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Sample records for accuser staff outcome

  1. Staff Development for Improving Student Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asayesh, Gelareh

    1993-01-01

    Several educators highlight aspects of effective staff development programs that have resulted in improved student outcomes, agreeing that staff development is an important ingredient in the elusive formula of success. The article includes a list of eight examples of what experts say about staff development. (SM)

  2. Staff Stressors and Staff Outcomes in Services for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: The Staff Stressor Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Chris; Rivers, Morna; Mason, Heidi; Mason, Linda; Kiernan, Chris; Emerson, Eric; Alborz, Alison; Reeves, David

    1999-01-01

    A study involving 512 staff serving individuals with mental retardation investigated the validity of the 33-item Staff Stressor Questionnaire (SSQ). The SSQ measures potential stressors, including user challenging behavior, poor user skills, lack of staff support, lack of resources, low-status job, bureaucracy, and work/home conflict. Results show…

  3. Staff-patient relationships and outcomes in schizophrenia: the role of staff attributions.

    PubMed

    Berry, Katherine; Gregg, Lynsey; Vasconcelos e Sa, Debora; Haddock, Gillian; Barrowclough, Christine

    2012-03-01

    We investigated associations between staff-patient relationships and outcomes in a randomised controlled trial of motivational interventions for drug and alcohol misuse in schizophrenia. Participants were 204 patients and their care co-ordinators. We assessed relationship status (positive versus neutral) and staff attributions of control using Five Minute Speech Samples collected at baseline. We examined associations between this baseline data and symptoms at 12-months follow-up. We found that dyads with positive relationships at baseline had significantly less symptoms at 12-months compared to those dyads with neutral relationships. As predicted, care co-ordinators with positive relationships were less likely to attribute patients' problems as being within their control. The findings highlight the potentially important role of positive staff-patient relationships in outcomes. Our findings are also in line with the hypothesis that staff attributions may contribute to the development of more positive relationships. PMID:22325807

  4. Professional Staff Contributions to Positive Student Outcomes: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2013-01-01

    Although professional staff comprise more than half the Australian higher education workforce, typically research has concentrated on the work of academic staff. Professional staff are increasingly researching the working lives of professional staff, adding to the understanding of the work of professional staff and the contributions they make…

  5. State Staff Perceptions of Vocational Education Outcomes. Identification and Assessment of Vocational Educational Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentling, Tim L.; Barnard, Wynette S.

    A study examined appropriate outcomes for students entering the work force after graduation from high school and for students going on to a community college for advanced training. Fifty-eight staff members of the Department fo Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DAVTE) of the Illinois State Board of Education were asked to write a profile…

  6. Organizational culture and staff outcomes in services for people with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Hatton, C; Rivers, M; Mason, H; Mason, L; Emerson, E; Kiernan, C; Reeves, D; Alborz, A

    1999-06-01

    Organizational culture has been shown by organizational psychology to influence important aspects of staff behaviour. In particular, mismatches between staff perceptions of real and ideal organizational cultures have been shown to be associated with a range of negative outcomes for staff, such as stress, sickness and staff turnover. The present study investigates organizational culture in services for people with intellectual disabilities. The aim was to discover the prevalent organizational cultures in these services, and associations between organizational culture and staff outcomes. As part of a large-scale survey of staff in services for people with intellectual disabilities, information concerning organizational culture and staff outcomes was collected from 450 staff. A self-report measure of real and ideal organizational culture produced nine dimensions of organizational culture: (I) tolerant/staff-oriented; (2) achievement-oriented; (3) innovative; (4) analytical; (5) social relationships; (6) rewarding staff; (7) stable work environment; (8) demanding; and (9) conflict management. These nine dimensions of organizational culture showed generally adequate psychometric properties. While there was some variation in organizational culture across services, there is little variation across staff with different job titles. Overall, the staff rated real organizational cultures to be relatively high in achievement orientation and fostering social relationships, and relatively low in managing conflict and providing rewards for staff. Staff rated ideal organizational cultures to be high in rewarding staff, being tolerant/staff-oriented and fostering social relationships, and low in demands on staff. Except for the dimension of making demands on staff, where staff rated organizations as considerably higher than ideal, staff generally rated organizations as being less than ideal on all dimensions of organizational culture. Organizational psychology theory predicts that

  7. A Comparative Study of the Perceptions of Professional Staff on Their Contribution to Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie-Anne; Dollard, Emma; Banks, Nicci

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of professional staff on their contribution to student outcomes. An online Delphi survey method was used to collect data from two expert panels: professional staff based in faculties and professional staff based in central university departments. The aim of this method is for the panels to reach consensus. The…

  8. Justice, Memory, and a Professor's Accusation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrook, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the accusation by a professor at the University of Miami that a prominent Chilean scholar participated in his torture in Chile after the 1973 coup, and the reverberations felt by academics from the accusation. (EV)

  9. Understanding inequities in home health care outcomes: staff views on agency and system factors.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Bourjolly, Joretha; Frasso, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Results regarding staff perspectives on contributing factors to racial/ethnic disparities in home health care outcomes are discussed. Focus group interviews were conducted with home health care staff (N = 23) who represented various agencies from three Northeastern states. Participants identified agency and system factors that contribute to disparities, including: (a) administrative staff bias/discretion, (b) communication challenges, (c) patient/staff cultural discordance, (d) cost control, and (e) poor access to community resources. Participants reported that bias can influence staff at all levels and is expressed via poor coverage of predominantly minority service areas, resulting in reduced intensity and continuity of service for minority patients. PMID:25706958

  10. Trainees versus Staff: Exploring Counseling Outcomes in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Mike; Sharp, Julia L.; Havice, Pamela; Ilagan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Investigators compared counseling outcomes among nonpaid graduate-level trainees and professional staff at a college counseling center. Counseling outcomes for 331 college student participants were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ45.2), employing a pretest--posttest design. The two groups of service providers did not differ…

  11. Physicist accused of misappropriating NASA funds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Government investigators have accused an Iranian-born physicist of defrauding US taxpayers by transferring millions of dollars of grants from NASA and other agencies into his own bank account. Samim Anghaie, founder and director of the University of Florida's Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPPI), has been accused of receiving funds worth a total of 3.4m, which his family then spent on cars and land.

  12. Nurse Aide Empowerment Strategies and Staff Stability: Effects on Nursing Home Resident Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Theresa; Brannon, Diane; Mor, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the moderating effect of staff stability on the relationship between management practices used to empower nurse aides and resident outcomes in a multistate sample of nursing homes. An adaptation of Kanter's theory of structural power in organizations guided the framework for the model used in this study. Design and…

  13. Effects of a Preschool Staff Intervention on Children's Sun Protection: Outcomes of Sun Protection Is Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritz, Ellen R.; Tripp, Mary K.; James, Aimee S.; Harrist, Ronald B.; Mueller, Nancy H.; Chamberlain, Robert M.; Parcel, Guy S.

    2007-01-01

    The preschool is an important yet understudied setting for sun-protection interventions. This study evaluates the effects of Sun Protection is Fun! (SPF) on preschool staff behavioral and psychosocial outcomes related to protecting children from sun exposure. Twenty preschools participated in a 2-year, group-randomized trial to evaluate SPF, a…

  14. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM... reasonable doubt, based on the evidence admitted at trial, that the Accused is guilty of the offense. (d) At... conduct of the Accused. (g) If the Accused so elects, the Accused may testify at trial on the...

  15. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM... reasonable doubt, based on the evidence admitted at trial, that the Accused is guilty of the offense. (d) At... conduct of the Accused. (g) If the Accused so elects, the Accused may testify at trial on the...

  16. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM... reasonable doubt, based on the evidence admitted at trial, that the Accused is guilty of the offense. (d) At... conduct of the Accused. (g) If the Accused so elects, the Accused may testify at trial on the...

  17. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM... reasonable doubt, based on the evidence admitted at trial, that the Accused is guilty of the offense. (d) At... conduct of the Accused. (g) If the Accused so elects, the Accused may testify at trial on the...

  18. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM... reasonable doubt, based on the evidence admitted at trial, that the Accused is guilty of the offense. (d) At... conduct of the Accused. (g) If the Accused so elects, the Accused may testify at trial on the...

  19. Stories of the Accused: A Phenomenological Inquiry of MFTs and Accusations of Unprofessional Conduct.

    PubMed

    Coy, Jacey S; Lambert, Jessica E; Miller, Marianne M

    2016-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with 10 MFTs (six females and four males) who had received a formal accusation of unprofessional conduct and went before state licensure boards in three different states. Accusations included dual relationships, financial fraud/errors, receiving DUIs, sexual misconduct, and emotionally harming a client. Utilizing Moustakas' (1994, Phenomenological research methods, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage) transcendental phenomenology, five essential themes emerged: (a) The experience of being formally accused of unprofessional conduct is life-changing, (b) state MFT licensing boards are more punitive than rehabilitative, (c) obtaining support is vital, (d) making accusations creates stigma, (e) therapists were unprepared to handle accusations of unprofessional conduct. Clinical implications include the importance of supervision, personal therapy, and strategies for prevention and rehabilitation with this population. PMID:25586897

  20. False Accusations of Nosocomial Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John

    1992-01-01

    Practitioners performing routine physical examination may be falsely accused of sexual abuse. Criminal justice system is incompatible with biomedical system of prevention. It is responsible for establishment of sexual abuse industry, practitioners of which have vested interest in maintaining status quo of sexual criminalization. They themselves…

  1. Legal Rights of the Criminally Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Young Lawyers Association, Austin.

    A brief review of the federal constitutional provisions and equivalent Texas Constitutional provisions for the criminally accused is provided in question and answer form. First Amendment rights related to such matters as freedom of the press, rights of students, picketing, distributing leaflets, state licensing, and obscenity are considered in the…

  2. Can staff and patient perspectives on hospital safety predict harm-free care? An analysis of staff and patient survey data and routinely collected outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Rebecca; O'Hara, Jane Kathryn; Sheard, Laura; Reynolds, Caroline; Cocks, Kim; Armitage, Gerry; Wright, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients have the potential to provide feedback on the safety of their care. Recently, tools have been developed that ask patients to provide feedback on those factors that are known to contribute to safety, therefore providing information that can be used proactively to manage safety in hospitals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the safety information provided by patients is different from that provided by staff and whether it is related to safety outcomes. Method Data were collected from 33 hospital wards across 3 acute hospital Trusts in the UK. Staff on these wards were asked to complete the four outcome measures of the Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture, while patients were asked to complete the Patient Measure of Safety and the friends and family test. We also collated publicly reported safety outcome data for ‘harm-free care’ on each ward. This patient safety thermometer measure is used in the UK NHS to record the percentage of patients on a single day of each month on every ward who have received harm-free care (ie, no pressure ulcers, falls, urinary tract infections and hospital acquired new venous thromboembolisms). These data were used to address questions about the relationship between measures and the extent to which patient and staff perceptions of safety predict safety outcomes. Results The friends and family test, a single item measure of patient experience was associated with patients’ perceptions of safety, but was not associated with safety outcomes. Staff responses to the patient safety culture survey were not significantly correlated with patient responses to the patient measure of safety, but both independently predicted safety outcomes. The regression models showed that staff perceptions (adjusted r2=0.39) and patient perceptions (adjusted r2=0.30) of safety independently predicted safety outcomes. When entered together both measures accounted for 49% of the variance in safety outcomes (adjusted r2

  3. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including ‘communication’, ‘diagnosis’, and ‘referral’ to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff. PMID:27247676

  4. Staff training and ambulatory tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a cluster randomized controlled trial in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Simon; Dick, Judy; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Lombard, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether adding a training intervention for clinic staff to the usual DOTS strategy (the internationally recommended control strategy for tuberculosis (TB)) would affect the outcomes of TB treatment in primary care clinics with treatment success rates below 70%. METHODS: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted from July 1996 to July 2000 in nurse-managed ambulatory primary care clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. Clinics with successful TB treatment completion rates of less than 70% and annual adult pulmonary TB loads of more than 40 patients per year were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 12) or control (n = 12) groups. All clinics completed follow-up. Treatment outcomes were measured in cohorts of adult, pulmonary TB patients before the intervention (n = 1200) and 9 months following the training (n = 1177). The intervention comprised an 18-hour experiential, participatory in-service training programme for clinic staff delivered by nurse facilitators and focusing on patient centredness, critical reflection on practice, and quality improvement. The main outcome measure was successful treatment, defined as patients who were cured and those who had completed tuberculosis treatment. FINDINGS: The estimated effect of the intervention was an increase in successful treatment rates of 4.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): -5.5% to 15.2%) and in bacteriological cure rates of 10.4% (CI: -1.2% to 22%). A treatment effect of 10% was envisaged, based on the views of policy-makers on the minimum effect size for large-scale implementation. CONCLUSION: This is the first evidence from a randomized controlled trial on the effects of experiential, participatory training on TB outcomes in primary care facilities in a developing country. Such training did not appear to improve TB outcomes. However, the results were inconclusive and further studies are required. PMID:15868015

  5. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lee-Fay; Fletcher, Jennifer; Goodenough, Belinda; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; MacAndrew, Margaret; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes. Methods Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure. Results Sixty-three unique studies were broadly grouped according to clinical domain—oral health (3 studies), hygiene and infection control (3 studies), nutrition (2 studies), nursing home acquired pneumonia (2 studies), depression (2 studies) appropriate prescribing (7 studies), reduction of physical restraints (3 studies), management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6 studies), falls reduction and prevention (11 studies), quality improvement (9 studies), philosophy of care (10 studies) and other (5 studies). No single intervention component, combination of, or increased number of components was associated with greater likelihood of positive outcomes. Studies with positive outcomes for residents also tended to change staff behavior, however changing staff behavior did not necessarily improve resident outcomes. Studies targeting specific care tasks (e.g. oral care, physical restraints) were more likely to produce positive outcomes than those requiring global practice changes (e.g. care philosophy). Studies using intervention theories were more likely to be successful. Program logic was rarely articulated, so it was often unclear whether there was a coherent connection between the intervention components and measured outcomes. Many studies reported barriers relating to staff (e.g. turnover, high workload, attitudes) or organizational factors (e.g. funding, resources, logistics). Conclusion Changing staff practice in nursing homes is possible but complex

  6. Tying the Design of Your Camp Staff Training to the Delivery of Desired Youth Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Robin; Bourdeau, Virginia; Arnold, Mary; Nott, Brooke D.

    2013-01-01

    As experience camp directors, we've seen the challenges faced by young camp counselors and inexperienced staff. Evaluations from staff at many camps motivated us to help our people be more effective with their campers. In response we created a comprehensive camp staff training. Lessons showed staff what we wanted them to do and say as they…

  7. Second Language Acquisition of Italian Accusative and Dative Clitics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    This experimental study investigates the acquisition of Italian accusative and dative clitics by English adult speakers. These pronouns are non-existent in English. Results from a grammaticality judgement task show that Italian accusative and dative clitics develop slowly but gradually in Italian second language (L2) grammars. Interestingly, the…

  8. A Structured Writing Programme for Staff: Facilitating Knowledge, Skills, Confidence and Publishing Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; Radloff, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the higher education sector in publishing pedagogical research has led to a focus on professional development for staff who wish to engage in this endeavour. This paper describes and evaluates a specific programme designed to help university staff to prepare and submit a high-quality paper to a peer-reviewed journal.…

  9. Assessing and Increasing Staff Preference for Job Tasks Using Concurrent-Chains Schedules and Probabilistic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.; Campisano, Natalie; Lacourse, Kristen; Azulay, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment and improvement of staff members' subjective valuation of nonpreferred work tasks may be one way to increase the quality of staff members' work life. The Task Enjoyment Motivation Protocol (Green, Reid, Passante, & Canipe, 2008) provides a process for supervisors to identify the aversive qualities of nonpreferred job tasks. Through…

  10. Promoting Shared Decision Making to strengthen outcome of young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: the role of staff competence.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Kristin; Benvenuto, Arianna; Battan, Barbara; Siracusano, Martina; Terribili, Monica; Curatolo, Paolo; Fava, Leonardo

    2015-03-01

    Little is known on how the conceptual description of Shared Decision Making (SDM) accomplishes clinical practice in the context of lifetime disabilities as in particular Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), when intervention is long-lasting and requires constant family involvement. This study aimed mainly to investigate to what extent the staff's competence in SDM contributes to positive child and parent improvement when involving parents in Early Intensive Behavior Interventions (EIBI). It was also geared to verify whether SDM staff competence contributes to a child's treatment responsiveness. A total of 25 young children with ASD (23 male, 3 female, age range 34-92 months, mean age 51.4±13.6) were included in the study. Of these, nine children were allocated to a Parent Involvement condition accompanied by SDM Staff Training (PI-SDM), and eight children to a Parent Inclusion in Treatment Delivery Only condition without SDM Staff Training (PI-DO). Nine months treatment outcomes of severity, developmental and adaptive measures were compared to Treatment As Usual (n=8). PI-SDM was associated with improvement of autistic symptoms (p≤.05), adaptive functioning (p≤.01) and developmental outcome (p≤.01), as well as parent (p≤.05) and staff competence (p≤.001). The magnitude of outcome was inferior in the PI-PO and TAU group. A Reliable Change was identified in more than 40% of children included in PI-SDM, while PI-PO (>20%) and TAU (>12%) let to little Reliable Change and partially skill deterioration. Staff's SDM skill competence predicts reduced parental stress (β=-.500, p≤.05) and contributes significantly to a positive treatment responder trajectory (p≤.01), besides lower severity (p≤.05), higher adaptive (p≤.01) and communication skills (p≤.05). The study indicates that parent inclusion should be conceptualized as a collaborative partnership model rather than as adherence in treatment provision, based on a target SDM staff training that may

  11. The 1950 Joint Scientific Session: Pavlovians as the accusers and the accused.

    PubMed

    Windholz, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1950, Stalin and the Soviet Government prevailed upon the USSR Academy of Sciences and the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences to organize the 1950 Joint Scientific Session for the purpose of formalizing the teachings of I.P. Pavlov. During the Session, some of Pavlov's erstwhile students--the Pavlovians--split into accusers and accused. The more prominent of the latter were denounced for deviating from the orthodox Pavlovian path, and urged to admit their mistakes, to work within the framework of Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity, and to avoid Western influence. Within this context, the travail of the prominent Pavlovian physiologist L. A. Orbeli is discussed. Contemporary Russian historians and scientists, evaluating the consequences of the 1950 Joint Scientific Session, point out its negative effects; namely, the general moral decline of Soviet physiologists pressured to accept a dogmatic ideology, the lowering of the quality of research in physiology, and the self-imposed exclusion of Soviet physiology from the worldwide scientific community. PMID:9062981

  12. Helping patients handle accusations of infidelity.

    PubMed

    1993-07-01

    You may have experience with women patients who assume their partners are being unfaithful if they try to use condoms because that behavior could indicate they are trying to prevent potential sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). These same women may believe the same will be assumed of them if they begin to use the new female condom. If women present the device to their partners in the context of a birth control product rather than a device to prevent STDs, men might be more willing to accept it, says sexuality expert Beverly Wipple, PhD, RN, an associate professor at Rutgers State University of New Jersey in Newark and the author of Safe Encounters: How a Woman Can Say Yes to Pleasure and No to Unsafe Sex (Pocketbooks, 1990). Wipple has been a leader in female sexuality research since 1979, having conducted the original research on the "G-spot" (Dell Publishers, 1983). Wipple bases her hypothesis on a presentation about the male condom given at the 1992 annual meeting of the International Society for the Scientific Study of Sex, held in San Diego. The presenter showed that if women were using the male condom as their only form of contraception, then the male was more likely to use it. If the woman was taking oral contraceptives or using another form of contraception--and was only relying on the condom or STD protection--then the male was less likely to use the condom. "I think the same thing might apply to the female condom," Wipple suggests. "If she identifies that this is her method of birth control. I think it is much more likely to be accepted than if she says she is using it to prevent the spread of diseases." Wipple says practitioners should tell women to emphasize the birth control angle and downplay the STD angle. "It may not be the only method they are using, but they don't have to tell him that." she says. "This way, it is not putting an accusation [of infidelity] on him." While she acknowledge and dislikes the lack of honesty inherent in this practice

  13. Rewarding and Developing Staff in Higher Education: Outcome of Phase Two. Special Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This document provides feedback on the second phase of the initiative to reward and develop staff in higher education. It includes a preliminary analysis of institutions' human resource (HR) strategies and lists the higher education institutions (HEIs) that have submitted strategies classified as full or full with conditions. In 2001, institutions…

  14. Motivational Interviewing Training for Juvenile Correctional Staff in California: One Year Initial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, Melinda; Doran, Neal; Koutsenok, Igor

    2009-01-01

    This study reports initial results of a program designed to train California corrections staff (n = 576) in motivational interviewing (MI), a method of communication that is based on a client-centered, collaborative style. After three days of training, participants made significant gains in terms of knowledge of MI principles and reflective…

  15. False Accusations: A Growing Fear in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Male role models are becoming increasingly scarce in Canadian classrooms, and the demographics indicate that the current low numbers will continue to decline. New teachers are quite prepared to take up the pedagogical issues raised by changing standards and a changing demographic; however, the spectre of violence and false accusations adds a level…

  16. Social Support and Outcomes for Staff Serving Individuals with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Sharon M.; Schellenberg, Richard P.

    Ninety-four persons employed in direct care positions in a community-based agency that serves adults with mental retardation completed self-report questionnaires assessing relationships between social support and the adaptive outcomes of mood, perceived competence, and self-efficacy. Findings indicated that: (1) negative mood was negatively…

  17. Don't Blame ME, Daddy. False Accusations of Child Sexual Abuse: A Hidden National Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tong, Dean

    Noting the increase in false accusations of child sexual abuse where divorce and custody litigation is in progress, this book examines the consequences of such accusations for everyone involved and provides defensive strategies for those falsely accused. The book draws on four case studies, including a personal one, to illustrate the chronology…

  18. Union faces trial for accusing employer of HIV safety lapses.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The Service Employees International Union faces defamation charges after accusing Intercity Maintenance Co. of violating safety laws by not providing workers with gloves and other protection from HIV and hepatitis B. Intercity provides janitorial services for commercial buildings, including hospitals. During the heat of a campaign to organize its workers, the union made statements concerning safety violations which Intercity claimed interfered with the company's business relationship with a health-care insurer. The suit claims a violation of the Rhode Island Privacy Act because Intercity was placed in a false light. The judge found that the union's chief organizer, [name removed], may have acted with malice by accusing Intercity of violating State and Federal laws without proof. PMID:11366822

  19. [Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice--the second victim].

    PubMed

    Wienke, A

    2013-04-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 [1]. Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decisions are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession and the actual requirements of the

  20. Development and preliminary evaluation of a training workshop for the collection of patient-reported outcome (PRO) interview data by research support staff.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Thomas M; Hurley, Karen; Bylund, Carma L; Berk, Alexandra; Diminni, Kimberly; Ostroff, Jamie S

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development and initial evaluation of a didactic curriculum to prepare research support staff with the core knowledge and skills required to collect patient-reported outcomes (PROs) via interviews. Research support staff members (N = 77) were recruited for eight separate workshops, each consisting of a didactic presentation followed by role-play scenarios with trained actors depicting common scenarios they may encounter as part of patient interaction. Trainees were observed and received feedback on their performance from trained facilitators and peers. In comparison to their pre-training assessment, trainees showed significant improvement in their confidence to conduct a research interview, handle a distressed participant, manage a wandering interview, ask participants sensitive questions, and handle irritated patients. Training research support staff in the effective collection of PROs via patient interviews can improve the confidence of these individuals in interacting with patients, which can ultimately lead to increased accuracy of data collection. PMID:23090591

  1. The Evidence Base for Mental Health Consultation in Early Childhood Settings: Research Synthesis Addressing Staff and Program Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Eileen M.; Bradley, Jennifer R.; Allen, Mary Dallas; Perry, Deborah F.

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: One strategy to support early childhood providers' work with children exhibiting challenging behavior is offering mental health consultation services in order to build staff skills and confidence and reduce staff stress and turnover. Through systematic search procedures, 26 recent studies were identified that addressed the…

  2. Protective factors and recidivism in accused juveniles who sexually offended.

    PubMed

    Klein, Verena; Rettenberger, Martin; Yoon, Dahlnym; Köhler, Nora; Briken, Peer

    2015-02-01

    To date, research on juvenile sexual offender recidivism has tended to focus on risk factors rather than protective factors. Therefore, very little is known about protective factors in the population of juveniles who sexually offended. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of protective factors on non-recidivism in a sample of accused juveniles who sexually offended (N = 71) in a mean follow-up period of 47.84 months. Protective factors were measured with the Protective Factor Scale of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY), and the Structured Assessment of PROtective Factors for violence risk (SAPROF). Criminal charges served as recidivism data. The internal scale of the SAPROF, in particular, yielded moderate predictive accuracy for the absence of violent and general recidivism, though not for the absence of sexual recidivism. No protective factor of the SAVRY did reveal predictive accuracy regarding various types of the absence of recidivism. Furthermore, protective factors failed to achieve any significant incremental predictive accuracy beyond that captured by the SAVRY risk factors alone. The potential therapeutic benefit of protective factors in juvenile sexual offender treatment is discussed. PMID:25351199

  3. Service User Outcomes of Staff Training in Positive Behaviour Support Using Person-Focused Training: A Control Group Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, Ian M.; McClean, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Effectively supporting individuals with intellectual disabilities who display challenging behaviours continues to be a priority for service providers. Person-focused training (PFT) is a model of service delivery which provides staff with skills in functional assessment and intervention development. Existing longitudinal data from a…

  4. Preparation and medical outcomes of Nepalese staff and porters compared with foreign nationals on the Annapurna trekking circuit.

