models are closely linked to skills required for staff development. Leading a vital, growing, innovative, dynamic school system requires risk-taking, stretching, painful, exhilarating change. This change is accomplished through staff development. Real staff development is not confined to one or two…

  3. A Single Sex Profession? Female Staff Numbers in Commonwealth Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Helen

    This study of numbers of female academic and administrative staff at universities in British Commonwealth nations was based on staff data collected during 1997-98 for the "Commonwealth Universities' Yearbook." The survey covers 30 nations. Survey results are presented separately for academic staff and administrative staff. For academic…

  4. 45 CFR 701.13 - Staff organization and functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Staff organization and functions. 701.13 Section... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.13 Staff organization and functions. The Commission staff organization and function are as follows: (a) Office of the Staff Director....

  5. Getting More from Your Staff without Even Asking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Randy

    1998-01-01

    Explores ways to maximize camp-staff potential and effort through wages; working conditions; promoting passion and enthusiasm; perks and benefits; special staff events; tokens of praise, support, and appreciation; staff mission statements; profit sharing; empowerment; use of a morale officer; and staff ownership of the camp's "vision." (SAS)

  6. The effects of staff nurses' morale on patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-Ping; Huang, Chen-Kuan

    2005-06-01

    This study, designed by descriptive and inferential methods, study aimed to examine staff nurses' morale and its effect on patient satisfaction, the most commonly used variable to measure patient outcomes. Data were collected with structured questionnaires from 332 nurses and 265 inpatients in 21 medical-surgical units of a medical center in Taiwan. All registered nurses (RN) among the 21 sample units were recruited and administered with Litwin and Stringerm's (1968) Work Morale Scale, which was modified by Hsu in 1981. A convenience sampling was implemented to select those patients who had been admitted for at least 3 days and were ready to be discharged. Yang's (1997) Nursing-Sensitive Patient Satisfaction Scale was used to measure patient outcomes. The results showed that job position and pay had a significant effect on nurses' work morale. Nurses' work morale may not necessarily be an impact factor on patient satisfaction, but it accounts for 66.7 percent of the discriminate power to predict nursing-sensitive patient satisfaction. In view of the findings, every attempt should be made to highlight the nature of a caring profession. Nursing leaders should put effort into improving nurses' involvement and identification with their organizations, both of which are significant factors associated with nursing unit morale. The findings of this study may contribute to a body of knowledge regarding nurses' work morale and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes.

  7. Attitudes towards fever amongst UK paediatric intensive care staff.

    PubMed

    Brick, Thomas; Agbeko, Rachel S; Davies, Patrick; Davis, Peter J; Deep, Akash; Fortune, Peter-Marc; Inwald, David P; Jones, Amy; Levin, Richard; Morris, Kevin P; Pappachan, John; Ray, Samiran; Tibby, Shane M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Peters, Mark J

    2017-03-01

    The role played by fever in the outcome of critical illness in children is unclear. This survey of medical and nursing staff in 35 paediatric intensive care units and transport teams in the United Kingdom and Ireland established attitudes towards the management of children with fever. Four hundred sixty-two medical and nursing staff responded to a web-based survey request. Respondents answered eight questions regarding thresholds for temperature control in usual clinical practice, indications for paracetamol use, and readiness to participate in a clinical trial of permissive temperature control. The median reported threshold for treating fever in clinical practice was 38 °C (IQR 38-38.5 °C). Paracetamol was reported to be used as an analgesic and antipyretic but also for non-specific comfort indications. There was a widespread support for a clinical trial of a permissive versus a conservative approach to fever in paediatric intensive care units. Within a trial, 58% of the respondents considered a temperature of 39 °C acceptable without treatment.

  8. Nuclear Power Acceptance Among University Staffs and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayder, G.; Rahim, M. S. Ab

    2016-03-01

    The need to consider alternative energy sources becomes very real. Nuclear has been identified as an alternative electricity source. However, media reports seem to indicate that there is a resistance among peoples with regards to harnessing nuclear for energy. This study was conducted to assess the acceptance level of university staff and students towards nuclear energy by asking them to answer a questionnaire. The questionnaire was constructed in a way to gauge their background knowledge on the energy situation of the country, the risks involved with regards to nuclear energy and also what aspects need to be improved in order to have a safe integration of nuclear energy into the national energy mix. The overall result of the questionnaire indicated high level of support for nuclear energy. The main areas of concerns however, were waste management, control and governance and also nuclear accidents. These should be identified as fields that require extra attention. However, the positive result obtained from this survey should not be construed as overall strong support in general. There might be different outcomes if the survey was conducted on to the general population as compared to the university students and staff that were involved in this research.

  9. Staff morale in the merger of mental health and social care organizations in England.

    PubMed

    Gulliver, P; Towell, D; Peck, E

    2003-02-01

    Following the closure of the last Victorian asylum in Somerset, the health authority and county council undertook a review of mental health services. A major outcome of this review was the creation of an integrated mental health and social care provider. The current paper explores the impact of this integration on the morale of staff members involved, using a conceptual model derived from the literature on organizational behaviour. During the year immediately following integration, the average ratings on all measures of role clarity and job satisfaction reduced. For staff members involved in the integration, by far the largest group of whom were mental health nurses, job satisfaction was related to team role clarity, team identification, emotional exhaustion and gender. These effects of the integration on staff morale are discussed in light of the wider research into the determinants of job satisfaction and the conditions for success in merging organizations. The study has significant implications for managerial and professional leadership during organizational change.

  10. Knowledge utilization among experienced staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Asselin, M E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive exploratory study was to describe the processes staff nurses use to select and transfer new knowledge to practice. Eleven experienced staff nurses shared 29 examples in which gaining new knowledge resulted in changes in thinking or acting in a clinical situation. Findings indicated that knowledge utilization originated with the nurse who was active in selecting and using new knowledge. Nurses used multiple knowledge utilization processes primarily involving factual knowledge and instrumental utilization. Often, the decision to move knowledge to practice was based on comparison by similarity. There were no variations in utilization processes as nurses floated across units. Sources of new knowledge were primarily informal and unit based. Implications for staff development focus on developing unit-based resources and resource personnel, using innovative ways to introduce new knowledge on the unit, and providing time in formal classes for exchange of ideas on using new knowledge in practice.

  11. Competing priorities: staff perspectives on supporting recovery.

    PubMed

    Le Boutillier, Clair; Slade, Mike; Lawrence, Vanessa; Bird, Victoria J; Chandler, Ruth; Farkas, Marianne; Harding, Courtenay; Larsen, John; Oades, Lindsay G; Roberts, Glenn; Shepherd, Geoff; Thornicroft, Graham; Williams, Julie; Leamy, Mary

    2015-07-01

    Recovery has come to mean living a life beyond mental illness, and recovery orientation is policy in many countries. The aims of this study were to investigate what staff say they do to support recovery and to identify what they perceive as barriers and facilitators associated with providing recovery-oriented support. Data collection included ten focus groups with multidisciplinary clinicians (n = 34) and team leaders (n = 31), and individual interviews with clinicians (n = 18), team leaders (n = 6) and senior managers (n = 8). The identified core category was Competing Priorities, with staff identifying conflicting system priorities that influence how recovery-oriented practice is implemented. Three sub-categories were: Health Process Priorities, Business Priorities, and Staff Role Perception. Efforts to transform services towards a recovery orientation require a whole-systems approach.

  12. [Investigation on cognition of zoonosis among veterinary clinical staff].

    PubMed

    Takinami, Kenji

    2005-10-01

    We conducted a survey to determine how much veterinary clinic staff, including veterinary surgeon and veterinary technicians, know about zoonosis. Response was 52.5%. All staff members knew of zoonosis. Staff members who knew what zoonosis meant accounted for 98%. Staff members trained in zoonosis accounted for 75% among veterinary surgeons and 66% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who thought that zoonosis would increase in future accounted for 92% among veterinary surgeons and 79% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who were asked by pet owners about zoonosis accounted for 87% among veterinary surgeons and 51% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who thought veterinary surgeons must report zoonosis to public health centers accounted for 96% among veterinary surgeons and 88% among veterinary technicians. Veterinary clinic staffs thus had correct knowledge and were aware of zoonosis. The network of medical staff and veterinary staff could therefore build on this result.

  13. Mentoring--a staff retention tool.

    PubMed

    Kanaskie, Mary Louise

    2006-01-01

    Staff retention presents a common challenge for hospitals nationwide. Mentorship programs have been explored as one method of creating environments that promote staff retention. Successful achievement of nurse competencies identified in the Synergy Model for Patient Care can best be achieved in an environment that encourages and facilitates mentoring. Mentoring relationships in critical care provide the ongoing interactions, coaching, teaching, and role modeling to facilitate nurses' progression along this continuum. Mentoring relationships offer support and professional development for nurses at all levels within an organization as well as an optimistic outlook for the nursing profession.

  14. Staff attachment styles: a pilot study investigating the influence of adult attachment styles on staff psychological mindedness and therapeutic relationships.

    PubMed

    Berry, Katherine; Shah, Rakhi; Cook, Amy; Geater, Ellie; Barrowclough, Christine; Wearden, Alison

    2008-03-01

    The attachment styles of psychiatric staff are likely to impact on their capacity to form positive therapeutic relationships with patients with psychosis. Twenty staff completed a measure assessing levels of attachment anxiety and avoidance. Staff and patients completed a measure of patients' interpersonal problems and staff completed the Five-Minute Speech Sample, which was used to derive ratings of psychological mindedness and therapeutic relationships. Higher staff avoidance was associated with greater discrepancies in staff and patient ratings of patients' interpersonal problems and poorer staff psychological mindedness. Lower staff anxiety and avoidance were associated with positive therapeutic relationships. Findings warrant replication in larger samples, but suggest that staff attachment style may be important in the development of better quality staff and patient relationships.

  15. Front-office staff can improve clinical tobacco intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Frederic; Naish, Brigham; Buwembo, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To learn whether front-line personnel in primary care practices can increase delivery of clinical tobacco interventions and also help smokers address physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression. Design Uncontrolled before-and-after design. Setting Vancouver, BC, area (4 practices); northern British Columbia (2 practices). Participants Six practices, with 1 staff person per practice serving as a “health coordinator” who tracked and, after the baseline period, delivered preventive interventions to all patients who smoked. To assess delivery of preventive interventions, each practice was to sample 300 consecutive patient records, both at baseline and at follow-up 15 months later. Interventions Front-office staff were recruited, trained, paid, and given ongoing support to provide preventive care. Clinicians supplemented this care with advice and guided the use of medication. Main outcome measures Effectiveness of the intervention was based on comparison, at baseline and at follow-up, of the proportion of patients with any of the following 6 proven intervention components documented in their medical records: chart reminder, advice received, self-management plan, target quit date, referral, and follow-up date (as they applied to tobacco, physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression). A Tobacco Intervention Flow Sheet cued preventive care, and its data were entered into a spreadsheet (which served as a smokers’ registry). Qualitative appraisal data were noted. Results For tobacco, substantial increases occurred after the intervention period in the proportion of patients with each of the intervention components noted in their charts: chart reminder (20% vs 94%); provision of advice (34% vs 79%); self-management plan (14% vs 57%); target quit date (5% vs 11%); referral (6% vs 11%); and follow-up date (7% vs 42%). Interventions for physical inactivity and depression showed some gains, but there were no gains for at

  16. Understanding and Enacting Learning Outcomes: The Academic's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbins, Kerry; Brooks, Sara; Scott, Jon J. A.; Rawlinson, Mark; Norman, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a detailed literature exploring the advancement of a learning outcomes approach in higher education, limited evidence exists concerning academics' use of them. This study employed a questionnaire survey and interviews with academic staff in three schools in one institution to explore their views and uses of learning outcomes. Whilst…

  17. Developing Community Support for Outcome-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckx, Joseph K.

    1994-01-01

    Committed to outcome-based education, the superintendent and board of a central California school district proceeded to stabilize the environment, develop a research-based belief system, align an outcome-focused curriculum, and implement a staff development program. To stem opposition to OBE, mastery learning, and criterion-referenced assessment,…

  18. Activities vs. Outcomes: The Difference Makes All the Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Janice; Munger, Linda; Hord, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to "Focus first on outcomes" (Bradley, Munger, & Hord, 2015), published in the August 2015 issue of "JSD" ["Journal of Staff Development"]. That article set the stage by creating awareness of the need and purpose for thinking first about outcomes, not activities, when starting a change…

  19. Burnout, compassion fatigue, and compassion satisfaction among staff in community-based mental health services.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alberto; Cetrano, Gaia; Pertile, Riccardo; Rabbi, Laura; Donisi, Valeria; Grigoletti, Laura; Curtolo, Cristina; Tansella, Michele; Thornicroft, Graham; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2012-12-30

    Providing care to individuals with complex mental health needs can be stressful. However, little research has focused on the emotional, cognitive, and physical consequences of providing mental health care. The aim of this study is to assess burnout (BO), compassion fatigue (CF) and compassion satisfaction (CS) among staff at the four community-based mental health services (CMHS) of Verona, Italy. All staff were asked to complete anonymously the Professional Quality of Life Scale, the General Health Questionnaire, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. In total 260 staff participated (a response rate of 84%). Psychiatrists and social workers were the professionals with the highest levels of BO and CF. Workers with psychological distress reported both higher BO and CF scores, and lower levels of CS. A significant increase in the BO and CF scores was also detected for each extra year spent working in a CMHS. A higher level of CF was associated with female and having been experienced one negative life event in the previous year. These findings are useful for health managers and team leaders to identify factors affecting the professional quality of life of mental healthcare staff, and can provide a rationale for detecting staff at risk for developing negative work-related outcomes.

  20. Making Schools Healthy for Students and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jack B.

    2012-01-01

    Superintendents and boards of education more often than not choose "books over bricks" and their repair and maintenance budgets usually are lower than what they need. However, they all recognize the importance of healthy schools for students and staff. Is there a way to improve the condition of one's school buildings without spending a lot of…

  1. Staff Development in Problem-based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ian; Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2000-01-01

    Argues that, for problem-based learning (PBL) to succeed, a sound program of staff development is required and describes the introduction of PBL into Nursing and Midwifery curricula at the University of Dundee (Scotland) including key components and evaluatory evidence to support its efficacy. (DB)

  2. Does Staff Diversity Imply Openness to Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international university departments in Denmark. The authors set out…

  3. Secondary School Design: Sixth Form and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    Information is presented regarding the design of an environment for the education of twelfth grade students and for accommodation for staff. Two main aspects of facilities for students are given consideration: first, the kind of environment needed for work (working spaces); secondly, the kind of environment needed for recreational and social life.…

  4. Between Education and Psychology: School Staff Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Tim; Finney, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When discussing contributions from psychology in/to educational practices like school-based mental health promotion, it is peculiar that psychologists (of an educational or clinical kind) or education-oriented sociologists, both not often based in schools or classrooms, dominate the topic. It has been acknowledged that school staff have been over…

  5. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  6. Staff Development in Light of Maslow's Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Christene K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the teacher change process in an Oregon staff development program, examining faculty development within the framework of Maslow's theory that says people are motivated to satisfy physiological, safety/security, social, self-esteem, and self-actualization needs. Program evaluation demonstrated the interdependence of the cognitive and…

  7. The Lighter Side of Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacall, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    As educators, we often take ourselves a bit too seriously, so veteran educator and illustrator Aaron Bacall offers a little perspective with these lighthearted cartoons. Whether used as overheads for meetings or as an individual break in a busy day, this collection of whimsical glimpses at staff development will provide a moment to laugh and add a…

  8. Computer Training for Staff and Patrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krissoff, Alan; Konrad, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Describes a pilot computer training program for library staff and patrons at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Reviews components of effective training programs and highlights core computer competencies: operating systems, hardware and software basics and troubleshooting, and search concepts and techniques. Includes an instructional outline and…

  9. About EPA's Acting Chief of Staff

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Matt Fritz is the Chief of Staff at EPA. His responsibilities include serving as a key advisor to Administrator Gina McCarthy, managing the day-to-day operations of the agency and developing strategic initiatives to guide programmatic activities.

  10. My third year as chief of staff.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Marc D

    2007-01-01

    Passing a Joint Commission survey, dealing with a sexual harassment complaint and writing a performance pay plan are just a few of the issues that a chief of staff in the VA wrestled with during his third year on the job.

  11. Improving Circulation Services through Staff Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisby, Cynthia M.; Kilman, Marcus D.

    2007-01-01

    The Circulation Services Department at the University of Central Florida Libraries reports on leadership and training initiatives that resulted in a number of service-enhancing projects implemented by a highly motivated and involved staff. Key elements in reinvigorating the department included a change in leadership philosophy, increased…

  12. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics and Space AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM STABILIZATION AIR TRANSPORTATION STABILIZATION BOARD AIR CARRIER GUARANTEE LOAN PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS AND AMENDMENT OR WAIVER OF A TERM OR CONDITION...

