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Sample records for accuser staff outcome

  1. How patient and staff experiences affect outcomes.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Neil; Warden, Ruth

    Exploring patient and staff experiences is a new discipline but is providing key insights into the quality of care patients receive. This article explores how patient and staff experiences are measured and how this information is used to change practice.

  2. Improving patient and staff outcomes using practice development.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, Catherine Elizabeth; Fry, Margaret

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of a practice development program, "Essentials of Care" (EOC), on patient and staff outcomes, workplace culture and service delivery. Design/methodology/approach A descriptive study design was used to explore the impact of EOC in a district hospital rehabilitation ward. EOC focuses on embedding a person-centered culture within clinical areas and is structured from practice development methodologies. EOC was implemented in a metropolitan district hospital rehabilitation, older person 20-bed, ward. Findings Two projects were implemented during EOC. These projects led to nine significant patient and staff outcomes for medication and continence care practices. Outcomes included a reduction in older person complaints by 80 percent, pressure injuries by 62 percent, ward multi resistant staphylococcus aureus infection rates by 50 percent, clinical incidents by 22 percent, older person falls by 14 percent (per 1,000 bed days) and nursing sick leave by 10 percent. There was also a 13 percent improvement in the post nursing workplace satisfaction survey. Research limitations/implications This is a single site study and findings may not be suitable for generalizing across ward settings and broader population groups. Originality/value The EOC program led to significant improvements for and in clinical practices, staff satisfaction and ward culture. Specifically, the EOC program also identified significant cost savings and brought together the healthcare team in a cohesive and integrated way not previously experienced by staff. Practice development strategies can champion service quality improvement, optimal patient outcomes and consistency within healthcare. PMID:27671421

  3. State Staff Perceptions of Vocational Education Outcomes. Identification and Assessment of Vocational Educational Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentling, Tim L.; Barnard, Wynette S.

    A study examined appropriate outcomes for students entering the work force after graduation from high school and for students going on to a community college for advanced training. Fifty-eight staff members of the Department fo Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DAVTE) of the Illinois State Board of Education were asked to write a profile…

  4. A Comparative Study of the Perceptions of Professional Staff on Their Contribution to Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie-Anne; Dollard, Emma; Banks, Nicci

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of professional staff on their contribution to student outcomes. An online Delphi survey method was used to collect data from two expert panels: professional staff based in faculties and professional staff based in central university departments. The aim of this method is for the panels to reach consensus. The…

  5. Understanding inequities in home health care outcomes: staff views on agency and system factors.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Bourjolly, Joretha; Frasso, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Results regarding staff perspectives on contributing factors to racial/ethnic disparities in home health care outcomes are discussed. Focus group interviews were conducted with home health care staff (N = 23) who represented various agencies from three Northeastern states. Participants identified agency and system factors that contribute to disparities, including: (a) administrative staff bias/discretion, (b) communication challenges, (c) patient/staff cultural discordance, (d) cost control, and (e) poor access to community resources. Participants reported that bias can influence staff at all levels and is expressed via poor coverage of predominantly minority service areas, resulting in reduced intensity and continuity of service for minority patients. PMID:25706958

  6. Trainees versus Staff: Exploring Counseling Outcomes in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Mike; Sharp, Julia L.; Havice, Pamela; Ilagan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Investigators compared counseling outcomes among nonpaid graduate-level trainees and professional staff at a college counseling center. Counseling outcomes for 331 college student participants were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ45.2), employing a pretest--posttest design. The two groups of service providers did not differ…

  7. Decreasing urinary tract infections through staff development, outcomes, and nursing process.

    PubMed

    Ribby, Kevin J

    2006-01-01

    For patients with indwelling catheters, even with current standards of care and evidence-based practice, urinary tract infections continue to be a problem. Data were gathered on urinary catheter usage in a large, rural acute care hospital, and outcomes profiles were developed (including mortality, morbidity, length of stay, and costs). An innovative poster and video approach focusing on alternatives to urinary catheterization, early discontinuance of catheters, and proper insertion and care techniques were used to educate nursing staff and improve outcomes.

  8. Restructuring a rehabilitation program for older adults: effects on patient outcomes and staff perspectives.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennifer; Hopper, Tammy

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods research study was to examine the impact of organizational change on patient outcomes and staff experiences in a rehabilitation program for older adults. Program restructuring focused on reducing patient length of stay and increasing admissions to the rehabilitation program. Study findings revealed that patients admitted after restructuring, as compared to the time period just prior, experienced shorter lengths of stay yet made similar progress towards rehabilitation goals. The average discharge Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores between the two time periods were not significantly different. Yet FIM efficiency scores improved after the restructuring. With this reorganization, rehabilitation staff reported working harder to help patients achieve satisfactory outcomes, although initially staff reported lower morale. Findings extend the current literature and have practical implications for health care professionals interested in facilitating successful organizational change.

  9. Nurse Aide Empowerment Strategies and Staff Stability: Effects on Nursing Home Resident Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Theresa; Brannon, Diane; Mor, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the moderating effect of staff stability on the relationship between management practices used to empower nurse aides and resident outcomes in a multistate sample of nursing homes. An adaptation of Kanter's theory of structural power in organizations guided the framework for the model used in this study. Design and…

  10. Effects of a Preschool Staff Intervention on Children's Sun Protection: Outcomes of Sun Protection Is Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritz, Ellen R.; Tripp, Mary K.; James, Aimee S.; Harrist, Ronald B.; Mueller, Nancy H.; Chamberlain, Robert M.; Parcel, Guy S.

    2007-01-01

    The preschool is an important yet understudied setting for sun-protection interventions. This study evaluates the effects of Sun Protection is Fun! (SPF) on preschool staff behavioral and psychosocial outcomes related to protecting children from sun exposure. Twenty preschools participated in a 2-year, group-randomized trial to evaluate SPF, a…

  11. Legal Rights of the Criminally Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Young Lawyers Association, Austin.

    A brief review of the federal constitutional provisions and equivalent Texas Constitutional provisions for the criminally accused is provided in question and answer form. First Amendment rights related to such matters as freedom of the press, rights of students, picketing, distributing leaflets, state licensing, and obscenity are considered in the…

  12. Improving Patient Outcomes: Effectively Training Healthcare Staff in Psychological Practice Skills: A Mixed Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garzonis, Katherine; Mann, Eryn; Wyrzykowska, Aleksandra; Kanellakis, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Training is an important part of modern European healthcare services and is often cited as a way to improve care quality. To date, various training methods have been used to impart skills relevant to psychological practice in a variety of mental health professionals. However, patient outcomes are rarely used in evaluating the effectiveness of the different training methods used, making it difficult to assess true utility. In the present review, we consider methods of training that can effectively impact trainee and patient outcomes. To do so, PubMed, PsycNET, Scopus, CENTRAL and ERIC were searched for studies on training of healthcare staff in psychological practice approaches. In total, 24 studies were identified (16 quantitative and 8 qualitative). For the most part, group, individual, and web-based training was used. A variety of health professionals were trained in skills including ‘communication’, ‘diagnosis’, and ‘referral’ to name but a few. In the majority of studies staff skill level improved. These findings hold implications for the design, implementation, and evaluation of training for mental healthcare staff. PMID:27247676

  13. Exploring the Contribution of Professional Staff to Student Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Australian and UK Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll; Regan, Julie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the second stage of a comparative study between two higher education institutions: one in Australia and the other in the United Kingdom, which explored the contributions of professional staff to student outcomes. The first stage acted as a scoping exercise to ascertain how the contributions of professional staff to student…

  14. Staff training and ambulatory tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a cluster randomized controlled trial in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Simon; Dick, Judy; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Lombard, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether adding a training intervention for clinic staff to the usual DOTS strategy (the internationally recommended control strategy for tuberculosis (TB)) would affect the outcomes of TB treatment in primary care clinics with treatment success rates below 70%. METHODS: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted from July 1996 to July 2000 in nurse-managed ambulatory primary care clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. Clinics with successful TB treatment completion rates of less than 70% and annual adult pulmonary TB loads of more than 40 patients per year were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 12) or control (n = 12) groups. All clinics completed follow-up. Treatment outcomes were measured in cohorts of adult, pulmonary TB patients before the intervention (n = 1200) and 9 months following the training (n = 1177). The intervention comprised an 18-hour experiential, participatory in-service training programme for clinic staff delivered by nurse facilitators and focusing on patient centredness, critical reflection on practice, and quality improvement. The main outcome measure was successful treatment, defined as patients who were cured and those who had completed tuberculosis treatment. FINDINGS: The estimated effect of the intervention was an increase in successful treatment rates of 4.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): -5.5% to 15.2%) and in bacteriological cure rates of 10.4% (CI: -1.2% to 22%). A treatment effect of 10% was envisaged, based on the views of policy-makers on the minimum effect size for large-scale implementation. CONCLUSION: This is the first evidence from a randomized controlled trial on the effects of experiential, participatory training on TB outcomes in primary care facilities in a developing country. Such training did not appear to improve TB outcomes. However, the results were inconclusive and further studies are required. PMID:15868015

  15. Magician accuses faith healers of hoax.

    PubMed

    Pankratz, L

    1987-06-01

    Discussions of faith healing have traditionally focused on the persuasiveness of the healer and the receptivity of the audience. Recently magician James Randi investigated popular American faith healers and accused them of deliberate fraud. The deceptions he identified are those used for many years by fraudulent mediums and psychics. This paper reviews the history of conflict between charlatans and magicians, providing a context for understanding the findings of Randi.

  16. A Systematic Review of Interventions to Change Staff Care Practices in Order to Improve Resident Outcomes in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lee-Fay; Fletcher, Jennifer; Goodenough, Belinda; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; MacAndrew, Margaret; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed interventions that attempted to change staff practice to improve long-term care resident outcomes. Methods Studies met criteria if they used a control group, included 6 or more nursing home units and quantitatively assessed staff behavior or resident outcomes. Intervention components were coded as including education material, training, audit and feedback, monitoring, champions, team meetings, policy or procedures and organizational restructure. Results Sixty-three unique studies were broadly grouped according to clinical domain—oral health (3 studies), hygiene and infection control (3 studies), nutrition (2 studies), nursing home acquired pneumonia (2 studies), depression (2 studies) appropriate prescribing (7 studies), reduction of physical restraints (3 studies), management of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6 studies), falls reduction and prevention (11 studies), quality improvement (9 studies), philosophy of care (10 studies) and other (5 studies). No single intervention component, combination of, or increased number of components was associated with greater likelihood of positive outcomes. Studies with positive outcomes for residents also tended to change staff behavior, however changing staff behavior did not necessarily improve resident outcomes. Studies targeting specific care tasks (e.g. oral care, physical restraints) were more likely to produce positive outcomes than those requiring global practice changes (e.g. care philosophy). Studies using intervention theories were more likely to be successful. Program logic was rarely articulated, so it was often unclear whether there was a coherent connection between the intervention components and measured outcomes. Many studies reported barriers relating to staff (e.g. turnover, high workload, attitudes) or organizational factors (e.g. funding, resources, logistics). Conclusion Changing staff practice in nursing homes is possible but complex

  17. Tying the Design of Your Camp Staff Training to the Delivery of Desired Youth Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Robin; Bourdeau, Virginia; Arnold, Mary; Nott, Brooke D.

    2013-01-01

    As experience camp directors, we've seen the challenges faced by young camp counselors and inexperienced staff. Evaluations from staff at many camps motivated us to help our people be more effective with their campers. In response we created a comprehensive camp staff training. Lessons showed staff what we wanted them to do and say as they…

  18. A Structured Writing Programme for Staff: Facilitating Knowledge, Skills, Confidence and Publishing Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Marcia; Radloff, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the higher education sector in publishing pedagogical research has led to a focus on professional development for staff who wish to engage in this endeavour. This paper describes and evaluates a specific programme designed to help university staff to prepare and submit a high-quality paper to a peer-reviewed journal.…

  19. Assessing and Increasing Staff Preference for Job Tasks Using Concurrent-Chains Schedules and Probabilistic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.; Campisano, Natalie; Lacourse, Kristen; Azulay, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment and improvement of staff members' subjective valuation of nonpreferred work tasks may be one way to increase the quality of staff members' work life. The Task Enjoyment Motivation Protocol (Green, Reid, Passante, & Canipe, 2008) provides a process for supervisors to identify the aversive qualities of nonpreferred job tasks. Through…

  20. The 1950 Joint Scientific Session: Pavlovians as the accusers and the accused.

    PubMed

    Windholz, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1950, Stalin and the Soviet Government prevailed upon the USSR Academy of Sciences and the USSR Academy of Medical Sciences to organize the 1950 Joint Scientific Session for the purpose of formalizing the teachings of I.P. Pavlov. During the Session, some of Pavlov's erstwhile students--the Pavlovians--split into accusers and accused. The more prominent of the latter were denounced for deviating from the orthodox Pavlovian path, and urged to admit their mistakes, to work within the framework of Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity, and to avoid Western influence. Within this context, the travail of the prominent Pavlovian physiologist L. A. Orbeli is discussed. Contemporary Russian historians and scientists, evaluating the consequences of the 1950 Joint Scientific Session, point out its negative effects; namely, the general moral decline of Soviet physiologists pressured to accept a dogmatic ideology, the lowering of the quality of research in physiology, and the self-imposed exclusion of Soviet physiology from the worldwide scientific community. PMID:9062981

  1. Ebola nurse Pauline Cafferkey accused of concealing high temperature.

    PubMed

    2016-08-24

    Pauline Cafferkey, the nurse who was infected with the Ebola virus while caring for sick people in west Africa, has been accused of concealing her temperature during checks on her return to the UK. PMID:27641552

  2. Witchcraft accusations and economic tension in precolonial old Calabar.

    PubMed

    Latham, A J

    1972-01-01

    Relevant anthropological studies have offered insight into the way in which witchcraft and witchcraft accusations may have operated in Old Calabar society (Africa) in pre-colonial times, and it is hoped that this discussion of witchcraft accusations and economic tension in pre-colonial Calabar will be of value to other historians of pre-colonial African societies. M. G. Marwick has suggested that witchcraft accusations reveal where the tensions lie in the societies in which they occur, and he intimates that in Africa witchcraft accusations only occur between persons in close social contact. Analysis of the cases of Efik witchcraft - for which there is evidence in the 18th and 19th centuries - support this claim. Their witchcraft accusations for the most part involved relations by blood or marriage. G.I. Jones has suggested that the underlying tensions which provoked witchcraft accusations in the eastern areas of Nigeria today arise from a contracting economic situation, but this was not true of old Calabar. In fact its economy was expanding under the stimulus of overseas trade. The expansion was responsible for the tension. Successful business men acquired wealth and slaves, and, consequently, status, which contradicted their position in the traditional status system, based on age and place in lineage instead of wealth. At the highest political level these tensions manifested themselves in election disputes; witchcraft accusations were made against candidates in order that they take the poison ordeal and be eliminated from the election. In the neighboring states of the Oil Rivers, where participation in the international economy was as great as old Calabar, witchcraft accusations were rare. For there the traditional descent groups had already broken up, and because of this there was no great need for covert forms of aggression, such as witchcraft.

  3. Motivational Interviewing Training for Juvenile Correctional Staff in California: One Year Initial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, Melinda; Doran, Neal; Koutsenok, Igor

    2009-01-01

    This study reports initial results of a program designed to train California corrections staff (n = 576) in motivational interviewing (MI), a method of communication that is based on a client-centered, collaborative style. After three days of training, participants made significant gains in terms of knowledge of MI principles and reflective…

  4. 32 CFR 9.5 - Procedures accorded the accused.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures accorded the accused. 9.5 Section 9.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MILITARY COMMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR TRIALS BY MILITARY COMMISSIONS OF CERTAIN NON-UNITED STATES CITIZENS IN THE WAR AGAINST...

  5. Social Support and Outcomes for Staff Serving Individuals with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Sharon M.; Schellenberg, Richard P.

    Ninety-four persons employed in direct care positions in a community-based agency that serves adults with mental retardation completed self-report questionnaires assessing relationships between social support and the adaptive outcomes of mood, perceived competence, and self-efficacy. Findings indicated that: (1) negative mood was negatively…

  6. The clinical global impression scale and the influence of patient or staff perspective on outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since its first publication, the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) has become one of the most widely used assessment instruments in psychiatry. Although some conflicting data has been presented, studies investigating the CGI's validity have only rarely been conducted so far. It is unclear whether the improvement index CGI-I or a difference score of the severity index CGI-S dif is more valid in depicting clinical change. The current study examined the validity of these two measures and investigated whether therapists' CGI ratings correspond to the view the patients themselves have on their condition. Methods Thirty-one inpatients of a German psychotherapeutic hospital suffering from a major depressive disorder (age M = 45.3, SD = 17.2; 58.1% women) participated. Patients filled in the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). CGI-S and CGI-I were rated from three perspectives: the treating therapist (THER), the team of therapists involved in the patient's treatment (TEAM), and the patient (PAT). BDI and CGI-S were filled in at admission and discharge, CGI-I at discharge only. Data was analysed using effect sizes, Spearman's ρ and intra-class correlations (ICC). Results Effect sizes between CGI-I and CGI-S dif ratings were large for all three perspectives with substantially higher change scores on CGI-I than on CGI-S dif. BDI dif correlated moderately with PAT ratings, but did not correlate significantly with TEAM or THER ratings. Congruence between CGI-ratings from the three perspectives was low for CGI-S dif (ICC = .37; Confidence Interval [CI] .15 to .59; F30,60 = 2.77, p < .001; mean ρ = 0.36) and moderate for CGI-I (ICC = .65 (CI .47 to .80; F30,60 = 6.61, p < .001; mean ρ = 0.59). Conclusions Results do not suggest a definite recommendation for whether CGI-I or CGI-S dif should be used since no strong evidence for the validity of neither of them could be found. As congruence between CGI ratings from patients' and staff's perspective was not convincing

  7. [Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice--the second victim].

    PubMed

    Wienke, A

    2013-04-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 [1]. Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decisions are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession and the actual requirements of the

  8. When Staff Members Sexually Abuse Children in Residential Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Presents practical suggestions for managing a protective service agency for children when one of its staff members is accused of sexually abusing a child in residential care. The agency must balance the tasks of protecting the child, supporting the staff, and maintaining the integrity and reputation of the agency. (GLR)

  9. When staff members sexually abuse children in residential care.

    PubMed

    Bloom, R B

    1992-01-01

    When an agency staff member is accused of sexually abusing a client, the administration is faced with the Solomonic task of balancing the necessity of protecting the child, supporting the staff, and maintaining the integrity and reputation of the agency. This article presents practical suggestions for managing the agency through such a crisis. PMID:1638902

  10. Development and preliminary evaluation of a training workshop for the collection of patient-reported outcome (PRO) interview data by research support staff.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Thomas M; Hurley, Karen; Bylund, Carma L; Berk, Alexandra; Diminni, Kimberly; Ostroff, Jamie S

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development and initial evaluation of a didactic curriculum to prepare research support staff with the core knowledge and skills required to collect patient-reported outcomes (PROs) via interviews. Research support staff members (N = 77) were recruited for eight separate workshops, each consisting of a didactic presentation followed by role-play scenarios with trained actors depicting common scenarios they may encounter as part of patient interaction. Trainees were observed and received feedback on their performance from trained facilitators and peers. In comparison to their pre-training assessment, trainees showed significant improvement in their confidence to conduct a research interview, handle a distressed participant, manage a wandering interview, ask participants sensitive questions, and handle irritated patients. Training research support staff in the effective collection of PROs via patient interviews can improve the confidence of these individuals in interacting with patients, which can ultimately lead to increased accuracy of data collection. PMID:23090591

  11. The Evidence Base for Mental Health Consultation in Early Childhood Settings: Research Synthesis Addressing Staff and Program Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Eileen M.; Bradley, Jennifer R.; Allen, Mary Dallas; Perry, Deborah F.

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: One strategy to support early childhood providers' work with children exhibiting challenging behavior is offering mental health consultation services in order to build staff skills and confidence and reduce staff stress and turnover. Through systematic search procedures, 26 recent studies were identified that addressed the…

  12. 32 CFR 719.115 - Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial sessions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... The provisions of this section are not intended to restrict the release of information designed to... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release of information pertaining to accused... Matters § 719.115 Release of information pertaining to accused persons; spectators at judicial...

  13. Protective factors and recidivism in accused juveniles who sexually offended.

    PubMed

    Klein, Verena; Rettenberger, Martin; Yoon, Dahlnym; Köhler, Nora; Briken, Peer

    2015-02-01

    To date, research on juvenile sexual offender recidivism has tended to focus on risk factors rather than protective factors. Therefore, very little is known about protective factors in the population of juveniles who sexually offended. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of protective factors on non-recidivism in a sample of accused juveniles who sexually offended (N = 71) in a mean follow-up period of 47.84 months. Protective factors were measured with the Protective Factor Scale of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY), and the Structured Assessment of PROtective Factors for violence risk (SAPROF). Criminal charges served as recidivism data. The internal scale of the SAPROF, in particular, yielded moderate predictive accuracy for the absence of violent and general recidivism, though not for the absence of sexual recidivism. No protective factor of the SAVRY did reveal predictive accuracy regarding various types of the absence of recidivism. Furthermore, protective factors failed to achieve any significant incremental predictive accuracy beyond that captured by the SAVRY risk factors alone. The potential therapeutic benefit of protective factors in juvenile sexual offender treatment is discussed. PMID:25351199

  14. Protective factors and recidivism in accused juveniles who sexually offended.

    PubMed

    Klein, Verena; Rettenberger, Martin; Yoon, Dahlnym; Köhler, Nora; Briken, Peer

    2015-02-01

    To date, research on juvenile sexual offender recidivism has tended to focus on risk factors rather than protective factors. Therefore, very little is known about protective factors in the population of juveniles who sexually offended. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of protective factors on non-recidivism in a sample of accused juveniles who sexually offended (N = 71) in a mean follow-up period of 47.84 months. Protective factors were measured with the Protective Factor Scale of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth (SAVRY), and the Structured Assessment of PROtective Factors for violence risk (SAPROF). Criminal charges served as recidivism data. The internal scale of the SAPROF, in particular, yielded moderate predictive accuracy for the absence of violent and general recidivism, though not for the absence of sexual recidivism. No protective factor of the SAVRY did reveal predictive accuracy regarding various types of the absence of recidivism. Furthermore, protective factors failed to achieve any significant incremental predictive accuracy beyond that captured by the SAVRY risk factors alone. The potential therapeutic benefit of protective factors in juvenile sexual offender treatment is discussed.

  15. Prevalence of Formal Accusations of Murder and Euthanasia against Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lewis M.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goy, Elizabeth; Arons, Stephen; Ganzini, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about how often physicians are formally accused of hastening patient deaths while practicing palliative care. Methods We conducted an Internet-based survey on a random 50% sample of physician-members of a national hospice and palliative medicine society. Results The final sample consisted of 663 physicians (response rate 53%). Over half of the respondents had had at least one experience in the last 5 years in which a patient's family, another physician, or another health care professional had characterized palliative treatments as being euthanasia, murder, or killing. One in four stated that at least one friend or family member, or a patient had similarly characterized their treatments. Respondents rated palliative sedation and stopping artificial hydration/nutrition as treatments most likely to be misconstrued as euthanasia. Overall, 25 physicians (4%) had been formally investigated for hastening a patient's death when that had not been their intention—13 while using opiates for symptom relief and six for using medications while discontinuing mechanical ventilation. In eight (32%) cases, another member of the health care team had initiated the charges. At the time of the survey, none had been found guilty, but they reported experiencing substantial anger and worry. Conclusions Commonly used palliative care practices continue to be misconstrued as euthanasia or murder, despite this not being the intention of the treating physician. Further efforts are needed to explain to the health care community and the public that treatments often used to relieve patient suffering at the end of life are ethical and legal. PMID:22401355

  16. Canadian trends in filicide by gender of the accused, 1961-2011.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Myrna

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive historical and contemporary picture of filicide in Canada for more than half a century. Focusing on 1,612 children under age 18 that were killed by their parents between 1961 and 2011, regional and temporal trends in the gender of accused are examined as well as differences in maternal and paternal filicides by the gender and age of the victim, the age and marital status of the accused, type of parental relationship, cause of death, motive, history of family violence, and clearance status. Results show that there are significant differences in filicides by mothers and fathers. Five possible emerging trends were identified: an increasing gender gap in accused, increasing presence of relationship breakdown, growing number of cases involving stepfathers and a prior history of family violence, and declines in accused who committed suicide. Implications of these trends for interventions and prevention are discussed and future research priorities highlighted. PMID:26271557

  17. Does Exonerating an Accused Researcher Restore the Researcher’s Credibility?

    PubMed Central

    Greitemeyer, Tobias; Sagioglou, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Scientific misconduct appears to be on the rise. However, an accused researcher may later be exonerated. The present research examines to what extent participants adhere to their attitude toward a researcher who allegedly committed academic misconduct after learning that the researcher is innocent. In two studies, participants in an exoneration and an uncorrected accusation condition learned that the ethics committee of a researcher’s university demanded the retraction of one of the researcher’s articles, whereas participants in a control condition did not receive this information. As intended, this manipulation led to a more favorable attitude toward the researcher in the control compared to the exoneration and the uncorrected accusation conditions (pre-exoneration attitude). Then, participants in the exoneration condition learned that the researcher was exonerated and that the article was not retracted. Participants in the uncorrected accusation and the control condition were not informed about the exoneration. Results revealed that the exoneration effectively worked, in that participants in the exoneration condition had a more favorable attitude (post-exoneration attitude) toward the researcher than did participants in the uncorrected accusation condition. Moreover, the post-exoneration attitude toward the researcher was similar in the exoneration and the control conditions. Finally, in the exoneration condition only, participants’ post-exoneration attitude was more favorable than their pre-exoneration attitude. These findings suggest that an exoneration of an accused researcher restores the researcher’s credibility. PMID:25970441

  18. Unpacking the "Colorblind Approach": Accusations of Racism at a Friendly, Mixed-Race School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modica, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The desire to ignore race in favor of a "colorblind" approach has so permeated the cultural ethos of the US, that many whites, teachers included, fear that talking about race in any capacity leaves them open to accusations of racism. As a result, race has become a taboo subject in many US classrooms. This article explores the…

  19. 32 CFR 719.151 - Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Furnishing of advice and counsel to accused placed in pretrial confinement. 719.151 Section 719.151 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL...

  20. From Bystander to Upstander Teacher for Gifted Black Students Accused of Acting White

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Tarek C.; Biddle, Winfred H.

    2014-01-01

    Gifted Black students experience many barriers that contribute to their under-representation in gifted and advanced programs. One of the greatest negative influences comes from peer accusations of acting White that undermine gifted and high-achieving Black students' academic motivation and their interest in challenging courses and programs.…

  1. 32 CFR 536.127 - Proper claimants; unknown accused-under the UCMJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proper claimants; unknown accused-under the UCMJ. 536.127 Section 536.127 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Military Justice § 536.127 Proper claimants; unknown accused—under the UCMJ. (a) A proper claimant...