    PubMed

    Drew, Christian M; Colleran, Shane; Zijp, Maarten; Lama, Lama Phuri; Sherpa, Nuru J; Kelly, Julia L; Sulzbach, Nina; Prior, Denise; Currin, Sally A; Currin, Simon; Nickol, Annabel H; Morrell, Mary J

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigates preparedness and medical problems in Nepalese staff and porters compared with foreign nationals trekking at altitude in the Nepal Himalaya. 331 Nepalese and 338 foreign nationals in 61 trekking groups were surveyed over 4 weeks on the Annapurna trekking circuit. Foreign nationals reported that 92% of trekking groups received altitude illness information and carried a medical kit. However, fewer than 30% knew the evacuation insurance status of the Nepalese staff and porters on their trek, 39% would not pay for an ill Nepalese national's helicopter evacuation, and 41% reported insufficient resources to carry an individual. Medical problems occurred in 44% of groups. A significantly higher proportion of Nepalese staff and porters were evacuated compared with foreign nationals. No significant differences in Nepalese and foreign national preparation were found between groups with and without medical problems. Medical problems were commonly encountered, yet many groups lacked resources to evacuate someone dangerously ill. Foreign and Nepalese nationals have a duty of care towards each other; recognizing that preparedness relies not only on a first aid kit, but also on knowledge of acclimatization and individuals' insurance is an important part of health and safety for individuals trekking at altitude. PMID:22206561

  5. Prevalence of Formal Accusations of Murder and Euthanasia against Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lewis M.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goy, Elizabeth; Arons, Stephen; Ganzini, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about how often physicians are formally accused of hastening patient deaths while practicing palliative care. Methods We conducted an Internet-based survey on a random 50% sample of physician-members of a national hospice and palliative medicine society. Results The final sample consisted of 663 physicians (response rate 53%). Over half of the respondents had had at least one experience in the last 5 years in which a patient's family, another physician, or another health care professional had characterized palliative treatments as being euthanasia, murder, or killing. One in four stated that at least one friend or family member, or a patient had similarly characterized their treatments. Respondents rated palliative sedation and stopping artificial hydration/nutrition as treatments most likely to be misconstrued as euthanasia. Overall, 25 physicians (4%) had been formally investigated for hastening a patient's death when that had not been their intention—13 while using opiates for symptom relief and six for using medications while discontinuing mechanical ventilation. In eight (32%) cases, another member of the health care team had initiated the charges. At the time of the survey, none had been found guilty, but they reported experiencing substantial anger and worry. Conclusions Commonly used palliative care practices continue to be misconstrued as euthanasia or murder, despite this not being the intention of the treating physician. Further efforts are needed to explain to the health care community and the public that treatments often used to relieve patient suffering at the end of life are ethical and legal. PMID:22401355

  6. Canadian trends in filicide by gender of the accused, 1961-2011.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Myrna

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive historical and contemporary picture of filicide in Canada for more than half a century. Focusing on 1,612 children under age 18 that were killed by their parents between 1961 and 2011, regional and temporal trends in the gender of accused are examined as well as differences in maternal and paternal filicides by the gender and age of the victim, the age and marital status of the accused, type of parental relationship, cause of death, motive, history of family violence, and clearance status. Results show that there are significant differences in filicides by mothers and fathers. Five possible emerging trends were identified: an increasing gender gap in accused, increasing presence of relationship breakdown, growing number of cases involving stepfathers and a prior history of family violence, and declines in accused who committed suicide. Implications of these trends for interventions and prevention are discussed and future research priorities highlighted. PMID:26271557

  7. Does Exonerating an Accused Researcher Restore the Researcher’s Credibility?

    PubMed Central

    Greitemeyer, Tobias; Sagioglou, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Scientific misconduct appears to be on the rise. However, an accused researcher may later be exonerated. The present research examines to what extent participants adhere to their attitude toward a researcher who allegedly committed academic misconduct after learning that the researcher is innocent. In two studies, participants in an exoneration and an uncorrected accusation condition learned that the ethics committee of a researcher’s university demanded the retraction of one of the researcher’s articles, whereas participants in a control condition did not receive this information. As intended, this manipulation led to a more favorable attitude toward the researcher in the control compared to the exoneration and the uncorrected accusation conditions (pre-exoneration attitude). Then, participants in the exoneration condition learned that the researcher was exonerated and that the article was not retracted. Participants in the uncorrected accusation and the control condition were not informed about the exoneration. Results revealed that the exoneration effectively worked, in that participants in the exoneration condition had a more favorable attitude (post-exoneration attitude) toward the researcher than did participants in the uncorrected accusation condition. Moreover, the post-exoneration attitude toward the researcher was similar in the exoneration and the control conditions. Finally, in the exoneration condition only, participants’ post-exoneration attitude was more favorable than their pre-exoneration attitude. These findings suggest that an exoneration of an accused researcher restores the researcher’s credibility. PMID:25970441

  8. Comparison of characteristics and outcomes by initial study contact (website versus staff) for participants enrolled in a weight-management study

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristine L; Elder, Charles R.; Lindberg, Nangel M.; Gullion, Christina M.; DeBar, Lynn L.; Meltesen, Gayle; Stevens, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional recruitment methods for clinical trials, such as telephone, mail, and print-media, are often inefficient, costly and use large amounts of staff time and resources. Purpose This analysis was conducted to determine whether retention, demographics, and outcomes differed between enrolled participants who responded to recruitment outreach using an Internet-based information and registration system and enrollees whose first contact was with study staff via telephone. Methods We identified potentially eligible participants from Kaiser Permanente Northwest databases and mailed brochures inviting them to participate in the Life weight-loss maintenance study. We also used employee newsletters, a member-directed website, and messages to employee email distribution lists to publicize the study. All outreach methods contained both a website address and a telephone number through which respondents could register for an information session. The website contained the same information as was provided by staff over the telephone. Results Out of 2122 potential participants who expressed interest in the study, 70% did so through the website. There was no difference in retention rates between enrollees who initiated contact through the website (WEB = 308) and enrollees who contacted the study by telephone (Staff = 161). The WEB group was younger (p = 0.01), had higher income (p = 0.01) and education (p < 0.01) levels, and lower body mass index (p < 0.01). There was a trend toward greater weight loss in the WEB group (p = 0.06). Limitations We did not conduct a formal cost analysis of the two methods. Also, the population for this analysis was mostly Caucasian and middle income; thus, we cannot draw conclusions about the generalizability of our findings to more racially and economically diverse populations. Conclusion Enrolled participants who used a website to register for an initial study information session had similar study retention and outcome performance as

  9. Professional Development for Teachers' Improvement and Students' Outcomes in Elementary Schools: Responses of Teachers, Coaches, and Administrative Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arjoon, Neelawattie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore why some elementary ETS benefited from professional development in terms of increased students' outcomes, while other ETS did not produce the same gains. The aim of this research was to analyze the degree of satisfaction and effectiveness of professional development by interviewing coaches,…

  10. From Bystander to Upstander Teacher for Gifted Black Students Accused of Acting White

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Tarek C.; Biddle, Winfred H.

    2014-01-01

    Gifted Black students experience many barriers that contribute to their under-representation in gifted and advanced programs. One of the greatest negative influences comes from peer accusations of acting White that undermine gifted and high-achieving Black students' academic motivation and their interest in challenging courses and programs.…

  11. Etiology of Loss among Parents Falsely Accused of Abuse or Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeman, Laura

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of loss among parents whose children were in child protective custody that resulted from false accusations of abuse or neglect. In practice, child protective service assessments more times than not clear parents of charges of wrongdoing, however the impact of these investigations on parents has not yet been…

  12. High School Students of Color Talk about Accusations of "Acting White."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergin, David A.; Cooks, Helen C.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated social pressure to avoid acting white, interviewing relatively high achieving African American and Mexican American students in public and private high schools. Most did not avoid academic achievement to avoid accusations of acting white, and most reported no loss of ethnic identity. They felt strong resentment toward peers'…

  13. The Variable Nature of Defamation: Social Mores and Accusations of Homosexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Elizabeth M.

    1999-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on defamation, legal interpretation, and social norms by examining 59 state and federal cases decided during the last 150 years involving allegedly false accusations of homosexuality. Finds 15% of the cases resulted in a determination that it was not defamatory to call someone gay, 35% that it was defamatory, and 50%…

  14. The Acquisition of Accusative Object Clitics by IA Children from China: Evidence of Early Age Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delcenserie, Audrey; Genesee, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared the performance of twenty-seven French-speaking internationally adopted (IA) children from China to that of twenty-seven monolingual non-adopted French-speaking children (CTL) matched for age, gender, and socioeconomic status on a Clitic Elicitation task. The IA children omitted significantly more accusative object…

  15. Unpacking the "Colorblind Approach": Accusations of Racism at a Friendly, Mixed-Race School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modica, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The desire to ignore race in favor of a "colorblind" approach has so permeated the cultural ethos of the US, that many whites, teachers included, fear that talking about race in any capacity leaves them open to accusations of racism. As a result, race has become a taboo subject in many US classrooms. This article explores the…

  16. Resting EEG deficits in accused murderers with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schug, Robert A; Yang, Yaling; Raine, Adrian; Han, Chenbo; Liu, Jianghong; Li, Liejia

    2011-10-31

    Empirical evidence continues to suggest a biologically distinct violent subtype of schizophrenia. The present study examined whether murderers with schizophrenia would demonstrate resting EEG deficits distinguishing them from both non-violent schizophrenia patients and murderers without schizophrenia. Resting EEG data were collected from five diagnostic groups (normal controls, non-murderers with schizophrenia, murderers with schizophrenia, murderers without schizophrenia, and murderers with psychiatric conditions other than schizophrenia) at a brain hospital in Nanjing, China. Murderers with schizophrenia were characterized by increased left-hemispheric fast-wave EEG activity relative to non-violent schizophrenia patients, while non-violent schizophrenia patients instead demonstrated increased diffuse slow-wave activity compared to all other groups. Results are discussed within the framework of a proposed left-hemispheric over-processing hypothesis specific to violent individuals with schizophrenia, involving left hemispheric hyperarousal deficits, which may lead to a homicidally violent schizophrenia outcome. PMID:21824754

  17. Staff Caricatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how the author brings staff and students together through an art project that deals with caricatures. The author started with a lesson on caricature, and she made a PowerPoint presentation showcasing the work of Al Hirschfeld. Using photos of the staff, students created portraits and hung them in a main hallway after school.…

  18. Errors and pitfalls: Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice - the second victim.

    PubMed

    Wienke, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 (published at http://www.bundesaerztekammer.de). Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decision are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession

  19. Errors and pitfalls: Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice – the second victim

    PubMed Central

    Wienke, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 (published at http://www.bundesaerztekammer.de). Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decision are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession

  20. Exploring the controversy in child abuse pediatrics and false accusations of abuse.

    PubMed

    Gabaeff, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    There is a controversy in child abuse pediatrics between an established corps of child abuse pediatricians aligned with hospital colleagues and law enforcement, and a multi-specialty challenger group of doctors and other medical professionals working with public interest lawyers. The latter group questions the scientific validity of the core beliefs of child abuse pediatricians and believes that there are a substantial number of false accusations of abuse occurring. An unproven primary hypothesis, crafted around 1975 by a small group of pediatricians with an interest in child abuse, lies at the foundation of child abuse pediatrics. With no scientific study, it was hypothesized that subdural hemorrhage (SDH) and retinal hemorrhage (RH) were diagnostic of shaking abuse. That hypothesis became the so-called "shaken baby syndrome." Through the period 1975-1985, in a coordinated manner, these child abuse specialists coalesced under the American Academy of Pediatrics and began working with district attorneys and social workers, informing them of the ways in which their hypothesis could be applied to prosecutions of child abuse and life-altering social service interventions. In a legal context, using then-prevailing evidentiary rules which treated scientific expert testimony as valid if it was "generally accepted" in the field, they represented falsely that there was general acceptance of their hypothesis and therefore it was valid science. As the ability to convict based on this unproven prime hypothesis (SDH and RH equals abuse) increased, some defense attorneys were professionally compelled by their own doubts to reach out to experts from other fields with experience with SDH and RH, trauma, and biomechanics, for second opinions. Medical and legal challenges to the established thinking soon emerged, based on both old and new evidenced-based literature. As the intensity of the controversy increased, the probability of false accusation became more apparent and the need

  1. Medico-legal implications of mobbing. A false accusation of psychological harassment at the workplace.

    PubMed

    Jarreta, Begoña Martínez; García-Campayo, Javier; Gascón, Santiago; Bolea, Miguel

    2004-12-01

    Mobbing, or psychological harassment at the workplace, is usually defined as a situation in which a person or a group of people engage in extreme psychological violence against another person. In Spain, the number of reports for mobbing has increased extraordinarily in the last years. The reports are increasing dramatically not only before the Labour Courts, but also before the Civil Courts, with claims for damages, and before the Penal Court for offences causing physical or moral injury, etc., since at the present time this figure is not typified as an offence in the Spanish Penal Code. The high degree of complexity of this situation has given rise to frequent misuse of the term and to a number of false accusations of mobbing. A recent European Parliament Resolution on harassment at the workplace addressed the devastating consequences of false accusations. In this paper we present a case in which the "false" victim was mentally ill (paranoia) but succeed in generating an extreme dangerous environment of great harassment against the "false" assailants that were "falsely" accused of mobbing. Forensic diagnosis of the psychiatric disorder suffered by the "false" victim was essential to clarify the issue at the Penal Court. PMID:15639569

  2. Staff Training Best Practices: Targeting Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Randall

    2001-01-01

    Enhancing the attitude of camp staff involves hiring staff that already have good attitudes, training staff in small groups that then train the rest, using the power of story, removing structural barriers, helping people understand how their actions influence organizational outcomes, identifying "termites," and placing a weak counselor with two…

  3. Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reusswig, James, Ed.; Ponzio, Richard, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Eight essays are presented which reflect current problems, issues, and practices related to the development of teacher and administrator expertise. The authors are school district and public school administrators, faculty of schools of education, and a director of staff development in a state department of education. The topics treated are: (1)…

  4. Women as easy scapegoats: witchcraft accusations and women as targets in tea plantations of India.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Soma

    2012-10-01

    This article revisits a much-debated question: Why are women popular targets during witch hunts? By using in-depth interviews this article provides an answer. Women are easy targets or scapegoats for two reasons. First, it is widely believed in the community that was studied that witches do, in fact, exist, and the images of witches are always female. Second, tribal women hold lower positions than men in all social, political, and ritual matters, and this contributes to their vulnerability during the hunt for scapegoats. This article also highlights the roles that rumors play during manipulation of witchcraft accusations to gather support for witch hunts. PMID:23136181

  5. The acquisition of accusative object clitics by IA children from China: evidence of early age effects?

    PubMed

    Delcenserie, Audrey; Genesee, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared the performance of twenty-seven French-speaking internationally adopted (IA) children from China to that of twenty-seven monolingual non-adopted French-speaking children (CTL) matched for age, gender, and socioeconomic status on a Clitic Elicitation task. The IA children omitted significantly more accusative object clitics and made significantly more agreement errors using clitics than the CTL children. No other significant differences were found between the groups. The findings suggest that the adoptees may experience difficulties in morphosyntactic development possibly as a result of their delayed exposure to the adopted language. PMID:24274007

  6. Declarations, accusations and judgement: examining conflict of interest discourses as performative speech-acts.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Christopher; Lipworth, Wendy; Kerridge, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Concerns over conflicts of interest (COI) in academic research and medical practice continue to provoke a great deal of discussion. What is most obvious in this discourse is that when COIs are declared, or perceived to exist in others, there is a focus on both the descriptive question of whether there is a COI and, subsequently, the normative question of whether it is good, bad or neutral. We contend, however, that in addition to the descriptive and normative, COI declarations and accusations can be understood as performatives. In this article, we apply J.L. Austin's performative speech-act theory to COI discourses and illustrate how this works using a contemporary case study of COI in biomedical publishing. We argue that using Austin's theory of performative speech-acts serves to highlight the social arrangements and role of authorities in COI discourse and so provides a rich framework to examine declarations, accusations and judgements of COI that often arise in the context of biomedical research and practice. PMID:27105634

  7. Donor organ distribution according to urgency of need or outcome maximization in liver transplantation. A questionnaire survey among patients and medical staff.

    PubMed

    Umgelter, Katrin S; Tobiasch, Moritz; Anetsberger, Aida; Blobner, Manfred; Thorban, Stefan; Umgelter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Low donor rates in Germany cause a trade-off between equity in the distribution of chances for survival and efficiency in dead-donor liver transplantation. Public attitudes concerning the principles that should govern organ allocation are of interest. We performed a questionnaire-based study among patients and medical staff. 1826 of 2200 questionnaires were returned. 79.2%, 67.1%, and 24.4% patients wanted to accept liver transplantation for themselves if expected 1-year survival was 80%, 50%, and 20%, respectively. 57.7% affirmed 'averting immediate risk of death (urgency) is a more important criterion for organ allocation than expected long-term success' (P = 0.002 against indifference). The majority of medical staff took the opposite decision. 20.7%, 8.8%, and 21.2% of patients chose 50%, 33%, and 10% as lowest acceptable 5-year survival, respectively. 49.3% accepted a survival of <10%. Variables associated with preferring urgency over efficiency as criterion for allocation were age (OR 1.009; 95% CI: 1.000-1.017; female gender (OR 1.331; 95%CI 0.992-1.784); higher education (OR 0.881; 95%CI 0.801-0.969); and refusal of transplantation for oneself (OR 1.719; 95%CI 1.272-2.324). Most patients supported urgency-based liver allocation. Patients and medical staff would accept lower survival rates than the transplant community. PMID:25557453

  8. The role of trust in nurturing compliance: a study of accused tax avoiders.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kristina

    2004-04-01

    Why an institution's rules and regulations are obeyed or disobeyed is an important question for regulatory agencies. This paper discusses the findings of an empirical study that shows that the use of threat and legal coercion as a regulatory tool--in addition to being more expensive to implement--can sometimes be ineffective in gaining compliance. Using survey data collected from 2,292 taxpayers accused of tax avoidance, it will be demonstrated that variables such as trust need to be considered when managing noncompliance. If regulators are seen to be acting fairly, people will trust the motives of that authority, and will defer to their decisions voluntarily. This paper therefore argues that to shape desired behavior, regulators will need to move beyond motivation linked purely to deterrence. Strategies directed at reducing levels of distrust between the two sides may prove particularly effective in gaining voluntary compliance with an organization's rules and regulations. PMID:15141778

  9. Introducing an online community into a clinical education setting: a pilot study of student and staff engagement and outcomes using blended learning

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are growing reasons to use both information and communication functions of learning technologies as part of clinical education, but the literature offers few accounts of such implementations or evaluations of their impact. This paper details the process of implementing a blend of online and face-to-face learning and teaching in a clinical education setting and it reports on the educational impact of this innovation. Methods This study designed an online community to complement a series of on-site workshops and monitored its use over a semester. Quantitative and qualitative data recording 43 final-year medical students' and 13 clinical educators' experiences with this blended approach to learning and teaching were analysed using access, adoption and quality criteria as measures of impact. Results The introduction of the online community produced high student ratings of the quality of learning and teaching and it produced student academic results that were equivalent to those from face-to-face-only learning and teaching. Staff had mixed views about using blended learning. Conclusions Projects such as this take skilled effort and time. Strong incentives are required to encourage clinical staff and students to use a new mode of communication. A more synchronous or multi-channel communication feedback system might stimulate increased adoption. Cultural change in clinical teaching is also required before clinical education can benefit more widely from initiatives such as this. PMID:20100354

  10. Rape myths, alcohol intoxication and condom use among males accused of sexual assault in Kabale, rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Dan K; Kakaire, Othman; Osinde, Michael O

    2011-07-01

    Through a cross-sectional study conducted at Kabale Regional Hospital, among 111 men accused of rape and admitted for forensic examination from June 2009 to June 2010, we assessed whether the characteristics of perpetrators and the circumstances of the alleged sexual assault differ in acquaintance and stranger rape. Using a semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire and records review, data were collected on socio-demographic variables, circumstances of the alleged offense and the relation of the accused to the survivors. The mean age was 26.6 years (± 10.1 years), 30 (27.0) had been drunk and 67.2% (75) knew their accuser. There was no difference in the socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics between stranger and acquaintance rape. There were no differences regarding whether the alleged crime occurred at the assailant's/survivor's home or outside either the survivor's or the assailant's home setting. Respondents either trivialized or justified the accusations against them. Our study shows that rape myths and drinking alcohol were common in all types of sexual assault. PMID:21532000

  11. Rights of the Accused: Criminal Amendments in the Bill of Rights. A Compilation of Lessons by Minnesota Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Jennifer, Ed.

    The 36 lessons collected in this publication are designed to introduce students to the rights of the accused and provide a scholarly study of these rights, exploring historical development as well as current application. Lessons are provided for all grade levels. The topics covered include the Bill of Rights, criminal rights amendments, juvenile…

  12. The Perils of Being a Male Primary/Junior Teacher: Vulnerability and Accusations of Inappropriate Contact with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Michael; Gosse, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    There is a perceived shortage of male teachers in education, particularly at the primary/junior (P/J) level where male teachers in Canada account for a dwindling minority. Included among the many factors inhibiting males from becoming P/J teachers are perceptions that males might be unduly vulnerable to false accusations of inappropriate conduct…

  13. "How Could They Believe That?": Explaining to Students Why Accusation of Witchcraft Made Good Sense in Seventeenth-Century New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbeer, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Explains that students must understand that, due to the beliefs of the time in New England, accusing people of witchcraft during the seventeenth century was plausible. Provides background information on societal beliefs centered upon witchcraft and the supernatural, as well as the process of accusing people of being witches. (CMK)

  14. How to staff for RACs.

    PubMed

    Brocato, Lori; Hirschl, Nancy; Padfield, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    To meet the challenges presented by recovery audit contractors (RACs), hospitals should perform six tasks that require appropriate investments in staff: conduct a financial risk assessment of the impact of RAC reviews on the organization; establish a RAC team and assign a coordinator; receive and fill RAC requests; track RAC activity; manage RAC appeals; analyze RAC audit outcomes. PMID:20088469

  15. Power lines: Derrida, discursive psychology and the management of accusations of teacher bullying.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, A

    2000-12-01

    This study connects broad issues of classroom control and the disciplining of pupils by teachers with a detailed examination of the way teachers deal with an implied accusation that they have been bullying. The analysis of interviews develops with reference to discursive psychology and Derrida's development of deconstruction. Billig's (1992) insights into ways that participants' accounts can neutralize threats to established social arrangements are employed in relating detailed analytic points to the broader power relations between teacher and pupil. Interviews were conducted with Scottish secondary school teachers, and subjected to close textual analysis. This resulted in the development of three themes: (1) Subjectivity Construction, in which the functional role of the construction of mental entities is examined; (2) Normalizing Techniques, identifying strategies whereby intimidation can be constructed as normal; and (3) Figuration, examining the utility of figurative language--metaphors, maxims, and so on. These themes display the subtlety and complexity of teachers' strategies for distancing themselves from being held accountable for reported intimidation. To conclude, three broader features of the study are discussed: the contribution to discursive psychology that Derrida's deconstructive philosophy can make; the respecification of psychology and subjectivity as participants' resources for action; and the contribution that this type of detailed study can make to issues of power and social critique. PMID:11190687

  16. The Impact of Staff Turnover and Staff Density on Treatment Quality in a Psychiatric Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Wolfram A.; Bielitz, Christoph J.; Georgi, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Intuition suggests that improving stability of the health workforce brings benefits to staff, the organization and, most importantly, the patients. Unfortunately, there is limited research available to support this, and how health workforce stability can contribute to reduced costs and better treatment outcomes. To help to rectify this situation, we investigated the effects of staff turnover and staff density (staff members per patient) on the treatment outcome of inpatients in a psychiatric clinic. Our data come from the standard assessment of 1429 patients who sought treatment in our clinic from January 2011 to August 2013. Correlation analysis shows no significant effect of raw staff turnover (the total number of psychiatrists, physicians and psychologists starting or quitting work per month) on treatment quality. However, we do find two significant beneficial effects: first, a higher staff consistency (time without staff turnover) and second, a higher staff density lead to an improvement of treatment quality. Our findings underline the dire need for an extended effort to achieve optimal staff retention, both to improve patient’s outcomes and to reduce health expenses. PMID:27065925

  17. Staff Development Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashur, Nina E.; And Others

    An evaluation of the staff development program at College of the Canyons (California) was conducted in 1991 to provide information applicable to program improvement. Questionnaires were distributed to all faculty, classified staff, and flexible calendar program committee and staff development advisory committee members, resulting in response rates…

  18. Directions in Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela, Ed.

    This collection of readings is intended to provide a source book on best practices in staff development in higher education within a British context. The 13 papers are grouped into three parts: part 1 presents the educational development tradition which has focused on development of staff as teachers; part 2 considers development of staff in…

  19. Successfully Coaching Nursing Staff to Publish Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kooker, Barbara Molina; Latimer, Renee; Mark, Debra D

    2015-12-01

    There is a need for bedside nurses to disseminate the results of evidence-based practice quality initiatives to a wider audience through publications in peer-reviewed journals. Barriers to publication are common and include lack of time, skills, experience, confidence, and tangible support. This article describes the structured approach, timeline, writing activities, and coaching guidance used to support the publication of 12 quality improvement articles in 1 nursing journal. PMID:26565642

  20. Developing behavioral objectives for perioperative staff development.

    PubMed

    Beitz, J M

    1996-07-01

    Behavioral objectives (i.e., clear statements that describe intended instructional outcomes) are a crucial component of educational planning for perioperative staff development. Properly written objectives promote positive learning outcomes such as increased motivation, better retention of information, and improved instructional accountability. This article describes the advantages of using behavioral objectives, gives a historical perspective of their development, presents a practical "how-to" approach to formulating them, and delineates their link to the selection of appropriate evaluation methods. PMID:8827333

  1. Planning Staff Meetings. Ideas for Staff Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2002-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of the planning and the process of organizing staff meetings. Specifically addresses the areas concerning clarity of purpose and structure of meetings, as well as promoting learning and connecting during meetings. Provides specific strategies to achieve these goals including suggestions for self-assessment. (SD)

  2. Factors Affecting the Quality of Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Larry O.

    A review of the literature concerning the effectiveness and quality of staff development programs focuses on factors that affect the success of such programs. These factors include: individual concerns, training activities, applications, qualifications of consultants, scheduling, strategies, facilities, feedback, collaboration, and outcomes. It is…

  3. Listening to Staff, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jane; Davies, Peter

    A 2002 staff satisfaction survey was administered to 100 sixth form colleges, general further education colleges, and beacon and specialist colleges in England. A questionnaire containing 38 positive statements concerning 6 broad areas one's own role; the staff of the college; style of senior management; communication; customers, including…

  4. Why Do Staff Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Connie

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 211 returning staff from 25 camps and interviewed 19 returning staff to study factors that influence a counselor's decision to return to camp. Examined the following dimensions of motivation and hygiene factors: (1) stimulation or inspiration; (2) personal; (3) job-related experience; (4) living conditions and camp life; (5) camp…

  5. Staff Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menlo Park City School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Believing that the knowledge and expertise of the District's staff are essential in the strength of the District as an effective educational institution, the Menlo Park City School District expanded its current staff development plan to be more consistent with current knowledge on the…

  6. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 150 - Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15) B Appendix B to Part 150 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pt. 150, App. B Appendix B to Part 150—Format for Assignment of Errors...

  7. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 150 - Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15) B Appendix B to Part 150 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pt. 150, App. B Appendix B to Part 150—Format for Assignment of Errors...

  8. Motivation and Outcomes for University Students in a Restorative Justice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher Dahl, Meghan; Meagher, Peter; Vander Velde, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    A restorative justice program (RJP) was developed at a large university in the housing student conduct office. Students accused of misconduct who participated in a restorative justice (RJ) conference completed surveys regarding their motivations and perceived outcomes. Results showed that students who were motivated to make reparations to others…

  9. [Peace policy by accusations of heresy against Johannes Crato (1519-1585) and denunciation of Paracelcius followers as Arians].

    PubMed

    Bröer, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Since 1563 the Paracelsians were publicly denounced as Arians who denied the full divinity of Christ. A work of Alexander von Suchten, who was personal physician of the Polish King, triggered the polemic. The "Propositiones" of Suchten outlined a doctrine of salvation based on chemistry and medicine. As can be proved the pamphlet was influenced by heterodox christologies and doctrines of justification. But there are no indications of contacts between Suchten and Polish antitrinitarians of his time. Actually the public denunciation of the Paracelsians as Arians was a clever political move of the Emperor's personal physician Johannes Crato who aimed at the reformation of medicine in a humanistic sense. This aim was threatened by the fundamental opposition of the Paracelsians, exactly as his irenic religious policy was jeopardized by the growing confessional dogmatism. In this situation Crato used the instrument of denunciation as a means to dissociate himself from medical and theological extremists. The Zurich naturalist Konrad Gessner supplied him with the basic idea. Thomas Erastus, medical professor in Heidelberg, worked out the accusation in detail. PMID:12522916

  10. Guidance to detect deception with the Aberdeen Report Judgment Scales: are verbal content cues useful to detect false accusations?