  13. Genetics: The New Staff Development Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Since genetics is about biological development and diversity, it is related to contentious social issues (like racism) and already permeates the K-12 curriculum. Staff who educated themselves about brain research can grasp genetics concepts and decide what knowledge is worth imparting to students. Print and web resources are listed. (MLH)

  14. Using Virtual Reference Transcripts for Staff Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, David

    2003-01-01

    Describes a method of library staff training based on chat transcript analysis in which graduate student workers at a university reference desk examined transcripts of actual virtual reference desk transactions to analyze reference interviews. Discusses reference interview standards, reference desk behavior, and reference interview skills in…

  15. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.25 Staff Offices. (a) Office of Administrative Law Judges. The Office of Administrative Law Judges, under the supervision of the Chief Administrative Law Judge, is responsible for... proceedings. The Office provides supervision of the Administrative Law Judges, who operate as a component...

  16. Staff-Development Program. Maxi I Practicum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutalo, Anthony J.

    Described are various aspects of a program to train school personnel to meet the special needs of mainstreamed children. The staff development program is discussed in terms of program responsibility, strategy, and steps taken by the principal in the implementation procedure. The four stages of Project RETAP, a special education in-service program…

  17. Selecting and Developing an A+ Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vernon G.

    2008-01-01

    Because the demand for excellence in public education is ever present, this article explores the development of a professional enhancement program designed to select and develop a qualified, competent faculty and staff. The basis for the program is a strong educational philosophy, which leads to a vision of what schools can be. It stresses the…

  18. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  19. Cultivating Shared Leadership with Docents and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Be they paid or volunteer docents, teaching staff members play an essential role in fulfilling a museum's mission. Yet the experiences that visitors have on docent tours--despite all of the time expended on docent training--are not often as powerful or meaningful as they could be. Knowing this, how can we support and empower docents as adult…

  20. Use staff wisely to save NHS money.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    2015-12-09

    The NHS could save up to £ 2 billion a year by improving workflow and containing workforce costs, according to Labour peer Lord Carter's review of NHS efficiency. Changes in areas such as rostering and management of annual leave must avoid increasing the pressure on staff.

  1. 19 CFR 207.17 - Staff report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff report. 207.17 Section 207.17 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  2. 19 CFR 207.17 - Staff report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staff report. 207.17 Section 207.17 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  3. 19 CFR 207.64 - Staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staff reports. 207.64 Section 207.64 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  4. 19 CFR 207.64 - Staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staff reports. 207.64 Section 207.64 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  5. 19 CFR 207.64 - Staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staff reports. 207.64 Section 207.64 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  6. 19 CFR 207.17 - Staff report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staff report. 207.17 Section 207.17 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  7. 19 CFR 207.64 - Staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff reports. 207.64 Section 207.64 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  8. 19 CFR 207.17 - Staff report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staff report. 207.17 Section 207.17 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  9. 19 CFR 207.17 - Staff report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staff report. 207.17 Section 207.17 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  10. 19 CFR 207.64 - Staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staff reports. 207.64 Section 207.64 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  11. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Metals Analyses. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. The Staff Guide provides step-by-step information on course planning, development, and implementation involving…

  12. Academic Staff Work Loads in a University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Neville H.

    1981-01-01

    The workloads of 1,032 members of the full-time teaching staff at the University of Queensland (Australia) are analyzed and compared by rank and by academic field. The study suggests that the workloads, although different in nature, are comparable in magnitude. (Author/MLF)

  13. The Hazardous Waters of Staff Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoop, Robert J.; Dunklee, Dennis R.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding prospective employees' rights (under the 1964 Civil Rights Act and other federal legislation prohibiting discriminatory practices) can help principals protect themselves, their schools, and their districts from litigation. Scenarios are described, along with permissible staff-selection steps: position analysis, recruitment,…

  14. Characteristics of Absenteeism in Nursing Home Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Rosenthal, Alvin S.

    This study investigated factors associated with absenteeism among nursing staff (N=219) at a long-term care facility. Four absenteeism measures were calculated from personnel records for each month of the year: no pay (the sum of unscheduled, unpaid sick, and leave without pay), part day (the sum of arrived late and left early), paid sick, and…

  15. Staff Development: A Practical Guide. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Elizabeth Fuseler, Ed.; Dahlin, Terry, Ed.; Carver, Deborah A., Ed.

    In this new, expanded edition step-by-step guidelines are provided for customizing a staff development program that is both proactive and goal-oriented. Drawing on the advice of 37 top experts with a variety of skill sets, this book presents information on how to assess a library's needs and set training goals, budget appropriately, develop a set…

  16. Exemplary Practices in Staff and Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Roy F., Ed.; Mezei, Katherine E., Ed.

    In June 1988, the heads of Staff Development of each institution of the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology were invited to submit brief descriptions of 5 to 10 outstanding programs or practices designed to develop human resources within the college. This directory of exemplary practice provides a selection of the colleges'…

  17. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Nutrients. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. This Staff Guide provides step-by-step guidelines on course planning, development and implementation involving…

  18. Focusing on Staff Development and Administrative Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolvitz, Marcia, Ed.

    These four conference papers from the Biennial Conference on Postsecondary Education for Persons who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing focus on staff development and administrative issues for postsecondary personnel working with students with deafness or who are hard of hearing. The first paper, "Mentorship for the Working Interpreter"…

  19. Joint Staff Officer’s Guide 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Hoover were eventually rejected by a lame- duck Congress. During the period, opposition among the military appears to have been strong. The Joint Board...Chiefs of Staff ECCM electronic counter-counter measure ECM electronic countermeasure EDC estimated date of completion of loading (at POE) EDD

  20. Effective Strategies for Engaging Faculty and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieving the Dream, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges are the pathways for millions of Americans to gain valuable education and to access career opportunities leading to family-sustaining wages. Faculty, student services staff, and administrators must share in the responsibility for student success if we are to meet national completion goals and reach even more students. During a…

  1. Camp Courageous of Iowa Staff Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp Courageous of Iowa, Monticello.

    Designed as a useful and practical tool for the staff at Camp Courageous of Iowa, a year-round residential camp serving all handicapped individuals, the manual outlines safety rules for camp activities, characteristics of the mentally and physically handicapped, and a general description of the camp and its objectives. Contents of the manual…

  2. The Boston Vocation Bureau's First Counseling Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sensoy-Briddick, Hande

    2009-01-01

    Although much has been written about Frank Parsons, the founder of the vocational guidance movement, little is known about the 1st counseling staff of the Vocation Bureau. Lucinda Wyman Prince, Ralph Albertson, and Philip Davis each deserve recognition for their role in founding vocation guidance as well as their civic contributions. This article…

  3. Accommodations: Staff Identity and University Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Andrew; Herrick, Tim; Keating, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Space has been of growing significance in social theory in recent years, yet, explorations of it in the scholarship of higher education have been limited. This is surprising, given the critical role space has in shaping staff and students' engagement with the university. Taking a practice-based approach and focusing on academic identities, this…

  4. Supervision, Staff Development, and Evaluation Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Frank O.; Wood, Fred H.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the relationship between supervision, staff development, and teacher evaluation, discussing why educators must strive to make connections among the three, identifying important misunderstandings about them, and describing the purposes of each process and the similarities, differences, and connections between them. Together, they can be…

  5. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  6. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  7. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  8. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  9. Using a professional writing retreat to enhance professional publications, presentations, and research development with staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Horstman, Patricia; Theeke, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the outcomes of a structured writing retreat used with a group of professional nurses from a Magnet-designated hospital. The purpose of the retreat was to enhance nurses' ability to prepare poster presentations, develop manuscripts for peer-reviewed journal submissions, and design new research studies. This staff development retreat can serve as an exemplar for other hospitals desiring to increase dissemination of best practice.

  10. Where has all the staff gone? Strategies to recruit and retain quality staff.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Helen M

    2007-06-01

    Recruiting and retaining quality staff is a national issue for all healthcare organizations, and transplant programs are also affected by this crisis. Transplant administrators are faced with increased regulatory burdens, reduced reimbursement, increased competition for uniquely qualified staff, and rising healthcare costs. These factors negatively affect transplant programs that try to ensure the infrastructure exists to provide quality care. Human resources management is a key component to transplant administration. In today's environment, administrators need to adopt long-term strategic practices to recruit and retain quality staff. Maintaining adequate staffing levels means "thinking out of the box" and looking at human resources management at all levels of skill mix including physician extenders that can perform the transplant coordinator role. Investing in the future development of staff can attract quality professionals to the field of transplantation for years to come.

  11. Systematic review of the effective components of psychosocial interventions delivered by care home staff to people with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Penny; Livingston, Gill; Murray, Joanna; Mulla, Aasiya; Cooper, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This review aims to understand what elements of psychosocial interventions are associated with improved outcomes for people with dementia to inform implementation in care homes. Design A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative intervention studies was undertaken. Eligibility criteria for included studies We included primary research studies evaluating psychosocial interventions that trained care home staff to deliver a specific intervention or that sought to change how staff delivered care to residents with dementia and reported staff and resident qualitative or quantitative outcomes. Methods We searched MEDLINE, PsychINFO and EMBASE electronic databases and hand-searched references up to May 2016. Quality of included papers was rated independently by 2 authors, using operationalised checklists derived from standard criteria. We discussed discrepancies and reached consensus. We conducted a narrative synthesis of quantitative and a thematic synthesis of qualitative findings to find what was effective immediately and in sustaining change. Results We identified 49 papers fulfilling predetermined criteria. We found a lack of higher quality quantitative evidence that effects could be sustained after psychosocial interventions finished with no evidence that interventions continued to work after 6 months. Qualitative findings suggest that staff valued interventions focusing on getting to know, understand and connect with residents with dementia. Successful elements of interventions included interactive training, post-training support, aiming to train most staff, retaining written materials afterwards and building interventions into routine care. Conclusions Psychosocial interventions can improve outcomes for staff and residents with dementia in care homes; however, many trial results are limited. Synthesis of qualitative findings highlight core components of interventions that staff value and feel improve care. These findings provide useful evidence

  12. Is the relationship between your hospital and your medical staff sustainable?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Greg; Greeley, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Issues in the macro-environment are affecting the historic relationships that have existed between hospitals and their medical staffs over the last half century. Rising healthcare costs, deteriorating relationships, unexplained variations in clinical outcomes, transparency in healthcare outcomes, medical tourism, competition between hospitals and physicians, and reluctance by hospitals and physicians to change are among the issues challenging the sustainability of the current business model. This article highlights barriers to maintaining traditional relationships and concludes with strategies to preserve and strengthen relationships between physicians and hospitals.

  13. Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Comparison of Perspectives of Residents, Family, and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Maria; Bernaldo de Quiros, Monica; Gomez, M. Mar; Hornillos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Quality of Life (QoL) has become increasingly valued as a key outcome in dementia both in clinical practice and in research. This study compares the QoL of long-term residents with dementia as assessed by the individuals, their relatives, and their care staff. Design and Methods: Data on residents with dementia were collected in 11…

  14. 76 FR 37808 - PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Discussion Topics for Staff Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Discussion Topics for Staff Technical... outcome of a technical conference.\\1\\ This notice establishes the topics for discussion at the technical... identified by the Commission in the June 3 Order, there will be a discussion on the topics identified in...

  15. Impact of Training on Cognitive Representation of Challenging Behaviour in Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Martin; Hogg, James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive representations of challenging behaviour among staff may influence therapeutic outcomes. This study looked at how cognitive dimensions of Identity, Cause, Consequences, Emotional Reaction and Treatment/Control are affected by training. Materials and Methods: A theoretically derived questionnaire was used to measure the impact…

  16. Inclusion of Pre-Kindergarten and Other Early Childhood Staff in State Teacher Evaluation Systems. CEELO FastFacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors-Tadros, L.

    2014-01-01

    Federal Staff from the U.S. Department of Education asked the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) to provide information on the number of states that include prekindergarten teachers in state teacher evaluation systems. This was a quick turnaround response to a request from the Office of Management and Budget. In response to this…

  17. Psychosocial Work-Related Predictors and Consequences of Personal Burnout among Staff Working with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Agnessa; Kersten, Maren; Schillmoller, Zita; Nienhaus, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the potential predictors of personal burnout among staff working with people with intellectual disabilities and to investigate whether personal burnout is associated with health and work-related outcomes. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2011 in 30 residential facilities in northern Germany…

  18. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  19. Involving staff pharmacists in management decisions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L A; Vanderveen, T W

    1977-03-01

    Various administrative techniques used to bring staff pharmacists in a decentralized, satellite pharmacy system into the managerial decision-making process are discussed. These techniques include a staff pharmacist on-call procedure to discourage absenteeism, and the concept of a head pharmacist to serve as a link with departmental administration. The head pharmacist works in the satelite pharmacy, is responsible for its daily operation and is the spokesman for the satellite. Active roles for the head pharmacist in the selection and evaluation of technicians are outlines. Management skills are developed in head pharmacists through a program of special classes and discussion groups. It is concluded that this program has improved the credibility of administrative decisions and has tapped an underused source of ideas and talent.

  20. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'.

  1. In Search of Command and Staff Doctrine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    following "military" dictionaries are in substantial accord: W. Heflin , The United States Air Force Dictionary 128 (1956) (not currently an official...for general staff, and the latter a name for a group consisting of aides-de-camp, executive support officers, etc. Accord W. Heflin , supra note 19, at... Heflin , supra note 19, at 486 (can include officers and civilians); P. Hayward, supra note 19, at 154 (can in- clude officers and soldiers); J. Quick

  2. Does Your Front Desk Staff Maximize Collections?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As collections become more difficult, practices need to use the front desk to help collect payments from patients when they are face to face. Training staff and giving them the tools to ask for money allows them to collect efficiently. Improve your collections by involving your front desk employees. Educate your patients to allow them to come to their visits prepared. It will save the practice time and money.

  3. The German General Staff System Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-27

    challenging of issues. The study will close with what generally is required in the way of political reform to make for a more complete solution to reform of...challenging of issues. The study will close with what generally is required in the way of political reform to make for a more complete solution to reform...divisions in 1934 ...." by Hitler. General staff resis- tance was based on conservatism, not technical or political oppo- sition. Furthermore, the brilliant

  4. Improving communication between emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kate

    2014-05-01

    During redevelopment of the emergency department at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, it was deemed vital that its internal communication system should be as effective as possible. An audit of staff perceptions of the existing communication system and a relevant literature review were undertaken, therefore, to inform a proposal for the development of a new online system. This article describes the development and implementation of the system.

  5. Tactical Level Commander and Staff Toolkit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    communications may require such a determination to be made on the spot , by the chaplain, based on the information available at the time. 4. The support...injuries, other medical symptoms may include: • Fever • Difficulty breathing • Persistent cough • Confusion DSCA Handbook Tactical Level...with a fever and shaking chills should seek immediate medical attention. DSCA Handbook Tactical Level Commander and Staff Toolkit 5-60

  6. Motivating Staff--A Problem for the School Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchler, Merv

    1981-01-01

    Examines the implications for educators of the "Motivation-Hygiene Theory" proposed by Frederick Herzberg. Suggests increasing staff opportunities for goal setting, decision making, and expanded professional competence as strategies for developing staff motivation. (Author/MLF)

  7. 1. VIEW OF STAFF HOUSE (FEATURE 10), FACING SOUTHWEST. DUPLEX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF STAFF HOUSE (FEATURE 10), FACING SOUTHWEST. DUPLEX (FEATURE 7) IS VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND AT RIGHT. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Staff House, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  8. Reorganization of the Yearbook Staffs for the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vossen, Daniel L.

    1981-01-01

    A diagram of the reorganized yearbook staff, reflective of current emphasis on magazine-style layout designs, and adaptable for colleges, high schools, mid-high schools, and junior high schools. Listings of responsibilities for each integral staff member. (RL)

  9. Religion in sexual health: a staff perspective.

    PubMed

    Hobern, Kylie

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports data on the complexities of delivering religious/spiritual care in sexual health from a staff perspective. A learning needs analysis, in survey format, was conducted with the nursing staff of a leading London, sexual health clinic. Recruitment took place in May 2011 over a period of 2 weeks. The sample consisted of 25 members of staff which included service support workers and registered nurses. The 25 question survey was conducted and reviewed using Survey Monkey™. The survey was divided into three sections, being population demographics, clinical experience and understanding and education. This article will explore the second section of being clinical experience and understanding. This section used six open-ended questions to investigate participant's experience of common clinical episodes where religion was an influential part of the patient experience and decision-making. A range of contemporary sexual health and religious issues were extrapolated from the survey findings ranging from homosexuality to termination of pregnancy. Four main areas of complexity identified from participants responses were sexual dysfunction, treatment issues, sexual health knowledge and high-risk behaviour. Findings from the study highlight the diversity of influence of religion has on the sexual health of patients.