  2. 32 CFR 536.127 - Proper claimants; unknown accused-under the UCMJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Proper claimants; unknown accused-under the UCMJ. 536.127 Section 536.127 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Military Justice § 536.127 Proper claimants; unknown accused—under the UCMJ. (a) A proper claimant...

  3. 32 CFR 536.127 - Proper claimants; unknown accused-under the UCMJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proper claimants; unknown accused-under the UCMJ. 536.127 Section 536.127 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Military Justice § 536.127 Proper claimants; unknown accused—under the UCMJ. (a) A proper claimant...

  4. 32 CFR 536.127 - Proper claimants; unknown accused-under the UCMJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Proper claimants; unknown accused-under the UCMJ. 536.127 Section 536.127 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Military Justice § 536.127 Proper claimants; unknown accused—under the UCMJ. (a) A proper claimant...

  5. Etiology of Loss among Parents Falsely Accused of Abuse or Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeman, Laura

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of loss among parents whose children were in child protective custody that resulted from false accusations of abuse or neglect. In practice, child protective service assessments more times than not clear parents of charges of wrongdoing, however the impact of these investigations on parents has not yet been…

  6. The Acquisition of Accusative Object Clitics by IA Children from China: Evidence of Early Age Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delcenserie, Audrey; Genesee, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared the performance of twenty-seven French-speaking internationally adopted (IA) children from China to that of twenty-seven monolingual non-adopted French-speaking children (CTL) matched for age, gender, and socioeconomic status on a Clitic Elicitation task. The IA children omitted significantly more accusative object…

  7. Errors and pitfalls: Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice - the second victim.

    PubMed

    Wienke, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 (published at http://www.bundesaerztekammer.de). Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decision are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession

  8. Errors and pitfalls: Briefing and accusation of medical malpractice – the second victim

    PubMed Central

    Wienke, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    In June 2012, the German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer) published the statistics of medical malpractice for 2011 (published at http://www.bundesaerztekammer.de). Still ENT-specific accusations of medical malpractice are by far the fewest in the field of hospitals and actually even in the outpatient context. Clearly most of the unforeseen incidents still occur in the disciplines of trauma surgery and orthopedics. In total, however, an increasing number of errors in treatment can be noticed on the multidisciplinary level: in 25.5% of the registered cases, an error in treatment was found to be the origin of damage to health justifying a claim for compensation of the patient. In the year before, it was only 24.7%. The reasons may be manifold, but the medical system itself certainly plays a major role in this context: the recent developments related to health policy lead to a continuous economisation of medical care. Rationing and limited remuneration more and more result in the fact that therapeutic decision are not exclusively made for the benefit of the patient but that they are oriented at economic or bureaucratic aspects. Thus, in the long term, practising medicine undergoes a change. According to the §§ 1, 3 of the professional code of conduct for doctors (Musterberufsordnung für Ärzte; MBO-Ä) medical practice as liberal profession is principally incompatible with the pursuit of profit, however, even doctors have to earn money which more and more makes him play the role of a businessman. Lack of personnel and staff savings lead to excessive workloads of physicians, caregivers, and nurses, which also favour errors. The quality and even the confidential relationship between doctor and patient, which is important for the treatment success, are necessarily affected by the cost pressure. The victims in this context are not only the patients but also the physicians find themselves in the continuous conflict between ethical requirements of their profession

  9. Exploring the controversy in child abuse pediatrics and false accusations of abuse.

    PubMed

    Gabaeff, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    There is a controversy in child abuse pediatrics between an established corps of child abuse pediatricians aligned with hospital colleagues and law enforcement, and a multi-specialty challenger group of doctors and other medical professionals working with public interest lawyers. The latter group questions the scientific validity of the core beliefs of child abuse pediatricians and believes that there are a substantial number of false accusations of abuse occurring. An unproven primary hypothesis, crafted around 1975 by a small group of pediatricians with an interest in child abuse, lies at the foundation of child abuse pediatrics. With no scientific study, it was hypothesized that subdural hemorrhage (SDH) and retinal hemorrhage (RH) were diagnostic of shaking abuse. That hypothesis became the so-called "shaken baby syndrome." Through the period 1975-1985, in a coordinated manner, these child abuse specialists coalesced under the American Academy of Pediatrics and began working with district attorneys and social workers, informing them of the ways in which their hypothesis could be applied to prosecutions of child abuse and life-altering social service interventions. In a legal context, using then-prevailing evidentiary rules which treated scientific expert testimony as valid if it was "generally accepted" in the field, they represented falsely that there was general acceptance of their hypothesis and therefore it was valid science. As the ability to convict based on this unproven prime hypothesis (SDH and RH equals abuse) increased, some defense attorneys were professionally compelled by their own doubts to reach out to experts from other fields with experience with SDH and RH, trauma, and biomechanics, for second opinions. Medical and legal challenges to the established thinking soon emerged, based on both old and new evidenced-based literature. As the intensity of the controversy increased, the probability of false accusation became more apparent and the need

  10. Staff Training Best Practices: Targeting Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Randall

    2001-01-01

    Enhancing the attitude of camp staff involves hiring staff that already have good attitudes, training staff in small groups that then train the rest, using the power of story, removing structural barriers, helping people understand how their actions influence organizational outcomes, identifying "termites," and placing a weak counselor with two…

  11. Women as easy scapegoats: witchcraft accusations and women as targets in tea plantations of India.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Soma

    2012-10-01

    This article revisits a much-debated question: Why are women popular targets during witch hunts? By using in-depth interviews this article provides an answer. Women are easy targets or scapegoats for two reasons. First, it is widely believed in the community that was studied that witches do, in fact, exist, and the images of witches are always female. Second, tribal women hold lower positions than men in all social, political, and ritual matters, and this contributes to their vulnerability during the hunt for scapegoats. This article also highlights the roles that rumors play during manipulation of witchcraft accusations to gather support for witch hunts.

  12. Steps toward validity in active living research: research design that limits accusations of physical determinism.

    PubMed

    Riggs, William

    2014-03-01

    "Active living research" has been accused of being overly "physically deterministic" and this article argues that urban planners must continue to evolve research and address biases in this area. The article first provides background on how researchers have dealt with the relationship between the built environment and health over years. This leads to a presentation of how active living research might be described as overly deterministic. The article then offers lessons for researchers planning to embark in active-living studies as to how they might increase validity and minimize criticism of physical determinism.

  13. Women as easy scapegoats: witchcraft accusations and women as targets in tea plantations of India.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Soma

    2012-10-01

    This article revisits a much-debated question: Why are women popular targets during witch hunts? By using in-depth interviews this article provides an answer. Women are easy targets or scapegoats for two reasons. First, it is widely believed in the community that was studied that witches do, in fact, exist, and the images of witches are always female. Second, tribal women hold lower positions than men in all social, political, and ritual matters, and this contributes to their vulnerability during the hunt for scapegoats. This article also highlights the roles that rumors play during manipulation of witchcraft accusations to gather support for witch hunts. PMID:23136181

  14. Declarations, accusations and judgement: examining conflict of interest discourses as performative speech-acts.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Christopher; Lipworth, Wendy; Kerridge, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Concerns over conflicts of interest (COI) in academic research and medical practice continue to provoke a great deal of discussion. What is most obvious in this discourse is that when COIs are declared, or perceived to exist in others, there is a focus on both the descriptive question of whether there is a COI and, subsequently, the normative question of whether it is good, bad or neutral. We contend, however, that in addition to the descriptive and normative, COI declarations and accusations can be understood as performatives. In this article, we apply J.L. Austin's performative speech-act theory to COI discourses and illustrate how this works using a contemporary case study of COI in biomedical publishing. We argue that using Austin's theory of performative speech-acts serves to highlight the social arrangements and role of authorities in COI discourse and so provides a rich framework to examine declarations, accusations and judgements of COI that often arise in the context of biomedical research and practice.

  15. Donor organ distribution according to urgency of need or outcome maximization in liver transplantation. A questionnaire survey among patients and medical staff.

    PubMed

    Umgelter, Katrin S; Tobiasch, Moritz; Anetsberger, Aida; Blobner, Manfred; Thorban, Stefan; Umgelter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Low donor rates in Germany cause a trade-off between equity in the distribution of chances for survival and efficiency in dead-donor liver transplantation. Public attitudes concerning the principles that should govern organ allocation are of interest. We performed a questionnaire-based study among patients and medical staff. 1826 of 2200 questionnaires were returned. 79.2%, 67.1%, and 24.4% patients wanted to accept liver transplantation for themselves if expected 1-year survival was 80%, 50%, and 20%, respectively. 57.7% affirmed 'averting immediate risk of death (urgency) is a more important criterion for organ allocation than expected long-term success' (P = 0.002 against indifference). The majority of medical staff took the opposite decision. 20.7%, 8.8%, and 21.2% of patients chose 50%, 33%, and 10% as lowest acceptable 5-year survival, respectively. 49.3% accepted a survival of <10%. Variables associated with preferring urgency over efficiency as criterion for allocation were age (OR 1.009; 95% CI: 1.000-1.017; female gender (OR 1.331; 95%CI 0.992-1.784); higher education (OR 0.881; 95%CI 0.801-0.969); and refusal of transplantation for oneself (OR 1.719; 95%CI 1.272-2.324). Most patients supported urgency-based liver allocation. Patients and medical staff would accept lower survival rates than the transplant community. PMID:25557453

  16. Applying the Model of the Interrelationship of Leadership Environments and Outcomes for Nurse Executives: a community hospital's exemplar in developing staff nurse engagement through documentation improvement initiatives.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jeffrey M; Denham, Debra; Neumeister, Irene Ramirez

    2010-01-01

    The Model of the Interrelationship of Leadership, Environments & Outcomes for Nurse Executives (MILE ONE) was developed on the basis of existing literature related to identifying strategies for simultaneous improvement of leadership, professional practice/work environments (PPWE), and outcomes. Through existing evidence, the MILE ONE identifies the continuous and dependent interrelationship of 3 distinct concept areas: (1) nurse executives influence PPWE, (2) PPWE influence patient and organizational outcomes, and (3) patient and organizational outcomes influence nurse executives. This article highlights the application of the MILE ONE framework to a community district hospital's clinical documentation performance improvement projects. Results suggest that the MILE ONE is a valid and useful framework yielding both anticipated and unexpected enhancements to leaders, environments, and outcomes.

  17. Introducing an online community into a clinical education setting: a pilot study of student and staff engagement and outcomes using blended learning

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are growing reasons to use both information and communication functions of learning technologies as part of clinical education, but the literature offers few accounts of such implementations or evaluations of their impact. This paper details the process of implementing a blend of online and face-to-face learning and teaching in a clinical education setting and it reports on the educational impact of this innovation. Methods This study designed an online community to complement a series of on-site workshops and monitored its use over a semester. Quantitative and qualitative data recording 43 final-year medical students' and 13 clinical educators' experiences with this blended approach to learning and teaching were analysed using access, adoption and quality criteria as measures of impact. Results The introduction of the online community produced high student ratings of the quality of learning and teaching and it produced student academic results that were equivalent to those from face-to-face-only learning and teaching. Staff had mixed views about using blended learning. Conclusions Projects such as this take skilled effort and time. Strong incentives are required to encourage clinical staff and students to use a new mode of communication. A more synchronous or multi-channel communication feedback system might stimulate increased adoption. Cultural change in clinical teaching is also required before clinical education can benefit more widely from initiatives such as this. PMID:20100354

  18. The role of trust in nurturing compliance: a study of accused tax avoiders.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kristina

    2004-04-01

    Why an institution's rules and regulations are obeyed or disobeyed is an important question for regulatory agencies. This paper discusses the findings of an empirical study that shows that the use of threat and legal coercion as a regulatory tool--in addition to being more expensive to implement--can sometimes be ineffective in gaining compliance. Using survey data collected from 2,292 taxpayers accused of tax avoidance, it will be demonstrated that variables such as trust need to be considered when managing noncompliance. If regulators are seen to be acting fairly, people will trust the motives of that authority, and will defer to their decisions voluntarily. This paper therefore argues that to shape desired behavior, regulators will need to move beyond motivation linked purely to deterrence. Strategies directed at reducing levels of distrust between the two sides may prove particularly effective in gaining voluntary compliance with an organization's rules and regulations. PMID:15141778

  19. The role of trust in nurturing compliance: a study of accused tax avoiders.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kristina

    2004-04-01

    Why an institution's rules and regulations are obeyed or disobeyed is an important question for regulatory agencies. This paper discusses the findings of an empirical study that shows that the use of threat and legal coercion as a regulatory tool--in addition to being more expensive to implement--can sometimes be ineffective in gaining compliance. Using survey data collected from 2,292 taxpayers accused of tax avoidance, it will be demonstrated that variables such as trust need to be considered when managing noncompliance. If regulators are seen to be acting fairly, people will trust the motives of that authority, and will defer to their decisions voluntarily. This paper therefore argues that to shape desired behavior, regulators will need to move beyond motivation linked purely to deterrence. Strategies directed at reducing levels of distrust between the two sides may prove particularly effective in gaining voluntary compliance with an organization's rules and regulations.

  20. The Perils of Being a Male Primary/Junior Teacher: Vulnerability and Accusations of Inappropriate Contact with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Michael; Gosse, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    There is a perceived shortage of male teachers in education, particularly at the primary/junior (P/J) level where male teachers in Canada account for a dwindling minority. Included among the many factors inhibiting males from becoming P/J teachers are perceptions that males might be unduly vulnerable to false accusations of inappropriate conduct…

  1. "How Could They Believe That?": Explaining to Students Why Accusation of Witchcraft Made Good Sense in Seventeenth-Century New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbeer, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Explains that students must understand that, due to the beliefs of the time in New England, accusing people of witchcraft during the seventeenth century was plausible. Provides background information on societal beliefs centered upon witchcraft and the supernatural, as well as the process of accusing people of being witches. (CMK)

  2. Power lines: Derrida, discursive psychology and the management of accusations of teacher bullying.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, A

    2000-12-01

    This study connects broad issues of classroom control and the disciplining of pupils by teachers with a detailed examination of the way teachers deal with an implied accusation that they have been bullying. The analysis of interviews develops with reference to discursive psychology and Derrida's development of deconstruction. Billig's (1992) insights into ways that participants' accounts can neutralize threats to established social arrangements are employed in relating detailed analytic points to the broader power relations between teacher and pupil. Interviews were conducted with Scottish secondary school teachers, and subjected to close textual analysis. This resulted in the development of three themes: (1) Subjectivity Construction, in which the functional role of the construction of mental entities is examined; (2) Normalizing Techniques, identifying strategies whereby intimidation can be constructed as normal; and (3) Figuration, examining the utility of figurative language--metaphors, maxims, and so on. These themes display the subtlety and complexity of teachers' strategies for distancing themselves from being held accountable for reported intimidation. To conclude, three broader features of the study are discussed: the contribution to discursive psychology that Derrida's deconstructive philosophy can make; the respecification of psychology and subjectivity as participants' resources for action; and the contribution that this type of detailed study can make to issues of power and social critique. PMID:11190687

  3. Power lines: Derrida, discursive psychology and the management of accusations of teacher bullying.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, A

    2000-12-01

    This study connects broad issues of classroom control and the disciplining of pupils by teachers with a detailed examination of the way teachers deal with an implied accusation that they have been bullying. The analysis of interviews develops with reference to discursive psychology and Derrida's development of deconstruction. Billig's (1992) insights into ways that participants' accounts can neutralize threats to established social arrangements are employed in relating detailed analytic points to the broader power relations between teacher and pupil. Interviews were conducted with Scottish secondary school teachers, and subjected to close textual analysis. This resulted in the development of three themes: (1) Subjectivity Construction, in which the functional role of the construction of mental entities is examined; (2) Normalizing Techniques, identifying strategies whereby intimidation can be constructed as normal; and (3) Figuration, examining the utility of figurative language--metaphors, maxims, and so on. These themes display the subtlety and complexity of teachers' strategies for distancing themselves from being held accountable for reported intimidation. To conclude, three broader features of the study are discussed: the contribution to discursive psychology that Derrida's deconstructive philosophy can make; the respecification of psychology and subjectivity as participants' resources for action; and the contribution that this type of detailed study can make to issues of power and social critique.

  4. Staff Counselling in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, H. L.

    One aspect of staff development that has not received much attention is staff counseling. In fact, the general pastoral care of the teaching staff is largely neglected. Since most problems of teachers have a personal nature, what is needed is a specially trained staff within the institution to offer personal counseling. This counseling could focus…

  5. The Impact of Staff Turnover and Staff Density on Treatment Quality in a Psychiatric Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Wolfram A.; Bielitz, Christoph J.; Georgi, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Intuition suggests that improving stability of the health workforce brings benefits to staff, the organization and, most importantly, the patients. Unfortunately, there is limited research available to support this, and how health workforce stability can contribute to reduced costs and better treatment outcomes. To help to rectify this situation, we investigated the effects of staff turnover and staff density (staff members per patient) on the treatment outcome of inpatients in a psychiatric clinic. Our data come from the standard assessment of 1429 patients who sought treatment in our clinic from January 2011 to August 2013. Correlation analysis shows no significant effect of raw staff turnover (the total number of psychiatrists, physicians and psychologists starting or quitting work per month) on treatment quality. However, we do find two significant beneficial effects: first, a higher staff consistency (time without staff turnover) and second, a higher staff density lead to an improvement of treatment quality. Our findings underline the dire need for an extended effort to achieve optimal staff retention, both to improve patient’s outcomes and to reduce health expenses. PMID:27065925

  6. Towards Tertiary Education. Staff and Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Joan

    This report is intended as a resource for all those interested in staff development, especially in the tertiary education context. It describes the staff development project in the first two years of a new tertiary college--Harlow Technical College in England. An introduction and a description of the context of the project begin the report.…

  7. Substitution of hospital staff in concurrent utilization review.

    PubMed

    Darmody, Julie; Pawlak, Roberta; Hook, Mary; Semeniuk, Yulia; Westphal, Judith; Murray, Mary Ellen; Henriques, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Substitution of hospital staff performing concurrent utilization review (CUR) was evaluated using a production process framework. There were no differences in the number of reimbursement denials or denied days among 4 job classifications of hospital staff performing CUR, indicating that educational preparation of staff did not affect outcomes. The implications are that hospitals could substitute assistive staff in place of registered nurses to complete the CUR function, potentially increasing the availability of professional nurses. PMID:17563593

  8. Directions in Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela, Ed.

    This collection of readings is intended to provide a source book on best practices in staff development in higher education within a British context. The 13 papers are grouped into three parts: part 1 presents the educational development tradition which has focused on development of staff as teachers; part 2 considers development of staff in…

  9. The use of neuroscientific evidence in the courtroom by those accused of criminal offenses in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Catley, Paul; Claydon, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This examination of the extent of the use of neuroscientific evidence in England and Wales identifies 204 reported cases in which such evidence has been used by those accused of criminal offenses during the eight-year period from 2005–12. Based on the number of reported cases found, the use of such evidence appears well established with those accused of criminal offenses utilizing such evidence in approximately 1 per cent of cases in the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division). Neuroscientific evidence is used to quash convictions, to lead to convictions for lesser offenses and to lead to reduced sentences. In addition, cases are identified where neuroscientific evidence is used to avoid extradition, to challenge bail conditions and to resist prosecution appeals against unduly lenient sentences. The range of uses identified is wide: including challenging prosecution evidence as to the cause of death or injury, challenging the credibility of witnesses and arguing that those convicted were unfit to plead, lacked mens rea or were entitled to mental condition defenses. The acceptance of such evidence reflects the willingness of the courts in England and Wales to hear novel scientific argument, where it is valid and directly relevant to the issue(s) to be decided. Indeed, in some of the cases the courts expressed an expectation that structural brain scan evidence should have been presented to support the argument being made. PMID:27774211

  10. Why Do Staff Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Connie

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 211 returning staff from 25 camps and interviewed 19 returning staff to study factors that influence a counselor's decision to return to camp. Examined the following dimensions of motivation and hygiene factors: (1) stimulation or inspiration; (2) personal; (3) job-related experience; (4) living conditions and camp life; (5) camp…

  11. Staff Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry Creek School District 5, Englewood, CO.

    This document lists staff development components in the Cherry Creek Schools of metropolitan Denver. A brief overview stresses that the establishment of the office of the Director of Staff Development in the Cherry Creek Schools reflects a recognition of the need for more active participation of local school districts as well as all interested…

  12. Factors Affecting the Quality of Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Larry O.

    A review of the literature concerning the effectiveness and quality of staff development programs focuses on factors that affect the success of such programs. These factors include: individual concerns, training activities, applications, qualifications of consultants, scheduling, strategies, facilities, feedback, collaboration, and outcomes. It is…

  13. The cumulative influence of conflict on nursing home staff.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Anderson, James G; Anderson, Marilyn M; Suitor, J Jill; Pillemer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Nursing staff burnout is a significant challenge in the delivery of nursing home care. Using a representative sample of nursing staff working within the nursing home setting, our analysis addressed the influence of conflict with residents' families on the burnout experience of staff. Through the use of computer simulation modeling we were able to assess the cumulative effects of conflict between staff and families. Findings indicated that conflict with the residents' families increased both burnout and dissatisfaction among nursing staff. The burnout experience of nursing staff peaked with initial episodes of conflict, then leveled off as simulated conflict with family members continued. Because previous research has indicated that burnout tends to peak early in nurses' career cycle, the finding that initial episodes of conflict have a strong influence on nursing staff burnout highlights the importance of interpersonal conflict within nursing homes in both individual and institutional outcomes.

  14. A Candide response to Panglossian accusations by Randolph and Dobson: biodiversity buffers disease.

    PubMed

    Ostfeld, Richard S

    2013-09-01

    Randolph and Dobson (2012) criticize the dilution effect, which describes the negative relationship between biodiversity and infectious disease risk. Unfortunately, their commentary includes distortions, errors of omission, and errors of commission, which are rebutted herein. Contrary to their claims, the dilution effect is not a 'mantra' that asserts that reduced disease risk is a 'universal' outcome of high diversity. Although universality of the dilution effect has not been claimed, and conditions under which diversity can amplify disease risk have been described, the growing literature indicates that the dilution effect is indeed a widespread phenomenon.

  15. Communicating with Congressional Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byerly, Radford

    2000-03-01

    Washington DC is the seat of all U.S. policy, including Science Policy. Those that want to influence policy need to be able to work effectively in that arena. While the elected officials make the final decisions, it is the congressional staff who do the research, write the specific language of bills, and help the elected officials understand and sell the policy. Thus, it is critical to interact with staff in order to influence policy. This session will provide advice, suggestions, and plenty of time for questions with someone who spent a number of years as Chief of Staff of the House Science Committee.

  16. Staff empowerment in Finnish intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Suominen, T; Leino-Kilpi, H; Merja, M; Doran, D I; Puukka, P

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe staff empowerment in Finnish intensive care units. The data were collected with a questionnaire comprising demographic background and empowerment items. The concept of empowerment was divided into three components: behavioural, verbal and outcome empowerment. The questionnaire was sent to all registered nurses at Finnish intensive care units (ICUs). Eight hundred and fourteen replied, giving a response rate of 77%. The ICU nurses demonstrated confidence in their own skills and competencies, although least so in the domain of outcome empowerment. Experience of behavioural, verbal and outcome empowerment increased linearly with age. The length of nursing experience was positively associated with behavioural, verbal and outcome empowerment. Experience in ICU nursing correlated positively with verbal and outcome empowerment. Motivation, job satisfaction, respect of job autonomy and the fact that the job of ICU nurses commanded respect in society were associated with behavioural, verbal, and outcome empowerment.

  17. Motivating Your Development Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    1996-01-01

    Suggestions for motivating institutional advancement staff at colleges and universities include nonfinancial motivators (such as appreciation, team building, empowerment, professional development opportunities, flexibility, and formal recognition) and financial rewards (such as bonuses and merit pay). (DB)

  18. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 150 - Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15) B Appendix B to Part 150 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pt. 150, App. B Appendix B to Part 150—Format for Assignment of Errors...

  19. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 150 - Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Format for Assignment of Errors and Brief on Behalf of Accused (§ 150.15) B Appendix B to Part 150 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF... OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pt. 150, App. B Appendix B to Part 150—Format for Assignment of Errors...

  20. Motivation and Outcomes for University Students in a Restorative Justice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher Dahl, Meghan; Meagher, Peter; Vander Velde, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    A restorative justice program (RJP) was developed at a large university in the housing student conduct office. Students accused of misconduct who participated in a restorative justice (RJ) conference completed surveys regarding their motivations and perceived outcomes. Results showed that students who were motivated to make reparations to others…

  1. Guidance to detect deception with the Aberdeen Report Judgment Scales: are verbal content cues useful to detect false accusations?

    PubMed

    Sporer, Siegfried L; Masip, Jaume; Cramer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In 2 studies we evaluated the efficiency of training raters with a short version of the Aberdeen Report Judgment Scales (ARJS-STV-S) in assessing the truthfulness of transcribed accounts. Participants told both truthful and deceptive accounts of either illegal or immoral actions. In the truthful accounts, the participants described their own misdeeds honestly (true confessions). In the deceptive accounts, the participants also described their own misdeeds but attributed them to someone else (false accusations). In Study 1, guided (n = 32) and unguided (n = 32) raters evaluated 64 transcribed accounts (16 per rater). Only a few ARJS-STV-S criteria differed significantly between false and true accounts. In Study 2 (N = 29), guided raters evaluated the same transcripts using only the most promising criteria of Study 1. Judgments in Study 2 were less biased (in terms of signal detection theory), and the classification of deceptive accounts was significantly better compared with a no-guidance control group and the guided group of Study 1. A Brunswikian lens model analysis showed that with the smaller set of cues there is a better correspondence between the ecological validities and the subjective utilities, which may explain the higher accuracy rates. When the criteria have little or no diagnostic value, or when true and false stories are very similar, providing raters with a larger set of truth criteria does not increase accuracy but instead may bias raters toward making truth judgments. Practical implications for content-based training programs are outlined. PMID:24720096

  2. The Staff of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  3. Mobility of University Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    This study deals with interuniversity mobility. Part I examines the harmonization of action taken to encourage mobility, the removal of legislative and statutory obstacles to mobility, the simplification of university staff regulations and careers, and incentives to mobility. Part II describes the ideas and activities of UNESCO, the Council of…

  4. Systematic Staff Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  5. Staff Development and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Richard A.; Breyer, Norman L.