    PubMed

    Sporer, Siegfried L; Masip, Jaume; Cramer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In 2 studies we evaluated the efficiency of training raters with a short version of the Aberdeen Report Judgment Scales (ARJS-STV-S) in assessing the truthfulness of transcribed accounts. Participants told both truthful and deceptive accounts of either illegal or immoral actions. In the truthful accounts, the participants described their own misdeeds honestly (true confessions). In the deceptive accounts, the participants also described their own misdeeds but attributed them to someone else (false accusations). In Study 1, guided (n = 32) and unguided (n = 32) raters evaluated 64 transcribed accounts (16 per rater). Only a few ARJS-STV-S criteria differed significantly between false and true accounts. In Study 2 (N = 29), guided raters evaluated the same transcripts using only the most promising criteria of Study 1. Judgments in Study 2 were less biased (in terms of signal detection theory), and the classification of deceptive accounts was significantly better compared with a no-guidance control group and the guided group of Study 1. A Brunswikian lens model analysis showed that with the smaller set of cues there is a better correspondence between the ecological validities and the subjective utilities, which may explain the higher accuracy rates. When the criteria have little or no diagnostic value, or when true and false stories are very similar, providing raters with a larger set of truth criteria does not increase accuracy but instead may bias raters toward making truth judgments. Practical implications for content-based training programs are outlined. PMID:24720096

  11. Training to raise staff awareness about safeguarding children.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jane

    2015-04-01

    To improve outcomes for children and young people health organisations are required to train all staff in children's safeguarding. This creates difficulties for large complex organisations where most staff provide services to the adult population. Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust is a large acute and community trust that had difficulties in engaging staff in children's safeguarding training. Compliance rates for clinical staff who were trained in children's safeguarding were low and needed to be addressed. This article sets out why safeguarding training is important for all staff and how the trust achieved staff engagement and improved compliance rates. To evaluate, maintain and develop safeguarding knowledge, understanding, skills, attitude and behaviour further resources are planned to allow access to learning resources in a variety of formats. PMID:25858407

  12. Listening to Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Owen, Jane

    Levels of staff satisfaction across the United Kingdom's post-16 sector were examined by distributing a questionnaire at more than 80 further education colleges. The questionnaire elicited 9,515 responses. Study participants rated 38 statements on a 4-point scale. The questions focused on the following areas: (1) faculty members' perceptions of…

  13. Higher Education Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clery, Sue; Lee, John

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews changes in higher education staff by occupation between 1993 and 1997. Specific attention is paid to staffing patterns in states with right to work laws compared to those without it. When a state enacts a right to work law, it can be assumed it is not supportive of public unions. This analysis is based on data from the National…

  14. Ideas on Staff Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Suggests the use of timely communication through feedback for the purpose of boosting staff morale. Managers can cause employees to motivate themselves by restructuring jobs to satisfy employees' needs, by using artful criticism, and by asking employees about morale. Includes a list of key ingredients of a satisfying job. (SH)

  15. Faculty and Staff Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Community Coll. System.

    This booklet is intended to acquaint faculty and staff members with general information about the University of Kentucky community College System, and to explain some of its policies affecting them. The booklet is organized into five sections. Section I contains general information about the system, gives its history, purpose, and a map of the…

  16. Systematic Staff Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  17. Effective Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Robert N.

    Beginning with the observation that educators are faced with rising public expectations, declining resources, and increased public criticism, this paper describes a six-fold model for determining how staff development is operating and how it can be made to operate more effectively, in a self-renewing manner. The six dimensions consist of the…

  18. Staff Reactions to Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winstead, Elizabeth B.

    1994-01-01

    Describes two surveys of three libraries on a university campus, one conducted in 1987 and one in 1993, that investigated how library staff reacted to the library automation process. The hypotheses that were tested are discussed, and results are compared to a similar survey conducted in 1985. (LRW)

  19. Moving Staff through Difficult Issues. Ideas for Training Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie; Pelo, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Offers practical solutions to three problems faced by administrators of early childhood education programs: motivating staff with different levels of commitment, dealing with staff communications and conflicts, and minimizing the impact of teacher turnover. (JPB)

  20. The impact of prison conditions on staff well-being.

    PubMed

    Bierie, David M

    2012-02-01

    Prison conditions have been at the center of long-standing debates among corrections scholars. Interestingly, this debate has focused on inmates alone while paying little attention to the potential impact of prison conditions on staff. Addressing this limitation, the study draws on survey data collected from a stratified random sample of prison staff working at all federal prisons in 2007 to examine the impact of prison conditions on staff well-being (substance use, psychological symptomatology, physical duress, and sick leave use). Mixed-level models show that harsh physical conditions correspond to significant problems for staff on all outcomes measured (individual-level impacts). The data also show that prison-level aggregations of harsher conditions correspond to significant deterioration in staff physical and psychological symptomatology above and beyond individual-level effects. PMID:21123210

  1. Telecourses for nursing staff development.

    PubMed

    Clark, C E

    1989-01-01

    Instructional television is a viable option for meeting staff development needs in health care agencies. Telecourses produced by the Intercollegiate Center for Nursing Education provide staff development educators with an efficient and effective alternative for meeting selected educational needs of staff within health care institutions, as well as interested nurses throughout the community. Use of this instructional methodology is described. PMID:2732789

  2. Staff perceptions of primary healthcare service change: influences on staff satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tham, Rachel; Buykx, Penny; Kinsman, Leigh; Ward, Bernadette; Humphreys, John S; Asaid, Adel; Tuohey, Kathy; Jenner, Rohan

    2014-11-01

    Strong primary healthcare (PHC) services are efficient, cost-effective and associated with better population health outcomes. However, little is known about the role and perspectives of PHC staff in creating a sustainable service. Staff from a single-point-of-entry primary health care service in Elmore, a small rural community in north-west Victoria, were surveyed. Qualitative methods were used to collect data to show how the key factors associated with the evolution of a once-struggling medical service into a successful and sustainable PHC service have influenced staff satisfaction. The success of the service was linked to visionary leadership, teamwork and community involvement while service sustainability was described in terms of inter-professional linkages and the role of the service in contributing to the broader community. These factors were reported to have a positive impact on staff satisfaction. The contribution of service delivery change and ongoing service sustainability to staff satisfaction in this rural setting has implications for planning service change in other primary health care settings. PMID:25283371

  3. [The biopolitical production "impaired" subjects within the scope of "Action T4" - a re-reading of "I accuse"].

    PubMed

    Offermann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The history of the Nazi "euthanasia programme" named "Aktion T4" has been examined from a biopolitical perspective for some time. However, these studies have not focused on the analytics of biopolitical practices of subjectivization as an essential element of the Foucaultian concept. The use of such a theoretical approach can be used in combination with new and substantial empirical research results. The Heidelberg DFG research programme evaluated the "T4" medical records statistically in order to conclusively determine which features had significant importance for selection by the "T4" experts. The inability to work or having an incurable mental illness were the criteria by which psychiatrists and "T4" experts subjectivized patients as "lives not worth living". Considering these new results and a biopolitical approach as starting point, it is time to reconsider the Nazi "euthanasia" propaganda movie "Ich klage an" ("I Accuse", 1941). When scholars began to study the production process of the movie in the 1980s, they looked at the narrative and the movie characters from an instrumental perspective. In other words, they examined how the "T4" protagonists and filmmakers sought to create a film which affected the viewers' opinion in a specific way intentionally influenced by them. According to that line of thought, the character Hanna was neglected because she was considered to be the morally inoffensive disguise of the intended propaganda massage. However, two works from the 1990s which were gender history-oriented finally focused on Hanna and the way the film narrative turns her into a subject "not worth living". Based on these considerations, this article states its thesis. The criteria of the film to subjectivize Hanna share many basic characteristics with those of the subjectivization process of the "T4" victims. To prove this statement, the analytics of the movie are combined with the results of the DFG project. Through the combination of both types of sources

  4. Training Out-of-School Time Staff. Part 2 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Frontline Staff. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Burkhauser; Mary; Bowie, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    A skilled and sustainable workforce is one of the most important markers of high-quality out-of-school time programs. Given the links between skilled staff, high-quality programs, and better youth outcomes, staff training has become an essential part of program implementation. To expand what is known about staff training, Child Trends recently…

  5. Improving staff selection processes.

    PubMed

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research. PMID:25370266

  6. Office support staff.

    PubMed

    Choat, Dennis E

    2005-11-01

    The pace at which we live and practice in this new century leaves little time to manage many of the menial tasks of day-to-day survival. This is especially true in the field of medicine. With today's insurance policies and procedures, Health Information Privacy Protection Act (HIPPA) regulations, and the low return of payment for time invested, it is crucial to have a supportive group of people around you to help make your valuable time as meaningful as possible. This article will describe an arrangement of ancillary office staff for a colorectal practice. There will be detailed information on job descriptions, expectations, and level of training required for each. Upon completion of this article, one should be able to identify the personnel needed to establish and manage an efficient office from the front desk to the billing department and ultimately the practice manager. PMID:20011292

  7. Values and Psychological Acceptance as Correlates of Burnout in Support Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noone, Stephen J.; Hastings, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that acceptance and mindfulness interventions for support staff in intellectual disability (ID) services can have beneficial mental health outcomes for staff themselves and individuals with ID. However, there are few data focusing on the relevance of related psychological processes for support staff well-being. The…

  8. Reviewing staff performance and salaries.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2005-01-01

    Do you feel like you're on shaky ground when it comes time to evaluate your staffs performance or to give them raises? If so, you're not alone. Staff performance and salary reviews are among the most dreaded tasks among medical practice managers. Yet, they are among the most effective techniques you can use to motivate, manage, correct, and reward your staff. This article provides an overview of the different kinds of appraisals you will need to conduct with your staff and the order in which to do them. It suggests that you begin the process by establishing concrete goals for your medical practice and then help your staff follow suit by developing their own performance goals for the next six months. This article also provides how-to guidance about conducting regular interim progress reviews with your staff to keep abreast of progress, changes, and problems and to issue ongoing assistance and feedback. It explains how to conduct tension-free semi-annual staff performance reviews and semi-annual or annual salary reviews, including a formula for calculating potential raises for each employee in nine increments. Finally, this article offers additional tips for evaluating your staffs performance, including job description updates and staff surveys. PMID:16302443

  9. Staff nurses revitalize a clinical ladder program through shared governance.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Susan A; Fickley, Sharon; Knight, Diane; Richards, Kimberley; Rosson, Joy; Rumbley, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    After 20 years of a static clinical ladder program at our institution, the clinical ladder program was completely redesigned using a staff nurse-led shared governance structure to re-envision the program as an innovative, staff leadership model to meet our organizational nursing mission and vision strategic plans around retention and professional development. The literature demonstrated a lack of outcome-driven findings on the sustainability of hospital-based clinical ladder programs. The authors cover the rationale for our clinical ladder model, the process used for revision, the implementation strategies, and the specific outcomes tracked regarding nurse satisfaction, affiliation, retention, and participation of staff nurses advancing to the optional upper levels of the ladder. PMID:21263275

  10. Nursing Home Quality, Cost, Staffing, and Staff Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Hicks, Lanis; Grando, Victoria; Petroski, Gregory F.; Madsen, Richard W.; Mehr, David R.; Conn, Vicki; Zwygart-Staffacher, Mary; Scott, Jill; Flesner, Marcia; Bostick, Jane; Porter, Rose; Maas, Meridean

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the processes of care, organizational attributes, cost of care, staffing level, and staff mix in a sample of Missouri homes with good, average, and poor resident outcomes. Design and Methods: A three-group exploratory study design was used, with 92 nursing homes randomly selected from all nursing…

  11. Staff Development Program: 1989-90. Glendale Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendale Community Coll., CA.

    In spring 1986, the Glendale Community College (GCC) Board of Trustees made a substantial financial commitment to establish and maintain a professional development program designed to benefit all full- and part-time college employees. The underlying goal of the staff development activities is to maximize student access and outcomes by synthesizing…

  12. Staff Differentiation. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin County Superintendent of Schools, Corte Madera, CA.

    This annotated bibliography reviews selected literature focusing on the concept of staff differentiation. Included are 62 items (dated 1966-1970), along with a list of mailing addresses where copies of individual items can be obtained. Also a list of 31 staff differentiation projects receiving financial assistance from the U.S. Office of Education…

  13. Design for Effective Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seagren, Alan T.

    This paper presents a model for designing an effective staff development program. The rationale, philosophy, and instructional design utilized in the instructional Staff Development (ISD) program provides the basis for the design presented. The ISD program was conceptualized, developed, pilot tested, and field tested as a cooperative research…

  14. Recruiting and Retaining Summer Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossen, Brian; Yerkes, Rita

    1998-01-01

    Recruiting of camp staff is challenged by economic and workplace restructuring, including business downsizing, part-time and temporary employment patterns, and generational attitude changes. Strategies for hiring and retaining staff include knowing what college-age workers want, marketing benefits, adopting new business strategies, and empowering…

  15. Staff Bullying in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…

  16. Risk management through staff education.

    PubMed

    Seisser, M A; Epstein, A L

    1998-01-01

    The staff members of a healthcare organization are recognized as students of risk management. The risk manager, through application of the fundamentals of andragogy (i.e., learning strategies specific to adult learners), is in an advantageous position to assist staff in successfully applying risk management thought processes and related actions. PMID:10185075

  17. Preparing Your Staff for Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer-Starks, Suanne

    2003-01-01

    Camps should have emergency protocols in place and involve appropriate personnel in their development. Staff should be certified in first aid and CPR, a recordkeeping system should be established, and mock emergencies should be practiced during staff orientation. It may also be advisable to involve campers in practice situations. First aid/CPR…

  18. Staff Development and Educational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, W. Robert, Ed.; And Others

    The contents of this volume are directed to designers and managers of staff development programs. It is designed to provide a systemic consideration of all factors involved, including the long-range goals of staff development, the behaviors of the people involved, the interface of existing organizational structures, and the mechanisms for program…

  19. Staff Development at the Crossroads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Susan L.; McGuire, Peggy

    1993-01-01

    Staff development continues to be an important but much-debated topic in adult basic education and adult literacy education. Some staff development professionals start with the "deficit" model, in which learners are presumed to be empty vessels to be filled with knowledge. This model ignores the rich and varied experience that practitioners bring…

  20. Staff Members as Lifelong Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Joanne V.

    Based on the assumption that all community college staff members should be lifelong learners, this paper outlines the purposes and principles underlying a quality staff development program and enumerates the elements, activities, incentives, and other considerations that are necessary for the program to be successful. First, the purposes of staff…

  1. Exploring Post-Program Psychological Adjustment for Adult Staff Facilitating a Wilderness Adventure Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence-Wood, Ellie; Raymond, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a pilot study of the post-program psychological adjustment outcomes of adult staff facilitating an Australian-based wilderness adventure program for youth at risk. The descriptive and correlational survey study (N = 62) examined the psychological adjustment processes staff underwent following program completion, and the factors…

  2. Staff- and School-Level Predictors of School Organizational Health: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevans, Katherine; Bradshaw, Catherine; Miech, Richard; Leaf, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Background: An organizationally healthy school environment is associated with favorable student and staff outcomes and thus is often targeted by school improvement initiatives. However, few studies have differentiated staff-level from school-level predictors of organizational health. Social disorganization theory suggests that school-level…

  3. WTCSB [Wisconsin Technical College System Board]. Equity Staff Development Workshops and Services. Phase VII Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldus, Lorayne

    This document reports the outcomes of a project that was conducted for the following purposes: provide statewide equity staff development workshops for Wisconsin technical college staff, school-to-work personnel, K-12 teachers, and persons who work in state agencies and community-based organizations; establish a task force and facilitate…

  4. Differences in Assisted Living Staff Perceptions, Experiences, and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lauren W.; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Gwyther, Lisa P.; Washington, Tiffany; Cagle, John C.; Reed, David

    2014-01-01

    Research within residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) settings has shown that the attitudes of personal care (PC) staff towards their organization, and its residents and families, can affect the quality of resident care. This paper describes the perceptions, experiences, and attitudes of PC staff and their supervisors and considers these data in the context of non-hierarchical staffing patterns – a philosophically expected, yet unproven tenet of RC/AL. Using data collected from 18 RC/AL communities, these analyses compared the characteristics, perceptions, experiences, and attitudes of PC staff (N=250) and supervisors (N=30). Compared to supervisors, PC staff reported greater burden, frustration, depersonalization, hassles, and feeling significantly more controlling of, and less in partnership with, families (p<0.05). Because the PC staff experience is crucial for their and resident outcomes, more work is needed to create a work environment where PC staff are less burdened and have better attitudes towards work and families. PMID:23937102

  5. Managing Custodial and Maintenance Staffs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents some basic maintenance management techniques that can help schools meet their budgets, preserve staffing levels, meet productivity needs, and sustain quality services. Tips for staff recruitment, training, and retention are explored. (GR)

  6. Human Bite of a Staff Nurse on a Psychiatric Unit.

    PubMed

    Suguna, Anbazhagan; Joseph, Bobby

    2016-04-01

    Occupational violence among health care professionals is a cause for concern, although often neglected especially in developing countries like India. Violence undermines the healing mission of the health care organization and interferes with the ability of the health care team to optimally contribute to positive patient outcomes. The authors discuss a case of a human bite of a staff nurse on a psychiatric unit in a tertiary care Indian hospital. The reported violence against this staff nurse lead to her admission for emergency care followed by emotional stress. Issues related to prevention of occupational violence are also discussed. PMID:26245465

  7. Advantage and Choice: Social Relationships and Staff Assistance in Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Street, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To understand how “cumulative inequality” (CI), expressed as individual advantage and choice, and “external social supports” contribute to the quality of social relationships and perceptions of staff assistance for older individuals in different assisted living (AL) settings. Methods. Data are from 429 cognitively intact AL residents aged 60 years and older interviewed for the Florida Study of Assisted Living. Bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses show how individual advantage and choice and external social networks influence respondents’ social relationships and staff assistance in AL. Results. Controlling for resident and facility characteristics, being able to pay privately enhances resident satisfaction with staff assistance and having control over the move to AL is positively associated with perceptions of staff relationships and assistance. Maintaining contact with pre-AL friends predicts quality of coresident relationships, as does family contact. Regular contact with family buffers some of the disadvantages associated with CI for perceptions of staff relationships but not perceptions of staff assistance. Discussion. Individual advantage and choice influence the quality of staff relationships and assistance for AL residents but matter little for coresident relationships. External social relationships buffer some of the risks associated with CI for perceptions of staff relationships but not perceived quality of staff assistance. Findings highlight outcomes associated with CI, including predictable risks that disadvantaged elders face in particular types of AL settings, differential advantages others enjoy that influence positive perceptions of staff relationships and staff assistance, and the enduring importance of supportive social relationships. PMID:20007640

  8. Outcome-Based Education: Another Educational Bandwagon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Traces the roots of outcome-based education in mastery learning. Considers such obstacles as lack of reform preconditions, poor understanding of program features, teacher resistance, teacher domestication, staff mobility, and routinization. (SK)

  9. Noninstructional Staff Perceptions of the College Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Molly H.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored staff perception of organizational climate, including the impact of gender on staff interactions with faculty and students and staff perceptions of workplace satisfaction within the community college. The overarching research question guiding this study was, What are noninstructional staff perceptions of the community college…

  10. 19 CFR 207.64 - Staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff reports. 207.64 Section 207.64 Customs... EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Five-Year Reviews § 207.64 Staff reports. (a) Prehearing staff report. The Director shall prepare and place in the record, prior to the hearing, a prehearing staff report...

  11. Staff Association Handbook, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery Coll. Staff Association, Takoma Park, MD.

    This handbook provides a list of Staff Senate and Committee members of the Staff Association of Montgomery College, a copy of the bylaws of the association, and sections of the college's "Policies and Procedures Manual" that affect staff employees. These sections of the manual pertain to: Administrative and Staff Communication; Affirmative Action…

  12. Technology in Staff Development. "Net"working: Staff Development Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vojtek, Rosie O'Brien; Vojtek, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of computer networking resources available via the Internet to assist staff developers. After explaining how to get started on the Internet, the article describes electronic mail, the World Wide Web (the graphic part of the Internet), archives and databases, newsgroups, chatlines, the ERIC site, and virtual environments. (SM)

  13. Staff detection with stable paths.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Cardoso, Jaime; Capela, Artur; Rebelo, Ana; Guedes, Carlos; Pinto da Costa, Joaquim

    2009-06-01

    The preservation of musical works produced in the past requires their digitalization and transformation into a machine-readable format. The processing of handwritten musical scores by computers remains far from ideal. One of the fundamental stages to carry out this task is the staff line detection. We investigate a general-purpose, knowledge-free method for the automatic detection of music staff lines based on a stable path approach. Lines affected by curvature, discontinuities, and inclination are robustly detected. Experimental results show that the proposed technique consistently outperforms well-established algorithms. PMID:19372615

  14. Does Finnish hospital staff job satisfaction vary across occupational groups?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction of staff is an essential outcome variable in research when describing the work environment of successful hospitals. Numerous studies have evaluated the topic, but few previous studies have assessed the job satisfaction of all staff in hospital settings. It is important to discover if there are any unsatisfied groups of people working in hospitals, the aspects they are unsatisfied with and why. The aim of this study was to evaluate job satisfaction of all staff working at a Finnish university hospital, identify differences in job satisfaction between staff groups, and explore the relationship between their self-evaluated quality of work and job satisfaction. Methods Data were collected from 1424 employees of the hospital using the web-based Kuopio University Job Satisfaction Scale survey instrument in autumn 2010. The research data were analysed by using SPSS 19.0 for Windows. Frequency and percentage distributions, as well as mean values, were used to describe the data. A non-parametric test (Kruskal–Wallis test) was used to determine the significance of differences in scores between different groups of staff members and between quality evaluations. Results The overall job satisfaction of the employees was good. They rated both motivating factors of their work and work welfare as excellent. The areas causing most dissatisfaction were work demands and participation in decision making. Physicians formed the most satisfied group, nurses and maintenance staff were the least satisfied, and office and administrative staff were fairly satisfied. Staff who rated the quality of work in their units as high usually also considered their job satisfaction to be excellent. Conclusions Every staff member has an influence on job satisfaction in her/his unit. A culture of participation should be developed and maintained in the units and the whole hospital to ensure that all staff feel they play important roles in the hospital. A university hospital is

  15. [Gastroenterology - accusations and errors in treatment: evaluation of the completed expertise process in internal medicine of the expert committee of North Rhineland for the years 2001 to 2005].

    PubMed

    Weber, B; Becker, K; Strohmeyer, G

    2008-08-01

    Since three decades the extrajudical expertise procedures of the Expert Committee and Arbitration Group has served to pacify the doctor-patient relationship. Systematic analyses of accusations and errors provide valuable data that help to avoid treatment errors and liability disputes against physicians. Disease of the gastrointestinal tract were found ex post to be the main diagnosis in 10 % of the patients entering complaints. The most common benign diseases were bile duct diseases (1.5 %), acute appendicitis (1.2 %) and diverticulosis (0.9 %); malignant tumours of the digestive organs were found in 1.8 %. About one-third of the procedures were directed internists; with 25 % the quota of treatment errors was less than the general average of one third. With an overproportional frequency (56 %) diagnosis errors were confirmed for the occurrence of appendicitis. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic examinations were the subject of the claimed erroneous treatment by internists in 34 % of the cases: perforations and postinterventional pancreatitis were frequent reasons for filing a complaint. For the resultant injuries, including 4 fatalities, the internists were found to be liable for damages in a total of 17 % of the cases. PMID:18759199

  16. Alcohol and Staff Leisure Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the problem of alcohol use and abuse by camp staff. Describes alcohol policies of two different camps. Camp Highlands allows responsible drinking but not intoxication. Camp Olympia requires total abstinence from alcohol. A policy that clearly expresses the camp's philosophy toward alcohol and spells out all expectations and results is…

  17. Hampshire Country School Staff Commitments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampshire Country School, Rindge, NH.

    Intended for professional personnel of the Hampshire Country School, which treats gifted children with immobilizing emotional dysfunctions, the handbook specifies staff commitments. The Code of Ethics, adapted from the National Education Association Code as supplemented by The Council for Exceptional Children, sets forth four principles:…

  18. Psychological States and Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKibbin, Michael; Joyce, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    A study of a group of 21 teachers focused on the relationship between their psychological states and their utilization of professional growth activities and programs. The study's objective was to generate a practical way of applying Maslow's Theory of Personality to the study of staff development. (JN)

  19. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  20. Top 10 Staff Survival Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Laurie

    1995-01-01

    Tips for camp staff on how to survive summer camp include not giving campers sugary drinks before bedtime, setting behavior limits with campers, setting an example by following camp rules, getting enough rest, being fair and consistent, controlling anger, being accountable for actions, asking questions, and being flexible. (LP)

  1. Internet Staff Development: A Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1998-01-01

    Provides a synopsis of classes developed by the Winona (Minnesota) Middle School media center to provide staff with current Internet skills. Includes navigation techniques using browsers; e-mail; search engines; selecting and evaluating Web sites; Internet ethics and Netiquette; critical evaluation of Web sources; graphics; interactive video…

  2. Staff Development in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby

    Special education staff development activities in Maine are listed, and ways to serve Maine's rural areas are described. Long range goals in Maine's Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (as required by P.L. 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act) are listed for collaboration, needs assessment, resource/data collection,…

  3. Simulation: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abi; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Crofts, Joanna; Draycott, Tim

    2013-06-01

    Effective training has been shown to improve perinatal care and outcome, decrease litigation claims and reduce midwifery sick leave. To be effective, training should be incentivised, in a realistic context, and delivered to inter-professional teams similar to those delivering actual care. Teamwork training is a useful addition, but it should be based on the characteristics of effective teamwork as derived from the study of frontline teams. Implementation of simulation and teamwork training is challenging, with constraints on staff time, facilities and finances. Local adoption and adaptation of effective programmes can help keep costs down, and make them locally relevant whilst maintaining effectiveness. Training programmes need to evolve continually in line with new evidence. To do this, it is vital to monitor outcomes and robustly evaluate programmes for their impact on patient care and outcome, not just on participants. PMID:23721770

  4. Strategies to Increase After-School Program Staff Skills to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin; Huberty, Jennifer; Moore, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Standards targeting children's healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) in after-school programs call for staff to display or refrain from HEPA-promoting or -discouraging behaviors that are linked to children's HEPA. This study evaluated strategies to align staff behaviors with HEPA Standards. Staff at four after-school programs serving approximately 500 children participated in professional development training from January 2012 to May 2013. Site leaders also attended workshops and received technical support during the same time frame. Changes in staff behaviors were evaluated using the System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition in a pre- (fall 2011) multiple-post (spring 2012, fall 2012, and spring 2013), no-control group study design. A total of 8,949 scans were completed across the four measurement periods. Of the 19 behaviors measured, 14 changed in the appropriate direction. For example, staff engaging in physical activity with children increased from 27% to 40% of scans and staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 56% to 14% of days. Ongoing training and technical assistance can have a measureable impact on staff behaviors linked to child-level HEPA outcomes. Future research should explore the feasibility of disseminating ongoing trainings to after-school program staff on a large scale. PMID:26055462

  5. Staff Stress and Morale in Community-Based Settings for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Janet; Hatton, Chris; Felce, David; Meek, Andrea; Carr, Deborah; Knapp, Martin; Hallam, Angela; Emerson, Eric; Pinkney, Lisa; Caesar, Emma; Lowe, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    Background: There are no studies that have compared outcomes for staff in different types of supported accommodation for people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. This study looked at stress, morale and intended job turnover in staff in two types of community-based residential supports: non-congregate settings where the…

  6. Hospital design and staff perceptions: an exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Mroczek, Jana; Mikitarian, George; Vieira, Elizabeth K; Rotarius, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    The movement in the health care design field to focus on "patient-centered care" and "healing environments" is often reflected in the health care facilities' incorporation of features meant to mitigate the stressful nature of serious illness. These features may range from a resource center (to allow patients and families to properly educate themselves about their illness) to providing space in rooms so family members can remain with patients, to more ambient features such as soft lighting, water features, or healing gardens. Research has shown that such features can in fact have positive effects for patients and may reduce stress and speed physical healing. What is not as well understood is how (if at all) the medical staff uses these types of features. Good health care cannot be administered without health care professionals, but factors such as job stress and burnout can impair both the physical and psychological health of the staff. A supportive organizational environment is imperative, but this article will set out to show that a supportive physical environment can be just as necessary in influencing how the staff views their workplace as well as how they might fare with regard to their own health. This article will examine a subset of results from a recent employee satisfaction survey given at a medical center. Exploratory analysis and interpretation will begin to shed light on whether or not building design can have an impact (positive or negative) on staff satisfaction. This can potentially act as a springboard to guide future empirical research in the area of health care design and its impact on staff satisfaction and well-being. By analyzing findings from a recent employee satisfaction survey, we can begin to understand how the hospital staff perceives the design of their building and begin to determine if these perceptions might impact health outcomes among the employees. PMID:16131934

  7. Staff Development: Doing It from the Inside.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milstein, Mike M.; Kreis, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    Presents a strategy for staff development designed to avoid resistance from tenured faculty. Suggests the use of outside consultants to train inside resource persons who then continue the staff development with their colleagues. Provides 11 references. (SKW)

  8. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D.