  10. Defining, constructing and assessing learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R M

    2009-08-01

    Learning outcomes define the veterinary curriculum and inform students about what they must be able to demonstrate to succeed. Stakeholder consultation during their development ensures that programme learning outcomes equip graduates to contribute to the veterinary profession. Effective learning outcomes form a hierarchy linking the programme, its courses and tasks. Clear outcomes direct students towards higher quality learning by indicating the achievements intended, but leave scope for emergent learning outcomes. Defined technical competencies fit within this overarching framework, complementing higher order learning. Mapping is used to align learning outcomes horizontally and vertically so students are systematically guided towards entry-level competence and professional independence. Constructively aligned learning and assessment tasks ensure learners spend the focused time required to sequentially develop programme outcomes. Assessment by staff, peers and other stakeholders certifies achievement of intended outcomes. Effective assessment also empowers students to define and achieve their own learning outcomes, so they develop the habits of autonomous life-long learning. Evaluation of the quality and consistency of achieved outcomes informs ongoing programme improvement. If we are going to achieve the objectives of this set of papers, i.e. to improve public health education globally (Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz. 28 [2] 2009), then it is essential that they be well defined in the learning outcomes statement of all veterinary schools.

  11. Design of Battle Simulations for Command and Staff Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    COMMAND AND STAFF TRAINING SECTION 1. INTRODUCTION Simulations designed to train Army commanders and staffs in planning and conducting milit-iry... plan to automate staff training at high echelons. The Army Research Institute (ARI) Field Unit at Fort Leavenworth has been participating in battle...TRAINING~ SCNA OBJECTIVE CONTRL COMANDE PERSONEL & STAFF AI SIMUATIO TACICA MODEL DAT SYSTEM MEASUEMEN & FEDBAC Figue 1.A tpica co ma.’d saff raiing

  12. What's the Use of Webnotes? Student and Staff Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambrook, Sally; Rowley, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    We present findings from a study exploring student and staff perceptions of the use of webnotes, and whether their availability affects attendance at lectures. A questionnaire survey gathered data from 162 undergraduate and masters students and 20 staff. Students and staff agree that webnotes have become an expected supplement to lecture delivery,…

  13. Targeting Obesity through Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.; Hall, Cougar

    2017-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and under-utilized resource that can lead to reductions in overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members if implemented properly. In addition to increasing the overall staff wellness, boosting morale, increasing productivity, improving academic achievement, providing…

  14. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  15. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  16. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  17. Higher Education Staff Development: Directions for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jennifer; And Others

    This collection of 13 papers offers an international perspective on future directions of staff development at colleges and universities, focusing on academic staff development, higher education teaching networks, and managerial and human resource development. Papers are: (1) "Higher Education Staff Development for the 21st Century: Directions…

  18. School Staff's Reflections on Truant Students: A Positioning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Anne-Sofie M.; Cedersund, Elisabet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how school staff members involved in Student Health and Welfare conferences reflect on individual students with high levels of truancy based on their personal relationships. Using positioning analysis, the transcriptions of 15 interviews with staff were analysed. The school staff's reflections on the individual…

  19. Identifying Needs to Develop a PBL Staff Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Prarthana

    2013-01-01

    Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims…

  20. You Say Staff Deserve Respect? Energize Your Words with Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    1998-01-01

    Lists 36 tangible ways that child care directors can motivate staff through showing them respect and appreciation. Included are suggestions related to publicly acknowledging staff expertise and training, organizing events for team bonding, recognizing and using staff members' talents, and providing space for organization and planning. (KB)

  1. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  2. Leading by Example: Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and underused resource that can reduce overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members. They can also reduce staff absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce costs associated with health care and disability, and foster a climate that promotes good health schoolwide. An…

  3. 32 CFR 2003.7 - Support Staff (Article VII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Support Staff (Article VII). 2003.7 Section 2003.7 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT... (ISCAP) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.7 Support Staff (Article VII). The staff...

  4. Staff Development for Effective Secondary Schools: A Synthesis of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert B.

    The question of how staff development can be structured to serve as a lever for school improvement is addressed by analyzing and synthesizing empirical studies that have reported an impact of staff development on significant characteristics of effective schools. The choice and conception of the term "staff development" is discussed, followed by…

  5. Academic Staff Disposition to Promotion Criteria in Nigerian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archibong, Ijeoma A.; Effiom, David O.; Omoike, Don; Edet, Aniefiok O.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at determining academic staff satisfaction with promotion criteria and what, in their view, should be included in the promotion criteria. A researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized for data collection from a sample size of 349 academic staff. Findings show that the majority of the academic staff were dissatisfied with the…

  6. 17 CFR 38.155 - Compliance staff and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Compliance staff and resources... DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Compliance With Rules § 38.155 Compliance staff and resources. (a) Sufficient... resources and staff to ensure that it can conduct effective audit trail reviews, trade practice...

  7. 17 CFR 38.155 - Compliance staff and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compliance staff and resources... DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Compliance With Rules § 38.155 Compliance staff and resources. (a) Sufficient... resources and staff to ensure that it can conduct effective audit trail reviews, trade practice...

  8. Five Flaws of Staff Development and the Future Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Student learning and development do not occur without teacher learning and development. Not any teacher development will do, though. The old flaws of weak and wayward staff development are well-known--no staff development, in which trial and error are assumed to be enough; staff development that is all ideas and no implementation, i.e. the…

  9. Conflict in Staff Development Implementation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponticell, Judith A.; Thomas, Julie A.; Cooper, Sandra B.

    2006-01-01

    Staff development is aimed at changing practice. Change creates conflict. Little work has been done to gain insight into the conflict that teachers experience in the implementation of staff development. This study examines conflict in a staff development project aimed at increasing teachers' knowledge and implementation of problem-based integrated…

  10. Classification of Staff Development Programmes and Effects Perceived by Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Rijdt, Catherine; Dochy, Filip; Bamelis, Sofie; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer diverse staff development programmes to allow staff members to keep up with educational innovations and to guarantee educational quality. The current study investigates by means of a survey and semi-structured interviews whether the teacher perceives staff development as a management model, a shop-floor model or a…

  11. 7 CFR 1700.33 - Financial Services Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial Services Staff. 1700.33 Section 1700.33... AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.33 Financial Services Staff. The Financial Services Staff evaluates the financial condition of financially troubled borrowers in order...

  12. 42 CFR 401.112 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 401... § 401.112 Availability of administrative staff manuals. All CMS administrative staff manuals and... Rulings. These manuals are generally not printed in a sufficient quantity to permit sale or other...

  13. Predictors of Burnout in Children's Residential Treatment Center Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Brittany L.; Leon, Scott C.; Miller, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored burnout among frontline staff within a children's residential treatment center (RTC) population. Data were collected from 375 full-time, frontline, children's RTC staff employed at 21 RTCs in Illinois. Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), results indicated that frontline staff age, training, empathic concern, communicative…

  14. Developing Staff Potential. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    The staff of a college is its single greatest resource, and its most significant capital investment. It is the collective manager of the college mission and purpose. As the purpose changes, so must the staff have opportunities to change and develop. This sourcebook presents selected approaches to staff development in community colleges. It…

  15. Positive Character Traits of Special Education Staff: Commonalities and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, Maggie A.; Woodard, Cooper R.; Tucker, Chelsea A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to identify the positive character traits of staff working with a special education population and further understand how staff apply these traits in their work. Twenty-eight staff from a school/treatment program for students with autism and related developmental disorders completed the VIA Inventory of Strengths…

  16. Connecting the Learners: Improving Uptake of a Nursing Home Educational Program by Focusing on Staff Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The CONNECT intervention is designed to improve staff connections, communication, and use of multiple perspectives for problem solving. This analysis compared staff descriptions of the learning climate, use of social constructivist learning processes, and outcomes in nursing facilities receiving CONNECT with facilities receiving a falls education program alone. Design and Methods: Qualitative evaluation of a randomized controlled trial was done using a focus group design. Facilities (n = 8) were randomized to a falls education program alone (control) or CONNECT followed by FALLS (intervention). A total of 77 staff participated in 16 focus groups using a structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using framework analysis, and summaries for each domain were compared between intervention and control facilities. Results: Notable differences in descriptions of the learning climate included greater learner empowerment, appreciation of the role of all disciplines, and seeking diverse viewpoints in the intervention group. Greater use of social constructivist learning processes was evidenced by the intervention group as they described greater identification of communication weaknesses, improvement in communication frequency and quality, and use of sense-making by seeking out multiple perspectives to better understand and act on information. Intervention group participants reported outcomes including more creative fall prevention plans, a more respectful work environment, and improved relationships with coworkers. No substantial difference between groups was identified in safety culture, shared responsibility, and self-reported knowledge about falls. Implications: CONNECT appears to enhance the use of social constructivist learning processes among nursing home staff. The impact of CONNECT on clinical outcomes requires further study. PMID:23704219

  17. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  18. The Utilization of Psychologists for Staff Development in a Large Public School System: A Staff Development Director's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James L., Jr.

    This model proposes the TAP Team approach as an on-site delivery system for local school staff development in large, urban school systems. TAP emphasizes in-service training for both upgrading skills of staff and for helping staff acquire new skills in the areas of coping strategies, classroom management, communication skills, instructional…

  19. Assessing Staff Competence at Implementing a Multifaceted Residential Program for Youth: Development and Initial Psychometrics of a Staff Observation Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Shaw, Tanya; Thompson, Ron; Griffith, Annette; Farmer, Elizabeth M.; Tierney, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the development of the Staff Implementation Observation Form, an instrument to assess staff competence delivering an intervention to youth in group home care with behavioral or emotional disorders. This instrument assesses staff skill at implementing the key treatment components, including building relationships with youth,…

  20. Attributes of nursing staff development in Port Said hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sanaa A; Mahran, Sabah M

    2010-01-01

    Attributes and quality are synonyms that refer to characteristics inherent in or ascribed to someone or something. This article describes a study of the attributes of nursing staff development. Results revealed that 16 out of total nurses included in the study did not receive any type of staff development programs since appointment, whereas 61.8% of them attended one program only. In total, less than half of the nurses agreed upon attributes or quality of their received training. Establishment of staff development committees in the public hospitals and planning programs for staff development based on staff and patient needs were recommended.

  1. Evaluation of OLD@HOME virtual health record staff opinions of the system and satisfaction with work.

    PubMed

    Engström, Maria; Scandurra, Isabella; Ljunggren, Birgitta; Lindqvist, Ragny; Koch, Sabine; Carlsson, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to study outcomes of use of the OLD@HOME Virtual Health Record with regard to staff opinions about information, communication technology, and satisfaction with work. A quasi-experimental design was used. Staff opinions about the information and communication technology were assessed using a study-specific questionnaire at the test site (n =22) and at other settings in the municipality (n =172). Staff (n =22) job satisfaction, perceived quality of care, and psychosomatic health were assessed using the Satisfaction with Work Questionnaires before and after a 5-month period of testing the technology in an intervention and a comparison group. Staff opinions about the information and communication technology were significantly more positive at the test site compared to other settings in the municipality. For the total scale of quality of care and the factor documentation, there were significant differences in change scores between intervention and comparison groups, with improvements for the comparison group. For job satisfaction and psychosomatic health, there were no differences in change scores between the groups. Participatory design enhances staff opinions about information and communication technology. However, a 5-month test period showed no benefits regarding staff satisfaction with work when compared to a comparison group. On the contrary, the comparison group improved in documentation, and for the intervention group, there was a trend toward deterioration, which may be due to their knowing how to document, but not having time when using both paper-based and electronic systems.

  2. Army Staff College Level Training Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-13

    training, Command and General Staff College, officer manage - ment 24L ABSTRACT (tlen ge i nerv eemy -sa a"d tdwalt by block numbeo) This report is an...Impact of Non-OPMD Managed Officers 59 Allies, Sister Service Officers and Reservists 59 Impact of Uniform Evaluation Scheme 60 Lack of Uniform Pri...applicable to all specialties Army wide. The top 30% to 40% of the OPtD managed officer corps should attend a much more rigorous Command and General

  3. Public Health Staff Development Needs in Informatics: Findings From a National Survey of Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Kelley; Shah, Gulzar H.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Public health practice is information-intensive and information-driven. Public health informatics is a nascent discipline, and most public health practitioners lack necessary skills in this area. Objective: To describe the staff development needs of local health departments (LHDs) related to informatics. Design: Data came from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, conducted by Georgia Southern University in collaboration with the National Association of County & City Health Officials. Participants: A total of 324 LHDs from all 50 states completed the survey (response rate: 50%). Main Outcome Measure(s): Outcome measures included LHDs' specific staff development needs related to informatics. Predictors of interest included jurisdiction size and governance type. Results: Areas of workforce development and improvement in informatics staff of LHDs included using and interpreting quantitative data, designing and running reports from information systems, using and interpreting qualitative data, using statistical or other analytical software, project management, and using geographical information systems. Significant variation in informatics training needs exists depending on the size of the LHD population and governance type. Conclusion: Substantial training needs exist for LHDs across many areas of informatics ranging from very basic to specialized skills and are related to the size of LHD population and governance type. PMID:27684619

  4. Disseminating contingency management: impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program.

    PubMed

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T Ron; Jones, Brinn E; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A

    2014-04-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability) were assessed at study conclusion in a qualitative interview with OTP management. Intervention effectiveness was also assessed via independent chart review of trial CM implementation vs. a historical control period. Results included: 1) robust, durable increases in delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness among trained staff; 2) positive managerial perspectives of intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability; and 3) significant clinical impacts on targeted patient indices. Collective results offer support for the study's collaborative intervention design and the applied, skills-based focus of staff training processes. Implications for CM dissemination are discussed.

  5. The CISQ: a tool to measure staff involvement in and attitudes toward the implementation of a clinical information system.

    PubMed Central

    Gugerty, B.; Wooldridge, P.; Brennan, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Clinical Information System Questionnaire (CISQ-15) is a new 15-item tool designed to measure staff involvement in and attitudes towards CIS implementations. It was developed during a clinical trial which tested the effects of a combined managerial and IT intervention on staff attitudes and patient outcomes. The CISQ-15 appears to have high construct validity and internal consistency, although further studies are needed. Such studies are under way, and an expanded 36-item version, the CISQ-36, is now being evaluated. PMID:11079897

  6. Practical solutions for staff recruitment & retention.

    PubMed

    Vander Hoek, N

    2001-01-01

    There are three essential topics for radiology managers to consider in light of persistent staffing shortages: support of the profession and educational programs, perks as recruitment tools and incentives as retention tools. Some activities that can help support departments and educational programs for radiologic technologists are job shadowing, training for volunteer services, advanced placement for school applicants, sponsoring an educational program or clinical training site, creating a positive work environment and supporting outreach projects geared to local high schools. Traditional perks used in recruitment efforts have included relocation assistance, travel and lodging expenses during the interview process, loan repayment, scholarships and sign-on bonuses. Some common incentives for retaining employees are tuition reimbursement, cross training, availability of educational resources, continuing education opportunities, professional development and incremental increases in salary. There are many other tools that can be used, such as career ladders, creating an environment conducive to teamwork or a more personal atmosphere and showcasing talents of various staff members. There is much overlap among these suggestions in support of the profession and educational programs, recruitment and retention of qualified staff radiologic technologists. Radiology managers can and should be creative in developing different programs to build loyalty and commitment to a radiology department.

  7. 78 FR 56752 - Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... COMMISSION Interim Staff Guidance Specific Environmental Guidance for Integral Pressurized Water Reactors Reviews AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft Interim Staff Guidance; request for comment... comment on, draft Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) ESP/COL-ISG-027, ``Interim Staff Guidance...

  8. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  9. Intramural Staff Handbook. Student Staff Personnel Manual from the Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudenhoeffer, Frances Tomlin; Fedak, Joseph F.

    This student staff personnel manual is designed to orient student employees of the New Mexico State University (Las Cruces) Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports to their duties and responsibilities and to provide personnel policies and standard operating procedures. Topics include: student employment procedures, pay rates for job…

  10. The Continuing Education Needs of Academic Staff: Senior College Staff in TAFE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mageean, Pauline

    Interviews intended to discover the best ways of meeting the continuing education needs of senior Technical and Further Education (TAFE) staff were conducted with 250 individuals from 17 TAFE colleges throughout Australia. The study population consisted of principals, deputy principals, department heads, and heads of schools who spend 50 percent…

  11. Effects of Staff Training on Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie L.; Harrington, Donna

    2002-01-01

    Four learning modules on elderly sexuality were pilot tested with 109 long-term care staff. On pretests men and whites scored higher than women and African-Americans. Knowledge and attitude improvements resulted from use of modules on the need for sexuality/intimacy, sex and dementia, and sex and aging, but not the family/personal issues module.…

  12. Does staff see what experts see? Accuracy of front line staff in scoring juveniles' risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kennealy, Patrick J; Skeem, Jennifer L; Hernandez, Isaias R

    2017-01-01

    Although increasingly complex risk assessment tools are being marketed, little is known about "real world" practitioners' capacity to score them accurately. In this study, we assess the extent to which 78 staff members' scoring of juveniles on the California-Youth Assessment and Screening Instrument (CA-YASI; Orbis Partners, Inc., 2008) agree with experts' criterion scores for those cases. There are 3 key findings. First, at the total score level, practitioners manifest limited agreement (M ICC = .63) with the criterion: Only 59.0% of staff scores the tool with "good" accuracy. Second, at the subscale level, practitioners' accuracy is particularly weak for treatment-relevant factors that require substantial judgment-like procriminal attitudes (M ICC = .52)-but good for such straightforward factors as legal history (M ICC = .72). Third, practitioners' accuracy depended on their experience-relatively new staff's scores were more consistent with the criterion than those with greater years of experience. Results suggest that attention to parsimony (for tools) and meaningful training and monitoring (for staff) are necessary to realize the promise of risk assessment for informing risk reduction. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Spica cast care: a collaborative staff-led education initiative for improved patient care.