    An ongoing behavioral model for implementing staff development and evaluation procedures is proposed, which systematically focuses on assessing and facilitating behavioral change in the classroom and enables the educational executive to assess what is actually happening there. The administrator is thus provided with the necessary information to…

  6. Faculty and Staff Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Community Coll. System.

    This booklet is intended to acquaint faculty and staff members with general information about the University of Kentucky community College System, and to explain some of its policies affecting them. The booklet is organized into five sections. Section I contains general information about the system, gives its history, purpose, and a map of the…

  7. Ideas on Staff Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Suggests the use of timely communication through feedback for the purpose of boosting staff morale. Managers can cause employees to motivate themselves by restructuring jobs to satisfy employees' needs, by using artful criticism, and by asking employees about morale. Includes a list of key ingredients of a satisfying job. (SH)

  8. Effective Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Robert N.

    Beginning with the observation that educators are faced with rising public expectations, declining resources, and increased public criticism, this paper describes a six-fold model for determining how staff development is operating and how it can be made to operate more effectively, in a self-renewing manner. The six dimensions consist of the…

  9. Staff Development Content Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Elizabeth A.

    1979-01-01

    Question clusters related to staff development content delivery are used to develop programs that will result in more productive professional development. The questions determine the focus of programs, analyze the target audience, discuss the selection of delivery modes, and identify future directions. (JMF)

  10. Autonomous staff selection teams.

    PubMed

    Mills, J; Oie, M

    1992-12-01

    Although some other organizations encourage staff input into employee selection, the advanced care department at Bellin Hospital in Green Bay, Wisconsin has taken this concept to a new level by implementing an autonomous interview team. This team is empowered to make hiring decisions for all positions within the department without management influence or interference.

  11. Staff Development and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Much is being emphasized in staff development in the area of reading instruction. It is important for teachers to study and think reflectively about what can be done to improve the elementary reading curriculum. One procedure that can be used is to hold a quality workshop based on the needs of reading teachers. Teachers might volunteer to serve on…

  12. [The topical problems pertaining to the performance of forensic medical expertise of the subjects suspected or accused of committing a crime and remaining in custody].

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, P V; Ustiukhina, I A; Samchuk, V V

    2012-01-01

    The authors consider topical problems pertaining to the performance of forensic medical expertise of the subjects suspected or accused of committing a crime and remaining in custody. The discussion is focused on the organization of expertise and medical examination of such persons with the participation of personnel representing different clinical disciplines. The special emphasis is laid on the absence in the normative-legal basis of the well-specified criteria for the severity of disease, the degree of vital activity limitation, and duration of the treatment in specialized hospitals. The lack of such criteria hampers not only medical certification of the subjects suspected or accused of committing a crime and remaining in custody but also objective forensic medical estimation of their health status. Recommendations for addressing this problem and its resolution are proposed.

  13. Staff training and computers in respiratory care.

    PubMed

    Walker, David H

    2004-05-01

    The respiratory therapists' (RTs') knowledge base is among a hospital's greatest assets. RTs routinely use advanced medical technologies and must understand the patient's physiology, anatomy, and condition to deliver safe and effective treatment with those technologies, especially within critical care environments. Also RTs often must educate patients and patients' families, which requires thorough understanding of the operation of medical equipment. RT education must include both tacit and explicit knowledge, so RT education can be complex, which may present challenges to clinical educators. RTs must have continuing education, and computer-based education can help meet education challenges, promote safe and effective patient care, improve patient outcomes, and improve employee satisfaction, which may improve RT recruitment and retention, while decreasing the cost of staff training. However, since computer-based education is relatively new to health care, RT educators should learn from other industries that have extensive experience with computer-based staff education.

  14. Office support staff.

    PubMed

    Choat, Dennis E

    2005-11-01

    The pace at which we live and practice in this new century leaves little time to manage many of the menial tasks of day-to-day survival. This is especially true in the field of medicine. With today's insurance policies and procedures, Health Information Privacy Protection Act (HIPPA) regulations, and the low return of payment for time invested, it is crucial to have a supportive group of people around you to help make your valuable time as meaningful as possible. This article will describe an arrangement of ancillary office staff for a colorectal practice. There will be detailed information on job descriptions, expectations, and level of training required for each. Upon completion of this article, one should be able to identify the personnel needed to establish and manage an efficient office from the front desk to the billing department and ultimately the practice manager. PMID:20011292

  15. Improving staff selection processes.

    PubMed

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  16. Evaluating your office staff.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2004-11-01

    The most important assets in a dental practice are the people. We no longer live in an era in which an employee stays in the same job for decades. Change is inevitable and often comes at inopportune times. Evaluation gives the dentist the opportunity to identify key team members who will join the core team and train new staff members. Conversely, executive evaluation also demonstrates that there may not be a proper fit for a team member, if he or she cannot demonstrate the ability to grow and change with a practice despite support, training and career path development. As author Alvin Toffler noted, "The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read or write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn."

  17. [The biopolitical production "impaired" subjects within the scope of "Action T4" - a re-reading of "I accuse"].

    PubMed

    Offermann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The history of the Nazi "euthanasia programme" named "Aktion T4" has been examined from a biopolitical perspective for some time. However, these studies have not focused on the analytics of biopolitical practices of subjectivization as an essential element of the Foucaultian concept. The use of such a theoretical approach can be used in combination with new and substantial empirical research results. The Heidelberg DFG research programme evaluated the "T4" medical records statistically in order to conclusively determine which features had significant importance for selection by the "T4" experts. The inability to work or having an incurable mental illness were the criteria by which psychiatrists and "T4" experts subjectivized patients as "lives not worth living". Considering these new results and a biopolitical approach as starting point, it is time to reconsider the Nazi "euthanasia" propaganda movie "Ich klage an" ("I Accuse", 1941). When scholars began to study the production process of the movie in the 1980s, they looked at the narrative and the movie characters from an instrumental perspective. In other words, they examined how the "T4" protagonists and filmmakers sought to create a film which affected the viewers' opinion in a specific way intentionally influenced by them. According to that line of thought, the character Hanna was neglected because she was considered to be the morally inoffensive disguise of the intended propaganda massage. However, two works from the 1990s which were gender history-oriented finally focused on Hanna and the way the film narrative turns her into a subject "not worth living". Based on these considerations, this article states its thesis. The criteria of the film to subjectivize Hanna share many basic characteristics with those of the subjectivization process of the "T4" victims. To prove this statement, the analytics of the movie are combined with the results of the DFG project. Through the combination of both types of sources

  18. Values and Psychological Acceptance as Correlates of Burnout in Support Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noone, Stephen J.; Hastings, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that acceptance and mindfulness interventions for support staff in intellectual disability (ID) services can have beneficial mental health outcomes for staff themselves and individuals with ID. However, there are few data focusing on the relevance of related psychological processes for support staff well-being. The…

  19. Staff Development for Classified Staff: One School District's Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Frances C.; Daniel, Cherry

    1997-01-01

    Describes one South Carolina school district's approach to staff development for classified staff (e.g., nurses, custodians, bus drivers, food service workers, maintenance personnel, substitutes, and secretaries). Program planning, implementation, and evaluation involved collaborative and comprehensive efforts. This paper makes seven…

  20. Difficulty and Ability: Staff Member Perceptions of Seasonal Staff Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Bixler, Robert D. Switzer, Deborah M.; Hurtes, Karen P.

    New and returning camp staff were surveyed about the difficulty of camp-specific skills and knowledge and their own abilities. A summer-camp training inventory of 24 camp-specific skills and knowledge statements was administered to a total of 702 new and returning staff at eight camps on the first and last day of pre-season training sessions and…

  1. Recruiting and Retaining Summer Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossen, Brian; Yerkes, Rita

    1998-01-01

    Recruiting of camp staff is challenged by economic and workplace restructuring, including business downsizing, part-time and temporary employment patterns, and generational attitude changes. Strategies for hiring and retaining staff include knowing what college-age workers want, marketing benefits, adopting new business strategies, and empowering…

  2. Preparing Your Staff for Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer-Starks, Suanne

    2003-01-01

    Camps should have emergency protocols in place and involve appropriate personnel in their development. Staff should be certified in first aid and CPR, a recordkeeping system should be established, and mock emergencies should be practiced during staff orientation. It may also be advisable to involve campers in practice situations. First aid/CPR…

  3. Staff Development Is Not Enough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammons, Jim

    Staff development activities that affect professional ability must be coupled with efforts toward organizational development if two additional determinants of performance, employee motivation and organizational climate, are to be significantly improved. Indeed, emphasis on staff development alone may have negative effects in that such an approach…

  4. Faculty Participation in Staff Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, John W.

    1979-01-01

    This article describes a process for staff involvement in the selection of secondary school teachers. Special attention is given to determining teacher selection criteria which will contribute to staff balance--the optimum mix of faculty by age, sex, race, and other variables. (SJL)

  5. Staff Bullying in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…

  6. Staff Development at the Crossroads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Susan L.; McGuire, Peggy

    1993-01-01

    Staff development continues to be an important but much-debated topic in adult basic education and adult literacy education. Some staff development professionals start with the "deficit" model, in which learners are presumed to be empty vessels to be filled with knowledge. This model ignores the rich and varied experience that practitioners bring…

  7. An Educational Program to Modify Laboratory Use by House Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, John M.

    1977-01-01

    The effectiveness of an educational program in decreasing utilization of the prothrombin time determination as a routine admission laboratory test by house staff physicians at a teaching hospital was studied. The results emphasize the need to measure the long-term outcome of educational programs aimed at modifying the clinical behavior of…

  8. Nursing Home Quality, Cost, Staffing, and Staff Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Hicks, Lanis; Grando, Victoria; Petroski, Gregory F.; Madsen, Richard W.; Mehr, David R.; Conn, Vicki; Zwygart-Staffacher, Mary; Scott, Jill; Flesner, Marcia; Bostick, Jane; Porter, Rose; Maas, Meridean

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the processes of care, organizational attributes, cost of care, staffing level, and staff mix in a sample of Missouri homes with good, average, and poor resident outcomes. Design and Methods: A three-group exploratory study design was used, with 92 nursing homes randomly selected from all nursing…

  9. Exploring Post-Program Psychological Adjustment for Adult Staff Facilitating a Wilderness Adventure Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence-Wood, Ellie; Raymond, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a pilot study of the post-program psychological adjustment outcomes of adult staff facilitating an Australian-based wilderness adventure program for youth at risk. The descriptive and correlational survey study (N = 62) examined the psychological adjustment processes staff underwent following program completion, and the factors…

  10. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  11. Managing Custodial and Maintenance Staffs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents some basic maintenance management techniques that can help schools meet their budgets, preserve staffing levels, meet productivity needs, and sustain quality services. Tips for staff recruitment, training, and retention are explored. (GR)

  12. Checklist for Staff Technology Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1997-01-01

    Presents a planning checklist for staff technology training. Includes forming a committee and developing proposals, contacting pertinent people, handling publicity, sending invitations, distributing schedules/registration information, arranging for equipment, purchasing prizes, conducting preliminary checks on equipment and software, ordering…

  13. Measuring competencies of temporary staff.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F; Kobs, A

    1997-05-01

    Strategic staffing requires an understanding of a new model, what Charles Handy has named the "Shamrock Organizational Model," in which you have three equally valuable groups of staff a minimal core of full-time staff; a short-term contingency workforce; and a supplemental workforce for long-range temporary staffing needs. Ensuring the competency of all three is a nontransferable, although shared, responsibility of both the hospital and the supplemental staffing company.

  14. Measuring competencies of temporary staff.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F; Kobs, A

    1997-05-01

    Strategic staffing requires an understanding of a new model, what Charles Handy has named the "Shamrock Organizational Model," in which you have three equally valuable groups of staff a minimal core of full-time staff; a short-term contingency workforce; and a supplemental workforce for long-range temporary staffing needs. Ensuring the competency of all three is a nontransferable, although shared, responsibility of both the hospital and the supplemental staffing company. PMID:9287795

  15. Implementation of Mindfulness Training for Mental Health Staff: Organizational Context and Stakeholder Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Gerard; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; McGrath, Caroline; Frazier, Jean A.; deTorrijos, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Occupational stress and burnout adversely impacts mental health care staff well-being and patient outcomes. Mindfulness training reduces staff stress and may improve patient care. However, few studies explore mental health setting implementation. This qualitative study used focus groups to evaluate stakeholders’ perceptions of organizational factors affecting implementation of an adapted version of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) for staff on adolescent mental health units. Common facilitators included leadership securing buy-in with staff, allocating staff time to participate, and quiet space for training and practice. Other facilitators were past staff knowledge of mindfulness, local champions, and acculturating staff with mindfulness through a non-mandatory training attendance policy. Common barriers were limited staff time to attend training sessions and insufficient training coverage for some staff. Staff also reported improved focus when interacting with adolescents and improved social cohesion on the units. We conclude that a mindfulness-based program for reducing occupational stress can be successfully implemented on adolescent mental health units. Implementation appeared to change the social context of the units, including staff and patient interactions. More broadly, our findings highlight the importance of environmental factors in shaping attitudes, diffusion of innovation, and acculturation of wellness program implementations. PMID:26500708

  16. Outcome-Based Education: Another Educational Bandwagon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towers, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Traces the roots of outcome-based education in mastery learning. Considers such obstacles as lack of reform preconditions, poor understanding of program features, teacher resistance, teacher domestication, staff mobility, and routinization. (SK)

  17. Day Camp Manual: Staff. Book II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    Book II of a 5-book day camp manual focuses on staff selection and training. Following the philosophy that developing an effective staff is the responsibility of the camp director, the book contains major sections on staff recruitment (sources of staff, problems, selection procedures, job descriptions, personnel practices); guidelines for job…

  18. Noninstructional Staff Perceptions of the College Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Molly H.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored staff perception of organizational climate, including the impact of gender on staff interactions with faculty and students and staff perceptions of workplace satisfaction within the community college. The overarching research question guiding this study was, What are noninstructional staff perceptions of the community college…

  19. Staff Association Handbook, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery Coll. Staff Association, Takoma Park, MD.

    This handbook provides a list of Staff Senate and Committee members of the Staff Association of Montgomery College, a copy of the bylaws of the association, and sections of the college's "Policies and Procedures Manual" that affect staff employees. These sections of the manual pertain to: Administrative and Staff Communication; Affirmative Action…

  20. Technology in Staff Development. "Net"working: Staff Development Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vojtek, Rosie O'Brien; Vojtek, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of computer networking resources available via the Internet to assist staff developers. After explaining how to get started on the Internet, the article describes electronic mail, the World Wide Web (the graphic part of the Internet), archives and databases, newsgroups, chatlines, the ERIC site, and virtual environments. (SM)

  1. Does Finnish hospital staff job satisfaction vary across occupational groups?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction of staff is an essential outcome variable in research when describing the work environment of successful hospitals. Numerous studies have evaluated the topic, but few previous studies have assessed the job satisfaction of all staff in hospital settings. It is important to discover if there are any unsatisfied groups of people working in hospitals, the aspects they are unsatisfied with and why. The aim of this study was to evaluate job satisfaction of all staff working at a Finnish university hospital, identify differences in job satisfaction between staff groups, and explore the relationship between their self-evaluated quality of work and job satisfaction. Methods Data were collected from 1424 employees of the hospital using the web-based Kuopio University Job Satisfaction Scale survey instrument in autumn 2010. The research data were analysed by using SPSS 19.0 for Windows. Frequency and percentage distributions, as well as mean values, were used to describe the data. A non-parametric test (Kruskal–Wallis test) was used to determine the significance of differences in scores between different groups of staff members and between quality evaluations. Results The overall job satisfaction of the employees was good. They rated both motivating factors of their work and work welfare as excellent. The areas causing most dissatisfaction were work demands and participation in decision making. Physicians formed the most satisfied group, nurses and maintenance staff were the least satisfied, and office and administrative staff were fairly satisfied. Staff who rated the quality of work in their units as high usually also considered their job satisfaction to be excellent. Conclusions Every staff member has an influence on job satisfaction in her/his unit. A culture of participation should be developed and maintained in the units and the whole hospital to ensure that all staff feel they play important roles in the hospital. A university hospital is

  2. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  3. Internet Staff Development: A Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1998-01-01

    Provides a synopsis of classes developed by the Winona (Minnesota) Middle School media center to provide staff with current Internet skills. Includes navigation techniques using browsers; e-mail; search engines; selecting and evaluating Web sites; Internet ethics and Netiquette; critical evaluation of Web sources; graphics; interactive video…

  4. Basic Instructional Technology Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Debbie

    As part of the overall goal of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to help provide environmental professionals with the skills required to plan and deliver training programs, this staff guide, and its related participant reference manual have been developed for conducting a workshop in basic instructional technology. The workshop consists of…

  5. Supported Employment Staff Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inge, Katherine; And Others

    This training manual provides practical guidelines for staff development in supported employment programs for individuals with severe disabilities. It provides information on designing and developing training programs using adult learning principles, for program managers or trainers responsible for implementing inservice training and technical…

  6. Training of Direct Service Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue features articles on training of direct service staff working with persons with developmental disabilities in employment, education, and residential settings. The articles examine job training, delivery systems, training models, and implications of current approaches. The newsletter includes three articles presenting…

  7. Motivating Staff, Parents, and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cynthia Cavenaugh

    Two motivational theories considered particularly useful in administering early childhood programs are discussed, and guidelines for motivating staff, parents, and children are provided. First, the two-factor theory of motivation within organizations, as outlined by Herzberg (1959), is described. Offered in this section are a list of motivators…

  8. Staff Development: A Gestalt Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael H.

    Hagerstown Junior College, Maryland, has had a staff development program for the past five years. The major components have been evaluated, revised, and integrated into a gestalt paradigm--a total institutional thrust designed to insure that the goals of the college meet the challenges presented by the service area. Each component exists to foster…

  9. Top 10 Staff Survival Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Laurie

    1995-01-01

    Tips for camp staff on how to survive summer camp include not giving campers sugary drinks before bedtime, setting behavior limits with campers, setting an example by following camp rules, getting enough rest, being fair and consistent, controlling anger, being accountable for actions, asking questions, and being flexible. (LP)

  10. Simulation: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abi; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Crofts, Joanna; Draycott, Tim

    2013-06-01

    Effective training has been shown to improve perinatal care and outcome, decrease litigation claims and reduce midwifery sick leave. To be effective, training should be incentivised, in a realistic context, and delivered to inter-professional teams similar to those delivering actual care. Teamwork training is a useful addition, but it should be based on the characteristics of effective teamwork as derived from the study of frontline teams. Implementation of simulation and teamwork training is challenging, with constraints on staff time, facilities and finances. Local adoption and adaptation of effective programmes can help keep costs down, and make them locally relevant whilst maintaining effectiveness. Training programmes need to evolve continually in line with new evidence. To do this, it is vital to monitor outcomes and robustly evaluate programmes for their impact on patient care and outcome, not just on participants. PMID:23721770

  11. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  12. Peds benchmarking group gathers outcomes data.

    PubMed

    2000-09-01

    Company literature refers to it as a national child health outcomes conference, but staff refer to it as the Halloween Meeting. A group of physicians, pediatric hospital chief executives, and representatives from payers and national quality organizations came together on Oct. 31, 1997, to ask questions and brainstorm about how to develop a mechanism for measuring pediatric outcomes. PMID:11187280

  13. Staff Stress and Morale in Community-Based Settings for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Janet; Hatton, Chris; Felce, David; Meek, Andrea; Carr, Deborah; Knapp, Martin; Hallam, Angela; Emerson, Eric; Pinkney, Lisa; Caesar, Emma; Lowe, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    Background: There are no studies that have compared outcomes for staff in different types of supported accommodation for people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. This study looked at stress, morale and intended job turnover in staff in two types of community-based residential supports: non-congregate settings where the…

  14. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D.

    2015-01-01

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning. PMID:26396280

  15. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    PubMed

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  16. Staff Development: Finding the Right Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standerfer, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    Three years ago, when the author joined the staff of Agua Fria High School in Phoenix, Arizona, as an assistant principal, she was excited to find that the students' school day started an hour and a half later than normal each Wednesday to provide staff development time for the teaching staff. That first year, however, neither the principal, Bryce…

  17. Improving staff nurse conflict resolution skills.

    PubMed

    Baker, K M

    1995-01-01

    As health care organizations restructure their organizations based on a team-managed philosophy, staff nurses will need new skills to function successfully in this type of environment. Specifically, staff nurses will need improved conflict resolution skills. Training and nurse managers' modeling of effective resolution techniques are key elements in developing improved conflict resolution skills among staff nurses. PMID:7566208

  18. Investing in Early Career General Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2009-01-01

    With the greying of the Australian population, it has been widely recognised that active career development for early career academics is essential to the future capacities of universities (Hugo, Daysh, Morris & Rudd, 2004). However, the same has not been acknowledged for general staff, despite general staff comprising more than 50% of staff in…

  19. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  20. 46 CFR 15.835 - Staff officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Staff officers. 15.835 Section 15.835 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.835 Staff officers. Staff officers, when carried, must be registered as specified in part...

  1. Trends in Staff Furnishings for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasi, John

    1987-01-01

    Factors to be considered in designing a comfortable library work environment are identified as new technology, changing relationships between library staff and patrons, and increased awareness of human needs of staff. Features of furniture and equipment for service desk areas, staff work areas, and office areas are discussed. (5 references) (MES)

  2. Yes, We Can Improve Staff Morale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Dick B.

    A literature review and discussion the effect of school administrators on staff morale is presented in this paper. Four factors for improving staff morale include: a supportive workplace; meaningful incentives; a good working environment; and personal display of high morale by the administrator. Ten recommendations for improving staff relations…

  3. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  4. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  5. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  6. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  7. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  8. Expansion of clinical pharmacy services through staff development.

    PubMed

    Greene, S A; Powell, C W

    1991-08-01

    A program that trains and uses staff pharmacists for clinical services is described. A position was created that is filled by staff pharmacists on six-week rotations. All full-time pharmacists may participate; they work under the direction and supervision of clinical pharmacists. Basic responsibilities in the rotation include responding to drug information requests, assisting with drug-use evaluation and adverse drug experience programs, assisting with research, writing and editing for newsletters, participating in staff development programs, and reviewing and clarifying drug orders for the skilled-nursing facility. About 60% of eligible pharmacists have participated in this program. The pharmacists have gained new practice skills, greater opportunity for career enhancement, and improved attitudes toward work and colleagues, and the department has been able to provide more clinical services. The focus of the rotation is now being changed from performing clinical tasks to assuming more responsibility for patient outcomes related to drug therapy. A rotating clinical position has enabled staff pharmacists to gain additional nondispensing skills and contribute to the development and maintenance of clinical services.

  9. Eye dose to staff involved in interventional and procedural fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, D.; Hadaya, D.; Tse, J.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) lowered the occupational eye dose limit from 150 to 20 mSv/yr [1]. While international jurisdictions are in a process of adopting these substantial changes, medical physicists at the clinical level have been advising medical colleagues on specific situations based on dose measurements. Commissioned and calibrated TLDs mounted in commercially available holders designed to simulate the measurement of Hp(3), were applied to staff involved in x-ray procedures for a one month period. During this period clinical procedure data was concurrently collected and subject to audit. The use or not of eye personal protective equipment (PPE) was noted for all staff. Audits were conducted in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory, the interventional angiography rooms and the procedural room where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures are performed. Significant levels of occupational dose were recorded in the cardiac and interventional procedures, with maximum reading exceeding the new limit for some interventional radiologists. No significant eye doses were measured for staff performing ERCP procedures. One outcome of the studies was increased use of eye PPE for operators of interventional equipment with increased availability also to nursing staff, when standing in close proximity to the patient during procedures.

  10. The balancing act. Collaboration between frontline forensic staff and hospital administration.

    PubMed

    Encinares, Maxima; Pullan, Shirley

    2003-12-01

    1. Flexibility, creativity, and consistency are critical characteristics for both frontline staff and administrators in the delivery of treatment and care for complex forensic patients who may be difficult to manage. 2. Through collaborative efforts and ongoing communication, plans can be identified and implemented that enhance patient and staff safety and facilitate positive behavioral and rehabilitation outcomes for patients. 3. Effective partnerships among frontline staff, administration, patients, their families, labor unions, and communities contribute significantly to the effective resolution of conflicts and dilemmas in the provision of holistic care to forensic patients. PMID:14682030

  11. Your Rights as an Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Bruce; Page, John P.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an instructive overview of the responsibilities of the police and the rights of the citizen concerning criminal investigations. Briefly describes the protections afforded by the fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and fourteenth amendments. Includes a learning activity involving a legal analysis of situations. (MJP)

  12. Program Characteristics that Predict Improved Learner Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Margaret Becker; Mellard, Daryl

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies adult education program characteristics that predict improved learner outcomes through statistical analyses of data across four years in a single state. Data indicate that, collectively, several predictors contribute to our understanding of learner outcomes, including (a) learner entry level, (b) size of community, (c) staff qualifications, and (d) learner exposure to high quality services. A surprising finding was the lack of robust outcome predictors that maintain consistency from one year to another. PMID:22348153

  13. Transformational management style positively affects financial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zwingman-Bagley, C

    1999-01-01

    Two specific examples from the author's experience demonstrate the central theme that positive financial outcomes are a function of a transformational leadership style of management. The article focuses on participation competencies utilizing involvement, empowerment, and accountability. Developing staff and empowering them to make decisions about their work and outcomes are necessary to achieve a high-quality, cost-effective outcome, the key to financial success.

  14. Measurement of staff empowerment within health service organizations.

    PubMed

    Irvine, D; Leatt, P; Evans, M G; Baker, R G

    1999-01-01

    A measure of empowerment was developed and its psychometric properties evaluated. Employees (n = 52) of two hospitals participated in semistructured interviews and a pilot test of the research instrument. A second study was undertaken with professional, support, and administrative staff (n = 405) of four community hospitals. Psychometric evaluation included factor analysis, reliability estimation, and validity assessment. Subjects responded to questionnaires measuring empowerment, leadership behavior, organizational citizenship behavior and job behaviors related to quality improvement. Factor analysis indicated three dimensions of empowerment: behavioral, verbal, and outcome empowerment. Coefficient alphas ranged from .83 to .87. The three dimensions were positively related to leadership behavior that encouraged self-leadership and negatively related to directive leadership. The three dimensions discriminated between the empowerment level of managers compared to that of nonmanagement staff. Empowerment predicted organizational citizenship behavior and job behaviors related to quality improvement.

  15. Staff supervision in residential care.

    PubMed

    Myers, Peter G; Bibbs, Tonya; Orozco, Candy

    2004-04-01

    Residential care workers must be offered opportunities for formalized and systematic supervision in individual and group formats to provide the highest possible level of care to children and adolescents whom they serve. Effective supervision with residential care staff should be open to exploring issues at all levels of their experience and in relation to each component of the broader organizational structure within which they work. Systems theory offers a useful lens through which to view supervising staff in residential treatment. Systems theory proposes that human behavior is shaped by interactional processes and internal factors. Although the development of the individual occurs within intrinsic cognitive and emotional spheres, it also is believed to be related to several other elements. These additional variables include the point at which the family and system function in their own life cycle, the historical and current emotional context, the current and changing structure of the system, narratives, and the cultural context. This article discussed how methods of training and supervision would be most effective if they were designed specifically for the developmental level of the participants. Some literature reviews have concluded that youth care workers, like all professionals, pass through developmental stages and progress through them in their work. To assist youth care workers in their jobs, supervisors must understand these stages and the ways in which they may be enacted in the workplace. PMID:15062348

  16. A Collaborative Approach to Workforce Transformation: Food and Nutrition Services Staff Education.

    PubMed

    Gates, Donna M.; Remmel, Anne; Adamson, Beverley J.; Hutt, Leonard J.