    2015-01-01

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning. PMID:26396280

  9. The Medical Staff Ride: an education tool for military medical leadership development.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, Martin C M

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides a description of the Medical Staff Ride as an educational tool for military medical leadership. It is based upon two Medical Staff Rides covering the Somme Campaign 1916 and the Normandy Campaign 1944. It describes the key educational activity 'The Stand' at which history and current issues are brought together through study of a particular location on the historical battlefield. The Medical Staff Ride can be divided into six distinct phases, each of which have common question sets for analysis by attendees. The Medical Staff Ride can be shown to have valuable educational outcomes that are efficient in time and cost, and effective in achieving personal learning. The supporting Readers for the two Medical Staff Rides covered by this paper are available as electronic supplement to this edition of the journal. PMID:26115999

  10. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as...

  11. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  12. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  13. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  14. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  15. Staff Development: Finding the Right Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standerfer, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    Three years ago, when the author joined the staff of Agua Fria High School in Phoenix, Arizona, as an assistant principal, she was excited to find that the students' school day started an hour and a half later than normal each Wednesday to provide staff development time for the teaching staff. That first year, however, neither the principal, Bryce…

  16. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  17. Training Staff for Technology: Options and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on effective technology training for library staff. Discusses helping staff overcome technophobia; suiting technology-based jobs with staff members' needs and capabilities; providing a policy/procedure manual to guide the training; the steps that should occur in training; aligning training with in-house library resources and services;…

  18. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff,...

  19. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the Commission is appointed by the President with the concurrence of a majority of the Commissioners. The...

  20. 1 CFR 15.3 - Staff assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff assistance. 15.3 Section 15.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS SERVICES TO FEDERAL AGENCIES General § 15.3 Staff assistance. The staff of the Office of...

  1. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not... within its disciplinary jurisdiction, regardless of whether its enforcement staff consists of employees... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff....

  2. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and...

  3. 19 CFR 207.17 - Staff report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff report. 207.17 Section 207.17 Customs Duties... EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Preliminary Determinations § 207.17 Staff report. Prior to the Commission's preliminary determination, the Director shall submit to the Commission a staff report. A public version of...

  4. 46 CFR 15.835 - Staff officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Staff officers. 15.835 Section 15.835 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.835 Staff officers. Staff officers, when carried, must be registered as specified in part...

  5. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as...

  6. 1 CFR 15.3 - Staff assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Staff assistance. 15.3 Section 15.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS SERVICES TO FEDERAL AGENCIES General § 15.3 Staff assistance. The staff of the Office of...

  7. Yes, We Can Improve Staff Morale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Dick B.

    A literature review and discussion the effect of school administrators on staff morale is presented in this paper. Four factors for improving staff morale include: a supportive workplace; meaningful incentives; a good working environment; and personal display of high morale by the administrator. Ten recommendations for improving staff relations…

  8. Training Student Library Staff. Professional Growth Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    The effective use of library student staff offers an opportunity to model both library instruction and student participation. This book details the process of effectively training student library staff. Chapter 1 lays the groundwork by helping the librarian determine the main functions and needs of the library, the role of library student staff,…

  9. Your Rights as an Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Bruce; Page, John P.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an instructive overview of the responsibilities of the police and the rights of the citizen concerning criminal investigations. Briefly describes the protections afforded by the fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and fourteenth amendments. Includes a learning activity involving a legal analysis of situations. (MJP)

  10. Beyond the Accusation of Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Qing; Brooks, Jane

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores the complexity of the notion of plagiarism from sociocultural and psychological perspectives. Plagiarism is a dynamic and multi-layered phenomenon [Russikoff, K., Fucaloro, L., Salkauskiene, D., 2003. "Plagiarism as a cross-cultural phenomenon." "The CAL Poly Pomona Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies" 16, 109-120.…

  11. Understanding the learning needs of the charge nurse: implications for nursing staff development.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Elizabeth; Ritze-Cullen, Nancy; Tyrrell, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Charge nurses are part of the nurse manager leadership team, yet they are often appointed to their roles with minimal, if any, leadership training, education, or mentoring. Literature shows that nursing leadership affects staff retention, satisfaction, and patient outcomes. In this study, charge nurses were surveyed about their learning needs, the barriers in functioning as a charge nurse, and their view of helpful resources in performing the role of a charge nurse. Findings point to the need for staff educators to facilitate charge nurse competency through both online training and mentoring. In addition, using a transformational leadership style provides staff educators with a strong framework for ensuring nurse leadership competency. PMID:21788738

  12. Improving Staff Satisfaction Through Peer-Led Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Nurses in a community gastroenterology hospital and associated clinic in Waterloo, Iowa are expected to earn and maintain specialty certification. Barriers to staff recertification were identified as workshop availability, cost, and access. Limited evidence was available to determine whether education provided by staff at a unit level could be used to reduce or eliminate the identified barriers. An educational plan was developed to provide peer-led education sessions. A pilot program of three presentations delivered a total of 6.4 educational contact hours. Efficacy was measured by acceptance of delivered continuing education units/contact hours for recertification by the American Board of Certification for Gastroenterology Nurses. Satisfaction with the method of delivery, costs, and timing were evaluated with prepilot/postpilot surveys. The program continues as an ongoing part of the department's orientation and education plan. The aim of this pilot study was to explore whether education could be provided economically, by existing staff, and within working hours to meet the requirements of recertification and improve staff satisfaction. The pilot study demonstrates that peer-to-peer education can be provided on a unit level, meeting and advancing individual and institutional certification goals for best practices and patient outcomes. PMID:27070793

  13. Eye dose to staff involved in interventional and procedural fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, D.; Hadaya, D.; Tse, J.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) lowered the occupational eye dose limit from 150 to 20 mSv/yr [1]. While international jurisdictions are in a process of adopting these substantial changes, medical physicists at the clinical level have been advising medical colleagues on specific situations based on dose measurements. Commissioned and calibrated TLDs mounted in commercially available holders designed to simulate the measurement of Hp(3), were applied to staff involved in x-ray procedures for a one month period. During this period clinical procedure data was concurrently collected and subject to audit. The use or not of eye personal protective equipment (PPE) was noted for all staff. Audits were conducted in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, the interventional angiography rooms and the procedural room where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures are performed. Significant levels of occupational dose were recorded in the cardiac and interventional procedures, with maximum reading exceeding the new limit for some interventional radiologists. No significant eye doses were measured for staff performing ERCP procedures. One outcome of the studies was increased use of eye PPE for operators of interventional equipment with increased availability also to nursing staff, when standing in close proximity to the patient during procedures.

  14. Propeller Research Tunnel - staff photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1928-01-01

    Standing on the PRT balance are five of the six men who comprised the majority of the PRT engineering staff in 1928. From left to right: Fred Weick, Ray Windler, William H. Herrnstein, Jr., John L. Crigler, and Donald Wood. Melvin N. Gough is mising. This group conducted the cowling research work which won the NACA its first Collier Trophy. Weick became the head of the PRT section when Max Munk was fired and Elton Miller became the chief of the Aerodynamics Division. Fred Weick liked this team of engineers and later praised the group in his autobiography.

  15. Selected Evidence Supporting or Rejecting Eighteen Outcomes for Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Floyd L.; Fornash, Patricia

    This study was conducted to identify outcomes and to produce information to support them for vocational education selected from the myriad of outcomes ascribed to it by various publics. From a list of 252 outcome questions, the project staff, selected personnel from the National Center for Research in Vocational Education, and vocational educators…

  16. Staff supervision in residential care.

    PubMed

    Myers, Peter G; Bibbs, Tonya; Orozco, Candy

    2004-04-01

    Residential care workers must be offered opportunities for formalized and systematic supervision in individual and group formats to provide the highest possible level of care to children and adolescents whom they serve. Effective supervision with residential care staff should be open to exploring issues at all levels of their experience and in relation to each component of the broader organizational structure within which they work. Systems theory offers a useful lens through which to view supervising staff in residential treatment. Systems theory proposes that human behavior is shaped by interactional processes and internal factors. Although the development of the individual occurs within intrinsic cognitive and emotional spheres, it also is believed to be related to several other elements. These additional variables include the point at which the family and system function in their own life cycle, the historical and current emotional context, the current and changing structure of the system, narratives, and the cultural context. This article discussed how methods of training and supervision would be most effective if they were designed specifically for the developmental level of the participants. Some literature reviews have concluded that youth care workers, like all professionals, pass through developmental stages and progress through them in their work. To assist youth care workers in their jobs, supervisors must understand these stages and the ways in which they may be enacted in the workplace. PMID:15062348

  17. Don't neglect routine staff meetings.

    PubMed

    Board, H K

    1982-03-01

    Staff meetings are essential to good staff communication. Meetings help keep the grapevine from growing so big that it strangles the group with its rumors. By holding regular meetings with your staff, you create a consistency in your communications that helps prevent problems that you don't even suspect from cropping up. All personnel should attend the meetings. This way everyone hears news at the same time. Be consistent in your use of meetings. Meetings are more effective if you have a planned agenda and a firm time schedule. Encourage your staff to use meetings to talk out problems that affect the group. Once the meeting is over, encourage them to leave their feelings in the room. Many leaders are reluctant, for a variety of reasons, to hold meetings with their staffs. But it's like dieting and exercise; the more you do it, the easier it becomes. This type of meeting will pay rich dividends in staff personal and professional growth and in improved communication. The sense of participation that can be gained by the effective use of staff meetings can lead to high morale and effective staff performance. As you begin to see the results of a cohesive staff functioning together well, you will realize the routine staff meeting is a management tool that should not be overlooked or underused. PMID:6917733

  18. Workplace bullying in NHS community trust: staff questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Quine, Lyn

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of workplace bullying in an NHS community trust; to examine the association between bullying and occupational health outcomes; and to investigate the relation between support at work and bullying. Design Questionnaire survey. Setting NHS community trust in the south east of England. Subjects Trust employees. Main outcome measures Measures included a 20 item inventory of bullying behaviours designed for the study, the job induced stress scale, the hospital anxiety and depression scale, the overall job satisfaction scale, the support at work scale, and the propensity to leave scale. Results 1100 employees returned questionnaires—a response rate of 70%. 421 (38%) employees reported experiencing one or more types of bullying in the previous year. 460 (42%) had witnessed the bullying of others. When bullying occurred it was most likely to be by a manager. Two thirds of the victims of bullying had tried to take action when the bullying occurred, but most were dissatisfied with the outcome. Staff who had been bullied had significantly lower levels of job satisfaction (mean 10.5 (SD 2.7) v 12.2 (2.3), P<0.001) and higher levels of job induced stress (mean 22.5 (SD 6.1) v 16.9 (5.8), P<0.001), depression (8% (33) v 1% (7), P<0.001), anxiety (30% (125) v 9% (60), P<0.001), and intention to leave the job (8.5 (2.9) v 7.0 (2.7), P<0.001). Support at work seemed to protect people from some of the damaging effects of bullying. Conclusions Bullying is a serious problem. Setting up systems for supporting staff and for dealing with interpersonal conflict may have benefits for both employers and staff. Key messages38% of staff in a community NHS trust reported being subjected to bullying behaviours in the workplace in the previous year and 42% had witnessed the bullying of othersStaff who had been bullied had lower levels of job satisfaction and higher levels of job induced stress, depression, anxiety, and intention to leaveSupport at work

  19. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization: Correlates with Quality Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul R.; Karuza, Jurgis; Lima, Julie; Intrator, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the relationship between how medical care is organized and delivered in nursing homes. Taking a lead from the acute care arena, we hypothesize that nursing home medical staff organization (NHMSO) is an important predictor of clinical outcomes in the nursing home. Methods A total of 202 usable surveys from a two-wave survey process using the Dillman Method were returned from medical directors who were randomly selected from the AMDA membership and were asked to fill out a survey on the structure of medical organization in their primary nursing home practice. Quality measures that are likely to be affected by physician practice patterns were culled from NH Compare and OSCAR data sets and matched to the physician surveys, i.e., long stay residents' prevalence of pain, restraint use, catheter use, pressure ulcers, pneumococcal vaccination, influenza vaccination, presence of advanced directives, prescription of antibiotics, and prevalence of depression. Results Using a series of hierarchical multiple regressions, significant R2 changes were found when the medical staff organization dimensions were added in the regressions after controlling for nursing home structural characteristics for the following outcomes: pneumococcal vaccination and restraint use. Near significant findings were noted for pain prevalence among long stay residents, catheter use and prevalence of pressure ulcers. Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate a relationship between medical staff organizational dimensions and clinical outcomes in the nursing home setting and as such represents an initial “proof of concept.” NHMSO should be considered as a potentially important mediating or moderating variable in the quality of care equation for nursing homes. PMID:21450190

  20. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  1. Using HL7 in hospital staff assignments.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S

    2014-02-01

    Hospital staff assignments are the instructions that allocate the hospital staff members to the hospital beds. Currently, hospital administrators make the assignments without accessing the information regarding the occupancy of the hospital beds and the acuity of the patient. As a result, administrators cannot distinguish between occupied and unoccupied beds, and may therefore assign staff to unoccupied beds. This gives rise to uneven and inefficient staff assignments. In this paper, the hospital admission-discharge-transfer (ADT) system is employed both as a data source and an assignment device to create staff assignments. When the patient data is newly added or modified, the ADT system updates the assignment software client with the relevant data. Based on the relevant data, the assignment software client is able to construct staff assignments in a more efficient way. PMID:24480165

  2. Emotional Well-Being of House Staff

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Yvonne; Magonet, Gordon; Rubin, Gordon; Carson, Katherine

    1991-01-01

    The results of a survey of 255 house staff conducted to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in interns and residents indicated that 25% of the sample population manifested depressive symptoms at the time of the study, and 34% reported a clinical depression within the previous year. Moreover, whereas 58% of the house staff reported that no attending staff inquired about their emotional well-being 73% stated that they would welcome such an inquiry. PMID:21229086

  3. Improving staff retention and career progression.

    PubMed

    Szeremeta, Lorraine; Shamash, Natalie

    Staff shortages are serious and widespread and, for many trusts, the cost of temporary staff is not sustainable. In many cases, the existing workforce has the skills necessary to fill vacant posts. A trust developed an initiative to maximise use of its nurses' expertise and minimise staff attrition. This article describes the scheme and how it increased job satisfaction, promoted development opportunities and cut costs. PMID:27344897

  4. Managing reliance on temporary agency staff.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Amid spiralling agency staff costs, in November 2015 Monitor and the Trust Development Authority placed caps on the hourly rate that NHS trusts can pay agency staff, and informed all NHS and foundation trusts that they are required to procure agency staff through approved frameworks. This article suggests ways in which management can maintain these requirements while ensuring safe staffing levels and high-quality care delivery. PMID:26927789

  5. Predicting Changes in Staff Morale and Burnout at Community Health Centers Participating in the Health Disparities Collaboratives

    PubMed Central

    Graber, Jessica E; Huang, Elbert S; Drum, Melinda L; Chin, Marshall H; Walters, Amy E; Heuer, Loretta; Tang, Hui; Schaefer, Cynthia T; Quinn, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of changes in staff morale and burnout associated with participation in a quality improvement (QI) initiative at community health centers (HCs). Data Sources Surveys of staff at 145 HCs participating in the Health Disparities Collaboratives (HDC) program in 2004. Data Collection and Study Design Self-administered questionnaire data collected from 622 HC staff (68 percent response rate) were analyzed to identify predictors of reported change in staff morale and burnout. Predictive categories included outcomes of the QI initiative, levels of HDC integration, institutional support, the use of incentives, and demographic characteristics of respondents and centers. Principal Findings Perceived improvements in staff morale and reduced likelihood of staff burnout were associated with receiving personal recognition, career promotion, and skill development opportunities. Similar outcomes were associated with sufficient funding and personnel, fair distribution of work, effective training of new hires, and consistent provider participation. Conclusions Having sufficient personnel available to administer the HDC was found to be the strongest predictor of team member satisfaction. However, a number of low-cost, reasonably modifiable, organizational and leadership characteristics were also identified, which may facilitate improvements in staff morale and reduce the likelihood of staff burnout at HCs participating in the HDC. PMID:18248402

  6. Relation of Principal Transformational Leadership to School Staff Job Satisfaction, Staff Turnover, and School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the direct effect of principal transformational leadership to school staff turnover and school performance was examined, in addition to its indirect effect through school staff job satisfaction. Survey data were obtained from elementary school staff and students, and school-aggregated student achievement test scores were…

  7. Breaking the Silence: Achieving a Positive Campus Climate for Diversity from the Staff Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Grunwald, Heidi E.; Dey, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that create a positive climate for diversity and to demonstrate how these factors predict outcomes related to achieving a positive campus climate for diversity. Based on survey data collected from 437 staff members employed at a large, public, predominantly White University in the Midwest, results…

  8. Seeing Eye-to-Eye? Staff and Student Views on Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevan, Ruth; Badge, Joanne; Cann, Alan; Willmott, Chris; Scott, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Feedback on academic performance is of critical importance to students' learning, and in their perception of the quality of instruction they receive. Here we report the outcomes of a study comparing the views and expectations of first year biological science undergraduate students and academic staff regarding feedback provision and utilisation.…

  9. Safe Schools, Staff Development, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonsoulin, Simon; Zablocki, Mark; Leone, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Zero-tolerance policies have created schools that are often intolerant and destructive to children and communities. High rates of suspension and expulsion of students are associated with negative outcomes and school dropout. New approaches to staff development that create positive school communities are essential in stemming the "school-to-prison…

  10. BE-ACTIV: A Staff-Assisted Behavioral Intervention for Depression in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Suzanne; Looney, Stephen W.; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Teri, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article (a) describes a 10-week, behavioral, activities-based intervention for depression that can be implemented in nursing homes collaboratively with nursing home activities staff and (b) presents data related to its development, feasibility, and preliminary outcomes. Design and Methods: We developed BE-ACTIV, which stands for…

  11. Quality of Care in the Nursing Home: Effects of Staff Assignment and Work Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Fairchild, J. Kaci; Scilley, Kay; Hardin, J. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a variety of resident and staff outcomes across two types of staffing patterns, permanent and rotating assignment, and work shift. Although studies have examined these staffing patterns as part of multicomponent intervention packages, few studies have examined the isolated effects of staffing…

  12. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  13. Faculty/Staff Perceptions of a Standards-Based Exit Portfolio System for Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Tena L.; Bailey, Rita L.

    2006-01-01

    New standards for certification were recently developed for speech-language pathology graduate training programs by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The new standards are outcomes-based rather than process-based. Using a collective case study approach, this article highlights the perceptions of faculty and staff regarding use of a…

  14. Perceptions of Staff on Embedding Speech and Language Therapy within a Youth Offending Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Karen; Gregory, Juliette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to ascertain the views of staff and managers within a youth offending team on their experiences of working with a speech and language therapist (SLT). The model of therapy provision was similar to the whole-systems approach used in schools. The impact of the service on language outcomes is reported elsewhere…

  15. From Thinking to Practice: School Staff Views on Disability Inclusion in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakiz, Halis; Woods, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents outcomes of a qualitative interview study conducted in four Turkish primary schools that had been identified by the Ministry of Education as engaging in the inclusion of disabled students. The main purpose of the study was to examine school staff views on inclusion in their schools. Data were collected through semi-structured…

  16. Staff Cuts Remake the Custodial Closet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that new cleaning and finishing materials and new equipment can help school facility departments cope with staff cuts, focusing on: chemicals and dispensers, safety training and information for custodial staff, cleaning tools and power equipment, and cleaner and more efficient schools. (SM)

  17. Special Issue on Staff Development. Information Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Mae, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This special issue of a quarterly newsletter describes a number of approaches to staff development in adult basic education and English-as-a-Second-Language programs being practiced in New York City. It includes an editorial about the necessity of making the resource commitment to provide full-time jobs and decent health coverage for staff.…

  18. The Staff Development Maze: Where Are We?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Frank O.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a five-stage model for staff development used in a survey of professors and practitioners. The survey found that there is a disparity between what professors and practitioners believe is practiced and what is actually occurring in staff development. (MD)

  19. Staff Development Needs in Pakistan Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullah, Muhammad Hameed; Khan, Muhammad Naeem Ullah; Murtaza, Ali; Ud Din, Muhammad Naseer

    2011-01-01

    Staff development is very significant for the achievement of overall goals of higher education in Pakistan. The success of innovations depends largely upon the skills of instructors; but in Pakistan, the people with a simple masters degree (without any pedagogical training) are inducted as teaching staff at the university level, so it is time to…

  20. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  1. Self-Concept Change in Camp Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    The 1981 study ascertained whether the self-concept of 66 camp staff from 2 Wisconsin camps changed more than a control group of 18 college students attending summer school; if differences in self-concept were based on a particular characteristic (age, gender, staff position, years at camp); and in what ways, if any, self-concept of camp staff…

  2. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  3. SHEEO Staffs and Organizations: A Portrait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingle, James R.; Rodriguez, Esther

    This report presents a portrait of the staff who work in State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) member agencies and the organizational structure and personnel policies of the agencies which employ them. Data sources included questionnaires submitted by 322 professional staff working in SHEEO agencies and an organizational survey…

  4. Restructure Staff Development for Systemic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systems approach based on the work of W. Edwards Deming to system wide, high impact staff development. Deming has pointed out the significance of structure in systems. By restructuring the process of staff development we can bring about cost effective improvement of the whole system. We can improve student achievement while…

  5. Staff Development for PICKUP. Workshop Materials Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, John; Richardson, Sally

    This manual has been developed for those staff members at further education unit (FEU) colleges and polytechnics in the United Kingdom that are responsible for Professional, Industrial, and Commercial Updating (PICKUP) staff development activities. It is divided into four sections. The first section provides background on the PICKUP project, and…

  6. Stacks Tour Project Presents Staff Development Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coopey, Barbara M.; Nicastro, David

    2007-01-01

    The Penn State Libraries' Open House activities for incoming students find Access Services staff extending beyond their everyday routines to creatively help relieve students' fears of the library and understand how Access Services can help them. Serving on the Access Services Open House Committee offers staff many opportunities for development as…

  7. 30 Reflective Staff Development Exercises for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaagan, Stephen S.

    This book presents a guide for educators who want to gain new ideas and a fresh perspective on staff development. It promotes individual and collective learning of all participants as they undertake formal staff development while enhancing the success and performance of the entire educational system. The 30 reflective exercises have been designed…

  8. [Prevention of addiction in hospital staff].

    PubMed

    Picchiottino, Frédérique

    2012-11-01

    La Pitié-Salpêtrière-Charles Foix university hospital group (Paris) has set up a task force to help healthcare managers manage a member of staff suffering with addiction. An addiction awareness day is also organised, aimed at all staff, with information stands and a performance by a theatre company. PMID:23173491

  9. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the...

  10. 29 CFR 511.7 - Committee staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committee staff. 511.7 Section 511.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS WAGE ORDER PROCEDURE FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.7 Committee staff. Each industry committee will be furnished a lawyer,...

  11. 32 CFR 723.8 - Staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff action. 723.8 Section 723.8 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL BOARD FOR CORRECTION OF NAVAL RECORDS § 723.8 Staff action. (a) Transmittal of final decisions granting relief. (1) If the...

  12. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the...

  13. 28 CFR 600.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Staff. A Special Counsel may request the assignment of appropriate Department employees to assist the... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 600.5 Section 600.5 Judicial... employees, and the office for which the designated employee works shall make reasonable efforts...

  14. 19 CFR 207.64 - Staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staff reports. 207.64 Section 207.64 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF... supplement and correct the information contained in the prehearing staff report. The Director shall place...

  15. Open Educational Resources: Staff Attitudes and Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfe, Vivien

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes towards "open educational resources" (OER) as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n = 6) were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews…

  16. School Site Staff Development: Structures and Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solo, Leonard J.

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the importance of staff development (broadly defined as anything that enables teachers to learn) and considers different development structures. Describes the role and duties of staff developer at a Cambridge, Massachusetts, elementary school as well as its "teacher teams," groups of instructors who meet monthly to discuss issues…

  17. Increasing Staff Participation in Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    A challenge facing school staffs is the development of school-based curriculum. Some guidelines and incentives for increasing staff participation in curriculum development are presented. Available from: Australian College of Education, 916 Swanston Street, Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia, $2.50 single copy. (Author/MLF)

  18. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training....

  19. Relating the Curriculum Study to Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Robert; Snow, Gordon

    Staff development is a school district activity that is generating more activity and becoming more expensive. As the amount of dollars spent increases, so will the demands for accountability and results. Traditional methods for determining staff development programs are inadequate or incomplete. A more effective method is to relate the staff…

  20. Are Your IT Staff Working Too Hard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Alan

    2008-01-01

    How do IT managers protect their staff from working excessively long hours? To begin addressing the problem of overworked staff, IT managers should educate themselves about legal regulations governing time spent at work. Failure to meet such requirements can expose a university to potentially expensive and embarrassing lawsuits. In this article,…

  1. Cuesta College All Staff Survey, Spring 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartnal, Ryan; Hagen, Peter F.

    The 1999 Cuesta College Faculty and Staff Survey examined ten functional areas: (1) safety/security/campus environment; (2) technology and equipment; (3) organizational structure; (4) college policies; (5) faculty/staff evaluations; (6) planning/decision-making; (7) communications/publications; (8) library/learning resources; (9) support services;…

  2. Exploring Staff Perceptions of Student Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Abbi; Clegg, Sue; Macdonald, Ranald

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of qualitative data from a research project looking at staff perceptions of plagiarism at a post-1992 university. Twenty-six members of staff from departments and academic schools from across the university took part in open and semi-structured interviews. Analysis shows that variable definitions of plagiarism exist;…

  3. Promoting Staff Support in Schools: Solution Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Emma; Henderson, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Solution Circle (SC) approach is a flexible tool which encourages participants to maintain a positive, creative approach to problem-solving. This project focussed on the introduction of this approach to staff in a primary and a secondary school. The rationale was to implement a problem-solving/discussion tool that would allow staff to utilise…

  4. Needs Assessment for Staff Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crim, Roger D.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to provide an adequate base of knowledge for the development of a local three-year master plan for staff development for education personnel. The plan should reflect specific needs identified through organized self-study and analysis by professional staff, students, and parents. The following opinion surveys and needs…

  5. General Staff Experiences in the Corporate University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, Judy

    2006-01-01

    The working lives of general staff in universities have been a rather closed book until recently, having been largely ignored in both academic and non-academic literature. When discussed or referred to, general staff have been depicted in problematic ways that, in recent times, can be associated with the prevailing discourse of "corporate…

  6. Professional Staff Carve out a New Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, Judy

    2011-01-01

    A 2004 paper, "The invisible workers" by Szekeres, lamented the "invisibility" of professional staff in Australian higher education. Even then, professional staff constituted more than half the university workforce, but they were defined by what they were not (non-academic) and they experienced a high level of frustration in their relationships…

  7. Quality Control in Child Care Staff Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Merwin R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of staff selection of child care staff at a residential treatment center for children, ages 8-16. Phases of candidate selection, an "open-door" interview procedure, the orientation of hired candidates and the agency's philosophy, procedures and practices are discussed. (GO)

  8. "It's Pretty Hard with Our Ones, They Can't Talk, the More Able Bodied Can Participate": Staff Attitudes about the Applicability of Disability Policies to People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, C.; Clement, T.; Mansell, J.; Beadle-Brown, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The level of resident's adaptive behaviour and staff facilitative practices are key sources of variation in outcomes for residents in community-based residential services. The higher the resident support needs the poorer their outcome. Although substantial investment has been made in values-based training for staff, their attitudes and…

  9. 10 CFR 2.1505 - Role of the NRC staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Role of the NRC staff. 2.1505 Section 2.1505 Energy... Legislative Hearings § 2.1505 Role of the NRC staff. The NRC staff shall be available to answer any Commission... officer may request without requiring the NRC staff to assume the role of an advocate. The NRC staff...

