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Sample records for ace activity plasminogen

  1. Plasminogen activators in human colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Mahmoud, M; Lewin, M R; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1986-01-01

    A crucial step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive colorectal cancer is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. Plasminogen activators may play a part in regulating the extracellular protease environment necessary for this to occur. Both functional and antigenic activity of the two principal activators of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator and urokinase, were measured in 30 colorectal cancers, matched samples of mucosa, and eight adenomatous polyps. Both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) had raised urokinase activities compared with normal mucosa, the activity being highest in the carcinomas. Activity of tissue plasminogen activator, however, was diminished in both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) compared with normal mucosa, the values being lowest in carcinomas. Plasmin generation by urokinase--in contrast with tissue plasminogen activator--is fibrin independent and thus less subject to physiological control. Images p730-a PMID:3094628

  2. Liposomal nanocarriers for plasminogen activators.

    PubMed

    Koudelka, Stepan; Mikulik, Robert; Mašek, Josef; Raška, Milan; Turánek Knotigová, Pavlína; Miller, Andrew D; Turánek, Jaroslav

    2016-04-10

    Several plasminogen activators (PAs) have been found effective in treating different thromboembolic diseases. However, administration of conventional thrombolytic therapy is limited by a low efficacy of present formulations of PAs. Conventional treatments using these therapeutic proteins are associated with several limitations including rapid inactivation and clearance, short half-life, bleeding complications or non-specific tissue targeting. Liposome-based formulations of PAs such as streptokinase, tissue-plasminogen activator and urokinase have been developed to improve the therapeutic efficacy of these proteins. Resulting liposomal formulations were found to preserve the original activity of PAs, promote their selective delivery and improve thrombus targeting. Therapeutic potential of these liposome-based PAs has been demonstrated successfully in various pre-clinical models in vivo. Reductions in unwanted side effects (e.g., hemorrhage or immunogenicity) as well as enhancements of efficacy and safety were achieved in comparison to currently existing treatment options based on conventional formulations of PAs. This review summarizes present achievements in: (i) preparation of liposome-based formulations of various PAs, (ii) development of PEGylated and targeted liposomal PAs, (iii) physico-chemical characterization of these developed systems, and (iv) testing of their thrombolytic efficacy. We also look to the future and the imminent arrival of theranostic liposomal formulations to move this field forward. PMID:26876783

  3. Innovative Approaches to Plasminogen Activator Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Edgar; Quertermous, Thomas; Matsueda, Gary R.; Runge, Marschall S.

    1989-01-01

    Plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction has become standard medical practice. Bleeding complications, however, limit the utility of the currently available agents. This article reviews how the tools of molecular biology and protein engineering are being used to develop safer and more effective plasminogen activators.

  4. Bound plasminogen is rate-limiting for cell-surface-mediated activation of plasminogen by urokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Namiranian, S; Naito, Y; Kakkar, V V; Scully, M F

    1995-01-01

    The ability of U937 monocyte-like cells and KATO III cells (a human gastric carcinoma line) to potentiate activation of plasminogen by single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA), as mediated by the cell receptor for urokinase (u-PAR), was compared. It was observed that, although the concentration of u-PAR on these cell lines differed considerably (U937 cells: 5000 receptors/cell, Kd 0.35 nM; KATO III cells: 400 receptors/cell, Kd 0.85 nM), the rate of activation of plasminogen by scu-PA in the presence of the same density of each cell line was equivalent. From data generated in the presence of increasing concentrations of scu-PA, the kcat, for plasminogen activation in the presence of each cell line was calculated and found to differ by 26-fold (0.36 s-1 on U937 cells; 9.25 s-1 on KATO III cells). However, the Km for plasminogen with respect to the rate of formation of plasmin was lower than the Kd for binding (0.2 microM compared with 0.5 microM on U937 cells; 0.34 microM compared with 1.6 microM on KATO III cells). A rapid transformation from Glu-plasminogen (native plasminogen with N-terminal Glu) to Lys-plasminogen (plasmin-degraded plasminogen with primarily N-terminal Lys-77) occurred on the surface of U937 cells (unlike KATO III cells), but this transition did not coincide with faster rates of plasminogen activation. From this evidence it is concluded that the accessibility of bound plasminogen acts to limit the rate of activation by cell-bound urokinase. The significance of this proposal is that the proteolytic potential of the cell-mediated activation of plasminogen would be controlled by the accessibility of plasminogen for activation rather than by the concentration of u-PAR (the latter may act to localize proteolysis to appropriate domains on the surface of the cell). PMID:7639718

  5. Influence of ACE I/D Polymorphism on Circulating Levels of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, D-Dimer, Ultrasensitive C-Reactive Protein and Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Sara Santos; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Sabino, Adriano de Paula; Evangelista, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo; Gomes, Karina Braga; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases are associated with coagulation disorders, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and fibrosis. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion polymorphism (ACE I/D polymorphism) has also be linked to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to compare plasma levels of ultrassensible C-reactive protein (usCRP), PAI-1, D-dimer and TGF-β1 in patients undergoing HD with different ACE I/D polymorphisms. Methods The study was performed in 138 patients at ESRD under hemodialysis therapy for more than six months. The patients were divided into three groups according to the genotype. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood cells (leukocytes). ACE I/D polymorphism was investigated by single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of D-dimer, PAI-1 and TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the determination of plasma levels of usCRP was performed by immunonephelometry. Data were analyzed by the software SigmaStat 2.03. Results Clinical characteristics were similar in patients with these three ACE I/D polymorphisms, except for interdialytic weight gain. I allele could be associated with higher interdialytic weight gain (P = 0.017). Patients genotyped as DD and as ID had significantly higher levels of PAI-1 than those with II genotype. Other laboratory parameters did not significantly differ among the three subgroups (P = 0.033). Despite not reaching statistical significance, plasma levels of usCRP were higher in patients carrying the D allele. Conclusion ACE I/D polymorphisms could be associated with changes in the regulation of sodium, fibrinolytic system, and possibly, inflammation. Our data showed that high levels of PAI-1 are detected when D allele is present, whereas greater interdialytic gain is associated with the presence of I allele. However, further studies with different experimental designs are necessary to elucidate the

  6. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    PubMed

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator. PMID:25442953

  7. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Masson, C; Angles-Cano, E

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) by the fast-acting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was investigated in homogeneous (plasma) and heterogeneous (solid-phase fibrin) systems by using radioisotopic and spectrophotometric analysis. It is demonstrated that fibrin-bound t-PA is protected from inhibition by PAI-1, whereas t-PA in soluble phase is rapidly inhibited (K1 = 10(7) M-1.s-1) even in the presence of 2 microM-plasminogen. The inhibitor interferes with the binding of t-PA to fibrin in a competitive manner. As a consequence the Kd of t-PA for fibrin (1.2 +/- 0.4 nM) increases and the maximal velocity of plasminogen activation by fibrin-bound t-PA is not modified. From the plot of the apparent Kd versus the concentration of PAI-1 a Ki value of 1.3 +/- 0.3 nM was calculated. The quasi-similar values for the dissociation constants between fibrin and t-PA (Kd) and between PAI-1 and t-PA (Ki), as well as the competitive type of inhibition observed, indicate that the fibrinolytic activity of human plasma may be the result of an equilibrium distribution of t-PA between both the amount of fibrin generated and the concentration of circulating inhibitor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3146972

  8. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  9. Characterization of the murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator system.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Collen, D

    1996-11-01

    The murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator (u-PA) system was studied using purified proteins, plasma and endothelioma cells. Recombinant murine u-PA was obtained as a single-chain molecule of 45 kDa which was converted to two-chain u-PA with plasmin by cleavage of the Lys159-Ile160 peptide bond. Murine plasminogen, purified from plasma as a single-chain protein of 95 kDa, was resistant to quantitative activation with murine recombinant two-chain u-PA: only 15% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C was obtained in mixtures of 1 microM plasminogen and 5 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas quantitative activation was observed in the autologous human system. Addition of 6-aminohexanoic acid to native murine plasminogen resulted in quantitative activation within 1 h. In murine plasma in vitro, plasminogen was also resistant to quantitative activation with u-PA (50% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C with 50 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas in the human system nearly quantitative activation was obtained). Murine plasma clots submerged in murine plasma were resistant to lysis with u-PA; < or = 2% clot lysis in 2 h was obtained with 80 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous murine system whereas 50% clot lysis in 2 h required only 15 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous human system. Saturable binding of murine recombinant two-chain u-PA was observed to murine endothelioma cells that are genetically deficient in u-PA (u-PA-/- End cells). Binding was characterized by a Kd of 5.5 nM and 800000 binding sites/cell. However, u-PA-/- End cells did not significantly stimulate the activation rate of murine plasminogen by murine recombinant two-chain u-PA and did not enhance the plasmin-mediated conversion rate of murine recombinant single-chain u-PA to its two-chain derivative. Murine recombinant two-chain u-PA bound to murine endothelioma cells was quantitatively inhibited by murine plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Thus

  10. ACE inhibition reduces infarction in normotensive but not hypertensive rats: correlation with cortical ACE activity

    PubMed Central

    Porritt, Michelle J; Chen, Michelle; Rewell, Sarah S J; Dean, Rachael G; Burrell, Louise M; Howells, David W

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition can reduce stroke risk by up to 43% in humans and reduce the associated disability, and hence understanding the mechanism of improvement is important. In animals and humans, these effects may be independent of the blood pressure-lowering effects of ACE inhibition. Normotensive (Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)) and hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)) animals were treated with the ACE inhibitors ramipril or lisinopril for 7 or 42 days before 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Blood pressure, serum ACE, and blood glucose levels were measured and stroke infarct volume was recorded 24 hours after stroke. Despite greater reductions in blood pressure, infarct size was not improved by ACE inhibition in hypertensive animals. Short-term ACE inhibition produced only a modest reduction in blood pressure, but WKY rats showed marked reductions in infarct volume. Long-term ACE inhibition had additional reductions in blood pressure; however, infarct volumes in WKY rats did not improve further but worsened. WKY rats differed from SHR in having marked cortical ACE activity that was highly sensitive to ACE inhibition. The beneficial effects of ACE inhibition on infarct volume in normotensive rats do not correlate with changes in blood pressure. However, WKY rats have ACE inhibitor-sensitive cortical ACE activity that is lacking in the SHR. PMID:20407464

  11. A miniaturized fibrinolytic assay for plasminogen activators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Damron, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a micro-clot lysis assay (MCLA) for evaluating fibrinolytic activity of plasminogen activators (PA). Fibrin clots were formed in wells of microtiter plates. Lysis of the clots by PA, indicated by change in turbidity (optical density, OD), was monitored with a microplate reader at five minutes intervals. Log-log plots of PA dilution versus endpoint, the time at which the OD value was halfway between the maximum and minimum value for each well, were linear over a broad range of PA concentrations (2-200 International units/ml). The MCLA is a modification and miniaturization of well established fibrinolytic methods. The significant practical advantages of the MCLA are that it is a simple, relatively sensitive, non-radioactive, quantitative, kinetic, fibrinolytic micro-technique which can be automated.

  12. The extracellular matrix proteins laminin and fibronectin contain binding domains for human plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Moser, T L; Enghild, J J; Pizzo, S V; Stack, M S

    1993-09-01

    This study describes the binding of plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and laminin. Plasminogen bound specifically and saturably to both fibronectin and laminin immobilized on microtiter wells, with Kd(app) values of 115 and 18 nM, respectively. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase V8 coupled with ligand blotting analysis showed that both plasminogen and t-PA preferentially bind to a 55-kDa fibronectin fragment and a 38-kDa laminin fragment. Amino acid sequence analysis demonstrated that the 5-kDa fragment originates with the fibronectin amino terminus whereas the laminin fragment was derived from the carboxyl-terminal globular domain of the laminin A chain. Ligand blotting experiments using isolated plasminogen domains were also used to identify distinct regions of the plasminogen molecule involved in fibronectin and laminin binding. Solution phase fibronectin binding to immobilized plasminogen was mediated primarily via lysine binding site-dependent interactions with plasminogen kringles 1-4. Lysine binding site-dependent binding of soluble laminin to immobilized plasminogen kringles 1-5 as well as an additional lysine binding site-independent interaction between mini-plasminogen and the 38-kDa laminin A chain fragment were also observed. These studies demonstrate binding of plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator to specific regions of the extracellular matrix glycoproteins laminin and fibronectin and provide further insight into the mechanism of regulation of plasminogen activation by components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:8360181

  13. Increased alveolar plasminogen activator in early asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, A.; Allard, C.; Begin, R.

    1989-03-01

    Alveolar macrophage-derived plasminogen activator (PA) activity is decreased in some chronic interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis but increased in experimental models of acute alveolitis. Although asbestos fibers can stimulate alveolar macrophages (AM) to release PA in vitro, the effect of chronic asbestos exposure of the lower respiratory tract on lung PA activity remains unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate PA activity of alveolar macrophages and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in asbestos-exposed sheep and asbestos workers. Forty-three sheep were exposed to either 100 mg UICC chrysotile B asbestos in 100 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or to 100 ml PBS by tracheal infusion every 2 wk for 18 months. At Month 18, chest roentgenograms were analyzed and alveolar macrophage and extracellular fluid PA activity were measured in samples obtained by BAL. Alveolar macrophage PA activity was increased in the asbestos-exposed sheep compared to control sheep (87.2 +/- 17.3 versus 41.1 +/- 7.2 U/10(5) AM-24 h, p less than 0.05) as was the BAL fluid PA activity (674.9 +/- 168.4 versus 81.3 +/- 19.7 U/mg alb-24 h, p less than 0.01). Among the asbestos-exposed sheep, 10 had normal chest roentgenograms (Group SA) and 15 had irregular interstitial opacities (Group SB). Strikingly, whereas Group SA did not differ from the control group in BAL cellularity or PA activity, Group SB had marked increases in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.005), AM PA activity (p less than 0.02), and BAL PA activity (p less than 0.001) compared to the control group.

  14. Minor Role of Plasminogen in Complement Activation on Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation. PMID:26637181

  15. Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Levels in Patients with Acute Paraquat Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Su-Jin; Kim, Su-Ji; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) plasma levels, and their possible implications on clinical outcome, we measured tPA and PAI-1 levels in 101 patients with acute paraquat (PQ) intoxication. The control group consisted of patients who ingested non-PQ pesticides during the same period. tPA and PAI-1 levels were higher in the PQ group than in the controls. PQ levels were significantly correlated with ingested amount, timelag to hospital, tPA level, and hospitalization duration. tPA levels were correlated with PAI-1, fibrin degradation product (FDP), and D-dimer. D-dimer levels were lower in the PQ group than in the controls. Univariate analysis indicated the following significant determinants of death: age, ingested amount, PQ level, timelag to hospital, serum creatinine, lipase, pH, pCO2, HCO3-, WBC, FDP, PAI-1, and tPA. However, multivariate analysis indicated that only PQ level was significant independent factor predicting death. In conclusion, tPA and PAI-1 levels were higher, while D-dimer levels were lower in the PQ group than in the controls, implying that ROS stimulate tPA and PAI-1, but PAI-1 activity overrides tPA activity in this setting. Decreased fibrinolytic activity appears to be one of the clinical characteristics of acute PQ intoxication. PMID:21468253

  16. Circadian fluctuations of tissue plasminogen activator antigen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigens in vasospastic angina.

    PubMed

    Sakata, K; Hoshino, T; Yoshida, H; Ono, N; Ohtani, S; Yokoyama, S; Mori, N; Kaburagi, T; Kurata, C; Urano, T

    1992-10-01

    To elucidate the circadian variation of fibrinolytic components in vasospastic angina, plasma levels of tissue plasminogen activator antigen (t-PA), free plasminogen activator inhibitor antigen (free PAI-1), t-PA/PAI-1 complex, and total PAI-1 were measured in venous plasma samples. Samples were taken every 6 hours (6:00 AM, noon, 6:00 PM, and midnight) for 24 hours in 14 patients with vasospastic angina, in 9 patients with exertional angina, and in 19 normal subjects. Twenty-four-hour Holter monitoring (Holter monitor, Del Mar Avionics, Irvine, Calif.) was also carried out in all subjects. All of the fibrinolytic components showed circadian variation, with a peak level at 6:00 AM in every study group except for the t-PA/PAI-1 complex in the group of patients with exertional angina. The values for all or the fibrinolytic components at each sampling time were higher in patients with coronary artery disease than in normal subjects. In particular, the mean value of free PAI-1 at 6:00 AM in patients with vasospastic angina was significantly higher than that in normal subjects and that in patients with exertional angina. This value of free PAI-1 in patients with vasospastic angina was closely associated with the duration of ischemic attacks. These results suggested that the circadian fluctuation of fibrinolytic components may be an important factor that leads to coronary thrombosis at the time of coronary spasm, especially in the early morning. PMID:1529901

  17. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A.; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  18. Structural basis of specific inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activators inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lihu; Liu, Min; Zeng, Tu; Shi, Xiaoli; Yuan, Cai; Andreasen, Peter A; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-03-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of death worldwide [1]. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is the FDA-approved thrombolytic drug for ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. tPA is a multi-domain serine protease of the trypsin-family [2] and catalyses the critical step in fibrinolysis [3], converting the zymogen plasminogen to the active serine protease plasmin, which degrades the fibrin network of thrombi and blood clots. tPA is rapidly inactivated by endogenous plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) [4] (Fig. 1). Engineering on tPA to reduce its inhibition by PAI-1 without compromising its thrombolytic effect is a continuous effort [5]. Tenecteplase (TNK-tPA) is a newer generation of tPA variant showing slower inhibition by PAI-1 [6]. Extensive studies to understand the molecular interactions between tPA and PAI-1 have been carried out [7], [8], [9], [10], [11], [12], [13], [14], [15], [16], [17], [18], however, the precise details at atomic resolution remain unknown. We report the crystal structure of tPA·PAI-1 complex here. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a PAI-1 variant (14-1B) containing four mutations (N150H, K154T, Q319L, and M354I), and a tPA serine protease domain (tPA-SPD) variant with three mutations (C122A, N173Q, and S195A, in the chymotrypsin numbering) [19]; (2) formation of a tPA-SPD·PAI-1 Michaëlis complex in vitro [19]; and (3) solving the three-dimensional structure for this complex by X-ray crystallography [deposited in the PDB database as 5BRR]. The data explain the specificity of PAI-1 for tPA and uPA [19], [20], and provide structural basis to design newer generation of PAI-1-resistant tPA variants as thrombolytic agents [19]. PMID:26909366

  19. Urokinase and type I plasminogen activator inhibitor production by normal human hepatocytes: modulation by inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Busso, N; Nicodeme, E; Chesne, C; Guillouzo, A; Belin, D; Hyafil, F

    1994-07-01

    We examined the effects of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta) on the plasminogen activator system (urokinase, tissue-type plasminogen activator, type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor) in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. We show that interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increase urokinase-type plasminogen activator production, reinforcing the concept that increased urokinase production is associated with inflammatory processes. By contrast, the same agents (i.e., interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) do not stimulate plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 production. This latter observation rules out hepatocytes as a major cellular source of plasmatic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 during acute-phase-related responses. Among the inflammatory agents used, transforming growth factor-beta was found to be the most effective modulator of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, inducing severalfold increases of activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, antigen and the corresponding mRNA and increasing plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 antigen and mRNA levels. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 modulation by transforming growth factor-beta may play a critical role in hepatic pathophysiology. PMID:8020888

  20. Use of mouse models to study plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Paul J; Gils, Ann; De Taeye, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and therefore plays an important role in the plasminogen/plasmin system. PAI-1 is involved in a variety of cardiovascular diseases (mainly through inhibition of t-PA) as well as in cell migration and tumor development (mainly through inhibition of u-PA and interaction with vitronectin). PAI-1 is a unique member of the serpin superfamily, exhibiting particular unique conformational and functional properties. Since its involvement in various biological and pathophysiological processes PAI-1 has been the subject of many in vivo studies in mouse models. We briefly discuss structural and physiological differences between human and mouse PAI-1 that should be taken into account prior to extrapolation of data obtained in mouse models to the human situation. The current review provides an overview of the various models, with a focus on cardiovascular disease and cancer, using wild-type mice or genetically modified mice, either deficient in PAI-1 or overexpressing different variants of PAI-1. PMID:21683250

  1. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator is quiescent in human plasma in the absence of fibrin unlike human tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Gardell, S J; Hare, T R; Bergum, P W; Cuca, G C; O'Neill-Palladino, L; Zavodny, S M

    1990-12-15

    The vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (Bat-PA) is a potent PA that exhibits remarkable selectivity toward fibrin-bound plasminogen (Gardell et al, J Biol Chem 256: 3568, 1989). Herein, we describe the activity of recombinant DNA-derived Bat-PA (rBat-PA) in a human plasma milieu. rBat-PA and recombinant human single-chain tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) are similarly efficacious at lysing plasma clots. In stark contrast to rt-PA, the addition of 250 nmol/L rBat-PA to plasma in the absence of a clot failed to deplete plasminogen, alpha 2-antiplasmin and fibrinogen. The lytic activities exhibited by finger-domain minus Bat-PA (F- rBat-PA) and finger and epidermal growth factor-like domains minus Bat-PA (FG- rBat-PA) were less than rBat-PA, especially at low concentrations of PA; nevertheless, these truncated forms also possessed a strict requirement for a fibrin cofactor. The loss of PA activity following the addition of rBat-PA to plasma was slower than that observed when either rt-PA or two-chain rt-PA was added. The efficacy, fibrin selectivity, and decreased susceptibility to inactivation exhibited by rBat-PA in vitro in a human plasma milieu suggests that rBat-PA may be superior to rt-PA for the treatment of thrombotic complications. PMID:2124935

  2. Immunohistochemical Detection of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator and Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in Canine Vascular Endothelial Tumours.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sh; Yanai, T; Sakai, H

    2015-11-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPA receptor (uPAR) in 57 canine primary haemangiosarcomas (HSAs), 26 canine cutaneous haemangiomas (HAs) and in control sections of canine cutaneous granulation tissue. The correlation between uPA/uPAR expression and the Ki67 labelling index (LI) was estimated in the HSA and HA tissues. uPA was expressed by 73.2% and 75.0% of splenic HSAs and non-splenic HSAs, respectively. All HSA tissues tested expressed uPAR. Expression of both molecules was significantly higher in HSAs than in cutaneous HAs (3.8% for uPA and 30.7% for uPAR). The average Ki67 LI of the uPA(+)/uPAR(+) HSAs was significantly higher than that of uPA(-)/uPAR(+) HSAs and HA tissues (mean ± SDs 32.8 ± 15.3, 15.2 ± 7.2 and 2.1 ± 0.7, respectively; P <0.05). These results suggest that uPA and uPAR play a significant role in the malignant proliferation of canine HSA, regardless of the primary origin of the tumour. PMID:26286429

  3. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  4. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen Induced by Low Dose UVB

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Manuel; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn; Campos, Sara R. R.; Baptista, António M.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760–765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the elimination of

  5. Biochemical assays on plasminogen activators and hormones from kidney sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were established for the purpose of analyzing the conditioned media from human embryonic kidney cell subpopulations separated in space by electrophoresis. This data is based on the experiments performed on STS-8 on the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The primary biological activity that was analyzed was plasminogen activator activity, but some assays for erythropoeitin and human granulocyte colony stimulating activity were also performed. It is concluded that a battery of assays are required to completely define the plasminogen activator profile of a conditioned media from cell culture. Each type of assay measures different parts of the mixture and are influenced by different parameters. The functional role of each assay is given along with an indication of which combination of assays are required to answer specific questions. With this type of information it is possible by combinations of assays with mathematical analysis to pinpoint a specific component of the system.

  6. Secretion of macrophage urokinase plasminogen activator is dependent on proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pejler, Gunnar; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Vuong, Tram T; Henningsson, Frida; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Kimata, Koji; Kolset, Svein O

    2003-10-01

    The importance of proteoglycans for secretion of proteolytic enzymes was studied in the murine macrophage cell line J774. Untreated or 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated macrophages were treated with hexyl-beta-d-thioxyloside to interfere with the attachment of glycosaminoglycan chains to their respective protein cores. Activation of the J774 macrophages with PMA resulted in increased secretion of trypsin-like serine proteinase activity. This activity was completely inhibited by plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and by amiloride, identifying the activity as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Treatment of both the unstimulated or PMA-stimulated macrophages with xyloside resulted in decreased uPA activity and Western blotting analysis revealed an almost complete absence of secreted uPA protein after xyloside treatment of either control- or PMA-treated cells. Zymography analyses with gels containing both gelatin and plasminogen confirmed these findings. The xyloside treatment did not reduce the mRNA levels for uPA, indicating that the effect was at the post-translational level. Treatment of the macrophages with xylosides did also reduce the levels of secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for proteoglycans in the secretion of uPA and MMP-9. PMID:14511379

  7. Pneumococcal phosphoglycerate kinase interacts with plasminogen and its tissue activator.

    PubMed

    Fulde, M; Bernardo-García, N; Rohde, M; Nachtigall, N; Frank, R; Preissner, K T; Klett, J; Morreale, A; Chhatwal, G S; Hermoso, J A; Bergmann, S

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is not only a commensal of the nasopharyngeal epithelium, but may also cause life-threatening diseases. Immune-electron microscopy studies revealed that the bacterial glycolytic enzyme, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), is localised on the pneumococcal surface of both capsulated and non-capsulated strains and colocalises with plasminogen. Since pneumococci may concentrate host plasminogen (PLG) together with its activators on the bacterial cell surface to facilitate the formation of plasmin, the involvement of PGK in this process was studied. Specific binding of human or murine PLG to strain-independent PGK was documented, and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicated a high affinity interaction with the kringle domains 1-4 of PLG. Crystal structure determination of pneumococcal PGK together with peptide array analysis revealed localisation of PLG-binding site in the N-terminal region and provided structural motifs for the interaction with PLG. Based on structural analysis data, a potential interaction of PGK with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was proposed and experimentally confirmed by binding studies, plasmin activity assays and thrombus degradation analyses. PMID:24196407

  8. Altered expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor in high-risk soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Benassi, M S; Ponticelli, F; Azzoni, E; Gamberi, G; Pazzaglia, L; Chiechi, A; Conti, A; Spessotto, P; Scapolan, M; Pignotti, E; Bacchini, P; Picci, P

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, classification of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) has improved with cytogenetic analyses, but their clinical behavior is still not easily predictable. The aim of this study was to detect alterations in the urokinase-type plasminogen system, involved in tumor growth and invasion, by comparing mRNA levels of its components with those of paired normal tissues, and relating them with patient clinical course. Real-time PCR was performed on human STS cell lines and tissues from highly malignant STS, including leiomyosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas, to evaluate the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Immunohistochemistry of gene products was also performed. Median mRNA values of all genes studied were higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues. In agreement with data on STS cell lines, significant up-regulation for uPA and PAI-1 genes compared to reference values was seen. Moreover, different levels of expression were related to histotype and metastatic phenotype. There was accordance between uPA mRNA and protein expression, while immunodetection of PAI-1 product was weak and scattered. Clearly, the controversial role of PAI-1 protein requires further biological analyses, but evident involvement of uPA/PAI-1 gene overexpression in STS malignancy may highlight a molecular defect useful in discriminating STS high-risk patients. PMID:17523079

  9. Serum-derived plasminogen is activated by apoptotic cells and promotes their phagocytic clearance.

    PubMed

    Rosenwald, Matthias; Koppe, Uwe; Keppeler, Hildegard; Sauer, Guido; Hennel, Roman; Ernst, Anne; Blume, Karin Erika; Peter, Christoph; Herrmann, Martin; Belka, Claus; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Wesselborg, Sebastian; Lauber, Kirsten

    2012-12-15

    The elimination of apoptotic cells, called efferocytosis, is fundamentally important for tissue homeostasis and prevents the onset of inflammation and autoimmunity. Serum proteins are known to assist in this complex process. In the current study, we performed a multistep chromatographic fractionation of human serum and identified plasminogen, a protein involved in fibrinolysis, wound healing, and tissue remodeling, as a novel serum-derived factor promoting apoptotic cell removal. Even at levels significantly lower than its serum concentration, purified plasminogen strongly enhanced apoptotic prey cell internalization by macrophages. Plasminogen acted mainly on prey cells, whereas on macrophages no enhancement of the engulfment process was observed. We further demonstrate that the efferocytosis-promoting activity essentially required the proteolytic activation of plasminogen and was completely abrogated by the urokinase plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and serine protease inhibitor aprotinin. Thus, our study assigns a new function to plasminogen and plasmin in apoptotic cell clearance. PMID:23150713

  10. Localization of the binding site of tissue-type plasminogen activator to fibrin.

    PubMed Central

    Ichinose, A; Takio, K; Fujikawa, K

    1986-01-01

    Functionally active A and B chains were separated from a two-chain form of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator after mild reduction and alkylation. The A chain was found to be responsible for the binding to lysine-Sepharose or fibrin and the B chain contained the catalytic activity of tissue-type plasminogen activator. An extensive reduction of two-chain tissue-type plasminogen activator, however, destroyed both the binding and catalytic activities. A thermolytic fragment, Fr. 1, of tissue-type plasminogen activator that contained a growth factor and two kringle segments retained its lysine binding activity. Additional thermolytic cleavages in the kringle-2 segment of Fr. 1 caused a total loss of the binding activity. These results indicated that the binding site of tissue-type plasminogen activator to fibrin was located in the kringle-2 segment. Images PMID:3088041

  11. Imaging Active Urokinase Plasminogen Activator in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Sevillano, Natalia; Markham, Kate; Winter, Michael B.; Murphy, Stephanie T.; Hostetter, Daniel R.; West, James; Lowman, Henry; Craik, Charles S.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    The increased proteolytic activity of membrane-bound and secreted proteases on the surface of cancer cells and in the transformed stroma is a common characteristic of aggressive metastatic prostate cancer. We describe here the development of an active site-specific probe for detecting a secreted peritumoral protease expressed by cancer cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Using a human fragment antigen binding phage display library, we identified a human antibody termed U33 that selectively inhibited the active form of the protease urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA, PLAU). In the full-length immunoglobulin form, U33 IgG labeled with near-infrared fluorophores or radionuclides allowed us to non-invasively detect active uPA in prostate cancer xenograft models using optical and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging modalities. U33 IgG labeled with 111In had a remarkable tumor uptake of 43.2% injected dose per gram (%ID/g) 72hr post tail vein injection of the radiolabeled probe in subcutaneous xenografts. Additionally, U33 was able to image active uPA in small soft-tissue and osseous metastatic lesions using a cardiac dissemination prostate cancer model that recapitulated metastatic human cancer. The favorable imaging properties were the direct result of U33 IgG internalization through an uPA receptor mediated mechanism where U33 mimicked the function of the endogenous inhibitor of uPA to gain entry into the cancer cell. Overall, our imaging probe targets a prostate cancer-associated protease, through a unique mechanism, allowing for the non-invasive preclinical imaging of prostate cancer lesions. PMID:25672980

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and activity in Alzheimer's disease: differences in brain and CSF ACE and association with ACE1 genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miners, Scott; Ashby, Emma; Baig, Shabnam; Harrison, Rachel; Tayler, Hannah; Speedy, Elizabeth; Prince, Jonathan A; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD): ACE1 variations influence plasma ACE and risk of AD, and ACE is increased in AD brain. We measured frontal ACE level and activity in 89 AD and 51 control brains, and post-mortem CSF from 101 cases and 19 controls. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level and Braak stage were used to indicate neuronal preservation and disease progression. We genotyped the common ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism, rs4343, rs1800764 and rs4921. ACE activity was elevated in AD and correlated with Braak stage. Crude ACE levels were unchanged but adjustment for NSE suggested increased neuronal ACE production with Braak stage. Exposing SH-SY-5Y neurons to oligomeric Aβ1-42 increased ACE level and activity, suggesting Aβ may upregulate ACE in AD. In CSF, ACE level but not activity was reduced in AD. ACE1 genotype did not predict ACE level or activity in brain or CSF. ACE activity and neuronal production increase in AD brain, possibly in response to Aβ. Peripheral measurements do not reflect ACE activity in the brain. PMID:19956428

  13. Differences between neonates and adults in tissue-type-plasminogen activator (t-PA)-catalyzed plasminogen activation with various effectors and in carbohydrate sequences of fibrinogen chains.