    2000-01-01

    Recent health care system changes have required the food and nutrition services workforce to learn new job skills, and to work with significantly less supervision. At Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care (892 beds), the Food and Nutrition and the Education and Organizational Development Departments collaborated to budget for, plan, and implement an educational program to transform a traditional food service workforce into an effective self-managing team. The workforce actively participated in a needs assessment process to identify the skills and behaviours requiring change. Clear behavioural objectives were developed. Training sessions involved realistic video modelling, role-playing, and discussion. Crucial to the success of the training were overcoming negative attitudes and promoting positive anticipation. Indicators, such as an incident audit sheet, were developed to evaluate program effectiveness. After taking the educational program, staff are more willing to identify and solve problems requiring intervention, and are better able to discuss change and suggest options. When problem-solving, work teams focus on the issue, rather than on accusing others or being defensive. This training process is ongoing and requires continual coaching and application. If follow-up training sessions are deferred, benefits may soon be lost.

  17. Don't neglect routine staff meetings.

    PubMed

    Board, H K

    1982-03-01

    Staff meetings are essential to good staff communication. Meetings help keep the grapevine from growing so big that it strangles the group with its rumors. By holding regular meetings with your staff, you create a consistency in your communications that helps prevent problems that you don't even suspect from cropping up. All personnel should attend the meetings. This way everyone hears news at the same time. Be consistent in your use of meetings. Meetings are more effective if you have a planned agenda and a firm time schedule. Encourage your staff to use meetings to talk out problems that affect the group. Once the meeting is over, encourage them to leave their feelings in the room. Many leaders are reluctant, for a variety of reasons, to hold meetings with their staffs. But it's like dieting and exercise; the more you do it, the easier it becomes. This type of meeting will pay rich dividends in staff personal and professional growth and in improved communication. The sense of participation that can be gained by the effective use of staff meetings can lead to high morale and effective staff performance. As you begin to see the results of a cohesive staff functioning together well, you will realize the routine staff meeting is a management tool that should not be overlooked or underused.

  18. A study of network education application on nursing staff continuing education effectiveness and staff's satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juin-Shu; Yen-Chi, Liao; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2006-01-01

    The rapid development of computer technology pushes Internet's popularity and makes daily services more timely and convenient. Meanwhile, it also becomes a trend for nursing practice to implement network education model to break the distance barriers and for nurses to obtain more knowledge. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of nursing staff's information competency, satisfaction and outcomes of network education. After completing 4 weeks of network education, a total of 218 nurses answered the on-line questionnaires. The results revealed that nurses who joined the computer training course for less than 3 hours per week, without networking connection devices and with college degree, had the lower nursing informatics competency; while nurses who were older, at N4 position, with on-line course experience and participated for more than 4 hours each week, had higher nursing informatics competency. Those who participated in the network education course less than 4 hours per week were less satisfied. There were significant differences between nursing positions before and after having the network education. Nurses who had higher nursing information competency also had higher satisfaction toward the network education. Network education not only enhances learners' computer competency but also improves their learning satisfaction. By promoting the network education and improving nurses' hardware/software skills and knowledge, nurses can use networks to access learning resources. Healthcare institutions should also enhance computer infrastructure, and to establish the standards for certificate courses to increase the learning motivation and learning outcome. PMID:17102390

  19. Hospice staff attitudes towards telehospice.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra R Parker; Fleming, David A; Edison, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Telemedicine, defined as the use of advanced telecommunication technologies to bridge geographic distance and improve delivery of care, is perceived by many as a way to eliminate barriers to quality care at the end of life. The use of telemedicine in hospice, known as telehospice, is a novel approach to such care, and few pilot studies have investigated its feasibility. The purpose of this study was to assess hospice providers 'perceptions of telehospice. A focus group session was conducted with 10 staff members from five hospice agencies in Missouri. Participants included administrators, nurses, and social workers. Overall, providers had a positive perception of telehospice and found that the use of videophone technology enhanced care by enabling providers, patients, and family members a means to communicate. However, they emphasized that it was an additional tool and not a substitute for actual visits. Issues of privacy and usability were also raised.

  20. Improving staff retention and career progression.

    PubMed

    Szeremeta, Lorraine; Shamash, Natalie

    Staff shortages are serious and widespread and, for many trusts, the cost of temporary staff is not sustainable. In many cases, the existing workforce has the skills necessary to fill vacant posts. A trust developed an initiative to maximise use of its nurses' expertise and minimise staff attrition. This article describes the scheme and how it increased job satisfaction, promoted development opportunities and cut costs. PMID:27344897

  1. Improving staff retention and career progression.

    PubMed

    Szeremeta, Lorraine; Shamash, Natalie

    Staff shortages are serious and widespread and, for many trusts, the cost of temporary staff is not sustainable. In many cases, the existing workforce has the skills necessary to fill vacant posts. A trust developed an initiative to maximise use of its nurses' expertise and minimise staff attrition. This article describes the scheme and how it increased job satisfaction, promoted development opportunities and cut costs.

  2. Emotional Well-Being of House Staff

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Yvonne; Magonet, Gordon; Rubin, Gordon; Carson, Katherine

    1991-01-01

    The results of a survey of 255 house staff conducted to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in interns and residents indicated that 25% of the sample population manifested depressive symptoms at the time of the study, and 34% reported a clinical depression within the previous year. Moreover, whereas 58% of the house staff reported that no attending staff inquired about their emotional well-being 73% stated that they would welcome such an inquiry. PMID:21229086

  3. An emergency department-based mental health nurse practitioner outpatient service: part 2, staff evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wand, Timothy; White, Kathryn; Patching, Joanna; Dixon, Judith; Green, Timothy

    2011-12-01

    The nurse practitioner role incorporates enhancing access to health-care services, particularly for populations that are underserved. This entails working collaboratively with colleagues across multidisciplinary teams and emphasizing a nursing model of practice within the nurse practitioner role. In Australia, the added value associated with establishing mental health nurse practitioner (MHNP) positions based in the emergency department (ED) is emerging. This paper presents qualitative findings from a study using a mixed-method design to evaluate an ED-based MHNP outpatient service in Sydney, Australia. One component of the evaluation involved semistructured interviews conducted with a random selection of study participants and a stratified sample of ED staff. This is the second of a two-part paper that presents an analysis of the qualitative data derived from the staff interviews (n = 20). Emergency staff were very supportive of the outpatient service, and perceived that it enhanced overall service provision and improved outcomes for patients. Moreover, staff expressed interest in receiving more formal feedback on the outcomes of the service. Staff also felt that service provision would be enhanced through additional mental health liaison nurses working in the department, especially after hours. An ED-based MHNP outpatient service expedites access to follow up to individuals with a broad range of problems, and supports ED staff in the provision of safe, effective, and more holistic care.

  4. Integrating Staff Development and Organization Development: An Empirical Study of Staff Developers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vojtek, RoseAnne O'Brien

    Findings of a study that explored the role of staff developers in integrating staff development with organizational development are presented in this paper. Staff development (SD) is defined as professional development for individuals to improve student instruction; organizational development (OD) is defined as professional development for groups…

  5. Staff Development: A Guide to Selected Sources of Information on Improving the Staff of Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholas, Russell C.

    This bibliography lists more than 600 publications that deal with staff development information pertinent to education. It presents information on staff development for specific educational fields, as well as for different educational levels; however, no attempt has been made to list staff development articles dealing with particular teaching…

  6. Relation of Principal Transformational Leadership to School Staff Job Satisfaction, Staff Turnover, and School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the direct effect of principal transformational leadership to school staff turnover and school performance was examined, in addition to its indirect effect through school staff job satisfaction. Survey data were obtained from elementary school staff and students, and school-aggregated student achievement test scores were…

  7. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training....

  8. Growing Teachers: Partnerships in Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Just as young children learn about the world around them by playing its scripts, teachers learn about teaching and learning by playing a teacher's script, observing what happens, and discussing all of the possibilities with other teachers. This book applies a constructivist model to staff development, describing staff development activities that…

  9. Just Say "Yes" to Great Staff Morale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem-Fuller, Nancy; Braun, Maggie

    Staff morale is part of all aspects of the camp operation. Six components of camp operation are reviewed in terms of how they affect staff morale. They include: scheduling, training, food, facilities, staffing pattern and program. Each of these aspects is presented in terms of physical needs, or emotional needs, or the subtle, underlying ideas…

  10. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  11. Cuesta College All Staff Survey, Spring 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartnal, Ryan; Hagen, Peter F.

    The 1999 Cuesta College Faculty and Staff Survey examined ten functional areas: (1) safety/security/campus environment; (2) technology and equipment; (3) organizational structure; (4) college policies; (5) faculty/staff evaluations; (6) planning/decision-making; (7) communications/publications; (8) library/learning resources; (9) support services;…

  12. Open Educational Resources: Staff Attitudes and Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfe, Vivien

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes towards "open educational resources" (OER) as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n = 6) were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews…

  13. Self-Concept Change in Camp Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    The 1981 study ascertained whether the self-concept of 66 camp staff from 2 Wisconsin camps changed more than a control group of 18 college students attending summer school; if differences in self-concept were based on a particular characteristic (age, gender, staff position, years at camp); and in what ways, if any, self-concept of camp staff…

  14. Staff Development for Teaching Slow Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leff, Rhona

    2008-01-01

    If you have noticed that your teachers need more "tricks up their sleeves" for working with slow learners, you can initiate a staff-development plan for changing that. Here are some suggestions for using the time, resources, and staff that you already have to improve the teaching of slow learners.

  15. Quality Control in Child Care Staff Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Merwin R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of staff selection of child care staff at a residential treatment center for children, ages 8-16. Phases of candidate selection, an "open-door" interview procedure, the orientation of hired candidates and the agency's philosophy, procedures and practices are discussed. (GO)

  16. Restructure Staff Development for Systemic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systems approach based on the work of W. Edwards Deming to system wide, high impact staff development. Deming has pointed out the significance of structure in systems. By restructuring the process of staff development we can bring about cost effective improvement of the whole system. We can improve student achievement while…

  17. How Adults Read. A Staff Development Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rance-Roney, Judith A.; Ditmars, Jane W.

    This textbook/sourcebook and accompanying trainer's guide, which were issued as part of a project to republish important staff development project reports/materials, are updated and repackaged versions of a staff development curriculum in adult literacy and learning. The first part of the sourcebook contains 20 "keys" or quick overviews of the…

  18. Measuring Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study the levels of staff turnover reported in the nursing home literature (1990-2003) are reviewed, as well as the definitions of turnover used in these prior studies. With the use of primary data collected from 354 facilities, the study addresses the various degrees of bias that result, depending on how staff turnover is defined…

  19. Staff Cuts Remake the Custodial Closet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that new cleaning and finishing materials and new equipment can help school facility departments cope with staff cuts, focusing on: chemicals and dispensers, safety training and information for custodial staff, cleaning tools and power equipment, and cleaner and more efficient schools. (SM)

  20. Staff Development: The Evolution of a Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, B. Barbara

    1980-01-01

    The team concept, in increased professionalism of admissions staffs, is the key to successful market positioning. Results show admission staffs increased recruitment efforts by 50 percent, decreased the budget by 10 percent, and, for the past two years, have exceeded new student goals. (Author)

  1. Strengthening the Commitment to Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Provides one approach to a comprehensive library staff development program that addresses the needs of both the new and long-term employee. Discusses keys to successful employee orientation, primary objectives to staff development, developing and enhancing employee knowledge through small training sessions, ensuring opportunities to develop…

  2. Increasing Staff Participation in Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    A challenge facing school staffs is the development of school-based curriculum. Some guidelines and incentives for increasing staff participation in curriculum development are presented. Available from: Australian College of Education, 916 Swanston Street, Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia, $2.50 single copy. (Author/MLF)

  3. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The Executive Director advises and assists the Joint Board directly in carrying out its responsibilities...

  4. General Staff Experiences in the Corporate University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, Judy

    2006-01-01

    The working lives of general staff in universities have been a rather closed book until recently, having been largely ignored in both academic and non-academic literature. When discussed or referred to, general staff have been depicted in problematic ways that, in recent times, can be associated with the prevailing discourse of "corporate…

  5. Professional Staff Carve out a New Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, Judy

    2011-01-01

    A 2004 paper, "The invisible workers" by Szekeres, lamented the "invisibility" of professional staff in Australian higher education. Even then, professional staff constituted more than half the university workforce, but they were defined by what they were not (non-academic) and they experienced a high level of frustration in their relationships…

  6. Causes of institutionalism: patient and staff perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wirt, G L

    1999-01-01

    Institutionalism is a pattern of passive, dependent behavior observed among psychiatric inpatients, characterized by hospital attachment and resistance to discharge. Survey research was conducted with 211 staff and 47 "institutionalized" patients in a public psychiatric hospital to determine their beliefs on the causes of institutionalism. Four explanatory models of institutionalism were investigated: the predisposition model, the total institution model, the asylum model, and the symptoms model. Patients and staff differed on all models. Responses indicated acceptance of multiple causes for the phenomenon, with patients and staff showing highest agreement on the need for hospitalization as asylum from the world. Patients and staff differed most on the role of the institution in promoting institutionalism. Job classification of staff also resulted in significant differences in beliefs on all models except the asylum model.

  7. Faculty/Staff Perceptions of a Standards-Based Exit Portfolio System for Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Tena L.; Bailey, Rita L.

    2006-01-01

    New standards for certification were recently developed for speech-language pathology graduate training programs by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The new standards are outcomes-based rather than process-based. Using a collective case study approach, this article highlights the perceptions of faculty and staff regarding use of a…

  8. Quality of Care in the Nursing Home: Effects of Staff Assignment and Work Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Fairchild, J. Kaci; Scilley, Kay; Hardin, J. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a variety of resident and staff outcomes across two types of staffing patterns, permanent and rotating assignment, and work shift. Although studies have examined these staffing patterns as part of multicomponent intervention packages, few studies have examined the isolated effects of staffing…

  9. From Thinking to Practice: School Staff Views on Disability Inclusion in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakiz, Halis; Woods, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents outcomes of a qualitative interview study conducted in four Turkish primary schools that had been identified by the Ministry of Education as engaging in the inclusion of disabled students. The main purpose of the study was to examine school staff views on inclusion in their schools. Data were collected through semi-structured…

  10. Perceptions of Staff on Embedding Speech and Language Therapy within a Youth Offending Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Karen; Gregory, Juliette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to ascertain the views of staff and managers within a youth offending team on their experiences of working with a speech and language therapist (SLT). The model of therapy provision was similar to the whole-systems approach used in schools. The impact of the service on language outcomes is reported elsewhere…

  11. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  12. BE-ACTIV: A Staff-Assisted Behavioral Intervention for Depression in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Suzanne; Looney, Stephen W.; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Teri, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article (a) describes a 10-week, behavioral, activities-based intervention for depression that can be implemented in nursing homes collaboratively with nursing home activities staff and (b) presents data related to its development, feasibility, and preliminary outcomes. Design and Methods: We developed BE-ACTIV, which stands for…

  13. "It's Pretty Hard with Our Ones, They Can't Talk, the More Able Bodied Can Participate": Staff Attitudes about the Applicability of Disability Policies to People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, C.; Clement, T.; Mansell, J.; Beadle-Brown, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The level of resident's adaptive behaviour and staff facilitative practices are key sources of variation in outcomes for residents in community-based residential services. The higher the resident support needs the poorer their outcome. Although substantial investment has been made in values-based training for staff, their attitudes and…

  14. Orientation Groups Bring New and Old Staff Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reter, Jessie L.

    1995-01-01

    An effective approach to camp staff orientation involves veteran staff leading orientation groups for new staff. In addition to familiarizing staff members with the camp, group leaders are responsible for making members feel at ease through activities. Details a highly successful five-day orientation led by veteran staff. (LP)

  15. 76 FR 63676 - Final Division of Safety Systems Interim Staff Guidance DSS-ISG-2010-01: Staff Guidance Regarding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... COMMISSION Final Division of Safety Systems Interim Staff Guidance DSS-ISG- 2010-01: Staff Guidance Regarding... final Division of Safety Systems Interim Staff Guidance, (DSS-ISG) DSS- ISG-2010-01, ``Staff Guidance... guidance to the NRC staff reviewer to address the increased complexity of recent spent fuel pool...

  16. The role of conflict resolution styles on nursing staff morale, burnout, and job satisfaction in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Montoro-Rodriguez, Julian; Small, Jeff A

    2006-06-01

    This study focuses on the ability of nursing staff to interact with residents in a way that affects positively on the nurses' well-being and occupational satisfaction. It investigates the role of coping skills related to staff-resident interactions, in particular, the use of conflict resolution styles and their influence on the level of morale, burnout and job satisfaction of nursing professionals. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from 161 direct care nursing staff. The authors used a multiple regression procedure to examine the influence of predictors on nursing staff outcomes. Multivariate analyses indicated that nurses' psychological morale, occupational stress, and job satisfaction are influenced by conflict resolution styles, after controlling by individual characteristics, work demands, and work resources factors. The findings highlight the importance of considering personal coping abilities to foster positive staff-resident interactions and to increase nurses' morale and job satisfaction. PMID:16648392

  17. Model Learner Outcomes for Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cheryl, Ed.; And Others

    Chapter 1 of this document contains sets of statements adopted by either the Minnesota State Board of Education or the Minnesota State Legislature. They represent the hierarchy used by Department of Education staff as they develop model learner outcomes for each subject area. Contents include learner values, education system values, philosophy for…

  18. School Size, School Characteristics, and School Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William J., Jr.

    A study investigated the possible dependence of educational outcomes on staff attributes and organizational size once socioeconomic indexes are taken into account. All data were obtained from the New Jersey Department of Education. The variables of interest and their operational definitions include school characteristics, teacher characteristics,…

  19. Medical staff committees benefit from job descriptions.

    PubMed

    Topham, A S

    1982-11-01

    When new medical staff officers and committees begin their terms, the confusion potential runs high. Job descriptions a la industry have helped facilitate the orientation of officers and the smooth running of committees.

  20. A Recipe for Support Staff Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hash, Vickie

    2002-01-01

    Describes ways in which professional development activities can be rewarding. Offers details from a support staff event at Wytheville Community College in Virginia as a template for a successful event. Focuses on planning, instruction, humor, camaraderie, and appreciation. (NB)

  1. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Tracey L.; Kennerly, Susan; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention’s characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. Methods: This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members). One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. Results: The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity) described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled “brainstormed ideas”, focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Implications: Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs. PMID:27429278

  2. 'I give staff time to care'.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Clare

    Flo Panel-Coates is working to improve care at a heavily criticised NHS trust. Since taking on the director of nursing post in October 2012, she has secured more support for ward leaders, giving them time to do their job, improved the skill mix of staff, and cut senior nurses' paperwork. Ensuring staff work consistently to the highest standard is the NHS's biggest challenge, she says.

  3. The Nature of Staff - Family Interactions in Nursing Homes: Staff Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Piven, Mary L.; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    Each year thousands of older adults are admitted to nursing homes. Following admission, nursing home staff and family members must interact and communicate with each other. This study examined relationship and communication patterns between nursing home staff members and family members of nursing home residents, as part of a larger multi-method comparative case study. Here, we report on 6- month case studies of two nursing homes where in-depth interviews, shadowing experiences, and direct observations were completed. Staff members from both nursing homes described staff-family interactions as difficult, problematic and time consuming, yet identified strategies that when implemented consistently, influenced the staff-family interaction positively. Findings suggest explanatory processes in staff-family interactions, while pointing toward promising interventions. PMID:19649311

  4. Understanding and Enacting Learning Outcomes: The Academic's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbins, Kerry; Brooks, Sara; Scott, Jon J. A.; Rawlinson, Mark; Norman, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a detailed literature exploring the advancement of a learning outcomes approach in higher education, limited evidence exists concerning academics' use of them. This study employed a questionnaire survey and interviews with academic staff in three schools in one institution to explore their views and uses of learning outcomes. Whilst…

  5. Activities vs. Outcomes: The Difference Makes All the Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Janice; Munger, Linda; Hord, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to "Focus first on outcomes" (Bradley, Munger, & Hord, 2015), published in the August 2015 issue of "JSD" ["Journal of Staff Development"]. That article set the stage by creating awareness of the need and purpose for thinking first about outcomes, not activities, when starting a change…

  6. Staff Selection: What's Important for Out-Of-School Time Programs? Part 1 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Frontline Staff. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Bandy, Tawana; Burkhauser, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Research on successful out-of-school time programs repeatedly has found that the caliber of a program's staff is a critical feature of high-quality programs that achieve positive outcomes. Therefore, attracting, selecting, and retaining high-quality staff has become a major objective of out-of-school time programs. To expand what is known about…

  7. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization and 30-Day Rehospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Julie C.; Intrator, Orna; Karuza, Jurgis; Wetle, Terrie; Mor, Vincent; Katz, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between features of nursing home (NH) medical staff organization and residents’ 30-day rehospitalizations. Design Cross-sectional study combining primary data collected from a survey of medical directors, NH resident assessment data (minimum data set), Medicare claims, and the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Setting A total of 202 freestanding US nursing homes. Participants Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were hospitalized and subsequently admitted to a study nursing home. Measurements Medical staff organization dimensions derived from the survey, NH residents’ characteristics derived from minimum data set data, hospitalizations obtained from Part A Medicare claims, and NH characteristics from the OSCAR database and from www.ltcfocus.org. Study outcome defined within a 30-day window following an index hospitalization: rehospitalized, otherwise died, otherwise survived and not rehospitalized. Results Thirty-day rehospitalizations occurred for 3788 (20.3%) of the 18,680 initial hospitalizations. Death was observed for 884 (4.7%) of residents who were not rehospitalized. Adjusted by hospitalization, resident, and NH characteristics, nursing homes having a more formal appointment process for physicians were less likely to have 30-day rehospitalization (b = −0.43, SE = 0.17), whereas NHs in which a higher proportion of residents were cared for by a single physician were more likely to have rehospitalizations (b = 0.18, SE = 0.08). Conclusion This is the first study to show a direct relationship between features of NH medical staff organization and resident-level process of care. The relationship of a more strict appointment process and rehospitalizations might be a consequence of more formalized and dedicated medical practice with a sense of ownership and accountability. A higher volume of patients per physician does not appear to improve quality of care. PMID:22682694

  8. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  9. Nuclear Power Acceptance Among University Staffs and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayder, G.; Rahim, M. S. Ab

    2016-03-01

    The need to consider alternative energy sources becomes very real. Nuclear has been identified as an alternative electricity source. However, media reports seem to indicate that there is a resistance among peoples with regards to harnessing nuclear for energy. This study was conducted to assess the acceptance level of university staff and students towards nuclear energy by asking them to answer a questionnaire. The questionnaire was constructed in a way to gauge their background knowledge on the energy situation of the country, the risks involved with regards to nuclear energy and also what aspects need to be improved in order to have a safe integration of nuclear energy into the national energy mix. The overall result of the questionnaire indicated high level of support for nuclear energy. The main areas of concerns however, were waste management, control and governance and also nuclear accidents. These should be identified as fields that require extra attention. However, the positive result obtained from this survey should not be construed as overall strong support in general. There might be different outcomes if the survey was conducted on to the general population as compared to the university students and staff that were involved in this research.

  10. Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report. EMIS Staff ECE Units 2005. Report Documentation. Version 1.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Preschool Units EMIS Staff Report is twofold. First, it helps School Districts and Educational Service Centers (ESC) ensure accuracy and validity of preschool staff, student and program data submitted to the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) through the Education Management Information System (EMIS). From this report, school…

  11. From Desk to Disk: Staff Development for VET Staff in Flexible Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Brisbane.

    A study was conducted to develop practical options that could help shape an Australian national staff development strategy for vocational education and training (VET) staff engaged in flexible delivery. Data were gathered from the following: analysis of the literature, evaluation of 15 case studies in two Australian states and one territory that…

  12. About Staff Development. A Brief Highlighting Important Literature Since 1970 on Community College Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzullo, Diane, Comp.

    This brief, divided into seven sections, focuses on community college staff development. The introductory section discusses the necessity of staff development and its purposes, the forms its activities take, and the components of effective programming. As indicated in the literature, effective programs should be holistic, reflect the goals of the…

  13. Developer's Concerns about Staff Retreat Create Opportunity and Obligation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with a staff developer's concerns about Bill Stewart's staff retreat, and how these concerns create opportunity and obligation. The author presents views from a superintendent and two staff developers on the staff retreat. Aside from these, the author talks about a superintendent named Darlene Preston, and her course of action.…

  14. Research misconduct among clinical trial staff.

    PubMed

    Redman, Barbara K; Templin, Thomas N; Merz, Jon F

    2006-07-01

    Between 1993 and 2002, 39 clinical trial staff were investigated for scientific misconduct by the Office of Research Integrity (ORI). Analysis of ORI case records reveals practices regarding workload, training and supervision that enable misconduct. Considering the potential effects on human subjects protection, quality and reliability of data, and the trustworthiness of the clinical research enterprise, regulations or guidance on use of clinical trial staff ought to be available. Current ORI regulations do not hold investigators or institutions responsible for supervision and training of clinical trial staff. Given the important issues at stake, the definition of research misconduct should encompass the intentional or negligent mismanagement of scientific projects. Individual institutions and professional associations not only can but should adopt stricter standards of conduct than those reflected in federal regulations. PMID:16909150

  15. Focus groups: nursing staff's experiences using restraints.

    PubMed

    Janelli, L M; Dickerson, S S; Ventura, M R

    1995-11-01

    A phenomenological approach was used to examine nursing staff's experiences using physical restraints. A total of 12 nurses from a tertiary hospital participated in one of three focus groups. Exploring the attitudes of nurses can contribute to a better understanding of how decisions are made concerning restraints. An analysis of the focus group data resulted in a description of the lived experiences of nurses using restraints. Seven themes emerged from the data, one of which reflected that the nurses felt ambiguous about restraints, yet they made judgments and justified their decisions after assessing patient characteristics, environmental safety, and unit traditions. Nurse clinicians could use the focus group method to sensitize themselves to the staff's needs and to allow staff the opportunity to share ideas and to dispel misconceptions about restraints. PMID:7580947

  16. [Hospital auxiliary staff, between polyvalence and invisibility].

    PubMed

    Veissier, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Often underestimated, hospital auxiliary staff carry out on a daily basis a professional activity that may be difficult to define and/or recognize. What does their work consist in and what are the boundaries of the scope of their activity? Faced with a growing rate of absenteeism among these members of staff in a nursing home for elderly people attached to a hospital, an issue emerges: does the content of their professional activity have an impact on the causes and evolution of this phenomenon? PMID:26976318

  17. A student emergency: helping school staff cope.

    PubMed

    Silver, R

    1999-04-01

    A serious illness, injury, or other medical emergency in a student while in school can be upsetting to school staff not accustomed to such situations. A healthcare emergency in a special health needs child in one school district prompted a nurse and a building principal to develop a protocol which would enable school staff to effectively assist the nurse in the event of a student emergency. The plan involved training school personnel to assist the nurse and the administrator in tasks such as answering and monitoring telephones, serving as a runner, controlling unnecessary traffic into the nurse's office, and passing clean supplies to the nurse.