  10. 10 CFR 2.1505 - Role of the NRC staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Role of the NRC staff. 2.1505 Section 2.1505 Energy... Legislative Hearings § 2.1505 Role of the NRC staff. The NRC staff shall be available to answer any Commission... officer may request without requiring the NRC staff to assume the role of an advocate. The NRC staff...

  11. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review by the staff. 385.33 Section 385.33...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS Procedure on Review of Staff Action § 385.33 Review by the staff. Where a petition for review is duly filed, the staff member may,...

  12. Staff Acceptance of Tele-ICU Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul S.; Cram, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Remote coverage of ICUs is increasing, but staff acceptance of this new technology is incompletely characterized. We conducted a systematic review to summarize existing research on acceptance of tele-ICU coverage among ICU staff. Methods: We searched for published articles pertaining to critical care telemedicine systems (aka, tele-ICU) between January 1950 and March 2010 using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library and abstracts and presentations delivered at national conferences. Studies were included if they provided original qualitative or quantitative data on staff perceptions of tele-ICU coverage. Studies were imported into content analysis software and coded by tele-ICU configuration, methodology, participants, and findings (eg, positive and negative staff evaluations). Results: Review of 3,086 citations yielded 23 eligible studies. Findings were grouped into four categories of staff evaluation: overall acceptance level of tele-ICU coverage (measured in 70% of studies), impact on patient care (measured in 96%), impact on staff (measured in 100%), and organizational impact (measured in 48%). Overall acceptance was high, despite initial ambivalence. Favorable impact on patient care was perceived by > 82% of participants. Staff impact referenced enhanced collaboration, autonomy, and training, although scrutiny, malfunctions, and contradictory advice were cited as potential barriers. Staff perceived the organizational impact to vary. An important limitation of available studies was a lack of rigorous methodology and validated survey instruments in many studies. Conclusions: Initial reports suggest high levels of staff acceptance of tele-ICU coverage, but more rigorous methodologic study is required. PMID:21051386

  13. School Size, School Characteristics, and School Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William J., Jr.

    A study investigated the possible dependence of educational outcomes on staff attributes and organizational size once socioeconomic indexes are taken into account. All data were obtained from the New Jersey Department of Education. The variables of interest and their operational definitions include school characteristics, teacher characteristics,…

  14. Model Learner Outcomes for Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cheryl, Ed.; And Others

    Chapter 1 of this document contains sets of statements adopted by either the Minnesota State Board of Education or the Minnesota State Legislature. They represent the hierarchy used by Department of Education staff as they develop model learner outcomes for each subject area. Contents include learner values, education system values, philosophy for…

  15. The role of conflict resolution styles on nursing staff morale, burnout, and job satisfaction in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Montoro-Rodriguez, Julian; Small, Jeff A

    2006-06-01

    This study focuses on the ability of nursing staff to interact with residents in a way that affects positively on the nurses' well-being and occupational satisfaction. It investigates the role of coping skills related to staff-resident interactions, in particular, the use of conflict resolution styles and their influence on the level of morale, burnout and job satisfaction of nursing professionals. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from 161 direct care nursing staff. The authors used a multiple regression procedure to examine the influence of predictors on nursing staff outcomes. Multivariate analyses indicated that nurses' psychological morale, occupational stress, and job satisfaction are influenced by conflict resolution styles, after controlling by individual characteristics, work demands, and work resources factors. The findings highlight the importance of considering personal coping abilities to foster positive staff-resident interactions and to increase nurses' morale and job satisfaction. PMID:16648392

  16. 75 FR 52939 - Supplemental Notice Regarding Staff Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Supplemental Notice Regarding Staff Technical Conference August 20, 2010... Regulatory Commission (Commission) directed staff to convene a technical conference regarding California... Room. The technical conference will be led by Commission staff. Commissioners may attend the...

  17. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Tracey L.; Kennerly, Susan; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention’s characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. Methods: This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members). One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. Results: The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity) described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled “brainstormed ideas”, focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Implications: Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs.

  18. A Recipe for Support Staff Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hash, Vickie

    2002-01-01

    Describes ways in which professional development activities can be rewarding. Offers details from a support staff event at Wytheville Community College in Virginia as a template for a successful event. Focuses on planning, instruction, humor, camaraderie, and appreciation. (NB)

  19. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities. PMID:10151790

  20. Public Relations Strategies for Scholastic Publication Staffs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance to scholastic publications staffs of four public relations strategies: meticulous research, systematic planning, strengthening communication efforts, and evaluation. Notes internal and external factors crucial to good public relations. Lists activities to consider. (SR)

  1. [A listening support group for nursing staff].

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The feedback from a consultant nurse in a listening support group for health professionals shows that, for hospital nursing staff, the phenomenon of suffering in the workplace is a reality. In addition to providing help to professionals who request it, the missions of such a group are to promote discussion around psycho-social risks in the framework of a policy of compassionate care for staff. PMID:27157563

  2. Malicious deprivation of hospital staff privileges.

    PubMed

    Firestone, M H; Schur, R

    1986-01-01

    The growing problem of discrimination against physicians seeking hospital staff privileges may be met by various tort and contract actions against hospitals and medical staff members. In many jurisdictions, the obstacles presented by common-law and statutory immunities and the unavailability of judicial review for actions involving private hospitals pose formidable obstacles. However, the current trend in the courts would seem to be toward actionability. PMID:3312890

  3. 'I give staff time to care'.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Clare

    Flo Panel-Coates is working to improve care at a heavily criticised NHS trust. Since taking on the director of nursing post in October 2012, she has secured more support for ward leaders, giving them time to do their job, improved the skill mix of staff, and cut senior nurses' paperwork. Ensuring staff work consistently to the highest standard is the NHS's biggest challenge, she says. PMID:23905257

  4. Activities vs. Outcomes: The Difference Makes All the Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Janice; Munger, Linda; Hord, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to "Focus first on outcomes" (Bradley, Munger, & Hord, 2015), published in the August 2015 issue of "JSD" ["Journal of Staff Development"]. That article set the stage by creating awareness of the need and purpose for thinking first about outcomes, not activities, when starting a change…

  5. Understanding and Enacting Learning Outcomes: The Academic's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbins, Kerry; Brooks, Sara; Scott, Jon J. A.; Rawlinson, Mark; Norman, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a detailed literature exploring the advancement of a learning outcomes approach in higher education, limited evidence exists concerning academics' use of them. This study employed a questionnaire survey and interviews with academic staff in three schools in one institution to explore their views and uses of learning outcomes. Whilst…

  6. Meta-Analytic Research on the Outcomes of Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, James T.

    This paper compares and summarizes empirical research on the outcomes of outdoor education (OE) and related programs. Most frequently, OE outcomes have been researched using post-program surveys of staff and participant attitudes. Such reports are vulnerable to many potential distortions. A second major approach to examining OE effectiveness…

  7. The Nature of Staff - Family Interactions in Nursing Homes: Staff Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Piven, Mary L.; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    Each year thousands of older adults are admitted to nursing homes. Following admission, nursing home staff and family members must interact and communicate with each other. This study examined relationship and communication patterns between nursing home staff members and family members of nursing home residents, as part of a larger multi-method comparative case study. Here, we report on 6- month case studies of two nursing homes where in-depth interviews, shadowing experiences, and direct observations were completed. Staff members from both nursing homes described staff-family interactions as difficult, problematic and time consuming, yet identified strategies that when implemented consistently, influenced the staff-family interaction positively. Findings suggest explanatory processes in staff-family interactions, while pointing toward promising interventions. PMID:19649311

  8. Creating outcomes with redesign efforts.

    PubMed

    Cole, D A

    1999-09-01

    Integrating principles from a variety of theories, managers have developed a conceptual framework for reengineering processes in an endoscopy unit to improve the value of services provided to customers. A major goal of this redesign was to enhance or maintain quality of care, increase efficiency, and maintain or reduce costs. This was accomplished by analyzing data and outcome measures related to patient, physician, and staff member satisfaction, as well as resource allocation. The departmental results were tangible, positive, and visible almost immediately. With the right team and the right techniques, tools, methodologies, and decision-making processes, redesign projects can and do lead to dramatic improvements in productivity, service, customer and staff member satisfaction, cost control, and innovation. PMID:10514888

  9. Staff Selection: What's Important for Out-Of-School Time Programs? Part 1 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Frontline Staff. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Bandy, Tawana; Burkhauser, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Research on successful out-of-school time programs repeatedly has found that the caliber of a program's staff is a critical feature of high-quality programs that achieve positive outcomes. Therefore, attracting, selecting, and retaining high-quality staff has become a major objective of out-of-school time programs. To expand what is known about…

  10. Sex and segregation: Staff attitudes explored.

    PubMed

    Cole, Mary; Baldwin, David; Thomas, Peter

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of the study was to establish whether there was consistency of opinion amongst staff about mixed sex wards and the sexual activity of inpatients. Also to establish what demographic factors, if any, modulated those opinions. METHOD A 17-item, five-point, questionnaire was supplied to all medical and nursing staff working on five wards of a psychiatric inpatient unit. Demographic details of the respondents were also recorded. RESULTS Some items produced almost unanimous responses: 92.5% agreeing or strongly agreeing that some inpatients form sexually active relationships that are detrimental to their health. Staff felt that single sex wards should be available but were unsure that they would improve quality of life for either patients or staff. The strongest factor predicting response was profession (doctor or nurse), the responses being significantly different in eight of the 17 items. Doctors were more likely to believe that women's and staff's lives would be better on single sex wards and were less likely to be satisfied with current arrangements. They were also more likely to believe that sex was common among inpatients, and that there was an unofficial place to go in hospitals to have sex. Doctors worried more about the patient choice of sexual partner and believed that health workers should have a role in influencing that choice. Doctors also felt more strongly that patients sometimes form sexually active relationships of benefit to health. Ward was the next most important, being significantly different in four of the 17 questions. Gender and age of respondents produced few differences. CONCLUSIONS In view of the United Kingdom government commitment to phasing out mixed sex hospital accommodation by 2002 (Safety, privacy and dignity in mental health units - Guidance on mixed sex accommodation, Department of Health, 2000), the doubts of staff about improvement to inpatient quality of life, and their own quality of working life need to be

  11. Mental Illness Training for Long Term Care Staff

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, A. Blair; Billow, Molly B.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Seeley, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Mental illness is prevalent among nursing home residents, but staff are not well trained to deal with it. This research evaluated an Internet mental illness training program designed for certified direct care workers i.e., Nurse Aides (NAs). Pilot research was also conducted to explore effects and acceptance of the same program with a sample of Licensed Health Professionals (LHPs). Design Trial 1: Pre-post randomized treatment and control design for NAs; Trial 2: Quasi-experimental pre-post within-subjects design for LHPs. Setting Both studies were conducted on the Internet. Participants Trial 1: N=62 NAs; Trial 2: N=16 LHPs Intervention Internet-based behavioral skills training and knowledge building, using video modeling with mastery learning instructional design. Measurements Video situations testing and assessment of psycho-social constructs associated with behavior change; follow-up interviews with a sample of treatment NAs. Results Trial 1: MANCOVA analysis showed positive results (p=.003) for knowledge, attitudes, self efficacy, and behavioral intention, with medium-large effect sizes. The training was well received by the users. Trial 2: Paired t-tests showed significant effects on five of six outcome measures, with medium-large effect sizes, and it was well received by the LHP sample. Conclusions Internet training can be an effective approach to help staff work with residents with mental illness. In this research, it showed significant positive effects and was well received by NAs and by LHPs. PMID:21450251

  12. Nuclear Power Acceptance Among University Staffs and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayder, G.; Rahim, M. S. Ab

    2016-03-01

    The need to consider alternative energy sources becomes very real. Nuclear has been identified as an alternative electricity source. However, media reports seem to indicate that there is a resistance among peoples with regards to harnessing nuclear for energy. This study was conducted to assess the acceptance level of university staff and students towards nuclear energy by asking them to answer a questionnaire. The questionnaire was constructed in a way to gauge their background knowledge on the energy situation of the country, the risks involved with regards to nuclear energy and also what aspects need to be improved in order to have a safe integration of nuclear energy into the national energy mix. The overall result of the questionnaire indicated high level of support for nuclear energy. The main areas of concerns however, were waste management, control and governance and also nuclear accidents. These should be identified as fields that require extra attention. However, the positive result obtained from this survey should not be construed as overall strong support in general. There might be different outcomes if the survey was conducted on to the general population as compared to the university students and staff that were involved in this research.

  13. Defining, constructing and assessing learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R M

    2009-08-01

    Learning outcomes define the veterinary curriculum and inform students about what they must be able to demonstrate to succeed. Stakeholder consultation during their development ensures that programme learning outcomes equip graduates to contribute to the veterinary profession. Effective learning outcomes form a hierarchy linking the programme, its courses and tasks. Clear outcomes direct students towards higher quality learning by indicating the achievements intended, but leave scope for emergent learning outcomes. Defined technical competencies fit within this overarching framework, complementing higher order learning. Mapping is used to align learning outcomes horizontally and vertically so students are systematically guided towards entry-level competence and professional independence. Constructively aligned learning and assessment tasks ensure learners spend the focused time required to sequentially develop programme outcomes. Assessment by staff, peers and other stakeholders certifies achievement of intended outcomes. Effective assessment also empowers students to define and achieve their own learning outcomes, so they develop the habits of autonomous life-long learning. Evaluation of the quality and consistency of achieved outcomes informs ongoing programme improvement. If we are going to achieve the objectives of this set of papers, i.e. to improve public health education globally (Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz. 28 [2] 2009), then it is essential that they be well defined in the learning outcomes statement of all veterinary schools. PMID:20128490

  14. Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report. EMIS Staff ECE Units 2005. Report Documentation. Version 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report is twofold. First, it helps School Districts and Educational Service Centers (ESC) ensure accuracy and validity of preschool staff, student and program data submitted to the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) through the Education Management Information System (EMIS). From this report, school…

  15. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator in developing and planning agency program initiatives. The Chief of Staff is responsible for... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief of Staff. 1700.27 Section 1700.27 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.27 Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff...

  16. 14 CFR 385.4 - Form of staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Form of staff action. 385.4 Section 385.4...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS General Provisions § 385.4 Form of staff action. Unless otherwise specified, staff action shall be by order or informal writing...

  17. 14 CFR 385.4 - Form of staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Form of staff action. 385.4 Section 385.4...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS General Provisions § 385.4 Form of staff action. Unless otherwise specified, staff action shall be by order or informal writing...

  18. 14 CFR 385.4 - Form of staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Form of staff action. 385.4 Section 385.4...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS General Provisions § 385.4 Form of staff action. Unless otherwise specified, staff action shall be by order or informal writing...

  19. Getting More from Your Staff without Even Asking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Randy

    1998-01-01

    Explores ways to maximize camp-staff potential and effort through wages; working conditions; promoting passion and enthusiasm; perks and benefits; special staff events; tokens of praise, support, and appreciation; staff mission statements; profit sharing; empowerment; use of a morale officer; and staff ownership of the camp's "vision." (SAS)

  20. 14 CFR 385.4 - Form of staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Form of staff action. 385.4 Section 385.4...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS General Provisions § 385.4 Form of staff action. Unless otherwise specified, staff action shall be by order or informal writing...

  1. 14 CFR 385.3 - Scope of staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of staff action. 385.3 Section 385.3...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS General Provisions § 385.3 Scope of staff action. Applications for relief which, pursuant to this part, may be granted by staff members...

  2. What Works in the Middle: Results-Based Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen

    This guide is the result of a 2-year initiative, Results-Based Staff Development for the Middle Grades. It provides information and resources for selecting, designing, and evaluating staff development to improve student achievement. It targets school staff development committees, principals, staff development leaders, and curriculum coordinators.…

  3. Research misconduct among clinical trial staff.

    PubMed

    Redman, Barbara K; Templin, Thomas N; Merz, Jon F

    2006-07-01

    Between 1993 and 2002, 39 clinical trial staff were investigated for scientific misconduct by the Office of Research Integrity (ORI). Analysis of ORI case records reveals practices regarding workload, training and supervision that enable misconduct. Considering the potential effects on human subjects protection, quality and reliability of data, and the trustworthiness of the clinical research enterprise, regulations or guidance on use of clinical trial staff ought to be available. Current ORI regulations do not hold investigators or institutions responsible for supervision and training of clinical trial staff. Given the important issues at stake, the definition of research misconduct should encompass the intentional or negligent mismanagement of scientific projects. Individual institutions and professional associations not only can but should adopt stricter standards of conduct than those reflected in federal regulations. PMID:16909150

  4. What if you went to the police and accused your uncle of abuse? Misunderstandings concerning the benefits of memory distortion: A commentary on Fernández (2015).

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Clark, Andrew; Wang, Jianqin; Merckelbach, Harald

    2015-05-01

    In a recent paper, Fernández (2015) argues that memory distortion can have beneficial outcomes. Although we agree with this, we find his reasoning and examples flawed to such degree that they will lead to misunderstandings rather than clarification in the field of memory (distortion). In his paper, Fernández uses the terms belief and memory incorrectly, creating a conceptual blur. Also, Fernández tries to make the case that under certain circumstances, false memories of abuse are beneficial. We argue against this idea as the reasoning behind this claim is based on controversial assumptions such as repression. Although it is true that memory distortions can be beneficial, the examples sketched by Fernández are not in line with recent documentation in this area. PMID:25681697

  5. [Hospital auxiliary staff, between polyvalence and invisibility].

    PubMed

    Veissier, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Often underestimated, hospital auxiliary staff carry out on a daily basis a professional activity that may be difficult to define and/or recognize. What does their work consist in and what are the boundaries of the scope of their activity? Faced with a growing rate of absenteeism among these members of staff in a nursing home for elderly people attached to a hospital, an issue emerges: does the content of their professional activity have an impact on the causes and evolution of this phenomenon? PMID:26976318

  6. Work redesign and implementation: staff perspectives.

    PubMed

    Reichert, S T; Smeltzer, C

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses how the process used to move an organization through redesign has changed drastically by involving all levels of clinical staff. We describe one hospital's recent redesign experience, explore nursing involvement throughout the process, and document lessons learned from staff in many institutions who have participated in redesign at their hospital. This article discusses why hospitals are willing to go through this massive change process, the process steps and data required to reach redesign goals, and the need to measure success and articulate postimplementation measurements. Most important, the theme of the article relies on advice from nurses who have participated in redesign at their hospital. PMID:10223006

  7. NASA Life Support Branch staff photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center's Life Support staff is a very important group of people. They are responsible for the emergency escape systems in all the aircraft. Their other role is to maintain the pilot's personal survival flight equipment such as flight pressure suits, helmets, etc.. If instruction is needed for new equipment the staff are ready to give support. Left to right: Rick Borsch (Chief), Steve Spandorf, Ray Kinney, Ed Ortiz (seated front), Nick Kiriokos, Kelly Snapp and Bob McElwain.

  8. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-05-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult to achieve in an in-service setting. In the present study, we have followed the coaching process of three staff members. Based on differences in the Linell balance of power across sessions, we explored the question: do different coaching processes have similar patterns in the development of dominance and coherence in interactions between coach and staff? Additionally, a qualitative approach was conducted to illustrate and enrich the meaning of quantitative outcomes. Processes were different regarding the balance of power at the start of the coaching, probably due to differences in resistance and insecurity. As a consequence of different starting points and differences in learning styles, each coaching process had its unique development over time. At the end, all dyads were comparable in the sense that all dyads were highly satisfied about the outcomes and process of coaching. This is in line with similar levels of power at the end of the coaching sessions suggesting equal contributions and leadership. The present findings suggest some relevant competencies of coaches within health-care services. Due to the small number of participants, the results have to be interpreted with caution. The present study provides suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:23474998

  9. Communication about science in a traditional museum: visitors' and staff's perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Léonie J.; Williams, Gina F.

    2006-12-01

    This study investigated visitors' and staff's perceptions about the communication of science in a traditional natural history museum. The research examined the science-related outcomes for adult visitors and explored visitors' and staff's ideas of science and how it is portrayed at the museum. Data were collected by questionnaire and interview from 84 staff and 102 visitors. Both groups held positive views about science, its importance and the need for everyone to understand it. Comparison of visitors' pretest and posttest scores on the questionnaire revealed some significant changes, several suggesting a change to views about science that were less "scientific." Most visitors thought that their ideas about science had not changed as a result of their visit, but they were positive about the museum as a place for learning science. Staff held more "scientific" views about the nature of science than did visitors; they recognized the potential of the museum to educate people about science, but felt it needed to be presented as more relevant and accessible, particularly in terms of science as a cultural practice. Neither staff nor visitors perceived that the museum stimulated visitors to think critically about science. While acknowledging that interpreting complex scientific knowledge into exhibits readily understood by lay visitors and displaying controversy are difficult, these challenges must be addressed if visitors are to be encouraged to think about science and the social, cultural and political contexts which shape it.

  10. Caring for inpatient boarders in the emergency department: improving safety and patient and staff satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bornemann-Shepherd, Melanie; Le-Lazar, Jamie; Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; DeVine, Deborah; McDevitt, Kelly; Paul, Marcee

    2015-01-01

    Hospital capacity constraints lead to large numbers of inpatients being held for extended periods in the emergency department. This creates concerns with safety, quality of care, and dissatisfaction of patients and staff. The aim of this quality-improvement project was to improve satisfaction and processes in which nurses provided care to inpatient boarders held in the emergency department. A quality-improvement project framework that included the use of a questionnaire was used to ascertain employee and patient dissatisfaction and identify opportunities for improvement. A task force was created to develop action plans related to holding and caring for inpatients in the emergency department. A questionnaire was sent to nursing staff in spring 2012, and responses from the questionnaire identified improvements that could be implemented to improve care for inpatient boarders. Situation-background-assessment-recommendation (SBAR) communications and direct observations were also used to identify specific improvements. Post-questionnaire results indicated improved satisfaction for both staff and patients. It was recognized early that the ED inpatient area would benefit from the supervision of an inpatient director, managers, and staff. Outcomes showed that creating an inpatient unit within the emergency department had a positive effect on staff and patient satisfaction. PMID:24985747

  11. Burnout, compassion fatigue, and compassion satisfaction among staff in community-based mental health services.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alberto; Cetrano, Gaia; Pertile, Riccardo; Rabbi, Laura; Donisi, Valeria; Grigoletti, Laura; Curtolo, Cristina; Tansella, Michele; Thornicroft, Graham; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2012-12-30

    Providing care to individuals with complex mental health needs can be stressful. However, little research has focused on the emotional, cognitive, and physical consequences of providing mental health care. The aim of this study is to assess burnout (BO), compassion fatigue (CF) and compassion satisfaction (CS) among staff at the four community-based mental health services (CMHS) of Verona, Italy. All staff were asked to complete anonymously the Professional Quality of Life Scale, the General Health Questionnaire, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. In total 260 staff participated (a response rate of 84%). Psychiatrists and social workers were the professionals with the highest levels of BO and CF. Workers with psychological distress reported both higher BO and CF scores, and lower levels of CS. A significant increase in the BO and CF scores was also detected for each extra year spent working in a CMHS. A higher level of CF was associated with female and having been experienced one negative life event in the previous year. These findings are useful for health managers and team leaders to identify factors affecting the professional quality of life of mental healthcare staff, and can provide a rationale for detecting staff at risk for developing negative work-related outcomes. PMID:22951335

  12. Staff nurses lead the way for improvement to shared governance structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shelley C; Wells, Nancy J

    2010-11-01

    The Magnet® model encompasses structural empowerment, transformational leadership, exemplary professional practice, and new knowledge, innovations, and improvements. As the American Nurses Credentialing Center reminds us, great leaders, structures, and nurses lead to great knowledge, innovation, and outcomes. One organization experienced the wisdom in this model through restructuring the systemwide staff nurse councils. The authors describe the steps by which this restructuring was accomplished and some of the positive effects on the work environment. PMID:20978416

  13. Are Students Customers? Perceptions of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomas, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of the student as a customer in a university, focusing on the perceptions of academic staff. Changes in the higher education sector in recent years have significantly reduced the differences between universities and other types of organisations and it has been argued that students have become "consumers" of higher…

  14. Staff Differentiation; An Annotated Bibliography Addendum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin County Public Schools, Corte Madera, CA.

    Differentiated staffing has emphasized development of teacher leadership roles, the importance of shared decision making in schools, and the constructive ways in which paid instructional aides and volunteer aides can support the professional teaching staff. Eighteen annotated bibliographic citations concerning the various aspects of differentiated…

  15. Leading Staff Development for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubb, Sara; Earley, Peter

    2009-01-01

    As part of a CfBT Education Trust funded study, we investigated the practical steps school leaders can take to ensure that self-evaluation of school performance led, through the effective staff development, to genuine school improvement. On the journey from self-evaluation to school improvement our research identified what schools did that worked,…

  16. Supervision, Staff Development, and Evaluation Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Frank O.; Wood, Fred H.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the relationship between supervision, staff development, and teacher evaluation, discussing why educators must strive to make connections among the three, identifying important misunderstandings about them, and describing the purposes of each process and the similarities, differences, and connections between them. Together, they can be…

  17. Camp Courageous of Iowa Staff Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp Courageous of Iowa, Monticello.

    Designed as a useful and practical tool for the staff at Camp Courageous of Iowa, a year-round residential camp serving all handicapped individuals, the manual outlines safety rules for camp activities, characteristics of the mentally and physically handicapped, and a general description of the camp and its objectives. Contents of the manual…

  18. Improving Circulation Services through Staff Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisby, Cynthia M.; Kilman, Marcus D.

    2007-01-01

    The Circulation Services Department at the University of Central Florida Libraries reports on leadership and training initiatives that resulted in a number of service-enhancing projects implemented by a highly motivated and involved staff. Key elements in reinvigorating the department included a change in leadership philosophy, increased…

  19. Including Rural Districts in Inclusive Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfluger, Loretta; Hendricks, Jenny

    Teaching students who receive special education services in integrated settings requires intensive staff development and on-going training. Region 16 Education Service Center in the Texas panhandle serves 65 rural school districts covering 25,000 square miles and 80,000 students. In 1996, with direction and funding from the state legislature,…

  20. Problems of the Low-Staff School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denisova, L.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes rural schools in the USSR, arguing their low staff-to-student ratio is the central link to rural schools' myriad problems. Examines how migration to cities and dwindling numbers of villages relate to rural schools and poor agricultural production. States presence of schools helps keep villages alive. Identifies difficulties in maintaining…

  1. Evaluating, Developing, and Promoting Community College Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Frank

    1983-01-01

    Offers a model for hiring, developing, and promoting staff which endeavors to synthesize numerous concepts used by business and industry in their human resources development programs. Presents a 23-item checklist for the model and proposes that it be used by community colleges to reach affirmative action goals. (DMM)

  2. Staff Development; Mini Models for College Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Gary T., Ed.

    One hundred twenty-seven participants at a June 1975 symposium in Squaw Valley, California, made use of a prescribed problem-solving process in order to originate a number of parts of a total staff development effort for a simulated community college. The developmental stages in the process included brainstorming, needs assessment, resource…

  3. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL... Agency financial assistance on a nondiscrimination basis. (c) Science Advisory Board. The...

  4. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL... Agency financial assistance on a nondiscrimination basis. (c) Science Advisory Board. The...

  5. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL... Agency financial assistance on a nondiscrimination basis. (c) Science Advisory Board. The...

  6. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL... Agency financial assistance on a nondiscrimination basis. (c) Science Advisory Board. The...

  7. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL... Agency financial assistance on a nondiscrimination basis. (c) Science Advisory Board. The...