    PubMed

    Ries, M; Easton, R L; Longstaff, C; Zenker, M; Corran, P H; Morris, H R; Dell, A; Gaffney, P J

    2001-08-01

    Our study investigates the effect of fetal and adult soluble fibrin (SF), fetal and adult fibrinogen Aalpha- and gamma-chains, as well as adult CNBr-fibrinogen fragments on tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA)-catalyzed plasminogen activation of both fetal and adult Glu-plasminogen types 1 and 2. In addition, we determined carbohydrate sequences of fetal and adult Bbeta- and gamma-chains by mass spectrometric analysis. In the absence of an effector, no substantial differences in the rate of plasmin formation could be seen between the fetal and adult plasminogen types. In the presence of an effector, both fetal Glu-plasminogen types revealed lower values for k(cat app) than the respective adult types. No differences could be seen in the values for K(m app). The resulting differences in catalytic efficiencies between the fetal and adult plasminogen types were much less than previously reported. No differences could be seen between fetal and adult effectors in stimulating t-PA-catalyzed plasminogen activation. Detailed analyses of the activation kinetics revealed a longer initial phase of slow plasmin formation of both fetal Glu-plasminogen types compared to their respective adult types, indicating a slower plasmin-induced modification of CNBr-fibrinogen fragments or SF by fetal plasmin. Mass spectrometric analysis of the N-glycans present on adult and fetal Bbeta- and gamma-fibrinogen chains showed the presence of a major monosialylated biantennary structure with lesser amounts of the disialylated form. In contrast to previous data, we conclude that catalytic efficiency of t-PA-catalyzed plasminogen activation in neonates is only slightly lower than in adults. PMID:11672579

  14. The influence of fibrin(ogen) fragments on the kinetic parameters of the tissue-type plasminogen-activator-mediated activation of different forms of plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, W; Voskuilen, M; Vermond, A; Hoegee-de Nobel, B; Traas, D W

    1988-05-16

    In the present work we have determined Km,app and kcat,app values for tissue-type plasminogen-activator-catalyzed activation of Glu-plasminogen, Lys-plasminogen and mini-plasminogen in the absence and in the presence of fibrinogen-derived fragments. These were CNBr fragment 2, the A alpha chain remnant of CNBr fragment 2 (A alpha 148-207) and plasmin-generated fragment D-EGTA. The time course of plasmin formation from the various types of plasminogen (plg) was measured spectrophotometrically in a coupled assay system where D-valyl-L-leucyl-L-lysine p-nitroanilide served as a plasmin substrate. The kinetic constants are summarized as follows. (Values in parentheses are concentrations at which the minimum Km,app and maximum kcat,app value is reached.) (Table: see text). In conclusion our results show that CNBr fragment 2, A alpha 148-207 and to some extent D-EGTA mimic the accelerating effect of fibrin. The first two of these fragments did not accelerate activation of mini-plasminogen, lacking the kringle structures I-IV. This suggests that the stimulating effects of these two fragments were dependent on the presence of kringles I-IV of the plasminogen molecule. PMID:3131143

  15. Skin abnormalities in mice transgenic for plasminogen activator inhibitor 1: implications for the regulation of desquamation and follicular neogenesis by plasminogen activator enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lyons-Giordano, B; Lazarus, G S

    1995-08-01

    Plasminogen activator enzymes have been implicated in the regulation of growth, migration, and differentiation which occur continually in normal epidermis and cyclically in the hair follicle. To elucidate further the importance of plasminogen activation in epidermal physiology, studies were conducted using mice transgenic for human plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). The epidermis of the newborn (4-7 days) transgenic mice was flaky and showed delayed hair growth compared to that of their control littermates. Histologic analyses revealed a greatly thickened stratum corneum in the transgenics. By 2 weeks after birth, no differences in epidermal morphology were apparent between transgenic and control littermates. Using in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and in situ reverse zymography techniques, epidermal PAI-1 expression was correlated temporally with the aberrant epidermal morphology. These data implicate plasminogen activator activity in the regulation of epidermal shedding and follicular neogenesis. PMID:7649363

  16. Tissue plasminogen activator-based clot busting: Controlled delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Elkholi, Islam E.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Thrombosis, the formation of blood clot (thrombus) in the circulatory system obstructing the blood flow, is one of the main causes behind various ischemic arterial syndromes such as ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction, as well as vein syndromes such as deep vein thrombosis, and consequently, pulmonary emboli. Several thrombolytic agents have been developed for treating thrombosis, the most common being tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), administrated systemically or locally via IV infusion directly proximal to the thrombus, with the aim of restoring and improving the blood flow. TPA triggers the dissolution of thrombi by inducing the conversion of plasminogen to protease plasmin followed by fibrin digestion that eventually leads to clot lysis. Although tPA provides powerful thrombolytic activity, it has many shortcomings, including poor pharmacokinetic profiles, impairment of the reestablishment of normal coronary flow, and impairment of hemostasis, leading to life-threatening bleeding consequences. The bleeding consequence is ascribed to the ability of tPA to circulate throughout the body and therefore can lysis all blood clots in the circulation system, even the good ones that prevent the bleeding and promote injury repair. This review provides an overview of the different delivery approaches for tPA including: liposomes, ultrasound-triggered thrombolysis, anti-fibrin antibody-targeted tPA, camouflaged-tPA, tpA-loaded microcarriers, and nano-modulated delivery approaches. PMID:25780787

  17. Structural basis of the cofactor function of denatured albumin in plasminogen activation by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Galántai, Rita; Módos, Károly; Fidy, Judit; Kolev, Krasimir; Machovich, Raymund

    2006-03-17

    Certain denatured proteins function as cofactors in the activation of plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator. The present study approached the structural requirements for the cofactor activity of a model protein (human serum albumin). Heat denaturation of 100-230 microM albumin (80 degrees C and 60-90 min) reproducibly yielded aggregates with radius in the range of 10-150 nm. The major determinant of the cofactor potency was the size of the aggregates. The increase of particle size correlated with the cofactor activity, and there was a minimal requirement for the size of the cofactor (about 10 nm radius). Similar to other proteins, the molecular aggregates with cofactor function contained a significant amount of antiparallel intermolecular beta-sheets. Plasmin pre-digestion increased the cofactor efficiency (related to C-terminal lysine exposure) and did not affect profoundly the structure of the aggregates, suggesting a long-lasting and even a self-augmenting cofactor function of the denatured protein. PMID:16438933

  18. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  19. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and angiotensin converting enzyme polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Shakarami, Fatemeh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Zare Karizi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) defined by two or more failed pregnancies before 20 weeks of gestation. Several factors play a role in RPL including thrombophilic conditions which can be influenced by gene polymorphisms. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genes are closely related to fibrinolytic process, embryonic development and pregnancy success. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between RPL and common polymorphisms in ACE and PAI-1 genes. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 100 women with recurrent abortions (at least two) were selected as cases and 100 healthy women with two or more normal term deliveries without a history of abortion as controls. Total genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The status of the PAI-1 4G/5G and ACE (D/I) polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP. Results: Homozygosity for PAI-1 4G polymorphism was seen in 17 cases (17%), and 5 controls (5%) (p=0.006) so patients with homozygote 4G mutation were significantly more prone to RPL in contrast to control group (OR: 4.63, % 95 CI: 1.55-13.84). In addition, 7 patients (7 %), and no one from the control group, were homozygote (I/I) for ACE polymorphism (p=0.034), suggesting no significant associations between ACE D allele or DD genotype and RPL. Conclusion: Considering these results, because 4G/4G polymorphism for PAI-1 gene could be a thrombophilic variant leading to abortion, analysis of this mutation and other susceptibility factors are recommended in patients with RPL. PMID:26644791

  20. Schistosomes Enhance Plasminogen Activation: The Role of Tegumental Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Barbara C.; Da'dara, Akram A.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Skelly, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease of global public health importance. These relatively large parasites are able to survive prolonged periods in the human vasculature without inducing stable blood clots around them. We show here that the intravascular life stages (schistosomula and adult males and females) can all promote significant plasminogen (PLMG) activation in the presence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). This results in the generation of the potent fibrinolytic agent plasmin which could degrade blood clots forming around the worms in vivo. We demonstrate that S. mansoni enolase (SmEno) is a host-interactive tegumental enzyme that, in recombinant form, can bind PLMG and promote its activation. Like classical members of the enolase protein family, SmEno can catalyze the interconversion of 2-phospho-D-glycerate (2-PGA) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The enzyme has maximal activity at pH 7.5, requires Mg2+ for optimal activity and can be inhibited by NaF but not mefloquin. Suppressing expression of the SmEno gene significantly diminishes enolase mRNA levels, protein levels and surface enzyme activity but, surprisingly, does not affect the ability of the worms to promote PLMG activation. Thus, while SmEno can enhance PLMG activation, our analysis suggests that it is not the only contributor to the parasite’s ability to perform this function. We show that the worms possess several other PLMG-binding proteins in addition to SmEno and these may have a greater importance in schistosome-driven PLMG activation. PMID:26658895

  1. Key role of tissue plasminogen activator in neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Laibaik; Gallo, Eduardo F.; Anrather, Josef; Wang, Gang; Norris, Erin H.; Paul, Justin; Strickland, Sidney; Iadecola, Costantino

    2008-01-01

    The increase in blood flow evoked by synaptic activity is essential for normal brain function and underlies functional brain imaging signals. Nitric oxide, a vasodilator released by NMDA receptor activation, is critical for the flow increase, but the factors linking NMDA receptor activity to nitric oxide-dependent hyperemia are poorly understood. Here, we show that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease implicated in NMDA receptor signaling, is required for the flow increase evoked by somatosensory stimulation. tPA acts by facilitating neuronal nitric oxide release, but this effect does not involve enhancement of NMDA currents or the associated intracellular Ca2+ rise. Rather, the evidence suggests that tPA controls NMDA-dependent nitric oxide synthesis by influencing the phosphorylation state of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. These findings unveil a previously unrecognized role of tPA in vital homeostatic mechanisms coupling NMDA receptor signaling with nitric oxide synthesis and local cerebral perfusion. PMID:18195371

  2. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator exhibits a strict and fastidious requirement for polymeric fibrin as its cofactor, unlike human tissue-type plasminogen activator. A kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergum, P W; Gardell, S J

    1992-09-01

    The vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (BatPA) is virtually inactive toward Glu-plasminogen in the absence of a fibrin-like cofactor, unlike human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) (the kcat/Km values were 4 and 470 M-1 s-1, respectively). In the presence of fibrin II, tPA and BatPA activated Glu-plasminogen with comparable catalytic efficiencies (158,000 and 174,000 M-1 s-1, respectively). BatPA's cofactor requirement was partially satisfied by polymeric fibrin I (54,000 M-1 s-1), but monomeric fibrin I was virtually ineffective (970 M-1 s-1). By comparison, a variety of monomeric and polymeric fibrin-like species markedly enhanced tPA-mediated activation of Glu-plasminogen. Fragment X polymer was 2-fold better but 9-fold worse as cofactor for tPA and BatPA, respectively, relative to fibrin II. Fibrinogen, devoid of plasminogen, was a 10-fold better cofactor for tPA than fibrinogen rigorously depleted of plasminogen, Factor XIII, and fibronectin; the enhanced stimulatory effect of the less-purified fibrinogen was apparently due to the presence of Factor XIII. By contrast, the two fibrinogen preparations were equally poor cofactors of BatPA-mediated activation of Glu-plasminogen. BatPA possessed only 23 and 4% of the catalytic efficiencies of tPA and two-chain tPA, respectively, in hydrolyzing the chromogenic substrate Spectrozyme tPA. However in the presence of fibrin II, BatPA and tPA exhibited similar kcat/Km values for the hydrolysis of Spectrozyme tPA. Our data revealed that BatPA, unlike tPA, displayed a strict and fastidious requirement for polymeric fibrin I or II. Consequently, BatPA may preferentially promote plasmin generation during a narrow temporal window of fibrin formation and dissolution. PMID:1387641

  3. Sensitive, coupled assay for plasminogen activator using a thiol ester substrate for plasmin

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, P L; Green, G D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Several assays for plasminogen activator employ a direct assay method. These are remarkably sensitive methods, yet they suffer in comparison to the sensitivity of coupled methods. Coupling the assay with plasminogen not only amplifies the sensitivity by the multiplicative effect of plasmin, but insures that only those proteases specific for plasminogen are assayed. The choice of substrate for plasmin is critical. A thiol ester substrate, thiobenzyl benzyloxy-carbonyl-L-lysinate (Z-Lys-SBzl), has been synthesized which combines high k/sub cat/ with alkaline stability. In an effort to characterize the plasminogen activator from hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) and its hormonally-controlled inhibitor, Z-Lys-SBzl was used in a coupled approach providing an assay which is superior to the /sup 125/I-fibrinolytic assay. It is also extremely sensitive to plasminogen activator and can be used for routine analysis of purification as well as kinetic and binding studies. (ERB)

  4. Plasminogen-Dependent Matriptase Activation Accelerates Plasmin Generation by Differentiating Primary Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Yin, Shi; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Johnson, Michael D; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-06-01

    Pericellular plasmin generation, an important pathophysiological process, can be initiated and accelerated by the autoactivation of the type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase and subsequent activation of urokinase plasminogen activator. The link between matriptase and plasminogen was initially thought to be one-directional: from matriptase, through plasminogen activator, to plasminogen. However, in the current study, we now show that primary human keratinocytes that are undergoing calcium-induced differentiation can rapidly activate matriptase in response to serum treatment via a mechanism dependent on intracellular calcium, protein kinase C, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases-based signaling. The serum factor, responsible for the induction of matriptase zymogen activation, was shown to be plasminogen. A sub-pM concentration of plasminogen (but not plasmin) acting at the cell surface is sufficient to induce matriptase activation, suggesting high potency and specificity of the induction. After matriptase zymogen activation, a proportion of active matriptase is shed into extracellular milieu and returns to the cell surface to accelerate plasmin generation. The ability of plasminogen to induce matriptase zymogen activation and the subsequent acceleration of plasmin generation by active matriptase reveals a feed-forward mechanism that allows differentiating human keratinocytes to rapidly and robustly activate pericellular proteolysis. PMID:26872599

  5. Binding and activation of plasminogen at the surface of Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Holm, Karin; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium, which has been suggested to be a normal inhabitant of the oral flora. In rare cases, it can invade the tonsils and deeper tissues, causing the serious condition Lemièrre's syndrome. Recruitment of host plasminogen is a well-known bacterial virulence mechanism, and plasmin activity at the bacterial surface is thought to be important for bacterial invasion. Herein we show that plasminogen can be recruited to the surface of F. necrophorum, that surface-bound plasminogen is more easily converted to active plasmin than plasminogen in buffer, and that bound plasminogen is protected against inactivation by α2-antiplasmin. These findings add to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Lemièrre's syndrome. PMID:23583624

  6. Alterations in plasminogen activation correlate with epithelial cell dysplasia grading in colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Protiva, P.; Sordat, I.; Chaubert, P.; Saraga, E.; Trân-Thang, C.; Sordat, B.; Blum, A. L.; Dorta, G.

    1998-01-01

    Proteases are important for neoplastic invasion but a specific role for the plasminogen activator system in the progression of colorectal epithelial dysplasia to adenomatous lesions remains unclear. Consecutive tissue cryosections of 51 adenomas, 49 distant mucosa samples and five mucosa samples from control subjects were histopathologically analysed for dysplasia grade and tissue type, urokinase plasminogen activator levels and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) using immunosorbent methods. Plasminogen activation and urokinase-mediated proteolytic activity levels were assessed using in situ zymography. Plasminogen activation and tissue-type activator levels were lower in adenomas than in mucosae (P < 0.001). PAI-1 concentration and urokinase levels were higher in adenomas than in mucosae (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001 respectively). In adenomas, urokinase concentration increased in parallel with PAI-1, but only the urokinase levels correlated with the dysplasia grade (P < 0.01). Thus, the alterations in plasminogen activation correlated with epithelial cell dysplasia grading. In the mucosa to adenoma transition, a marked decrease in tissue-type plasminogen activator occurred. In adenomas, this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in urokinase and PAI-1. The urokinase level only continued to rise in parallel with the dysplasia grade. Resulting protease-antiprotease imbalance in high-grade dysplasia may represent the phenotypic change associated with malignant transformation and invasive behaviour. Images Figure 2 PMID:9461001

  7. Keeping the blood flowing—plasminogen activator genes and feeding behavior in vampire bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellgren-Roth, Åsa; Dittmar, Katharina; Massey, Steven E.; Kemi, Cecilia; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Savolainen, Peter; Lyons, Leslie A.; Liberles, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The blood feeding vampire bats emerged from New World leaf-nosed bats that fed on fruit and insects. Plasminogen activator, a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation, is known to be expressed in the saliva of Desmodus rotundus (common vampire bat) and is thought to be a key enzyme for the emergence of blood feeding in vampire bats. To better understand the evolution of this biological function, we studied the plasminogen activator (PA) genes from all vampire bat species in light of their feeding transition to bird and subsequently mammalian blood. We include the rare species Diphylla ecaudata and Diaemus youngi, where plasminogen activator had not previously been studied and demonstrate that PA gene duplication observed in Desmodus is not essential to the vampire phenotype, but relates to the emergence of predominant mammalian blood feeding in this species. Plasminogen activator has evolved through gene duplication, domain loss, and sequence evolution leading to change in fibrin-specificity and susceptibility to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Before undertaking this study, only the four plasminogen activator isoforms from Desmodus were known. The evolution of vampire bat plasminogen activators can now be linked phylogenetically to the transition in feeding behavior among vampire bat species from bird to mammalian blood.

  8. Physicochemical characteristics of magnetic microspheres containing tissue plasminogen activator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yumei; Kaminski, Michael D.; Torno, Michael D.; Finck, Martha R.; Liu, Xianqiao; Rosengart, Axel J.

    2007-04-01

    As a first step toward improving the treatment of stroke, we are developing a magnetic carrier system to target tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to a thrombosis. We report the characterization of biodegradable microspheres containing tPA and magnetic iron oxide. The resultant microspheres were superparamagnetic with a magnetization of 6.9-8.7 emu/g. We encapsulated 5% tPA by mass which eluted from the microspheres to produce a solution concentration of 5.3- 19.6 μg/mL in tPA, which exceeds the theoretical thrombolysis concentration. Although smaller microspheres will be necessary for in vivo experiments, we have shown that sufficient tPA can be encapsulated and released in a magnetic matrix.

  9. Tissue plasminogen activator regulates Purkinje neuron development and survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianxue; Yu, Lili; Gu, Xuesong; Ma, Yinghua; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Snyder, Evan Y.; Sidman, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex is centrally involved in motor coordination and learning, and its sole output is provided by Purkinje neurons (PNs). Growth of PN dendrites and their major synaptic input from granule cell parallel fiber axons takes place almost entirely in the first several postnatal weeks. PNs are more vulnerable to cell death than most other neurons, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We find that the homozygous nervous (nr) mutant mouse’s 10-fold–increased cerebellar tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a part of the tPA/plasmin proteolytic system, influences several different molecular mechanisms, each regulating a key aspect of postnatal PN development, followed by selective PN necrosis, as follows. (i) Excess endogenous or exogenous tPA inhibits dendritic growth in vivo and in vitro by activating protein kinase Cγ and phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 2. (ii) tPA/plasmin proteolysis impairs parallel fiber-PN synaptogenesis by blocking brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling. (iii) Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (a mitochondrial and plasma membrane protein) bound with kringle 5 (a peptide derived from the excess plasminogen) promotes pathological enlargement and rounding of PN mitochondria, reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, and damages plasma membranes. These abnormalities culminate in young nr PN necrosis that can be mimicked in wild-type PNs by exogenous tPA injection into cerebellum or prevented by endogenous tPA deletion in nr:tPA-knockout double mutants. In sum, excess tPA/plasmin, through separate downstream molecular mechanisms, regulates postnatal PN dendritogenesis, synaptogenesis, mitochondrial structure and function, and selective PN viability. PMID:23674688

  10. Kinetic studies on novel plasminogen activators. Demonstration of fibrin enhancement for hybrid enzymes comprising the A-chain of plasmin (Lys-78) and B-chain of tissue-type plasminogen activator (Ile-276) or urokinase (Ile-159).

    PubMed Central

    Fears, R; Dodd, I; Ferres, H; Robinson, J H

    1990-01-01

    The activation of plasminogen by two novel hybrid enzymes, constructed from the A-chain of plasmin and the B-chains of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) or urokinase, was compared with the activation by the parent enzymes. Basal kinetic constants for 'Lys-plasminogen' (human plasminogen with N-terminal lysine) and 'Glu-plasminogen' (human plasminogen with N-terminal glutamic acid) activation were similar to those of the parent activators. The Km for plasminogen turnover for both hybrid enzymes was considerably decreased in the presence of both soluble fibrin and a mimic, a CNBr digest of fibrinogen. These enhancements and the related apparent negative co-operativity are similar to the behaviour of t-PA itself. The results are discussed with regard to the molecular features involved in the mechanism of fibrin stimulation. PMID:2139324

  11. A Novel Serine Protease Secreted by Medicinal Maggots Enhances Plasminogen Activator-Induced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Andersen, Anders S.; Nazir, Sheresma; van Tilburg, Nico H.; Oestergaard, Peter R.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Hensbergen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. PMID:24647546

  12. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration. PMID:19996631

  13. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in sputum and nasal fluids increases in asthmatics during common colds

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong H.; Hong, Seung J.; Chen, Haimei; Habib, Ali; Cho, David; Lee, Sun H.; Kang, Joseph; Ward, Theresa; Boushey, Homer A.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Avila, Pedro C.

    2014-01-01

    Capsule Summary This study showed that sputum and nasal lavage levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) rise during a common cold in asthmatic patients. This rise may contribute to the progression of airway remodeling. PMID:24373352

  14. Bacterial pathogens activate plasminogen to breach tissue barriers and escape from innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Peetermans, Marijke; Vanassche, Thomas; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Lijnen, Roger H; Verhamme, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Both coagulation and fibrinolysis are tightly connected with the innate immune system. Infection and inflammation cause profound alterations in the otherwise well-controlled balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis. Many pathogenic bacteria directly exploit the host's hemostatic system to increase their virulence. Here, we review the capacity of bacteria to activate plasminogen. The resulting proteolytic activity allows them to breach tissue barriers and evade innate immune defense, thus promoting bacterial spreading. Yersinia pestis, streptococci of group A, C and G and Staphylococcus aureus produce a specific bacterial plasminogen activator. Moreover, surface plasminogen receptors play an established role in pneumococcal, borrelial and group B streptococcal infections. This review summarizes the mechanisms of bacterial activation of host plasminogen and the role of the fibrinolytic system in infections caused by these pathogens. PMID:26485450

  15. Tissue plasminogen activator in the treatment of superior vena caval thrombosis associated with parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, G. R.; Allen, K.; Pennington, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Two patients, one of whom was pregnant, developed superior vena caval thrombosis while receiving central parenteral nutrition. They were successfully treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2115160

  16. ACE-FTS instrument: activities in preparation for launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucy, Marc-Andre; Walker, Kaley A.; Fortin, Serge; Deutsch, Christophe

    2003-11-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is the mission selected by the Canadian Space Agency for its next science satellite, SCISAT-1. ACE consists of a suite of instruments in which the primary element is an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) coupled with an auxiliary 2-channel visible (525 nm) and near infrared imager (1020 nm). A secondary instrument, MAESTRO, provides spectrographic data from the near ultra-violet to the near infrared, including the visible spectral range. In combination the instrument payload covers the spectral range from 0.25 to 13.3 micron. A comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature will be made by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. The ACE mission will measure and analyse the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. A high inclination (74 degrees), low earth orbit (650 km) allows coverage of tropical, mid-latitude and polar regions. This paper presents the instrument-related activities in preparation for launch. In particular, activities related to the integration of instrument to spacecraft are presented as well as tests of the instrument on-board the SciSat-1 bus. Environmental qualification activities at spacecraft-level are described. An overview of the characterization and calibration campaign is presented. Activities for integration and verification at launch site are also covered. The latest status of the spacecraft is also presented.

  17. β2-Glycoprotein I Is a Cofactor for t-PA–Mediated Plasminogen Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Chunya; Gao, Lei; Xie, Weidong; Zhang, Jainwei; He, Yuhong; Cai, Guoping; McCrae, Keith R

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is critical in the control of fibrin deposition. While several plasminogen activators have been described, soluble plasma cofactors that stimulate fibrinolysis have not been characterized. Here, we report that the abundant plasma glycoprotein, β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), stimulates t-PA–dependent plasminogen activation in the fluid phase and within a fibrin gel. The region within β2GPI responsible for stimulating t-PA activity is at least partially contained within β2GPI domain V. β2GPI bound t-PA with high affinity (Kd ~ 20 nM), stimulated t-PA amidolytic activity, and caused an overall 20-fold increase in the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of t-PA–mediated conversion of Glu-plasminogen to plasmin. Moreover, depletion of β2GPI from plasma led to diminished rates of clot lysis, with restoration of normal lysis rates following β2GPI repletion. Finally, stimulation of t-PA–mediated plasminogen activity by β2GPI was inhibited by monoclonal anti-β2GPI antibodies, as well as by anti-β2GPI antibodies from patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). These findings suggest that β2GPI may be an endogenous regulator of fibrinolysis. Impairment of β2GPI-stimulated fibrinolysis by anti-β2GPI antibodies may contribute to the development of thrombosis in patients with APS. PMID:19180513

  18. Aberrant glomerular filtration of urokinase-type plasminogen activator in nephrotic syndrome leads to amiloride-sensitive plasminogen activation in urine.