    PubMed

    Reed, Cynthia; Carroll, Lee; Baccari, Susan; Shermont, Herminia

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects for nurses caring for incontinent children in spica casts is maintaining healthy skin integrity. Noting an increase in the number of phone calls from parents of discharged children in spica casts concerning diaper rash and skin breakdown, inpatient orthopedics staff nurses lead an interdisciplinary quality improvement and educational initiative. They standardized pediatric spica cast care and education by creating an intranet narrated PowerPoint presentation for staff and parents of children with spica casts. A take-home DVD of this education module is now produced and given to parents, reinforcing nursing discharge teaching and giving parents the opportunity to review these new skills at home as needed. The purpose of this article is to share this experience of improving patient outcomes and empowering other orthopedics nurses to develop creative educational solutions.

  14. Improving nursing home resident integrity by optimizing interpersonal communication skills in clinical staff.

    PubMed

    Matusitz, Jonathan; Breen, Gerald-Mark; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Seblega, Binyam K

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors discuss the prevalence of resident abuse and reported violations of care deficiencies and resident maltreatment in nursing homes in the United States. The number of nursing homes in the United States that are cited with abuse violations has increased in recent years. While the authors recognize that treatments (both positive and negative) received by residents are sometimes related to factors other than staff's lack of knowledge and poor attitudes, their purpose in this analysis is to enhance resident integrity through the improvement of staff interpersonal communication skills. In doing so, innovative strategies and specific interpersonal communication theories are examined as educational methods to confront and resolve care deficiencies and elevate and enrich residents' integrity, satisfaction, and outcomes.

  15. An Educational Plan for Nursing Staff in the Procedural Treatment Unit of the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther; Daugherty, JoAnn

    2016-04-01

    Professional education for health practitioners is a continuum which commences with the first year professional school until the cessation of a professional career. This article draws on the theories and models developed by experts in curriculum design, teaching, and learning evaluation to better understand the intricacies and challenges of instructional design. Selected models, in particular Malcolm Knowles and the World Health Organization report served as a compass and benchmark to illuminate, guide, and evaluate the impact, process, contents, and outcomes of an educational program for the stakeholders. The aim of this educational program is to ensure that learners develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to deliver competent and quality patient-centered care. Multimodal teaching strategies are essential to meet the diverse needs of staff. Utilization of technology such as intranet and mobile applications helps to deliver educational content in a cost-effective manner. Program evaluation determines the effectiveness of teaching and helps to define ongoing needs of staff.

  16. Effectiveness of high-fidelity simulation for pediatric staff nurse education.

    PubMed

    Bultas, Margaret W; Hassler, Margaret; Ercole, Patrick M; Rea, Gail

    2014-01-01

    A pre-test post-test control group design was used to compare the effectiveness of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) with traditional static mannequins as a teaching strategy for pediatric staff nurse education. Thirty-three nurses from a metropolitan pediatric Magnet hospital completed the study that evaluated knowledge retention, skill performance, and team confidence during the American Heart Association's (AHA) Pediatric Emergency Assessment, Recognition and Stabilization (PEARS) course. Written exams, competency and skill performance measures, and the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS) were used to compare the outcomes between the two groups. Results indicated that knowledge retention was maintained, skill performance improved, and teamwork performance scores increased in the experimental group. This study provides a foundation supporting the use of HFS as an effective teaching modality when educating pediatric staff nurses in the identification and intervention of the deteriorating pediatric patient.

  17. Empowering Staff Nurses With Essential Skills: Training Strategies for Success.

    PubMed

    Czekanski, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Nurse leaders in the mental health field are challenged to ensure the mental health environment is safe and therapeutic. They must also continually evaluate whether nurses are effectively engaging therapeutically with patients in their care. Undergraduate nursing students and practicing nurses usually receive little or no training in facilitating nurse-led groups. Nurses who are trained and capable of facilitating groups may enhance therapeutic relationships and engage patients to improve treatment outcomes. Training staff and disseminating educational materials in an efficient manner are often challenges for nurse leaders. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Office of Nursing Services (ONS) Mental Health Field Advisory Committee (MH-FAC) developed a nursing guide for conducting psychoeducation groups. This was followed up with a complementary live virtual training with "on-demand" features that included discussion and demonstration of nurse-led group implementation strategies. Both products were disseminated to nurse leaders throughout the VHA ONS Web site. Responses to both the guide and video were overwhelmingly positive. This article discusses the importance of nurse-led psychoeducational groups and describes a project implemented by the ONS MH-FAC, which helped provide an essential training to more than 1100 RNs within the Veterans Affairs Health System nationally.

  18. Cooperative learning strategies to teach nutrition to geriatric nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Marta; Rocandio, Ana Ma; Ansotegui, Laura; Pascual, Estíbaliz; Martínez de la Pera, Concepción

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that cooperative learning strategies will help to increase nutrition knowledge of nurses and nursing assistants caring for the elderly in different institutional communities of the Basque Country, Spain. The target population was a sample of volunteers, 16 nurses and 28 nursing assistants. Training consisted of 12 nutrition education sessions using cooperative strategies conducted over a period of 3 consecutive weeks. The assessment instruments included two pretest and two posttest questionnaires with questions selected in multiple-choice format. The first questionnaire was about general knowledge of applied nutrition (0-88 point scale) and the second one on geriatric nutrition knowledge (0-18 point scale). Data were analyzed using SPSS vs. 11.0. The outcomes indicated a significant increase in general nutrition knowledge (difference between the pre- and post-test mean score: 14.5+/-10.1; P<0.001) and in geriatric nutrition knowledge for all participants (difference between the pre- and post-test mean score: 4.6+/-4.6; P<0.001). So the results indicated that cooperative learning strategies could improve the nutrition knowledge of nursing staff. Additionally, the results of this study provide direction to continuing nutrition education program planners regarding appropriate content and methodology for programs.

  19. Knowledge, attitude, and practice about Emergency Contraception among health staff in Bushehr state, south of Iran.

    PubMed

    Najafi-Sharjabad, Fatemeh; Hajivandi, Abdollah; Rayani, Mohammad

    2013-10-12

    Emergency Contraception (EC) is used within a few days of unprotected sex to prevent an unintended pregnancy. About one quarter of pregnancies in south of Iran are unintended. EC is important option that women can use after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure for preventing of unplanned pregnancies and adverse maternal and perinatal health outcomes. Health staff have influence on women's contraceptive behavior and their knowledge and attitudes about EC can affect women's contraceptive behaviors. Data are lacking about the knowledge, attitude and practice of hormonal EC method among health staff in Bushehr state, south of Iran. A cross-sectional study using self administered questionnaire was conducted. A sample of 170 health staff were surveyed. The mean age of respondents was 30.6±5.1. Overall 6.5% of participants had poor knowledge, 25.2% moderate knowledge, 68.3% good knowledge about EC. Half of participants had positive and half had negative attitude towards the EC method. Midwives and family health workers were more knowledgeable (p<0.05) and more frequently counseled women about EC than general practitioners (GPs) (p<0.001). The most cited reason for EC prescriptions were rupture condom and none use of contraception. Our findings showed despite of majority of health staff had good knowledge about EC, their knowledge about the indications for prescription of EC and its side effects was inadequate. The educational efforts for health staff should be focused more on the specific aspects of EC method. GPs also should be more involved in family planning program.

  20. Transforming Spaces and Identities: The Contributions of Professional Staff to Learning Spaces in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2012-01-01

    Staff are a university's key resource. Typically, research has concentrated on the contribution of academic staff, and has largely overlooked the crucial role of professional staff. However, recently there has been an increase in research by professional staff, about professional staff. In Australia, professional staff comprise more than half the…

  1. Evidence-Based Staff Training: A Guide for Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Marsha B.; Rollyson, Jeannia H.; Reid, Dennis H.

    2012-01-01

    Behavior analysts in human service agencies are commonly expected to train support staff as one of their job duties. Traditional staff training is usually didactic in nature and generally has not proven particularly effective. We describe an alternative, evidence-based approach for training performance skills to human service staff. The description includes a specific means of conducting a behavioral skills training session with a group of staff followed by on-the-job training requirements. A brief case demonstration then illustrates application of the training approach and its apparent effectiveness for training staff in two distinct skill sets: use of most-to-least prompting within teaching procedures and use of manual signs. Practical issues associated with applying evidence-based behavioral training are presented with a focus on providing training that is effective, efficient, and acceptable to staff trainees. PMID:23730462

  2. A comparative study of staff removal algorithms.

    PubMed

    Dalitz, Christoph; Droettboom, Michael; Pranzas, Bastian; Fujinaga, Ichiro

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a quantitative comparison of different algorithms for the removal of stafflines from music images. It contains a survey of previously proposed algorithms and suggests a new skeletonization based approach. We define three different error metrics, compare the algorithms with respect to these metrics and measure their robustness with respect to certain image defects. Our test images are computer-generated scores on which we apply various image deformations typically found in real-world data. In addition to modern western music notation our test set also includes historic music notation such as mensural notation and lute tablature. Our general approach and evaluation methodology is not specific to staff removal, but applicable to other segmentation problems as well.

  3. An analysis of obituaries in staff magazines.

    PubMed

    Heynderickx, Priscilla C; Dieltjens, Sylvain M

    2016-01-01

    In the literature, extensive attention is given to the content, structure, and style of obituaries in newspapers. Analyses of the demise of colleagues in internal business communications are however nonexistent. This article discusses a bottom-up analysis of 150 obituaries published in Flemish staff magazines--obituaries that mostly focus on the deceased's career and professional qualities. Following analysis, the data were divided in obituaries that are continuous texts and obituaries with a letter format. The differences between the two types lie at different levels: format, content, structure, and language use. Obituaries with a letter format are characterized and determined by three paradoxes: the sender-receiver paradox, life-death paradox, and happiness-sadness paradox.

  4. G. N. Rassam Joins AGU Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassan N. Rassam joined the AGU staff today, assuming the dual roles of Division Director for Public Information and Marketing and of Special Assistant for Nonprint Publications. He comes to AGU from the American Geological Institute, where he has been chief editor and assistant director of the GeoRef Information System.As Director of Public Information and Marketing, Rassam will head one of AGU's five divisions. He will have under his purview the Public Information Department and the Promotion and Sales Department. The Public Information Department produces Eos and also has the responsibility for press relations, including the preparation of news releases and the operation of press rooms at meetings. These activities are critical to the implementation of AGU's public education and public affairs initiatives, as well as to the central role of AGU in promoting the unity of geophysics.

  5. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

  6. Medical staff appointment and delineation of pediatric privileges in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    The review and verification of credentials and the granting of clinical privileges are required of every hospital to ensure that members of the medical staff are competent and qualified to provide specified levels of patient care. The credentialing process involves the following: (1) assessment of the professional and personal background of each practitioner seeking privileges; (2) assignment of privileges appropriate for the clinician's training and experience; (3) ongoing monitoring of the professional activities of each staff member; and (4) periodic reappointment to the medical staff on the basis of objectively measured performance. We examine the essential elements of a credentials review for initial and renewed medical staff appointments along with suggested criteria for the delineation of clinical privileges. Sample forms for the delineation of privileges can be found on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Hospital Care Web site (http://www.aap.org/visit/cmte19.htm). Because of differences among individual hospitals, no 1 method for credentialing is universally applicable. The medical staff of each hospital must, therefore, establish its own process based on the general principles reviewed in this report. The issues of medical staff membership and credentialing have become very complex, and institutions and medical staffs are vulnerable to legal action. Consequently, it is advisable for hospitals and medical staffs to obtain expert legal advice when medical staff bylaws are constructed or revised.

  7. Measuring work stress among correctional staff: a Rasch measurement approach.

    PubMed

    Higgins, George E; Tewksbury, Richard; Denney, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Today, the amount of stress the correctional staff endures at work is an important issue. Research has addressed this issue, but has yielded no consensus as to a properly calibrated measure of perceptions of work stress for correctional staff. Using data from a non-random sample of correctional staff (n = 228), the Rasch model was used to assess whether a specific measure of work stress would fit the model. Results show that three items rather than six items accurately represented correctional staff perceptions of work stress.

  8. Public Hospital Reform and the Principal Roles of Medical Staff.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiying

    2015-05-01

    During the reform of public hospitals, medical staff's enthusiasm and participation must be mobilized. In the positive factors, such as benefit, power, reputation, humanistic concern and satisfaction evaluation, benefit stands at the core position, power and reputation guides the medical staff's enthusiasm, and humanistic concern and satisfaction evaluation guarantees the enthusiasm of medical staff. By the institutionalized settings of benefit, power, reputation, and other factors, medical staffs of Xuzhou Central Hospital have been effectively mobilized, the development of hospital operates well, and the function of ensuring people health level regionally is further developed.

  9. Staff-family relationships in residential aged care facilities: the views of residents' family members and care staff.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Fetherstonhaugh, Deirdre; Tarzia, Laura; Chenco, Carol

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine staff and family members' perceptions of each other's roles and responsibilities in the Australian residential aged care setting. Data was collected by interview and focus group from 27 staff and 14 family members at five residential aged care facilities in the state of Victoria, Australia. Findings highlight "communication" as the core category supporting the formation of constructive staff-family relationships, as described by three main themes; "building trust," "involvement," and "keeping the family happy." Staff attitudes, mutual cooperation, meaningful engagement, and shared expectations lay the foundation for relationships. Findings suggest that further efforts to establish and sustain good relationships with families are required by facilities. Characteristics, roles, and expectations of staff and family that can both promote and hinder the formation of constructive staff-family relationships are discussed.

  10. Learning from Experience, for Experienced Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; Waring, Burney; Nicholson, Gerry

    2004-01-01

    Business needs in multinational corporations call for courses that involve problem solving and creating and sharing new knowledge based on workplace situations. The courses also need to be engaging for the participants. Blended learning at Shell International Exploration and Production involves these kinds of outcomes in courses designed around a…

  11. [Effects of an intensive therapy program for behaviorally disordered mentally handicapped patients on staff personnel in residential care].

    PubMed

    Elbing, U; Rohmann, U H

    1994-03-01

    This study evaluates the effects of an intensive therapy program designed for mentally handicapped persons with severely disturbed or autistic behavior on their staff personal which had an active role in the program. The staff members rated their professional competence, quality of interaction with the client, team culture and work satisfaction before and after being engaged in the program, with additional ratings of their personal aims at the beginning of the program. Three sets of data were obtained with the program being conducted three times in a row. The testings of the related as well as the independent samples show differentiated program effects. The main effect is an increase of the professional competence and quality of interaction, especially by the qualified staff members. Trainees put emphasis on the development of their personal relationship with the client. The results are discussed in terms of the impact of learning processes specific to the roles of the staff members and motivational factors on learning and therapy outcome, along with institutional conditions influencing successful learning. Thus the program facilitates the professional and interpersonal learning process of staff members in a specific way with success as well as with limitations.

  12. Participation of a preschooler with visual impairments on the playground: effects of musical adaptations and staff development.

    PubMed

    Kern, P; Wolery PhD, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adaptations of a playground, and subsequently staff development, on the participation of a 3-year-old boy with congenital blindness. A single-subject design with three conditions (baseline, adaptations of the playground, and staff development) was used. The playground adaptation involved adding musical stations in strategic locations on the playground and connecting them with a "path" that provided auditory feedback. The staff training involved the music therapist providing individualized instruction to the staff who supervised the child. The child's participation was measured in terms of social interaction with peers or adults, play and engagement with materials, movement on the playground, and stereotypic behaviors. The playground adaptation resulted in no changes in the child's social interactions with peers or adults, increases in engagement, no change in movement on the playground, and a decrease in stereotypic responses. Staff training resulted in increased but variable interactions with adults and peers, in additional increases in engagement, less movement, and similar levels of stereotypic behavior. The findings suggest that musical adaptations of physical environments may he helpful but not sufficient for promoting desired outcomes.