  8. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  9. Public Health Nursing Staff Health Education Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Terence R.; And Others

    Health education attitudes toward prevention, detection, and treatment of selected chronic diseases and conditions confronting public health nursing staffs were investigated at a Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services District, which is composed of 16 county public health units (CPHU). Findings were used to determine type of…

  10. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Metals Analyses. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. The Staff Guide provides step-by-step information on course planning, development, and implementation involving…

  11. Professional Staff in Canadian University Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Samuel

    1986-01-01

    Data from three Canadian university libraries on length of service, degree of mobility, and age of professional staff suggest that the combination of middle age, long service, and immobility results in severe deficiencies of motivation, morale, and creativity. Job rotation and job enlargement are suggested as solutions. (EM)

  12. Accommodations: Staff Identity and University Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Andrew; Herrick, Tim; Keating, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Space has been of growing significance in social theory in recent years, yet, explorations of it in the scholarship of higher education have been limited. This is surprising, given the critical role space has in shaping staff and students' engagement with the university. Taking a practice-based approach and focusing on academic identities, this…

  13. Staff Development in Light of Maslow's Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Christene K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the teacher change process in an Oregon staff development program, examining faculty development within the framework of Maslow's theory that says people are motivated to satisfy physiological, safety/security, social, self-esteem, and self-actualization needs. Program evaluation demonstrated the interdependence of the cognitive and…

  14. Involving your staff in committees and meetings.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, C D; Jeffrey, L P

    1984-01-01

    Committees serve as an ideal forum for members of an organizaton to exchange views and information. If managed effectively, they can be utilized to generate ideas and to provide sound recommendations to the pharmacy manager. This article describes a personnel management program in which all levels of pharmacy personnel are provided with several opportunities to actively participate and contribute to the establishment and attainment of departmental objectives. The involvement of the staff in serving on committees and attending meetings is outlined. Various intradepartmental and interdepartmental committees as well as continuing education conferences are described. The comprehensive program permits each member of the pharmacist staff to spend approximately 5-10% of their time participating in the three above-mentioned activities. This personnel management approach has had a positive effect on the role of the entire staff and has enabled all levels of employees to get involved and contribute to departmental services and hospital issues. Most importantly, it has successfully provided a stimulus to the staff to pursue avenues of professional specialization. PMID:10264745

  15. Cultivating Leadership Development for Support Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Describes an urban school district's focus on leadership development for support staff. The project identified and trained 500 front-line supervisors representing office managers, food service managers, head custodians, and district maintenance supervisors. This paper explains program design, objectives, participants, management support, content,…

  16. Alternatives for Staff Development of Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrichter, Arthur W.; Gardner, Daniel L.

    The product of a three-year adult education teacher training project conducted for Florida's adult educators, this guide is designed to assist planners, facilitators, evaluators, and administrators of staff development programs for adult education teachers to design and conduct effective personal and professional learning experiences. It provides…

  17. School Staff Guide to Risk and Resiliency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Bureau of Instructional Support and Community Services.

    School staff can use information on risk factors to identify student needs and assess the ability of the school to address these needs. It is also important to identify protective factors that promote successful development or buffer risk factors that might otherwise compromise development. Three key factors that have been identified as fostering…

  18. Measuring Mindfulness in Summer Camp Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Ann; Roark, Mark F.; Nyaga, Lewis Ramsey Kanyiba; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Examining mindfulness in a non-clinical and non-therapeutic setting such as a summer camp is an area of growing interest. Our study tested three mindfulness scales with staff in a summer camp setting, and we conducted preliminary reliability and validity analyses for any modifications needed in the scales. Results indicated two major findings: (a)…

  19. Using Public Library Reference Collections and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Thomas A.

    1997-01-01

    Three studies examined public library reference services use by patrons in Anglo, Hispanic, and Vietnamese communities in California. Interview questions concerned search topics, use of staff help, perceived usefulness of search result, successful search strategies, reasons for not seeking help, foreknowledge of sources, reasons for using the…

  20. Exemplary Practices in Staff and Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Roy F., Ed.; Mezei, Katherine E., Ed.

    In June 1988, the heads of Staff Development of each institution of the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology were invited to submit brief descriptions of 5 to 10 outstanding programs or practices designed to develop human resources within the college. This directory of exemplary practice provides a selection of the colleges'…

  1. Between Education and Psychology: School Staff Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Tim; Finney, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When discussing contributions from psychology in/to educational practices like school-based mental health promotion, it is peculiar that psychologists (of an educational or clinical kind) or education-oriented sociologists, both not often based in schools or classrooms, dominate the topic. It has been acknowledged that school staff have been over…

  2. Evaluation of a Statewide Staff Development Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandes, Barbara G.; Padia, William L.

    Findings from an evaluation of Teacher Education and Computer (TEC) Centers were presented. The California State Legislature authorized 15 TEC Centers to provide staff development services to teachers and administrators. Evaluation of the Centers focused on several policy issues in order to describe the major accomplishments of TEC Centers on a…

  3. Student and Staff Victimization. NSSC Resource Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Safety Center, Sacramento, CA.

    Schools today face serious, daily threats to the safety of students and staff. Students and school employees become victims when experiencing a crime against themselves or when threatened by the perpetration of a crime. On school grounds, these crimes are most often assaults, robberies, and extortion. Recent studies have highlighted the…

  4. The Lighter Side of Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacall, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    As educators, we often take ourselves a bit too seriously, so veteran educator and illustrator Aaron Bacall offers a little perspective with these lighthearted cartoons. Whether used as overheads for meetings or as an individual break in a busy day, this collection of whimsical glimpses at staff development will provide a moment to laugh and add a…

  5. Making Schools Healthy for Students and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jack B.

    2012-01-01

    Superintendents and boards of education more often than not choose "books over bricks" and their repair and maintenance budgets usually are lower than what they need. However, they all recognize the importance of healthy schools for students and staff. Is there a way to improve the condition of one's school buildings without spending a lot of…

  6. Retirement Plans of Instructional Faculty and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronister, Jay L.; Baldwin, Roger G.

    1996-01-01

    This analysis of the retirement plans of college and university faculty and staff used data from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty. It first determined the proportion of faculty who are age 55 or older by institutional type, discipline, gender, and minority/nonminority status and then analyzed their retirement plans using the same…

  7. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  8. Data Element Dictionary: Staff. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James S.

    This document is intended to serve as a guide for institutions in the development of data bases to support the implementation of planning and management systems. This publication serves to identify and describe those staff-related data elements: (1) required to support current National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS)…

  9. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Nutrients. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. This Staff Guide provides step-by-step guidelines on course planning, development and implementation involving…

  10. Getting Staff to Use Data Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    In this article, John Forbes, administrative analyst for the 80,000-student Fresno Unified School District in Fresno, and Terrence Young, chief information officer for the 70,000-student Guilford Country Schools in Greensboro, North Carolina, share their strategies for getting staff on board with Web-based data systems. These are the strategies:…

  11. Catching the Kinks in Staff Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Rebecca Maria

    Many exciting and successful staff development programs with different goals and objectives and using varied techniques and approaches have been realized in recent years. Each was successful not only because of the unique approaches it utilized, but because of the careful planning and preparation that encompassed each program. A number of crucial…

  12. Roosevelt/UMass Staff Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byas, Ulysses

    The Roosevelt School District, with the lowest wealth per pupil of the 56 districts located in Nassau County, Long Island, New York, worked with the Urban Education Department of the University of Massachusetts' Division of Instructional Leadership to design and implement a degree-granting staff development program centered around identifying and…

  13. The Boston Vocation Bureau's First Counseling Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sensoy-Briddick, Hande

    2009-01-01

    Although much has been written about Frank Parsons, the founder of the vocational guidance movement, little is known about the 1st counseling staff of the Vocation Bureau. Lucinda Wyman Prince, Ralph Albertson, and Philip Davis each deserve recognition for their role in founding vocation guidance as well as their civic contributions. This article…

  14. Staff Issue Paper on Institutional Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of State, Washington, DC.

    Staff Issue Papers for the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on the 1972 United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, Stockholm, Sweden, are summarized in this compendium. Papers developed by the various sub-committees are included for: (1) institutional arrangements; (2) development and the environment; (3) human settlements; (4)…

  15. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  16. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  17. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  18. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  19. Building a Learning Community of Senior Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Denise K.

    2005-01-01

    One of the current education "buzz phrases" speaks to the creation of professional learning communities to build the capacity of staff. Learning organizations are described as "where people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective…

  20. Costing Child Protective Services Staff Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graef, Michelle I.; Hill, Erick L.

    2000-01-01

    Details process of determining a child welfare agency's actual dollar costs directly attributed to protective services staff turnover, using the agency's human resources database and interviews with administrative personnel. Provides formulas and process for calculating specific cost elements due to employee separation, replacement, and training.…

  1. Greeks in America; Staff Development Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lereah, Lucy; And Others

    This module lists eight staff development objectives pertaining to various aspects of Greek-American culture. Topics dealt with include Greek emigration and immigration, Greek vocabulary, contributions made by prominent Greek-Americans, Greek family life and the changing role of family members, Greek values, and the growth of Atlanta's Greek…

  2. Equity Training for State Education Agency Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Claire; And Others

    A training manual for state education agency (SEA) staff dealing with issues of sex bias and discrimination in the educational system is presented. The manual is designed to achieve the following primary objectives: (1) provide a status report on federal and state roles in promoting educational equity; (2) provide an overview of inequities based…

  3. Staff Development for the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Barbara E.; Weckmueller, Beth L.

    1991-01-01

    Many college and university student service units consider staff development peripheral to their primary mission and not cost effective, especially in lean financial times. However, recent trends in business suggest this assumption is false, and ultimately costly. The University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, experience found development efforts empower…

  4. Staff-Development Program. Maxi I Practicum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutalo, Anthony J.

    Described are various aspects of a program to train school personnel to meet the special needs of mainstreamed children. The staff development program is discussed in terms of program responsibility, strategy, and steps taken by the principal in the implementation procedure. The four stages of Project RETAP, a special education in-service program…

  5. Computer Training for Staff and Patrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krissoff, Alan; Konrad, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Describes a pilot computer training program for library staff and patrons at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Reviews components of effective training programs and highlights core computer competencies: operating systems, hardware and software basics and troubleshooting, and search concepts and techniques. Includes an instructional outline and…

  6. Turning Up the Staff for Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jr., Richard V.

    1969-01-01

    With the tremendous growth of innovation in education in recent years, the need to "tune up the staff has appeared as an essential ingredient. The days of change through administrative directives have disappeared with the rise in teacher militancy and competency. (CK)

  7. Does Staff Diversity Imply Openness to Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international university departments in Denmark. The authors set out…

  8. The Hazardous Waters of Staff Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoop, Robert J.; Dunklee, Dennis R.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding prospective employees' rights (under the 1964 Civil Rights Act and other federal legislation prohibiting discriminatory practices) can help principals protect themselves, their schools, and their districts from litigation. Scenarios are described, along with permissible staff-selection steps: position analysis, recruitment,…

  9. Selecting and Developing an A+ Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vernon G.

    2008-01-01

    Because the demand for excellence in public education is ever present, this article explores the development of a professional enhancement program designed to select and develop a qualified, competent faculty and staff. The basis for the program is a strong educational philosophy, which leads to a vision of what schools can be. It stresses the…

  10. Use staff wisely to save NHS money.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    2015-12-01

    The NHS could save up to £ 2 billion a year by improving workflow and containing workforce costs, according to Labour peer Lord Carter's review of NHS efficiency. Changes in areas such as rostering and management of annual leave must avoid increasing the pressure on staff. PMID:26647680

  11. School Age Child Care Staff Training Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Jane S.; And Others

    A formative and summative evaluation was made of eight school-age child care (SACC) training workshops conducted in 1989-90 for 190 participants in upstate New York. (The focus of the SACC workshops was to "train the trainers," as well as to provide trainees with quality materials and instruction for future training with their staff members.) All…

  12. Staff Development Resources, 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Instructional Technology.

    This staff development resource guide provides listings of instructional television and radio broadcasts related to major areas of the Total Teaching Act in South Carolina's Program for Effective Teaching (PET). Television program topics include: administration; adult education; the arts; career education; certificate-renewal credit courses;…

  13. Effective Strategies for Engaging Faculty and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieving the Dream, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges are the pathways for millions of Americans to gain valuable education and to access career opportunities leading to family-sustaining wages. Faculty, student services staff, and administrators must share in the responsibility for student success if we are to meet national completion goals and reach even more students. During a…

  14. Correlates of nursing staff survivor responses to hospital restructuring and downsizing.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ronald J

    2005-01-01

    This study examines correlates of 4 archetypal survivor responses to organizational restructuring and downsizing proposed by Mishra and Spreitzer: hopeful, obliging, cynical, and fearful. Data were collected from 744 long-term nursing staff survivors of hospital restructuring and downsizing using questionnaires. Three types of correlates were considered: work outcomes, indicators of psychologic well-being, and perceptions of hospital functioning. Greater endorsement of cynical and fearful restructuring responses was associated with more negative work outcomes and lower psychologic well-being. Greater endorsement of both cynical and fearful responses was also found to be associated with more negative perceptions of hospital functioning and effectiveness. PMID:15923926

  15. Alignment of the system's chief nursing officer: staff or direct line structure?

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene M; Luquire, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    The role of the system chief nursing officer nationally and internationally has been traditionally structured as a staff model, a direct line model, or a hybrid that includes parts of each model. The choice of structure should be made after a thorough investigation of what outcomes the system wants this position to accomplish, developing the appropriate structure to achieve these outcomes, and then engaging a chief nursing officer with the skills indicated by the type of structure chosen. This article describes these 3 structures and the support infrastructure necessary for each model. PMID:22955221

  16. Psychosocial Work-Related Predictors and Consequences of Personal Burnout among Staff Working with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Agnessa; Kersten, Maren; Schillmoller, Zita; Nienhaus, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the potential predictors of personal burnout among staff working with people with intellectual disabilities and to investigate whether personal burnout is associated with health and work-related outcomes. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2011 in 30 residential facilities in northern Germany…

  17. Impact of Training on Cognitive Representation of Challenging Behaviour in Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Martin; Hogg, James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive representations of challenging behaviour among staff may influence therapeutic outcomes. This study looked at how cognitive dimensions of Identity, Cause, Consequences, Emotional Reaction and Treatment/Control are affected by training. Materials and Methods: A theoretically derived questionnaire was used to measure the impact…

  18. Inclusion of Pre-Kindergarten and Other Early Childhood Staff in State Teacher Evaluation Systems. CEELO FastFacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors-Tadros, L.

    2014-01-01

    Federal Staff from the U.S. Department of Education asked the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) to provide information on the number of states that include prekindergarten teachers in state teacher evaluation systems. This was a quick turnaround response to a request from the Office of Management and Budget. In response to this…

  19. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  20. Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Comparison of Perspectives of Residents, Family, and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Maria; Bernaldo de Quiros, Monica; Gomez, M. Mar; Hornillos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Quality of Life (QoL) has become increasingly valued as a key outcome in dementia both in clinical practice and in research. This study compares the QoL of long-term residents with dementia as assessed by the individuals, their relatives, and their care staff. Design and Methods: Data on residents with dementia were collected in 11…

  1. A Comprehensive Professional Development Training's Effect on Afterschool Program Staff Behaviors to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluate a comprehensive intervention designed to support staff and program leaders in the implementation of the YMCA of USA Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for their afterschool programs (3-6pm). Design Pre (Fall 2011) and post (Spring 2012) assessment no control-group. Setting/Participants Four large-scale YMCA afterschool programs serving approximately 500 children. Intervention Professional development training founded in the 5Ms (i.e. Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, Maximize) and LET US Play principles (i.e. lines, elimination, team size, uninvolved staff/kids, and space, equipment and rules), on-site booster training sessions, workshops, and ongoing technical support for staff and program leaders from January to May 2012. Main outcome measures System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition (SOSPAN). Analysis Multilevel mixed effects linear (i.e., staff behaviors expressed as a percentage of the number of scans observed) and logistic regression. Results A total of 5328 SOSPAN scans were completed over the two measurement periods. Of the 20 staff behaviors identified in HEPA Standards and measured in this study, 17 increased or decreased in the appropriate direction. For example, staff engaged in physical activity with children increased from 26.6% to 37% and staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 42.1% to 4.5%. Conclusions Comprehensive professional development training, founded in the 5Ms and LET US Play principles, and ongoing technical assistance can have a sizable impact on key staff behaviors identified by HEPA Standards for afterschool programs. PMID:24858323

  2. Clinical and fiscal outcomes of utilization review.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mary Ellen; Darmody, Julie V

    2004-01-01

    Concurrent utilization review (UR) is both a quality improvement tool and a cost containment strategy used by managed care organizations. The UR process requires that providers (hospital staff) communicate clinical information about hospitalized patients to payers who evaluate the appropriateness and medical necessity of the planned care. Payers then make a decision whether to certify the care for reimbursement. This study provides data to indicate that denials of certification have little impact on clinical and fiscal outcomes of patient care. PMID:14740580

  3. Assisted living facility administrator and direct care staff views of resident mental health concerns and staff training needs.

    PubMed

    Dakin, Emily; Quijano, Louise M; McAlister, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    This community needs assessment surveyed 21 administrators and 75 direct care staff at 9 larger and 12 smaller assisted living facilities (ALFs) regarding perceptions of resident mental health concerns, direct care staff capacity to work with residents with mental illness, and direct care staff training needs. Group differences in these perceptions were also examined. Both administrators and directcare staff indicated that direct care staff would benefit from mental health-related training, and direct care staff perceived themselves as being more comfortable working with residents with mental illness than administrators perceived them to be. Implications for gerontological social work are discussed. PMID:21170779

  4. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'. PMID:17562724

  5. Effects of hospital downsizing on surviving staff.

    PubMed

    Young, S; Brown, H N

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, 27% of 1,147 surveyed hospitals planned to decrease staff size in the next year. This study surveyed 48 vice presidents of nursing in North Carolina hospitals with an average inpatient census over 100 using a 13-item questionnaire in an effort to discover strategies that were helpful in effective downsizing endeavors. Of the 31 (48%) returned questionnaires, 11 (35%) of the VPs reported downsizing in the past 3 years, most of which required the closing of one or more units. The respondents ranked attrition as the most common strategy, followed by relocation, early retirement, a change in skill mix, and layoffs. The most important components in successful downsizing or reorganization efforts were: two-way communication and sufficient planning, as well as seeking and using input from a broad group of staff (using both individual meetings and group forums/discussions). PMID:9987324

  6. Cutting hospital costs without cutting staff.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, John P

    2011-10-01

    A hospital that is seeking ways to cut costs without compromising care should resist the temptation to lay off staff and instead make it a priority to improve efficiencies. This approach requires a formal program to identify and analyze all of the hospital's processes. The focus of the analysis should be to determine which activities are being performed efficiently, which are being performed inefficiently, and which are unnecessary. This effort will achieve the greatest success if it is customer-centric. PMID:22053641

  7. Does Your Front Desk Staff Maximize Collections?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As collections become more difficult, practices need to use the front desk to help collect payments from patients when they are face to face. Training staff and giving them the tools to ask for money allows them to collect efficiently. Improve your collections by involving your front desk employees. Educate your patients to allow them to come to their visits prepared. It will save the practice time and money. PMID:26399028

  8. Connecting the Learners: Improving Uptake of a Nursing Home Educational Program by Focusing on Staff Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The CONNECT intervention is designed to improve staff connections, communication, and use of multiple perspectives for problem solving. This analysis compared staff descriptions of the learning climate, use of social constructivist learning processes, and outcomes in nursing facilities receiving CONNECT with facilities receiving a falls education program alone. Design and Methods: Qualitative evaluation of a randomized controlled trial was done using a focus group design. Facilities (n = 8) were randomized to a falls education program alone (control) or CONNECT followed by FALLS (intervention). A total of 77 staff participated in 16 focus groups using a structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using framework analysis, and summaries for each domain were compared between intervention and control facilities. Results: Notable differences in descriptions of the learning climate included greater learner empowerment, appreciation of the role of all disciplines, and seeking diverse viewpoints in the intervention group. Greater use of social constructivist learning processes was evidenced by the intervention group as they described greater identification of communication weaknesses, improvement in communication frequency and quality, and use of sense-making by seeking out multiple perspectives to better understand and act on information. Intervention group participants reported outcomes including more creative fall prevention plans, a more respectful work environment, and improved relationships with coworkers. No substantial difference between groups was identified in safety culture, shared responsibility, and self-reported knowledge about falls. Implications: CONNECT appears to enhance the use of social constructivist learning processes among nursing home staff. The impact of CONNECT on clinical outcomes requires further study. PMID:23704219

  9. Healthcare Staff Wellbeing, Burnout, and Patient Safety: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Louise H.; Johnson, Judith; Watt, Ian; Tsipa, Anastasia; O’Connor, Daryl B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is an association between healthcare professionals’ wellbeing and burnout, with patient safety. Design Systematic research review. Data Sources PsychInfo (1806 to July 2015), Medline (1946 to July 2015), Embase (1947 to July 2015) and Scopus (1823 to July 2015) were searched, along with reference lists of eligible articles. Eligibility Criteria for Selecting Studies Quantitative, empirical studies that included i) either a measure of wellbeing or burnout, and ii) patient safety, in healthcare staff populations. Results Forty-six studies were identified. Sixteen out of the 27 studies that measured wellbeing found a significant correlation between poor wellbeing and worse patient safety, with six additional studies finding an association with some but not all scales used, and one study finding a significant association but in the opposite direction to the majority of studies. Twenty-one out of the 30 studies that measured burnout found a significant association between burnout and patient safety, whilst a further four studies found an association between one or more (but not all) subscales of the burnout measures employed, and patient safety. Conclusions Poor wellbeing and moderate to high levels of burnout are associated, in the majority of studies reviewed, with poor patient safety outcomes such as medical errors, however the lack of prospective studies reduces the ability to determine causality. Further prospective studies, research in primary care, conducted within the UK, and a clearer definition of healthcare staff wellbeing are needed. Implications This review illustrates the need for healthcare organisations to consider improving employees’ mental health as well as creating safer work environments when planning interventions to improve patient safety. Systematic Review Registration PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015023340. PMID:27391946

  10. 77 FR 50492 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  11. 77 FR 73645 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  12. 77 FR 74181 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of ISO New England Inc.: NEPOOL...

  13. 77 FR 38045 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  14. 77 FR 28869 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southern Company Services, Inc.: 2012...

  15. 77 FR 31004 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  16. 77 FR 47620 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the PJM Interconnection, LLC (PJM): PJM...

  17. 77 FR 3764 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  18. 77 FR 42300 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  19. 78 FR 36183 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the South Carolina Regional...

  20. 77 FR 11531 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission...

  1. 77 FR 64983 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  2. 77 FR 16221 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  3. 78 FR 4406 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the South Carolina Regional...

  4. 76 FR 76157 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  5. 78 FR 36770 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following stakeholder meeting related to the transmission planning activities of PJM Interconnection,...

  6. 77 FR 58376 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  7. 77 FR 59184 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives ] notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southern Company Services, Inc.:...

  8. 78 FR 32386 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southern Company Services,...

  9. 77 FR 63308 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southern Company Services,...

  10. 78 FR 24193 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following joint stakeholder meeting related to the transmission planning activities of PJM Interconnection,...

  11. 78 FR 28839 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following joint stakeholder meeting related to the transmission planning activities of PJM Interconnection,...

  12. 77 FR 38046 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southern Company Services, Inc.: 2012...

  13. 77 FR 73645 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southern Company Services,...

  14. 77 FR 14777 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southern Company Services, Inc.:...

  15. 78 FR 21927 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the ] transmission planning activities of the Southern Company Services,...

  16. 77 FR 34034 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP):...

  17. 76 FR 60820 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  18. 78 FR 39728 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following joint stakeholder meeting related to the transmission planning activities of PJM Interconnection,...

  19. 78 FR 18330 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following joint stakeholder meeting related to the transmission planning activities of PJM Interconnection,...

  20. 77 FR 37665 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the North Carolina Transmission Planning...

  1. 77 FR 40606 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meetings related to the transmission planning activities of the Midwest Independent Transmission System...

  2. 77 FR 6556 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP):...

  3. 78 FR 38313 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following joint stakeholder meeting related to the transmission planning activities of PJM Interconnection,...

  4. 77 FR 21765 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP):...

  5. Motivating Staff--A Problem for the School Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchler, Merv

    1981-01-01

    Examines the implications for educators of the "Motivation-Hygiene Theory" proposed by Frederick Herzberg. Suggests increasing staff opportunities for goal setting, decision making, and expanded professional competence as strategies for developing staff motivation. (Author/MLF)

  6. 77 FR 24485 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following...

  7. 77 FR 21978 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the...

  8. 32 CFR 700.710 - Organization of a staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organization of a staff. 700.710 Section 700.710... Commanders Staffs of Commanders § 700.710 Organization of a staff. (a) The term “staff” means those officers... operation of his or her command. (b) The officer detailed as chief of staff and aide to a fleet admiral...

  9. The Human Element: Staff Development in the Electronic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Stresses the importance of staff development as a key to effective operations in the electronic library, with emphasis upon the importance of staff development in the transition to the computerized library. Current library staffing, personnel in the electronic library, and the responsibility for staff development are discussed. (Author/JL)

  10. Higher Education Staff Development: Directions for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jennifer; And Others

    This collection of 13 papers offers an international perspective on future directions of staff development at colleges and universities, focusing on academic staff development, higher education teaching networks, and managerial and human resource development. Papers are: (1) "Higher Education Staff Development for the 21st Century: Directions for…

  11. Academic Staff Disposition to Promotion Criteria in Nigerian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archibong, Ijeoma A.; Effiom, David O.; Omoike, Don; Edet, Aniefiok O.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at determining academic staff satisfaction with promotion criteria and what, in their view, should be included in the promotion criteria. A researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized for data collection from a sample size of 349 academic staff. Findings show that the majority of the academic staff were dissatisfied with the…

  12. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  13. 10 CFR 51.40 - Consultation with NRC staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....40 Consultation with NRC staff. (a) A prospective applicant or petitioner for rulemaking is encouraged to confer with NRC staff as early as possible in its planning process before submitting... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consultation with NRC staff. 51.40 Section 51.40...

  14. Leading by Example: Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and underused resource that can reduce overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members. They can also reduce staff absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce costs associated with health care and disability, and foster a climate that promotes good health schoolwide. An…

  15. Predictors of Burnout in Children's Residential Treatment Center Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Brittany L.; Leon, Scott C.; Miller, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored burnout among frontline staff within a children's residential treatment center (RTC) population. Data were collected from 375 full-time, frontline, children's RTC staff employed at 21 RTCs in Illinois. Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), results indicated that frontline staff age, training, empathic concern, communicative…

  16. The Place of Staff Morale in Educational Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zengaro, Franco

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the current place of staff morale in the educational marketing of one high school in the northwestern United States. It also looked at ways in which staff morale could be improved to ensure a positive image of the school in the community. Research was conducted by emailing questionnaires on issues relating to staff morale to…

  17. Classification of Staff Development Programmes and Effects Perceived by Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Rijdt, Catherine; Dochy, Filip; Bamelis, Sofie; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer diverse staff development programmes to allow staff members to keep up with educational innovations and to guarantee educational quality. The current study investigates by means of a survey and semi-structured interviews whether the teacher perceives staff development as a management model, a shop-floor model or a…

  18. Conflict in Staff Development Implementation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponticell, Judith A.; Thomas, Julie A.; Cooper, Sandra B.

    2006-01-01

    Staff development is aimed at changing practice. Change creates conflict. Little work has been done to gain insight into the conflict that teachers experience in the implementation of staff development. This study examines conflict in a staff development project aimed at increasing teachers' knowledge and implementation of problem-based integrated…

  19. 32 CFR 2003.7 - Support Staff (Article VII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Support Staff (Article VII). 2003.7 Section 2003.7 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT... (ISCAP) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.7 Support Staff (Article VII). The staff...