    PubMed

    Stæhr, Mette; Buhl, Kristian B; Andersen, René F; Svenningsen, Per; Nielsen, Flemming; Hinrichs, Gitte Rye; Bistrup, Claus; Jensen, Boye L

    2015-08-01

    In nephrotic syndrome, aberrant glomerular filtration of plasminogen and conversion to active plasmin in preurine are thought to activate proteolytically epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and contribute to sodium retention and edema. The ENaC blocker amiloride is an off-target inhibitor of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in vitro. It was hypothesized that uPA is abnormally filtered to preurine and is inhibited in urine by amiloride in nephrotic syndrome. This was tested by determination of Na(+) balance, uPA protein and activity, and amiloride concentration in urine from rats with puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced nephrotic syndrome. Urine samples from 6 adult and 18 pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome were analyzed for uPA activity and protein. PAN treatment induced significant proteinuria in rats which coincided with increased urine uPA protein and activity, increased urine protease activity, and total plasminogen/plasmin concentration and Na(+) retention. Amiloride (2 mg·kg(-1)·24 h(-1)) concentration in urine was in the range 10-20 μmol/l and reduced significantly urine uPA activity, plasminogen activation, protease activity, and sodium retention in PAN rats, while proteinuria was not altered. In paired urine samples, uPA protein was significantly elevated in urine from children with active nephrotic syndrome compared with remission phase. In six adult nephrotic patients, urine uPA protein and activity correlated positively with 24 h urine protein excretion. In conclusion, nephrotic syndrome is associated with aberrant filtration of uPA across the injured glomerular barrier. Amiloride inhibits urine uPA activity which attenuates plasminogen activation and urine protease activity in vivo. Urine uPA is a relevant target for amiloride in vivo. PMID:25972510

  19. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  20. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  1. Nuclear translocation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Victoria; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Kuo, Alice; Yarovoi, Serge; Tkachuk, Sergei; Zaitsev, Sergei; Bdeir, Khalil; Dumler, Inna; Marks, Michael S; Parfyonova, Yelena; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof; Cines, Douglas B

    2008-07-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) participates in diverse (patho)physiological processes through intracellular signaling events that affect cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, although the mechanisms by which these occur are only partially understood. Here we report that upon cell binding and internalization, single-chain uPA (scuPA) translocates to the nucleus within minutes. Nuclear translocation does not involve proteolytic activation or degradation of scuPA. Neither the urokinase receptor (uPAR) nor the low-density lipoprotein-related receptor (LRP) is required for nuclear targeting. Rather, translocation involves the binding of scuPA to the nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein nucleolin through a region containing the kringle domain. RNA interference and mutational analysis demonstrate that nucleolin is required for the nuclear transport of scuPA. Furthermore, nucleolin is required for the induction smooth muscle alpha-actin (alpha-SMA) by scuPA. These data reveal a novel pathway by which uPA is rapidly translocated to the nucleus where it might participate in regulating gene expression. PMID:18337556

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator prevents white matter damage following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Fernando; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Macrez, Richard; Hommet, Yannick; Obiang, Pauline; Hernangómez, Miriam; Montagne, Axel; Liot, Géraldine; Guaza, Carmen; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Vivien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only available treatment for acute stroke. In addition to its vascular fibrinolytic action, tPA exerts various effects within the brain, ranging from synaptic plasticity to control of cell fate. To date, the influence of tPA in the ischemic brain has only been investigated on neuronal, microglial, and endothelial fate. We addressed the mechanism of action of tPA on oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and on the extent of white matter lesions in stroke. We also investigated the impact of aging on these processes. We observed that, in parallel to reduced levels of tPA in OLs, white matter gets more susceptible to ischemia in old mice. Interestingly, tPA protects murine and human OLs from apoptosis through an unexpected cytokine-like effect by the virtue of its epidermal growth factor–like domain. When injected into aged animals, tPA, although toxic to the gray matter, rescues white matter from ischemia independently of its proteolytic activity. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of action of tPA and unveil OL as a target cell for cytokine effects of tPA in brain diseases. They show overall that tPA protects white matter from stroke-induced lesions, an effect which may contribute to the global benefit of tPA-based stroke treatment. PMID:21576385

  3. Angiostatin inhibits endothelial and melanoma cellular invasion by blocking matrix-enhanced plasminogen activation.

    PubMed Central

    Stack, M S; Gately, S; Bafetti, L M; Enghild, J J; Soff, G A

    1999-01-01

    Angiostatin, a kringle-containing fragment of plasminogen, is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. The mechanism(s) responsible for the anti-angiogenic properties of angiostatin are unknown. We now report that human angiostatin blocks plasmin(ogen)-enhanced in vitro invasion of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing endothelial and melanoma cells. Kinetic analyses demonstrated that angiostatin functions as a non-competitive inhibitor of extracellular-matrix (ECM)-enhanced, t-PA-catalysed plasminogen activation, with a Ki of 0.9+/-0.03 microM. This mechanism suggests that t-PA has a binding site for the inhibitor angiostatin, as well as for its substrate plasminogen that, when occupied, prevents ternary complex formation between t-PA, plasminogen and matrix protein. Direct binding experiments confirmed that angiostatin bound to t-PA with an apparent Kd [Kd(app)] of 6.7+/-0.7 nM, but did not bind with high affinity to ECM proteins. Together, these data suggest that angiostatin in the cellular micro-environment can inhibit matrix-enhanced plasminogen activation, resulting in reduced invasive activity, and suggest a biochemical mechanism whereby angiostatin-mediated regulation of plasmin formation could influence cellular migration and invasion. PMID:10229661

  4. Regulation of epithelial sodium channels in urokinase plasminogen activator deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zaixing; Zhao, Runzhen; Zhao, Meimi; Liang, Xinrong; Bhattarai, Deepa; Dhiman, Rohan; Shetty, Sreerama; Idell, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) govern transepithelial salt and fluid homeostasis. ENaC contributes to polarization, apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, etc. Fibrinolytic proteases play a crucial role in virtually all of these processes and are elaborated by the airway epithelium. We hypothesized that urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates ENaC function in airway epithelial cells and tested that possibility in primary murine tracheal epithelial cells (MTE). Both basal and cAMP-activated Na+ flow through ENaC were significantly reduced in monolayers of uPA-deficient cells. The reduction in ENaC activity was further confirmed in basolateral membrane-permeabilized cells. A decrease in the Na+-K+-ATPase activity in the basolateral membrane could contribute to the attenuation of ENaC function in intact monolayer cells. Dysfunctional fluid resolution was seen in uPA-disrupted cells. Administration of uPA and plasmin partially restores ENaC activity and fluid reabsorption by MTEs. ERK1/2, but not Akt, phosphorylation was observed in the cells and lungs of uPA-deficient mice. On the other hand, cleavage of γ ENaC is significantly depressed in the lungs of uPA knockout mice vs. those of wild-type controls. Expression of caspase 8, however, did not differ between wild-type and uPA−/− mice. In addition, uPA deficiency did not alter transepithelial resistance. Taken together, the mechanisms for the regulation of ENaC by uPA in MTEs include augmentation of Na+-K+-ATPase, proteolysis, and restriction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We demonstrate for the first time that ENaC may serve as a downstream signaling target by which uPA controls the biophysical profiles of airway fluid and epithelial function. PMID:25172911

  5. Increased Plasminogen Activator (Urokinase) in Tissue Culture After Fibrin Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Bernik, Maria B.

    1973-01-01

    Lysis of fibrin in tissue culture has been shown to be due to plasminogen activator identified immunologically as urokinase. The present study examines fibrinolytic events in culture, particularly mechanisms leading to increased urokinase levels and accelerated fibrinolysis. Deposition of fibrin on cells in culture was followed by a two- to six-fold increase in urokinase in the supernates and rapid disappearance of the fibrin. Investigation of factors that might be responsible for these events (including fibrin, fibrinogen, vasoactive stimuli, and the enzymes thrombin and plasmin) indicated that the enhanced urokinase yields were mediated through plasmin and thrombin. Study of the possible modes of action of thrombin and plasmin indicated that these enzymes are capable of acting on the cells themselves as well as on cell-produced material. The effect on cells was manifested by mitotic activity or, occasionally, cell injury and death. Although these effects influenced urokinase levels, enhanced yields were explained best by the action of enzymes on cellproduced material. Studies with plasmin and thrombin, and also trypsin, indicated that proteolytic enzymes may act in various ways—affect the stability of urokinase, interfere with inhibition of urokinase by naturally occurring inhibitor(s), and induce urokinase activity from inactive material. Plasma and thrombin appeared to act primarily through the latter mechanism. Inactive material, which gave rise to urokinase upon exposure to proteolytic enzymes and which may represent urokinase precursor, was found in cultures of kidney, lung, spleen, and thyroid. Urokinase in such inactive state appears to be readily accessible to activation by enzymes, particularly plasmin and thrombin, thus facilitating removal of fibrin and possibly also providing pathways to excessive fibrinolysis. PMID:4266421

  6. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  7. Expression of PRSS, the plasminogen activator system and its activity in the ovine placentome during Stage 2 of parturition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for placenta separation are not completely understood. We know placentomes from cases of retained placenta possess limited matrix-metalloprotease (MMP) activity and retained placenta occurs at a greater incidence during induced parturition. The plasminogen activ...

  8. Urokinase plasminogen activator gene deficiency inhibits fracture cartilage remodeling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Nicoleta L; Wergedal, Jon E; Lau, K-H William; Mohan, Subburaman; Rundle, Charles H

    2014-03-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates a proteolytic cascade of extracellular matrix degradation that functions in tissue development and tissue repair. The development and remodeling of the skeletal extracellular matrix during wound healing suggests that uPA might regulate bone development and repair. To determine whether uPA functions regulate bone development and repair, we examined the basal skeletal phenotype and endochondral bone fracture repair in uPA-deficient mice. The skeletal phenotype of uPA knockout mice was compared with that of control mice under basal conditions by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-CT analysis, and during femur fracture repair by micro-CT and histological examination of the fracture callus. No effects of uPA gene deficiency were observed in the basal skeletal phenotype of the whole body or the femur. However, uPA gene deficiency resulted in increased fracture callus cartilage abundance during femur fracture repair at 14 days healing. The increase in cartilage corresponded to reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining for osteoclasts in the uPA knockout fracture callus at this time, consistent with impaired osteoclast-mediated remodeling of the fracture cartilage. CD31 staining was reduced in the knockout fracture tissues at this time, suggesting that angiogenesis was also reduced. Osteoclasts also colocalized with CD31 expression in the endothelial cells of the fracture tissues during callus remodeling. These results indicate that uPA promotes remodeling of the fracture cartilage by osteoclasts that are associated with angiogenesis and suggest that uPA promotes angiogenesis and remodeling of the fracture cartilage at this time of bone fracture repair. PMID:23700285

  9. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  10. Enzymatic vitreolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for vitreomacular traction

    PubMed Central

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Lipowski, Paweł; Zorena, Katarzyna; Skorek, Andrzej; Glasner, Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of our research was to gain data about the efficacy of intravitreal injections of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) in dissolving vitreoretinal tractions (VRTs). Materials and methods The study group consisted of patients of our Ophthalmology Clinic who had received an injection of rTPA (TPA Group) for an existent vitreomacular traction confirmed by optical coherence tomography and stereoscopic examinations. The control group consisted of patients who had declined treatment despite the existence of a vitreomacular traction confirmed by the same diagnostic methods. Each group consisted of 30 people (30 eyes). The observation period was 6 months. Conclusion In both groups some of the VRTs had dissolved. In the TPA group the traction dissolved in 10 patients (33.33%) and in the control group only in 5 (16.67%). It is also important to point out that the mean baseline membrane thickness was higher in the TPA group than in the control group. Observing patients in both groups we noticed that the dissolution of vitreoretinal membrane occurred most frequently in those cases where the membrane was thin. In the TPA group, the mean membrane thickness after 6 months decreased considerably. At the same time, no significant change in the membrane thickness could be observed in the control group. Observation of the retinal thickness allows us to draw the following conclusion: in the TPA group, the retinal thickness in the macular area (edema) had decreased over the study period, whereas in the control group it had increased. In those cases where the traction had dissolved, the edema of the retina decreased by the end of the 6-month period in both groups. In the TPA group, the dissolution of the membrane occurred most often within 3 months from the primary injection. Based on statistics, we can confirm that in the control group there was a decrease in visual acuity during the 6 months of the study period. At the same time, visual acuity in the TPA

  11. Plasminogen activator activity in cultures from human tissues. An immunological and histochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Bernik, Maria B.; Kwaan, Hau C.

    1969-01-01

    Human tissues and cells from pre- and postnatal life were cultivated and studied for plasminogen activator activity. Cultures were obtained from kidney, renal blood vessels, ureter, bladder, lung, and heart. Local activator activity of cells was demonstrated by histochemical techniques. Activator released by cells into the supernatant culture media was assayed by fibrin plate techniques and was investigated for immunological identity using specific antisera to an activator of human origin, urokinase (UK). Plasminogen activator was produced in primary cultures where cells retain specific functions and generally reflect the enzyme pattern of the tissues of origin. Cells from fetal and adult sources were found to yield activator antigenically identical to UK, as well as activator activity which differed from that of UK in immunoassays and which may represent tissue type activator. Such activity was released after injury or death of cells while UK was produced in cultures containing live, metabolizing cells. Primary cultures of kidney confirmed that this organ is a rich source of UK and demonstrated, in addition, that UK is produced from the early stages of gestation and in increasing amounts thereafter. However, primary cultures also demonstrated that the ability to produce UK is not limited to the kidney but is a function of cells which are distributed widely in body tissues. Thus, activator antigenically identical to UK accumulated progressively after many refeedings in culture supernates of fetal lung and ureter, as well as in supernates of renal blood vessels of adults. These findings indicate continuous formation of UK by the cultured cells and, furthermore, provide evidence of UK production in blood vessels. In cultures from other tissues, particularly those from fetal heart and adult lung and bladder, investigation of activator was hindered by inhibitory activity which accumulated in the supernates. Such activity was derived from cells in culture and was

  12. Doxycycline inhibits MMPs via modulation of plasminogen activators in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Burggraf, Dorothe; Trinkl, Andreas; Dichgans, Martin; Hamann, Gerhard F

    2007-03-01

    Tetracyclines inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and reduce infarction volume following cerebral ischemia. In this thesis an involvement of urokinase could be proven. Cerebral ischemia in rats was induced for 3 h followed by 24 h reperfusion (suture model). Each 6 animals received orally either doxycycline or water. Doxycycline treatment began 10 days before ischemia. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were substantially decreased. The possibility of involvement of the endogenous MMP inhibitors in the MMP inhibiting mechanisms was excluded. The plasminogen activator uPA was significantly decreased by doxycycline indicating an MMP inhibiting mechanism including the plasminogen/plasmin system. In the doxycycline group, this resulted in a decreased damage to the cerebral microvessels and less loss of the basal lamina antigen collagen type IV. Hemoglobin extravasation was also significantly reduced. Our results suggest that doxycycline may have a potential use as an anti-ischemic compound since it provides microvascular protection by inhibiting the plasminogen system. PMID:17166729

  13. Therapeutic Administration of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Prevents Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dianer; Nemkul, Niza; Shereen, Ahmed; Jone, Alice; Dunn, R. Scott; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Lindquist, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of the integrity of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important mechanism of cerebrovascular diseases, including neonatal cerebral hypoxia–ischemia (HI). Although both tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) can produce BBB damage, their relationship in neonatal cerebral HI is unclear. Here we use a rodent model to test whether the plasminogen activator (PA) system is critical for MMP-9 activation and HI-induced brain injury in newborns. To test this hypothesis, we examined the therapeutic effect of intracerebroventricular injection of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in rat pups subjected to unilateral carotid artery occlusion and systemic hypoxia. We found that the injection of PAI-1 greatly reduced the activity of both tPA and urokinase-type plasminogen activator after HI. It also blocked HI-induced MMP-9 activation and BBB permeability at 24 h of recovery. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis showed the PAI-1 treatment reduced brain edema, axonal degeneration, and cortical cell death at 24–48 h of recovery. Finally, the PAI-1 therapy provided a dose-dependent decrease of brain tissue loss at 7 d of recovery, with the therapeutic window at 4 h after the HI insult. Together, these results suggest that the brain PA system plays a pivotal role in neonatal cerebral HI and may be a promising therapeutic target in infants suffering hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:19587273

  14. The antifibrotic effects of plasminogen activation occur via prostaglandin E2 synthesis in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Kristy A.; Wettlaufer, Scott H.; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Vannella, Kevin M.; Stoolman, Joshua S.; Huang, Steven K.; Courey, Anthony J.; White, Eric S.; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Simon, Richard H.; Toews, Galen B.; Sisson, Thomas H.; Moore, Bethany B.; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Plasminogen activation to plasmin protects from lung fibrosis, but the mechanism underlying this antifibrotic effect remains unclear. We found that mice lacking plasminogen activation inhibitor–1 (PAI-1), which are protected from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit lung overproduction of the antifibrotic lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Plasminogen activation upregulated PGE2 synthesis in alveolar epithelial cells, lung fibroblasts, and lung fibrocytes from saline- and bleomycin-treated mice, as well as in normal fetal and adult primary human lung fibroblasts. This response was exaggerated in cells from Pai1–/– mice. Although enhanced PGE2 formation required the generation of plasmin, it was independent of proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and instead reflected proteolytic activation and release of HGF with subsequent induction of COX-2. That the HGF/COX-2/PGE2 axis mediates in vivo protection from fibrosis in Pai1–/– mice was demonstrated by experiments showing that a selective inhibitor of the HGF receptor c-Met increased lung collagen to WT levels while reducing COX-2 protein and PGE2 levels. Of clinical interest, fibroblasts from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were found to be defective in their ability to induce COX-2 and, therefore, unable to upregulate PGE2 synthesis in response to plasmin or HGF. These studies demonstrate crosstalk between plasminogen activation and PGE2 generation in the lung and provide a mechanism for the well-known antifibrotic actions of the fibrinolytic pathway. PMID:20501949

  15. Plasminogen activators in experimental colorectal neoplasia: a role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Lewin, M R; Driver, H E; Savage, F; Mahmoud, M; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1987-01-01

    An important step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive carcinoma is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. By the generation of plasmin, plasminogen activators may play an important role in regulating the extracellular protease activity required for this event to occur. The production of biofunctional urokinase and of tissue plasminogen activator was therefore investigated in the dimethylhydrazine induced rat model of colorectal neoplasia. Both adenomatous polyps (p values less than 0.001) and colorectal carcinomas (p values less than 0.001) were demonstrated to produce a significant excess of both urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator when compared with macroscopically normal colon. There was, however, no increased production of either enzyme by macroscopically normal preneoplastic colon when compared with control colon. This enhanced capacity of colorectal tumours to produce plasminogen activators and generate plasmin is thus a feature of both the premalignant as well as the malignant phenotype. These enzymes may contribute to the malignant potential of adenomatous polyps and to the invasive capacity of established carcinomas. PMID:3115868

  16. Metabolic factors, adipose tissue, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by adipose tissue is increased in obesity, and its circulating levels are high in type 2 diabetes. PAI-1 increases cardiovascular risk by favoring clot stability, interfering with vascular remodeling, or both. We investigated in obese diabetic per...

  17. Production of Plasminogen Activator in Cultures of Superior Cervical Ganglia and Isolated Schwann Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Valinsky, Jay E.

    1985-05-01

    Plasminogen activator has been implicated in tissue remodeling and cell migration during embryogenesis. In the developing nervous system, these processes are evident in the migration of neurons, axonal extension, Schwann cell migration, and the ensheathment and myelination of nerves. We have studied the production of plasminogen activator in cultures of superior cervical ganglia under conditions in which both neurons and glia are present. We have found that a principal source of the enzyme in these cultures is the glial cells and that the enzyme could not be detected at the growing tips of neurites. Plasminogen activator is also produced by Schwann cells isolated from neonatal rat sciatic nerve. The production of the enzyme by these cells is stimulated 6- to 10-fold by cholera toxin. Isolated Schwann cells and glial cells in the ganglion explant cultures produce the tissue form of plasminogen activator, a form of the enzyme not often found in nonmalignant cells. Preliminary experiments suggest that neuronal-glial interactions may regulate enzyme production by Schwann cells.

  18. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activation receptor - An emerging new biomarker of cardiovascular disease and critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Cyrille, Nicole B.; Villablanca, Pedro A.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Soluble urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (suPAR) is an emerging new biomarker, which has been shown to not only correlate with traditional biomarkers but also outperform CRP at prognosticating CVD. More clinical trials on suPAR is in the future research agenda. PMID:27052059

  19. SCORE/ACE Counselor Handbook. Service Corps of Retired Executives. Active Corps of Executives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsverk, Arvel; And Others

    This counselor handbook is intended to help Service Corps of Retired Executives/Active Corps of Executives (SCORE/ACE) counselors to plan and conduct counseling services more effectively. Included in the introductory section are an overview of the SCORE/ACE counseling program, a discussion of what the counselor does, directions for completing…

  20. A nonantigenic covalent streptokinase-polyethylene glycol complex with plasminogen activator function.

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S; Gonias, S L; Pizzo, S V

    1985-01-01

    A series of new, covalent polyethylene glycol (PEG)-streptokinase adducts were synthesized and characterized. PEGs with average molecular weights of 2,000, 4,000, and 5,000 were activated with carbonyldiimidazole and coupled to the protein under standardized reaction conditions. Steady-state kinetic analysis demonstrated comparable Km values for the activation of plasminogen by streptokinase, PEG-2-streptokinase, and PEG-4-streptokinase. The kcat values were somewhat decreased when PEG-2 or PEG-4 was coupled to the streptokinase. Activation by the PEG-5 adduct did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics under the conditions employed in this study. Plasmin activity obtained by incubating streptokinase derivatives with plasminogen also was studied as a function of time with each of the PEG-streptokinase derivatives. By this assay, incubations containing PEG-5-streptokinase and unmodified streptokinase demonstrated comparable activity while reaction mixtures containing PEG-2-streptokinase and PEG-4-streptokinase were slightly more active. Streptokinase incubated with plasminogen at a 1:1 molar ratio was extensively degraded after 30 min whereas PEG-2-streptokinase was resistant to plasmin cleavage. The derivatized proteins were radioiodinated and incubated in plastic microtiter plates that were coated with an immunoglobulin fraction containing antibodies to streptokinase. Binding of the PEG-streptokinase adducts was decreased by greater than 95% compared with unmodified streptokinase. Plasminogen activator complexes were formed by reacting the streptokinases with human plasminogen in vitro and the clearance studied in mice. Radioiodinated plasmin in complex with the PEG-streptokinase adducts cleared at a slower rate than did plasmin complexed with unmodified streptokinase. Catabolism of the protease still occurred by a mechanism that involved reaction with alpha 2-macroglobulin as has been described for nonderivatized streptokinase-plasminogen complex (Gonias, S. L., M

  1. Climate-active Trace Gases from ACE Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.; Brown, A.; Harrison, J.; Chipperfield, M.; Boone, C.; Wilson, C.; Walker, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    ACE (also known as SCISAT) is making a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of more than 30 trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-1) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. Launched by NASA in August 2003 for a nominal two-year mission, ACE performance remains excellent after 8 years in orbit. Volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles of sixteen halogenated trace gases are routinely retrieved from ACE-FTS atmospheric spectra: CCl4, CF4, CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), C2Cl3F3 (CFC-113), CH3Cl, ClONO2, COF2, COCl2, COClF, CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3CCl2F (HCFC-141b), CH3CClF2 (HCFC-142b), HCl, HF and SF6. ACE also provides VMR profiles for CH4, N2O and OCS; HCFC-23 (CHF3) is a recent research product. ACE-FTS measurements were compared to surface measurements made by the AGAGE network and output from the SLIMCAT three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model, which is constrained by similar surface data. ACE-FTS measurements of CFCs (and HCl) show declining trends which agree with both AGAGE and SLIMCAT values. The concentrations of HCFCs are increasing with ACE-FTS, SLIMCAT and AGAGE all showing positive trends. These results illustrate the success of the Montreal Protocol in reducing ozone depleting substances. The replacement of CFCs with HCFCs has led to an increase in the VMR of HF in the stratosphere. As chlorine containing compounds continue to be phased out and replaced by fluorine-containing molecules, it is likely that total atmospheric fluorine will continue increasing in the near future. These species are all powerful greenhouse gases. ACE provides near global VMR

  2. Induction of the plasminogen activator system by mechanical stimulation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Eric K; Cheng, Jason; Foley, John S; Mecham, Brigham H; Owen, Caroline A; Haley, Kathleen J; Mariani, Thomas J; Kohane, Isaac S; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2006-12-01

    Mechanical stimulation of the airway epithelium, as would occur during bronchoconstriction, is a potent stimulus and can activate profibrotic pathways. We used DNA microarray technology to examine gene expression in compressed normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE). Compressive stress applied continuously over an 8-h period to NHBE cells led to the upregulation of several families of genes, including a family of plasminogen-related genes that were previously not known to be regulated in this system. Real-time PCR demonstrated a peak increase in gene expression of 8.0-fold for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), 16.2-fold for urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), 4.2-fold for plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and 3.9-fold for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Compressive stress also increased uPA protein levels in the cell lysates (112.0 versus 82.0 ng/ml, P = 0.0004), and increased uPA (4.7 versus 3.3 ng/ml, P = 0.02), uPAR (1.3 versus 0.86 ng/ml, P = 0.007), and PAI-1 (50 versus 36 ng/ml, P = 0.006) protein levels in cell culture media. Functional studies demonstrated increased urokinase-dependent plasmin generation in compression-stimulated cells (0.0090 versus 0.0033 OD/min, P = 0.03). In addition, compression led to increased activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 in a urokinase-dependent manner. In postmortem human lung tissue, we observed an increase in epithelial uPA and uPAR immunostaining in the airways of two patients who died in status asthmaticus compared with minimal immunoreactivity noted in airways from seven lung donors without asthma. Together these observations suggest an integrated response of airway epithelial cells to mechanical stimulation, acting through the plasminogen-activating system to modify the airway microenvironment. PMID:16794260

  3. Excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration and seizure are mediated by tissue plasminogen activator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirka, Stella E.; Gualandris, Anna; Amaral, David G.; Strickland, Sidney

    1995-09-01

    NEURONAL degeneration in the hippocampus, a region of the brain important for acquisition of memory in humans, occurs in various pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia and epilepsy. When neuronal activity is stimulated in the adult rat and mouse hippocampus, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin, is transcriptionally induced1,2. The activity of tPA in neural tissue is correlated with neurite outgrowth3, regeneration4 and migration5, suggesting that it might be involved in neuronal plasticity. Here we show that tPA is produced primarily by microglia in the hippocampus. Using excitotoxins to induce neuronal cell loss, we demonstrate that tPA-deficient mice are resistant to neuronal degeneration. These mice are also less susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures than wild-type mice. These findings identify a role for tPA in neuronal degeneration and seizure.

  4. Importance of viability and attachment to an ascites tumor in the release of plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Q.; Zhou, M.; Subbarao, V.; Ts'ao, C.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor plasminogen activator (PA) has been alleged to play a role in the growth and metastasis of tumors. Before such a role can be realized, PA first must be released from tumor cells. Having determined intra- and extracellular PA and PA-inhibitor activities in an experimental pancreatic ascites tumor grown in hamsters, the release of PA from these cells was investigated. No PA activity was detected in the suspension medium of freshly isolated tumor cells; inclusion of plasminogen, fibrinogen, or collagen in the medium yielded similar negative results. On the other hand, PA activity was demonstrated to be released in a time-dependent manner from these tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots. Plasminogen activator activity also was not found in the suspension medium of frozen-thawed tumor cells, despite the fact that most of them had breaks on their cell membrane. Unlike freshly isolated tumor cells, PA was not released from frozen-thawed cells embedded in fibrin clots. Full PA activity was demonstrated in frozen-thawed cells treated with Triton X-100, however. Frozen-thawed cells exhibited signs of severe damage, and more than 80% of them failed to exclude trypan blue. Obviously PA is released from viable tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots but not suspended in artificial medium. The PA-release mechanism, not PA itself, is destroyed in cells rendered nonviable by freeze thawing. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1902626

  5. Complexes between tissue-type plasminogen activator and proteinase inhibitors in human plasma, identified with an immunoradiometric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, D.C.; Juhan-Vague, I.; Collen, D.