  18. Staff interactions: communicating with co-workers.

    PubMed

    Ribnick, P

    1990-01-01

    The issue of staff attitudes toward their jobs has always been of vital importance, and the pressures of today's healthcare industry makes this issue even more critical. The role communication plays in developing positive attitudes towards one's workplace is immense. Both verbal and non-verbal communication can project an image of being cold, unfeeling, unprofessional and indifferent. These are not the messages anyone wants to receive! Humanistic verbal communications sends the messages that should be received by every staff person--messages of a warm, caring and concerned workplace for everyone. PMID:10108291

  19. Front-office staff can improve clinical tobacco intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Frederic; Naish, Brigham; Buwembo, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To learn whether front-line personnel in primary care practices can increase delivery of clinical tobacco interventions and also help smokers address physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression. Design Uncontrolled before-and-after design. Setting Vancouver, BC, area (4 practices); northern British Columbia (2 practices). Participants Six practices, with 1 staff person per practice serving as a “health coordinator” who tracked and, after the baseline period, delivered preventive interventions to all patients who smoked. To assess delivery of preventive interventions, each practice was to sample 300 consecutive patient records, both at baseline and at follow-up 15 months later. Interventions Front-office staff were recruited, trained, paid, and given ongoing support to provide preventive care. Clinicians supplemented this care with advice and guided the use of medication. Main outcome measures Effectiveness of the intervention was based on comparison, at baseline and at follow-up, of the proportion of patients with any of the following 6 proven intervention components documented in their medical records: chart reminder, advice received, self-management plan, target quit date, referral, and follow-up date (as they applied to tobacco, physical inactivity, at-risk alcohol use, and depression). A Tobacco Intervention Flow Sheet cued preventive care, and its data were entered into a spreadsheet (which served as a smokers’ registry). Qualitative appraisal data were noted. Results For tobacco, substantial increases occurred after the intervention period in the proportion of patients with each of the intervention components noted in their charts: chart reminder (20% vs 94%); provision of advice (34% vs 79%); self-management plan (14% vs 57%); target quit date (5% vs 11%); referral (6% vs 11%); and follow-up date (7% vs 42%). Interventions for physical inactivity and depression showed some gains, but there were no gains for at

  20. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-05-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult to achieve in an in-service setting. In the present study, we have followed the coaching process of three staff members. Based on differences in the Linell balance of power across sessions, we explored the question: do different coaching processes have similar patterns in the development of dominance and coherence in interactions between coach and staff? Additionally, a qualitative approach was conducted to illustrate and enrich the meaning of quantitative outcomes. Processes were different regarding the balance of power at the start of the coaching, probably due to differences in resistance and insecurity. As a consequence of different starting points and differences in learning styles, each coaching process had its unique development over time. At the end, all dyads were comparable in the sense that all dyads were highly satisfied about the outcomes and process of coaching. This is in line with similar levels of power at the end of the coaching sessions suggesting equal contributions and leadership. The present findings suggest some relevant competencies of coaches within health-care services. Due to the small number of participants, the results have to be interpreted with caution. The present study provides suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:23474998

  1. Burnout, compassion fatigue, and compassion satisfaction among staff in community-based mental health services.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alberto; Cetrano, Gaia; Pertile, Riccardo; Rabbi, Laura; Donisi, Valeria; Grigoletti, Laura; Curtolo, Cristina; Tansella, Michele; Thornicroft, Graham; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2012-12-30

    Providing care to individuals with complex mental health needs can be stressful. However, little research has focused on the emotional, cognitive, and physical consequences of providing mental health care. The aim of this study is to assess burnout (BO), compassion fatigue (CF) and compassion satisfaction (CS) among staff at the four community-based mental health services (CMHS) of Verona, Italy. All staff were asked to complete anonymously the Professional Quality of Life Scale, the General Health Questionnaire, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. In total 260 staff participated (a response rate of 84%). Psychiatrists and social workers were the professionals with the highest levels of BO and CF. Workers with psychological distress reported both higher BO and CF scores, and lower levels of CS. A significant increase in the BO and CF scores was also detected for each extra year spent working in a CMHS. A higher level of CF was associated with female and having been experienced one negative life event in the previous year. These findings are useful for health managers and team leaders to identify factors affecting the professional quality of life of mental healthcare staff, and can provide a rationale for detecting staff at risk for developing negative work-related outcomes. PMID:22951335

  2. Communication about science in a traditional museum: visitors' and staff's perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Léonie J.; Williams, Gina F.

    2006-12-01

    This study investigated visitors' and staff's perceptions about the communication of science in a traditional natural history museum. The research examined the science-related outcomes for adult visitors and explored visitors' and staff's ideas of science and how it is portrayed at the museum. Data were collected by questionnaire and interview from 84 staff and 102 visitors. Both groups held positive views about science, its importance and the need for everyone to understand it. Comparison of visitors' pretest and posttest scores on the questionnaire revealed some significant changes, several suggesting a change to views about science that were less "scientific." Most visitors thought that their ideas about science had not changed as a result of their visit, but they were positive about the museum as a place for learning science. Staff held more "scientific" views about the nature of science than did visitors; they recognized the potential of the museum to educate people about science, but felt it needed to be presented as more relevant and accessible, particularly in terms of science as a cultural practice. Neither staff nor visitors perceived that the museum stimulated visitors to think critically about science. While acknowledging that interpreting complex scientific knowledge into exhibits readily understood by lay visitors and displaying controversy are difficult, these challenges must be addressed if visitors are to be encouraged to think about science and the social, cultural and political contexts which shape it.

  3. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics and Space AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM STABILIZATION AIR TRANSPORTATION STABILIZATION BOARD AIR CARRIER GUARANTEE LOAN PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS AND AMENDMENT OR WAIVER OF A TERM OR CONDITION...

  4. Digest of Adult Education Staff Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    This digest describes types of statewide programs for the training of adult educators. Eight types of programs involving 19 states are outlined, and contacts for each are given. These programs are included: Michigan Staff Development Collaborative, the Iowa Community College Telenetwork (or Telenet), Virginia Consultant Training Institute to…

  5. Leading Staff Development for School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubb, Sara; Earley, Peter

    2009-01-01

    As part of a CfBT Education Trust funded study, we investigated the practical steps school leaders can take to ensure that self-evaluation of school performance led, through the effective staff development, to genuine school improvement. On the journey from self-evaluation to school improvement our research identified what schools did that worked,…

  6. Resources for Administrator Assessment and Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud; Hord, Shirley M.

    A synthesis of literature on administrator assessment and staff development and a directory of resources are presented in this document. Section 1 discusses several aspects of administrator evaluation--the purposes of performance assessment; the components of evaluation; and the issues, processes, and recommendations for an effective evaluation…

  7. Effective Strategies for Engaging Faculty and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieving the Dream, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges are the pathways for millions of Americans to gain valuable education and to access career opportunities leading to family-sustaining wages. Faculty, student services staff, and administrators must share in the responsibility for student success if we are to meet national completion goals and reach even more students. During a…

  8. Are Students Customers? Perceptions of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomas, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of the student as a customer in a university, focusing on the perceptions of academic staff. Changes in the higher education sector in recent years have significantly reduced the differences between universities and other types of organisations and it has been argued that students have become "consumers" of higher…

  9. Public Health Nursing Staff Health Education Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Terence R.; And Others

    Health education attitudes toward prevention, detection, and treatment of selected chronic diseases and conditions confronting public health nursing staffs were investigated at a Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services District, which is composed of 16 county public health units (CPHU). Findings were used to determine type of…

  10. Does Staff Diversity Imply Openness to Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international university departments in Denmark. The authors set out…

  11. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Nutrients. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. This Staff Guide provides step-by-step guidelines on course planning, development and implementation involving…

  12. Effluent Monitoring Procedures: Metals Analyses. Staff Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. The Staff Guide provides step-by-step information on course planning, development, and implementation involving…

  13. School Staff Guide to Risk and Resiliency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Bureau of Instructional Support and Community Services.

    School staff can use information on risk factors to identify student needs and assess the ability of the school to address these needs. It is also important to identify protective factors that promote successful development or buffer risk factors that might otherwise compromise development. Three key factors that have been identified as fostering…

  14. Prospect Identification Research and Staff Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Frank P.

    Prospect Identification, Research and Staff Service is described as a system to identify and provide information in depth on the 20, 50, or 200 individuals or organizations who can make impact on the institution if motivated to help. Usually an institutional prospect research system will limit its efforts, in the interest of cost effectiveness, to…

  15. Staff Development for the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Barbara E.; Weckmueller, Beth L.

    1991-01-01

    Many college and university student service units consider staff development peripheral to their primary mission and not cost effective, especially in lean financial times. However, recent trends in business suggest this assumption is false, and ultimately costly. The University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, experience found development efforts empower…

  16. Equity Training for State Education Agency Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Claire; And Others

    A training manual for state education agency (SEA) staff dealing with issues of sex bias and discrimination in the educational system is presented. The manual is designed to achieve the following primary objectives: (1) provide a status report on federal and state roles in promoting educational equity; (2) provide an overview of inequities based…

  17. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  18. The Hazardous Waters of Staff Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoop, Robert J.; Dunklee, Dennis R.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding prospective employees' rights (under the 1964 Civil Rights Act and other federal legislation prohibiting discriminatory practices) can help principals protect themselves, their schools, and their districts from litigation. Scenarios are described, along with permissible staff-selection steps: position analysis, recruitment,…

  19. Ensuring Competent Staff in Adult Literacy Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Anabel P.

    Since staff are a key element in adult literacy programs, this document outlines requirements and actions for effective administrative and instructional personnel for such programs. Addressing first administrative personnel and then instructional personnel, the paper describes skill and knowledge requirements, and recommends actions to be taken…

  20. Selecting and Developing an A+ Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vernon G.

    2008-01-01

    Because the demand for excellence in public education is ever present, this article explores the development of a professional enhancement program designed to select and develop a qualified, competent faculty and staff. The basis for the program is a strong educational philosophy, which leads to a vision of what schools can be. It stresses the…

  1. Staff Issue Paper on Institutional Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of State, Washington, DC.

    Staff Issue Papers for the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on the 1972 United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, Stockholm, Sweden, are summarized in this compendium. Papers developed by the various sub-committees are included for: (1) institutional arrangements; (2) development and the environment; (3) human settlements; (4)…

  2. The Lighter Side of Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacall, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    As educators, we often take ourselves a bit too seriously, so veteran educator and illustrator Aaron Bacall offers a little perspective with these lighthearted cartoons. Whether used as overheads for meetings or as an individual break in a busy day, this collection of whimsical glimpses at staff development will provide a moment to laugh and add a…

  3. Between Education and Psychology: School Staff Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Tim; Finney, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When discussing contributions from psychology in/to educational practices like school-based mental health promotion, it is peculiar that psychologists (of an educational or clinical kind) or education-oriented sociologists, both not often based in schools or classrooms, dominate the topic. It has been acknowledged that school staff have been over…

  4. Accommodations: Staff Identity and University Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Andrew; Herrick, Tim; Keating, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Space has been of growing significance in social theory in recent years, yet, explorations of it in the scholarship of higher education have been limited. This is surprising, given the critical role space has in shaping staff and students' engagement with the university. Taking a practice-based approach and focusing on academic identities, this…

  5. Alternatives for Staff Development of Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrichter, Arthur W.; Gardner, Daniel L.

    The product of a three-year adult education teacher training project conducted for Florida's adult educators, this guide is designed to assist planners, facilitators, evaluators, and administrators of staff development programs for adult education teachers to design and conduct effective personal and professional learning experiences. It provides…

  6. Making Schools Healthy for Students and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jack B.

    2012-01-01

    Superintendents and boards of education more often than not choose "books over bricks" and their repair and maintenance budgets usually are lower than what they need. However, they all recognize the importance of healthy schools for students and staff. Is there a way to improve the condition of one's school buildings without spending a lot of…

  7. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  8. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  9. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  10. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  11. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM Commission §...

  12. Problems of the Low-Staff School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denisova, L.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes rural schools in the USSR, arguing their low staff-to-student ratio is the central link to rural schools' myriad problems. Examines how migration to cities and dwindling numbers of villages relate to rural schools and poor agricultural production. States presence of schools helps keep villages alive. Identifies difficulties in maintaining…

  13. Staff Development for the Social Studies Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon-Peterson, Elizabeth; Greenawald, G. Dale

    The book identifies critical variables that influence the success or failure of staff development programs for social studies teachers and provides suggestions for planning and implementing effective inservice activities. It is based on interviews with 24 educators of diverse backgrounds and the authors' own practical field experiences as well as…

  14. Roosevelt/UMass Staff Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byas, Ulysses

    The Roosevelt School District, with the lowest wealth per pupil of the 56 districts located in Nassau County, Long Island, New York, worked with the Urban Education Department of the University of Massachusetts' Division of Instructional Leadership to design and implement a degree-granting staff development program centered around identifying and…

  15. Improving Circulation Services through Staff Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisby, Cynthia M.; Kilman, Marcus D.

    2007-01-01

    The Circulation Services Department at the University of Central Florida Libraries reports on leadership and training initiatives that resulted in a number of service-enhancing projects implemented by a highly motivated and involved staff. Key elements in reinvigorating the department included a change in leadership philosophy, increased…

  16. Student and Staff Victimization. NSSC Resource Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Safety Center, Sacramento, CA.

    Schools today face serious, daily threats to the safety of students and staff. Students and school employees become victims when experiencing a crime against themselves or when threatened by the perpetration of a crime. On school grounds, these crimes are most often assaults, robberies, and extortion. Recent studies have highlighted the…

  17. Retirement Plans of Instructional Faculty and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronister, Jay L.; Baldwin, Roger G.

    1996-01-01

    This analysis of the retirement plans of college and university faculty and staff used data from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty. It first determined the proportion of faculty who are age 55 or older by institutional type, discipline, gender, and minority/nonminority status and then analyzed their retirement plans using the same…

  18. Student Victimization by Educational Staff in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the relationships between physical, emotional, and sexual victimization of school students by educational staff with a number of variables describing the student (gender, age, and relationship with teachers) and the school (the socioeconomic status (SES) of the students' families and school's neighborhood, school…

  19. The Boston Vocation Bureau's First Counseling Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sensoy-Briddick, Hande

    2009-01-01

    Although much has been written about Frank Parsons, the founder of the vocational guidance movement, little is known about the 1st counseling staff of the Vocation Bureau. Lucinda Wyman Prince, Ralph Albertson, and Philip Davis each deserve recognition for their role in founding vocation guidance as well as their civic contributions. This article…

  20. Staff Development Resources, 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Instructional Technology.

    This staff development resource guide provides listings of instructional television and radio broadcasts related to major areas of the Total Teaching Act in South Carolina's Program for Effective Teaching (PET). Television program topics include: administration; adult education; the arts; career education; certificate-renewal credit courses;…

  1. Characteristics of Absenteeism in Nursing Home Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Rosenthal, Alvin S.

    This study investigated factors associated with absenteeism among nursing staff (N=219) at a long-term care facility. Four absenteeism measures were calculated from personnel records for each month of the year: no pay (the sum of unscheduled, unpaid sick, and leave without pay), part day (the sum of arrived late and left early), paid sick, and…

  2. Focusing on Staff Development and Administrative Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolvitz, Marcia, Ed.

    These four conference papers from the Biennial Conference on Postsecondary Education for Persons who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing focus on staff development and administrative issues for postsecondary personnel working with students with deafness or who are hard of hearing. The first paper, "Mentorship for the Working Interpreter" (Caroline…

  3. Staff nurses lead the way for improvement to shared governance structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shelley C; Wells, Nancy J

    2010-11-01

    The Magnet® model encompasses structural empowerment, transformational leadership, exemplary professional practice, and new knowledge, innovations, and improvements. As the American Nurses Credentialing Center reminds us, great leaders, structures, and nurses lead to great knowledge, innovation, and outcomes. One organization experienced the wisdom in this model through restructuring the systemwide staff nurse councils. The authors describe the steps by which this restructuring was accomplished and some of the positive effects on the work environment.

  4. The role of dental hygienists, assistants, and office staff in CAMBRA.

    PubMed

    Gutkowski, Shirley; Gerger, Debi; Creasey, Jean; Nelson, Anna; Young, Douglas A

    2007-11-01

    The role of the dental team in caries management by risk assessment is critical to successful patient outcomes. Positive patient interactions and communication, proper appointment scheduling, diagnostics and data gathering, as well as implementation of noninvasive or minimally invasive procedures can be the responsibility of all members of the dental team. This article will evaluate the role of the clinical and administrative staff in maintaining a practice with a focus on disease prevention and management..

  5. Is the relationship between your hospital and your medical staff sustainable?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Greg; Greeley, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Issues in the macro-environment are affecting the historic relationships that have existed between hospitals and their medical staffs over the last half century. Rising healthcare costs, deteriorating relationships, unexplained variations in clinical outcomes, transparency in healthcare outcomes, medical tourism, competition between hospitals and physicians, and reluctance by hospitals and physicians to change are among the issues challenging the sustainability of the current business model. This article highlights barriers to maintaining traditional relationships and concludes with strategies to preserve and strengthen relationships between physicians and hospitals. PMID:20565033

  6. Alignment of the system's chief nursing officer: staff or direct line structure?

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene M; Luquire, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    The role of the system chief nursing officer nationally and internationally has been traditionally structured as a staff model, a direct line model, or a hybrid that includes parts of each model. The choice of structure should be made after a thorough investigation of what outcomes the system wants this position to accomplish, developing the appropriate structure to achieve these outcomes, and then engaging a chief nursing officer with the skills indicated by the type of structure chosen. This article describes these 3 structures and the support infrastructure necessary for each model.

  7. Impact of Training on Cognitive Representation of Challenging Behaviour in Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Martin; Hogg, James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive representations of challenging behaviour among staff may influence therapeutic outcomes. This study looked at how cognitive dimensions of Identity, Cause, Consequences, Emotional Reaction and Treatment/Control are affected by training. Materials and Methods: A theoretically derived questionnaire was used to measure the impact…

  8. Psychosocial Work-Related Predictors and Consequences of Personal Burnout among Staff Working with People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Agnessa; Kersten, Maren; Schillmoller, Zita; Nienhaus, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the potential predictors of personal burnout among staff working with people with intellectual disabilities and to investigate whether personal burnout is associated with health and work-related outcomes. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2011 in 30 residential facilities in northern Germany…

  9. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  10. Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: A Comparison of Perspectives of Residents, Family, and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespo, Maria; Bernaldo de Quiros, Monica; Gomez, M. Mar; Hornillos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Quality of Life (QoL) has become increasingly valued as a key outcome in dementia both in clinical practice and in research. This study compares the QoL of long-term residents with dementia as assessed by the individuals, their relatives, and their care staff. Design and Methods: Data on residents with dementia were collected in 11…

  11. Where has all the staff gone? Strategies to recruit and retain quality staff.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Helen M

    2007-06-01

    Recruiting and retaining quality staff is a national issue for all healthcare organizations, and transplant programs are also affected by this crisis. Transplant administrators are faced with increased regulatory burdens, reduced reimbursement, increased competition for uniquely qualified staff, and rising healthcare costs. These factors negatively affect transplant programs that try to ensure the infrastructure exists to provide quality care. Human resources management is a key component to transplant administration. In today's environment, administrators need to adopt long-term strategic practices to recruit and retain quality staff. Maintaining adequate staffing levels means "thinking out of the box" and looking at human resources management at all levels of skill mix including physician extenders that can perform the transplant coordinator role. Investing in the future development of staff can attract quality professionals to the field of transplantation for years to come. PMID:17624130

  12. Recognition of staff nurse job performance and achievements: staff and manager perceptions.

    PubMed

    Cronin, S N; Becherer, D

    1999-01-01

    Recognition for job performance is central to staff nurse morale. However, little research has been done to identify recognition methods most valued by nurses themselves. The authors report results of a multisite survey conducted to compare staff and manager perceptions of meaningful recognition behaviors. They provide data for developing management interventions that may help to improve morale and increase retention. Given the financial constraints of the current environment, the nonmonetary recognition practices identified are of particular significance.

  13. Promoting Organizational Learning in Higher Education to Achieve Equity in Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Georgia L.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes a project in which teams of faculty, administrators, and staff from fourteen colleges and universities engaged in organizational learning for the purposes of identifying and improving inequitable educational outcomes for African American and Latino students.

  14. Involving staff pharmacists in management decisions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L A; Vanderveen, T W

    1977-03-01

    Various administrative techniques used to bring staff pharmacists in a decentralized, satellite pharmacy system into the managerial decision-making process are discussed. These techniques include a staff pharmacist on-call procedure to discourage absenteeism, and the concept of a head pharmacist to serve as a link with departmental administration. The head pharmacist works in the satelite pharmacy, is responsible for its daily operation and is the spokesman for the satellite. Active roles for the head pharmacist in the selection and evaluation of technicians are outlines. Management skills are developed in head pharmacists through a program of special classes and discussion groups. It is concluded that this program has improved the credibility of administrative decisions and has tapped an underused source of ideas and talent.

  15. Improving communication between emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kate

    2014-05-01

    During redevelopment of the emergency department at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, it was deemed vital that its internal communication system should be as effective as possible. An audit of staff perceptions of the existing communication system and a relevant literature review were undertaken, therefore, to inform a proposal for the development of a new online system. This article describes the development and implementation of the system. PMID:24806866

  16. Staff selection for an ambulatory surgery unit.

    PubMed

    Martin, B J

    1992-07-01

    Major changes in the care delivery system affect the selection of the professional nursing staff for an ambulatory surgery unit. The skills required are diverse and dynamic. Selecting the right applicant requires not only knowledge of the interview process, but also acute observation and communication skills. The use of a matrix system helps to organize the process as well as to quantify and qualify the information gained.

  17. Does Your Front Desk Staff Maximize Collections?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As collections become more difficult, practices need to use the front desk to help collect payments from patients when they are face to face. Training staff and giving them the tools to ask for money allows them to collect efficiently. Improve your collections by involving your front desk employees. Educate your patients to allow them to come to their visits prepared. It will save the practice time and money. PMID:26399028

  18. Does Your Front Desk Staff Maximize Collections?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As collections become more difficult, practices need to use the front desk to help collect payments from patients when they are face to face. Training staff and giving them the tools to ask for money allows them to collect efficiently. Improve your collections by involving your front desk employees. Educate your patients to allow them to come to their visits prepared. It will save the practice time and money.

  19. Organizational innovations that nourish staff leadership.

    PubMed

    Warfel, W M; Allen, R; McGoldrick, T; McLane, S; Martin, S G

    1994-10-01

    Health care is experiencing a paradigm shift that has the potential to redefine traditional roles, systems, and practices. At Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the nursing organization has capitalized on this potential and has been energized by the array of opportunities for innovation and experimentation. The results of these efforts suggest that many of these changes not only are positive approaches to patient care but also promote staff leadership and an entrepreneurial spirit at the front line.

  20. Clinical and fiscal outcomes of utilization review.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mary Ellen; Darmody, Julie V

    2004-01-01

    Concurrent utilization review (UR) is both a quality improvement tool and a cost containment strategy used by managed care organizations. The UR process requires that providers (hospital staff) communicate clinical information about hospitalized patients to payers who evaluate the appropriateness and medical necessity of the planned care. Payers then make a decision whether to certify the care for reimbursement. This study provides data to indicate that denials of certification have little impact on clinical and fiscal outcomes of patient care. PMID:14740580

  1. Motivating Staff--A Problem for the School Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchler, Merv

    1981-01-01

    Examines the implications for educators of the "Motivation-Hygiene Theory" proposed by Frederick Herzberg. Suggests increasing staff opportunities for goal setting, decision making, and expanded professional competence as strategies for developing staff motivation. (Author/MLF)

  2. Healthcare Staff Wellbeing, Burnout, and Patient Safety: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Louise H.; Johnson, Judith; Watt, Ian; Tsipa, Anastasia; O’Connor, Daryl B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is an association between healthcare professionals’ wellbeing and burnout, with patient safety. Design Systematic research review. Data Sources PsychInfo (1806 to July 2015), Medline (1946 to July 2015), Embase (1947 to July 2015) and Scopus (1823 to July 2015) were searched, along with reference lists of eligible articles. Eligibility Criteria for Selecting Studies Quantitative, empirical studies that included i) either a measure of wellbeing or burnout, and ii) patient safety, in healthcare staff populations. Results Forty-six studies were identified. Sixteen out of the 27 studies that measured wellbeing found a significant correlation between poor wellbeing and worse patient safety, with six additional studies finding an association with some but not all scales used, and one study finding a significant association but in the opposite direction to the majority of studies. Twenty-one out of the 30 studies that measured burnout found a significant association between burnout and patient safety, whilst a further four studies found an association between one or more (but not all) subscales of the burnout measures employed, and patient safety. Conclusions Poor wellbeing and moderate to high levels of burnout are associated, in the majority of studies reviewed, with poor patient safety outcomes such as medical errors, however the lack of prospective studies reduces the ability to determine causality. Further prospective studies, research in primary care, conducted within the UK, and a clearer definition of healthcare staff wellbeing are needed. Implications This review illustrates the need for healthcare organisations to consider improving employees’ mental health as well as creating safer work environments when planning interventions to improve patient safety. Systematic Review Registration PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015023340. PMID:27391946

  3. Connecting the Learners: Improving Uptake of a Nursing Home Educational Program by Focusing on Staff Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The CONNECT intervention is designed to improve staff connections, communication, and use of multiple perspectives for problem solving. This analysis compared staff descriptions of the learning climate, use of social constructivist learning processes, and outcomes in nursing facilities receiving CONNECT with facilities receiving a falls education program alone. Design and Methods: Qualitative evaluation of a randomized controlled trial was done using a focus group design. Facilities (n = 8) were randomized to a falls education program alone (control) or CONNECT followed by FALLS (intervention). A total of 77 staff participated in 16 focus groups using a structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using framework analysis, and summaries for each domain were compared between intervention and control facilities. Results: Notable differences in descriptions of the learning climate included greater learner empowerment, appreciation of the role of all disciplines, and seeking diverse viewpoints in the intervention group. Greater use of social constructivist learning processes was evidenced by the intervention group as they described greater identification of communication weaknesses, improvement in communication frequency and quality, and use of sense-making by seeking out multiple perspectives to better understand and act on information. Intervention group participants reported outcomes including more creative fall prevention plans, a more respectful work environment, and improved relationships with coworkers. No substantial difference between groups was identified in safety culture, shared responsibility, and self-reported knowledge about falls. Implications: CONNECT appears to enhance the use of social constructivist learning processes among nursing home staff. The impact of CONNECT on clinical outcomes requires further study. PMID:23704219

  4. 10 CFR 2.709 - Discovery against NRC staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Discovery against NRC staff. 2.709 Section 2.709 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Rules for Formal Adjudications § 2.709 Discovery against NRC staff. (a)(1) In a proceeding in which the NRC staff is a party, the NRC staff will make available one or more...