  20. 32 CFR 2003.7 - Support Staff (Article VII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Support Staff (Article VII). 2003.7 Section 2003.7 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT... (ISCAP) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.7 Support Staff (Article VII). The staff...

  1. Staff Survey Results, 2000-2001. E&R Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Wanda N.

    Evaluation and Research (E&R) staff of the Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS), North Carolina, have conducted spring surveys of school staff since 1992. This report contains information from the survey distributed in March 2001. Completed surveys were returned by 5,755 staff members. Survey results indicate that in the year 2000, more staff…

  2. Vocational Staff Workshops Project: April 26, 1991-May 30, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillicuddy (Shirley) & Associates, Sierra Madre, CA.

    The Vocational Staff Workshops Project was initiated in 1984 by the California Community College Association of Occupational Education (CCCAOE) to provide staff development activities for vocational education instructors, administrators, and support services staff. In 1991-92, the project was implemented by Orange Coast College, which…

  3. Teaching Health and Safety: Preparing Staff for the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Greg

    1999-01-01

    Discusses methods for training camp counselors in safety standards. Safety awareness and camp wellness should be introduced during staff interviews. During precamp training, staff should complete a test in OSHA requirements, followed by role playing to expand staff's knowledge in each OSHA safety and health area. First aid training, fire safety,…

  4. Organizational Climate as a Tool for Child Care Staff Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinkner, Joan M.; Riley, Dave; Roach, Mary A.

    2005-01-01

    A successful early childhood program that is a nurturing place for children must also be a good place for staff to work. Too often it is not, and employees leave. Coping with staff turnover in early childhood programs is a constant struggle, not only for administrators but also for children and their families and the staff who remain behind. Both…

  5. 17 CFR 38.155 - Compliance staff and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compliance staff and resources... DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Compliance With Rules § 38.155 Compliance staff and resources. (a) Sufficient... resources and staff to ensure that it can conduct effective audit trail reviews, trade practice...

  6. 17 CFR 38.155 - Compliance staff and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Compliance staff and resources... DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Compliance With Rules § 38.155 Compliance staff and resources. (a) Sufficient... resources and staff to ensure that it can conduct effective audit trail reviews, trade practice...

  7. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective Service System employed in an area office will be referred to as the area office staff. ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section...

  8. 77 FR 66609 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance October 31, 2012. Docket No. Pacifi... notice that on November 7, 2012, members of its staff will attend a meeting conducted by representatives... stakeholders and Commission staff's attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach efforts....

  9. 77 FR 74844 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance PacifiCorp Docket No. ER13-64-000. Deseret... that on December 19, 2012, members of its staff will attend a meeting hosted by NV Energy, Inc... meeting is open to all stakeholders and Commission staff's attendance is part of the Commission's...

  10. 7 CFR 2200.7 - Officer and staff responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Officer and staff responsibilities. 2200.7 Section... § 2200.7 Officer and staff responsibilities. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and... respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  11. 75 FR 53297 - Supplemental Notice Regarding Staff Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Supplemental Notice Regarding Staff Technical Conference August 23, 2010... Docket No. ER10-1401-000, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) directed staff to convene... led by Commission staff. Commissioners may attend the conference. All interested persons are...

  12. 32 CFR 700.330 - The Staff Assistants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Staff Assistants. 700.330 Section 700.330 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS... Office of the Secretary of the Navy/the Staff Assistants § 700.330 The Staff Assistants. The...

  13. 10 CFR 52.143 - Staff approval of design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff approval of design. 52.143 Section 52.143 Energy... Standard Design Approvals § 52.143 Staff approval of design. Upon completion of its review of a submittal....141 of this subpart, the NRC staff shall publish a determination in the Federal Register as to...

  14. 78 FR 16497 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance Docket No. PacifiCorp ER13-64-000 Deseret... its staff will attend a conference call conducted by representatives of California Independent System... stakeholders and Commission staff's attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach efforts....

  15. 17 CFR 171.28 - Participation by Commission staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... staff. 171.28 Section 171.28 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION..., Membership Denial and Registration Actions § 171.28 Participation by Commission staff. The Division of.... The Commission shall by order establish a supplementary briefing schedule for the Commission staff...

  16. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7...) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff. (a) EEO Managers, including SEP Managers and other staff who are responsible for EEO and...

  17. 7 CFR 1700.33 - Financial Services Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial Services Staff. 1700.33 Section 1700.33... AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.33 Financial Services Staff. The Financial Services Staff evaluates the financial condition of financially troubled borrowers in order...

  18. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prehearing and final staff reports. 207.22 Section 207.22 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS... version of the staff report. The final staff report is intended to supplement and correct the...

  19. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing and final staff reports. 207.22 Section 207.22 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS... version of the staff report. The final staff report is intended to supplement and correct the...

  20. 14 CFR 385.32 - Effective date of staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effective date of staff action. 385.32 Section 385.32 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS Procedure on Review of Staff Action § 385.32 Effective date of...

  1. Staff Reactions to Challenging Behaviour: An Observation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambrechts, Greet; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Eeman, Lieve; Maes, Bea

    2010-01-01

    Staff reactions play an important role in the development and maintaining of clients' challenging behaviour. Because there is a paucity of research on staff reactions in naturalistic settings, this study examined sequential associations between challenging behaviour and staff reactions by means of a descriptive analysis. We analysed video…

  2. Identifying Needs to Develop a PBL Staff Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Prarthana

    2013-01-01

    Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims…

  3. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The Water Resources Council Staff (hereinafter the...

  4. 42 CFR 401.112 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 401... § 401.112 Availability of administrative staff manuals. All CMS administrative staff manuals and... Rulings. These manuals are generally not printed in a sufficient quantity to permit sale or other...

  5. Suspected Child Maltreatment: Preschool Staff in a Conflict of Loyalty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Birgitta; Janson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the actions of Swedish preschool staff when suspecting the maltreatment of children in their domestic environment, and the staff's further experiences and relations to the family members. Methods: A questionnaire in 2005 to the staff of 189 child groups in community preschools, including 3,100 children. Results: A report…

  6. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  7. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  8. 34 CFR 75.517 - Changes in key staff members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Changes in key staff members. 75.517 Section 75.517 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.517 Changes in key staff members. A grantee shall comply with 34...

  9. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  10. 34 CFR 75.517 - Changes in key staff members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changes in key staff members. 75.517 Section 75.517 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.517 Changes in key staff members. A grantee shall comply with 34...

  11. 34 CFR 75.517 - Changes in key staff members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changes in key staff members. 75.517 Section 75.517 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.517 Changes in key staff members. A grantee shall comply with 34...

  12. 34 CFR 75.517 - Changes in key staff members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changes in key staff members. 75.517 Section 75.517 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.517 Changes in key staff members. A grantee shall comply with 34...

  13. 34 CFR 75.517 - Changes in key staff members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changes in key staff members. 75.517 Section 75.517 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.517 Changes in key staff members. A grantee shall comply with 34...

  14. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  15. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  16. Public violence, staff harassment and the wellbeing of nursing staff: an analysis of national survey data.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, Chris; Guest, David E

    2012-02-01

    Instances of physical violence from members of the public and non-physical harassment from colleagues are highly prevalent in the health-care workforce and can be damaging to both staff and patients. While policy has tended to focus on the more visible problem of public violence, little is known about which of the two behaviours is the most damaging. This study compared the consequences of public violence and staff harassment for wellbeing in two large samples of English nurses. The results revealed that while both types of aggression were related to decreased levels of staff wellbeing, staff harassment had a stronger negative association with wellbeing than public violence. The relationships between each of the types of aggression and some aspects of wellbeing were moderated by perceived supervisory support, such that the negative effects on wellbeing were greater for those with higher levels of support. The major implication of this study is that health-care organizations must pay more attention to the prevention of staff harassment in the workplace. PMID:22323668

  17. Impact of Magnet Culture in Maintaining Quality Outcomes During Periods of Organizational Transition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Judith F Zedreck; Wolf, Gail; Dudjak, Linda; Jordan, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Organizational transition presents substantial risk to maintaining quality outcomes. The leadership style and culture present during periods of change and transition empower the frontline staff to react quickly and identify opportunities. The culture of Magnet develops the skill set that enables staff to be leaders in problem solving and identifying creative care delivery approaches. Objectives of this study were to analyze the impact of organizational transition on patient and staff satisfaction, quality, and safety in a Magnet-designated hospital and determine key factors contributing to these outcomes. PMID:25768059

  18. Alcohol Misuse among University Staff: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Awoliyi, Susanna; Ball, David; Parkinson, Norman; Preedy, Victor R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the prevalence of hazardous drinking among staff in a UK university and its association with key socio-demographic features. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting A university in the UK. Participants All employees on the university employee database were eligible to participate. Those who completed and returned the questionnaire were included in the sample. Respondents were 131 university employees. Primary and Secondary Outcome Measures An AUDIT cut-off score of ≥8 was used as a measure of hazardous drinking. AUDIT total score as well as a score of ≥1 in each of the three conceptual domains of alcohol consumption (questions 1–3), dependence symptoms (questions 4–6) and alcohol-related problems (questions 7–10) were used as indicators of levels of drinking and alcohol-related consequences. Secondary outcomes were employees' demographics. Results Over one third (35%) of respondents were classified as hazardous drinkers. Twenty three per cent reported having blackouts after drinking and 14% had injuries or had injured someone. The odds of being a hazardous drinker for an employee in central departments (Human Resources, Registry etc) is only one third of that of an employee in science and health-related departments (OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.14 to 0.91). The proportion of hazardous drinkers was higher in males compared to females (43% and 30% respectively), part-time compared to full-time (46% and 34% respectively), and academic compared to non-academic employees (39% and 32% respectively), although these were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Furthermore, age, religion and ethnic origin were not found to be significantly associated with hazardous drinking, although total scores were significantly lower for ethnic minorities compared to white employees (p = 0.019). Conclusions In this study, hazardous drinking was highly prevalent among university employees. However, overt recruiting of staff to address sensitive issues

  19. Patient and Staff Perceptions of Intradialytic Exercise before and after Implementation: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hannah M. L.; Hudson, Nicky; Clarke, Amy L.; Dungey, Maurice; Feehally, John; Burton, James O.; Smith, Alice C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite guidance and evidence for the beneficial effects of intradialytic exercise (IDE), such programmes are rarely adopted within practice and little is known about how they may best be sustained. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was used to guide the understanding of the barriers and facilitators to initial and ongoing IDE participation and to understand how these are influential at each stage. Materials and Methods Focus groups explored patient (n=24) and staff (n=9) perceptions of IDE prior to the introduction of a programme and, six months later, face to face semi-structured interviews captured exercising patients (n=11) and staffs’ (n=8) actual experiences. Data were collected at private and NHS haemodialysis units within the UK. All data were audio-recorded, translated where necessary, transcribed verbatim and subject to framework analysis. Results IDE initiation can be facilitated by addressing the pre-existing beliefs about IDE through the influence of peers (for patients) and training (for staff). Participation was sustained through the observation of positive outcomes and through social influences such as teamwork and collaboration. Despite this, environment and resource limitations remained the greatest barrier perceived by both groups. Conclusions Novel methods of staff training and patient education should enhance engagement. Programmes that clearly highlight the benefits of IDE should be more successful in the longer term. The barrier of staff workload needs to be addressed through specific guidance that includes recommendations on staffing levels, roles, training and skill mix. PMID:26068875

  20. Engaging Vulnerable Adolescents in a Pregnancy Prevention Program: Perspectives of Prime Time Staff

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Amanda E.; Secor-Turner, Molly; Garwick, Ann; Sieving, Renee; Rush, Kayci

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Evaluating interventions for reducing unintended adolescent pregnancy is necessary to ensure quality and efficacy. The purpose of this study was to examine core case management practices and processes for engaging high-risk girls in Prime Time, an intensive multi-component intervention from the perspectives of intervention program staff. Method Structured individual interviews were conducted with the entire Prime Time program staff (N=7) to assess successes and challenges in engaging adolescent girls at high risk for early pregnancy recruited from school and community clinics. Results Program staff described different capacities of adolescents to engage with the program (easy, middle and difficult connecting adolescents) and provided specific recommendations for working with different connectors. Discussion Findings from this study support the notion that preventive interventions with vulnerable groups of adolescents must pay careful attention to strategies for establishing trusting youth-adult relationships. The ability of staff (e.g., case managers, nurses) to engage with adolescents is a crucial step in improving health outcomes. The identified strategies are useful in helping adolescents build skills, motivations and supports needed for healthy behavior change. PMID:22726710

  1. Staff experiences of providing maternity services in rural southern Tanzania – a focus on equipment, drug and supply issues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The poor maintenance of equipment and inadequate supplies of drugs and other items contribute to the low quality of maternity services often found in rural settings in low- and middle-income countries, and raise the risk of adverse patient outcomes through delaying care provision. We aim to describe staff experiences of providing maternal and neonatal care in rural health facilities in Southern Tanzania, focusing on issues related to equipment, drugs and supplies. Methods Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews were conducted with different staff cadres from all facility levels in order to explore experiences and views of providing maternity care in the context of poorly maintained equipment, and insufficient drugs and other supplies. A facility survey quantified the availability of relevant items. Results The facility survey, which found many missing or broken items and frequent stock outs, corroborated staff reports of providing care in the context of missing or broken care items. Staff reported increased workloads, reduced morale, difficulties in providing optimal maternity care, and carrying out procedures with potential health risks to themselves as a result. Conclusions Inadequately stocked and equipped facilities compromise the health system’s ability to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity by affecting staff personally and professionally, which hinders the provision of timely and appropriate interventions. Improving stock control and maintaining equipment could benefit mothers and babies, not only through removing restrictions to the availability of care, but also through improving staff working conditions. PMID:23410228

  2. Disseminating contingency management: impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program.

    PubMed

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T Ron; Jones, Brinn E; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A

    2014-04-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability) were assessed at study conclusion in a qualitative interview with OTP management. Intervention effectiveness was also assessed via independent chart review of trial CM implementation vs. a historical control period. Results included: 1) robust, durable increases in delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness among trained staff; 2) positive managerial perspectives of intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability; and 3) significant clinical impacts on targeted patient indices. Collective results offer support for the study's collaborative intervention design and the applied, skills-based focus of staff training processes. Implications for CM dissemination are discussed. PMID:24462242

  3. Disseminating contingency management: Impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T. Ron; Jones, Brinn E.; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability) were assessed at study conclusion in a qualitative interview with OTP management. Intervention effectiveness was also assessed via independent chart review of trial CM implementation vs. a historical control period. Results included: 1) robust, durable increases in delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness among trained staff; 2) positive managerial perspectives of intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability; and 3) significant clinical impacts on targeted patient indices. Collective results offer support for the study’s collaborative intervention design and the applied, skills-based focus of staff training processes. Implications for CM dissemination are discussed. PMID:24462242

  4. House Staff Quality Council: One Institution's Experience to Integrate Resident Involvement in Patient Care Improvement Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer L.; Papaconstantinou, Harry T.; Erwin, John P.; McAllister, Russell Keith; Berry, Tiffany; Wehbe-Janek, Hania

    2013-01-01

    Background Residents and fellows perform a large portion of the hands-on patient care in tertiary referral centers. As frontline providers, they are well suited to identify quality and patient safety issues. As payment reform shifts hospitals to a fee-for-value–type system with reimbursement contingent on quality outcomes, preventive health, and patient satisfaction, house staff must be intimately involved in identifying and solving care delivery problems related to quality, outcomes, and patient safety. Many challenges exist in integrating house staff into the quality improvement infrastructure; these challenges may ideally be managed by the development of a house staff quality council (HSQC). Methods Residents and fellows at Scott & White Memorial Hospital interested in participating in a quality council submitted an application, curriculum vitae, and letter of support from their program director. Twelve residents and fellows were selected based on their prior quality improvement experience and/or their interest in quality and safety initiatives. Results In only 1 year, our HSQC, an Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers National Initiative III project, initiated 3 quality projects and began development of a fourth project. Conclusion Academic medical centers should consider establishing HSQCs to align institutional quality goals with residency training and medical education. PMID:24052771

  5. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  6. The Utilization of Psychologists for Staff Development in a Large Public School System: A Staff Development Director's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James L., Jr.

    This model proposes the TAP Team approach as an on-site delivery system for local school staff development in large, urban school systems. TAP emphasizes in-service training for both upgrading skills of staff and for helping staff acquire new skills in the areas of coping strategies, classroom management, communication skills, instructional…

  7. Assessing Staff Competence at Implementing a Multifaceted Residential Program for Youth: Development and Initial Psychometrics of a Staff Observation Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Shaw, Tanya; Thompson, Ron; Griffith, Annette; Farmer, Elizabeth M.; Tierney, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the development of the Staff Implementation Observation Form, an instrument to assess staff competence delivering an intervention to youth in group home care with behavioral or emotional disorders. This instrument assesses staff skill at implementing the key treatment components, including building relationships with youth,…

  8. Visioning as a hiring strategy for quality outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Karen M; Carroll, V Susan

    2011-09-01

    Mutual trust and shared nurse leadership behaviors between the chief nurse executive and nursing staff are linked to improved clinical outcomes through an initial visioning process. The authors outline a hospital's strategy to improve nurse-driven outcomes by using visioning in the hiring process. Visioning, implemented in the hiring process, is a unique application of this tool for creating a desired future. PMID:21881443

  9. Research staff training in a multisite randomized clinical trial: Methods and recommendations from the Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) trial

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robrina; Morris, David W; Greer, Tracy L; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2014-01-01

    Background Descriptions of and recommendations for meeting the challenges of training research staff for multisite studies are limited despite the recognized importance of training on trial outcomes. The STRIDE (STimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise) study is a multisite randomized clinical trial that was conducted at nine addiction treatment programs across the United States within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) and evaluated the addition of exercise to addiction treatment as usual (TAU), compared to health education added to TAU, for individuals with stimulant abuse or dependence. Research staff administered a variety of measures that required a range of interviewing, technical, and clinical skills. Purpose In order to address the absence of information on how research staff are trained for multisite clinical studies, the current manuscript describes the conceptual process of training and certifying research assistants for STRIDE. Methods Training was conducted using a three-stage process to allow staff sufficient time for distributive learning, practice, and calibration leading up to implementation of this complex study. Results Training was successfully implemented with staff across nine sites. Staff demonstrated evidence of study and procedural knowledge via quizzes and skill demonstration on six measures requiring certification. Overall, while the majority of staff had little to no experience in the six measures, all research assistants demonstrated ability to correctly and reliably administer the measures throughout the study. Conclusions Practical recommendations are provided for training research staff and are particularly applicable to the challenges encountered with large, multisite trials. PMID:25379036

  10. An Educational Plan for Nursing Staff in the Procedural Treatment Unit of the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther; Daugherty, JoAnn

    2016-04-01

    Professional education for health practitioners is a continuum which commences with the first year professional school until the cessation of a professional career. This article draws on the theories and models developed by experts in curriculum design, teaching, and learning evaluation to better understand the intricacies and challenges of instructional design. Selected models, in particular Malcolm Knowles and the World Health Organization report served as a compass and benchmark to illuminate, guide, and evaluate the impact, process, contents, and outcomes of an educational program for the stakeholders. The aim of this educational program is to ensure that learners develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to deliver competent and quality patient-centered care. Multimodal teaching strategies are essential to meet the diverse needs of staff. Utilization of technology such as intranet and mobile applications helps to deliver educational content in a cost-effective manner. Program evaluation determines the effectiveness of teaching and helps to define ongoing needs of staff. PMID:27037167

  11. Spica cast care: a collaborative staff-led education initiative for improved patient care.

    PubMed

    Reed, Cynthia; Carroll, Lee; Baccari, Susan; Shermont, Herminia

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects for nurses caring for incontinent children in spica casts is maintaining healthy skin integrity. Noting an increase in the number of phone calls from parents of discharged children in spica casts concerning diaper rash and skin breakdown, inpatient orthopedics staff nurses lead an interdisciplinary quality improvement and educational initiative. They standardized pediatric spica cast care and education by creating an intranet narrated PowerPoint presentation for staff and parents of children with spica casts. A take-home DVD of this education module is now produced and given to parents, reinforcing nursing discharge teaching and giving parents the opportunity to review these new skills at home as needed. The purpose of this article is to share this experience of improving patient outcomes and empowering other orthopedics nurses to develop creative educational solutions. PMID:22124183

  12. Impact of unit practice councils on culture and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes positive outcomes in culture, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores, employee engagement, and clinical quality as a result of using shared governance, specifically unit practice councils (UPC) or staff councils, to implement Relationship-Based Care (RBC). PMID:23513431

  13. Beacons for Change: An Innovative Outcome Model for Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, John E.; Baker, George A.

    The participatory, outcome-centered model of college governance described in this book focuses on recruitment, rewards, and retention of both students and professional staff. An introduction examines the history and current status of community colleges, presents existing and proposed patterns of administrative and faculty relationships, and…

  14. Early Head Start Relationships: Association with Program Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elicker, James; Wen, Xiaoli; Kwon, Kyong-Ah; Sprague, Jill B.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Interpersonal relationships among staff caregivers, parents, and children have been recommended as essential aspects of early childhood intervention. This study explored the associations of these relationships with program outcomes for children and parents in 3 Early Head Start programs. A total of 71 children (8-35 months,…

  15. Outcomes-Based Funding and Stakeholder Engagement. Lumina Issue Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadlec, Alison; Shelton, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the key aspects of stakeholder engagement that can strengthen the design, implementation and sustainability of outcomes-based funding policies. We seek to help policymakers understand the prevailing starting-point attitudes of institutional stakeholders, primarily college and university administrators, faculty and staff, and…

  16. The Leadership Paradox: Can School Leaders Transform Student Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative case study of an exceptional school in the south of England challenges the hypothesis that transformational leaders significantly impact on student outcomes. Interviews with staff and students, together with classroom observation, confirm that the head, appointed in 1995, has played an important role in transforming internal…

  17. Empowering Staff Nurses With Essential Skills: Training Strategies for Success.

    PubMed

    Czekanski, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Nurse leaders in the mental health field are challenged to ensure the mental health environment is safe and therapeutic. They must also continually evaluate whether nurses are effectively engaging therapeutically with patients in their care. Undergraduate nursing students and practicing nurses usually receive little or no training in facilitating nurse-led groups. Nurses who are trained and capable of facilitating groups may enhance therapeutic relationships and engage patients to improve treatment outcomes. Training staff and disseminating educational materials in an efficient manner are often challenges for nurse leaders. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Office of Nursing Services (ONS) Mental Health Field Advisory Committee (MH-FAC) developed a nursing guide for conducting psychoeducation groups. This was followed up with a complementary live virtual training with "on-demand" features that included discussion and demonstration of nurse-led group implementation strategies. Both products were disseminated to nurse leaders throughout the VHA ONS Web site. Responses to both the guide and video were overwhelmingly positive. This article discusses the importance of nurse-led psychoeducational groups and describes a project implemented by the ONS MH-FAC, which helped provide an essential training to more than 1100 RNs within the Veterans Affairs Health System nationally. PMID:27259127

  18. False accusations of physical and sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Schuman, D C

    1986-01-01

    Child sexual abuse is sometimes mistakenly over-reported. This discussion of seven cases focuses on one potential area which can generate a substantial segment of false positives: conflicted domestic relations litigation situation. Such situations generate striking, regressive affect and behavior especially when issues of child custody or visitation erupt. Parental regression has been discussed in the literature, but children regress too: behavioral symptoms erupt with vegetative and social disruption, and instinctual material regarding both sex and anger is more accessible to consciousness than is age-appropriate. Heightened instinctual forces in children and regressive loosening of pre-litigation character defenses in adults, both in the context of stressful family breakdown, combine to generate genuine perceptions of abuse but invalid reports. PMID:3697518

  19. Intramural Staff Handbook. Student Staff Personnel Manual from the Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudenhoeffer, Frances Tomlin; Fedak, Joseph F.

    This student staff personnel manual is designed to orient student employees of the New Mexico State University (Las Cruces) Office of Intramural/Recreational Sports to their duties and responsibilities and to provide personnel policies and standard operating procedures. Topics include: student employment procedures, pay rates for job…

  20. Computer Based Learning in FE. A Staff Development Model. A Staff Development Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This booklet describes the development and content of a model staff development pack for use in training teachers to incorporate the techniques of computer-based learning into their subject teaching. The guide consists of three parts. Part 1 outlines the aims and objectives, content, and use of the pack. Described next are seven curriculum samples…

  1. The Washington State System for Coordination of Staff Development. The Staff Development Coordination Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This report outlines the roles and responsibilities, pertaining to the improvement amd coordination of statewide teacher inservice, of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (SPI) in the state of Washington. After a field-based research study was conducted, a system was devised by which the SPI can improve coordination of staff development…

  2. The Continuing Education Needs of Academic Staff: Senior College Staff in TAFE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mageean, Pauline

    Interviews intended to discover the best ways of meeting the continuing education needs of senior Technical and Further Education (TAFE) staff were conducted with 250 individuals from 17 TAFE colleges throughout Australia. The study population consisted of principals, deputy principals, department heads, and heads of schools who spend 50 percent…

  3. Effects of Staff Training on Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie L.; Harrington, Donna

    2002-01-01

    Four learning modules on elderly sexuality were pilot tested with 109 long-term care staff. On pretests men and whites scored higher than women and African-Americans. Knowledge and attitude improvements resulted from use of modules on the need for sexuality/intimacy, sex and dementia, and sex and aging, but not the family/personal issues module.…

  4. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  5. Benefit or burden: introducing paraprofessional support staff to health visiting teams: the case of Starting Well.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Mhairi

    2006-11-01

    With increased public-sector funding to expand and improve frontline services, pre-existing skill shortages within key professional workforces have become more acute. One response to this has been to encourage the development of skill-mix approaches which allow tasks previously undertaken by professional staff groupings to be assumed by new paraprofessional employees. Within the UK National Health Service, one group of professionals who are being challenged to change their way of working in this way are health visitors. Starting Well, one of Scotland's four health demonstration projects, which was established in 2000 to bring about a step-change in child health within deprived communities in Glasgow, operated as a pilot for such a skill-mix model of health visiting. The project was evaluated using a multimethod approach that encompassed the study of both processes and outcomes. The present paper reports on a process evaluation of the project's implementation that addressed the rationale underlying the development of Starting Well's skill-mix approach and the challenges which this model faced in practice. The perceptions of both managerial staff (n=18) and those working in practice (n=33) were gathered using semistructured interviews which sought to elicit and test Starting Well's theory of change in relation to the use of paraprofessional staff. Two sets of interviews were conducted with each group of staff between 2001 and 2003. Two main types of challenge were identified: deploying potentially vulnerable members of staff; and co-management of paraprofessionals by the health service and a voluntary-sector organisation. A potential challenge identified from the literature, i.e. that of implementing a new role within an existing team, proved to be less problematic within Starting Well. These issues are discussed in relation to current policy and practice debates. PMID:17059494

  6. HPV and HPV Vaccine Education Intervention: Effects on Parents, Healthcare Staff, and School Staff

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Paul L.; Stubbs, Brenda; Panozzo, Catherine A.; Whitesell, Dianne; Brewer, Noel T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increasing knowledge about HPV and HPV vaccine is a potentially important way to increase vaccination rates, yet few education interventions have addressed these topics. We report the results of an education intervention targeting three key groups who have contact with adolescent females. Methods We conducted HPV education intervention sessions during 2008 and 2009 in Guilford County, North Carolina. Parents (n=376), healthcare staff (n=118), and school staff (n=456) attended the one-time sessions and completed self-administered surveys. Analyses used mixed regression models to examine the intervention’s effects on participants’ self-rated HPV knowledge, objectively assessed HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge, and beliefs about HPV vaccine. Results Participants had relatively low levels of objectively assessed HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge prior to the intervention. The education intervention increased self-rated HPV knowledge among all three key groups (all p<0.001), as well as objectively assessed knowledge about many aspects of HPV and HPV vaccine among healthcare and school staff members (all p<0.05). Following the intervention, over 90% of school staff members believed HPV and HPV vaccine education is worthwhile for school personnel and that middle schools are an appropriate venue for this education. Most parents (97%) and school staff members (85%) indicated they would be supportive of school-based vaccination clinics. Conclusions Our education intervention greatly increased HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge among groups influential to the HPV vaccination behaviors of adolescent females. Impact Education interventions represent a simple yet potentially effective strategy for increasing HPV vaccination and garnering stronger support for school-based vaccination clinics. PMID:21949110

  7. Transforming Spaces and Identities: The Contributions of Professional Staff to Learning Spaces in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2012-01-01

    Staff are a university's key resource. Typically, research has concentrated on the contribution of academic staff, and has largely overlooked the crucial role of professional staff. However, recently there has been an increase in research by professional staff, about professional staff. In Australia, professional staff comprise more than half the…

  8. Nonprofit Organizations and Outcome Measurement: From Tracking Program Activities to Focusing on Frontline Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Lehn M.