    1983-02-01

    Extrinsic (tissue-type) plasminogen activator antigen in human plasma, as measured by a two-site immunoradiometric assay, is composed of a fibrin-adsorbable and a nonadsorbable fraction. Gel filtration on Ultrogel AcA 44 in 1.6M KSCN of the fibrin-adsorbable fraction showed a peak with M/sub r/ approx. =70,000, which contained plasminogen activator activity and was assumed to represent free extrinsic plasminogen activator. The nonadsorbable fraction showed a broad peak with M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 without plasminogen activator activity. Overnight incubation at 37/sup 0/C of postexercise plasma revealed a shift of the M/sub r/ approx. =70,000 peak to the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 position, suggesting that the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 peak consists of extrinsic plasminogen activator-protease inhibitor complex(es). ..cap alpha../sub 2/-Antiplasmin is the main inhibitor of extrinsic plasminogen activator in plasma and is probably responsible for the generation of the M/sub r/ approx. =140,000 component. A possible involvement of other plasma proteinase inhibitors was explored by incubation of /sup 125/I-labeled extrinsic plasminogen activator in ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin-depleted plasma. A complex was formed with a t1/2 of about 1 hr, which was identified by immunoprecipitation as extrinsic plasminogen activator-..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin complex. Additional evidence for the presence of extrinsic plasminogen activator complexes with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin in plasma was obtained from two-site immunoradiometric assays. It was concluded that plasma contains both free extrinsic plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator complexes with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antiplasmin and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin. These complexes are also present in plasma collected on the active site inhibitor, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-CH/sub 2/Cl, at rest and after exercise and are therefore assumed to circulate in vivo. (JMT)

  6. Structure-activity relationships of the plasminogen modulator SMTP with respect to the inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Eriko; Tsujihara, Kota; Nishimura, Yuuichi; Hasumi, Keiji

    2015-11-01

    A family of fungal metabolites, SMTP, is a small-molecule plasminogen modulator that enhances plasminogen activation, leading to thrombolysis. We recently demonstrated that SMTP-7 effectively treats ischemic stroke due to its thrombolytic activity as well as anti-inflammatory action, which is attributable to soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibition. In this paper, we studied detailed structure-activity relationships of plasminogen modulation and sEH inhibition using 25 SMTP congeners including six newly synthesized ones. The results clearly demonstrate that the structure of the N-linked side chain of SMTP congeners markedly affect their activities toward plasminogen modulation and inhibitions of the two activities of sEH (C-terminal epoxide hydrolase and N-terminal phosphatase). A slight change in the N-linked side chain results in affording selectivity of SMTP congeners. Many congeners, which lacked plasminogen modulation activity, differently inhibited the two sEH activities depending on the structures of the N-linked side chain. Some congeners were active in plasminogen modulation and inhibition of both activities of sEH. These results help comprehensive understanding of ideal design of a drug useful for ischemic diseases that are associated with inflammation, such as stroke. PMID:25966853

  7. Role of Plasminogen Activator in Spinal Cord Remodeling after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Seeds, Nicholas W.; Akison, Lisa; Minor, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Plasminogen activators play an active role in synaptic plasticity associated with the crossed phrenic phenomenon (CPP) and recovery of respiratory function following spinal cord injury. A genetic approach has been used to identify molecular mechanisms underlying this synaptic plasticity. Knockout mice lacking different genes in the plasminogen activator/plasmin system demonstrate that expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is required during the critical 1-2h delay period following C2-hemisection for acquisition of a good CPP response. uPA knockout mice fail to show the structural remodeling of phrenic motor neuron synapses that underlie the CPP response. Potential mechanisms by which uPA may promote phrenic motor neuron synaptic plasticity have been explored. Expression of uPA receptors, uPAR and LRP-1, are both up-regulated in the ipsilateral phrenic motor nucleus (PMN) following C2-hemisection. A comparison of microarray data and real-time PCR analysis of mRNAs induced in the PMN after hemisection indicate potential cell signaling pathways downstream of uPA’s interaction with these cell surface receptors in the PMN. Knowledge of these uPA-mediated signaling pathways may identify potential means for pharmacological activation of the synaptic plasticity required for recovery of phrenic motor neuron activity. PMID:19651246

  8. Role of plasminogen activator in spinal cord remodeling after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Seeds, Nicholas W; Akison, Lisa; Minor, Kenneth

    2009-11-30

    Plasminogen activators play an active role in synaptic plasticity associated with the crossed phrenic phenomenon (CPP) and recovery of respiratory function following spinal cord injury. A genetic approach has been used to identify molecular mechanisms underlying this synaptic plasticity. Knockout mice lacking different genes in the plasminogen activator/plasmin system demonstrate that expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is required during the critical 1-2h delay period following C2-hemisection for the acquisition of a good CPP response. uPA knockout mice fail to show the structural remodeling of phrenic motorneuron synapses that underlie the CPP response. Potential mechanisms by which uPA may promote phrenic motorneuron synaptic plasticity have been explored. Expression of uPA receptors, uPAR and LRP-1, are both up-regulated in the ipsilateral phrenic motor nucleus (PMN) following C2-hemisection. A comparison of microarray data and real-time PCR analysis of mRNAs induced in the PMN after hemisection indicate potential cell signaling pathways downstream of uPA's interaction with these cell surface receptors in the PMN. Knowledge of these uPA-mediated signaling pathways may identify potential means for the pharmacological activation of the synaptic plasticity required for recovery of phrenic motorneuron activity. PMID:19651246

  9. Microglia and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor/uPA system in innate brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Orla; Campion, Suzanne; Perry, V Hugh; Murray, Carol; Sidenius, Nicolai; Docagne, Fabian; Cunningham, Colm

    2009-12-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-linked cell surface protein that facilitates focused plasmin proteolytic activity at the cell surface. uPAR has been detected in macrophages infiltrating the central nervous system (CNS) and soluble uPAR has been detected in the cerebrospinal fluid during a number of CNS pathologies. However, its expression by resident microglial cells in vivo remains uncertain. In this work, we aimed to elucidate the murine CNS expression of uPAR and uPA as well as that of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) during insults generating distinct and well-characterized inflammatory responses; acute intracerebral lipopolysaccharide (LPS), acute kainate-induced neurodegeneration, and chronic neurodegeneration induced by prion disease inoculation. All three insults induced marked expression of uPAR at both mRNA and protein level compared to controls (naïve, saline, or control inoculum-injected). uPAR expression was microglial in all cases. Conversely, uPA transcription and activity was only markedly increased during chronic neurodegeneration. Dissociation of uPA and uPAR levels in acute challenges is suggestive of additional proteolysis-independent roles for uPAR. PAI-1 was most highly expressed upon LPS challenge, whereas tissue plasminogen activator mRNA was constitutively present and less responsive to all insults studied. These data are novel and suggest much wider involvement of the uPAR/uPA system in CNS function and pathology than previously supposed. PMID:19459212

  10. [Plasminogen activator system and its clinical significance in patients with a malignant disease].

    PubMed

    Halámková, J; Kiss, I; Tomásek, J; Pavlovský, Z; Cech, Z; Tutek, S; Hanáková, L; Moulis, M; Penka, M

    2011-01-01

    Urokinase (uPA) plays an essential role in the activation of plasminogen to plasmin, a serine protease participating in the activation of matrixmetaloproteinases, latent elastases, growth factors and cytokines involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix elements. Together with its receptor (uPAR), tissue activator (tPA) and urokinase inhibitors (PAI-1, PAI-2, PAI-3 and protease nexin), it forms the plasminogen activator system (PAS), a component of metastatic cascade importantly contributing to the invasive growth and angiogenesis of malignant tumours. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 inhibits uPA-dependent invasiveness of some cancer cell lines. The vitronectin-PAI-1 complex inhibits migration of smooth muscle cells by binding alpha(v)beta3 integrin to vitronectin. PAI-1 or its deficiency interferes with signalling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and JAK/STAT and it is included in the processes of maintaining the integrity of the endothelial cells and thereby regulation of cell death. PAI-1 affects apoptosis by reducing cell adhesion and functioning of intracellular signalling pathways. The individual components of PAS undoubtedly play an important role in angiogenesis and metastasising of malignant tumours. In the near future, results of published studies with various types of cancer could be reflected in diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms and, at the same time, could serve as the goal for targeted therapies. PMID:22257230

  11. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Drapkin, Paola T.; O’Riordan, Catherine R.; Yi, Su Min; Chiorini, John A.; Cardella, Jonathan; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  12. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, P T; O'Riordan, C R; Yi, S M; Chiorini, J A; Cardella, J; Zabner, J; Welsh, M J

    2000-03-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  13. Characterization of tissue plasminogen activator binding proteins isolated from endothelial cells and other cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, D.P.; Wood, L.L.; Moos, M. )

    1990-07-15

    Human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) was shown to bind specifically to human osteosarcoma cells (HOS), and human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A-431 cells). Crosslinking studies with DTSSP demonstrated high molecular weight complexes (130,000) between {sup 125}I-t-PA and cell membrane protein on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), HOS, and A-431 cells. A 48-65,000 molecular weight complex was demonstrated after crosslinking t-PA peptide (res. 7-20) to cells. Ligand blotting of cell lysates which had been passed over a t-PA affinity column revealed binding of t-PA to 54,000 and 95,000 molecular weight proteins. Several t-PA binding proteins were identified in immunopurified cell lysates, including tubulin beta chain, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and single chain urokinase.

  14. Structural Basis of Interaction Between Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator and its Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka,C.; Parry, G.; Callahan, J.; Shaw, D.; Kuo, A.; Cines, B.; Mazar, A.; Lubkowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) to its high-affinity receptor (uPAR) orchestrates uPAR interactions with other cellular components that play a pivotal role in diverse (patho-)physiological processes, including wound healing, angiogenesis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis. However, notwithstanding the wealth of biochemical data available describing the activities of uPAR, little is known about the exact mode of uPAR/uPA interactions or the presumed conformational changes that accompany uPA/uPAR engagement. Here, we report the crystal structure of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), which contains the three domains of the wild-type receptor but lacks the cell-surface anchoring sequence, in complex with the amino-terminal fragment of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (ATF), at the resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of free ATF. Our results provide a structural basis, represented by conformational changes induced in uPAR, for several published biochemical observations describing the nature of uPAR/uPA interactions and provide insight into mechanisms that may be responsible for the cellular responses induced by uPA binding.

  15. Plasminogen-dependent and -independent proteolytic activity of murine endothelioma cells with targeted inactivation of fibrinolytic genes.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Wagner, E F; Collen, D

    1997-02-01

    Plasminogen-dependent and -independent proteolytic activity of marine endothelioma (End) cells that were derived from mice with targeted inactivation of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA-/-), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA-/-) or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1-/-) genes was studied with the use of fibrin and extracellular matrix degradation assays. In a buffer milieu, the activation rate of plasminogen (final concentration 0.25 microM) with wild-type and t-PA-/- End cells (3 x 10(4) to 4 x 10(6) cells/ml) was comparable, but it was about 4-fold reduced with u-PA-/- End cells and 3-fold enhanced with PAI-1-/- End cells. Plasminogen activation was markedly reduced by addition of amiloride or of anti-murine u-PA antibodies but not by addition of anti-murine t-PA antibodies, and it was not stimulated by addition of fibrin. Lysis of 125I-fibrin labeled matrix in the presence of plasminogen was comparable with wild-type, t-PA-/- and PAI-1-/- End cells (50% lysis in 3 h with 0.7 to 1.5 x 10(6) cells/ml), but was significantly reduced with u-PA-/- End cells (50% lysis in 20 h with 0.87 x 10(6) cells/ml). Lysis of 3H-proline labeled extracellular matrix in the presence of plasminogen with wild-type, t-PA-/- and PAI-1-/- End cells (20% lysis in 48 h with 3 to 5 x 10(6) cells/ml) was comparable, but it was virtually abolished with u-PA-/- End cells. In the absence of plasminogen, lysis of both the fibrin and the extracellular matrix by all four cell types was drastically reduced and was virtually abolished by addition of phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride or 1,10 phenanthroline. These data indicate that the proteolytic activity of the transformed murine endothelioma cells, measured in plasminogen activation or matrix degradation assays, is essentially u-PA-related and largely plasminogen-dependent. PMID:9157597

  16. Modulation of the plasminogen activation system by inflammatory cytokines in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Trân-Thang, C.; Kruithof, E.; Lahm, H.; Schuster, W. A.; Tada, M.; Sordat, B.

    1996-01-01

    Inflammation may promote malignant invasion by enhancing cancer cell-associated proteolysis. Here we present the effect of inflammatory cytokines on the plasminogen activation system of eight human colon carcinoma cell lines. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) increased in several, but not all, cell lines the production of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue-type PA (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) as analysed by zymography, enzyme immunoassays and Northern analysis. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) had no effect. uPA receptor (uPAR) mRNA levels were also upregulated. However, each individual cell line responded differently following exposure to TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta. For example, there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of uPA and PAI-1 in SW 620 cells, whereas increased uPA production in SW 1116 cells was not accompanied by an increase in PAI-1. The TNF-alpha stimulatory effect was blocked by anti-TNF-alpha Fab fragments. All cell lines expressed both types of TNF receptor mRNAs, whereas no transcript for TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-6 receptor or the IL-1 receptors was found. Our results demonstrate that TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta stimulate the plasminogen activation system in tumour cell but the responses differed even in cells derived from the same tissue origin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8826848

  17. Inhibitors of Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator and Cytostatic Activity from Crude Plants Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Xueqiang; Diaz, Ricardo; Franco, Jose Javier Rosado; Sanchez, Veronica Forbes; Fasoli, Ezio; Barletta, Gabriel; Carvajal, Augusto; Bansal, Vibha

    2014-01-01

    In view of the clear evidence that urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the processes of tumor cell metastasis, aortic aneurysm, and multiple sclerosis, it has become a target of choice for pharmacological intervention. The goal of this study was thus to determine the presence of inhibitors of uPA in plants known traditionally for their anti-tumor properties. Crude methanol extracts were prepared from the leaves of plants (14) collected from the subtropical dry forest (Guanica, Puerto Rico), and tested for the presence of inhibitors of uPA using the fibrin plate assay. The extracts that tested positive (6) were then partitioned with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, in a sequential manner. The resulting fractions were then tested again using the fibrin plate assay. Extracts from leaves of Croton lucidus (C. lucidus) showed the presence of a strong uPA inhibitory activity. Serial dilutions of these C. lucidus partitions were performed to determine the uPA inhibition IC50 values. The chloroform extract showed the lowest IC50 value (3.52 μg/mL) and hence contained the most potent uPA inhibitor. Further investigations revealed that the crude methanol extract and its chloroform and n-butanol partitions did not significantly inhibit closely related proteases such as the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin, indicating their selectivity for uPA, and hence superior potential for medicinal use with fewer side effects. In a further evaluation of their therapeutic potential for prevention of cancer metastasis, the C. lucidus extracts displayed cytostatic activity against human pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa-2) cells, as determined through an MTS assay. The cytostatic activities recorded for each of the partitions correlated with their relative uPA inhibitory activities. There are no existing reports of uPA inhibitors being present in any of the plants reported in this study. PMID:23896619

  18. Urokinase links plasminogen activation and cell adhesion by cleavage of the RGD motif in vitronectin.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzi, Valentina; Sarra Ferraris, Gian Maria; Madsen, Jeppe B; Lupia, Michela; Andreasen, Peter A; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-07-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system including urokinase (uPA), its inhibitor (PAI-1) and its cell surface receptor (uPAR) have been implicated in a wide variety of biological processes related to tissue homoeostasis. Firstly, the binding of uPA to uPAR favours extracellular proteolysis by enhancing cell surface plasminogen activation. Secondly, it promotes cell adhesion and signalling through binding of the provisional matrix protein vitronectin. We now report that uPA and plasmin induces a potent negative feedback on cell adhesion through specific cleavage of the RGD motif in vitronectin. Cleavage of vitronectin by uPA displays a remarkable receptor dependence and requires concomitant binding of both uPA and vitronectin to uPAR Moreover, we show that PAI-1 counteracts the negative feedback and behaves as a proteolysis-triggered stabilizer of uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to vitronectin. These findings identify a novel and highly specific function for the plasminogen activation system in the regulation of cell adhesion to vitronectin. The cleavage of vitronectin by uPA and plasmin results in the release of N-terminal vitronectin fragments that can be detected in vivo, underscoring the potential physiological relevance of the process. PMID:27189837

  19. Endogenous plasminogen activators mediate progressive intracerebral hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Nuha; Abu Fanne, Rami; Abramovitch, Rinat; Yarovoi, Serge; Higazi, Muhamed; Abdeen, Suhair; Basheer, Maamon; Maraga, Emad; Cines, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major cause of death and disability after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for which no medical treatment is available. Delayed bleeding is often ascribed to consumptive coagulopathy initiated by exposed brain tissue factor. We examined an alternative hypothesis, namely, that marked release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) followed by delayed synthesis and release of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from injured brain leads to posttraumatic bleeding by causing premature clot lysis. Using a murine model of severe TBI, we found that ICH is reduced in tPA−/− and uPA−/− mice but increased in PAI-1−/− mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice. tPA−/−, but not uPA−/−, mice developed a systemic coagulopathy post-TBI. Tranexamic acid inhibited ICH expansion in uPA−/−mice but not in tPA−/− mice. Catalytically inactive tPA-S481A inhibited plasminogen activation by tPA and uPA, attenuated ICH, lowered plasma d-dimers, lessened thrombocytopenia, and improved neurologic outcome in WT, tPA−/−, and uPA−/− mice. ICH expansion was also inhibited by tPA-S481A in WT mice anticoagulated with warfarin. These data demonstrate that protracted endogenous fibrinolysis induced by TBI is primarily responsible for persistent ICH and post-TBI coagulopathy in this model and offer a novel approach to interrupt bleeding. PMID:25673638

  20. Penta-L-lysine Potentiates Fibrin-Independent Activity of Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Mohammad; Sagar, Amin; Sharma, Vandna; Mishra, Sanskruti; Ashish; Sahni, Girish

    2015-10-22

    The therapeutic action of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a two-step process: (1) binding to lysine-rich fibrin (Km event) and (2) converting local plasminogen into plasmin (Kcat event). Overcoming limitations of other structural biophysics methods, we wanted to employ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to visualize what shape changes occur/accompany t-PA activation, but the prime hurdle was the polydisperse nature of the fibrin, which occluded scattering information from t-PA. Earlier, larger polylysine peptides have been used to potentiate activation of t-PA, so while screening short polylysine peptides as alternatives to fibrin or larger peptides, we found that penta-polylysine (P5) specifically activates t-PA in a dose-dependent manner, averaging to almost 3-fold more than in the absence of any peptide. SAXS data analysis confirmed that P5 does not induce association of t-PA molecules, and a narrower peak profile of the Kratky plot indicated that P5 binding quenches inherent motion in t-PA. Shape reconstruction of t-PA ∓ P5 revealed that P5 closes the "gap" between the two gross domains of t-PA, viz. fused F/E, K1 and K2 domains, and the P domain. Docking experiments suggested that, while other polylysine peptides preferentially interacted with the surfaces of kringle domains, P5 "slipped into" the gap/groove between K2 and P domains, thereby mediating a substantial increase in the number of long-range interactions between the K2 domain and exosites in the P domain. We report here dissection of shape events involved in between Km/Kcat steps of t-PA activation, which can pave the way toward the search for small molecule function regulator(s) of t-PA. PMID:26447340

  1. Variable Resistance to Plasminogen Activator Initiated Fibrinolysis for Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, William B.; Alves, Nathan J.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Kline, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background We examine the clinical significance and biomarkers of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-catalyzed clot lysis time (CLT) in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods Platelet-poor, citrated plasma was obtained from patients with PE. Healthy age- and sex-matched patients served as disease-negative controls. Fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), plasminogen activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), thrombin time and D-dimer were quantified. Clotting was induced using CaCl2, tissue factor, and phospholipid. Lysis was induced using 60 ng/mL tPA. Time to 50% clot lysis (CLT) was assessed by both thromboelastography (TEG) and turbidimetry (A405). Results Compared with disease-negative controls, patients with PE exhibited significantly longer mean CLT on TEG (+2,580 seconds, 95% CI 1,380 to 3,720 sec). Patients with PE and a short CLT who were treated with tenecteplase had increased risk of bleeding, whereas those with long CLT had significantly worse exercise tolerance and psychometric testing for quality of life at 3 months. A multivariate stepwise removal regression model selected PAI-1 and TAFI as predictive biomarkers of CLT. Conclusion The CLT from TEG predicted increased risk of bleeding and clinical failure with tenecteplase treatment for intermediate-risk PE. Plasmatic PAI-1 and TAFI were independent predictors of CLT. PMID:26866684

  2. Regulation of plasminogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Herren, Thomas; Swaisgood, Carmen; Plow, Edward F

    2003-01-01

    Many eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells bind plasminogen in a specific and saturable manner. When plasminogen is bound to cell-surface proteins with C-terminal lysines via its lysine binding sites, its activation to plasmin is accelerated, and cell-bound plasmin is protected from inactivation by natural inhibitors. Plasmin mediates direct or indirect degradation of the extracellular matrix, and bound plasmin is used by cells to facilitate migration through extracellular matrices. Since cell migration and tissue remodelling are the underpinnings of many physiological and pathological responses, the modulation of plasminogen receptors may serve as a primary regulatory mechanism for control of many cellular responses. Specific examples of cell types on which plasminogen receptors undergo modulation include: fibroblasts, where modulation may contribute to cartilage and bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis; leukemic cells, where enhanced plasminogen binding may contribute to the heightened fibrinolytic state in the patients; other tumor cells, where up-regulation may support invasion and metastasis; bacteria, where enhanced plasminogen binding may facilitate tissue destruction and invasion; platelets, where up-regulation of plasminogen binding may play a role in regulating clot lysis; and adipocytes, where the modulation of plasminogen receptor expression may regulate cell differentiation and fat accumulation. Two pathways for modulation of plasminogen receptors have been characterized: A protease-dependent pathway can either up-regulate or down-regulate plasminogen binding to cells by changing the availability of plasminogen-binding proteins with C-terminal lysines. New receptors may be generated by trypsin-like proteases, including plasmin, which create new C-terminal lysines; other enzymes may expose existing membrane proteins by altering the cell surface; or receptor function may be lost by removal of C-terminal lysines. The basic carboxypeptidases of blood

  3. Proteolytic regulation of epithelial sodium channels by urokinase plasminogen activator: cutting edge and cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Zhao, Runzhen; Komissarov, Andrey A; Chang, Yongchang; Liu, Yongfeng; Matthay, Michael A

    2015-02-27

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) level is extremely elevated in the edematous fluid of acutely injured lungs and pleurae. Elevated PAI-1 specifically inactivates pulmonary urokinase-type (uPA) and tissue-type plasminogen activators (tPA). We hypothesized that plasminogen activation and fibrinolysis may alter epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity, a key player in clearing edematous fluid. Two-chain urokinase (tcuPA) has been found to strongly stimulate heterologous human αβγ ENaC activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This activity of tcuPA was completely ablated by PAI-1. Furthermore, a mutation (S195A) of the active site of the enzyme also prevented ENaC activation. By comparison, three truncation mutants of the amino-terminal fragment of tcuPA still activated ENaC. uPA enzymatic activity was positively correlated with ENaC current amplitude prior to reaching the maximal level. In sharp contrast to uPA, neither single-chain tPA nor derivatives, including two-chain tPA and tenecteplase, affected ENaC activity. Furthermore, γ but not α subunit of ENaC was proteolytically cleaved at ((177)GR↓KR(180)) by tcuPA. In summary, the underlying mechanisms of urokinase-mediated activation of ENaC include release of self-inhibition, proteolysis of γ ENaC, incremental increase in opening rate, and activation of closed (electrically "silent") channels. This study for the first time demonstrates multifaceted mechanisms for uPA-mediated up-regulation of ENaC, which form the cellular and molecular rationale for the beneficial effects of urokinase in mitigating mortal pulmonary edema and pleural effusions. PMID:25555911

  4. Binding of tissue-type plasminogen activator to the glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) modulates plasminogen activation and promotes human neuroblastoma cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Gomez, Cristian Farias; de Ridder, Gustaaf G; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V

    2014-09-01

    The glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is a plasminogen (Pg) receptor on the cell surface. In this study, we demonstrate that GRP78 also binds the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which results in a decrease in K(m) and an increase in the V(max) for both its amidolytic activity and activation of its substrate, Pg. This results in accelerated Pg activation when GRP78, t-PA, and Pg are bound together. The increase in t-PA activity is the result of a mechanism involving a t-PA lysine-dependent binding site in the GRP78 amino acid sequence (98)LIGRTWNDPSVQQDIKFL(115). We found that GRP78 is expressed on the surface of neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells where it is co-localized with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is also a t-PA-binding protein in these cells. We demonstrate that both Pg and t-PA serve as a bridge between GRP78 and VDAC bringing them together to facilitate Pg activation. t-PA induces SK-N-SH cell proliferation via binding to GRP78 on the cell surface. Furthermore, Pg binding to the COOH-terminal region of GRP78 stimulates cell proliferation via its microplasminogen domain. This study confirms previous findings from our laboratory showing that GRP78 acts as a growth factor-like receptor and that its association with t-PA, Pg, and VDAC on the cell surface may be part of a system controlling cell growth. PMID:25059665

  5. Structural requirements of position A alpha-157 in fibrinogen for the fibrin-induced rate enhancement of the activation of plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Schielen, J G; Adams, H P; Voskuilen, M; Tesser, G J; Nieuwenhuizen, W

    1991-01-01

    The sequence fibrinogen-A alpha-(148-160) can mimic part of the fibrin-induced rate enhancement of the activation of plasminogen by tissue-type plasminogen activator. Previously we have reported that the lysine residue at position A alpha-157 is crucial. During our further investigations on A alpha-157 we found that lysine at position A alpha-157 may be replaced by glutamic acid. This unexpected finding prompted us to re-investigate the requirements of this position. We prepared analogues of A alpha-(148-160) in which the lysine residue at position A alpha-157 was replaced by lysine derivatives (acetyl-lysine, benzyloxycarbonyl-lysine and methanesulphonylethyloxycarbonyl-lysine), acidic residues (aspartic acid and glutamic acid), basic residues (arginine and ornithine), polar residues (glutamine and methanesulphonylethyloxycarbonylornithine), apolar residues (alanine, valine, norleucine and glutamic acid 4-nitrobenzyl ester) and glycine. These analogues were tested for their stimulatory activity. When aspartic acid, glutamic acid 4-nitrobenzyl ester or norleucine is present at position A alpha-157 in A alpha-(148-160) virtually all stimulatory capacity is lost. With valine at position A alpha-157 the stimulatory activity is marginal. None of the other replacements at position A alpha-157 caused loss of rate-enhancing properties. From these results we conclude that for the rate-enhancing effect of A alpha-(148-160) the side chain of the amino acid residue at position A alpha-157 must fulfill certain requirements: there must be one (as in alanine) or no (as in glycine) carbon atom in the side chain, or at least two carbon atoms and a polar group (charged or uncharged) to which a rather bulky group (such as the benzyloxycarbonyl group) or a polar group (such as the methanesulphonylethyloxycarbonyl group) may be attached. The highest activity [even higher than native A alpha-(148-160)] was obtained with ornithine, methanesulphonylethyloxycarbonylornithine or

  6. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar) Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E.; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes. PMID:25123137

  7. Detection and partial characterization of an inhibitor of plasminogen activator in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, L A; Ginsberg, M H; Loskutoff, D J

    1984-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the presence of a previously undescribed fibrinolytic inhibitor in human serum. It has an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 and is not detected in serum derived from platelet-poor plasma, suggesting that it originates from platelets. This conclusion is supported by a number of observations. For example, extracts of washed, gel-filtered human platelets contain an inhibitor of similar activity and size, and physiological concentrations of thrombin induce its release from the platelets. Moreover, the kinetics and dose dependency of this release are similar to those observed for the release of platelet factor 4, and the release of both molecules is blocked by pretreating the platelets with prostaglandin E1 and theophylline. Mixing experiments, which were devised to investigate the specificity of the inhibitor, showed that the fibrinolytic activity initiated by both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator was blocked by platelet releasate in a dose-dependent manner. In both cases, the amount of inhibition increased when the releasates were preincubated with the purified activators, indicating a direct interaction between the activators and an inhibitor(s). The inhibitory activity was removed by preincubating the releasates with antiserum prepared against an antiactivator purified from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. These results indicate that platelets contain an inhibitor which is released by thrombin, inhibits both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator, and is immunologically similar to an inhibitor produced by endothelial cells. This molecule may represent a new class of inhibitors, the antiactivators, which function together with alpha 2-antiplasmin to regulate the fibrinolytic system of the blood. Its release from platelets by thrombin may protect the growing thrombus against premature dissolution initiated by plasminogen activators released by the endothelium. Images PMID:6434594

  8. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator promotes rapid and sustained reperfusion without concomitant systemic plasminogen activation in a canine model of arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mellott, M J; Stabilito, I I; Holahan, M A; Cuca, G C; Wang, S; Li, P; Barrett, J S; Lynch, J J; Gardell, S J

    1992-02-01

    The efficacy of recombinant vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (bat-PA) as a thrombolytic agent was compared with that of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in a canine model of arterial thrombosis. An occlusive thrombus was formed in the femoral artery by insertion of a thrombogenic copper coil; femoral arterial blood flow was monitored with a Doppler flow meter. Bat-PA and t-PA, when administered by 5-minute intravenous infusion (14 nmol/kg), reperfused seven out of eight and four out of eight dogs, respectively. The median reperfusion times in the bat-PA and t-PA groups were 24 and greater than or equal to 131 minutes, respectively. The mean reperfusion times (+/- SEM) in the recanalized bat-PA- and t-PA-treated dogs were similar (20 +/- 5 and 11 +/- 2 minutes, respectively, p = NS). Maximal blood flow after reperfusion was greater with bat-PA than with t-PA (80 +/- 10% and 41 +/- 15% of control flow, respectively, p less than 0.05). Furthermore, the median reocclusion time was markedly delayed in the bat-PA group relative to the t-PA group (131 versus 34 minutes, respectively, p less than 0.05). Plasma fibrinogen and plasminogen were not significantly depleted by the administration of t-PA or bat-PA. However, plasma alpha 2-antiplasmin activity was moderately depressed in the t-PA group relative to the bat-PA group (p less than 0.05). The clearance profile for t-PA was monoexponential, with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.4 +/- 0.3 minutes and a mean residence time of 3.5 +/- 0.4 minutes. The clearance profile for bat-PA was biexponential, with a t1/2 alpha of 0.9 +/- 0.2 minutes, a t1/2 beta of 20.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, and a mean residence time of 21.3 +/- 4.3 minutes. The steady-state volume of distribution displayed by bat-PA was 16-fold greater than that of t-PA. Zymography of serial plasma samples from the bat-PA-treated dogs failed to demonstrate the apparent generation of a complex between bat-PA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1; the

  9. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of stroke: therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Hatcher, James F

    2008-06-01

    Today there exists only one FDA-approved treatment for ischemic stroke; i.e., the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). In the aftermath of the failed stroke clinical trials with the nitrone spin trap/radical scavenger, NXY-059, a number of articles raised the question: are we doing the right thing? Is the animal research truly translational in identifying new agents for stroke treatment? This review summarizes the current state of affairs with plasminogen activators in thrombolytic therapy. In addition to therapeutic value, potential side effects of tPA also exist that aggravate stroke injury and offset the benefits provided by reperfusion of the occluded artery. Thus, combinational options (ultrasound alone or with microspheres/nanobubbles, mechanical dissociation of clot, activated protein C (APC), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), neuroserpin and CDP-choline) that could offset tPA toxic side effects and improve efficacy are also discussed here. Desmoteplase, a plasminogen activator derived from the saliva of Desmodus rotundus vampire bat, antagonizes vascular tPA-induced neurotoxicity by competitively binding to low-density lipoprotein related-receptors (LPR) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) interface, minimizing the tPA uptake into brain parenchyma. tPA can also activate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of endopeptidases comprised of 24 mammalian enzymes that primarily catalyze the turnover and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMPs have been implicated in BBB breakdown and neuronal injury in the early times after stroke, but also contribute to vascular remodeling, angiogenesis, neurogenesis and axonal regeneration during the later repair phase after stroke. tPA, directly or by activation of MMP-9, could have beneficial effects on recovery after stroke by promoting neurovascular repair through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, any treatment regimen directed at MMPs must consider their