  13. Staff Turnover in Assertive Community Treatment (Act) Teams: The Role of Team Climate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Wholey, Douglas R; Cain, Cindy; Natafgi, Nabil

    2017-03-01

    Staff turnover in Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams can result in interrupted services and diminished support for clients. This paper examines the effect of team climate, defined as team members' shared perceptions of their work environment, on turnover and individual outcomes that mediate the climate-turnover relationship. We focus on two climate dimensions: safety and quality climate and constructive conflict climate. Using survey data collected from 26 ACT teams, our analyses highlight the importance of safety and quality climate in reducing turnover, and job satisfaction as the main mediator linking team climate to turnover. The findings offer practical implications for team management.

  14. Outcomes-Based Funding and Stakeholder Engagement. Lumina Issue Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadlec, Alison; Shelton, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the key aspects of stakeholder engagement that can strengthen the design, implementation and sustainability of outcomes-based funding policies. We seek to help policymakers understand the prevailing starting-point attitudes of institutional stakeholders, primarily college and university administrators, faculty and staff, and…

  15. Learning Outcomes in Higher Education. A Development Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otter, Sue

    A project tested the feasibility of describing learning outcomes in adult/continuing education in ways that could be more clearly understood by three major groups of people--students, teachers, and employers of graduates--and how these could be assessed and accredited. Academic staff explored four different approaches to describing learning…

  16. Impact of unit practice councils on culture and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes positive outcomes in culture, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores, employee engagement, and clinical quality as a result of using shared governance, specifically unit practice councils (UPC) or staff councils, to implement Relationship-Based Care (RBC).

  17. Beacons for Change: An Innovative Outcome Model for Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, John E.; Baker, George A.

    The participatory, outcome-centered model of college governance described in this book focuses on recruitment, rewards, and retention of both students and professional staff. An introduction examines the history and current status of community colleges, presents existing and proposed patterns of administrative and faculty relationships, and…

  18. Model Learner Outcomes for Agriculture/Agribusiness Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    Chapter 1 of this document contains sets of statements adopted by the Minnesota State Board of Education or Minnesota State Legislature. They represent the hierarchy used by Department of Education staff to develop model learner outcomes for each subject area. Contents include learner values, education system values, philosophy of education,…

  19. Multidisciplinary staff attitudes to home haemodialysis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Foden, Philip; Mitra, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: More than a decade after the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommendation of home haemodialysis (home HD) for 10–15% of those needing renal replacement therapy, the uptake across different regions in the UK remains uneven. Methods: This survey is part of the Barriers to Successful Implementation of Care in Home Haemodialysis (BASIC-HHD) study, an observational study of patient and organizational factor barriers and enablers of home HD uptake, in the UK. The study centres had variable prevalence of home HD by design [low: <3% (2), medium: 5–8% (2) and high: >8% (1)]. This survey was administered electronically in 2013, and had 20 questions pertaining to home HD beliefs and practices. A total of 104 members of staff across five study centres were approached to complete the survey. Results: The response rate was 46%, mostly from experienced HD practitioners. Most believed in the benefits of home HD therapy. Across all centres, respondents believed that preconceptions about patients’ and carers’ ability to cope with home HD (35% to a great or very great extent) and staff knowledge and bias influenced offer of home HD therapy (45%). Also, compared with respondents from high prevalence (HP) centre, those from low prevalence (LP) centres felt that display and presentation of dialysis information lacked clarity and uniformity (44% versus 18%), and that a better set-up for training patients for self-care HD was required (72.8% versus 33.3%). A greater proportion of respondents from the HP centre expressed concerns over caregiver support and respite care for patients on home HD (63.7% versus 33.3%). Conclusions: Survey results indicate that across all centres in the study, there is an appetite for growing home HD. There are some differences in attitudes and practice between LP and HP centres. There are other domains where all centres have expressed concern and addressing these will be influential in navigating change

  20. Staff retention and recruitment: "one great department".

    PubMed

    Casady, Wanda M; Dowd, Terry A

    2002-01-01

    The projected demand for healthcare workers during the next ten years has been the impetus for many organizations to develop more creative strategies to ensure adequate staffing levels in the future. In order to keep pace with service demands, the diagnostic imaging department at Valley Lutheran Medical Center (VLMC) in Mesa, Ariz., has been growing as well. Since November of 1999, the number of core FTEs increased from 54.5 to 96. As a result, efforts to retain the current employees became just as critical as efforts to recruit staff for the new positions that were created to support the expanded services. In February 2001, an AHRA seminar was held in Phoenix, which included a day-long session called "Workforce 2001: Recruitment, Selection, Retention of Quality Employees." The presenter, Clint Maun, C.S.P., emphasized the need to provide "passionate orientation" for new employees, encouraged team-based selection of new employees, and reminded the audience that new employees decide within the first three days whether or not they will stay with an organization, regardless of how long it actually takes to leave. Maun also described to the group a model for creating team effort called "One Great Unit" (OGU), which uses a "12-Week Plan" for engaging staff. For the diagnostic imaging department at VLMC, this concept was remodeled so that, instead of focusing on one modality (unit) in the department, the focus was on the whole department. The first step to creating "One Great Department" was to establish an Oversight Committee that would help define the focus of the 12-Week Teams. Five, front-line employees were recruited who represented a cross-section of the imaging department. To assist in the implementation, the director of learning and innovation at VLMC agreed to facilitate the first two meetings. The first 12-Week Team was called together in May 2001. The operational objective addressed was "improving communication inter- and intra-departmentally." Each member

  1. Valuing Professional, Managerial and Administrative Staff in HE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David

    2014-01-01

    The article explores the role of the Registrar (Chief Operating Officer) in a university, and the ways in which we value the contributions of professional, managerial and administrative (PMA) staff. It assesses the conditions in which PMA staff work and describes the professional development opportunities they enjoy. The article goes on to analyse…

  2. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  3. Statewide VTAE Staff Training Needs Assessment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxwell, Sue

    This final report begins with a three-page narrative of a statewide needs assessment of vocational, technical, and adult education (VTAE) instructors and administrators on technical staff training needs in Wisconsin. Statewide composite results for areas of need are presented for eight survey questionnaires sent to staff in these areas: management…

  4. School Libraries: A Systematic Approach to Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptist, Jean; Brown, Gerald R.

    This paper on professional development activities in the Winnipeg (Canada) School Division No. 1 begins with background on population, staffing, and budgeting in the district, a list of principles of effective staff development, and historical perspectives on the division's staff development program from 1962 to 1988. Activities discussed include…

  5. The Joint Staff Officer’s Guide 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    by the joint staff officer. Refer- ences listed in each chapter should be consulted for the most current and accurate proce- dures and policies . Its...high-level policy , command, and staff responsibilities. NWC focuses on national security policy and military strategy and emphasizes a joint and...Primary areas of concentration include business process reengineering, IRM policy , information technology, and acquisition reform. JOINT

  6. Staff and Student Attitudes to Plagiarism at University College Northampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, Jill

    2006-01-01

    University College Northampton (UCN) provides undergraduate and postgraduate courses in a wide range of subjects. In the past, instances of plagiarism were considered rare and were dealt with by academic staff on a case-by-case basis. However, the increase in instances detected by staff has led to a need to address the issue more consistently. The…

  7. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 226 - Official Staff Interpretations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official Staff Interpretations I Supplement I to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Pt. 226, Supp. I Supplement I to Part 226—Official Staff Interpretations Introduction 1. Official...

  8. Moving On: Voluntary Staff Departures at Small Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortegast, Carrie A.; Hamrick, Florence A.

    2009-01-01

    Although voluntary departures are frequent among new professional student affairs staff members at small colleges and universities, there is little systematic study of the processes involved in departing a job at one campus to accept a student affairs position at another. Potentially awkward dynamics surrounding staff departures can complicate…

  9. The Forgotten Workforce: Female General Staff in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Tanya; Allen, Margaret

    1995-01-01

    Data from 10 Australian universities' payrolls indicate that while women constitute a majority of general staff, they are concentrated in lower-level positions. While general staff are more likely than faculty to hold permanent positions, women disproportionately hold nonpermanent jobs, even when age and length of service are controlled.…

  10. Staff and Student Perceptions of Plagiarism and Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty-nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on…

  11. Faculty and Staff: The Weather Radar of Campus Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Patricia; Cofer, James; Austin, Jan L.; Inman, Dean; Martin, Tim; Rook, Steve; Stokes, Tim; Wilkinson, Leah

    1998-01-01

    The campus climate for faculty and staff is one of change and uncertainty. College faculty are varied and bring to their work diverse perspectives. They are challenged to redefine their work, assimilate interdisciplinary and active learning techniques into their repertoires, and deal with a new population of students. Nonteaching staff may find…

  12. Risk Management: Supporting the District's Ancillary Services Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldmann, Steve; Strasburger, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The everyday operations of a school district depend on a network of people, including students, teachers, staff, and administrators. However, the ancillary services staff are really responsible for making the school day run smoothly. They are often the first employees that students see in the morning, either on the school bus or in the cafeteria,…

  13. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, the medical staff may also include other... candidates in accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, and the medical staff bylaws... for use in the periodic appraisal of the distant-site physician or practitioner. At a minimum,...

  14. Delivering Library Services at a Maximum Security Institution: Staff Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Lorraine

    The survey summarized in this report was administered to 54 sample staff members--school teachers, vocational education and shop instructors, corrections officers, counselors, administrators and secretaries, and inmates who hold responsible jobs--at the Connecticut Correctional Institution-Cheshire, to determine the extent to which the staff has…

  15. Attitudes of Spanish University Teaching Staff to Quality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barandiaran-Galdos, Marta; Barrenetxea-Ayesta, Miren; Cardona-Rodriguez, Antonio; Mijangos-Del-Campo, Juan Jose; Olaskoaga-Larrauri, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article sets out to investigate the notions Spanish university teaching staff have of quality in education, on the assumption that those notions give a reliable picture of the attitudes of teaching staff towards education policy design and university management. The paper takes an empirical approach, collecting opinions telematically via a…

  16. Increasing Day Care Staff Members' Interactions during Caregiving Routines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venn, Martha L.; Wolery, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Four paraprofessional staff members in a mainstreamed day care program were trained to engage in positive interactive behaviors during diaper changing. Results indicated that staff increased frequency of game playing and other interactive behaviors during diapering, but increases were not generalized to feeding routines. (Author/JDD)

  17. Personal Sustainability: Listening to Extension Staff and Observing Organizational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forstadt, Leslie; Fortune, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Extension staff are increasingly challenged to do excellent work and balance their lives. University of Maine Cooperative Extension committed to a 2-year participatory action research project to support staff and to an organizational climate that encourages personal sustainability. With tools from ethnography and appreciative inquiry, staff…

  18. Didactic Competencies among Teaching Staff of Universities in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Florah Katanu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the levels and types of didactic competencies that exist among teaching staff in universities in Kenya, giving recognition to curriculum development, pedagogical attributes and quality assurance competencies. The study was carried out in two phases among two samples of the teaching staff population. The first…

  19. Experiences of Australian School Staff in Addressing Student Cannabis Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Peter J.; Norberg, Melissa M.; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis is the most frequently used illicit drug by Australian secondary school students yet there is scant research investigating school staff responses to student cannabis use. As such, this study surveyed 1,692 school staff who attended "Generation Next" seminars throughout Australia. The self-complete survey identified that the…

  20. Engaging Students and Staff with Educational Development through Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadi-Hanifi, Karima; Dagman, Ozlem; Peters, John; Snell, Ellen; Tutton, Caroline; Wright, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Appreciative inquiry (AI) offers a constructive, strengths-based framework for engaging students and staff in the enhancement of academic programmes of study. This paper explores the basis of AI, its potential for educational development and the many agendas it might help address. Students and academic staff involved in an AI project, focused on…

  1. Undergraduate Interns as Staff Developers: Flowers in the Desert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Anne Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate education can be characterised by large lecture classes, lack of quality contact time with staff, and an impersonal experience. There is a move towards encouraging students to learn by enquiry, but how can this be encouraged, given pressures of time on both staff and students? One possible solution is to give the students themselves…

  2. MAN, MEDIA, AND MACHINES--THE TEACHER AND HIS STAFF.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOYCE, BRUCE R.

    AN ORGANIZATIONAL MODEL FOR THE SCHOOL IS PROPOSED, PLACING TEACHERS AT THE CENTER OF THE DECISION-MAKING PROCESS AND PROVIDING THEM WITH A SUPPORTIVE STAFF TO HELP INDIVIDUALIZE EDUCATION. IN THIS MODEL, A DIRECT INSTRUCTION TEAM WORKS WITH A PROFESSIONAL STAFF, WHO ORGANIZE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND PROVIDE CONSULTANT HELP, AT THE…

  3. Issues in Staff Development. A Collection of Conference Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London Univ. (England). Inst. of Education.

    Papers and discussions presented at a British Staff Development in Universities program conference are reported in this collection. Focus was on the role of staff development units, courses and activities concerned with both teaching and administration, and information services. Topics and authors or reporters are: "The Longer Reach," by…

  4. 78 FR 49782 - Interim Staff Guidance on Changes During Construction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... COMMISSION Interim Staff Guidance on Changes During Construction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft interim staff guidance; request for comment. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing this notice for use of, and to solicit public comment on the draft Interim...

  5. 42 CFR 491.8 - Staffing and staff responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Rural health clinic staffs must also include one or more physician's assistants or nurse practitioners... under this section. (3) The physician assistant, nurse practitioner, nurse-midwife, clinical social... one physician assistant or nurse practitioner must be an employee of the clinic. (4) The staff...

  6. Flexible Calendar and Staff Development 1977-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glucksman, Marc

    As part of a continuing assessment of the flexible calendar at El Camino College (California) that provided ten days during the academic year for staff development, two surveys were undertaken in 1977-78. Approximately 750 faculty evaluation questionnaires on staff development, divided into three parts, were distributed to full- and part-time…

  7. 18 CFR 401.85 - Staff and other expert testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staff and other expert testimony. 401.85 Section 401.85 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Administrative and Other Hearings § 401.85 Staff and...

  8. Teaching the Lecturers: Academic Staff Learning about Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northcote, Maria; Reynaud, Daniel; Beamish, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Developing online teaching skills can occur through involvement in learn-by-doing strategies, which incorporates informal, organic or need-driven strategies. Such processes are sometimes labeled as "bottom-up" staff development processes. In other contexts, teaching staff are formally directed to develop online teaching skills through a…

  9. Teachers' Perceptions of an On-Site Staff Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Mary E.; Danielson, Lana M.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' perceptions of how one school district supported and sustained a teacher-led staff development committee's professional development program. In this small, rural school district, teachers regarded as exemplary by their administrators and colleagues were invited to serve on the district's staff development…

  10. 15 CFR 2002.2 - Trade Policy Staff Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trade Policy Staff Committee. 2002.2 Section 2002.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE OPERATION OF COMMITTEES § 2002.2 Trade Policy Staff Committee. (a)...

  11. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy or, when permitted by State law of...

  12. 12 CFR Appendix to Part 535 - Official Staff Commentary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official Staff Commentary Appendix to Part 535 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNFAIR OR DECEPTIVE ACTS OR PRACTICES Pt. 535, App. Appendix to Part 535—Official Staff Commentary Subpart A—General Provisions...

  13. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... first law enforcement staff member to respond to the report shall be required to: (1) Separate the..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  14. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... first law enforcement staff member to respond to the report shall be required to: (1) Separate the..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  15. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... first law enforcement staff member to respond to the report shall be required to: (1) Separate the..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  16. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... medical care provided to patients by the hospital. (a) Standard: Eligibility and process for appointment to medical staff. The medical staff must include doctors of medicine or osteopathy. In accordance... services are furnished to the hospital's patients through an agreement with a distant-site hospital,...

  17. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... medical care provided to patients by the hospital. (a) Standard: Composition of the medical staff. The medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... candidates. (3) When telemedicine services are furnished to the hospital's patients through an agreement...

  18. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... medical care provided to patients by the hospital. (a) Standard: Eligibility and process for appointment to medical staff. The medical staff must include doctors of medicine or osteopathy. In accordance... services are furnished to the hospital's patients through an agreement with a distant-site hospital,...

  19. Staff Ratings of Relocation Risk in Elderly Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusak, Judith M.; And Others

    Patients in long-term care facilities are often moved from one living area to another within an institution. While the staff often consider such moves as part of the daily work load, even intrainstitutional relocation has been observed to have negative consequences for the elderly patient. If staff could identify those patients who might…

  20. 28 CFR 115.361 - Staff and agency reporting duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... incident of sexual abuse or sexual harassment that occurred in a facility, whether or not it is part of the... also require all staff to comply with any applicable mandatory child abuse reporting laws. (c) Apart..., staff shall be prohibited from revealing any information related to a sexual abuse report to...