    2012-01-01

    Why do we continue to see evidence that nonprofit staff feel like outcome measurement is missing important aspects of their work? Based on an analysis of over 1,000 pages of material in 10 outcome measurement guides and a focused literature review of frontline work in three types of nonprofit organizations, this article shows that existing outcome…

  9. Benchmarking Work Practices and Outcomes in Australian Universities Using an Employee Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langford, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to benchmark a broad range of work practices and outcomes in Australian universities against other industries. Past research suggests occupational stress experienced by academic staff is worse than experienced by employees in other industries. However, no other practices or outcomes can be compared confidently.…

  10. Association Between Staff Experience and Effective Tuberculosis Contact Tracing in North Carolina, 2008–2009

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Kia. E.; Allen, Myra G.; Fortenberry, Ellen R.; Luffman, Julie; Zeringue, Elizabeth; Stout, Jason E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Effective investigation of tuberculosis (TB) contacts is essential for continued progress toward TB elimination. As the incidence of TB declines, staff experience will also decline. Little is known about the association between the experience level of public health TB staff and the quality of contact investigations. METHODS Contact investigations involving fewer than 30 contacts during the period 2008–2009 were included in this analysis. Multivariable models were used to examine associations between staff TB experience (assessed by a standardized survey) and measures of contact investigation quality: time from case identification to contact identification and number of contacts identified per case investigated. RESULTS A total of 501 cases and 3,230 contacts met the inclusion criteria. Data were stratified by the number of cases in the county and whether the case was smear-positive or smear-negative. For contacts of smear-positive cases, greater staff experience was associated with more rapid contact identification both in counties with high case counts (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.43; 95% CI, 1.79–3.31) and in counties with low case counts (HR = 1.142; 95% CI, 0.95–1.37). However, for smear-negative cases, staff in counties with low case counts identified contacts more slowly as years of experience increased (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.62–1.07). For contacts of smear-negative cases, more contacts (relative risk [RR] = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.35) were identified per case in high case-count counties (more than 20 cases during 2008–2009). Conversely, in low case-count counties, fewer contacts were identified per case (RR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.82–1.08); however, this finding was not significant. DISCUSSION Speed of identification and number of contacts are imperfect surrogates for the most important outcome of contact investigations—that is, the rapid identification and treatment of infected contacts. CONCLUSION More TB experience was associated with more

  11. Academic Drift in Dutch Non-University Higher Education Evaluated: A Staff Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffioen, Didi M. E.; de Jong, Uulkje

    2013-01-01

    In the context of a European knowledge economy, the Dutch non-university institutions systematically develop research activities at a higher frequency than before. With this development, they have been accused of academic drift, of striving to receive a status comparable to traditional universities. This study considers the perceptions of both…

  12. Experiences of Australian school staff in addressing student cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Gates, Peter J; Norberg, Melissa M; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis is the most frequently used illicit drug by Australian secondary school students yet there is scant research investigating school staff responses to student cannabis use. As such, this study surveyed 1,692 school staff who attended Generation Next seminars throughout Australia. The self-complete survey identified that the majority of school staff had discussed cannabis use at least once in the past year, although teachers were less likely to report having cannabis-related discussions compared to other school staff. Staff drug education training was consistently associated with an increased prevalence of cannabis-related discussion and assistance. These findings highlight a need for drug education among school staff and particularly among teachers. PMID:25068166

  13. Recovering substance abuse staff members' beliefs about addiction.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, K; Noke, J M; Moos, R H

    1996-01-01

    This study of 329 substance abuse treatment staff assessed how recovery status, in combination with other variables, influences beliefs about the causes and treatment of substance abuse. About 15% (n = 47) of participants were "in recovery" from substance abuse problems; these staff members were not significantly different than nonrecovering staff members on education, age, race/ethnicity, years of clinical experience, or amount of client contact. When examined in a multiple regression equation that also included age, education, and treatment program goals and activities, staff members' recovery status was not associated with endorsement of disease and psychosocial models of substance abuse. However, being in recovery was associated with endorsing an eclectic approach to substance abuse treatment. The importance of recognizing the diversity of beliefs about substance abuse among recovering staff and of acknowledging that multiple influences affect all staff members viewpoints on treatment is discussed. PMID:8699546

  14. The palliative care needs of ethnic minority patients: staff perspectives.

    PubMed

    Diver, Fiona; Molassiotis, Alexander; Weeks, Les

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess palliative care staff's perceptions of multicultural care provision and explore the barriers and facilitators to culturally sensitive care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with five palliative care staff were conducted. Staff showed awareness of inter-cultural diversity and the importance of individualized care. It also became apparent that staff did not possess ethnocentric attitudes. Facilitators of multicultural care that emerged from the data included training, learning from experience, the use of culturally specific literature and resources, and effective communication channels in the team. However, barriers were present, including limited interpreting services, and some staff and other patients' negative behaviours towards ethnic minority patients. The findings lead to recommendations for better resourcing and expansion of interpreting services, and for more training, based on staff's desire for limited culturally specific knowledge in sensitive combination with an individualized care philosophy. PMID:12968120

  15. G. N. Rassam Joins AGU Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassan N. Rassam joined the AGU staff today, assuming the dual roles of Division Director for Public Information and Marketing and of Special Assistant for Nonprint Publications. He comes to AGU from the American Geological Institute, where he has been chief editor and assistant director of the GeoRef Information System.As Director of Public Information and Marketing, Rassam will head one of AGU's five divisions. He will have under his purview the Public Information Department and the Promotion and Sales Department. The Public Information Department produces Eos and also has the responsibility for press relations, including the preparation of news releases and the operation of press rooms at meetings. These activities are critical to the implementation of AGU's public education and public affairs initiatives, as well as to the central role of AGU in promoting the unity of geophysics.

  16. Effects of Dementia-Care Mapping on Residents and Staff of Care Homes: A Pragmatic Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Geertje; Draskovic, Irena; Adang, Eddy M. M.; Donders, Rogier; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of dementia-care mapping (DCM) for institutionalised people with dementia has been demonstrated in an explanatory cluster-randomised controlled trial (cRCT) with two DCM researchers carrying out the DCM intervention. In order to be able to inform daily practice, we studied DCM effectiveness in a pragmatic cRCT involving a wide range of care homes with trained nursing staff carrying out the intervention. Methods Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. The primary outcome was agitation, measured with the Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory (CMAI). The secondary outcomes included residents’ neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) and quality of life, and staff stress and job satisfaction. The nursing staff made all measurements at baseline and two follow-ups at 4-month intervals. We used linear mixed-effect models to test treatment and time effects. Results 34 units from 11 care homes, including 434 residents and 382 nursing staff members, were randomly assigned. Ten nurses from the intervention units completed the basic and advanced DCM training. Intention-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effect on the CMAI (mean difference between groups 2·4, 95% CI −2·7 to 7·6; p = 0·34). More NPSs were reported in the intervention group than in usual care (p = 0·02). Intervention staff reported fewer negative and more positive emotional reactions during work (p = 0·02). There were no other significant effects. Conclusions Our pragmatic findings did not confirm the effect on the primary outcome of agitation in the explanatory study. Perhaps the variability of the extent of implementation of DCM may explain the lack of effect. Trial Registration Dutch Trials Registry NTR2314. PMID:23844003

  17. The relationship between managerial leadership behaviors and staff nurse retention.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe perceptions of managerial leadership behaviors associated with staff nurse turnover and to compare nurse manager leadership behaviors as perceived by managers and their staff nurses. Effective leadership styles among nurse managers have been associated with staff nurse job satisfaction and retention. Although both transformational and transactional leadership styles have been described as effective, it is unclear which nurse manager leadership behaviors contribute most to staff nurse retention. This descriptive, correlational study was conducted at a 465-bed community hospital in the northeastern United States. All staff nurses and nurse managers employed in both ambulatory and acute care nursing units were invited to participate in the study. The study sample comprised 79 staff nurses and 10 nurse managers, who completed demographic forms and the 45-item Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, which measures 12 dimensions of leadership style. Data were collected from July through September 2003. Active management by exception as perceived by staff nurses was the only managerial leadership style associated with staff nurse turnover (r = .26, p = .03). Compared with the perceptions among their staff nurses, nurse managers consistently perceived that they demonstrated a higher mean frequency of transformational leadership behaviors. The transactional leadership style of active management by exception not only appeared to be a deterrent to staff nurse retention but also reflected leadership perceptions among staff nurses who work evening and night shifts. This study also provides further evidence regarding a trend in which nurse managers and staff nurses do not concur on the frequency of transformational leadership behaviors but do demonstrate agreement on the frequency of transactional leadership behaviors. PMID:15898399

  18. Learning from Experience, for Experienced Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; Waring, Burney; Nicholson, Gerry

    2004-01-01

    Business needs in multinational corporations call for courses that involve problem solving and creating and sharing new knowledge based on workplace situations. The courses also need to be engaging for the participants. Blended learning at Shell International Exploration and Production involves these kinds of outcomes in courses designed around a…

  19. Career Magnets: Interviews with Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heebner, Amy; And Others

    Seventy students and 62 teachers and administrators in New York City career magnet and comprehensive schools were interviewed to learn why the career magnets were successful. A statistical analysis of student outcome data for the interview sites verified they were at least as effective as the typical magnet school. Interviews with students…

  20. Teaching material. Ways to enhance visual aids in staff development programs.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, M E

    1990-02-01

    Most nurse educators incorporate some kind of media into their teaching strategies. The widespread availability of professionally developed media resources, however, does not guarantee effectiveness. The ASSURE model was presented as one method of selecting these materials on the basis of their suitability for the subject, the adult learner, and the instructor in achieving the desired educational outcomes. Furthermore, it offers guidelines for modifying or designing materials to be used in settings where media resources may be limited. The ASSURE model can help staff development educators provide effective instruction by making the best use of available media through the use of systematic instructional design principles. PMID:1689561

  1. Medical staff appointment and delineation of pediatric privileges in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    The review and verification of credentials and the granting of clinical privileges are required of every hospital to ensure that members of the medical staff are competent and qualified to provide specified levels of patient care. The credentialing process involves the following: (1) assessment of the professional and personal background of each practitioner seeking privileges; (2) assignment of privileges appropriate for the clinician's training and experience; (3) ongoing monitoring of the professional activities of each staff member; and (4) periodic reappointment to the medical staff on the basis of objectively measured performance. We examine the essential elements of a credentials review for initial and renewed medical staff appointments along with suggested criteria for the delineation of clinical privileges. Sample forms for the delineation of privileges can be found on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Hospital Care Web site (http://www.aap.org/visit/cmte19.htm). Because of differences among individual hospitals, no 1 method for credentialing is universally applicable. The medical staff of each hospital must, therefore, establish its own process based on the general principles reviewed in this report. The issues of medical staff membership and credentialing have become very complex, and institutions and medical staffs are vulnerable to legal action. Consequently, it is advisable for hospitals and medical staffs to obtain expert legal advice when medical staff bylaws are constructed or revised. PMID:22451705

  2. Measuring work stress among correctional staff: a Rasch measurement approach.

    PubMed

    Higgins, George E; Tewksbury, Richard; Denney, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Today, the amount of stress the correctional staff endures at work is an important issue. Research has addressed this issue, but has yielded no consensus as to a properly calibrated measure of perceptions of work stress for correctional staff. Using data from a non-random sample of correctional staff (n = 228), the Rasch model was used to assess whether a specific measure of work stress would fit the model. Results show that three items rather than six items accurately represented correctional staff perceptions of work stress. PMID:23270982

  3. Staff planning for operating rooms with different surgical services lines.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Monica C; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-06-01

    We present a two-phase model for a staff planning problem in a surgical department. We consider the setting where staff, in particular nurse circulators and surgical scrub technicians, are assigned to one of different service lines, and while they can be 'pooled' and temporally assigned to other service line if needed, these re-assignments should belimited. In Phase I, we decide on the number of staff hours to budget for each service line, considering policies limiting staff pooling and overtime, and different demand scenarios. In Phase II, we determine how these budgeted staff hours should be allocated across potential work days and shifts, given estimated staff requirements and shift-related scheduling restrictions. We propose a heuristic to speed the model's Phase II solution time. We implement the model using a hospital's surgical data and compare the model's results with the hospital's current practices. Using a simulation model for the surgical operations, we find that our two-phase model reduces the delays caused by staff unavailability as well as staff pooling, without increasing the workforce size. Finally, we briefly describe a decision-support tool we developed with the objective of fine-tuning staff planning decisions. PMID:25366968

  4. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

  5. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices should be improved especially

  6. Organisational climate as a cause of job dissatisfaction among nursing staff in selected hospitals within the Mpumalanga Province.

    PubMed

    Lephoko, C S P; Bezuidenhout, M C; Roos, J H

    2006-11-01

    This article focuses on a study conducted with the purpose of exploring and describing the organisational climate as a cause of job dissatisfaction among nursing staff in selected hospitals within the Mpumalanga Province. The major objectives were to determine what organisational climate encompasses; ascertain which factors related to organisational climate can cause dissatisfaction among nurses; determine whether there is a difference in the way nursing management and the nursing staff perceive the existing organisational climate; and make recommendations for health service managers to improve the organisational climate in order to facilitate greater job satisfaction among the nursing staff. A quantitative approach with an exploratory and descriptive design encompassing the survey method was used. A questionnaire was applied as the data collection instrument and was distributed to 140 respondents. The results indicated that the nursing management and the nursing staff were content with the intrinsic factors of their jobs, but were dissatisfied with the extrinsic factors of the organisational climate. The outcome of this research affirms that there are extrinsic factors within the organisational climate that affect the nursing management and the nursing staff adversely. Recommendations were made to promote job satisfaction in selected public hospitals within the Mpumalanga province. PMID:17310742

  7. Staff development sessions. A strategy to facilitate nursing staff education with limited teaching resources.

    PubMed

    Kirsivali-Farmer, K

    1994-01-01

    A reduction in clinical nursing educator positions resulted in the need for the Department of Nursing to continue to facilitate the professional development of nursing staff members with limited resources. In this article, the author describes a program, developed by the central Nursing Education Department at The Toronto Hospital, that was offered to clinical resource nurses, nurse managers, patient care coordinators, and preceptors. These individuals could use the information to promote the development of nursing staff members at the unit level. Several topics were presented: self-directed learning, needs assessment, behavioral objectives, lesson plans, teaching strategies, educational program evaluation, and clinical evaluation. Program evaluations were positive, and 45% of the respondents indicated they had the opportunity to apply what they learned. PMID:7807245

  8. Radiation exposure and adverse health effects of interventional cardiology staff.

    PubMed

    Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan Nair; Haamann, Frank; Nienhaus, Albert

    2013-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this chapter constitutes the first systematic review of radiation exposure to eyes, thyroid, and hands for Interventional Cardiology (IC) staff. We have concluded from our review that these anatomical locations are likely to be exposed to radiation as a result of the limited use of personal protective equipment (PPE) among IC staff as shown in Fig. 8. Our review also reveals that, with the exception of three eye exposure cases, the annual radiation dose to eyes, thyroid, and hands among IC staff was within recommended levels and limits. The As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) limit was not achieved in three cases for fingers/hands and four cases for eyes. However, an increased incidence of cataracts were reported for IC staff, and this gives rise to the concern that low-dose or unnoticed exposures may increase the risk of developing cataracts among cardiology staff. Clearly, the formation of cataracts among IC staff may be an issue and should be studied in more depth. Our review also disclosed that the two groups who receive excessive radiation doses (i.e., exceed the recommended limit) are physicians-in-training and junior staff physicians who work in cardiac catheterization laboratories. In particular, more attention should be given to assessing the effects of radiation exposure among IC staff who work in the Asia Pacific countries, because our review indicates that the number of IC procedures performed by IC staff in these countries is higher than for other continents. There is a huge demand for procedures conducted by IC staff in the Asia-Pacific area, for both treating patients and consulting with specialists. Our review also disclosed that recommended limits for per-procedure radiation doses are needed for IC staff. We recommend that such limits be established by the appropriate national and international agencies that are responsible for occupational radiation exposure. Although our review indicates that the current

  9. Pharmacy staff characteristics associated with support for pharmacy-based HIV-testing in pharmacies participating in the New York State Expanded Access Syringe Exchange Program

    PubMed Central

    Amesty, Silvia; Blaney, Shannon; Crawford, Natalie D.; Rivera, Alexis V.; Fuller, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine support of in-pharmacy HIV-testing among pharmacy staff and the individual-level characteristics associated with in-pharmacy HIV testing support. Design Descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study. Setting New York City (NYC) during January 2008 to March 2009. Intervention 131 pharmacies registered in the Expanded Syringe Access Program (ESAP) completed a survey. Participants 480 pharmacy staff, including pharmacists, owners/managers, and technicians/clerks. Main outcome measures Support of in-pharmacy HIV testing. Results Support of in-pharmacy HIV testing is high among pharmacy staff (79.4%). Pharmacy staff that supported in-pharmacy vaccinations were significantly more likely to support in-pharmacy HIV testing. Pharmacy staff that think that selling syringes to IDUs causes the community to be littered with dirty syringes were significantly less likely to support in-pharmacy HIV testing. Conclusion Support for in-pharmacy HIV testing is high among our sample of ESAP pharmacy staff actively involved in non-prescription syringe sales. These findings suggest that active ESAP pharmacy staff may be amenable to providing HIV counseling and testing to injection drug users and warrants further investigation. PMID:22825227

  10. A Coordinated Comprehensive Professional Development Training’s Effect on Summer Day Camp Staff Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Promoting Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Beighle, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Background The YMCA of USA recently adopted Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for their summer-day-camps (SDCs). Standards call for staff to exhibit HEPA promoting behaviors while eliminating HEPA discouraging behaviors. No studies have evaluated training programs to influence policy specified staff behaviors and related changes in child activity in SDCs. Method Four YMCA summer-day-camps serving approximately 800 children per week participated in this no control group pre/post pilot study. Professional development training founded in the 5Ms (Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, Maximize) and LET US Play principles (lines, elimination, team size, uninvolved staff/kids, and space, equipment and rules) was delivered to staff. Outcomes were staff promotion behaviors and child activity assessed via systematic observation instruments. Results Twelve of 17 HEPA staff behaviors changed in the appropriate direction from baseline to post-assessment with five behaviors reaching statistically significant changes. The percentage of girls and boys observed in moderate-to-vigorous-physical-activity increased from 15.3% to 18.3% (p > .05) and 17.9% to 21.2% whereas sedentary behavior decreased from 66.8% to 59.8% and 62.3% to 53.6%, respectively. Conclusion Evidence suggests that the professional development training designed to assist SDCs to meet the HEPA Standards can lead to important changes in staff behaviors and children’s physical activity. PMID:25368946

  11. The State of Higher Education for STEM LGBTQQ Faculty/Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Susan

    2012-02-01

    It has long been understood---an understanding that has been well supported by research-based evidence---that institutional ``climate'' has a profound effect on any academic community's ability to carry out its tripartite mission of teaching, research, and service (Bauer, 1996; Boyer, 1990; Peterson & Spencer, 1990; Rankin, 1998; 2003; 2010; Rankin & Reason, 2008; Tierney & Dilley, 1996). With the acknowledgment that institutions differ in the level of attention and emphasis on issues campus climate, it is safe to say that a campus climate offering equitable learning opportunities for all students, academic freedom for all faculty, and fairness in employment for all staff and administrators is one of the primary responsibilities of institutions of higher education. The research also suggests that a challenging campus climate exists for LGBTQQ students, faculty and staff. Based on the literature, a challenging climate leads to decreased productivity, decreased sense of value to the community, decreased retention, and negatively influences educational outcomes (Settles, et al. 2006; Trower & Chait (2002); Pascrell & Terenzini, 2005; Whitt, Edison, Pascarella, Terenzini, & Nora, 2001). Little is available in the literature on LGBTQQ faculty in the STEM fields. This program will engage participants in a review of the results of the 2010 project with regard to the experiences of LGBTQQ faculty and staff in the STEM fields.

  12. Identifying medical-surgical nursing staff perceptions of the drug-abusing patient.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Stacy L; Stone, Wendy L; Burleson, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    Nurses report a negative, stereotypical, and moralistic view of substance-abusing patients. Unaddressed bias may impede delivery of quality care. There is limited research of the needs specific to medical-surgical nursing staff interacting with substance-abusing patients. Nursing therapeutic commitment refers to the degree the nurse feels prepared with an adequate knowledge base, professional support, and personal ownership of a patient condition. Low therapeutic commitment correlates with job dissatisfaction. The Drug and Drug Problems Perceptions Questionnaire assesses healthcare provider attitude and therapeutic commitment to patients using or abusing medication or illicit substances. This therapeutic commitment survey serves as a staff needs assessment for a targeted educational innovation. The results show that the medical and surgical nursing staff has a constructive attitude and a moderately high degree of therapeutic commitment to the drug-abusing patient population, similar to more specialized multidisciplinary, mental healthcare workers. This study showed that medical-surgical nurses feel professionally responsible and clinically supported with patients with primary or comorbid drug abuse. Consistent with established results, focused and ongoing education on the risk factors, outcomes, and physical and psychological effects of illicit substances is necessary to improve therapeutic commitment to drug-dependent patients. PMID:24621546

  13. High salt meals in staff canteens of salt policy makers: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Berentzen, C A; van Montfrans, G A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the salt content of hot meals served at the institutions of salt policy makers in the Netherlands. Design Observational study. Setting 18 canteens at the Department of Health, the Health Council, the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, university hospitals, and affiliated non-university hospitals. Intervention A standard hot meal collected from the institutional staff canteens on three random days. Main outcome measure Salt content of the meals measured with an ion selective electrode assay. Results The mean salt content of the meals (7.1 g, SE 0.2 g) exceeded the total daily recommended salt intake of 6 g and was high at all locations: 6.9 g (0.4 g) at the Department of Health and National Health Council; 6.0 g (0.9 g) at the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority; 7.4 g (0.5 g) at university hospital staff canteens; and 7.0 g (0.3 g) at non-university hospital staff canteens. With data from a national food consumption survey, the estimated total mean daily salt intake in people who ate these meals was 15.4 g. This translates into a 23-36% increase in premature cardiovascular mortality compared with people who adhere to the recommended levels of salt intake. Conclusion If salt policy makers eat at their institutional canteens they might consume too much salt, which could put their health at risk. PMID:22187322

  14. Staff retention and recruitment: "one great department".

    PubMed

    Casady, Wanda M; Dowd, Terry A

    2002-01-01

    The projected demand for healthcare workers during the next ten years has been the impetus for many organizations to develop more creative strategies to ensure adequate staffing levels in the future. In order to keep pace with service demands, the diagnostic imaging department at Valley Lutheran Medical Center (VLMC) in Mesa, Ariz., has been growing as well. Since November of 1999, the number of core FTEs increased from 54.5 to 96. As a result, efforts to retain the current employees became just as critical as efforts to recruit staff for the new positions that were created to support the expanded services. In February 2001, an AHRA seminar was held in Phoenix, which included a day-long session called "Workforce 2001: Recruitment, Selection, Retention of Quality Employees." The presenter, Clint Maun, C.S.P., emphasized the need to provide "passionate orientation" for new employees, encouraged team-based selection of new employees, and reminded the audience that new employees decide within the first three days whether or not they will stay with an organization, regardless of how long it actually takes to leave. Maun also described to the group a model for creating team effort called "One Great Unit" (OGU), which uses a "12-Week Plan" for engaging staff. For the diagnostic imaging department at VLMC, this concept was remodeled so that, instead of focusing on one modality (unit) in the department, the focus was on the whole department. The first step to creating "One Great Department" was to establish an Oversight Committee that would help define the focus of the 12-Week Teams. Five, front-line employees were recruited who represented a cross-section of the imaging department. To assist in the implementation, the director of learning and innovation at VLMC agreed to facilitate the first two meetings. The first 12-Week Team was called together in May 2001. The operational objective addressed was "improving communication inter- and intra-departmentally." Each member

  15. Do K-12 School Facilities Affect Education Outcomes? Staff Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ed; Green, Harry A.; Roehrich-Patrick, Lynnisse; Joseph, Linda; Gibson, Teresa

    This report explains that there is growing evidence of a correlation between the adequacy of a school facility and student behavior and performance. In general, students attending school in newer, betterfacilities score 5 to 17 points higher on standardized tests than those attending in substandard buildings. School facility factors such as…

  16. Teacher Performance Incentives and Student Outcomes. Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberts, Randall; Hollenbeck, Kevin; Stone, Joe

    This paper reviews evidence of the impact of individual merit pay systems for teachers on student achievement, presenting new empirical results from a system established within a collective bargaining environment. While many merit pay systems exist nationwide, very little empirical evidence concerning their influence on student achievement exists.…

  17. The power of engagement: creating the culture that gets your staff aligned and invested.

    PubMed

    Studer, Quint; Hagins, Mitch; Cochrane, Bonnie S

    2014-01-01

    The Canadian government officially recognizes the value of staff engagement in providing better healthcare. Evidence demonstrates that engagement is connected to improved financial outcomes as well as better patient safety and clinical outcomes. There is a need for health leaders to create organizational cultures that simultaneously result in higher rates of employee and physician engagement, better clinical care, and lower costs. This article highlights the research and experience gained on the benefits of engagement, explores Studer Group's approach to improving both engagement and quality, and shares the results achieved by the firm's Canadian partners. In addition, it describes some of the "building blocks" that, together, create the necessary cultures of engagement inside organizations. PMID:25046972

  18. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  19. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers at a public teaching and national referral hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Makori, L.; Gikera, M.; Wafula, J.; Chakaya, J.; Edginton, M. E.; Kumar, A. M. V.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), Nairobi, Ken-ya, a large referral and teaching hospital. Objective: 1) To document tuberculosis (TB) case notification rates and trends; 2) to describe demographic, clinical and workplace characteristics and treatment outcomes; and 3) to examine associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome) treatment and anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers with TB at KNH during the period 2006–2011. Design: A retrospective cohort study involving a review of medical records. Results: The TB case notification rate among hospital staff ranged between 413 and 901 per 100 000 staff members per year; 51% of all cases were extra-pulmonary TB; 74% of all cases were among medical, paramedical and support staff. The TB-HIV coinfection rate was 60%. Only 75% had a successful treatment outcome. Patients in the retreatment category, those with unknown HIV status and those who were support staff had a higher risk of poor treatment outcomes. Conclusion: The TB case rate among hospital workers was unacceptably high compared to that of the general population, and treatment outcomes were poor. Infection control in the hospital and management of staff with TB requires urgent attention. PMID:26393055

  20. The Effects of a Staff Development Program: The Relationship between the Level of Use of Innovative Science Curriculum Activities and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adey, Philip S.

    This paper describes one aspect of a multi-factor investigation of the parameters which mediate in the effectiveness of an inservice staff development program. The paper also represents an attempt to recognize and to meet the problems associated with the evaluation of inservice programs for teachers in terms of student outcomes. The inservice…