  10. Low Molecular Weight Antagonists of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1: Therapeutic Potential in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Simone, Tessa M; Higgins, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1; SERPINE1) is the major physiologic regulator of the plasmin-based pericellular proteolytic cascade, a modulator of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and a causative factor in cardiovascular disease and restenosis, particularly in the context of increased vessel transforming growth factor- β1 (TGF-β1) levels. PAI-1 limits conversion of plasminogen to plasmin (and, thereby, fibrin degradation) by inhibiting its protease targets urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activators (uPA, tPA). PAI-1 also has signaling functions and binds to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to regulate LRP1-dependent cell motility that, in turn, contributes to neointima formation. PAI-1/uPA/uPA receptor/LRPI/integrin complexes are endocytosed with subsequent uPAR/LRP1/integrin redistribution to the leading edge, initiating an "adhesion-detachment-readhesion" cycle to promote cell migration. PAI-1 also interacts with LRP1 in a uPA/uPAR-independent manner triggering Jak/Stat1 pathway activation to stimulate cell motility. PAI-1 itself is a substrate for extracellular proteases and exists in a "cleaved" form which, while unable to interact with uPA and tPA, retains LRP1-binding and migratory activity. These findings suggest that there are multiple mechanisms through which inhibition of PAI-1 may promote cardiovascular health. Several studies have focused on the design, synthesis and preclinical assessment of PAI-1 antagonists including monoclonal antibodies, peptides and low molecular weight (LMW) antagonists. This review discusses the translational impact of LMW PAI-1 antagonists on cardiovascular disease addressing PAI-1-initiated signaling, PAI-1 structure, the design and characteristics of PAI-1-targeting drugs, results of in vitro and in vivo studies, and their clinical implications. PMID:23936868

  11. Regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and urokinase by hyaluronan fragments in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Horton, M R; Olman, M A; Bao, C; White, K E; Choi, A M; Chin, B Y; Noble, P W; Lowenstein, C J

    2000-10-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis are characterized by increased turnover and production of the extracellular matrix as well as an impairment of lung fibrinolytic activity. Although fragments of the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan induce macrophage production of inflammatory mediators, the effect of hyaluronan on the fibrinolytic mediators plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is unknown. This study demonstrates that hyaluronan fragments augment steady-state mRNA, protein, and inhibitory activity of PAI-1 as well as diminish the baseline levels of uPA mRNA and inhibit uPA activity in an alveolar macrophage cell line. Hyaluronan fragments alter macrophage expression of PAI-1 and uPA at the level of gene transcription. Similarly, hyaluronan fragments augment PAI-1 and diminish uPA mRNA levels in freshly isolated inflammatory alveolar macrophages from bleomycin-treated rats. These data suggest that hyaluronan fragments influence alveolar macrophage expression of PAI-1 and uPA and may be a mechanism for regulating fibrinolytic activity during lung inflammation. PMID:11000131

  12. The role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in gastric mucosal protection

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Susan; Steele, Islay; Lyons, Suzanne; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Dimaline, Rod; Pritchard, D. Mark; Varro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Gastric mucosal health is maintained in response to potentially damaging luminal factors. Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) disrupt protective mechanisms leading to bleeding and ulceration. The plasminogen activator system has been implicated in fibrinolysis following gastric ulceration, and an inhibitor of this system, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, is expressed in gastric epithelial cells. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients with normal gastric histology taking aspirin or NSAIDs, we found elevated gastric PAI-1 mRNA abundance compared with controls; the increase in patients on aspirin was independent of whether they were also taking proton pump inhibitors. In the same patients, aspirin tended to lower urokinase plasminogen activator mRNA. Immunohistochemistry indicated PAI-1 localization to epithelial cells. In a model system using MKN45 or AGS-GR cells transfected with a PAI-1 promoter-luciferase reporter construct, we found no evidence for upregulation of PAI-1 expression by indomethacin, and, in fact, cyclooxygenase products such as PGE2 and PGI2 weakly stimulated expression. Increased gastric PAI-1 mRNA was also found in mice following gavage with ethanol or indomethacin, but plasma PAI-1 was unaffected. In PAI-1−/− mice, gastric hemorrhagic lesions in response to ethanol or indomethacin were increased compared with C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, in PAI-1-H/Kβ mice in which PAI-1 is overexpressed in parietal cells, there were decreased lesions in response to ethanol and indomethacin. Thus, PAI-1 expression is increased in gastric epithelial cells in response to mucosal irritants such as aspirin and NSAIDs probably via an indirect mechanism, and PAI-1 acts as a local autoregulator to minimize mucosal damage. PMID:23494120

  13. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Cancer: Rationale and Insight for Future Therapeutic Testing.

    PubMed

    Placencio, Veronica R; DeClerck, Yves A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its function as an inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator (PA), PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has a paradoxical protumorigenic role in cancer, promoting angiogenesis and tumor cell survival. In this review, we summarize preclinical evidence in support of the protumorigenic function of PAI-1 that has led to the testing of small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitors, initially developed as antithrombotic agents, in animal models of cancer. The review discusses the challenges and the opportunities that lay ahead to the development of efficacious and nontoxic PAI-1 inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:26180080

  14. Does Intravenous Administration of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Ischemic Stroke can Cause Inferior Myocardial Infarction?

    PubMed Central

    Almasi, Mostafa; Razmeh, Saeed; Habibi, Amir Hassan; Rezaee, Amir Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) is one of the main portions of acute ischemic stroke management, but unfortunately has some complications. Myocardial infarction (MI) is a hazardous complication of administration of intravenous rTPA that has been reported recently. A 78-year-old lady was admitted for elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. On the second day of admission, she developed acute left hemiparesis and intravenous rTPA was administered within 120 minutes. Three hours later, she has had chest pain. Rescue percutaneous coronary intervention was performed on right coronary artery due to diagnosis of inferior MI, and the symptoms were resolved. PMID:27441068

  15. Unsuccessful tissue plasminogen activator treatment of acute stroke caused by a calcific embolus.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John I; Bekavac, Ivo

    2004-10-01

    Intravenous (IV) administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) given to patients during acute cerebral ischemia according to National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) guidelines improves clinical outcome by 11% to 14%. The success of IV tPA stroke therapy is dependent on several previously reported factors. The authors suggest that the presence of calcification within an embolus may represent an additional important factor. This report describes a patient with an acute stroke secondary to a spontaneous calcific cerebral embolus who had a negative outcome despite receiving proper thrombolytic therapy. PMID:15358964

  16. Targets for dioxin: Genes for plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 and interleukin-1. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, T.R.; Guzman, K.; Dold, K.M. ); Greenlee, W.F. )

    1991-10-18

    Dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD), a widespread environmental contaminant, may elicit its effects by altering gene expression in susceptible cells. Five TCDD-responsive complementary DNA clones were isolated from a human keratinocyte cell line. One of these clones encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor-2, a factor that influences growth and differentiation by regulating proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. Another encodes the cytokine interleukin-1{beta}. Thus, TCDD alters the expression of growth regulator genes and has effects similar to those of other tumor-promoting agents that affect both inflammation and differentiation.

  17. Mechanism of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 regulation by Oncostatin M and Interleukin-1 in human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kasza, Aneta; Kiss, Daniel L.; Gopalan, Sunita; Xu, Weili; Rydel, Russell E.; Koj, Aleksander; Kordula, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Glial cells that produce and respond to various cytokines mediate inflammatory processes in the brain. Here, we show that oncostatin M (OSM) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) regulate the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in human astrocytes. Using the PAI-1 reporter constructs we show that the −58 to −51 proximal element mediates activation by both cytokines. This element is already bound by c-fos/c-jun heterodimers in unstimulated astrocytes, and treatment with cytokine strongly stimulates both expression of c-fos and binding of c-fos/c-jun heterodimers. In addition, IL-1 activates an inhibitory mechanism that downregulates PAI-1 expression after longer exposure to this cytokine. Overexpression of dominant-negative signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1), STAT3, STAT5 and inhibitor of nuclear factor kB (IkB) suppressed OSM/IL-1-induced expression of the PAI-1 reporter construct. We conclude that OSM and IL-1 regulate the PAI-1 gene expression via up-regulating c-fos levels and subsequent binding of c-fos/c-jun heterodimers to the proximal element of the PAI-1 gene. PMID:12390531

  18. Effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia on ACE activity in the cerebral microcirculation of anesthetized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, B.R.; Lister, G.; Dawson, C.A.; Linehan, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity of the cerebral microcirculation of anesthetized dogs was measured from cerebral venous outflow curves after bolus injection of a synthetic ACE substrate, (/sup 3/H)benzoyl-phenylalanyl-alanylproline ((/sup 3/H)BPAP), into a common carotid artery. Cerebral BPAP metabolism was quantified by measuring the concentration of (/sup 3/H)benzoyl-phenylalanine (the product of BPAP hydrolysis by ACE) in blood samples from the sagittal sinus after occlusion of the lateral sinuses with bone wax. Instantaneous BPAP metabolism in each sample increased as a function of time after injection, suggestive of perfusion heterogeneity, and averaged 59 +/- 4% (n = 8) over a single pass during normoxia and normocapnia. The ratio of Vmax (the maximal rate of cerebral BPAP metabolism) to Km (the concentration at Vmax/2), was calculated from instantaneous outflow curves using a model based on first-order kinetics. Increases in cerebral blood flow during either hypoxia or hypercapnia significantly reduced BPAP metabolism to 33 +/- 3 (n = 7) and 24 +/- 3% (n = 5), respectively; however, Vmax/Km of ACE activity (0.19 +/- 0.03 ml/s) was not affected by either condition. The lack of change in apparent kinetics of ACE activity (i.e., in Vmax/Km) during hypoxia or hypercapnia suggests that recruitment of cerebral capillaries was not a quantitatively significant factor in controlling BPAP metabolism with this degree of either hypoxia or hypercapnia.

  19. ACE inhibitory activity of pangasius catfish (Pangasius sutchi) skin and bone gelatin hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodani, Fatemeh; Ghassem, Masomeh; Babji, Abdul Salam; Yusop, Salma Mohamad; Khosrokhavar, Roya

    2014-09-01

    Skin and bone gelatins of pangasius catfish (Pangasius sutchi) were hydrolyzed with alcalase to isolate Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides. Samples with the highest degree of hydrolysis (DH) were separated into different fractions with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) sizes of 10, 3 and 1 kDa, respectively and assayed for ACE inhibitory activity. Skin and bone gelatins had highest DH of 64.87 and 68.48 % after 2 and 1 h incubation, respectively. Results from this study indicated that by decreasing the molecular weight of fractions, ACE inhibitory activity was increased. Therefore, F3 permeates (MWCO < 1 kDa) of skin (IC50 = 3.2 μg/ml) and bone (IC50 = 1.3 μg/ml) gelatins possessed higher ACE inhibitory activity compared to their untreated gelatins and corresponding hydrolyzed fractions. In this study, the major amino acids were Glycine followed by Proline with an increased amount of hydrophobic amino acid content in F3 permeates of skin (4.01 %) and bone (5.79 %) gelatin. Digestion stability against gastrointestinal proteases did not show any remarkable change on ACE inhibition potency of these permeates. It was concluded that alcalase hydrolysis of P. sutchi by-products could be utilized as a part of functional food or ingredients of a formulated drug in order to control high blood pressure. PMID:25190839

  20. The nature of interactions between tissue-type plasminogen activator and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Torr, S.R.; Winters, K.J.; Santoro, S.A.; Sobel, B.E. )

    1990-07-15

    To elucidate interactions responsible for inhibition of aggregation of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) harvested from whole blood preincubated with t-PA, experiments were performed with PRP and washed platelets under diverse conditions of preincubation. Both ADP and collagen induced aggregation were inhibited in PRP unless aprotinin had been added to the preincubated whole blood concomitantly with t-PA. However, in washed platelets prepared after the same exposure aggregation was intact. When washed platelets were supplemented with fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) in concentrations simulating those in whole blood preincubated with t-PA, aggregation induced with either ADP or collagen was inhibited. Thus, the inhibition in PRP depended on generation of FDPs by activated plasminogen. The functional integrity of surface glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptors in washed platelets was documented by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE of surface labeled GPs and by fibrinogen binding despite preincubation of the whole blood or washed platelets themselves with t-PA and plasminogen as long as exogenous calcium (greater than or equal to 0.1 microM) was present. In contrast, when calcium was absent, the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor was rendered susceptible to degradation by plasmin, and aggregation was inhibited by preincubation at 37 degrees C even if aprotinin was present when aggregation was being assayed. These observations reconcile disparate results in the literature from studies in vivo and in vitro by demonstrating that inhibition of aggregation of platelets in PRP and in whole blood reflects indirect effects of plasminogen activation rather than direct effects of t-PA or plasmin on the platelets themselves.

  1. Hyperthermia stimulates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wojta, J.; Holzer, M.; Hufnagl, P.; Christ, G.; Hoover, R. L.; Binder, B. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of exposure to hyperthermia on the fibrinolytic potential of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in culture was studied. HUVEC responded to exposure to 42 degrees C with a time-dependent increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) activity and antigen accompanied by a four- to fivefold increase in PAI-1 specific m-RNA and a decrease in tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen. The effect of 8 hours exposure to hyperthermia on PAI-1 activity and antigen could not be reversed by reexposure of the cells to 37 degrees C for 24 hours as evidenced by continuously increased amounts of PAI-1 released into the conditioned media. t-PA release, however, decreased during the 24-hour period at 37 degrees C after exposure to hyperthermia. No difference in PAI-1 antigen present in the extracellular matrix of heat treated HUVEC as compared to HUVEC kept at 37 degrees C could be found. Our data supports the idea that hyperthermia is one stress factor that influences the fibrinolytic potential of endothelial cells. Images Figure 6 PMID:1928306

  2. High level of urokinase plasminogen activator contributes to cholangiocarcinoma invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Thummarati, Parichut; Wijitburaphat, Sitsom; Prasopthum, Aruna; Menakongka, Apaporn; Sripa, Banchob; Tohtong, Rutaiwan; Suthiphongchai, Tuangporn

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) invasion and its correlation with clinicopathological parameters. METHODS: uPA expression in CCA tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. The level of uPA from two CCA cell lines (HuCCA-1 and KKU-M213) and a non-cancer immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (H69) was monitored by plasminogen-gelatin zymography and western blotting, whereas that of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) protein and uPA receptor (uPAR) mRNA was monitored by western blotting and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Two independent methods were employed to suppress uPA function: a synthetic uPA inhibitor (B428) and silencing of uPA gene expression using siRNA. In vitro invasion of the uPA-disrupted cells was assessed by Matrigel-coated Transwell assay. RESULTS: The immunohistochemical study showed that 75.3% (131/174) of CCA tissues expressed uPA. High uPA expression was correlated with lymphatic invasion and metastasis of CCA patients. Plasminogen-gelatin zymography of the conditioned media and cell-surface eluates showed that both CCA cell lines, but not H69, expressed both secreted and membrane-bound forms of uPA. Although the two CCA cell lines, HuCCA-1 and KKU-M213, expressed a relatively high level of uPA and uPAR, the latter exhibited a much lower degree of in vitro invasiveness, correlating with a high expression of PAI-1 in the latter, but not in the former. Suppressing uPA function with a specific uPA inhibitor, B428, or with siRNA against uPA reduced in vitro invasiveness of KKU-M213 cells, demonstrating the requirement for uPA in the invasiveness of CCA cells. Therefore, our in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that uPA is an important requirement for the invasion process of CCA. CONCLUSION: uPA expression correlates with lymphatic invasion and metastasis in vivo and is required for CCA cell invasion in vitro

  3. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Interacts with α3 Subunit of Proteasome and Modulates Its Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting. PMID:21135093

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 stimulates macrophage activation through Toll-like Receptor-4.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Xu, Zhi; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-08-26

    While inflammation is often associated with increased Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the functional consequences of PAI-1 in inflammation have yet to be fully determined. The aim of this study was to establish the in vivo relevance of PAI-1 in inflammation. A mouse model of systemic inflammation was employed in wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1(-/-)) mice. Mice survival, macrophage infiltration into the lungs, and plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion. In vitro experiments were conducted to examine changes in LPS-induced inflammatory responses after PAI-1 exposure. PAI-1 was shown to regulate inflammation, in vivo, and affect macrophage infiltration into lungs. Further, PAI-1 activated macrophages, and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels in these cells. The effect of PAI-1 on macrophage activation was dose-dependent and LPS-independent. Proteolytic inhibitory activity and Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP) and vitronectin (VN) binding functions, were not involved in PAI-1-mediated activation of macrophages. However, the effect of PAI-1 on macrophage activation was partially blocked by a TLR4 neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, PAI-1-induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-2 (MIP-2) expression was reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages compared to WT macrophages. These results demonstrate that PAI-1 is involved in the regulation of host inflammatory responses through Toll-like Receptor-4 (TLR4)-mediated macrophage activation. PMID:27317488

  5. Staphylokinase has distinct modes of interaction with antimicrobial peptides, modulating its plasminogen-activation properties.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Leonard T; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-01-01

    Staphylokinase (Sak) is a plasminogen activator protein that is secreted by many Staphylococcus aureus strains. Sak also offers protection by binding and inhibiting specific antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we evaluate Sak as a more general interaction partner for AMPs. Studies with melittin, mCRAMP, tritrpticin and bovine lactoferricin indicate that the truncation of the first ten residues of Sak (SakΔN10), which occurs in vivo and uncovers important residues in a bulge region, improves its affinity for AMPs. Melittin and mCRAMP have a lower affinity for SakΔN10, and in docking studies, they bind to the N-terminal segment and bulge region of SakΔN10. By comparison, lactoferricin and tritrpticin form moderately high affinity 1:1 complexes with SakΔN10 and their cationic residues form several electrostatic interactions with the protein's α-helix. Overall, our work identifies two distinct AMP binding surfaces on SakΔN10 whose occupation would lead to either inhibition or promotion of its plasminogen activating properties. PMID:27554435

  6. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Coating on Implant Surfaces Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Peetermans, Marijke; Verhamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are a major medical challenge because of their high prevalence and antibiotic resistance. As fibrin plays an important role in S. aureus biofilm formation, we hypothesize that coating of the implant surface with fibrinolytic agents can be used as a new method of antibiofilm prophylaxis. The effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) coating on S. aureus biofilm formation was tested with in vitro microplate biofilm assays and an in vivo mouse model of biofilm infection. tPA coating efficiently inhibited biofilm formation by various S. aureus strains. The effect was dependent on plasminogen activation by tPA, leading to subsequent local fibrin cleavage. A tPA coating on implant surfaces prevented both early adhesion and later biomass accumulation. Furthermore, tPA coating increased the susceptibility of biofilm infections to antibiotics. In vivo, significantly fewer bacteria were detected on the surfaces of implants coated with tPA than on control implants from mice treated with cloxacillin. Fibrinolytic coatings (e.g., with tPA) reduce S. aureus biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel way to prevent bacterial biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices. PMID:26519394

  7. Staphylokinase has distinct modes of interaction with antimicrobial peptides, modulating its plasminogen-activation properties

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylokinase (Sak) is a plasminogen activator protein that is secreted by many Staphylococcus aureus strains. Sak also offers protection by binding and inhibiting specific antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we evaluate Sak as a more general interaction partner for AMPs. Studies with melittin, mCRAMP, tritrpticin and bovine lactoferricin indicate that the truncation of the first ten residues of Sak (SakΔN10), which occurs in vivo and uncovers important residues in a bulge region, improves its affinity for AMPs. Melittin and mCRAMP have a lower affinity for SakΔN10, and in docking studies, they bind to the N-terminal segment and bulge region of SakΔN10. By comparison, lactoferricin and tritrpticin form moderately high affinity 1:1 complexes with SakΔN10 and their cationic residues form several electrostatic interactions with the protein’s α-helix. Overall, our work identifies two distinct AMP binding surfaces on SakΔN10 whose occupation would lead to either inhibition or promotion of its plasminogen activating properties. PMID:27554435

  8. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  9. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  10. Engineering of plasminogen activators for targeting to thrombus and heightening thrombolytic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Absar, S; Gupta, N; Nahar, K; Ahsan, F

    2015-09-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of the coronary artery, which triggers acute myocardial infarction, is one of the major causes of death in the USA. Currently, arterial occlusions are treated with intravenous plasminogen activators (PAs), which dissolve the clot by activating plasminogen. However, PAs indiscriminately generate plasmin, which depletes critical clotting factors (fibrinogen, factor V, and factor VIII), precipitates a lytic state in the blood, and produces bleeding complications in a large patient population. PAs have been extensively investigated to achieve thrombus specificity, to attenuate the bleeding risk, and to widen their clinical applications. In this review, we discuss various strategies that have been pursued since the beginning of thrombolytic therapy. We review the biotechnological approaches that have been used to develop mutant and chimeric PAs for thrombus selectivity, including the use of specific antibodies for targeting thrombi. We discuss particulate carrier-based systems and triggered-release concepts. We propose new hypotheses and strategies to spur future studies in this research arena. Overall, we describe the approaches and accomplishments in the development of patient-friendly and workable delivery systems for thrombolytic drugs. PMID:26074048

  11. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  12. Fine-Mapping Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene: Separate QTLs Identified for Hypertension and for ACE Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chia-Min; Wang, Ruey-Yun; Fann, Cathy S. J.; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Kang, Chih-Sen; Chen, Chien-Chung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in multiple biological system, particularly cardiovascular diseases. However, findings associating ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism with hypertension or other related traits are inconsistent. Therefore, in a two-stage approach, we aimed to fine-map ACE in order to narrow-down the function-specific locations. We genotyped 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ACE from 1168 individuals from 305 young-onset (age ≤40) hypertension pedigrees, and found four linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks. A tag-SNP, rs1800764 on LD block 2, upstream of and near the ACE promoter, was significantly associated with young-onset hypertension (p = 0.04). Tag-SNPs on all LD blocks were significantly associated with ACE activity (p-value: 10–16 to <10–33). The two regions most associated with ACE activity were found between exon13 and intron18 and between intron 20 and 3′UTR, as revealed by measured haplotype analysis. These two major QTLs of ACE activity and the moderate effect variant upstream of ACE promoter for young-onset hypertension were replicated by another independent association study with 842 subjects. PMID:23469169

  13. Protonation state of a single histidine residue contributes significantly to the kinetics of the reaction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 with tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Komissarov, Andrey A; Declerck, Paul J; Shore, Joseph D

    2004-05-28

    Stopped-flow fluorometry was used to study the kinetics of the reactive center loop insertion occurring during the reaction of N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-3-diazole (NBD) P9 plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) with tissue-(tPA) and urokinase (uPA)-type plasminogen activators and human pancreatic elastase at pH 5.5-8.5. The limiting rate constants of reactive center loop insertion (k(lim)) and concentrations of proteinase at half-saturation (K(0.5)) for tPA and uPA and the specificity constants (k(lim)/K(0.5)) for elastase were determined. The pH dependences of k(lim)/K(0.5) reflected inactivation of each enzyme due to protonation of His57 of the catalytic triad. However, the specificity of the inhibitory reaction with tPA and uPA was notably higher than that for the substrate reaction catalyzed by elastase. pH dependences of k(lim) and K(0.5) obtained for tPA revealed an additional ionizable group (pKa, 6.0-6.2) affecting the reaction. Protonation of this group resulted in a significant increase in both k(lim) and K(0.5) and a 4.6-fold decrease in the specificity of the reaction of tPA with NBD P9 PAI-1. Binding of monoclonal antibody MA-55F4C12 to PAI-1 induced a decrease in k(lim) and K(0.5) at any pH but did not affect either the pKa of the group or an observed decrease in k(lim)/K(0.5) due to protonation of the group. In contrast to tPA, the k(lim) and K(0.5) for the reactions of uPA with NBD P9 PAI-1 or its complex with the monoclonal antibody were independent of pH in the 6.5-8.5 range. Since slightly acidic pH is a feature of a number of malignant tumors, alterations in PAI-1/tPA kinetics could play a role in the cancerogenesis. Changes in the protonation state of His(188), which is placed closely to the S1 site and is unique for tPA, has been proposed to contribute to the observed pH dependences of k(lim) and K(0.5). PMID:15033993

  14. Stability of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator at −30 °C Over One Year

    PubMed Central

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is used to restore patency and avoid inadvertent removal of peripheral and central venous catheters. rt-PA was reconstituted (1 mg/mL) then cryopreserved at −30 °C for 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, and 12 months and, then its stability was determined. After cryopreservation for one and two months, rt-PA kept more than 95% of its activity compared to standard samples, while cryopreservation for three months caused 8% loss of activity. However, after cryopreservation for six months or more, rt-PA retained only 87.5% or less activity compared to standard samples. Therefore, it is recommended that reconstituted rt-PA be cryopreserved at −30 °C for a maximum period of three months. PMID:24275785

  15. Physiological and pathological roles of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor neuroserpin in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tsang, Vicky W. K.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    Although its roles in the vascular space are most well-known, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is widely expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, where its activity is believed to be regulated by neuroserpin, a predominantly brain-specific member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. In the normal physiological state, tPA has been shown to play roles in the development and plasticity of the nervous system. Ischemic damage, however, may lead to excess tPA activity in the brain and this is believed to contribute to neurodegeneration. In this article, we briefly review the physiological and pathological roles of tPA in the nervous system, which includes neuronal migration, axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, neuroprotection and neurodegeneration, as well as a contribution to neurological disease. We summarize tPA's multiple mechanisms of action and also highlight the contributions of the inhibitor neuroserpin to these processes. PMID:26528129

  16. Subunits of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Cluster of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Are Surface-Displayed Proteins that Bind and Activate Human Plasminogen

    PubMed Central

    Gründel, Anne; Friedrich, Kathleen; Pfeiffer, Melanie; Jacobs, Enno; Dumke, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The dual role of glycolytic enzymes in cytosol-located metabolic processes and in cell surface-mediated functions with an influence on virulence is described for various micro-organisms. Cell wall-less bacteria of the class Mollicutes including the common human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae possess a reduced genome limiting the repertoire of virulence factors and metabolic pathways. After the initial contact of bacteria with cells of the respiratory epithelium via a specialized complex of adhesins and release of cell-damaging factors, surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes may facilitate the further interaction between host and microbe. In this study, we described detection of the four subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHA-D) among the cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins of M. pneumoniae. Subunits of PDH were cloned, expressed and purified to produce specific polyclonal guinea pig antisera. Using colony blotting, fractionation of total proteins and immunofluorescence experiments, the surface localization of PDHA-C was demonstrated. All recombinant PDH subunits are able to bind to HeLa cells and human plasminogen. These interactions can be specifically blocked by the corresponding polyclonal antisera. In addition, an influence of ionic interactions on PDHC-binding to plasminogen as well as of lysine residues on the association of PDHA-D with plasminogen was confirmed. The PDHB subunit was shown to activate plasminogen and the PDHB-plasminogen complex induces degradation of human fibrinogen. Hence, our data indicate that the surface-associated PDH subunits might play a role in the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae infections by interaction with human plasminogen. PMID:25978044

  17. Reactivated recombinant plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (rPAI-1) effectively prevents thrombolysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, D E; Declerck, P J; Van Houtte, E; De Mol, M; Collen, D

    1992-07-01

    The effects of human recombinant plasminogen activator inhibitor (rPAI-1) on thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) were studied in a rabbit model of jugular vein thrombosis. Two functionally distinct rPAI-1 preparations were used in these experiments, including latent rPAI-1 (approximately 2 units of t-PA neutralizing activity per micrograms protein) and reactivated rPAI-1 (approximately 150 units/micrograms). Simultaneous intravenous infusion over 4 h of 1.7 mg/kg of reactivated rPAI-1 (inhibitory capacity approximately 0.5 mg/kg rt-PA) with 0.5 mg/kg of rt-PA completely prevented lysis of a jugular venous thrombus, whereas an equivalent amount of latent PAI-1 did not significantly influence clot lysis. These findings demonstrate that reactivated human rPAI-1 efficiently neutralizes thrombolysis with rt-PA in vivo. Since previous studies have suggested that elevated endogenous levels of PAI-1 do not attenuate the thrombolytic potency of rt-PA in the endotoxin-treated model, we compared the stability of complexes formed by 125I-rt-PA with reactivated human rPAI-1 and with rabbit PAI-1 in vitro. Our findings indicate that both forms of PAI-1 form SDS-stable complexes following incubation with 125I-rt-PA. Thus, it seems likely that elevated levels of active PAI-1 can negate the thrombolytic effects of rt-PA in vivo and argues against the possibility that t-PA can dissociate from PAI-1 and have its activity restored in the presence of a thrombus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1514173

  18. Effect of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    DING, YOUCHENG; ZHANG, HUI; LU, AIGUO; ZHOU, ZHUQING; ZHONG, MINGAN; SHEN, DONGWEI; WANG, XUJING; ZHU, ZHENGGANG

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a primary cause of mortality in patients with gastric cancer. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) has been demonstrated to be associated with tumor cell metastasis through the degradation of the extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of the uPA system in gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis. Expression of uPA, uPA receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in four gastric cell lines (AGS, SGC7901, MKN45 and MKN28) was measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. uPA activity was detected using a uPA activity kit. Peritoneal implantation models of rats were established by injecting four gastric cancer cell lines for the selection of the cancer cells with a high planting potential. Biological behaviors, including adhesion, migration and invasion, were determined using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Expression of the uPA system was observed to be highest in the SGC7901 cells among the four gastric cell lines. uPA activity was observed to be highest in the MKN45 cells and lowest in the AGS cells. Furthermore, peritoneal implantation analysis demonstrated that no peritoneal tumors were identified in the AGS cells, whilst the tumor masses observed in the SGC7901 and MKN45 cells were of different sizes. The survival times of the rats injected with the MKN28 and SGC7901 cells were longer than those of the rats injected with the MKN45 cells. Antibodies for uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 in the uPA system had the ability to inhibit the adhesion, migration and invasion of peritoneal metastasis in the gastric cancer cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the uPA system was positively associated with peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:27313768

  19. High-fat diet enhances and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency attenuates bone loss in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1-/-) on bone structure in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) by 22% and 21%, trabecular number (Tb.N) by 8% and 4% and bone mineral de...