  5. The Process of Staff Development: Components for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Helen M.; And Others

    The purpose of this book is to examine the development, process, and concepts of staff development in nursing education and its relationship to the overall continuing education effort. It is intended for staff development educators in agency development or revision, for administrators of nursing services in planning staff development, and for…

  6. 32 CFR 2003.7 - Support Staff (Article VII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Support Staff (Article VII). 2003.7 Section 2003.7 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT... (ISCAP) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.7 Support Staff (Article VII). The staff...

  7. 32 CFR 2003.7 - Support Staff (Article VII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Support Staff (Article VII). 2003.7 Section 2003.7 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT... (ISCAP) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.7 Support Staff (Article VII). The staff...

  8. Higher Education Staff Development: Directions for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jennifer; And Others

    This collection of 13 papers offers an international perspective on future directions of staff development at colleges and universities, focusing on academic staff development, higher education teaching networks, and managerial and human resource development. Papers are: (1) "Higher Education Staff Development for the 21st Century: Directions for…

  9. Staff Reactions to Challenging Behaviour: An Observation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambrechts, Greet; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Eeman, Lieve; Maes, Bea

    2010-01-01

    Staff reactions play an important role in the development and maintaining of clients' challenging behaviour. Because there is a paucity of research on staff reactions in naturalistic settings, this study examined sequential associations between challenging behaviour and staff reactions by means of a descriptive analysis. We analysed video…

  10. 17 CFR 38.155 - Compliance staff and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compliance staff and resources... DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Compliance With Rules § 38.155 Compliance staff and resources. (a) Sufficient... resources and staff to ensure that it can conduct effective audit trail reviews, trade practice...

  11. 17 CFR 38.155 - Compliance staff and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Compliance staff and resources... DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Compliance With Rules § 38.155 Compliance staff and resources. (a) Sufficient... resources and staff to ensure that it can conduct effective audit trail reviews, trade practice...

  12. Santa Fe Community College Staff Development Programs, Policies and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Fe Community Coll., NM.

    This collection of materials describes various aspects of Santa Fe Community College's (SFCC's) faculty and staff development program. Part 1 explains the philosophy that underpins staff development at SFCC; the planning, programming, information dissemination, and evaluation phases of staff development; and the use of professional development…

  13. Staff Development: A Vital Component of Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Helen M.

    1976-01-01

    The article discusses: the role of staff development within the broad concept of continuing education, continuing education based on different types of preparatory education, need for improved learning opportunities for staff development educators, and major goals for the staff development educator. (Author/MS)

  14. 14 CFR 385.4 - Form of staff action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS General Provisions § 385.4 Form of staff action. Unless otherwise specified, staff action shall be by order or informal writing (letters, telegrams, decision marked on copy of application form, etc.). Such orders or informal writings...

  15. Staff Survey Results, 2000-2001. E&R Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Wanda N.

    Evaluation and Research (E&R) staff of the Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS), North Carolina, have conducted spring surveys of school staff since 1992. This report contains information from the survey distributed in March 2001. Completed surveys were returned by 5,755 staff members. Survey results indicate that in the year 2000, more staff…

  16. Five Flaws of Staff Development and the Future Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Student learning and development do not occur without teacher learning and development. Not any teacher development will do, though. The old flaws of weak and wayward staff development are well-known--no staff development, in which trial and error are assumed to be enough; staff development that is all ideas and no implementation, i.e. the…

  17. Suspected Child Maltreatment: Preschool Staff in a Conflict of Loyalty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Birgitta; Janson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the actions of Swedish preschool staff when suspecting the maltreatment of children in their domestic environment, and the staff's further experiences and relations to the family members. Methods: A questionnaire in 2005 to the staff of 189 child groups in community preschools, including 3,100 children. Results: A report…

  18. Predictors of Burnout in Children's Residential Treatment Center Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Brittany L.; Leon, Scott C.; Miller, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored burnout among frontline staff within a children's residential treatment center (RTC) population. Data were collected from 375 full-time, frontline, children's RTC staff employed at 21 RTCs in Illinois. Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), results indicated that frontline staff age, training, empathic concern, communicative…

  19. A Comprehensive Plan for Institutional Staff Development. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Patricia

    Mount Hood Community College studied existing staff development programs at numerous other institutions, reexamined its own philosophy and staff development programs, analyzed faculty needs, formulated new directions for its faculty, and more closely articulated staff development opportunities with area institutions and agencies. This report…

  20. Leading by Example: Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and underused resource that can reduce overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members. They can also reduce staff absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce costs associated with health care and disability, and foster a climate that promotes good health schoolwide. An…

  1. Conflict in Staff Development Implementation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponticell, Judith A.; Thomas, Julie A.; Cooper, Sandra B.

    2006-01-01

    Staff development is aimed at changing practice. Change creates conflict. Little work has been done to gain insight into the conflict that teachers experience in the implementation of staff development. This study examines conflict in a staff development project aimed at increasing teachers' knowledge and implementation of problem-based integrated…

  2. 20 CFR 402.50 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 402.50 Section 402.50 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 402.50 Availability of administrative staff manuals. All administrative staff manuals of the Social...

  3. 20 CFR 402.50 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 402.50 Section 402.50 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 402.50 Availability of administrative staff manuals. All administrative staff manuals of the Social...

  4. Teaching Health and Safety: Preparing Staff for the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Greg

    1999-01-01

    Discusses methods for training camp counselors in safety standards. Safety awareness and camp wellness should be introduced during staff interviews. During precamp training, staff should complete a test in OSHA requirements, followed by role playing to expand staff's knowledge in each OSHA safety and health area. First aid training, fire safety,…

  5. The Impact of Clients' Rights Legislation on Hospital Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrander, Susan A.

    1982-01-01

    Assessed the impact of a new clients' rights bill on the functioning of the state mental health system. Reports on specification of those levels of staff role ambiguity and conflict among and between staff and clients that were perceived by staff as caused by the new legislation. (Author)

  6. Should trustees be members of medical staff committees? Its' debatable.

    PubMed

    Mountz, W

    1978-06-01

    Trustee membership on medical staff committees is not an appropriate way of ensuring liasion between the medical staff and the governing board. All assurances concerning quality of care should come to the governing board from the organized medical staff, to whom such accountability is and should be delegated.

  7. Classification of Staff Development Programmes and Effects Perceived by Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Rijdt, Catherine; Dochy, Filip; Bamelis, Sofie; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer diverse staff development programmes to allow staff members to keep up with educational innovations and to guarantee educational quality. The current study investigates by means of a survey and semi-structured interviews whether the teacher perceives staff development as a management model, a shop-floor model or a…

  8. Developing Staff Potential. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    The staff of a college is its single greatest resource, and its most significant capital investment. It is the collective manager of the college mission and purpose. As the purpose changes, so must the staff have opportunities to change and develop. This sourcebook presents selected approaches to staff development in community colleges. It…

  9. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  10. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  11. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  12. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  13. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  14. Values and Perceptions of Community College Professional Staff in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Betty Jensen

    A study was conducted to develop a profile of values held by Oregon Community Colleges full-time professional staff members as a group and to acertain if there are differences in the values and perceptions held by sub-groups within the college staff. A total of 479 staff members were sent questionnaires, and 360 of these questionnaires were…

  15. Patient and Staff Perceptions of Intradialytic Exercise before and after Implementation: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hannah M. L.; Hudson, Nicky; Clarke, Amy L.; Dungey, Maurice; Feehally, John; Burton, James O.; Smith, Alice C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite guidance and evidence for the beneficial effects of intradialytic exercise (IDE), such programmes are rarely adopted within practice and little is known about how they may best be sustained. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was used to guide the understanding of the barriers and facilitators to initial and ongoing IDE participation and to understand how these are influential at each stage. Materials and Methods Focus groups explored patient (n=24) and staff (n=9) perceptions of IDE prior to the introduction of a programme and, six months later, face to face semi-structured interviews captured exercising patients (n=11) and staffs’ (n=8) actual experiences. Data were collected at private and NHS haemodialysis units within the UK. All data were audio-recorded, translated where necessary, transcribed verbatim and subject to framework analysis. Results IDE initiation can be facilitated by addressing the pre-existing beliefs about IDE through the influence of peers (for patients) and training (for staff). Participation was sustained through the observation of positive outcomes and through social influences such as teamwork and collaboration. Despite this, environment and resource limitations remained the greatest barrier perceived by both groups. Conclusions Novel methods of staff training and patient education should enhance engagement. Programmes that clearly highlight the benefits of IDE should be more successful in the longer term. The barrier of staff workload needs to be addressed through specific guidance that includes recommendations on staffing levels, roles, training and skill mix. PMID:26068875

  16. [Single-family rooms for neonatal intensive care units impacts on preterm newborns, families, and health-care staff. A systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Servel, A-C; Rideau Batista Novais, A

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the environment is an essential point in the care of preterm newborns. The design of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) (open-bay, single-patient room, single-family room) directly affects both the preterm newborns and their caregivers (parents, healthcare staff). The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the impact of single-family rooms on the preterm newborn, its parents, and the staff. Single-family rooms improve outcome for the preterm newborn, with increasing parental involvement and better control of the environment (fewer inappropriate stimulations such as high levels of noise and illumination). This kind of NICU design also improves parental and staff satisfaction.

  17. The Utilization of Psychologists for Staff Development in a Large Public School System: A Staff Development Director's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James L., Jr.

    This model proposes the TAP Team approach as an on-site delivery system for local school staff development in large, urban school systems. TAP emphasizes in-service training for both upgrading skills of staff and for helping staff acquire new skills in the areas of coping strategies, classroom management, communication skills, instructional…

  18. Assessing Staff Competence at Implementing a Multifaceted Residential Program for Youth: Development and Initial Psychometrics of a Staff Observation Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Shaw, Tanya; Thompson, Ron; Griffith, Annette; Farmer, Elizabeth M.; Tierney, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the development of the Staff Implementation Observation Form, an instrument to assess staff competence delivering an intervention to youth in group home care with behavioral or emotional disorders. This instrument assesses staff skill at implementing the key treatment components, including building relationships with youth,…

  19. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  20. Impact of Magnet Culture in Maintaining Quality Outcomes During Periods of Organizational Transition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Judith F Zedreck; Wolf, Gail; Dudjak, Linda; Jordan, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Organizational transition presents substantial risk to maintaining quality outcomes. The leadership style and culture present during periods of change and transition empower the frontline staff to react quickly and identify opportunities. The culture of Magnet develops the skill set that enables staff to be leaders in problem solving and identifying creative care delivery approaches. Objectives of this study were to analyze the impact of organizational transition on patient and staff satisfaction, quality, and safety in a Magnet-designated hospital and determine key factors contributing to these outcomes.

  1. Public Health Staff Development Needs in Informatics: Findings From a National Survey of Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Kelley; Shah, Gulzar H.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Public health practice is information-intensive and information-driven. Public health informatics is a nascent discipline, and most public health practitioners lack necessary skills in this area. Objective: To describe the staff development needs of local health departments (LHDs) related to informatics. Design: Data came from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, conducted by Georgia Southern University in collaboration with the National Association of County & City Health Officials. Participants: A total of 324 LHDs from all 50 states completed the survey (response rate: 50%). Main Outcome Measure(s): Outcome measures included LHDs' specific staff development needs related to informatics. Predictors of interest included jurisdiction size and governance type. Results: Areas of workforce development and improvement in informatics staff of LHDs included using and interpreting quantitative data, designing and running reports from information systems, using and interpreting qualitative data, using statistical or other analytical software, project management, and using geographical information systems. Significant variation in informatics training needs exists depending on the size of the LHD population and governance type. Conclusion: Substantial training needs exist for LHDs across many areas of informatics ranging from very basic to specialized skills and are related to the size of LHD population and governance type. PMID:27684619

  2. Disseminating contingency management: Impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T. Ron; Jones, Brinn E.; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability) were assessed at study conclusion in a qualitative interview with OTP management. Intervention effectiveness was also assessed via independent chart review of trial CM implementation vs. a historical control period. Results included: 1) robust, durable increases in delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness among trained staff; 2) positive managerial perspectives of intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability; and 3) significant clinical impacts on targeted patient indices. Collective results offer support for the study’s collaborative intervention design and the applied, skills-based focus of staff training processes. Implications for CM dissemination are discussed. PMID:24462242

  3. The CISQ: a tool to measure staff involvement in and attitudes toward the implementation of a clinical information system.

    PubMed Central

    Gugerty, B.; Wooldridge, P.; Brennan, M.

    2000-01-01

    The Clinical Information System Questionnaire (CISQ-15) is a new 15-item tool designed to measure staff involvement in and attitudes towards CIS implementations. It was developed during a clinical trial which tested the effects of a combined managerial and IT intervention on staff attitudes and patient outcomes. The CISQ-15 appears to have high construct validity and internal consistency, although further studies are needed. Such studies are under way, and an expanded 36-item version, the CISQ-36, is now being evaluated. PMID:11079897

  4. Criteria for staff pharmacist selection in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, D J; Segal, R

    1989-02-01

    Criteria that pharmacy managers think are currently being used and criteria that they think should be used in the selection of staff pharmacists were identified. A questionnaire was mailed to pharmacy directors in 232 Ohio hospitals. Respondents were asked to indicate how frequently they think that pharmacy managers consider each of 63 criteria when choosing a staff pharmacist and whether each criterion should be considered in an ideal selection process. Respondents also assessed the effect that each of 17 of these criteria would have on their own hiring decisions, all other factors being equal. A total of 116 usable questionnaires were returned, for a 50% response rate. Respondents indicated that they believed that many managers consider the following when choosing a staff pharmacist: licensure status, salary requirements, date of availability, interest in the position, ability to relocate, willingness to work unexpected hours, appearance, honesty, friendliness, police record, previous illicit drug use, previous absenteeism record, and the reason for leaving the last job. Respondents also thought that the equal employment opportunity traits, with the exceptions of handicaps and the applicant's age, were considered by few or some managers. However, 17% of the respondents indicated that they would discriminate in favor of a married applicant, 14% indicated that they would discriminate against an applicant born outside of the United States, 22% indicated that they would discriminate against an applicant whose age was in the fifties, and 24% indicated that they would discriminate against an applicant with a handicap that could reasonably be accommodated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Implementing effective staff education about advance directives.

    PubMed

    DesRosiers, M; Navin, P

    1997-01-01

    The Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990 guarantees the right to refuse medical or surgical treatment and the right to draft advance directives. This review of the current literature provides those in nursing staff development and inservice education with an overview of advance directives and their implications for nursing education and practice. Possible core subjects for inclusion in planned, purposeful, advance directive education programs are examined, including cultural sensitivity, facilitator skills, interviewing techniques, legal information, patient autonomy, and reasoning and decision making. This review provides a platform for future research.

  6. Workroles of staff nurses in psychiatric settings.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E G; Shealy, A H; Kowalski, C; LaMont, J; Range, B A

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to operationalize Peplau's workroles of the psychiatric staff nurse. Thirty registered nurses audiotaped one-to-one interactions with 62 adult, child, and adolescent psychiatric patients. Content analysis was used to identify role behaviors and to identify roles that were different from those outlined by Peplau. The counselor role was the most frequently occurring primary workrole. Overlap was found between behaviors indicative of autocratic leader versus surrogate and those of resource person versus teacher. The findings supported Peplau's contention that the counselor role is central to the practice of psychiatric nursing. PMID:8710297

  7. Securing staff salary adjustments and raises.

    PubMed

    Dilts, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Salary issues have plagued laboratories for as long as there has been a labor shortage, and the situation grows more complicated. At the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System (VCUHS) in Richmond, Virginia, competition for laboratory staff now comes not only from area hospitals and health-care companies but also from non-health-care industries. Shorter shifts, less stress, and better hourly wages offered by fast food chains and retail stores lure away the young workers traditionally hired for entry-level laboratory positions. Clearly, a salary adjustment is necessary. PMID:12506845

  8. Workroles of staff nurses in psychiatric settings.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E G; Shealy, A H; Kowalski, C; LaMont, J; Range, B A

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to operationalize Peplau's workroles of the psychiatric staff nurse. Thirty registered nurses audiotaped one-to-one interactions with 62 adult, child, and adolescent psychiatric patients. Content analysis was used to identify role behaviors and to identify roles that were different from those outlined by Peplau. The counselor role was the most frequently occurring primary workrole. Overlap was found between behaviors indicative of autocratic leader versus surrogate and those of resource person versus teacher. The findings supported Peplau's contention that the counselor role is central to the practice of psychiatric nursing.

  9. LG Strategist: your personal chief of staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir

    2001-09-01

    LG STRATEGIST is an advanced software package based on the new type of game theory called Linguistic Geometry. This theory allows us to generate best war-gaming strategies in real time. Armed with LG STRATEGIST, a commander would obtain hands-on capability to plan missions, respond immediately to crisis, run what-if analysis, and monitor the execution of operations at all levels. With little experience, a commander could turn LG STRATEGIST into a friendly tactical/operational advisor or a devil advocate, into his/her personal chief of staff.

  10. Supporting Staff to Identify Residents in Pain: A Controlled Pretest-Posttest Study in Residential Aged Care.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Clint; Haydon, Deborah; Wollin, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Practical strategies are needed to improve pain awareness among aged care staff and promote a systematic approach to pain identification using evidence-based tools. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a pain identification tool for use by nursing and nonprofessional staff in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). A controlled pretest-posttest intervention design was conducted in two RACFs in Brisbane, Australia. Completed surveys were returned by 216 staff and 74 residents at baseline and 218 staff and 94 residents at 3-month follow-up. Chart audits were conducted on 308 residents at baseline and 328 at follow-up. Groups were compared on: (1) staff knowledge and attitudes regarding pain, perceived confidence and skills for pain assessment, and perceived quality of pain management; (2) frequency of pain assessments and use of pain interventions; and (3) residents' perceptions of the quality of pain management. Both groups had high knowledge scores and reported high levels of confidence, skills, and perceived quality of pain management at baseline and follow-up. The intervention group showed significant improvement in routine pain assessment and use of nonpharmacological pain interventions. However, due to unexpected changes in control group conditions, both groups increased episodic pain assessment. Overall, staff believed the intervention was clinically useful and fostered a team approach to pain assessment. We found the introduction of pain identification resources with implementation strategies to support frontline staff was partially effective in improving staff and resident outcomes. Nonetheless, our findings confirm the need for change and importance of translational pain research in RACFs. PMID:26700721

  11. The ecology of outcomes: system accountability in children's mental health.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, M; Hodges, S; Cascardi, M

    1998-05-01

    This article provides a conceptual and practical framework called the Ecology of Outcomes. Based on this framework, agencies that serve children and families build and use outcome-oriented information systems to respond to their clients in a more flexible manner. The goal is to improve promising programs by involving stakeholders in outcome identification and in utilization of results. Problems addressed include the emphasis human services place on rules compliance, lack of feedback to program staff to allow for midcourse correction, and lack of input by key stakeholders in the identification of outcomes to be measured. The following components of the framework are described: principles of outcome accountability, prerequisites and building blocks, implementing an outcome information system, and utilizing the results. Key elements of the framework are the integration of outcome information into a service system's decision-making process and the inclusion of client, stakeholder, and provider satisfaction information. PMID:9595878

  12. Effectiveness of high-fidelity simulation for pediatric staff nurse education.

    PubMed

    Bultas, Margaret W; Hassler, Margaret; Ercole, Patrick M; Rea, Gail

    2014-01-01

    A pre-test post-test control group design was used to compare the effectiveness of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) with traditional static mannequins as a teaching strategy for pediatric staff nurse education. Thirty-three nurses from a metropolitan pediatric Magnet hospital completed the study that evaluated knowledge retention, skill performance, and team confidence during the American Heart Association's (AHA) Pediatric Emergency Assessment, Recognition and Stabilization (PEARS) course. Written exams, competency and skill performance measures, and the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS) were used to compare the outcomes between the two groups. Results indicated that knowledge retention was maintained, skill performance improved, and teamwork performance scores increased in the experimental group. This study provides a foundation supporting the use of HFS as an effective teaching modality when educating pediatric staff nurses in the identification and intervention of the deteriorating pediatric patient.

  13. An Educational Plan for Nursing Staff in the Procedural Treatment Unit of the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther; Daugherty, JoAnn

    2016-04-01

    Professional education for health practitioners is a continuum which commences with the first year professional school until the cessation of a professional career. This article draws on the theories and models developed by experts in curriculum design, teaching, and learning evaluation to better understand the intricacies and challenges of instructional design. Selected models, in particular Malcolm Knowles and the World Health Organization report served as a compass and benchmark to illuminate, guide, and evaluate the impact, process, contents, and outcomes of an educational program for the stakeholders. The aim of this educational program is to ensure that learners develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to deliver competent and quality patient-centered care. Multimodal teaching strategies are essential to meet the diverse needs of staff. Utilization of technology such as intranet and mobile applications helps to deliver educational content in a cost-effective manner. Program evaluation determines the effectiveness of teaching and helps to define ongoing needs of staff. PMID:27037167

  14. An Educational Plan for Nursing Staff in the Procedural Treatment Unit of the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther; Daugherty, JoAnn

    2016-04-01

    Professional education for health practitioners is a continuum which commences with the first year professional school until the cessation of a professional career. This article draws on the theories and models developed by experts in curriculum design, teaching, and learning evaluation to better understand the intricacies and challenges of instructional design. Selected models, in particular Malcolm Knowles and the World Health Organization report served as a compass and benchmark to illuminate, guide, and evaluate the impact, process, contents, and outcomes of an educational program for the stakeholders. The aim of this educational program is to ensure that learners develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to deliver competent and quality patient-centered care. Multimodal teaching strategies are essential to meet the diverse needs of staff. Utilization of technology such as intranet and mobile applications helps to deliver educational content in a cost-effective manner. Program evaluation determines the effectiveness of teaching and helps to define ongoing needs of staff.

  15. Elected medical staff leaders: who needs 'em?

    PubMed

    Thompson, R E

    1994-03-01

    Authority, influence, and power are not synonyms. In working with elected medical staff leaders, a physician executive who chooses to exert authority may soon find him- or herself relatively powerless. But one who chooses to downplay authority, to influence through persuasion, and to coach leaders to lead effectively soon generates support for his or her ideas. The need to coax, cajole, explain, persuade, and "seek input" frustrates many leaders in all kinds of organizations. It would be much easier just to order people about. It's so tempting to think: "Who needs 'em? I'm the 'chief physician.' I know what needs to be done. Let's weigh anchor, take her out, and do what it takes to sail those rough, uncharted seas." If you really enjoy sailing a large ship in rough seas without a crew, go right ahead. Or if you think it makes sense to run an organization with only an executive staff and no knowledgeable middle managers, by all means let clinician leaders know that, now that you're aboard, they're just window-dressing. If you can make this approach work, well and good. Your life will be much less complicated, each day will have far fewer frustrations, and progress toward established goals will be much faster. However, given the reality of traditionally thinking physicians, it would be best to keep an up-dated resume in the locked lower left-hand drawer of your desk.

  16. The Washington State System for Coordination of Staff Development. The Staff Development Coordination Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This report outlines the roles and responsibilities, pertaining to the improvement amd coordination of statewide teacher inservice, of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (SPI) in the state of Washington. After a field-based research study was conducted, a system was devised by which the SPI can improve coordination of staff development…

  17. Computer Based Learning in FE. A Staff Development Model. A Staff Development Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This booklet describes the development and content of a model staff development pack for use in training teachers to incorporate the techniques of computer-based learning into their subject teaching. The guide consists of three parts. Part 1 outlines the aims and objectives, content, and use of the pack. Described next are seven curriculum samples…

  18. The Continuing Education Needs of Academic Staff: Senior College Staff in TAFE. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mageean, Pauline

    A study assessed the continuing education needs of Australia's Technical and Further Education (TAFE) senior staff (who were defined as spending 50 percent or more of their time on college administration as opposed to teaching). A literature search, interviews, and submissions were the principal sources of data for the needs assessment. The…

  19. A Comparison of Pyramidal Staff Training and Direct Staff Training in Community-Based Day Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberlin, Alayna T.; Beauchamp, Ken; Agnew, Judy; O'Brien, Floyd

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated two methods of training staff who were working with individuals with developmental disabilities: pyramidal training and consultant-led training. In the pyramidal training, supervisors were trained in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and in delivering feedback. The supervisors then trained their direct-care…

  20. Project REACH: Camp Goldenrod: Prototype Staff Manual. Appendix R. Camp Staff Training Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinton, Dennis A., Ed.; Farley, Elizabeth M., Ed.

    Resulting from a 3 year project to develop and test competency based programs for camp personnel, the document contains a staff manual for personnel of a residential camp for physically handicapped campers (6 to 18 years old). An introductory section gives an explanation of competency based instruction, describes a module, and provides an overview…

  1. Exploring How the Wilderness Therapy Process Relates to Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Keith C.

    2000-01-01

    Case studies of four adolescent boys with behavioral disorders in four wilderness therapy programs identified time alone for reflection, a non-confrontive and caring approach by staff, and the role of wilderness as helpful common elements. Outcomes attributed to these elements included better family relationships, abstinence from drugs and…

  2. Outcomes-Based Funding and Stakeholder Engagement. Lumina Issue Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadlec, Alison; Shelton, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the key aspects of stakeholder engagement that can strengthen the design, implementation and sustainability of outcomes-based funding policies. We seek to help policymakers understand the prevailing starting-point attitudes of institutional stakeholders, primarily college and university administrators, faculty and staff, and…

  3. Smoking behavior among hospital staff still influences attitudes and counseling on smoking.

    PubMed

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-04-01

    Smoking among health professionals has been shown to influence smoking-related knowledge and counseling in clinical practice. The evidence regarding smoking as a risk factor has increased in the past decade. The present study was carried out in 2000 and investigated the associations between individual smoking behavior among hospital staff and (a). smoking-related knowledge, (b). attitudes toward counseling on smoking, and (c). self-reported smoking-related counseling provided by the staff. The study was based on a survey using self-administered questionnaires given to all hospital staff in a large university hospital in Denmark. Altogether, 82% of staff (2561) returned a completed questionnaire. Analyses focused on a subsample consisting of health professionals in the clinical wards (1429). Multivariate analyses were performed in which smoking-related knowledge, attitudes toward smoking-related counseling, smoking-related counseling practices, and self-rated qualifications for counseling were main outcome measures. Health professionals who were current smokers systematically underestimated the health consequences of smoking and differed significantly from nonsmokers in their assessments of smoking as a risk factor. Nonsmokers might overestimate smoking as a risk factor. Nonsmokers gave patients advice on smoking cessation significantly more often than did current smokers (ex-smokers, OR=2.5, 95% CI=1.8-3.4; never-smokers, OR=1.5, 95% CI=1.1-2.0). Ex-smokers and smokers felt significantly more qualified to counsel patients about smoking than did never-smokers (ex-smokers, OR=1.8, 95% CI=1.3-2.5; smokers, OR=1.4, 95% CI=1.0-1.9). Individual smoking behavior among hospital staff was strongly associated with smoking-related knowledge, attitudes, and counseling practices. Lack of self-rated qualifications was a major barrier to professional counseling on smoking in a hospital framework.