  1. 28 CFR 115.361 - Staff and agency reporting duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... incident of sexual abuse or sexual harassment that occurred in a facility, whether or not it is part of the... also require all staff to comply with any applicable mandatory child abuse reporting laws. (c) Apart..., staff shall be prohibited from revealing any information related to a sexual abuse report to...

  2. 28 CFR 115.361 - Staff and agency reporting duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... incident of sexual abuse or sexual harassment that occurred in a facility, whether or not it is part of the... also require all staff to comply with any applicable mandatory child abuse reporting laws. (c) Apart..., staff shall be prohibited from revealing any information related to a sexual abuse report to...

  3. Staff Development and Organizational Change. Report 97.03-SR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oromaner, Mark

    Most community colleges are involved in some sort of staff development program and are also undergoing constant change involving restructuring, rightsizing, or developing new missions and objectives. In general, the more institutionalized and integrated a staff development program is, the more effective the organization will be. Organizations are…

  4. The Professional Staff: Two Accounts of Addressing the Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Mary Jo; Wulf, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    Colleges and universities have begun creating a structured employment environment for their professional staff. Questions of the adequacy of grievance procedures, job security, staff reduction, appropriate notice periods, length of probationary status, etc. are being studied. Two approaches are described: the University of Iowa and the University…

  5. Using psychological science to improve summer camp staff training.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Ethan D

    2007-10-01

    Preseason staff training is an exciting and stressful time for all camping professionals. By using principles of developmental psychology, learning theory, and self-monitoring, however, we can maximize the usefulness of training sessions. This article also discusses educating staff about children's mental health issues and managing challenging situations with adolescents.

  6. Staff Prescription Medication: Safety and Privacy Concerns. A Roundtable Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marugg Mary; Erceg, Linda Ebner; Weinberg, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Staff medications, except for time-critical medications, should be kept at the camp health center, separate from camper medications. Medication use should be documented, with efforts to insure confidentiality. Staff should be able to access their own medications unless they are controlled substances. Medication policies should be explained to…

  7. Staff Training in a Clinical Setting. Volume II, Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangs, Tina E.

    Provided is the script for a presentation of 16 slides on staff training, orientation, and role in a clinical setting providing educational programs for the preschool and primary grade handicapped child. The sixteen slide commentaries cover an introduction to principles and implementation of a staff training program in a clinical setting, staff…

  8. 20 CFR 632.40 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative staff and personnel standards. 632.40 Section 632.40 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR....40 Administrative staff and personnel standards. (a) Staffing. Members of the population to be...

  9. Invisible asset: the PDA staff is motivated and hardworking.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, H

    1990-04-01

    This article describes the able leadership and hard working staff of the Population and Community Development Association (PDA), a non-profit organization (NGO) striving to improve the conditions of the economically disadvantaged in Thailand. Visitors to the PDA receive a warm welcome and are promptly attended by a cheerful staff. They are not only committed to the idea of social work for the benefit of the disadvantaged, they also process a strong educational background. The staff derives inspiration from its leader, PDA founder and current Secretary General Mechai Viravaidya. When PDA was begun in 1974, it almost entirely on international agencies for its budget. But Viravaidya has steered PDA towards becoming more self-reliant, so that one day it will no longer have to depend on donor agencies. The Secretary General has also worked to improve the living conditions of the PDA staff itself; the organization now enjoys one of the highest salary levels of any NGO in Thailand and staff security. Another reason for the high degree of motivation among PDA's staff is the organization's decentralized approach towards community development. Individuals are allowed to take initiatives and implement new programs. But the staff is quick to point out that PDA does not tell villagers what to do, but respects their opinions. The goal of PDA is to a assist communities in surveying, planning, implementing, and monitoring developing programs. And this partnership has led villagers to trust the PDA staff.

  10. Internal Communication: Staff and Supervisory Roles. SPEC Kit 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    Based on a spring 1979 survey on communication in Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions, this Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) kit focuses on upward communication from staff to administration by looking at individual responsibilities of staff members and supervisors. Results indicate that the two most commonly…

  11. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  12. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  13. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  14. Supervising Staff in Student Affairs: Exploration of the Synergistic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Sue A.; Cooper, Diane L.; Winston, Roger B., Jr.; Chernow, Erin

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development andexplores the validity of the Synergistic Supervision Scale (SSS), which measures the extent to which staff perceive that their supervisor focuses on the advancement of the institutional mission and the personal and professional advancement of staff. Results indicate that synergistic supervision seems to be a valid…

  15. Knowing Me, Knowing You: Professional Development for Support Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulbeck, Joy

    2009-01-01

    Meeting the challenges of delivering a 21st-century curriculum and a world-class quality education ultimately depends on the willingness of the staff on the ground to give 100% effort to their jobs. Although many people in schools work very hard, some staff members are way down on the scale with regard to performance. All too often, a significant…

  16. Adult Basic Education Staff Development: 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clasen, Sherwood W., Ed.; And Others

    The pamphlet contains seven articles describing some of the in-service activities and stating conclusions reached in an adult basic education (ABE) staff development project in Minnesota. The purpose of the project was to establish a permanent delivery system for staff development at the local and State levels. Article titles and authors are:…

  17. Identification of Domains for Malaysian University Staff Happiness Index Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yassin, Sulaiman Md.

    2014-01-01

    Without any doubt happiness among staff in any organization is pertinent to ensure continued growth and development. However, not many studies were carried out to determine the domains that will be able to measure the level of happiness among staff in universities. Thus, the aim of this study is to elicit the domains that explain the overall…

  18. School Climate for Gay and Lesbian Students and Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John D.

    1994-01-01

    In high schools, a conspiracy of silence shrouds the sexual orientation issue. Although the social atmosphere is vaguely supportive, fear and the realities of life cause most gays and lesbians to keep their sexual identities hidden. Homophobia can be addressed through staff development, support staff and services, inclusion of homosexual issues in…

  19. 10 CFR 52.143 - Staff approval of design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the design in the form of a report available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov. ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Staff approval of design. 52.143 Section 52.143 Energy... Standard Design Approvals § 52.143 Staff approval of design. Upon completion of its review of a...

  20. 10 CFR 52.143 - Staff approval of design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the design in the form of a report available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov. ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Staff approval of design. 52.143 Section 52.143 Energy... Standard Design Approvals § 52.143 Staff approval of design. Upon completion of its review of a...

  1. 42 CFR 491.8 - Staffing and staff responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... physician assistant and the nurse practitioner members of the clinic's or center's staff: (i) Participate in... 491.8 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... center, or may furnish services under contract to the center. (4) The staff may also include...

  2. Involvement of Professional Staff in Conducting an Organizational Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibodeau, Janice A.; Vance, Carmen L.

    1986-01-01

    An organizational study of the residential life staff shows responses on time, personal and physical space, and motivation and morale. Provides a systematic, objective database upon which to develop departmental objectives and priorities. Affords staff the opportunity to further develop research skills and to work on team-building skills.…

  3. Practical Staff Management Techniques for Distance Education Coordinators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toccara D.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the author's enrollment in the SuccessfUL Supervisor Series course. As a new distance education library coordinator the author sought out formal supervisor training to address staff misconduct and establish staff training initiatives for distance library service needs. Structured as a case study, the author discusses how…

  4. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 230 - Official Staff Interpretations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Official Staff Interpretations I Supplement I to Part 230 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) Pt. 230, Supp. I Supplement I to Part 230—Official Staff Interpretations Introduction...

  5. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 230 - Official Staff Interpretations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official Staff Interpretations I Supplement I to Part 230 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) Pt. 230, Supp. I Supplement I to Part 230—Official Staff Interpretations Introduction 1. Official...

  6. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 230 - Official Staff Interpretations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Official Staff Interpretations I Supplement I to Part 230 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) Pt. 230, Supp. I Supplement I to Part 230—Official Staff Interpretations Introduction...

  7. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 230 - Official Staff Interpretations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Official Staff Interpretations I Supplement I to Part 230 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) Pt. 230, Supp. I Supplement I to Part 230—Official Staff Interpretations Introduction...

  8. Staff Efficiency Trends Among Pediatric Hospices, 2002–2011

    PubMed Central

    Cozad, Melanie J.; Lindley, Lisa C.; Mixer, Sandra J.

    2016-01-01

    Delivering care for children at end of life often takes considerable time and effort by the hospice staff. The purpose of this study was to examine trends in staff technical efficiency among California pediatric hospice providers from 2002 and 2011. PMID:27265950

  9. 10 CFR 52.143 - Staff approval of design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff approval of design. 52.143 Section 52.143 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Standard Design Approvals § 52.143 Staff approval of design. Upon completion of its review of a...

  10. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  11. Keeping Children Safe: Afterschool Staff and Mandated Child Maltreatment Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandarilla, Maria; O'Donnell, Julie

    2014-01-01

    With 8.4 million children in the U.S. spending an average of eight hours a week in afterschool programs, afterschool providers are an important part of the network of caring adults who can help to keep children safe. In addition, afterschool staff are "mandated reporters." Whether or not the laws specifically mention afterschool staff,…

  12. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  13. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  14. Different Spaces: Staff Development for Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samarawickrema, Gayani; Benson, Robyn; Brack, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative staff development activity run across two Australian universities, for academic staff integrating Web 2.0 technologies into their teaching. It describes a three-week long virtual workshop on teaching with wikis, where participants in two groups developed a group project as students and then assessed the work…

  15. The Recruitment of Support Staff in Tanzanian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwaisumo, William Nathan

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the meaning, classification and types of support staff, their contributions towards conducive teaching and learning environments, conditions required/attributes required for support staff to be employed in temporally or permanent terms. It further identifies current situations and challenges in recruitment and recruited…

  16. Collective Bargaining and Staff Salaries in American Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaff, Daniel B.; Ehrenberg, Ronald G.

    2003-01-01

    Data on employees in 168 colleges and universities were analyzed using collective bargaining coverage as an exogenous variable. Union-covered staff enjoyed a 9-11% salary premium. The union/nonunion differential was larger in two-year than four-year institutions, with no public-private differences. Where faculty were union covered, staff had an…

  17. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602... System employed in an area office will be referred to as the area office staff....

  18. Staff corridor (room 206, representing rooms 301, 305, 401, 405, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Staff corridor (room 206, representing rooms 301, 305, 401, 405, 501, and 505), looking south towards the staff corridor vestibule (room 206A, representing rooms 305A, 405A, and 505A). - California State Office Building No. 1, 915 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. Getting into the System: The Physician's Staff and Waiting Room

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This article represents a panel discussion with the staff of the Family Practice Unit at the Plains Health Centre, Regina, Sask. It outlines those things found helpful in presenting a positive image to the patient by a physician and his staff - telephone contacts, waiting rooms, patient flow, and common complaints. PMID:21308056

  20. Simulation-based training improves ITU staff knowledge in the management of head injuries.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew; Jankowski, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the polytrauma situation is a phenomenon often seen at UK hospitals. Without immediate access to dedicated neurocritical care facilities, the potential for under-treatment of the underlying brain injury and serious neurological sequalae is high, especially if staff on the general intensive care units on which these patients are treated lack confidence in this area of practice, a reality confirmed by our baseline study. We found that by engaging staff by implementing a regular simulation-based team training programme, we were able to boost the skills, knowledge, and ultimately confidence levels in treating TBI amongst these groups of staff. "Buy-in" by those concerned was high, and we found that self-reported scores for the attributes described above were improved considerably and consistently by our intervention. This quality improvement project has been rolled out through several iterations to become sustainable, has significant cost-saving potential, and will hopefully lead to proven improved clinical outcomes for this group of patients.

  1. Identifying medical-surgical nursing staff perceptions of the drug-abusing patient.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Stacy L; Stone, Wendy L; Burleson, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    Nurses report a negative, stereotypical, and moralistic view of substance-abusing patients. Unaddressed bias may impede delivery of quality care. There is limited research of the needs specific to medical-surgical nursing staff interacting with substance-abusing patients. Nursing therapeutic commitment refers to the degree the nurse feels prepared with an adequate knowledge base, professional support, and personal ownership of a patient condition. Low therapeutic commitment correlates with job dissatisfaction. The Drug and Drug Problems Perceptions Questionnaire assesses healthcare provider attitude and therapeutic commitment to patients using or abusing medication or illicit substances. This therapeutic commitment survey serves as a staff needs assessment for a targeted educational innovation. The results show that the medical and surgical nursing staff has a constructive attitude and a moderately high degree of therapeutic commitment to the drug-abusing patient population, similar to more specialized multidisciplinary, mental healthcare workers. This study showed that medical-surgical nurses feel professionally responsible and clinically supported with patients with primary or comorbid drug abuse. Consistent with established results, focused and ongoing education on the risk factors, outcomes, and physical and psychological effects of illicit substances is necessary to improve therapeutic commitment to drug-dependent patients.

  2. The State of Higher Education for STEM LGBTQQ Faculty/Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Susan

    2012-02-01

    It has long been understood---an understanding that has been well supported by research-based evidence---that institutional ``climate'' has a profound effect on any academic community's ability to carry out its tripartite mission of teaching, research, and service (Bauer, 1996; Boyer, 1990; Peterson & Spencer, 1990; Rankin, 1998; 2003; 2010; Rankin & Reason, 2008; Tierney & Dilley, 1996). With the acknowledgment that institutions differ in the level of attention and emphasis on issues campus climate, it is safe to say that a campus climate offering equitable learning opportunities for all students, academic freedom for all faculty, and fairness in employment for all staff and administrators is one of the primary responsibilities of institutions of higher education. The research also suggests that a challenging campus climate exists for LGBTQQ students, faculty and staff. Based on the literature, a challenging climate leads to decreased productivity, decreased sense of value to the community, decreased retention, and negatively influences educational outcomes (Settles, et al. 2006; Trower & Chait (2002); Pascrell & Terenzini, 2005; Whitt, Edison, Pascarella, Terenzini, & Nora, 2001). Little is available in the literature on LGBTQQ faculty in the STEM fields. This program will engage participants in a review of the results of the 2010 project with regard to the experiences of LGBTQQ faculty and staff in the STEM fields.

  3. Snake and staff symbolism, and healing.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2002-07-01

    Since time immemorial the snake has been venerated as an enigmatic creature with supernatural powers. As a snake and staff symbol it is also traditionally associated with the healing arts, either as the single-snake emblem of Asklepios, or as the double-snake emblem (caduceus) of Hermes. The mythological basis for this symbolism is reviewed. The Asklepian emblem has been associated with health care since the 5th century BC, when Asklepios became accepted by the Greeks as the god of healing. Whether he was also an historical figure as healer in earlier ages is less certain. The origin of the double-snake emblem is shrouded in the mists of antiquity. In classical times it became the herald's wand of Hermes, messenger of the gods who guided departed souls to the underworld, and was seen as protector of travellers, shepherds and merchants. In the latter capacity Hermes also conveyed a negative connotation as protector of thieves. During the Middle Ages the caduceus became a symbol of the healing sciences (pharmacy and alchemy in particular), and today, although mythologically incorrect, it is in common usage in the health care field.

  4. Scheduling IT staff at a bank: a mathematical programming approach.

    PubMed

    Labidi, M; Mrad, M; Gharbi, A; Louly, M A

    2014-01-01

    We address a real-world optimization problem: the scheduling of a Bank Information Technologies (IT) staff. This problem can be defined as the process of constructing optimized work schedules for staff. In a general sense, it requires the allocation of suitably qualified staff to specific shifts to meet the demands for services of an organization while observing workplace regulations and attempting to satisfy individual work preferences. A monthly shift schedule is prepared to determine the shift duties of each staff considering shift coverage requirements, seniority-based workload rules, and staff work preferences. Due to the large number of conflicting constraints, a multiobjective programming model has been proposed to automate the schedule generation process. The suggested mathematical model has been implemented using Lingo software. The results indicate that high quality solutions can be obtained within a few seconds compared to the manually prepared schedules.

  5. An intervention to enhance nursing staff teamwork and engagement.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Curley, Millie; Stefanov, Susan

    2007-02-01

    Numerous studies have concluded that work group teamwork leads to higher staff job satisfaction, increased patient safety, improved quality of care, and greater patient satisfaction. Although there have been studies on the impact of multidisciplinary teamwork in healthcare, the teamwork among nursing staff on a patient care unit has received very little attention from researchers. In this study, an intervention to enhance teamwork and staff engagement was tested on a medical unit in an acute care hospital. The results showed that the intervention resulted in a significantly lower patient fall rate, staff ratings of improved teamwork on the unit, and lower staff turnover and vacancy rates. Patient satisfaction ratings approached, but did not reach, statistical significance.