  20. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator as a novel treatment option for infective endocarditis: a retrospective clinical study in 32 children.

    PubMed

    Levitas, Aviva; Krymko, Hanna; Richardson, Justin; Zalzstein, Eli; Ioffe, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening infectious syndrome, with high morbidity and mortality. Current treatments for infective endocarditis include intravenous antibiotics, surgery, and involve a lengthy hospital stay. We hypothesised that adjunctive recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment for infective endocarditis may facilitate faster resolution of vegetations and clearance of positive blood cultures, and therefore decrease morbidity and mortality. This retrospective study included follow-up of patients, from 1997 through 2014, including clinical presentation, causative organism, length of treatment, morbidity, and mortality. We identified 32 patients, all of whom were diagnosed with endocarditis and were treated by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Among all, 27 patients (93%) had positive blood cultures, with the most frequent organisms being Staphylococcus epidermis (nine patients), Staphylococcus aureus (six patients), and Candida (nine patients). Upon treatment, in 31 patients (97%), resolution of vegetations and clearance of blood cultures occurred within hours to few days. Out of 32 patients, one patient (3%) died and three patients (9%) suffered embolic or haemorrhagic events, possibly related to the recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. None of the patients required surgical intervention to assist vegetation resolution. In conclusion, it appears that recombinant tissue plasminogen activator may become an adjunctive treatment for infective endocarditis and may decrease morbidity as compared with current guidelines. Prospective multi-centre studies are required to validate our findings. PMID:25682953

  1. Components of the Plasminogen Activation System Promote Engraftment of Porous Polyethylene Biomaterial via Common and Distinct Effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Christoph A.; Hessenauer, Maximilian E. T.; Pflieger, Kerstin; Rehberg, Markus; Kanse, Sandip M.; Zahler, Stefan; Krombach, Fritz; Berghaus, Alexander; Strieth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rapid fibrovascularization is a prerequisite for successful biomaterial engraftment. In addition to their well-known roles in fibrinolysis, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or their inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have recently been implicated as individual mediators in non-fibrinolytic processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Since these events are critical for fibrovascularization of biomaterial, we hypothesized that the components of the plasminogen activation system contribute to biomaterial engraftment. Employing in vivo and ex vivo microscopy techniques, vessel and collagen network formation within porous polyethylene (PPE) implants engrafted into dorsal skinfold chambers were found to be significantly impaired in uPA-, tPA-, or PAI-1-deficient mice. Consequently, the force required for mechanical disintegration of the implants out of the host tissue was significantly lower in the mutant mice than in wild-type controls. Conversely, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, non-catalytic uPA, or PAI-1, but not with non-catalytic tPA, accelerated implant vascularization in wild-type mice. Thus, uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 contribute to the fibrovascularization of PPE implants through common and distinct effects. As clinical perspective, surface coating with recombinant uPA, tPA, or PAI-1 might provide a novel strategy for accelerating the vascularization of this biomaterial. PMID:25658820

  2. Acceleration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Mediated Thrombolysis by Magnetically Powered Nanomotors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dose control and effectiveness promotion of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) for thrombolysis are vitally important to alleviate serious side effects such as hemorrhage in stroke treatments. In order to increase the effectiveness and reduce the risk of stroke treatment, we use rotating magnetic nanomotors to enhance the mass transport of t-PA molecules at the blood clot interface for local ischemic stroke therapy. The in vitro experiments demonstrate that, when combined with magnetically activated nanomotors, the thrombolysis speed of low-concentration t-PA (50 μg mL–1) can be enhanced up to 2-fold, to the maximum lysis speed at high t-PA concentration. Based on the convection enhanced transport theory due to rotating magnetic nanomotors, a theoretical model is proposed and predicts the experimental results reasonably well. The validity and efficiency of this enhanced treatment has been demonstrated in a rat embolic model. PMID:25006696

  3. Overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator in transgenic mice is correlated with impaired learning.

    PubMed Central

    Meiri, N; Masos, T; Rosenblum, K; Miskin, R; Dudai, Y

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic mice designated alpha MUPA overproduce in the brain murine urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), an extracellular protease implicated in tissue remodeling. We have now localized, by in situ hybridization, extensive signal of uPA mRNA in the alpha MUPA cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala, sites that were not labeled in counterpart wild-type mice. Furthermore, biochemical measurements reveal a remarkably high level of enzymatic activity of uPA in the cortex and hippocampus of alpha MUPA compared with wild-type mice. We have used the alpha MUPA mice to examine whether the abnormal level of uPA in the cortex and the limbic system affects learning ability. We report that alpha MUPA mice perform poorly in tasks of spatial, olfactory, and taste-aversion learning, while displaying normal sensory and motor capabilities. Our results suggest that uPA is involved in neural processes subserving a variety of learning types. Images PMID:8159723

  4. Acceleration of tissue plasminogen activator-mediated thrombolysis by magnetically powered nanomotors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Rui; Huang, Weijie; Huang, Lijie; Yang, Bo; Mao, Leidong; Jin, Kunlin; ZhuGe, Qichuan; Zhao, Yiping

    2014-08-26

    Dose control and effectiveness promotion of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) for thrombolysis are vitally important to alleviate serious side effects such as hemorrhage in stroke treatments. In order to increase the effectiveness and reduce the risk of stroke treatment, we use rotating magnetic nanomotors to enhance the mass transport of t-PA molecules at the blood clot interface for local ischemic stroke therapy. The in vitro experiments demonstrate that, when combined with magnetically activated nanomotors, the thrombolysis speed of low-concentration t-PA (50 μg mL(-1)) can be enhanced up to 2-fold, to the maximum lysis speed at high t-PA concentration. Based on the convection enhanced transport theory due to rotating magnetic nanomotors, a theoretical model is proposed and predicts the experimental results reasonably well. The validity and efficiency of this enhanced treatment has been demonstrated in a rat embolic model. PMID:25006696

  5. Distribution of tissue plasminogen activator in human and monkey eyes. An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, B J; Geanon, J D; Tripathi, R C

    1987-11-01

    The authors examined various structures of human and rhesus monkey eyes for the presence of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) by using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunohistochemical technique with a monoclonal antibody specific for human t-PA. Positive staining for t-PA was observed both intracellularly and in the extracellular matrix of many tissues in both species. The tissues which stained intensely for t-PA included the corneal endothelium, corneal epithelium, trabecular meshwork, lens epithelium, peripheral vitreous, uveal tract, inner retina, and all vascular endothelia. The apparent minor difference in staining intensity between human and monkey eyes may be related to the time-dependent degradation of t-PA, to variations in the tissue content of t-PA, or to the difference in animal species. The discussion includes a consideration of the fibrinolytic activity of t-PA and of its emerging role in the destructive remodeling of the extracellular matrix in various ocular structures. PMID:3120076

  6. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Suppresses Profibrotic Responses in Fibroblasts from Fibrotic Lungs*

    PubMed Central

    Marudamuthu, Amarnath S.; Shetty, Shwetha K.; Bhandary, Yashodhar P.; Karandashova, Sophia; Thompson, Michael; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Florova, Galina; Hogan, Taryn B.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y. S.; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Fu, Jian; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Idell, Steven; Shetty, Sreerama

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial scarification. A hallmark morphological lesion is the accumulation of myofibroblasts or fibrotic lung fibroblasts (FL-fibroblasts) in areas called fibroblastic foci. We previously demonstrated that the expression of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the uPA receptor are elevated in FL-fibroblasts from the lungs of patients with IPF. FL-fibroblasts isolated from human IPF lungs and from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis showed an increased rate of proliferation compared with normal lung fibroblasts (NL-fibroblasts) derived from histologically “normal” lung. Basal expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in human and murine FL-fibroblasts was reduced, whereas collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin were markedly elevated. Conversely, alveolar type II epithelial cells surrounding the fibrotic foci in situ, as well as those isolated from IPF lungs, showed increased activation of caspase-3 and PAI-1 with a parallel reduction in uPA expression. Transduction of an adenovirus PAI-1 cDNA construct (Ad-PAI-1) suppressed expression of uPA and collagen-I and attenuated proliferation in FL-fibroblasts. On the contrary, inhibition of basal PAI-1 in NL-fibroblasts increased collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin. Fibroblasts isolated from PAI-1-deficient mice without lung injury also showed increased collagen-I and uPA. These changes were associated with increased Akt/phosphatase and tensin homolog proliferation/survival signals in FL-fibroblasts, which were reversed by transduction with Ad-PAI-1. This study defines a new role of PAI-1 in the control of fibroblast activation and expansion and its role in the pathogenesis of fibrosing lung disease and, in particular, IPF. PMID:25648892

  7. Hyperoxia enhanced the production of plasminogen activator by cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.G.; Ryan, T.J.; Birnby, L.; Tsan, M.F. New York State Health Lab., Albany )

    1990-02-26

    Pulmonary artery endothelial cell (EC) monolayers exposed to hyperoxia show increased permeability to albumin and marked alterations in actin filament distribution. The mechanism for these cytoskeletal changes is unknown. The authors now report that cells exposed to hyperoxia (95% O{sub 2}) produce significant quantities of urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). Zymographic analysis revealed that plasminogen-dependent caseinolytic activity in conditioned media from O{sub 2}-exposed cells was several fold higher than controls, especially at 48 hr. Cell-associated lytic activity was markedly increased at 48 and 72 hr when oxidative effects on the cytoskeleton were most apparent. Amidolytic assays confirmed these findings. (1) Conditioned media, CTA U/ml (mean {+-} SEM): Control 0.73{+-}0.05 vs 48 hr O{sub 2} 2.09{+-}0.50, (2) Cell-associated activity (preparations enriched for adhesion plaques), CTA mU/10{sup 6} cells: Control 0.17{+-}0.06; O{sub 2}: 24 hr 0.18{+-}0.07; 48 hr 0.46{+-}0.08; 72 hr 0.48{+-}0.08; O{sub 2} 48 hr or 72 hr vs Control. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated breakdown and restructuring of fibronectin and collagen components of the extracellular matrix at 48 and 72 hours. They conclude that hyperoxia enhanced both PA production and dismantling of matrix by EC. These changes may in part be responsible for some of the actin filament alterations which occur in conjunction with O{sub 2}-induced permeability increases.

  8. Plasminogen activation system in oral cancer: Relevance in prognosis and therapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Wyganowska-Świątkowska, Marzena; Jankun, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Research on carcinogenesis and progress in cancer treatment have reduced mortality of cancer patients. Mortality rates decreased by 1.5% per year from 2001 through 2010 for most types of cancer in men and women. However, oral cancer is still a significant global health problem since incidence and mortality rates are increasing. Oral cavity cancer is ranked the 8th in men and the 14th in women based on data collected between 2006 and 2010 by the National Institute of Health. Furthermore, an increasing incidence of head and neck neoplasms, particularly the tongue cancer among young adults has been reported recently. It is most likely due to increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or the early start of tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment of oral cancer patients is mainly surgical and often leads to esthetic and functional deformities, with severe impact on the quality of life. Thus, novel form of treatments and selection of patients with high and low risk of mortality is of high priority for clinical studies. The expression of proteolytic enzymes in tumor and stromal tissues has been shown to have prognostic significance in many human cancers and inhibiting proteolysis can reduce tumor growth in many in vivo and in vitro models. Plasmin, with its activators and inhibitors are of great importance in many human malignances and collectively are called plasminogen activation system (PAS). In this comprehensive review we examine expression, possible prognostic markers and importance for therapy of the PAS members in oral cancer. Literature review suggests that overexpression of urokinase and its receptor are markers of poor outcome, thus, their inhibition can be explored in oral cancer therapy. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is complex and depends on its concentration. Overexpression of PAI-1 favors angiogenesis, metastasis and poor prognosis, although when applied in very high concentrations it inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth, the

  9. Tissue-type plasminogen activator induces synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yepes, M; Wu, F; Torre, E; Cuellar-Giraldo, D; Jia, D; Cheng, L

    2016-04-01

    The release of the serine proteinase tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons plays a central role in the development of synaptic plasticity, adaptation to metabolic stress and neuronal survival. Our earlier studies indicate that by inducing the recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin and voltage-gated calcium channels to the active zone, tPA promotes Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) to the synaptic release site where they release their load of neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate whether this effect leads to depletion of SVs in the presynaptic terminal. Our data indicate that tPA promotes SV endocytosis via a mechanism that does not require the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. Instead, we show that tPA induces calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation, which is followed by dynamin I-induced recruitment of the actin-binding protein profilin II to the presynaptic membrane, and profilin II-induced F-actin formation. We report that this tPA-induced sequence of events leads to the association of newly formed SVs with F-actin clusters in the endocytic zone. In summary, the data presented here indicate that following the exocytotic release of neurotransmitters tPA activates the mechanism whereby SVs are retrieved from the presynaptic membrane and endocytosed to replenish the pool of vesicles available for a new cycle of exocytosis. Together, these results indicate that in murine cerebral cortical neurons tPA plays a central role coupling SVs exocytosis and endocytosis. PMID:26820595

  10. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator-like Proteases in Teleosts Lack Genuine Receptor-binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Bager, René; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Jensen, Jan K.; Szczur, Agnieszka; Christensen, Anni; Andersen, Lisbeth M.; Johansen, Jesper S.; Larsen, Niels; Baatrup, Erik; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen activation catalyzed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in normal and pathological tissue remodeling processes. Since its discovery in the mid-1980s, the cell membrane-anchored urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been believed to be central to the functions of uPA, as uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation activity appeared to be confined to cell surfaces through the binding of uPA to uPAR. However, a functional uPAR has so far only been identified in mammals. We have now cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized two zebrafish proteases, zfuPA-a and zfuPA-b, which by several criteria are the fish orthologs of mammalian uPA. Thus, both proteases catalyze the activation of fish plasminogen efficiently and both proteases are inhibited rapidly by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). But zfuPA-a differs from mammalian uPA by lacking the exon encoding the uPAR-binding epidermal growth factor-like domain; zfuPA-b differs from mammalian uPA by lacking two cysteines of the epidermal growth factor-like domain and a uPAR-binding sequence comparable with that found in mammalian uPA. Accordingly, no zfuPA-b binding activity could be found in fish white blood cells or fish cell lines. We therefore propose that the current consensus of uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation taking place on cell surfaces, derived from observations with mammals, is too narrow. Fish uPAs appear incapable of receptor binding in the manner known from mammals and uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation in fish may occur mainly in solution. Studies with nonmammalian vertebrate species are needed to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of plasminogen activation. PMID:22733817

  11. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression Is Restricted to Subsets of Excitatory Pyramidal Glutamatergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Louessard, Morgane; Lacroix, Alexandre; Martineau, Magalie; Mondielli, Gregoire; Montagne, Axel; Lesept, Flavie; Lambolez, Bertrand; Cauli, Bruno; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Although the extracellular serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is involved in pathophysiological processes such as learning and memory, anxiety, epilepsy, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease, information about its regional, cellular, and subcellular distribution in vivo is lacking. In the present study, we observed, in healthy mice and rats, the presence of tPA in endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes, mastocytes, and ependymocytes, but not in pericytes, microglial cells, and astrocytes. Moreover, blockage of the axo-dendritic transport unmasked tPA expression in neurons of cortical and hippocampal areas. Interestingly, combined electrophysiological recordings, single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistological analyses revealed that the presence of tPA is restricted to subsets of excitatory pyramidal glutamatergic neurons. We further evidenced that tPA is stored in synaptobrevin-2-positive glutamatergic synaptic vesicles. Based on all these data, we propose the existence of tPA-ergic neurons in the mature brain. PMID:26377106

  12. Tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: a New York city emergency medicine perspective.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yu-Feng; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G; Rella, Joseph G; Rennie, William P; Kwon, Robert K; Silverman, Robert A

    2005-11-01

    Nationally, only 2-3% of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) currently receive tissue plasminogen activator (TPA). To better understand the reasons, we investigated the practice patterns, level of familiarity and acceptance of TPA for AIS among emergency physicians in New York City (NYC). Fifty-seven 911-receiving hospital emergency department directors were surveyed regarding TPA use. Of those responding, 37% had never used TPA to treat AIS. Lack of neurological support was reported by 33%. Departments with formal protocols were more likely to use TPA for AIS. In conclusion, there is considerable variation in the practice, knowledge, and attitudes regarding the use of TPA for AIS in NYC emergency departments. Improved educational efforts and institutional support may be necessary to ensure the appropriate use of TPA by emergency physicians. PMID:16243196

  13. RNA aptamers as conformational probes and regulatory agents for plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Dupont, Daniel M; Andersen, Thomas B; Nielsen, Anne F; Sang, Lu; Brix, Ditte M; Jensen, Jan K; Broos, Thomas; Hendrickx, Maarten L V; Christensen, Anni; Kjems, Jørgen; Andreasen, Peter A

    2010-05-18

    The hallmark of serpins is the ability to undergo the so-called "stressed-to-relaxed" switch during which the surface-exposed reactive center loop (RCL) becomes incorporated as strand 4 in central beta-sheet A. RCL insertion drives not only the inhibitory reaction of serpins with their target serine proteases but also the conversion to the inactive latent state. RCL insertion is coupled to conformational changes in the flexible joint region flanking beta-sheet A. One interesting serpin is plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a fast and specific inhibitor of the serine proteases tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Via its flexible joints' region, native PAI-1 binds vitronectin and relaxed, protease-complexed PAI-1 certain endocytosis receptors. From a library of 35-nucleotides long 2'-fluoropyrimidine-containing RNA oligonucleotides, we have isolated two aptamers binding PAI-1 by the flexible joint region with low nanomolar K(D) values. One of the aptamers exhibited measurable binding to native PAI-1 only, while the other also bound relaxed PAI-1. While none of the aptamers inhibited the antiproteolytic effect of PAI-1, both aptamers inhibited vitronectin binding and the relaxed PAI-1-binding aptamer also endocytosis receptor binding. The aptamer binding exclusively to native PAI-1 increased the half-life for the latency transition to more than 6 h, manyfold more than vitronectin. Contact with Lys124 in the flexible joint region was critical for strong inhibition of the latency transition and the lack of binding to relaxed PAI-1. We conclude that aptamers yield important information about the serpin conformational switch and, because they can compete with high-affinity protein-protein interactions, may provide leads for pharmacological intervention. PMID:20387790

  14. Effect of recombinant plasminogen activator timing on thrombolysis in a novel rat embolic stroke model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yinzhong; Li, Li; Niu, Ziran; Song, Junke; Lin, Yihuang; Zhang, Huifang; Du, Guanhua

    2016-05-01

    The treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) using thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rtPA, alteplase) is limited by its narrow time window and the risk of hemorrhage. Recombinant plasminogen activator (rPA, reteplase) has been used clinically on coronary artery thrombosis and acute myocardial infarction. It is necessary to induce strokes experimentally as a means of validating the rPA timing on patients with AIS. However, current embolic models cannot mimic clinical situations well due to the embolus's composition of dried blood clots or artificial materials. In this paper, we used two novel rat thromboembolic models to determine the dosage-effect relationship and therapeutic time window of r-PA. Male rats were administered rPA or rtPA intravenously at 2-12h postischemia. Cerebral blood flow, behavioral outcomes and infarct volume within the same animal group were determined. Our results demonstrated that rPA (0.2 and 0.4mg/kg) or rtPA (0.2mg/kg) restored focal perfusion, reduced cerebral infarction, and improved behavioral outcomes at 2-4h postischemia. rPA but not rtPA significantly restored focal perfusion at 6h postischemia. However, delayed rPA-treatment neither decreased infarct volume nor improved the neurological disorder. Cerebral hemorrhage occurred at 6h postischemia detected by Evan's blue leakage and tissue hemoglobin content. Collectively, Thrombolysis with rPA may be beneficial in revascularization at an acceptable dosage of 0.2-0.4mg/kg within 6h after the cerebral infarct onset. PMID:27038532

  15. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Enhances Tissue Plasminogen Activator Release Capacity in Atherosclerotic Man

    PubMed Central

    Svennerholm, Kristina; Haney, Michael; Biber, Björn; Ulfhammer, Erik; Saluveer, Ott; Larsson, Pia; Omerovic, Elmir; Jern, Sverker; Bergh, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    The expression of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene appears to be under epigenetic control and can be affected by histone deacetylation inhibition. The study aimed to test if histone deacetalyase inhibitor treatment lead to increased t-PA release or reduced exhaustion in t-PA release in response to stimulation, as well as change in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in subjects with coronary disease. In this clinical study, 16 post-myocardial infarction subjects, the perfused forearm model was used with isoprenaline provocation during 20 minutes, to stimulate local t-PA release. Each subject was measured twice on the same day (repeated stimuli sequences) as well as on two different occasions, without treatment and after four weeks of treatment with valproic acid (500 mg, twice daily). Net forearm release for t-PA in response to isoprenaline at minutes 1.5, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 was measured, allowing assessment of cumulative t-PA release. There was a reduction in the exhaustion of cumulative t-PA release during repeated and prolonged stimulation with valproic acid treatment compared to non-treatment. Plasma PAI-1 antigen was decreased following treatment compared to non-treatment (18.4 ± 10.0 vs. 11.0 ± 7.1 nanograms/ml respectively, mean with 95% confidence interval). These findings demonstrate that histone deacetylation inhibition increases the capacity for endogenous t-PA release in subjects with vascular disease. Furthermore, the fibrinolytic balance is favored with suppressed PAI-1 levels. More studies are needed to establish the clinical relevance of these findings. Trial registration EU Clinical Trials Register 2012-004950-27 PMID:25807501

  16. Alternative Roles of STAT3 and MAPK Signaling Pathways in the MMPs Activation and Progression of Lung Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke Exposure in ACE2 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yi-Han; Hsieh, Wen-Yeh; Hsieh, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Fon-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Hung; Lu, Li-Che; Huang, Chen-Yi; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-mediated abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury. Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) homologue that displays antagonist effects on ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) axis, could also play a protective role against lung diseases. However, the relationship between ACE2 and MMPs activation in lung injury is still largely unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether MMPs activity could be affected by ACE2 and which ACE2 derived signaling pathways could be also involved via using a mouse model with lung injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure for 1 to 3 weeks. Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6) and ACE2 KO mice (ACE2(-/-)) were utilized to study CS-induced lung injury. Increases in the resting respiratory rate (RRR), pulmonary immunokines, leukocyte infiltration and bronchial hyperplasia were observed in the CS-exposed mice. Compared to WT mice, more serious physiopathological changes were found in ACE2(-/-) mice in the first week of CS exposure. CS exposure increased pulmonary ACE and ACE2 activities in WT mice, and significantly increased ACE in ACE2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, the activity of pulmonary MMPs was decreased in CS-exposed WT mice, whereas this activity was increased in ACE2(-/-) mice. CS exposure increased the pulmonary p-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK1/2 level in all mice. In ACE2(-/-) mice, a significant increase p-STAT3 signaling was detected; however, no effect was observed on the p-STAT3 level in WT mice. Our results support the hypothesis that ACE2 deficiency influences MMPs activation and STAT3 phosphorylation signaling to promote more pulmonary inflammation in the development of lung injury. PMID:27019629

  17. Alternative Roles of STAT3 and MAPK Signaling Pathways in the MMPs Activation and Progression of Lung Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke Exposure in ACE2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yi-Han; Hsieh, Wen-Yeh; Hsieh, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Fon-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Hung; Lu, Li-Che; Huang, Chen-Yi; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-mediated abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury. Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) homologue that displays antagonist effects on ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) axis, could also play a protective role against lung diseases. However, the relationship between ACE2 and MMPs activation in lung injury is still largely unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether MMPs activity could be affected by ACE2 and which ACE2 derived signaling pathways could be also involved via using a mouse model with lung injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure for 1 to 3 weeks. Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6) and ACE2 KO mice (ACE2-/-) were utilized to study CS-induced lung injury. Increases in the resting respiratory rate (RRR), pulmonary immunokines, leukocyte infiltration and bronchial hyperplasia were observed in the CS-exposed mice. Compared to WT mice, more serious physiopathological changes were found in ACE2-/- mice in the first week of CS exposure. CS exposure increased pulmonary ACE and ACE2 activities in WT mice, and significantly increased ACE in ACE2-/- mice. Furthermore, the activity of pulmonary MMPs was decreased in CS-exposed WT mice, whereas this activity was increased in ACE2-/- mice. CS exposure increased the pulmonary p-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK1/2 level in all mice. In ACE2-/- mice, a significant increase p-STAT3 signaling was detected; however, no effect was observed on the p-STAT3 level in WT mice. Our results support the hypothesis that ACE2 deficiency influences MMPs activation and STAT3 phosphorylation signaling to promote more pulmonary inflammation in the development of lung injury. PMID:27019629

  18. [Epidemiological study of blood stasis and plasma tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor activity in healthy aged].

    PubMed

    Liangmin, L D; Lu, L H; Zhang, X M

    1994-12-01

    According to the blood stasis survey of 77 healthy subjects in presenile geriatric period, in comparison with 35 healthy young people, it was found the 51.79% of healthy subjects had blood stasis. The detectable rate were significantly different among various age groups (P < 0.005), and the rate increase was age-dependent. Chromogenic peptide substrate analytical method was used to detect plasma tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) activity and ratio of P/t. The result revealed that the activity of plasma t-PA in presenile geriatric period subjects was significantly higher than that of young people (P < 0.01), but the activity of PAI had no difference in various age groups, and the ratio of P/t was markedly decreased. It showed that this was the physiological compensatory reaction of aging organism against hypercoagulability, and it was an effective way to maintain the physiological balance of the aged. PMID:7719105

  19. On the composition and function of the carbohydrate moiety of tissue-type plasminogen activator from human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rijken, D C; Emeis, J J; Gerwig, G J

    1985-12-17

    Two variants (I and II) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) from human melanoma cells were separated by Lysine Sepharose chromatography. The carbohydrate compositions of the forms were determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Variant I contained 12.8 g and variant II 7.1 g of carbohydrate per 100 g protein. Both variants contained N-acetylgalactosamine, suggesting O-glycosylation in addition to N-glycosylation. The possible role of N-linked oligosaccharides for the biological activity of t-PA was studied using t-PA secreted by melanoma cells in the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation. The latter t-PA showed the same plasminogen activating and fibrin binding properties as normally glycosylated t-PA, indicating that N-linked carbohydrate is not involved in the fibrinolytic activity of t-PA. PMID:3937276

  20. Activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) attenuates allergic airway inflammation in rat asthma model.