  4. The Military: Its Processing of Accused Homosexuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Colin J.; Weinberg, Martin S.

    1970-01-01

    The authors describe the procedure by which men charged with homosexuality are classified as one of three organizationally recognized classes of homosexuals and processed to dishonorable," undesirable," or general" discharges usually correlated with such classifications. (DB)

  5. An analysis of obituaries in staff magazines.

    PubMed

    Heynderickx, Priscilla C; Dieltjens, Sylvain M

    2016-01-01

    In the literature, extensive attention is given to the content, structure, and style of obituaries in newspapers. Analyses of the demise of colleagues in internal business communications are however nonexistent. This article discusses a bottom-up analysis of 150 obituaries published in Flemish staff magazines--obituaries that mostly focus on the deceased's career and professional qualities. Following analysis, the data were divided in obituaries that are continuous texts and obituaries with a letter format. The differences between the two types lie at different levels: format, content, structure, and language use. Obituaries with a letter format are characterized and determined by three paradoxes: the sender-receiver paradox, life-death paradox, and happiness-sadness paradox.

  6. G. N. Rassam Joins AGU Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassan N. Rassam joined the AGU staff today, assuming the dual roles of Division Director for Public Information and Marketing and of Special Assistant for Nonprint Publications. He comes to AGU from the American Geological Institute, where he has been chief editor and assistant director of the GeoRef Information System.As Director of Public Information and Marketing, Rassam will head one of AGU's five divisions. He will have under his purview the Public Information Department and the Promotion and Sales Department. The Public Information Department produces Eos and also has the responsibility for press relations, including the preparation of news releases and the operation of press rooms at meetings. These activities are critical to the implementation of AGU's public education and public affairs initiatives, as well as to the central role of AGU in promoting the unity of geophysics.

  7. Staff retention and empowerment: functions of leadership.

    PubMed

    Mass, Diana

    2002-01-01

    Regardless of any organization's structure and technology, the most potent leverage for exceptional performance and quality assurance resides within personnel. Retention of empowered, committed staff who believe in their organization's purpose and leadership is important to an organization's success. The Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CLS) profession faces a different kind of crisis, not only one of economics, but also one of quality because of lost professional expertise. This dilemma is because of profound neglect of the organization's greatest asset--its CLS professionals. Retention of expert CLS professionals requires a dramatic change in management's belief system regarding the value of their assets. Laboratory leaders must create a culture of empowered people with the freedom to exhibit self-direction toward achieving the organization's mission and goals. Managers must consider employees valuable enough to invest in their professional growth. A laboratory's long-term sustainability and economic performance will depend on a committed workforce.

  8. Evidence-Based Staff Training: A Guide for Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Marsha B.; Rollyson, Jeannia H.; Reid, Dennis H.

    2012-01-01

    Behavior analysts in human service agencies are commonly expected to train support staff as one of their job duties. Traditional staff training is usually didactic in nature and generally has not proven particularly effective. We describe an alternative, evidence-based approach for training performance skills to human service staff. The description includes a specific means of conducting a behavioral skills training session with a group of staff followed by on-the-job training requirements. A brief case demonstration then illustrates application of the training approach and its apparent effectiveness for training staff in two distinct skill sets: use of most-to-least prompting within teaching procedures and use of manual signs. Practical issues associated with applying evidence-based behavioral training are presented with a focus on providing training that is effective, efficient, and acceptable to staff trainees. PMID:23730462

  9. Effects of Dementia-Care Mapping on Residents and Staff of Care Homes: A Pragmatic Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Geertje; Draskovic, Irena; Adang, Eddy M. M.; Donders, Rogier; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of dementia-care mapping (DCM) for institutionalised people with dementia has been demonstrated in an explanatory cluster-randomised controlled trial (cRCT) with two DCM researchers carrying out the DCM intervention. In order to be able to inform daily practice, we studied DCM effectiveness in a pragmatic cRCT involving a wide range of care homes with trained nursing staff carrying out the intervention. Methods Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. The primary outcome was agitation, measured with the Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory (CMAI). The secondary outcomes included residents’ neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) and quality of life, and staff stress and job satisfaction. The nursing staff made all measurements at baseline and two follow-ups at 4-month intervals. We used linear mixed-effect models to test treatment and time effects. Results 34 units from 11 care homes, including 434 residents and 382 nursing staff members, were randomly assigned. Ten nurses from the intervention units completed the basic and advanced DCM training. Intention-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effect on the CMAI (mean difference between groups 2·4, 95% CI −2·7 to 7·6; p = 0·34). More NPSs were reported in the intervention group than in usual care (p = 0·02). Intervention staff reported fewer negative and more positive emotional reactions during work (p = 0·02). There were no other significant effects. Conclusions Our pragmatic findings did not confirm the effect on the primary outcome of agitation in the explanatory study. Perhaps the variability of the extent of implementation of DCM may explain the lack of effect. Trial Registration Dutch Trials Registry NTR2314. PMID:23844003

  10. Nonprofit Organizations and Outcome Measurement: From Tracking Program Activities to Focusing on Frontline Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Lehn M.

    2012-01-01

    Why do we continue to see evidence that nonprofit staff feel like outcome measurement is missing important aspects of their work? Based on an analysis of over 1,000 pages of material in 10 outcome measurement guides and a focused literature review of frontline work in three types of nonprofit organizations, this article shows that existing outcome…

  11. Benchmarking Work Practices and Outcomes in Australian Universities Using an Employee Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langford, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to benchmark a broad range of work practices and outcomes in Australian universities against other industries. Past research suggests occupational stress experienced by academic staff is worse than experienced by employees in other industries. However, no other practices or outcomes can be compared confidently.…

  12. Career Magnets: Interviews with Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heebner, Amy; And Others

    Seventy students and 62 teachers and administrators in New York City career magnet and comprehensive schools were interviewed to learn why the career magnets were successful. A statistical analysis of student outcome data for the interview sites verified they were at least as effective as the typical magnet school. Interviews with students…

  13. 42 CFR 401.112 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... instructions to staff personnel which contain policies, procedures, or interpretations that affect the public... distribution to the public. Selected material is maintained at Social Security Administration district...

  14. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator regarding policy initiatives and operational issues and assists the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator in developing and planning agency program initiatives. The Chief of Staff is responsible...

  15. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

  16. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, Photographer, 1973 DETAIL OF WINTER GARDEN - Larz Anderson House, 2118 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. Academic Drift in Dutch Non-University Higher Education Evaluated: A Staff Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffioen, Didi M. E.; de Jong, Uulkje

    2013-01-01

    In the context of a European knowledge economy, the Dutch non-university institutions systematically develop research activities at a higher frequency than before. With this development, they have been accused of academic drift, of striving to receive a status comparable to traditional universities. This study considers the perceptions of both…

  18. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices should be improved especially

  19. Organisational climate as a cause of job dissatisfaction among nursing staff in selected hospitals within the Mpumalanga Province.

    PubMed

    Lephoko, C S P; Bezuidenhout, M C; Roos, J H

    2006-11-01

    This article focuses on a study conducted with the purpose of exploring and describing the organisational climate as a cause of job dissatisfaction among nursing staff in selected hospitals within the Mpumalanga Province. The major objectives were to determine what organisational climate encompasses; ascertain which factors related to organisational climate can cause dissatisfaction among nurses; determine whether there is a difference in the way nursing management and the nursing staff perceive the existing organisational climate; and make recommendations for health service managers to improve the organisational climate in order to facilitate greater job satisfaction among the nursing staff. A quantitative approach with an exploratory and descriptive design encompassing the survey method was used. A questionnaire was applied as the data collection instrument and was distributed to 140 respondents. The results indicated that the nursing management and the nursing staff were content with the intrinsic factors of their jobs, but were dissatisfied with the extrinsic factors of the organisational climate. The outcome of this research affirms that there are extrinsic factors within the organisational climate that affect the nursing management and the nursing staff adversely. Recommendations were made to promote job satisfaction in selected public hospitals within the Mpumalanga province. PMID:17310742

  20. Organisational climate as a cause of job dissatisfaction among nursing staff in selected hospitals within the Mpumalanga Province.

    PubMed

    Lephoko, C S P; Bezuidenhout, M C; Roos, J H

    2006-11-01

    This article focuses on a study conducted with the purpose of exploring and describing the organisational climate as a cause of job dissatisfaction among nursing staff in selected hospitals within the Mpumalanga Province. The major objectives were to determine what organisational climate encompasses; ascertain which factors related to organisational climate can cause dissatisfaction among nurses; determine whether there is a difference in the way nursing management and the nursing staff perceive the existing organisational climate; and make recommendations for health service managers to improve the organisational climate in order to facilitate greater job satisfaction among the nursing staff. A quantitative approach with an exploratory and descriptive design encompassing the survey method was used. A questionnaire was applied as the data collection instrument and was distributed to 140 respondents. The results indicated that the nursing management and the nursing staff were content with the intrinsic factors of their jobs, but were dissatisfied with the extrinsic factors of the organisational climate. The outcome of this research affirms that there are extrinsic factors within the organisational climate that affect the nursing management and the nursing staff adversely. Recommendations were made to promote job satisfaction in selected public hospitals within the Mpumalanga province.

  1. Staff development sessions. A strategy to facilitate nursing staff education with limited teaching resources.

    PubMed

    Kirsivali-Farmer, K

    1994-01-01

    A reduction in clinical nursing educator positions resulted in the need for the Department of Nursing to continue to facilitate the professional development of nursing staff members with limited resources. In this article, the author describes a program, developed by the central Nursing Education Department at The Toronto Hospital, that was offered to clinical resource nurses, nurse managers, patient care coordinators, and preceptors. These individuals could use the information to promote the development of nursing staff members at the unit level. Several topics were presented: self-directed learning, needs assessment, behavioral objectives, lesson plans, teaching strategies, educational program evaluation, and clinical evaluation. Program evaluations were positive, and 45% of the respondents indicated they had the opportunity to apply what they learned. PMID:7807245

  2. Choosing a model of care for patients in alternate level care: caregiver perspectives with respect to staff injury.

    PubMed

    Ostry, Aleck S; Tomlin, Katrina M; Cvitkovich, Yuri; Ratner, Pamela A; Park, Il Hyeok; Tate, Robert B; Yassi, Annalee

    2004-03-01

    The population of alternate level care (ALC) patients utilizing acute-care hospital resources inappropriate to their needs is growing. The purpose of this study was to explore how the care of ALC patients was managed at 4 acute-care facilities in the Canadian province of British Columbia and to examine how this care impacts on outcomes of staff injury. Interviews were conducted to identify and characterize the different models of ALC. Injury outcomes for all caregivers were obtained (n = 2,854) and logistic regression conducted to compare staff injuries across ALC models. Injured workers were surveyed regarding their perceptions of injury risk and ALC. Five ALC models were identified: low-mix, high-mix, dedicated ALC units, extended care units, and geriatric assessment units. The risk for caregiver injuries was lowest on dedicated ALC units. These findings suggest that acute-care facilities faced with a growing ALC population should consider creating dedicated ALC units.

  3. Do K-12 School Facilities Affect Education Outcomes? Staff Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ed; Green, Harry A.; Roehrich-Patrick, Lynnisse; Joseph, Linda; Gibson, Teresa

    This report explains that there is growing evidence of a correlation between the adequacy of a school facility and student behavior and performance. In general, students attending school in newer, betterfacilities score 5 to 17 points higher on standardized tests than those attending in substandard buildings. School facility factors such as…

  4. High salt meals in staff canteens of salt policy makers: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Berentzen, C A; van Montfrans, G A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the salt content of hot meals served at the institutions of salt policy makers in the Netherlands. Design Observational study. Setting 18 canteens at the Department of Health, the Health Council, the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, university hospitals, and affiliated non-university hospitals. Intervention A standard hot meal collected from the institutional staff canteens on three random days. Main outcome measure Salt content of the meals measured with an ion selective electrode assay. Results The mean salt content of the meals (7.1 g, SE 0.2 g) exceeded the total daily recommended salt intake of 6 g and was high at all locations: 6.9 g (0.4 g) at the Department of Health and National Health Council; 6.0 g (0.9 g) at the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority; 7.4 g (0.5 g) at university hospital staff canteens; and 7.0 g (0.3 g) at non-university hospital staff canteens. With data from a national food consumption survey, the estimated total mean daily salt intake in people who ate these meals was 15.4 g. This translates into a 23-36% increase in premature cardiovascular mortality compared with people who adhere to the recommended levels of salt intake. Conclusion If salt policy makers eat at their institutional canteens they might consume too much salt, which could put their health at risk. PMID:22187322

  5. Valuing Professional, Managerial and Administrative Staff in HE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David

    2014-01-01

    The article explores the role of the Registrar (Chief Operating Officer) in a university, and the ways in which we value the contributions of professional, managerial and administrative (PMA) staff. It assesses the conditions in which PMA staff work and describes the professional development opportunities they enjoy. The article goes on to analyse…

  6. Personal Sustainability: Listening to Extension Staff and Observing Organizational Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forstadt, Leslie; Fortune, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Extension staff are increasingly challenged to do excellent work and balance their lives. University of Maine Cooperative Extension committed to a 2-year participatory action research project to support staff and to an organizational climate that encourages personal sustainability. With tools from ethnography and appreciative inquiry, staff…

  7. Identification of Domains for Malaysian University Staff Happiness Index Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yassin, Sulaiman Md.

    2014-01-01

    Without any doubt happiness among staff in any organization is pertinent to ensure continued growth and development. However, not many studies were carried out to determine the domains that will be able to measure the level of happiness among staff in universities. Thus, the aim of this study is to elicit the domains that explain the overall…

  8. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  9. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  10. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  11. Staff and Student Perceptions of Plagiarism and Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty-nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on…

  12. Getting into the System: The Physician's Staff and Waiting Room

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This article represents a panel discussion with the staff of the Family Practice Unit at the Plains Health Centre, Regina, Sask. It outlines those things found helpful in presenting a positive image to the patient by a physician and his staff - telephone contacts, waiting rooms, patient flow, and common complaints. PMID:21308056

  13. Handbook for Staff Development in Residential Schools for Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naiman, Doris W.; Mashikian, Hagop S.

    The handbook is intended to aid residential schools for deaf children in establishing comprehensive staff development programs. Stressed is the importance of involving all staff members including administrators, teachers, and dormitory counselors in the provision of an integrated 24-hour-a-day learning environment. The handbook is said to be…

  14. Knowing Me, Knowing You: Professional Development for Support Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulbeck, Joy

    2009-01-01

    Meeting the challenges of delivering a 21st-century curriculum and a world-class quality education ultimately depends on the willingness of the staff on the ground to give 100% effort to their jobs. Although many people in schools work very hard, some staff members are way down on the scale with regard to performance. All too often, a significant…

  15. Staff Development: The Key to Successful Desegregation/Integration Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moynahan, Martha Jo Probst

    To examine the role of staff development in implementing desegregation programs, the author annotates 39 publications from which she draws conclusions on the kinds of inservice staff education needed. Preceding the annotations is a glossary of 40 terms used in the literature. Four annotated publications describe teacher and principal behaviors and…

  16. Workplace Information Literacy for Administrative Staff in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepworth, Mark; Smith, Marian

    2008-01-01

    A joint project carried out by Leeds University and Loughborough University, funded by JISC, studied the information literacy of non academic staff in higher education. The in-depth, qualitative study deployed an information audit, interviews and focus groups with eleven staff in the Finance and Research Departments at Loughborough University. The…

  17. 15 CFR 2002.2 - Trade Policy Staff Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Treasury, by the Executive Director of the Council on International Economic Policy, and by the Chairman of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trade Policy Staff Committee. 2002.2... UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE OPERATION OF COMMITTEES § 2002.2 Trade Policy Staff Committee. (a)...

  18. Keeping Children Safe: Afterschool Staff and Mandated Child Maltreatment Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandarilla, Maria; O'Donnell, Julie

    2014-01-01

    With 8.4 million children in the U.S. spending an average of eight hours a week in afterschool programs, afterschool providers are an important part of the network of caring adults who can help to keep children safe. In addition, afterschool staff are "mandated reporters." Whether or not the laws specifically mention afterschool staff,…

  19. Experiences of Australian School Staff in Addressing Student Cannabis Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Peter J.; Norberg, Melissa M.; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis is the most frequently used illicit drug by Australian secondary school students yet there is scant research investigating school staff responses to student cannabis use. As such, this study surveyed 1,692 school staff who attended "Generation Next" seminars throughout Australia. The self-complete survey identified that the…

  20. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  1. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  2. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  3. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  4. 32 CFR 191.7 - Civilian EEO program staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civilian EEO program staff. 191.7 Section 191.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS THE DOD CIVILIAN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY (EEO) PROGRAM § 191.7 Civilian EEO program staff....

  5. Staff stress and job satisfaction at a children's hospice.

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, H; Stein, A; Forrest, G C; Baum, J D

    1989-01-01

    A study of staff stress and job satisfaction was undertaken in a children's hospice. In addition factors were investigated which might be stressful or which helped staff to manage in difficult circumstances. Three quarters were under comparatively little stress and in general showed very few psychological symptoms but a distinct subgroup were under a great deal of stress. A number of factors, notably recent personal bereavement and unresolved grief about a death that had occurred before they came to work at the hospice, distinguished this small group. Job satisfaction was generally high. The main sources of stress were: the sense of impotence staff felt when they were unable to relieve perceived needs or distress; dealing with negative responses in families, and conflicts within the staff group. The most important mitigating factors were: the informal support that staff provided for each other in this small cohesive working unit, the homelike atmosphere of the hospice, and the diversity of professional and personal skills among the staff group. The implications of these findings for reducing stress among staff dealing with dying people are discussed; this includes not only staff on paediatric wards, intensive care and neonatal units, but also community paediatric nurses. PMID:2923460

  6. Staff stress and job satisfaction at a children's hospice.

    PubMed

    Woolley, H; Stein, A; Forrest, G C; Baum, J D

    1989-01-01

    A study of staff stress and job satisfaction was undertaken in a children's hospice. In addition factors were investigated which might be stressful or which helped staff to manage in difficult circumstances. Three quarters were under comparatively little stress and in general showed very few psychological symptoms but a distinct subgroup were under a great deal of stress. A number of factors, notably recent personal bereavement and unresolved grief about a death that had occurred before they came to work at the hospice, distinguished this small group. Job satisfaction was generally high. The main sources of stress were: the sense of impotence staff felt when they were unable to relieve perceived needs or distress; dealing with negative responses in families, and conflicts within the staff group. The most important mitigating factors were: the informal support that staff provided for each other in this small cohesive working unit, the homelike atmosphere of the hospice, and the diversity of professional and personal skills among the staff group. The implications of these findings for reducing stress among staff dealing with dying people are discussed; this includes not only staff on paediatric wards, intensive care and neonatal units, but also community paediatric nurses.

  7. Understanding and Minimizing Staff Burnout. An Introductory Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health Schools.

    Staff who bring a mental health perspective to the schools can deal with problems of staff burnout. This packet is designed to help in beginning the process of minimizing burnout, a process that requires reducing environmental stressors, increasing personal capabilities, and enhancing job supports. The packet opens with brief discussions of "What…

  8. Support for Retired Academic Staff: University Policies and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tizard, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Following an earlier survey of the attitudes and activities of academic staff who had retired three to five years earlier, a survey was undertaken of the policies and practices of university authorities in relation to supporting the academic activities of their retired staff. The sample included 21 universities in England and Scotland, and 28…

  9. Engaging Students and Staff with Educational Development through Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadi-Hanifi, Karima; Dagman, Ozlem; Peters, John; Snell, Ellen; Tutton, Caroline; Wright, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Appreciative inquiry (AI) offers a constructive, strengths-based framework for engaging students and staff in the enhancement of academic programmes of study. This paper explores the basis of AI, its potential for educational development and the many agendas it might help address. Students and academic staff involved in an AI project, focused on…

  10. Planning for Effective Staff Development: Six Research-Based Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Meredith D.; Vojtek, Roseanne O'Brien

    Many educators and policymakers find that deciding on the right staff-development program has become increasingly difficult. This brief, three-part monograph organizes staff-development objectives, models, and program-design features into an understandable, comprehensive framework. Part 1 advises readers on how to weigh a program's objectives.…

  11. Managing 4-H Volunteer Staff: A 4-H Intern Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Hope M.

    The 4-H intern report organizes concepts and materials to aid the extension worker in his role as coordinator and trainer of 4-H volunteer staff. A 10-item task analysis of the extension worker--4-H and youth--as volunteer leader coordinator is presented. The importance of managing a volunteer staff is touched upon, and models for job descriptions…

  12. Low Cost/High Value Staff Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell, Jackie Moe

    In 1974, the Career Development and Renewal Program (CDRP) was created to train staff in the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) for placement in three new District colleges. Currently, the program offers renewal and career-path training to staff; provides for a bank of personnel for internal promotion opportunities; and broadens…

  13. School Climate for Gay and Lesbian Students and Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John D.

    1994-01-01

    In high schools, a conspiracy of silence shrouds the sexual orientation issue. Although the social atmosphere is vaguely supportive, fear and the realities of life cause most gays and lesbians to keep their sexual identities hidden. Homophobia can be addressed through staff development, support staff and services, inclusion of homosexual issues in…

  14. Increasing Day Care Staff Members' Interactions during Caregiving Routines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venn, Martha L.; Wolery, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Four paraprofessional staff members in a mainstreamed day care program were trained to engage in positive interactive behaviors during diaper changing. Results indicated that staff increased frequency of game playing and other interactive behaviors during diapering, but increases were not generalized to feeding routines. (Author/JDD)

  15. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective...

  16. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective...

  17. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective...

  18. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective...

  19. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective...

  20. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  1. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  2. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  3. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  4. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  5. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  6. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, the medical staff may also include other... candidates in accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, and the medical staff bylaws... for use in the periodic appraisal of the distant-site physician or practitioner. At a minimum,...

  7. 5 CFR 534.304 - Basic pay for staff positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Basic Pay for Employees of Temporary Organizations § 534.304 Basic pay for staff... of basic pay for staff and other non-executive level positions of temporary organizations, the head of a temporary organization must give consideration to the significance, scope, and...

  8. 5 CFR 534.304 - Basic pay for staff positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Basic Pay for Employees of Temporary Organizations § 534.304 Basic pay for staff... of basic pay for staff and other non-executive level positions of temporary organizations, the head of a temporary organization must give consideration to the significance, scope, and...

  9. 5 CFR 534.304 - Basic pay for staff positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Basic Pay for Employees of Temporary Organizations § 534.304 Basic pay for staff... of basic pay for staff and other non-executive level positions of temporary organizations, the head of a temporary organization must give consideration to the significance, scope, and...

  10. 5 CFR 534.304 - Basic pay for staff positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Basic Pay for Employees of Temporary Organizations § 534.304 Basic pay for staff... of basic pay for staff and other non-executive level positions of temporary organizations, the head of a temporary organization must give consideration to the significance, scope, and...

  11. 5 CFR 534.304 - Basic pay for staff positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Basic Pay for Employees of Temporary Organizations § 534.304 Basic pay for staff... of basic pay for staff and other non-executive level positions of temporary organizations, the head of a temporary organization must give consideration to the significance, scope, and...

  12. Issues in Staff Development. A Collection of Conference Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London Univ. (England). Inst. of Education.

    Papers and discussions presented at a British Staff Development in Universities program conference are reported in this collection. Focus was on the role of staff development units, courses and activities concerned with both teaching and administration, and information services. Topics and authors or reporters are: "The Longer Reach," by David…

  13. Didactic Competencies among Teaching Staff of Universities in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Florah Katanu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the levels and types of didactic competencies that exist among teaching staff in universities in Kenya, giving recognition to curriculum development, pedagogical attributes and quality assurance competencies. The study was carried out in two phases among two samples of the teaching staff population. The first…

  14. Supervising Staff in Student Affairs: Exploration of the Synergistic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Sue A.; Cooper, Diane L.; Winston, Roger B., Jr.; Chernow, Erin

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development andexplores the validity of the Synergistic Supervision Scale (SSS), which measures the extent to which staff perceive that their supervisor focuses on the advancement of the institutional mission and the personal and professional advancement of staff. Results indicate that synergistic supervision seems to be a valid…

  15. Disability Awareness and University Staff Training in Ireland (Practice Brief)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padden, Lisa; Ellis, Carol

    2015-01-01

    It is vital that all university staff have awareness of the difficulties that may be experienced by students with disabilities. Staff must be given the knowledge and resources to support these students effectively. University College Dublin (UCD) Access & Lifelong Learning has developed a communication and training strategy to improve…

  16. Staff Reports of Setting Events Associated With Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Peter; Teer, Kerry; Rye, Lynne; Hughes, David

    2005-01-01

    This study sought to identify the setting events reported by care staff as more and less likely to be associated with the challenging behaviors of people with intellectual disabilities. Sixty-five staff working with 22 individuals were interviewed using an inventory of putative setting events. Findings were collated to allow identification of…

  17. Different Spaces: Staff Development for Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samarawickrema, Gayani; Benson, Robyn; Brack, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative staff development activity run across two Australian universities, for academic staff integrating Web 2.0 technologies into their teaching. It describes a three-week long virtual workshop on teaching with wikis, where participants in two groups developed a group project as students and then assessed the work…

  18. Maintaining Nursing Staff Performance on an Intensive Behavior Therapy Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, B. D., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The authors suggest ways to establish quality behavioral programs within a hospital for the mentally ill. They emphasize the importance of staff morale, consistency of effort, teamwork, staff training and reinforcement. Procedures said to be responsible for successful maintenance include a flexible credit economy system. (Author/CL)

  19. Staff Selection and Training: Can the Two Functions Be Combined?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumba, Russell P., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Results indicate that the seminar process provides candidates with the opportunity to learn responsibilities and objectives of residence departments and to indicate their own qualifications. The traditional process provides a better means of staff selection, while the seminar process provides better staff training. (NRB)

  20. Long-Range Planning in Public Libraries; Staff Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Brett

    1993-01-01

    Investigates the effects of participatory management techniques advocated by the Public Library Association through a study of long-range planning at four public libraries that focused on staff members' views of the planning process, types and levels of staff participation, and attitudes about the effectiveness and consequences of the planning…

  1. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... chain of command with respect to the staff member who took the initial action. If the initial action is... Law Judges, action taken by a staff member other than an office head or Assistant General Counsel...

  2. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... chain of command with respect to the staff member who took the initial action. If the initial action is... Law Judges, action taken by a staff member other than an office head or Assistant General Counsel...