  6. Scheduling IT Staff at a Bank: A Mathematical Programming Approach

    PubMed Central

    Labidi, M.; Mrad, M.; Gharbi, A.; Louly, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We address a real-world optimization problem: the scheduling of a Bank Information Technologies (IT) staff. This problem can be defined as the process of constructing optimized work schedules for staff. In a general sense, it requires the allocation of suitably qualified staff to specific shifts to meet the demands for services of an organization while observing workplace regulations and attempting to satisfy individual work preferences. A monthly shift schedule is prepared to determine the shift duties of each staff considering shift coverage requirements, seniority-based workload rules, and staff work preferences. Due to the large number of conflicting constraints, a multiobjective programming model has been proposed to automate the schedule generation process. The suggested mathematical model has been implemented using Lingo software. The results indicate that high quality solutions can be obtained within a few seconds compared to the manually prepared schedules. PMID:24772032

  7. State legislative staff influence in health policy making.

    PubMed

    Weissert, C S; Weissert, W G

    2000-12-01

    State legislative staff may influence health policy by gathering intelligence, setting the agenda, and shaping the legislative proposals. But they may also be stymied in their roles by such institutional constraints as hiring practices and by turnover in committee leadership in the legislature. The intervening variable of trust between legislators and their support staff is also key to understanding influence and helps explain how staff-legislator relationships play an important role in designing state health policy. This study of legislative fiscal and health policy committee staff uses data from interviews with key actors in five states to model the factors important in explaining variation in the influence of committee staff on health policy.

  8. Nursing staff's understanding expressions of people with advanced dementia disease.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Thomas; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Norberg, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    People with advanced dementia disease (ADD) are known to have communication difficulties and thus it presents a challenge in understanding the expressions of these people. Because successful communication presupposes cooperation at least between 2 individuals, both individual's actions must be acknowledged. The aim of this study is to describe nursing staff's ways of understanding the expressions of people with ADD when communicating with them. Interviews from 8 nursing staff were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes were constructed: "Being in communication" and "Doing communication." Being in communication means that nursing staff perceive people with ADD as being capable of communication. Doing communication means that nursing staff attempt different individualized strategies to understand what people with ADD communicate. Good care of people with ADD presupposes nursing staff that are willing and able to relate to other people and to maintain good care for people with ADD continuous education and supervision are needed.

  9. Supporting relationships between family and staff in continuing care settings.

    PubMed

    Austin, Wendy; Goble, Erika; Strang, Vicki; Mitchell, Agnes; Thompson, Elizabeth; Lantz, Helen; Balt, Linda; Lemermeyer, Gillian; Vass, Kelly

    2009-08-01

    In this Canadian study, a participatory action research approach was used to examine the relationships between families of residents of traditional continuing care facilities and the health care team. The objectives were to (a) explore the formation and maintenance of family-staff relationships, with attention paid to the relational elements of engagement and mutual respect; (b) explore family and staff perspectives of environmental supports and constraints; and (c) identify practical ways to support and enhance these relationships. Results indicate that the resource-constrained context of continuing care has directly impacted family and staff relationships. The nature of these relationships are discussed using the themes of "Everybody Knows Your Name," "Loss and Laundry," "It's the Little Things That Count," and "The Chasm of Us Versus Them." Families' and staff's ideas of behaviors that support or undermine relationships are identified, as are concrete suggestions for improving family- staff relationships in traditional continuing care settings in Canada.

  10. The Mobile Library and Staff Preparedness: Exploring Staff Competencies Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saravani, Sarah-Jane; Haddow, Gaby

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings of a study investigating the current state of preparedness of staff at institutes of technology and TAFE libraries across Australia and New Zealand in relation to delivering services through mobile technologies. In particular, the skills, knowledge, and competencies of staff in relation to mobile…

  11. Nonprofit Organizations and Outcome Measurement: From Tracking Program Activities to Focusing on Frontline Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Lehn M.

    2012-01-01

    Why do we continue to see evidence that nonprofit staff feel like outcome measurement is missing important aspects of their work? Based on an analysis of over 1,000 pages of material in 10 outcome measurement guides and a focused literature review of frontline work in three types of nonprofit organizations, this article shows that existing outcome…

  12. Exploring Locality: The Impact of Context on Indigenous Vocational Education and Training Aspirations and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelade, Susan; Stehlik, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The impact of urban, regional, and remote location on Indigenous vocational education and training (VET) students' aspirations and outcomes is examined in this report. It finds the availability of desired courses, teaching staff, and community attitudes to learning in the various locations influence the success of outcomes of Indigenous students.…

  13. Hospice in the Nursing Home: Perspectives of Front Line Nursing Home Staff

    PubMed Central

    Unroe, Kathleen T.; Cagle, John G.; Dennis, M. E.; Lane, Kathleen A.; Callahan, Christopher M.; Miller, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Use of hospice has been associated with improved outcomes for nursing home residents and attitudes of nursing home staff towards hospice influences hospice referral. The objective of this study is to describe attitudes of certified nursing assistants (CNAs), nurses, and social workers towards hospice care in nursing homes. Design, Setting and Participants We conducted a survey of 1,859 staff from 52 Indiana nursing homes. Measurements Study data include responses to 6 scaled questions and 3 open-ended qualitative prompts. In addition, respondents who cared for a resident on hospice in the nursing home were asked how often hospice: 1) makes their job easier; 2) is responsive when a patient has symptoms or is actively dying; 3) makes care coordination smooth; 4) is needed; 5) taught them something; 6) is appreciated by patients/families. Responses were dichotomized as always/often or sometimes/never. Results 1229 surveys met criteria for inclusion. Of respondents, 48% were CNAs, 49% were nurses, and 3% were social workers; 83% reported caring for a nursing home patient on hospice. The statement with the highest proportion of always/often rating was ‘patient/family appreciate added care’ (84%); the lowest was ‘hospice makes my job easier’ (54%). More social workers responded favorably regarding hospice responsiveness and coordination of care compared with CNAs (p=.03 and p=.05 respectively). Conclusion A majority of staff responded favorably regarding hospice care in nursing homes. About 1/3 of nursing home staff rated coordination of care lower than other aspects, and many qualitative comments highlighted examples of when hospice was not responsive to patient needs, representing important opportunities for improvement. PMID:25239013

  14. "Being There": The Experiences of Staff in Dealing with Matters of Dying and Death in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research on staffed housing for people with intellectual disability has identified the challenges in achieving positive quality of life outcomes. However, a less well considered dimension of such services is that they are places of living and dying. This paper looks at the experiences of staff in dealing with issues of death and dying.…

  15. An Evaluation of the Napa County Office of Education's Follow Through Staff Development Effort to Increase Student Learning Time and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Jane A.

    This report assesses the effectiveness of the Napa County (California) Instructional Skills Staff Development Program, focusing on its impact on student achievement and student engaged rate in classrooms. The program, providing training for teachers and principals in administrative and instructional skills, is examined for outcomes in two schools,…

  16. Collaborating with Staff: Sharing a Common Philosophy, Working To Achieve Common Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzman, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    A well-understood camp philosophy motivates the entire staff to work toward a common purpose, which is more meaningful than money. Camp administrators can ensure that staff members implement the camp philosophy by interviewing prospective staff members with the mission in mind, teaching staff the camp's vision, praising staff with specifics,…

  17. Do K-12 School Facilities Affect Education Outcomes? Staff Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ed; Green, Harry A.; Roehrich-Patrick, Lynnisse; Joseph, Linda; Gibson, Teresa

    This report explains that there is growing evidence of a correlation between the adequacy of a school facility and student behavior and performance. In general, students attending school in newer, betterfacilities score 5 to 17 points higher on standardized tests than those attending in substandard buildings. School facility factors such as…

  18. Education and training to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Sally; Powell, Tom; Coles, Bernadette; Hale, Rachel; Gould, Dinah

    2016-01-01

    Background The delivery of end-of-life care in nursing homes is challenging. This situation is of concern as 20% of the population die in this setting. Commonly reported reasons include limited access to medical care, inadequate clinical leadership and poor communication between nursing home and medical staff. Education for nursing home staff is suggested as the most important way of overcoming these obstacles. Objectives To identify educational interventions to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff and to identify types of study designs and outcomes to indicate success and benchmark interventions against recent international guidelines for education for palliative and end-of-life care. Design Thirteen databases and reference lists of key journals were searched from the inception of each up to September 2014. Included studies were appraised for quality and data were synthesised thematically. Results Twenty-one studies were reviewed. Methodological quality was poor. Education was not of a standard that could be expected to alter clinical behaviour and was evaluated mainly from the perspectives of staff: self-reported increase in knowledge, skills and confidence delivering care rather than direct evidence of impact on clinical practice and patient outcomes. Follow-up was often short term, and despite sound economic arguments for delivering effective end-of-life care to reduce burden on the health service, no economic analyses were reported. Conclusions There is a clear and urgent need to design educational interventions that have the potential to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. Robust evaluation of these interventions should include impact on residents, families and staff and include economic analysis. PMID:27329513

  19. Peer coaching: the next step in staff development.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Donna L; Dunn, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    A common problem in continuing nursing education and staff development is the transfer of learning to clinical practice. Peer coaching offers a solution to this problem. Initiated by educators, peer coaching has been researched in educational settings and found to be effective in facilitating the transfer of newly acquired knowledge and skill into classroom teaching strategies. This article describes the background, components, process, characteristics, and benefits of peer coaching. A specific example of using peer coaching to teach clinical breast examination skills is used to illustrate the application of peer coaching to the staff development of healthcare professionals. Peer coaching is the next step in nursing staff development.

  20. Staff perceptions of caring: the importance of a supportive environment.

    PubMed

    Sikma, Suzanne K

    2006-06-01

    Five themes of caring interventions emerged from the perspective of staff caregivers-valuing personhood and the work, belonging, knowing, acting together, and promoting quality. Three themes of caring organizational conditions identified by participants included communicating, providing resources, and trusting. The research-based Model of Caring in the Organizational Environment can be used to assess and improve the caring environment of nursing homes as well as to develop caring managers and staff. Organizational well-being for nursing homes is everyone's responsibility and requires formal and informal leaders who can create supportive caring organizational conditions, engage in caring interventions with staff, and inspire the synergy of caring.

  1. PEL Staff Together for the First Time | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer John-Paul Denson and Troy Taylor of the Protein Expression Laboratory (PEL) used to pack liters of Escherichia coli lysates on ice, put them in the back of a microvan, and drive across campus to deliver the samples for protein purification. Now that all PEL staff members are working under the same roof at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), transferring samples is just a walk down the hall. Staff members were previously spread out in five buildings across the Fort Detrick campus.

  2. Job satisfaction and associated factors among healthcare staff: a cross-sectional study in Guangdong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Min; Huang, Xiao-Liang; Zhuang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Pi; Feng, Li-Fen; Hu, Wei; Chen, Long; Hao, Yuan-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This cross-sectional study aimed to explore job satisfaction among healthcare staff in Guangdong following the health system reforms in 2009, and to investigate the association between job satisfaction and work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting The Fifth National Health Service Survey was carried out in Guangdong, China. Participants All participants in this study were healthcare staff including physicians, nurses and public health staff from hospitals, health service centres and health clinics. A total of 6583 questionnaires were distributed and collected. After excluding the incomplete questionnaires, 5845 questionnaires were included for the analysis. Outcome measures Sociodemographic information and scores for evaluating job satisfaction, work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship were obtained using the questionnaire developed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China. To assess the significantly associated factors on job satisfaction of the healthcare staff in Guangdong, a binary logistic regression model was used. Results Based on the 5845 valid responses of the healthcare staff who worked in Guangdong, the mean score of overall perception of job satisfaction was 3.99 on a scale of 1–6. Among the sociodemographic variables, occupation, educational background, professional status, years of service, annual income and night shift frequency significantly influenced the level of job satisfaction. Work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship also had significant effect on job satisfaction. Conclusions The overall job satisfaction exceeded slightly dissatisfied (score 3) and approached slightly satisfied (score 4). Measures to enhance job satisfaction include the reduction of workload, increase of welfare, maintaining moderate stress and balancing work–family conflict. Moreover

  3. Moral distress in nursing: contributing factors, outcomes and interventions.

    PubMed

    Burston, Adam S; Tuckett, Anthony G

    2013-05-01

    Moral distress has been widely reviewed across many care contexts and among a range of disciplines. Interest in this area has produced a plethora of studies, commentary and critique. An overview of the literature around moral distress reveals a commonality about factors contributing to moral distress, the attendant outcomes of this distress and a core set of interventions recommended to address these. Interventions at both personal and organizational levels have been proposed. The relevance of this overview resides in the implications moral distress has on the nurse and the nursing workforce: particularly in regard to quality of care, diminished workplace satisfaction and physical health of staff and increased problems with staff retention.

  4. 78 FR 22418 - Reassignment of Commission Staff Responsibilities and Delegations of Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... Commission Staff Responsibilities and Delegations of Authority AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission... responsibilities, including delegations of authority, resulting from its recent reorganization of Commission staff... reassigned its staff and responsibilities to the newly established Division of Swap Dealer and...

  5. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers at a public teaching and national referral hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Makori, L.; Gikera, M.; Wafula, J.; Chakaya, J.; Edginton, M. E.; Kumar, A. M. V.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), Nairobi, Ken-ya, a large referral and teaching hospital. Objective: 1) To document tuberculosis (TB) case notification rates and trends; 2) to describe demographic, clinical and workplace characteristics and treatment outcomes; and 3) to examine associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome) treatment and anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers with TB at KNH during the period 2006–2011. Design: A retrospective cohort study involving a review of medical records. Results: The TB case notification rate among hospital staff ranged between 413 and 901 per 100 000 staff members per year; 51% of all cases were extra-pulmonary TB; 74% of all cases were among medical, paramedical and support staff. The TB-HIV coinfection rate was 60%. Only 75% had a successful treatment outcome. Patients in the retreatment category, those with unknown HIV status and those who were support staff had a higher risk of poor treatment outcomes. Conclusion: The TB case rate among hospital workers was unacceptably high compared to that of the general population, and treatment outcomes were poor. Infection control in the hospital and management of staff with TB requires urgent attention. PMID:26393055

  6. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  7. House Staff Salaries: An Analysis of Interinstitutional and Longitudinal Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Dennis D.; Crane, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Analyses suggested that house staff salaries are becoming more homogenous across time, although significant interinstitutional differences are related to location, affiliation pattern, ownership, number of house officers employed, number of approved training programs, and percentage of available positions filled. (Editor)

  8. ASA24® Instructions for Study Staff & Respondents

    Cancer.gov

    The following documents have been created by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as resources for study staff and Respondents. Each resource is available as a ready-to-use PDF to allow users to adapt the content as desired.

  9. Staff Development and Professional Education: A Cooperative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browell, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Describes a cooperative approach to faculty development between competing further and higher education institutions and the relationship between the institutions and a professional organization. Outlines the benefits of cooperation for staff, students, and professional organizations. (SK)

  10. 77 FR 69450 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... ER13-105-000 Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company. ER13-120-000 Avista Corporation ER13-93-000 Avista... staff will attend a meeting conducted by representatives of WestConnect, ColumbiaGrid, Northern...

  11. Staff Meetings: An Opportunity for Accelerated Training of Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattison, Sherry A.

    2001-01-01

    Accelerated learning techniques for training incorporated into staff meetings were designed to address different learning styles and modalities. The use of experiential games and multisensory whole-brain approaches was engaging and motivating. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  12. The Impact of a Staff Development Offering on Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foglesong, Dianne H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a problem-focused audit used to measure the impact of a staff development offering on pain relief. Concludes that the audit provided concrete evidence that the class on pain did influence nursing practice and affected patients directly. (NRJ)

  13. Staff Development and Instructional Improvement: Response to Robbins and Wolfe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    1987-01-01

    Critiques the Napa/Vacaville project for being exceptionally well designed yet being ineffective. The key to effective staff development is to find ways of increasing teachers' ability to accept innovations and incorporate them into their teaching repertoires. (MD)

  14. Staff Development in Reading: What the Experts Say.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacca, Jo Anne

    1979-01-01

    Presents interviews of six prominent researchers (Ira Aaron, Harold Herber, Wayne Otto, Robert Ruddell, Roselmina Indrisano, and Olive Niles), which focused on the dynamics constituting effective staff development experiences. (HOD)

  15. Principals Can Increase Leadership Effectiveness by Knowing Staff Personalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberds-Baxter, Sharon

    1986-01-01

    An essential ingredient of good school administrators is understanding the differences among people. Provides a simplified outline of Carl Jung's typology of personality differences to provide administrators a better understanding of staff behavior. (MD)

  16. Staff confidence in dealing with aggressive patients: a benchmarking exercise.

    PubMed

    McGowan, S; Wynaden, D; Harding, N; Yassine, A; Parker, J

    1999-09-01

    Interacting with potentially aggressive patients is a common occurrence for nurses working in psychiatric intensive care units. Although the literature highlights the need to educate staff in the prevention and management of aggression, often little, or no, training is provided by employers. This article describes a benchmarking exercise conducted in psychiatric intensive care units at two Western Australian hospitals to assess staff confidence in coping with patient aggression. Results demonstrated that staff in the hospital where regular training was undertaken were significantly more confident in dealing with aggression. Following the completion of a safe physical restraint module at the other hospital staff reported a significant increase in their level of confidence that either matched or bettered the results of their benchmark colleagues.