    PubMed

    Dhawale, Vaibhav Shrirang; Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Malek, Vajir; Patel, Deep; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) is positively correlated to asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is highly expressed in lungs. ACE2, the counteracting enzyme of ACE, was proven to be protective in pulmonary, cardiovascular diseases. In the present study we checked the effect of ACE2 activation in animal model of asthma. Asthma was induced in male wistar rats by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin and then treated with ACE2 activator, diminazene aceturate (DIZE) for 2weeks. 48h after last allergen challenge, animals were anesthetized, blood, BALF, femoral bone marrow lavage were collected for leucocyte count; trachea for measuring airway responsiveness to carbachol; lungs and heart were isolated for histological studies and western blotting. In our animal model, the characteristic features of asthma such as altered airway responsiveness to carbachol, eosinophilia and neutrophilia were observed. Western blotting revealed the increased pulmonary expression of ACE1, IL-1β, IL-4, NF-κB, BCL2, p-AKT, p-p38 and decreased expression of ACE2 and IκB. DIZE treatment prevented these alterations. Intraalveolar interstitial thickening, inflammatory cell infiltration, interstitial fibrosis, oxidative stress and right ventricular hypertrophy in asthma control animals were also reversed by DIZE treatment. Activation of ACE2 by DIZE conferred protection against asthma as evident from biochemical, functional, histological and molecular parameters. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that activation of ACE2 by DIZE prevents asthma progression by altering AKT, p38, NF-κB and other inflammatory markers. PMID:27343405

  1. Coordinate regulation of fibronectin matrix assembly by the plasminogen activator system and vitronectin in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Vial, Daniel; Monaghan-Benson, Elizabeth; McKeown-Longo, Paula J

    2006-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activators are known to play a key role in the remodeling of bone matrix which occurs during tumor progression, bone metastasis and bone growth. Dysfunctional remodeling of bone matrix gives rise to the osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions seen in association with metastatic cancers. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of these lesions are not well understood. Studies were undertaken to address the role of the plasminogen activator system in the regulation of fibronectin matrix assembly in the osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63. Results Treatment of MG-63 cells with P25, a peptide ligand for uPAR, resulted in an increase in assembly of fibronectin matrix which was associated with an increase in the number of activated β1 integrins on the cell surface. Overexpression of uPAR in MG-63 cells increased the effect of P25 on fibronectin matrix assembly and β1 integrin activation. P25 had no effect on uPAR null fibroblasts, confirming a role for uPAR in this process. The addition of plasminogen activator inhibitor Type I (PAI-1) to cells increased the P25-induced fibronectin polymerization, as well as the number of activated integrins. This positive regulation of PAI-1 on fibronectin assembly was independent of PAI-1's anti-proteinase activity, but acted through PAI-1 binding to the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin. Conclusion These results indicate that vitronectin modulates fibronectin matrix assembly in osteosarcoma cells through a novel mechanism involving cross-talk through the plasminogen activator system. PMID:16569238

  2. Improvement of Psychotic Symptoms and the Role of Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Nardi, Antonio E.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mediates a number of processes that are pivotal for synaptogenesis and remodeling of synapses, including proteolysis of the brain extracellular matrix, degradation of adhesion molecules, activation of neurotrophins, and activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Abnormalities in these processes have been consistently described in psychotic disorders. In this paper, we review the physiological roles of tPA, focusing on conditions characterized by low tPA activity, which are prevalent in schizophrenia. We then describe how tPA activity is influenced by lifestyle interventions and nutritional supplements that may ameliorate psychotic symptoms. Next, we analyze the role of tPA in the mechanism of action of hormones and medications effective in mitigating psychotic symptoms, such as pregnenolone, estrogen, oxytocin, dopamine D3 receptor antagonists, retinoic acid, valproic acid, cannabidiol, sodium nitroprusside, N-acetyl cysteine, and warfarin. We also review evidence that tPA participates in the mechanism by which electroconvulsive therapy and cigarette smoking may reduce psychotic symptoms. PMID:26593907

  3. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  4. Improvement of Psychotic Symptoms and the Role of Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Nardi, Antonio E

    2015-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mediates a number of processes that are pivotal for synaptogenesis and remodeling of synapses, including proteolysis of the brain extracellular matrix, degradation of adhesion molecules, activation of neurotrophins, and activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Abnormalities in these processes have been consistently described in psychotic disorders. In this paper, we review the physiological roles of tPA, focusing on conditions characterized by low tPA activity, which are prevalent in schizophrenia. We then describe how tPA activity is influenced by lifestyle interventions and nutritional supplements that may ameliorate psychotic symptoms. Next, we analyze the role of tPA in the mechanism of action of hormones and medications effective in mitigating psychotic symptoms, such as pregnenolone, estrogen, oxytocin, dopamine D3 receptor antagonists, retinoic acid, valproic acid, cannabidiol, sodium nitroprusside, N-acetyl cysteine, and warfarin. We also review evidence that tPA participates in the mechanism by which electroconvulsive therapy and cigarette smoking may reduce psychotic symptoms. PMID:26593907

  5. Circadian variation of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor, von Willebrand factor antigen, and prostacyclin stimulating factor in men with ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, A B; McLaren, M; Scott, N A; Pringle, T H; McNeill, G P; Belch, J J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine whether plasma concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator antigen, von Willebrand factor antigen, and prostacyclin stimulating factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor activity show circadian variation in men with ischaemic heart disease. DESIGN--Blood samples were obtained every four hours for 24 hours from 10 men with ischaemic heart disease. The men were ambulant from 08:10 until 00:00 when they went to bed and they remained in bed until 08:00 the following morning. PATIENTS--Ten men with positive diagnostic exercise tolerance tests with no significant past history, who were not regularly taking any medical treatment except for glyceryl trinitrate. RESULTS--There was significant circadian variation in plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (p = 0.001) (peak value 04:00 and trough value 20:00), but not in plasma concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator antigen, von Willebrand factor, or prostacyclin stimulating factor. CONCLUSION--Men with ischaemic heart disease showed a significant circadian variation in fibrinolysis. The combination of peak values of plasminogen activator inhibitor activity and failure of plasma concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator antigen to increase in the early morning must predispose to thrombosis at this time. The circadian variation in fibrinolysis may contribute to the increased incidence of myocardial infarction in the morning. PMID:8435236

  6. Increased production of plasminogen activator inhibitor in vitro by pleural leukocytes from rats intratracheally instilled with crocidolite asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yang Li; Brown, G.M.; Donaldson, K. ); Lamb, D. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have previously reported that normal pleural leukocytes secrete a urokinase-type plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) in culture. In view of the pathogenic effects of asbestos on the pleura, in particular pleural fibrosis, they have extended these observation to crocidolite asbestos-exposed rats. Pleural leukocytes from rats exposed to crocidolite asbestos were found to secrete more PAI in culture than controls. The activity of PAI in pleural leukocyte-conditioned medium increased in a dose-dependent manner in relation to the quantity of asbestos injected into the lung. However, with increasing time post asbestos instillation, there was no significant change in the secretion of PAI by pleural leukocytes in culture compared with earlier time points of crocidolite-exposed rats. Plasminogen activator was not detectable in the conditioned medium at any time point. The data derived from this study may help to elucidate the pathogenesis of some pleural disorders caused by exposure to fibrous dusts in the lungs.

  7. Acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in a patient taking dabigatran with radiographic evidence of recanalization.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Navdeep; El Khoury, Ramy; Misra, Vivek; Lopez, George

    2012-11-01

    Dabigatran etexelate is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. A 51-year-old man with a history of atrial fibrillation who was taking dabigatran presented with an acute ischemic stroke. The patient had a normal international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, and an elevated thrombin time of 26.4 seconds. Recanalization of the middle cerebral artery with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was apparent on digital subtraction angiography, and there was no evidence of intracerebral hemorrhage on the repeat computed tomographic scan. This is the first report of a patient who was taking dabigatran etexilate and who had an ischemic stroke caused by a middle cerebral artery occlusion, with an elevated thrombin time and radiographic recanalization with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator without evidence of hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:22683118

  8. Solar Activity and GCR Particle Flux Variations: Assessment and Modeling with Ulysses and ACE/CRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar

    Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment during the current and historically known lower solar minimum condition indicate some of the very high anticipated measurements of particle spectral data. Data from the Ulysses spacecraft in the polar orbit about the sun during the years 2004 and 2008 (about 5 AU) provided proton and alpha particle flux data and showed such anticipated high particle flux variations. Also, ACE/CRIS spacecraft data during the years 2007 and 2009 showed some of the high particle flux measurements of several heavy ions such as oxygen and iron. We present Ulysses and ACE/CRIS measured particle flux data and discuss their high density and variations in the context of the current low solar activity for depicting current space radiation environment.

  9. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is a neuroprotectant in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Yepes, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine proteinase found not only in the intravascular space but also in a well-defined sub-set of neurons in the brain. tPA is rapidly released from neurons after either exposure to hypoxia or hypoglycemia in vitro, or the induction of cerebral ischemia in vivo. It has been proposed that tPA has a neurotoxic effect in the ischemic brain. However, recent evidence indicate that once released into the synaptic cleft tPA activates specific cell signaling pathways that promote the detection and adaptation to metabolic stress. More specifically, the non-proteolytic interaction of tPA with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family in dendritic spines activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway that adapts cellular processes to the availability of energy and metabolic resources. TPA-induced mTOR activation in neurons leads to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) accumulation, HIF-1α-induced expression and membrane recruitment of the neuronal transporter of glucose GLUT3, and GLUT3-mediated uptake of glucose. These and other data discussed in this Review suggest that the postulated neurotoxic effect of tPA needs to be reconsidered and instead indicate the emergence of a new paradigm: that tPA is an endogenous neuroprotectant in the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:26347605

  10. Abrogation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1-Vitronectin Interaction Ameliorates Acute Kidney Injury in Murine Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kamlesh K.; Donahue, Deborah L.; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J.; Castellino, Francis J.; Ploplis, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to the high mortality and morbidity in patients. Although the pathogenesis of AKI during sepsis is poorly understood, it is well accepted that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and vitronectin (Vn) are involved in AKI. However, the functional cooperation between PAI-1 and Vn in septic AKI has not been completely elucidated. To address this issue, mice were utilized lacking either PAI-1 (PAI-1−/−) or expressing a PAI-1-mutant (PAI-1R101A/Q123K) in which the interaction between PAI-1 and Vn is abrogated, while other functions of PAI-1 are retained. It was found that both PAI-1−/− and PAI-1R101A/Q123K mice are associated with decreased renal dysfunction, apoptosis, inflammation, and ERK activation as compared to wild-type (WT) mice after LPS challenge. Also, PAI-1−/− mice showed attenuated fibrin deposition in the kidneys. Furthermore, a lack of PAI-1 or PAI-1-Vn interaction was found to be associated with an increase in activated Protein C (aPC) in plasma. These results demonstrate that PAI-1, through its interaction with Vn, exerts multiple deleterious mechanisms to induce AKI. Therefore, targeting of the PAI-1-Vn interaction in kidney represents an appealing therapeutic strategy for the treatment of septic AKI by not only altering the fibrinolytic capacity but also regulating PC activity. PMID:25799354

  11. Validation of an ELISA for the quantitation of lanoteplase, a novel plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, B; Habte, S; Vachharajani, N; Tay, L

    1999-11-01

    An ELISA was developed and validated for the quantitation of lanoteplase in human citrated plasma. The ELISA employed a monoclonal anti-lanoteplase antibody absorbed onto 96-well microtiter plates to capture lanoteplase in citrated human plasma samples containing PPACK, a protease inhibitor. The captured lanoteplase was detected using a biotinylated rabbit anti-lanoteplase polyclonal antibody. The standard curve range in human plasma for the ELISA was 7-100 ng/ml. Assessment of individual standard curve variability indicated reproducible responses with r2 values of > or = 0.985. The accuracy (% DEV) and precision (%RSD) estimates for the ELISA based on the predicted values from quality control (QC) samples were within 7.3% and 11%, respectively. Cross-reactivity with t-PA was determined to be less than 11% by ELISA. The stability of lanoteplase was established in human citrated PPACK plasma for 24 hours at 4 degrees C, for 2 months at -20 degrees C, for 22 months at -70 degrees C, three weeks at room temperature, and through four freeze/thaw cycles. To quantify lanoteplase plasminogen activator (PA) activity, a commercially available chromogenic activity assay was also validated. This method and its application is described briefly here. The lanoteplase ELISA as well as the commercial activity method were successfully employed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters of lanoteplase in support of clinical Phase II/III studies. PMID:10595857

  12. Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Regulates the Neuronal Uptake of Glucose in the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Wu, Jialing; Nicholson, Andrew D.; Echeverry, Ramiro; Haile, Woldeab B.; Catano, Marcela; An, Jie; Lee, Andrew K.; Duong, Duc; Dammer, Eric B.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Tong, Frank C.; Votaw, John R.; Medcalf, Robert; Yepes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The ability to sense and adapt to hypoxic conditions plays a pivotal role in neuronal survival. Hypoxia induces the release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from cerebral cortical neurons. We found that the release of neuronal tPA or treatment with recombinant tPA (rtPA) promotes cell survival in cerebral cortical neurons previously exposed to hypoxic conditions in vitro or experimental cerebral ischemia in vivo. Our studies using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry revealed that tPA activates the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway which adapts cellular processes to the availability of energy and metabolic resources. We found that mTOR activation leads to accumulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and induction and recruitment to the cell membrane of the HIF-1α-regulated neuronal transporter of glucose GLUT3. Accordingly, in vivo positron emission tomography studies with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose in mice overexpressing tPA in neurons show that neuronal tPA induces the uptake of glucose in the ischemic brain and that this effect is associated with decrease in the volume of the ischemic lesion and improved neurological outcome following the induction of ischemic stroke. Our data indicate that tPA activates a cell signaling pathway that allows neurons to sense and adapt to oxygen and glucose deprivation. PMID:22815500

  13. Antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory of Class II hydrophobin from wild strain Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Khalesi, Mohammadreza; Jahanbani, Raheleh; Riveros-Galan, David; Sheikh-Hassani, Vahid; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud; Sahihi, Mehdi; Winterburn, James; Derdelinckx, Guy; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-01

    There are several possible uses of the Class II hydrophobin HFBII in clinical applications. To fully understand and exploit this potential however, the antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory potential of this protein need to be better understood and have not been previously reported. In this study, the Class II hydrophobin HFBII was produced by the cultivation of wild type Trichoderma reesei. The crude hydrophobin extract obtained from the fermentation process was purified using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and the identity of the purified HFBII verified by MALDI-TOF (molecular weight: 7.2kDa). Subsequently the antioxidant activities of different concentrations of HFBII (0.01-0.40mg/mL) were determined. The results show that for HFBII concentrations of 0.04mg/mL and upwards the protein significantly reduced the presence of ABTS(+) radicals in the medium, the IC50 value found to be 0.13mg/mL. Computational modeling highlighted the role of the amino acid residues located in the conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the surface of the HFBII molecule and the interactions with the aromatic rings of ABTS. The ACE-inhibitory effect of HFBII was found to occur from 0.5mg/mL and upwards, making the combination of HFBII with strong ACE-inhibitors attractive for use in the healthcare industry. PMID:27211298

  14. Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms for Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Noorlidah; Ismail, Siti Marjiana; Aminudin, Norhaniza; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Lau, Beng Fye

    2012-01-01

    Considering the importance of diet in prevention of oxidative stress-related diseases including hypertension, this study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms extracted by boiling in water for 30 min. Antioxidant capacity was measured using the following assays: DPPH free radical scavenging activity, β-carotene bleaching, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, reducing power ability, and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC). Antioxidant potential of each mushroom species was calculated based on the average percentages relative to quercetin and summarized as Antioxidant Index (AI). Ganoderma lucidum (30.1%), Schizophyllum commune (27.6%), and Hericium erinaceus (17.7%) showed relatively high AI. Total phenolics in these mushrooms varied between 6.19 to 63.51 mg GAE/g extract. In the ACE inhibitory assay, G. lucidum was shown to be the most potent species (IC50 = 50 μg/mL). Based on our findings, culinary-medicinal mushrooms can be considered as potential source of dietary antioxidant and ACE inhibitory agents. PMID:21716693

  15. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator: Dangerous Partners in Tumorigenesis—Implications in Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santibanez, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic factor, with several different roles in health and disease. TGF-β has been postulated as a dual factor in tumor progression, since it represses epithelial tumor development in early stages, whereas it stimulates tumor progression in advanced stages. During tumorigenesis, cancer cells acquire the capacity to migrate and invade surrounding tissues and to metastasize different organs. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system, comprising uPA, the uPA cell surface receptor, and plasminogen-plasmin, is involved in the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix and regulates key cellular events by activating intracellular signal pathways, which together allow cancer cells to survive, thus, enhancing cell malignance during tumor progression. Due to their importance, uPA and its receptor are tightly transcriptionally regulated in normal development, but are deregulated in cancer, when their activity and expression are related to further development of cancer. TGF-β regulates uPA expression in cancer cells, while uPA, by plasminogen activation, may activate the secreted latent TGF-β, thus, producing a pernicious cycle which contributes to the enhancement of tumor progression. Here we review the specific roles and the interplay between TGF-β and uPA system in cancer cells and their implication in skin cancer. PMID:23984088

  16. Project ACE Activity Sets. Book III: Grades 8 through 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden City Schools, NC.

    Eleven activity sets for students in grades 8 through 12 are designed to supplement courses in citizenship and U.S. history and government. "The Civil War That Could Have Been" creates a hypothetical situation which requires the participant to analyze the causes of the Civil War. In "History on TV -- Enemy or Ally of the Social Studies Program,"…

  17. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C.

    1994-06-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days` irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Novel Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitors Prevent Diabetic Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hi Bahl; Miyata, Toshio; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, but no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Because plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is increasingly recognized as a key factor in extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy, this study examined the renoprotective effects of TM5275 and TM5441, two novel orally active PAI-1 inhibitors that do not trigger bleeding episodes, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. TM5275 (50 mg/kg) and TM5441 (10 mg/kg) were administered orally for 16 weeks to STZ-induced diabetic and age-matched control mice. Relative to the control mice, the diabetic mice showed significantly increased (p < 0.05) plasma glucose and creatinine levels, urinary albumin excretion, kidney-to-bodyweight ratios, glomerular volume, and fractional mesangial area. Markers of fibrosis and inflammation along with PAI-1 were also upregulated in the kidney of diabetic mice, and treatment with TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited albuminuria, mesangial expansion, ECM accumulation, and macrophage infiltration in diabetic kidneys. Furthermore, in mouse proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) cells, both TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited PAI-1-induced mRNA expression of fibrosis and inflammation markers and also reversed PAI-1-induced inhibition of plasmin activity, which confirmed the efficacy of the TM compounds as PAI-1 inhibitors. These data suggest that TM compounds could be used to prevent diabetic kidney injury. PMID:27258009

  19. PGE2 Reduces MMP-14 and Increases Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Kamal M.; Clevenger, Margarette H.; Szandzik, David L.; Peterson, Edward; Harding, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated during cardiac injury and we have previously shown that mice lacking the PGE EP4 receptor display dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with increased expression of the membrane type matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-14. We thus hypothesized that PGE2 regulates expression of MMP-14 and also affects fibroblast migration. Primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular fibroblasts (NVFs) were used to test the effects of PGE2. Gene and protein expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blot, MMP activity was determined by zymography and migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. PGE2 reduced expression of MMP-14 and these effects were antagonized by an EP4 antagonist. An EP4 agonist mimicked the effect of PGE2. PGE2 also increased mRNA and protein levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of MMP activation. However, PGE2-stimulation of PAI-1 was mediated by the EP1/EP3 receptor and not EP4. Migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. Treatment of NVFs with PGE2 reduced the number of cells migrating towards 10% FCS. Treatment with the EP2 agonist also reduced migration but did not affect MMP-14 expression or PAI-1. Our results suggest that PGE2 utilizes different receptors and mechanisms to ultimately decrease MMP expression and NVF migration. PMID:25263346

  20. Terminalia catappa attenuates urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression through Erk pathways in Hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The survival rate of malignant tumors, and especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has not improved primarily because of uncontrolled metastasis. In our previous studies, we have reported that Terminalia catappa leaf extract (TCE) exerts antimetastasis effects on HCC cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) in HCC metastasis have not been thoroughly investigated, and remain poorly understood. Methods The activities and protein levels of u-PA were determined by casein zymography and western blotting. Transcriptional levels of u-PA were detected by real-time PCR and promoter assays. Results We found that treatment of Huh7 cells with TCE significantly reduced the activities, protein levels and mRNA levels of u-PA. A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that TCE inhibited the transcription protein of nuclear factors SP-1 and NF-κB. TCE also did inhibit the effects of u-PA by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 pathway. Conclusions These results show that u-PA expression may be a potent therapeutic target in the TCE-mediated suppression of HCC metastasis. PMID:24886639

  1. PGE2 reduces MMP-14 and increases plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Kamal M; Clevenger, Margarette H; Szandzik, David L; Peterson, Edward; Harding, Pamela

    2014-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated during cardiac injury and we have previously shown that mice lacking the PGE2 EP4 receptor display dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with increased expression of the membrane type matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-14. We thus hypothesized that PGE2 regulates expression of MMP-14 and also affects fibroblast migration. Primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular fibroblasts (NVFs) were used to test the effects of PGE2. Gene and protein expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blot, MMP activity was determined by zymography and migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. PGE2 reduced expression of MMP-14 and these effects were antagonized by an EP4 antagonist. An EP4 agonist mimicked the effect of PGE2. PGE2 also increased mRNA and protein levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of MMP activation. However, PGE2-stimulation of PAI-1 was mediated by the EP1/EP3 receptor and not EP4. Migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. Treatment of NVFs with PGE2 reduced the number of cells migrating toward 10% FCS. Treatment with the EP2 agonist also reduced migration but did not affect MMP-14 expression or PAI-1. Our results suggest that PGE2 utilizes different receptors and mechanisms to ultimately decrease MMP expression and NVF migration. PMID:25263346

  2. Adhesive properties of the purified plasminogen activator Pla of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leandro Araujo

    2006-09-01

    The beta-barrel outer membrane protease Pla from Yersinia pestis is an important virulence factor in plague and enables initiation of the bubonic plague. Pla is a multifunctional protease whose expression also enhances bacterial adherence to extracellular matrix. It has remained uncertain whether the increase in cellular adhesiveness results from modification of the bacterial surface by Pla, or whether the Pla molecule is an adhesin. Pla was purified as a His6-fusion protein from Escherichia coli and reconstituted with lipopolysaccharide to an enzymatically active form. Purified His6-Pla was coated onto fluorescent micro-particles (FMPs) that expressed plasminogen activity. Pla-coated FMPs also bound to laminin and to reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel) immobilized on permanox slides, whereas only poor activity was seen with lipopolysaccharide-coated FMPs or bovine serum albumin-coated FMPs. The results show that the Pla molecule has intrinsic adhesive properties and that purified transmembrane proteins coated onto FMPs can be used for functional assays. PMID:16923070

  3. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    SciTech Connect

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  4. A high-affinity receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator on human keratinocytes: characterization and potential modulation during migration.

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, H; Jensen, P J

    1990-01-01

    Low passage cultures of normal human keratinocytes produce several components of the plasminogen activator/plasmin proteolytic cascade, including urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and two specific inhibitors. Studies here presented demonstrate that these cells also contain a high-affinity (Kd = 3 x 10(-10) M) plasma membrane-binding site for uPA. High molecular weight uPA, either as the single-chain precursor or two-chain activated form, bound to the receptor; however, low molecular weight (33 kD) uPA, tPA, or epidermal growth factor did not compete for binding, demonstrating specificity. Acid treatment, which removed endogenous uPA from the receptor, was required to detect maximal binding (45,000 sites per cell). To investigate the possibility that the uPA receptor on keratinocytes may be involved in epithelial migration during wound repair, cultures were wounded and allowed to migrate into the wounded site. Binding sites for uPA were localized by autoradiographic analysis of 125I-uPA binding as well as by immunocytochemical studies using anti-uPA IgG. With both techniques uPA binding sites were detected selectively on the plasma membrane of cells at the leading edge of the migrating epithelial sheet. This localization pattern suggests that uPA receptor expression on keratinocytes may be coupled to cell migration during cutaneous wounding. Images PMID:1965151

  5. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Line; Unmack Larsen, Esben Kjær; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Iversen, Frank; Liu, Zhuo; Thomsen, Karen; Pedersen, Michael; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Ploug, Michael; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific targeting peptide onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated USPIO nanoparticles by click chemistry resulted in a five times higher uptake in vitro in a uPAR positive cell line compared to nanoparticles carrying a non-binding control peptide. In accordance with specific receptor-mediated recognition, a low uptake was observed in the presence of an excess of ATF, a natural ligand for uPAR. The uPAR specific magnetic nanoparticles can potentially provide a useful supplement for tumor patient management when combined with MRI and drug delivery.Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific

  6. Airway Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Acute Mortality Due to Lethal Sulfur Mustard Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Veress, Livia A.; Anderson, Dana R.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Houin, Paul R.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; Loader, Joan E.; Paradiso, Danielle C.; Smith, Russell W.; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Holmes, Wesley W.; White, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical weapon stockpiled today in volatile regions of the world. SM inhalation causes a life-threatening airway injury characterized by airway obstruction from fibrin casts, which can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is more than 80%. No therapy exists to prevent mortality after SM exposure. Our previous work using the less toxic analog of SM, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, identified tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) an effective rescue therapy for airway cast obstruction (Veress, L. A., Hendry-Hofer, T. B., Loader, J. E., Rioux, J. S., Garlick, R. B., and White, C. W. (2013). Tissue plasminogen activator prevents mortality from sulfur mustard analog-induced airway obstruction. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 48, 439–447). It is not known if exposure to neat SM vapor, the primary agent used in chemical warfare, will also cause death due to airway casts, and if tPA could be used to improve outcome. Methods: Adult rats were exposed to SM, and when oxygen saturation reached less than 85% (median: 6.5 h), intratracheal tPA or placebo was given under isoflurane anesthesia every 4 h for 48 h. Oxygen saturation, clinical distress, and arterial blood gases were assessed. Microdissection was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Results: Intratracheal tPA treatment eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h) and greatly improved morbidity after lethal SM inhalation (100% death in controls). tPA normalized SM-associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress. Moreover, tPA treatment resulted in greatly diminished airway casts, preventing respiratory failure from airway obstruction. Conclusions: tPA given via airway more than 6 h after exposure prevented death from lethal SM inhalation, and normalized oxygenation and ventilation defects, thereby rescuing from respiratory distress and failure. Intra-airway tPA should be considered as a life

  7. Add-on rosiglitazone therapy improves plasminogen activity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mustaffa, Nazri; Ibrahim, Suhairi; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Yusof, Zurkurnai

    2011-09-01

    Rosiglitazone is an oral hypoglycaemic agent of the thiazolidinedione group. This study aimed to assess changes in the diabetic prothrombotic state via plasminogen activity and changes in surrogate markers of atherosclerotic burden via ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) measurements after rosiglitazone was added to a pre-existing type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment regime. A nonblinded interventional study was designed. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled. Rosiglitazone-naïve patients were prescribed oral rosiglitazone 4 mg daily for 10 weeks. ABPI, plasminogen activity, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting lipid profile were measured pretreatment and post-treatment. Forty-eight patients completed the study. At the end of this study, mean plasminogen activity improvement was nearly 16% (P<0.05), mean ABPI improvement was 0.01 (P=0.439), mean HbA1c reduction was 0.51% (P<0.05), mean total cholesterol (TC) increase was 0.36 mmol/l (P<0.05), mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increase was 0.15 mmol/l (P<0.05) and mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 0.19 mmol/l (P=0.098). Rosiglitazone significantly improved plasminogen activity. There was also significant HbA1c reduction, and rise in both TC and HDL-C. Thus, rosiglitazone potentially improves the atherosclerotic burden and prothrombotic state. In future, more studies are needed to confirm the relationship between rosiglitazone, fibrinolytic system and atheromatous reduction in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:21537159

  8. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  9. Age-dependent neonatal intracerebral hemorrhage in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Philippe; Omouendze, Priscilla L; Roy, Vincent; Dourmap, Nathalie; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Carmeliet, Peter; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Marret, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    Intracerebral-intraventricular hemorrhages (ICH/IVH) in very preterm neonates are responsible for high mortality and subsequent disabilities. In humans, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) initiates fibrinolysis and activates endoluminal-endothelial receptors; dysfunction of the t-PA inhibitor (PAI-1) results in recurrent hemorrhages. We used PAI-1 knockout (PAI-1) mice to examine the role of t-PA in age-dependent intracranial hemorrhages as a possible model of preterm ICH/IVH. Intracortical injection of 2 μL of phosphate-buffered saline produced a small traumatic injury and a high rate of hemorrhage in PAI-1 pups at postnatal day 3 (P3) or P5, whereas it had no effect in wild-type neonates. This resulted in white matter and cortical lesions, ventricle enlargement, hyperlocomotion, and altered cortical levels of serotonin and dopamine in the adult PAI mice. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockers, plasmin- and matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors reduced hemorrhage and tissue lesions. In contrast to P3 to P5, no significant hemorrhages were induced in P10 PAI-1 pups and there were no behavioral or neurochemical alterations in adulthood. These data suggest that microvascular immaturity up to P5 in mice is a determinant factor required for t-PA-dependent vascular rupture. Neonatal PAI-1 mice could be a useful ICH/IVH model for studying the ontogenic window of vascular immaturity and vascular protection against later neurodisabilities. PMID:24709679

  10. Fibrin-Induced Skin Fibrosis in Mice Deficient in Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    de Giorgio-Miller, Alexander; Bottoms, Steve; Laurent, Geoffrey; Carmeliet, Peter; Herrick, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    The deposition of fibrin is an integral part of the tissue repair process, but its persistence is also associated with a number of fibrotic conditions. This study addressed the hypothesis that reduced fibrinolysis and fibrin persistence are associated with an enhanced accumulation of collagen and the development of skin fibrosis. Decreased fibrinolysis was confirmed in fibrin gel cultures that contained human dermal fibroblasts plus the specific plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin or dermal fibroblasts isolated from plasminogen activator (PA)-deficient mice. Collagen accumulation was significantly increased in the presence of inhibitor and in tPA-deficient, but not uPA-deficient, fibroblasts compared with controls. These findings were also confirmed using a skin fibrosis model in which multiple injections of fibrin were given subcutaneously to PA-deficient mice. Injection sites from tPA-deficient mice displayed significantly increased collagen levels compared with uPA-deficient mice and wild-type controls. Up-regulation of fibroblast procollagen gene expression and reduced activation of pro-MMP-1 appeared to mediate the increase in collagen by human dermal fibroblasts in the presence of α2-antiplasmin. These findings suggest that persistent fibrin is associated with enhanced collagen accumulation that may result in the development of fibrotic skin disorders in which reduced fibrinolysis is a feature. PMID:16127152

  11. Bioconjugation of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator to magnetic nanocarriers for targeted thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Lin, Kun-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Wu, Siao-Yun; Lu, Yi-Ching; Liu, Hao-Li; Wu, Tony; Ma, Yunn-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Low-toxicity magnetic nanocarriers (MNCs) composed of a shell of poly [aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline] over a Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle core were developed to carry recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) in MNC-rtPA for targeted thrombolysis. With an average diameter of 14.8 nm, the MNCs exerted superparamagnetic properties. Up to 276 μg of active rtPA was immobilized per mg of MNCs, and the stability of the immobilized rtPA was greatly improved during storage at 4°C and 25°C. In vitro thrombolysis testing with a tubing system demonstrated that magnet-guided MNC-rtPA showed significantly improved thrombolysis compared with free rtPA and reduced the clot lysis time from 39.2 ± 3.2 minutes to 10.8 ± 4.2 minutes. In addition, magnet-guided MNC-rtPA at 20% of the regular rtPA dose restored blood flow within 15–25 minutes of treatment in a rat embolism model without triggering hematological toxicity. In conclusion, this improved system is based on magnetic targeting accelerated thrombolysis and is potentially amenable to therapeutic applications in thromboembolic diseases. PMID:23055728

  12. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections

    PubMed Central

    McClune, Jason R.; Wilshire, Candice L.; Gorden, Jed A.; Louie, Brian E.; Farviar, Alexander S.; Stefanski, Michael J.; Vallieres, Eric; Aye, Ralph W.