  3. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... chain of command with respect to the staff member who took the initial action. If the initial action is... Law Judges, action taken by a staff member other than an office head or Assistant General Counsel...

  4. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... chain of command with respect to the staff member who took the initial action. If the initial action is... Law Judges, action taken by a staff member other than an office head or Assistant General Counsel...

  5. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS... chain of command with respect to the staff member who took the initial action. If the initial action is... Law Judges, action taken by a staff member other than an office head or Assistant General Counsel...

  6. Florida Flexible Staff Organization Feasibility Study. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crenshaw, Joseph W.; And Others

    The rationale and master plan have been developed, in accordance with legislative mandate, for the planning and implementation of a Flexible Staff Organization (FSO) feasibility study involving the operation of model FSO projects in selected Florida elementary and secondary schools. Objectives will be to explore patterns of staff utilization…

  7. Undergraduate Interns as Staff Developers: Flowers in the Desert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Anne Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate education can be characterised by large lecture classes, lack of quality contact time with staff, and an impersonal experience. There is a move towards encouraging students to learn by enquiry, but how can this be encouraged, given pressures of time on both staff and students? One possible solution is to give the students themselves…

  8. Moving On: Voluntary Staff Departures at Small Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortegast, Carrie A.; Hamrick, Florence A.

    2009-01-01

    Although voluntary departures are frequent among new professional student affairs staff members at small colleges and universities, there is little systematic study of the processes involved in departing a job at one campus to accept a student affairs position at another. Potentially awkward dynamics surrounding staff departures can complicate…

  9. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 203 - Staff Commentary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Affairs of the Federal Reserve Board issues formal staff interpretations of Regulation C (12 CFR part 203... example, as part of a preclosing review by an affiliate bank under 12 CFR 250.250, which interprets... official staff commentary to Regulation B (Equal Credit Opportunity, 12 CFR part 202, Supplement 1)...

  10. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 203 - Staff Commentary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Affairs of the Federal Reserve Board issues formal staff interpretations of Regulation C (12 CFR part 203... example, as part of a preclosing review by an affiliate bank under 12 CFR 250.250, which interprets... official staff commentary to Regulation B (Equal Credit Opportunity, 12 CFR part 202, Supplement 1)...

  11. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 203 - Staff Commentary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Affairs of the Federal Reserve Board issues formal staff interpretations of Regulation C (12 CFR part 203... example, as part of a preclosing review by an affiliate bank under 12 CFR 250.250, which interprets... official staff commentary to Regulation B (Equal Credit Opportunity, 12 CFR part 202, Supplement 1)...

  12. 12 CFR Supplement I to Part 203 - Staff Commentary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Affairs of the Federal Reserve Board issues formal staff interpretations of Regulation C (12 CFR part 203... example, as part of a preclosing review by an affiliate bank under 12 CFR 250.250, which interprets... official staff commentary to Regulation B (Equal Credit Opportunity, 12 CFR part 202, Supplement 1)...

  13. Attitudes of Spanish University Teaching Staff to Quality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barandiaran-Galdos, Marta; Barrenetxea-Ayesta, Miren; Cardona-Rodriguez, Antonio; Mijangos-Del-Campo, Juan Jose; Olaskoaga-Larrauri, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article sets out to investigate the notions Spanish university teaching staff have of quality in education, on the assumption that those notions give a reliable picture of the attitudes of teaching staff towards education policy design and university management. The paper takes an empirical approach, collecting opinions telematically via a…

  14. Predictors of Organizational Commitment among Staff in Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the role of organizational culture, job satisfaction, and sociodemographic characteristics as predictors of organizational commitment among staff in assisted living. It is particularly important to examine organizational commitment, because of its close links to staff turnover. Design and Methods: Data were collected…

  15. The Recruitment of Support Staff in Tanzanian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwaisumo, William Nathan

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the meaning, classification and types of support staff, their contributions towards conducive teaching and learning environments, conditions required/attributes required for support staff to be employed in temporally or permanent terms. It further identifies current situations and challenges in recruitment and recruited…

  16. 20 CFR 632.40 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administrative staff and personnel standards....40 Administrative staff and personnel standards. (a) Staffing. Members of the population to be served.... Native American grantees shall establish systems to enhance the recruitment and hiring of...

  17. Staff Prescription Medication: Safety and Privacy Concerns. A Roundtable Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marugg Mary; Erceg, Linda Ebner; Weinberg, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Staff medications, except for time-critical medications, should be kept at the camp health center, separate from camper medications. Medication use should be documented, with efforts to insure confidentiality. Staff should be able to access their own medications unless they are controlled substances. Medication policies should be explained to…

  18. 7 CFR 1700.33 - Financial Services Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial Services Staff. 1700.33 Section 1700.33 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.33 Financial Services Staff....

  19. Staff reactions to challenging behaviour: an observation study.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Greet; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Eeman, Lieve; Maes, Bea

    2010-01-01

    Staff reactions play an important role in the development and maintaining of clients' challenging behaviour. Because there is a paucity of research on staff reactions in naturalistic settings, this study examined sequential associations between challenging behaviour and staff reactions by means of a descriptive analysis. We analysed video recordings of the reactions of 10 staff members towards challenging behaviour of clients with severe or profound intellectual disabilities who displayed self-injurious behaviour, stereotyped behaviour and/or aggressive/destructive behaviour. As expected, the staff members used much verbal behaviours after challenging behaviour and often immediately tried to stop the challenging behaviour. Furthermore, staff often gave attention to challenging behaviour whereas offering or taking away material or tasks were less frequently observed reactions. Reactions to aggressive/destructive behaviour and self-injurious behaviour were quite similar. After stereotyped behaviour, not that many reactions occurred significantly more. Although this study has clinical implications and made a valuable contribution to research on staff reactions to challenging behaviour, more research is needed, more specifically, about the effectiveness of these staff reactions.

  20. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy...

  1. Staff corridor (room 206, representing rooms 301, 305, 401, 405, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Staff corridor (room 206, representing rooms 301, 305, 401, 405, 501, and 505), looking south towards the staff corridor vestibule (room 206A, representing rooms 305A, 405A, and 505A). - California State Office Building No. 1, 915 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  2. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  3. Retention of Staff in the Early Childhood Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holochwost, Steven J.; DeMott, Kerri; Buell, Martha; Yannetta, Kelly; Amsden, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    What incentives can the administrators of early childhood education facilities offer their staff in order to retain them? In light of research identifying low staff turnover as a key component of high quality early childhood education, the answer to this question has ramifications beyond human-resources management. This paper presents the results…

  4. 10 CFR 52.143 - Staff approval of design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff approval of design. 52.143 Section 52.143 Energy... Standard Design Approvals § 52.143 Staff approval of design. Upon completion of its review of a submittal under this subpart and receipt of a report by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards under §...

  5. International Review of Staff Appraisal Practices: Current Trends and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes the purposes, form, and content of staff appraisal schemes in ten countries' public administrations and discusses a number of related trends and issues. Examines the effects of these trends in light of the organizations' experiences and draws attention to the inadequate monitoring and evaluation of staff appraisal schemes. (Author/JG)

  6. 10 CFR 52.143 - Staff approval of design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Staff approval of design. 52.143 Section 52.143 Energy... Standard Design Approvals § 52.143 Staff approval of design. Upon completion of its review of a submittal... or not the design is acceptable, subject to appropriate terms and conditions, and make an analysis...

  7. 18 CFR 401.85 - Staff and other expert testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staff and other expert testimony. 401.85 Section 401.85 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Administrative and Other Hearings § 401.85 Staff and...

  8. 28 CFR 115.361 - Staff and agency reporting duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... also require all staff to comply with any applicable mandatory child abuse reporting laws. (c) Apart... incident of sexual abuse or sexual harassment that occurred in a facility, whether or not it is part of the..., staff shall be prohibited from revealing any information related to a sexual abuse report to...

  9. 28 CFR 115.361 - Staff and agency reporting duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... also require all staff to comply with any applicable mandatory child abuse reporting laws. (c) Apart... incident of sexual abuse or sexual harassment that occurred in a facility, whether or not it is part of the..., staff shall be prohibited from revealing any information related to a sexual abuse report to...

  10. 28 CFR 115.361 - Staff and agency reporting duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... also require all staff to comply with any applicable mandatory child abuse reporting laws. (c) Apart... incident of sexual abuse or sexual harassment that occurred in a facility, whether or not it is part of the..., staff shall be prohibited from revealing any information related to a sexual abuse report to...

  11. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  12. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  13. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  14. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  15. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  16. Your Investments in Staff Development--An Open Letter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddy, Juanita Warren

    2009-01-01

    This article features an open letter written by the author to her school library media colleagues, applauding those who are providing informative and interesting staff development activities for teachers, administrators, and their library media peers. She reminds her colleagues about their role in staff development and not to underestimate the…

  17. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to medical staff. The medical staff must include doctors of medicine or osteopathy. In accordance... majority of the members of the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility...) An individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy. (ii) A doctor of dental surgery or dental...

  18. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy or, when permitted by State law of...

  19. Staff Perceptions of Higher Education Science and Engineering Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Alison; Kunnemeyer, Rainer; Prinsep, Michele R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents staff perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities derived from a cross-case analysis of four case studies across the New Zealand university and polytechnic sectors. First we report staff expectations and experiences in terms of infrastructure and resources, and their own careers. Staff…

  20. Snake and staff symbolism, and healing.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2002-07-01

    Since time immemorial the snake has been venerated as an enigmatic creature with supernatural powers. As a snake and staff symbol it is also traditionally associated with the healing arts, either as the single-snake emblem of Asklepios, or as the double-snake emblem (caduceus) of Hermes. The mythological basis for this symbolism is reviewed. The Asklepian emblem has been associated with health care since the 5th century BC, when Asklepios became accepted by the Greeks as the god of healing. Whether he was also an historical figure as healer in earlier ages is less certain. The origin of the double-snake emblem is shrouded in the mists of antiquity. In classical times it became the herald's wand of Hermes, messenger of the gods who guided departed souls to the underworld, and was seen as protector of travellers, shepherds and merchants. In the latter capacity Hermes also conveyed a negative connotation as protector of thieves. During the Middle Ages the caduceus became a symbol of the healing sciences (pharmacy and alchemy in particular), and today, although mythologically incorrect, it is in common usage in the health care field.

  1. Lean Participative Process Improvement: Outcomes and Obstacles in Trauma Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    New, Steve; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “systems” approach using Lean methodology to improve surgical care, as part of a programme of studies investigating possible synergy between improvement approaches. Setting A controlled before-after study using the orthopaedic trauma theatre of a UK Trust hospital as the active site and an elective orthopaedic theatre in the same Trust as control. Participants All staff involved in surgical procedures in both theatres. Interventions A one-day “lean” training course delivered by an experienced specialist team was followed by support and assistance in developing a 6 month improvement project. Clinical staff selected the subjects for improvement and designed the improvements. Outcome Measures We compared technical and non-technical team performance in theatre using WHO checklist compliance evaluation, “glitch count” and Oxford NOTECHS II in a sample of directly observed operations, and patient outcome (length of stay, complications and readmissions) for all patients. We collected observational data for 3 months and clinical data for 6 months before and after the intervention period. We compared changes in measures using 2-way analysis of variance. Results We studied 576 cases before and 465 after intervention, observing the operation in 38 and 41 cases respectively. We found no significant changes in team performance or patient outcome measures. The intervention theatre staff focused their efforts on improving first patient arrival time, which improved by 20 minutes after intervention. Conclusions This version of “lean” system improvement did not improve measured safety processes or outcomes. The study highlighted an important tension between promoting staff ownership and providing direction, which needs to be managed in “lean” projects. Space and time for staff to conduct improvement activities are important for success. PMID:27124012

  2. State legislative staff influence in health policy making.

    PubMed

    Weissert, C S; Weissert, W G

    2000-12-01

    State legislative staff may influence health policy by gathering intelligence, setting the agenda, and shaping the legislative proposals. But they may also be stymied in their roles by such institutional constraints as hiring practices and by turnover in committee leadership in the legislature. The intervening variable of trust between legislators and their support staff is also key to understanding influence and helps explain how staff-legislator relationships play an important role in designing state health policy. This study of legislative fiscal and health policy committee staff uses data from interviews with key actors in five states to model the factors important in explaining variation in the influence of committee staff on health policy.

  3. Inappropriate sexual behaviour and dementia: an exploration of staff experiences.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Laura E; Robertson, Noelle; Knight, Caroline

    2013-07-01

    Research assessing the impact of inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) on staff working in dementia care is circumscribed, yet studies from comparable settings indicate that ISB appears uniquely challenging, particularly to personal and cultural values. This study explored staff experiences of ISB exhibited by older adults with a dementia. Fourteen staff working within an in-patient setting were interviewed. Participants' experiences of ISB appeared underpinned by complex social and psychological processes. Shock, embarrassment and incomprehension were prominent when ISB was initially encountered. Knowledge of dementia, familiarity with patients and social norms were important in contextualising ISB and staff often minimised its impact by construing a lack of capacity. Feelings about ISB appeared equivocal and findings suggest that the effect of ISB should be routinely considered in preparing staff who work within dementia care.

  4. "Being There": The Experiences of Staff in Dealing with Matters of Dying and Death in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research on staffed housing for people with intellectual disability has identified the challenges in achieving positive quality of life outcomes. However, a less well considered dimension of such services is that they are places of living and dying. This paper looks at the experiences of staff in dealing with issues of death and dying.…

  5. The Mobile Library and Staff Preparedness: Exploring Staff Competencies Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saravani, Sarah-Jane; Haddow, Gaby

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings of a study investigating the current state of preparedness of staff at institutes of technology and TAFE libraries across Australia and New Zealand in relation to delivering services through mobile technologies. In particular, the skills, knowledge, and competencies of staff in relation to mobile…

  6. Education and training to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Sally; Powell, Tom; Coles, Bernadette; Hale, Rachel; Gould, Dinah

    2016-01-01

    Background The delivery of end-of-life care in nursing homes is challenging. This situation is of concern as 20% of the population die in this setting. Commonly reported reasons include limited access to medical care, inadequate clinical leadership and poor communication between nursing home and medical staff. Education for nursing home staff is suggested as the most important way of overcoming these obstacles. Objectives To identify educational interventions to enhance end-of-life care for nursing home staff and to identify types of study designs and outcomes to indicate success and benchmark interventions against recent international guidelines for education for palliative and end-of-life care. Design Thirteen databases and reference lists of key journals were searched from the inception of each up to September 2014. Included studies were appraised for quality and data were synthesised thematically. Results Twenty-one studies were reviewed. Methodological quality was poor. Education was not of a standard that could be expected to alter clinical behaviour and was evaluated mainly from the perspectives of staff: self-reported increase in knowledge, skills and confidence delivering care rather than direct evidence of impact on clinical practice and patient outcomes. Follow-up was often short term, and despite sound economic arguments for delivering effective end-of-life care to reduce burden on the health service, no economic analyses were reported. Conclusions There is a clear and urgent need to design educational interventions that have the potential to improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. Robust evaluation of these interventions should include impact on residents, families and staff and include economic analysis. PMID:27329513

  7. Design and Outcome of a Certification Preparation Program for Outpatient Nurses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Theresa; Ferguson, Susan; McKenzie, Jennifer; Brassil, Kelly J

    2015-10-01

    This article presents the design, implementation, and outcomes of a certification preparation program for nurses working in an outpatient clinic. A nurse educator designed curriculum using the Certified Breast Care Nurse test blueprint. Nurse administrators provided the resources and the staff coverage to allow all staff members to attend the sessions without disruption to patient care. This outpatient center has achieved and sustained 100% certification among eligible nurses over the past 5 years. PMID:26425977

  8. Job satisfaction and associated factors among healthcare staff: a cross-sectional study in Guangdong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Min; Huang, Xiao-Liang; Zhuang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Pi; Feng, Li-Fen; Hu, Wei; Chen, Long; Hao, Yuan-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This cross-sectional study aimed to explore job satisfaction among healthcare staff in Guangdong following the health system reforms in 2009, and to investigate the association between job satisfaction and work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting The Fifth National Health Service Survey was carried out in Guangdong, China. Participants All participants in this study were healthcare staff including physicians, nurses and public health staff from hospitals, health service centres and health clinics. A total of 6583 questionnaires were distributed and collected. After excluding the incomplete questionnaires, 5845 questionnaires were included for the analysis. Outcome measures Sociodemographic information and scores for evaluating job satisfaction, work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship were obtained using the questionnaire developed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China. To assess the significantly associated factors on job satisfaction of the healthcare staff in Guangdong, a binary logistic regression model was used. Results Based on the 5845 valid responses of the healthcare staff who worked in Guangdong, the mean score of overall perception of job satisfaction was 3.99 on a scale of 1–6. Among the sociodemographic variables, occupation, educational background, professional status, years of service, annual income and night shift frequency significantly influenced the level of job satisfaction. Work stress, work–family conflict and doctor–patient relationship also had significant effect on job satisfaction. Conclusions The overall job satisfaction exceeded slightly dissatisfied (score 3) and approached slightly satisfied (score 4). Measures to enhance job satisfaction include the reduction of workload, increase of welfare, maintaining moderate stress and balancing work–family conflict. Moreover

  9. Staff perceptions of caring: the importance of a supportive environment.

    PubMed

    Sikma, Suzanne K

    2006-06-01

    Five themes of caring interventions emerged from the perspective of staff caregivers-valuing personhood and the work, belonging, knowing, acting together, and promoting quality. Three themes of caring organizational conditions identified by participants included communicating, providing resources, and trusting. The research-based Model of Caring in the Organizational Environment can be used to assess and improve the caring environment of nursing homes as well as to develop caring managers and staff. Organizational well-being for nursing homes is everyone's responsibility and requires formal and informal leaders who can create supportive caring organizational conditions, engage in caring interventions with staff, and inspire the synergy of caring. PMID:16773860

  10. Staff perceptions of caring: the importance of a supportive environment.

    PubMed

    Sikma, Suzanne K

    2006-06-01

    Five themes of caring interventions emerged from the perspective of staff caregivers-valuing personhood and the work, belonging, knowing, acting together, and promoting quality. Three themes of caring organizational conditions identified by participants included communicating, providing resources, and trusting. The research-based Model of Caring in the Organizational Environment can be used to assess and improve the caring environment of nursing homes as well as to develop caring managers and staff. Organizational well-being for nursing homes is everyone's responsibility and requires formal and informal leaders who can create supportive caring organizational conditions, engage in caring interventions with staff, and inspire the synergy of caring.

  11. PEL Staff Together for the First Time | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer John-Paul Denson and Troy Taylor of the Protein Expression Laboratory (PEL) used to pack liters of Escherichia coli lysates on ice, put them in the back of a microvan, and drive across campus to deliver the samples for protein purification. Now that all PEL staff members are working under the same roof at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), transferring samples is just a walk down the hall. Staff members were previously spread out in five buildings across the Fort Detrick campus.

  12. Relationship centred outcomes focused on compassionate care for older people within in-patient care settings.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Dewar, Belinda; Pullin, Simon; Tocher, Ria

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes outcomes from research titled Leadership in Compassionate Care. The research adopts a participatory action research approach, utilizing appreciative inquiry and relationship centred care. Outcomes of the research are based upon relationships between patients, families and staff. This paper focuses on in-patient care for older people. A range of data generation activities were undertaken including: observation, interviews using emotional touch points and reflective accounts. To highlight outcomes in compassionate care, this paper uses case studies from two participating services. Principles of compassionate care were derived from understanding experiences of patients, relatives and staff and initiating responsive action projects. The aim was to enhance the experience of relationship centred, compassionate care. The process of emotional touch points enabled a richer understanding of experience. In terms of outcomes for patients this involved, enhanced quality of time spent with family and opening up conversations between families and staff. Outcomes for families involved enhanced access to relevant information and the opportunity to make sense of their situation. Staff outcomes were gaining experience in working alongside family to co-create the service, enhanced understanding of the experiences of patients and relatives led to direct changes in individual and team practices.

  13. 76 FR 36542 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: The Content of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Staff: The Content of Investigational Device Exemption and Premarket Approval Applications for Low... document entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: The Content of... Staff: The Content of Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA)...

  14. Integrating New Personnel. The Art of Building (and Re-Building) Staff Unity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    1995-01-01

    Discusses ways to help new staff members acclimate and existing staff adjust to new personnel. Explores the role of friendships in staff relationships and suggests 11 strategies for setting the stage for positive employee relationships. (DR)

  15. HALS SUMMER HISTORIAN JULIA SIENKEWICZ (RIGHT) AND HABS STAFF HISTORIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HALS SUMMER HISTORIAN JULIA SIENKEWICZ (RIGHT) AND HABS STAFF HISTORIAN LISA PFUELLER DAVIDSON POSING BY THE MAIN GATE. - Congressional Cemetery, 1801 E Street, Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 25 CFR 36.86 - Are there staff training requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Suicide Prevention. (c) Homeliving staff as well as all employees that supervise students participating in... Resolution; (2) Substance Abuse Issues; (3) Ethics; (4) Parenting skills/Child Care; (5) Special...

  17. Hospital opts for "greenhouse" atmosphere in staff dining area.

    PubMed

    Green, D E

    1981-02-16

    The administration of St. Elizabeth Hospital, Granite City, IL, chose a staff dining area design that accents natural light, foliage, and wood finishes in an attempt to provide their employees with a relaxing, intimate place to meet.

  18. An exploration of cancer staff attitudes and values.

    PubMed

    McKegney, F P; Visco, G; Yates, J; Hughes, J

    1979-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team involved in the care of patients with advanced cancer including physicians, nurses, social workers, physical therapists, nutritionists, clergymen, enterostomal therapists, biostatisticians and administrative personnel were studied over a period of eighteen months. A prospective study of staff attitudes and values about life, disease, and medical care which focused particularly on cancer, cancer treatment and patients with cancer was undertaken. Data were gathered from the staff by written responses to the following instruments: 1) Rokeach Value Survey and 2) a Personal Attitudes Toward Illness Questionnaire. This longitudinal prospective study demonstrated the reliability of scrutinizing individual and collective staff characteristics in a cancer care team. Although most team members had minimal previous contact with clinical research or with patients with advanced cancer, increased exposure did not result in changes in staff attitudes and values over the period of seventeen months. PMID:481321

  19. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.22 Prehearing... matter of the investigation. A version of the staff report containing business proprietary...

  20. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.22 Prehearing... matter of the investigation. A version of the staff report containing business proprietary...

  1. Training Senior Citizen Centers Staff in Blind Rehabilitation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asch, Celine

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses a project conducted in 1979 in which personnel from Arkansas Enterprises for the Blind trained staff members from community based programs for the elderly in techniques designed to involve and assist visually impaired senior citizens. (Author)

  2. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, Photographer, 1973 WINTER GARDEN FROM BREAKFAST ROOM - Larz Anderson House, 2118 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, Photographer, 1973 CORNER CUPBOARD, DINING ROOM - Arthur C. Stanley House, 2370 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, Photographer, 1973 DETAIL OF NEWEL, ENTRANCE STAIR - Arthur C. Stanley House, 2370 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. ASA24® Instructions for Study Staff & Respondents

    Cancer.gov

    The following documents have been created by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as resources for study staff and Respondents. Each resource is available as a ready-to-use PDF to allow users to adapt the content as desired.

  6. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey CFA Staff, Photographer, 1972 FIRST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey CFA Staff, Photographer, 1972 FIRST- SECOND- FLOOR PLAN J. L. S. Jennings, Jr., Delineator - Edward H. Everett House, 1606 Twenty-third Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  8. 28 CFR 115.364 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  9. The Principal and Staff Development: Countering the School Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Mary; Rogus, Joseph F.

    1979-01-01

    After addressing the problems inherent in developing staff improvement programs, the author offers starter planning steps for countering the energy drainage of teachers, countering the weak technology of teaching, and countering the feeling of aloneness of the teacher. (KC)

  10. Staff Development in Reading: What the Experts Say.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacca, Jo Anne

    1979-01-01

    Presents interviews of six prominent researchers (Ira Aaron, Harold Herber, Wayne Otto, Robert Ruddell, Roselmina Indrisano, and Olive Niles), which focused on the dynamics constituting effective staff development experiences. (HOD)

  11. What does Brexit mean for nursing and our EU staff?

    PubMed

    Flynn, Hannah; Kendall-Raynor, Petra; Longhurst, Chris

    2016-06-29

    Currently there is free movement of labour and mutual recognition of nurse training and qualifications between EU member states. This means UK hospitals can actively recruit nurses from across the EU to cover staff shortfalls. So what now? PMID:27353905

  12. Chief nurse urges trusts to fill vacancies with permanent staff.

    PubMed

    Kleebauer, Alistair

    2014-06-10

    Northern Ireland's chief nurse has written to the chief executives of the country's five health and social care trusts telling them to create 'permanent posts' where there has been persistent use of bank and agency staff.

  13. Principals Can Increase Leadership Effectiveness by Knowing Staff Personalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberds-Baxter, Sharon

    1986-01-01

    An essential ingredient of good school administrators is understanding the differences among people. Provides a simplified outline of Carl Jung's typology of personality differences to provide administrators a better understanding of staff behavior. (MD)

  14. What does Brexit mean for nursing and our EU staff?

    PubMed

    Flynn, Hannah; Kendall-Raynor, Petra; Longhurst, Chris

    2016-06-29

    Currently there is free movement of labour and mutual recognition of nurse training and qualifications between EU member states. This means UK hospitals can actively recruit nurses from across the EU to cover staff shortfalls. So what now?

  15. 28 CFR 115.364 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  16. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  17. 28 CFR 115.364 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  18. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  19. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  20. Schwartz Center Rounds. A Staff Dialogue on Caring for an Intensely Spiritual Patient: Psychosocial Issues Faced By Patients, Their Families, and Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Lintz; Penson; Chabner; Lynch

    1998-01-01

    The Schwartz Center Rounds are a monthly multidisciplinary forum, at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), in which caregivers discuss a specific patient with cancer and the important psychosocial issues faced by the patient, family, and caregivers. This forum allows caregivers to reflect on their experiences with patients and to gain support and insight from their fellow staff members. The following case discussion was addressed at the September 1997 Schwartz Center Rounds. M.R. was a 45-year-old woman who developed ovarian carcinoma and was subsequently treated at MGH. She was a deeply religious woman and believed that God would cure her cancer. Her religious views profoundly influenced her decisions related to further care and her ability to accept what staff felt to be a realistic assessment of her condition and progress. At the rounds, staff members struggled with many issues, including whether M.R. should continue her treatment at MGH or return home to Puerto Rico. Staff found it challenging to discuss a sensitive topic-such as spirituality-with a patient, especially when the patient was from a different cultural background. One of the most striking outcomes of the rounds was the diversity of staff views regarding how they advocated addressing spirituality with a patient. Staff concluded that discussion of spirituality-while challenging-can meaningfully enhance the caregiver-patient relationship.