  17. Staff Expectations for Disabled Persons: Helpful and Harmful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Nancy

    1970-01-01

    The social psychological environment of hospitals or rehabilitation centers is described and suggestions are offered for research that would help to increase the understanding of the staff toward the patient. (Author)

  18. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey CFA Staff, Photographer, 1972 FIRST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey CFA Staff, Photographer, 1972 FIRST- SECOND- FLOOR PLAN J. L. S. Jennings, Jr., Delineator - Edward H. Everett House, 1606 Twenty-third Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Excel-based scheduling for reallocation of nursing staff.

    PubMed

    2016-10-19

    Outi Annelli Tuominen and colleagues write in Nursing Management about the use of an Excel-based scheduling system for reallocation of nursing staff, which was trialled on ward managers and assistant ward managers.

  20. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, 1971 Photocopy of Architects' Drawing, 1906 Filed with Permit #825 FRONT ELEVATION - Clarence Moore House, 1746 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ca. 1971 Photocopy of Drawings by Bruce Price & de Sibour, 1908 MARQUISE DRAWINGS: SECTION AND ELEVATION - Clarence Moore House, 1746 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. Negotiating autism: relations between parents and treatment staff.

    PubMed

    Gray, D E

    1993-04-01

    This study examines the relationship between parents of autistic children and the treatment centre staff at a state autistic association. There are three main points of disagreement between parents and staff including: the prospect of a cure, the nature of the child's affection, and the uniqueness of the child and how this is related to the possibility of institutionalisation. The nature of these disagreements, and the means by which they are negotiated, are examined and discussed.

  3. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  4. An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Work Environment Variables on Job Satisfaction Among Chinese Prison Staff.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shanhe; Lambert, Eric G; Liu, Jianhong; Zhang, Jinwu

    2017-02-01

    Job satisfaction has been linked to many positive outcomes, such as greater work performance, increased organizational commitment, reduced job burnout, decreased absenteeism, and lower turnover intent/turnover. A substantial body of research has examined how work environment variables are linked to job satisfaction among U.S. correctional staff; far less research has examined prison staff in non-Western nations, especially China. Using survey data collected from two prisons in Guangzhou, China, this study investigated the level of job satisfaction among prison staff and how personal characteristics (i.e., gender, tenure, age, and educational level) and work environment variables (i.e., perceived dangerousness of the job, job variety, supervision, instrumental communication, and input into decision making) affect job satisfaction. The findings from ordinary least squares regression equations indicated that the work environment variables explained a greater proportion of the variance in the job satisfaction measure than the personal characteristics. In the full multivariate regression model, gender was the only personal characteristic to have a significant association with job satisfaction, with female staff reporting higher satisfaction. Input into decision making and job variety had significant positive associations, whereas dangerousness had a significant negative relationship with job satisfaction.

  5. Design and Outcome of a Certification Preparation Program for Outpatient Nurses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Theresa; Ferguson, Susan; McKenzie, Jennifer; Brassil, Kelly J

    2015-10-01

    This article presents the design, implementation, and outcomes of a certification preparation program for nurses working in an outpatient clinic. A nurse educator designed curriculum using the Certified Breast Care Nurse test blueprint. Nurse administrators provided the resources and the staff coverage to allow all staff members to attend the sessions without disruption to patient care. This outpatient center has achieved and sustained 100% certification among eligible nurses over the past 5 years.

  6. Stakeholders' views on measuring outcomes for people with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Young, Anita F; Chesson, Rosemary A

    2006-01-01

    What works and how do we know? These are recurring questions for health and social care professionals, although mediated through differing philosophies and historical perspectives. The aims of the study reported here were to discover views of managers and commissioners of services for people with learning disabilities in Scotland regarding (a) current approaches to service evaluation (as an indication of what is to be measured) and (b) healthcare outcome measurement (as an indication of preferences regarding how this should be measured). A postal questionnaire was used to survey 94 stakeholders from the NHS, Local Authorities, and non-statutory organisations across Scotland. Respondents' views were sought on current approaches to service evaluation within learning disabilities; outcome measurement; appropriateness of specified methods of measuring health outcomes; desired future methods of outcome measurement within learning disabilities; and service user involvement in care. A 77% (73/94) response rate to the questionnaire was achieved. Different methods of service evaluation were used by different stakeholders. Staff appraisal was the most frequently identified method (used by 85% of respondents). Specific outcome measures were used by 32% of respondents although there were differences of opinion as to what constitutes specific outcome measures. Overall there was strong support for goal-setting and reviewing (83%) and individualised outcome measures (75%) as appropriate methods for use with people with learning disabilities. The hypothetical question asking what outcome measures should be introduced for this client group had by far the lowest response rate (51/73). The overwhelming majority of all respondents, 68 (92%), reported user involvement in their service. Staff ambivalence to outcome measurement was evident in the research and respondents highlighted the complexity and multidimensional nature of outcomes for this service user group. Managers recognised

  7. The importance of staff in the facial plastic surgical practice: dynamic staff interface with patients in support of the surgeon's objectives.

    PubMed

    Patseavouras, Louie L

    2008-05-01

    This article addresses how staff can support surgeons in practical terms, making a business more efficient, seamless, and less costly (in terms of emotional and time components). This article addresses (1) using staff as a first line of defense against misperceptions, false expectations, and general problems; (2) recognizing that effective staff are highly intuitive and can be trained to troubleshoot and intervene; (3) encouraging staff to rely on gut instinct; (4) learning that body language and the nonverbal are powerful indicators; (5) training staff concerning nonverbal communication; and (6) realizing that a great deal of communication is within surgeon and staff control.

  8. Mount Wilson Staff Reaction to Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, G. W.

    2004-12-01

    By 1950 Mount Wilson astronomers had come to accept light pollution by Los Angeles and its environs as inevitable. Those concerned with measurements of faint objects transferred their research to Caltech's Palomar Observatory (see, for example, Baade 1948) under the terms of an agreement between Carnegie and Caltech. Others took advantage of reduced pressure on the Mount Wilson telescopes to undertake major scientific programs that could tolerate the Los Angeles sky (Arp 1956, Sandage & Kowal 1986, Sandage & Fouts 1987, Vaughan & Preston 1980, Wilson 1974). However, these adjustments in style produced no remedy for the progressive deterioration that accompanied advancing age of the Mount Wilson facilities and lack of investment at a polluted site. The accelerating imbalance in demand for the Mount Wilson and Palomar facilities began to weigh on the Carnegie-Caltech joint operation. In the 1960's Carnegie attempted to redress the imbalance by developing a dark-sky site at Las Campanas, Chile, but the telescopes (1.0-m, 2.5-m) it could provide in the 1970's failed to arouse sufficient interest among Caltech astronomers, who opted to discontinue joint operation of the Carnegie and Caltech observatories in 1980. To fulfill its own need for a large telescope at a dark site Carnegie withdrew from the Mount Wilson operation in 1985, redirecting all of its resources to Las Campanas, and soon thereafter organized the Magellan Consortium that built and now operate two superb 6.5-m telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory. This outcome is the legacy of Los Angeles lights. Arp, H. C. 1956, AJ, 61, 15 Baade, W. 1948, PASP, 60, 230 Sandage, A. R., & Kowal, C. 1986, AJ, 91, 1140 Sandage, A. R., & Fouts, G. 1987, AJ, 93, 74 Vaughan, A. H., & Preston, G. W. 1980, PASP, 92, 385 Wilson, O. C. 1978, ApJ, 226, 379

  9. Teaching the teacher program to assist nurse managers to educate nursing staff in Ecuadorian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sheri P; Heaston, Sondra

    2009-03-01

    Continuing education for hospital staff nurses is a concern worldwide. Current research shows that continuing education among nurses can positively affect patient outcomes (O'Brien, T., Freemantle, N., Oxman, A, et al., 2002. Interactive continuing education workshops or conferences can improve professional practice and patient outcomes. Journal of Evidence Based Nursing. 26 (5)). Seeing a need for improved patient outcomes among hospitals in Ecuador, we conducted a teaching the teacher program to assist nurse managers to carry-out continuing education in their hospital system. This teaching the teacher program was established through the collaboration between one College of Nursing in Utah, USA and a large healthcare system in Guayaquil, Ecuador. The collaboration has been ongoing for five years, 2003 to present. Initial projects included classes for the nursing staff including technical skills, life-saving techniques, and nursing process and assessment. Collaborators from the US and Ecuador believed that in order to maximize the improvement of nursing care in the hospital system it was necessary to turn attention on the nurse managers and not just the staff nurses. This would allow for meaningful ongoing learning beyond the one-time classroom setting. Continuing education is not common in Ecuadorian hospitals as it is in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project and provide initial evaluative data on the response to the curriculum; including evidence of managers using the teaching principles they were taught. The underlying aim of the project was to achieve a sustainable impact by teaching the leaders of each unit how to be more effective teachers. In May 2007, a two-day "teaching the teacher" workshop was developed with the needs of the managers in mind. The participants in the course included the chief nursing officer and leaders of various units of the hospital. In May 2008 a follow-up class was taught, along with an evaluation by

  10. Effectiveness in professional organizations: the impact of surgeons and surgical staff organizations on the quality of care in hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Flood, A B; Scott, W R; Ewy, W; Forrest, W H

    1982-01-01

    In this research, we examine the relative importance of different structural units in a professional organization, the hospital, as they affect organizational effectiveness. The difficulties of measuring effectiveness in a complex professional organization are discussed, and an adjusted measure of surgical outcome is developed. Data are drawn from a prospective study of over 8,000 surgical patients treated by more than 500 surgeons in 15 hospitals throughout the nation. Two different types of analyses are presented, both indicating that hospital features have more impact on surgical outcomes than do surgeon characteristics. The second analysis assesses the relative importance of specific attributes of the hospital, surgical staff organization, and surgeon characteristics on surgical outcomes. PMID:7152960

  11. Assessing reference staff competency in the electronic environment.

    PubMed

    Munson, Kurt I; Walton, Linda J

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows how the Galter Health Sciences Library of Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine developed and implemented a program to assess reference staff competencies for assisting users in the electronic environment after completing a new training program. The first phase was a year-long assessment of reference questions to identify the types of questions received at the desk. Next, a training program for reference was developed and implemented with an emphasis on answering the most common questions identified such as remote access, access privileges, holdings information, and database searching. The program included individualized instruction on library policies, electronic resources, access restrictions, and troubleshooting. The next phase was to create instruments to test staff competencies in answering questions after training. Based on the scores, additional training was individualized and provided to the appropriate staff member to enhance their skills where needed. The training system that was developed has proven to be effective as most staff scored better than 92% on initial testing. As a result, library management can be certain that users' questions are being answered correctly and that the staff has the skills required to work in an electronic environment.

  12. Visual performance feedback: effects on targeted and nontargeted staff.

    PubMed

    Burke, Raymond V; Howard, Monica R; Peterson, Jane L; Peterson, Roger W; Allen, Keith D

    2012-09-01

    This study used a multiple baseline with reversal design to assess whether visual performance feedback (VPF) influenced targeted and nontargeted staffs' use of behavior-specific praise (BSP) in a day-treatment program. This study expands on the typical VPF audience and assesses whether VPF can be effective with noncertified staff in a day-treatment program for young children with behavior disorders, an environment in which it is difficult to maintain high rates of BSP. In previous school-based studies, VPF has been collected by researchers and provided to targeted teaching staff. In the current study, rather than relying on researchers, the authors used staff instructors to collect VPF and assessed how that experience influenced the instructors' use of BSP. Results suggest that VPF provided, on average, a doubling in rates of BSP use by directly targeted staff and more than a 50% increase in rates of BSP in nontargeted instructors who collected BSP data. Furthermore, three of the four participants had substantially higher praise-to-correction ratios during the VPF intervention when compared with baseline and reversal conditions. Implications for improving treatment fidelity and reducing supervision time are discussed.

  13. Developing the educational needs of Telehealthcare support staff at SCQF/QCF level 6

    PubMed Central

    Cund, Audrey; Henderson, Donna; Watson, Doreen; Fleming, Donna; Honeyman, John; Fraser, Fiona; Wright, Polly

    2012-01-01

    unqualified support staff working in telehealthcare service delivery. To achieve National accreditation of a Professional Development Award in Telehealthcare at SCQF/QCF level 6. Proposed next stage objectives To evaluate the telehealthcare support staff experience of undertaking the Professional Development Award. To evaluate the modes of delivery and geographical contexts in which the Professional Development Award is delivered. To describe the impact the educational experience has on the candidates personal and professional development. Proposed design/method A mixed method research design will be used to evaluate the candidate’s experiences of undertaking the Professional Development Award in Telehealthcare. Structured interviews and surveys will be used to gather information to analyse the candidate’s experience. A random sample of candidates will be drawn from all SQA approved sites to deliver the Professional Development Award. Findings and points of interest It is anticipated that a positive outcome will be achieved from the project evaluation as this award was driven and led by Telehealthcare staff working in the field. Further awards and specific modules are likely to emerge from this work to underpin advancements in career pathways and to address innovations and developments in telehealthcare.

  14. Promoting an equitable and supportive school climate in high schools: the role of school organizational health and staff burnout.

    PubMed

    Bottiani, Jessika H; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Mendelson, Tamar

    2014-12-01

    In response to persistent racial disparities in academic and behavioral outcomes between Black and White students, equitable school climate has drawn attention as a potential target for school reform. This study examined differences in Black and White students' experiences of school climate and explored whether indicators of school organizational health and staff burnout moderated differences in students' school experiences by race. Utilizing hierarchical linear modeling with a sample of 18,397 Black students (n=6228) and White students (n=12,169) and 2391 school staff in 53 schools, we found a consistent pattern of racial inequalities, such that Black students reported less positive experiences than White students across three indicators of school climate (caring γ=-0.08, p<.001; equity γ=-0.05, p=.007; and engagement γ=-0.05, p<.001). In addition, we found significant, positive associations between aggregated staff-report of school organizational health and student-reported school climate (e.g., staff affiliation and student-perceived equity, γ=0.07, p<.001). Surprisingly, a number of school organizational health indicators were more strongly associated with positive perceptions of school climate among White students than Black students, translating into greater racial disparities in perceived school climate at schools with greater organizational health (e.g., supportive leadership by race on student-perceived engagement, γ=-0.03, p=.042). We also found negative associations between staff-reported burnout and students' experience of equity, such that the racial gap was smaller in schools with high ratings of burnout (γ=0.04, p=.002). These findings have implications for educators and education researchers interested in promoting school social contexts that equitably support student engagement and success.

  15. Staff Morale in Day Care Centres for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascha, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Background: Levels of burnout, job satisfaction and intended turnover of staff working in day care centres for adults with intellectual disabilities are investigated in relation to role clarity, staff support and supervision, and coping strategies used by staff. Materials and methods: Thirty six direct-care staff of four day care centres in the UK…

  16. Can Brief Workshop Interventions Change Care Staff Understanding of Challenging Behaviours?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowey, Alan; Toogood, Sandy; Hastings, Richard P.; Nash, Susie

    2007-01-01

    Background: The working culture surrounding challenging behaviour may have a strong effect on staff behaviour. As a first step to influencing staff talk about challenging behaviour, the aim of the present study was to explore whether a 1-day training workshop could have an effect on staff causal explanations. Methods: Fifty-four front line staff,…

  17. The Quality of Life of Palliative Care Staff: A Personal Construct Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared palliative care staff with staff from burn and neonatal units and with mature age general nursing trainees at end of training. Found that palliative care staff expressed better quality of life, in terms of significantly less anxiety and depression, as well as more good feelings than other staff groups. (Author/NB)

  18. Staff Utilization and Commitment in Borno State Colleges of Education, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fika, Ibrahim Baba; Ibi, Mustapha Baba; Abdulrahman, Aishatu

    2016-01-01

    The study determines the relationship between staff utilization and staff commitment in Borno State Colleges of Education, Nigeria. The objectives of the study were to determine: the level of staff utilization in Borno State Colleges of Education, the level of staff commitment in Borno State Colleges of Education and the relationship between staff…

  19. Indicators of Staff Efficacy in Seven Special Schools in the Sydney Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallance, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    Staff in Special Schools are seldom the focus of research, yet work with a student group some might consider demanding and stressful. Staff who work in Catholic special Schools are under-represented in the academic literature. The motivation and efficacy of Special School staff were studies in 7 Catholic Special Schools. These staff were observed…

  20. Staff Beliefs about Why People with Learning Disabilities Self-Harm: A Q-Methodology Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Katie; Gleeson, Kate; Johnstone, Lucy; Weston, Clive

    2011-01-01

    Staff beliefs about self-harm can influence staff responses to the behaviour. Existing research into staff beliefs about self-harm by people with learning disabilities is limited, with qualitative research restricted to forensic services. The aim of this study was to use Q-methodology to explore staff beliefs about why people with learning…