    2016-01-01

    The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101) of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7–16). Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study. PMID:27445574

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections.

    PubMed

    McClune, Jason R; Wilshire, Candice L; Gorden, Jed A; Louie, Brian E; Farviar, Alexander S; Stefanski, Michael J; Vallieres, Eric; Aye, Ralph W; Gilbert, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101) of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7-16). Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study. PMID:27445574

  14. Timing of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: outcomes-based recommendations for practice.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Carol J

    2014-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a major cause of death and disability in the United States. Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is an intravenously administered therapy that can prevent death and disability for patients presenting within early onset of AIS. There has been a debate around the exact time parameters for administration, because very few patients present to the hospital within the initial 0- to 3-hour window of time. Not all of the current national guidelines for timing of AIS in the United States are in agreement with regards to this issue. To the nurse caring for patients with neurologic illnesses, this topic is of utmost importance. Nurse are not only involved in determining the time of stroke symptom onset, but nurses also hold responsibility for a working knowledge of the latest eligibility and exclusion criteria for t-PA administration. This article examines the central body of research related to the timing of t-PA and makes recommendations for eligible candidates based on this literature. PMID:25365047

  15. Imaging Evidence for Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS), a rare complication after cerebral revascularization, is a well-described phenomenon after carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting. However, the imaging evidence of CHS after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (iv tPA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has not been reported. Case Report. Four patients were determined to have manifestations of CHS with clinical deterioration after treatment with iv tPA, including one patient who developed seizure, one patient who had a deviation of the eyes toward lesion with worsened mental status, and two patients who developed worsened hemiparesis. In all four patients, postthrombolysis head CT examinations were negative for hemorrhage; CT angiogram showed patent cervical and intracranial arterial vasculature; CT perfusion imaging revealed hyperperfusion with increased relative cerebral blood flow and relative cerebral blood volume and decreased mean transit time along with decreased time to peak in the clinically related artery territory. Vascular dilation was also noted in three of these four cases. Conclusions. CHS should be considered in patients with clinical deterioration after iv tPA and imaging negative for hemorrhage. Cerebral angiogram and perfusion studies can be useful in diagnosing CHS thereby helping with further management. PMID:27242938

  16. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Controls Vascular Integrity by Regulating VE-Cadherin Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Anna E.; Timmerman, Ilse; Kovacevic, Igor; Hordijk, Peter L.; Adriaanse, Luc; Paatero, Ilkka; Belting, Heinz-Georg; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor, is expressed and secreted by endothelial cells. Patients with PAI-1 deficiency show a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis, which has been exclusively ascribed to the function of PAI-1 in down-regulating fibrinolysis. We tested the hypothesis that PAI-1 function plays a direct role in controlling vascular integrity and permeability by keeping endothelial cell-cell junctions intact. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized PAI-039, a specific small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, to investigate the role of PAI-1 in protecting endothelial integrity. In vivo inhibition of PAI-1 resulted in vascular leakage from intersegmental vessels and in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos. In addition PAI-1 inhibition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers leads to a marked decrease of transendothelial resistance and disrupted endothelial junctions. The total level of the endothelial junction regulator VE-cadherin was reduced, whereas surface VE-cadherin expression was unaltered. Moreover, PAI-1 inhibition reduced the shedding of VE-cadherin. Finally, we detected an accumulation of VE-cadherin at the Golgi apparatus. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that PAI-1 function is important for the maintenance of endothelial monolayer and vascular integrity by controlling VE-cadherin trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Our data further suggest that therapies using PAI-1 antagonists like PAI-039 ought to be used with caution to avoid disruption of the vessel wall. PMID:26714278

  17. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in depression: Results from Animal and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haitang; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Suzhen; Lu, Na; Yue, Yingying; Liang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Zhijun; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a stress-related factor, and serum PAI-1 levels are increased in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). Herein, we analysed PAI-1 protein levels in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of rodents exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress or treated with escitalopram. In addition, we examined PAI-1 concentrations in serum obtained from 17 drug-free depressed patients before and after escitalopram treatment. We found that PAI-1 expression was increased in area 1 of the cingulate cortex and prelimbic cortex of the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 and dentate gyrus in stressed rats. A downregulation of PAI-1 following chronic escitalopram treatment was also found. PAI-1 levels were higher in the CSF and serum in stressed rats than in controls, although the difference did not reach statistical significance in the serum. Escitalopram treatment significantly decreased PAI-1 levels in the serum, but not in the CSF. MDD patients had significantly greater serum PAI-1 concentrations than controls. Our results suggest that PAI-1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:27456456

  18. Localization of tissue plasminogen activator in the endothelium of a limited number of vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, E. G.; del Zoppo, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    The immunolocalization of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was assessed in vessels of various sizes from baboons. Femoral artery and vein, carotid artery, aorta, and sections from basal ganglia and cerebral cortex were stained for tPA and CD31, an endothelial cell-specific surface antigen. In each case, the endothelium of the large vessel stained positively for anti-CD31 but not for tPA. However, vascular structures in the adventitia corresponding to the vasa vasorum were found to be associated with tPA antigen. In situ hybridization of femoral artery with 35S-labeled cRNA probes detected tPA mRNA in the vasa vasorum but not the large vessel endothelium. Analysis of the microvasculature of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex showed limited immunohistochemical staining for tPA; only 3% of the vessels measuring 4 to 100 mu were positive. Even so, tPA was mostly distributed within a narrow range of vessel size; 90% of the positive vessels were classified as precapillary arterioles and postcapillary venules (7.5 to 30.0 mu), whereas only 3% of the capillaries were positive, despite accounting for 40% of all vessels. Thus, tPA-containing endothelium are distributed mainly in smaller vessels, excluding the capillaries. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8178936

  19. cDNA cloning of human plasminogen activator-inhibitor from endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, D; Zeheb, R; Yang, A Y; Rafferty, U M; Andreasen, P A; Nielsen, L; Dano, K; Lebo, R V; Gelehrter, T D

    1986-01-01

    Full-length cDNA for plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) was isolated from a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) lambda gt11 cDNA library. Three overlapping clones were identified by immunologic screening of 10(6) recombinant phage using a rabbit anti-human fibrosarcoma PAI-1 antiserum. The fusion proteins encoded by these three clones also react strongly with a monoclonal mouse anti-human fibrosarcoma PAI-1 antibody. By nucleotide sequence analysis, PAI-1 cDNA encodes a protein containing 402 amino acids with a predicted, nonglycosylated molecular mass of 45 kD. Identity of this material as authentic PAI-1 was confirmed by the presence of high level homology with the primary amino acid sequence of an internal peptide prepared from purified rat hepatoma PAI-1. The predicted amino acid sequence also reveals extensive homology with other members of the serine protease inhibitor gene family. Cultured HUVECs contain two PAI-1 mRNA species, both encoded by a single gene, differing by 1 kb in the 3' untranslated region. The PAI-1 gene is located on human chromosome 7. Images PMID:3097076

  20. Impacts of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) on neuronal survival

    PubMed Central

    Chevilley, Arnaud; Lesept, Flavie; Lenoir, Sophie; Ali, Carine; Parcq, Jérôme; Vivien, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) a serine protease is constituted of five functional domains through which it interacts with different substrates, binding proteins, and receptors. In the last years, great interest has been given to the clinical relevance of targeting tPA in different diseases of the central nervous system, in particular stroke. Among its reported functions in the central nervous system, tPA displays both neurotrophic and neurotoxic effects. How can the protease mediate such opposite functions remain unclear but several hypotheses have been proposed. These include an influence of the degree of maturity and/or the type of neurons, of the level of tPA, of its origin (endogenous or exogenous) or of its form (single chain tPA versus two chain tPA). In this review, we will provide a synthetic snapshot of our current knowledge regarding the natural history of tPA and discuss how it sustains its pleiotropic functions with focus on excitotoxic/ischemic neuronal death and neuronal survival. PMID:26528141

  1. Evaluation of Cerebral Perfusion in Patients Undergoing Intravenous Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, Teruyuki

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the indication for thrombolytic therapy using intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is restricted strictly to patients with acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h of onset. The effect of rt-PA declines over time; therefore, we need to minimize the time delay while generating imaging information. The use of cerebral blood flow imaging is not recommended within this time window. Conversely, the balance of efficacy and the risk of bleeding complications differ among patients > 4.5 h after onset. Several ongoing studies are using mismatch concepts to extend the therapeutic time window for rt-PA. Long-awaited reliable software, such as RAPID and PMA, are now available to analyze computed tomography/magnetic resonance perfusion data. Patients with wake-up stroke (WUS) are another group that can be used to expand rt-PA candidates. Diffusion fluid- attenuated inversion recovery mismatch is a promising imaging surrogate to select good candidates with WUS. These trials will cause a therapeutic paradigm shift from time-based to tissue-based strategies in the near future. PMID:26369875

  2. Plasminogen activator induction facilitates recovery of respiratory function following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kenneth H; Seeds, Nicholas W

    2008-01-01

    The possibility that plasminogen activator (PA) plays a role in synaptic plasticity was explored in the spinal cord during the crossed phrenic phenomenon (CPP), where respiratory functional plasticity develops following spinal cord injury. Synaptic remodeling on phrenic motorneurons occurs during the characteristic delay period following spinal cord injury before CPP recovery of respiratory function. The molecular mechanisms underlying this plasticity are not well-defined. During the critical 1-2 h delay period required for this synaptic plasticity following a C2 hemisection in mice, uPA and tPA mRNAs are rapidly induced in C4-5 ventral spinal cord neurons in the ipsilateral phrenic motor nucleus (PMN), as are uPA and tPA protein levels. A role for uPA in CPP spinal cord plasticity is confirmed by the impaired ability of uPA knockout mice to acquire a good CPP response by 6 h post-hemisection and their lack of structural remodeling of PMN synapses that underlies development of the CPP response. PMID:18042398

  3. Full-length soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor down-modulates nephrin expression in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Massimo; Cinque, Paola; Giusti, Guido; Proietti, Silvia; Nebuloni, Manuela; Danese, Silvio; D'Alessio, Silvia; Genua, Marco; Portale, Federica; Lo Porto, Manuela; Singhal, Pravin C; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Saleem, Moin A; Mavilio, Domenico; Mikulak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma level of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was associated recently with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In addition, different clinical studies observed increased concentration of suPAR in various glomerular diseases and in other human pathologies with nephrotic syndromes such as HIV and Hantavirus infection, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Here, we show that suPAR induces nephrin down-modulation in human podocytes. This phenomenon is mediated only by full-length suPAR, is time-and dose-dependent and is associated with the suppression of Wilms' tumor 1 (WT-1) transcription factor expression. Moreover, an antagonist of αvβ3 integrin RGDfv blocked suPAR-induced suppression of nephrin. These in vitro data were confirmed in an in vivo uPAR knock out Plaur(-/-) mice model by demonstrating that the infusion of suPAR inhibits expression of nephrin and WT-1 in podocytes and induces proteinuria. This study unveiled that interaction of full-length suPAR with αvβ3 integrin expressed on podocytes results in down-modulation of nephrin that may affect kidney functionality in different human pathologies characterized by increased concentration of suPAR. PMID:26380915

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice. II. Effects on hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Carmeliet, P; Stassen, J M; Schoonjans, L; Ream, B; van den Oord, J J; De Mol, M; Mulligan, R C; Collen, D

    1993-01-01

    The effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene inactivation on hemostasis, thrombosis and thrombolysis were studied in homozygous PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1-/-) mice, generated by homologous recombination in D3 embryonic stem cells. Diluted (10-fold) whole blood clots from PAI-1-/- and from PAI-1 wild type (PAI-1+/+) mice underwent limited but significantly different (P < 0.001) spontaneous lysis within 3 h (6 +/- 1 vs 3 +/- 1%, respectively). A 25-microliters 125I-fibrin-labeled normal murine plasma clot, injected into a jugular vein, was lysed for 47 +/- 5, 66 +/- 3, and 87 +/- 7% within 8 h in PAI-1+/+, heterozygous PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1+/-), and PAI-1-/- mice, respectively (P = 0.002 for PAI-1+/+ vs PAI-1-/- mice). Corresponding values after pretreatment with 0.5 mg/kg endotoxin in PAI-1+/+ and PAI-1-/- mice, were 35 +/- 5 and 91 +/- 3% within 4 h, respectively (P < 0.001). 11 out of 26 PAI-1+/+ but only 1 out of 25 PAI-1-/- mice developed venous thrombosis (P = 0.004) within 6 d after injection of 10 or 50 micrograms endotoxin in the footpad. Spontaneous bleeding or delayed rebleeding could not be documented in PAI-1-/- mice after partial amputation of the tail or of the caecum. Thus, disruption of the PAI-1 gene in mice appears to induce a mild hyperfibrinolytic state and a greater resistance to venous thrombosis but not to impair hemostasis. Images PMID:8254029

  5. Early intracardiac thrombosis in preterm infants and thrombolysis with recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, F; Vagnarelli, F; Gargano, G; Roversi, M; Biagioni, O; Ranzi, A; Cavazzuti, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the incidence of catheter related thrombosis and to test the efficacy of recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in preterm infants.
STUDY DESIGN—From January 1995 to December 1998, echocardiography was performed in the first few days of life in 76 very low birthweight (⩽ 1500 g) infants out of a total of 147 having an umbilical catheter placed. When intracardiac thrombosis was diagnosed, rt-PA infusion was performed.
RESULTS—Four infants (5%) developed an intracardiac thrombosis during the first few days of life. In three of them, rt-PA at a dose of 0.4-0.5 mg/kg in a 20-30 minute bolus led to dissolution of the clot. One patient received a three hour infusion after the bolus, at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/h, with resolution of the thrombus. No systemic effects were observed after rt-PA infusion.
CONCLUSIONS—Early thrombosis may occur as a complication of umbilical catheterisation in preterm infants; early echocardiographic detection of this disorder allows complete, safe, and rapid lysis with rt-PA.

 PMID:11420328

  6. Increased concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and fibrinogen in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván G; Gutiérrez, César L; Alarcón, Marcelo L; Jaramillo, Julio C; Segovia, Fabián M; Leiva, Elba M; Mujica, Verónica E; Icaza, Gloria N; Díaz, Nora S; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is closely linked to a generalized metabolic disorder referred to as insulin resistance. Disturbances in the hemostasis and fibrinolytic systems are a feature of MS. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration levels of fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a group of patients with MS with respect to a non-MS group, and to evaluate their possible relation with other risk factors in MS. The study was carried out in a total of 186 male and female non-smoking individuals aged 45-64 years, 93 with MS (ATP III criteria) and 93 without MS. Plasmatic levels of PAI-1 were measured by ELISA, and those of fibrinogen by the Claus method. The plasmatic levels of PAI-1 (men 49.2±19.8 vs. 35.0±12.2 ng/ml and women 42.0±19.7 vs. 31.6±14.6 ng/ml; p=0.0026) and fibrinogen (274.0±82.1 vs. 232.7±66.6 ng/ml; p=0.0002) were significantly higher in the MS group than in the non-MS group. PAI-1 was significantly associated with diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides and waist circumference. Fibrinogen was negatively associated with HDL-c. High plasmatic levels of PAI-1 and fibrinogen contribute to the cardiovascular risk that characterizes individuals with MS. PMID:21475821

  7. Electroanalysis of pM-levels of urokinase plasminogen activator in serum by phosphorothioated RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Jarczewska, Marta; Kékedy-Nagy, László; Nielsen, Jesper S; Campos, Rui; Kjems, Jørgen; Malinowska, Elżbieta; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2015-06-01

    Protein biomarkers of cancer allow a dramatic improvement in cancer diagnostics as compared to the traditional histological characterisation of tumours by enabling a non-invasive analysis of cancer development and treatment. Here, an electrochemical label-free assay for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a universal biomarker of several cancers, has been developed based on the recently selected uPA-specific fluorinated RNA aptamer, tethered to a gold electrode via a phosphorothioated dA tag, and soluble redox indicators. The binding properties of the uPA-aptamer couple and interference from the non-specific adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were modulated by the electrode surface charge. A nM uPA electroanalysis at positively charged surfaces, complicated by the competitive adsorption of BSA, was tuned to the pM uPA analysis at negative surface charges of the electrode, being improved in the presence of negatively charged BSA. The aptamer affinity for uPA displayed via the binding/dissociation constant relationship correspondingly increased, ca. three orders of magnitude, from 0.441 to 367. Under optimal conditions, the aptasensor allowed 10(-12)-10(-9) M uPA analysis, also in serum, being practically useful for clinical applications. The proposed strategy for optimization of the electrochemical protein sensing is of particular importance for the assessment and optimization of in vivo protein ligand binding by surface-tethered aptamers. PMID:25620243

  8. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in depression: Results from Animal and Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haitang; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Suzhen; Lu, Na; Yue, Yingying; Liang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Zhijun; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a stress-related factor, and serum PAI-1 levels are increased in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). Herein, we analysed PAI-1 protein levels in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of rodents exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress or treated with escitalopram. In addition, we examined PAI-1 concentrations in serum obtained from 17 drug-free depressed patients before and after escitalopram treatment. We found that PAI-1 expression was increased in area 1 of the cingulate cortex and prelimbic cortex of the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 and dentate gyrus in stressed rats. A downregulation of PAI-1 following chronic escitalopram treatment was also found. PAI-1 levels were higher in the CSF and serum in stressed rats than in controls, although the difference did not reach statistical significance in the serum. Escitalopram treatment significantly decreased PAI-1 levels in the serum, but not in the CSF. MDD patients had significantly greater serum PAI-1 concentrations than controls. Our results suggest that PAI-1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:27456456

  9. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor signaling is critical in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ying-Na; Cao, Xue; Luo, Dong-Hua; Sun, Rui; Peng, Li-Xia; Wang, Lin; Yan, Yong-Pan; Zheng, Li-Sheng; Xie, Ping; Cao, Yun; Liang, Ying-Ying; Zheng, Fang-Jing; Huang, Bi-Jun; Xiang, Yan-Qun; Lv, Xing; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Chen, Ming-Yuan; Huang, Pei-Yu; Guo, Ling; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Guo, Xiang; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Qian, Chao-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignancies in southern China and Southeast Asia, with the highest metastasis rate among head and neck cancers. The mechanisms underlying NPC progression remain poorly understood. Genome-wide expression profiling on 18 NPC vs. 18 noncancerous nasopharyngeal tissues together with GeneGo pathway analysis and expression verification in NPC cells and tissues revealed a potential role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in NPC progression, which has not been investigated in NPC. We then observed that uPAR expression is increased in poorly differentiated, highly metastatic NPC cells compared with lowly metastatic cells or differentiated NPC cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that uPAR regulates NPC cell growth, colony formation, migration, and invasion and promotes the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additional tumor xenograft and spontaneous metastasis experiments revealed that uPAR promotes NPC cell growth and metastasis in vivo. The JAK-STAT pathway is involved in uPAR-regulated signaling in NPC cells as determined by immunoblotting. Moreover, uPAR-mediated growth and motility is partially abolished upon treatment with the Jak1/Jak2 inhibitor INCB018424. We suppressed uPA expression in uPAR-overexpressing NPC cells and found that uPAR-mediated cellular growth and motility is not exclusively dependent on uPA. In summary, uPAR is a significant regulator of NPC progression and could serve as a promising therapeutic target. PMID:24763226

  10. A novel plasminogen activator from Agkistrodon blomhoffii Ussurensis venom (ABUSV-PA): Purification and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shuqing; Sun Mingzhong . E-mail: ming-zhong.sun@case.edu; Greenaway, Frederick T.

    2006-10-06

    A plasminogen activator with arginine ester hydrolysis activity (ABUSV-PA) has been identified and purified to homogeneity from Chinese Agkistrodon blomhoffii Ussurensis snake venom. ABUSV-PA, a monomeric protein with molecular mass of 27815.2 Da, was purified 180-fold with 0.02% recovery for protein and 3.6% recovery for esterase activity. ABUSV-PA reacts optimally with its substrate N {sub {alpha}}-tosyl-L-arginine-methyl ester (TAME) at {approx}pH 7.5 and at 51 {sup o}C. Measurement from inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) reveals that ABUSV-PA is a Zn{sup 2+}-containing protein with a stoichiometry of 1:1 [Zn{sup 2+}]:[ABUSV-PA]. Analyses of esterase hydrolysis and UV absorption and CD spectra indicate that Zn{sup 2+} plays an important role in maintaining the structural integrity rather than the esterase activity of ABUSV-PA. Divalent metal ions, including Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+}, increase the TAME hydrolysis activity of ABUSV-PA. A red-shift of the emission wavelengths of the synchronous fluorescence of ABUSV-PA, compared to those of free Tyr and Trp, indicates a conformation where the Tyr and Trp residues are in exposed hydrophilic environments. The presence of zinc increases the hydrophobicity of the conformational environments surrounding the Trp residues of ABUSV-PA and affects the secondary structure of ABUSV-PA, as proved by UV absorption and CD spectroscopy.

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Induced Cerebral Hemorrhage Following Experimental Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Yi; Xiao, Yunqi; Hua, Zichun; Cheng, Jian; Jia, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the only approved drug for the treatment of ischemic stroke, increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we investigated whether the newly identified gaso-transmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S), when used in combination with tPA, reduced the hemorrhagic transformation following stroke. In a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), intravenous injection of tPA enhanced cerebral hemorrhage, which was significantly attenuated by the co-administration of two structurally unrelated H2S donors, ADT-OH and NaHS. By assessing extravasation of Evans blue into the ischemic hemisphere as well as brain edema following MCAO, we further showed that a tPA-exacerbated BBB disruption was significantly ameliorated by the co-administration of ADT-OH. In the mouse MCAO model, tPA upregulated Akt activation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activity in the ischemic brain, which was remarkably attenuated by ADT-OH. In the in vitro glucose-oxygen deprivation (OGD) model, ADT-OH markedly attenuated tPA-enhanced Akt activation and VEGF expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Finally, ADT-OH improved functional outcomes in mice subjected to MCAO and tPA infusion. In conclusion, H2S donors reduced tPA-induced cerebral hemorrhage by possibly inhibiting the Akt-VEGF-MMP9 cascade. Administration of H2S donors has potential as a novel modality to improve the safety of tPA following stroke. PMID:27018013

  12. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289. PMID:26029848

  13. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Limits Liver Injury and Facilitates Regeneration after Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Yan, Hui-Min; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression is known to promote growth factor activation and regeneration in a number of hepatotoxicity models. To evaluate if PAI-1 has similar effects in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity, wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 gene knockout mice (PAI-KO) were treated with 200 mg/kg APAP and liver injury and its repair were assessed. In WT animals, plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities increased during the first 12 h and then returned to baseline within 48 h. The area of necrosis increased in parallel to the ALT values, peaked between 12 and 24 h and was completely resolved by 96 h. The regenerative response of cells outside the necrotic area, as indicated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and cyclin D1 gene expression, was observed within 24 h, peaked at 48 h and then declined but remained elevated until 96 h. Liver injury in response to APAP was similar in PAI-KO as in WT animals during the first 12 h. However, plasma ALT values and the area of necrosis further increased during the following 12 h with development of massive intrahepatic hemorrhage. Approximately, 50% of the PAI-KO animals did not survive. Although liver injury of the surviving animals was repaired, the regeneration process was delayed until 48 h. A potential reason for this delay may have been due to the more severe injury and/or the increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Our data indicate that PAI activation limits liver injury and mortality during APAP hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive hemorrhage and thereby facilitating tissue repair. PMID:18469330

  14. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 limits liver injury and facilitates regeneration after acetaminophen overdose.

    PubMed

    Bajt, Mary Lynn; Yan, Hui-Min; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2008-08-01

    Deficiency in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene expression is known to promote growth factor activation and regeneration in a number of hepatotoxicity models. To evaluate if PAI-1 has similar effects in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity, wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 gene knockout mice (PAI-KO) were treated with 200 mg/kg APAP and liver injury and its repair were assessed. In WT animals, plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities increased during the first 12 h and then returned to baseline within 48 h. The area of necrosis increased in parallel to the ALT values, peaked between 12 and 24 h and was completely resolved by 96 h. The regenerative response of cells outside the necrotic area, as indicated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein and cyclin D(1) gene expression, was observed within 24 h, peaked at 48 h and then declined but remained elevated until 96 h. Liver injury in response to APAP was similar in PAI-KO as in WT animals during the first 12 h. However, plasma ALT values and the area of necrosis further increased during the following 12 h with development of massive intrahepatic hemorrhage. Approximately, 50% of the PAI-KO animals did not survive. Although liver injury of the surviving animals was repaired, the regeneration process was delayed until 48 h. A potential reason for this delay may have been due to the more severe injury and/or the increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Our data indicate that PAI activation limits liver injury and mortality during APAP hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive hemorrhage and thereby facilitating tissue repair. PMID:18469330

  15. ACE-inhibitory activity of enzymatic protein hydrolysates from lupin and other legumes.

    PubMed

    Boschin, Giovanna; Scigliuolo, Graziana Maria; Resta, Donatella; Arnoldi, Anna

    2014-02-15

    The objective of this investigation was to compare the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates obtained by pepsin digestion of proteins of some legumes, such as chickpea, common bean, lentil, lupin, pea, and soybean, by using the same experimental procedure. The ACE-inhibitory activity was measured by using the tripeptide hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL), as model peptide, and HPLC-DAD, as analytical method. The peptide mixtures of all legumes were active, with soybean and lupin the most efficient, with IC50 values of 224 and 226 μg/ml, respectively. Considering the promising results obtained with lupin, and aiming to identify the protein(s) that release(s) the peptides responsible for the activity, the peptides obtained from the pepsin digestion of some industrial lupin protein isolates and purified protein fractions were tested. The most active mixture, showing an IC50 value of 138 μg/ml, was obtained hydrolysing a mixture of lupin α+β conglutin. PMID:24128446

  16. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor regulates cell surface plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Sakthivel, R; Kniss, D; Graham, C H; Strickland, D K; McCrae, K R

    1998-11-27

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP/alpha2MR) mediates the internalization of numerous ligands, including prourokinase (pro-UK) and complexes between two-chain urokinase (tc-u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1). It has been suggested that through its ability to internalize these ligands, LRP/alpha2MR may regulate the expression of plasminogen activator activity on cell surfaces; this hypothesis, however, has not been experimentally confirmed. To address this issue, we assessed the ability of LRP/alpha2MR to regulate plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells, which express both LRP/alpha2MR and the urokinase receptor (uPAR). Trophoblasts internalized and degraded exogenous 125I-pro-UK (primarily following its conversion to tc-u-PA and incorporation into tc-u-PA.PAI complexes) in an LRP/alpha2MR-dependent manner, which was inhibited by the LRP/alpha2MR receptor-associated protein. Receptor-associated protein also caused a approximately 50% reduction in cell surface plasminogen activator activity and delayed the regeneration of unoccupied uPAR by cells on which uPAR were initially saturated with pro-UK. Identical effects were caused by anti-LRP/alpha2MR antibodies. These results demonstrate that LRP/alpha2MR promotes the expression of cell surface plasminogen activator activity on trophoblasts by facilitating the clearance of tc-u-PA.PAI complexes and regeneration of unoccupied cell surface uPAR. PMID:9822706

  17. Neuroserpin Differentiates Between Forms of Tissue Type Plasminogen Activator via pH Dependent Deacylation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Karen-Sue B; Nguyen, Lan; Schwartz, Kat; Lawrence, Daniel A; Schwartz, Bradford S

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), initially characterized for its critical role in fibrinolysis, also has key functions in both physiologic and pathologic processes in the CNS. Neuroserpin (NSP) is a t-PA specific serine protease inhibitor (serpin) found almost exclusively in the CNS that regulates t-PA's proteolytic activity and protects against t-PA mediated seizure propagation and blood-brain barrier disruption. This report demonstrates that NSP inhibition of t-PA varies profoundly as a function of pH within the biologically relevant pH range for the CNS, and reflects the stability, rather than the formation of NSP: t-PA acyl-enzyme complexes. Moreover, NSP differentiates between the zymogen-like single chain form (single chain t-PA, sct-PA) and the mature protease form (two chain t-PA, tct-PA) of t-PA, demonstrating different pH profiles for protease inhibition, different pH ranges over which catalytic deacylation occurs, and different pH dependent profiles of deacylation rates for each form of t-PA. NSP's pH dependent inhibition of t-PA is not accounted for by differential acylation, and is specific for the NSP-t-PA serpin-protease pair. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the differential regulation of the two forms of t-PA in the CNS, and suggest a potential specific regulatory role for CNS pH in controlling t-PA proteolytic activity. PMID:27378851

  18. Leucocyte expression of genes implicated in the plasminogen activation cascade is modulated by yoghurt peptides.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Georgios; Politis, Ioannis

    2016-08-01

    The urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA), its receptor (u-PAR) and the inhibitors of u-PA (PAI-1 and PAI-2) provide a multi-molecular system in leucocytes that exerts pleiotropic functions influencing the development of inflammatory and immune responses. The objective of the present study was to examine the ability of water soluble extracts (WSE) obtained from traditional Greek yoghurt made from bovine or ovine milk to modulate the expression of u-PA, u-PAR, PAI-1 and PAI-2 in ovine monocytes and neutrophils. WSE were obtained from 8 commercial traditional type Greek yoghurts made from ovine or bovine milk. WSE upregulated the expression of all 4 u-PA related genes in monocytes but the upregulation was much higher in the PAI-1 (10-fold) than in u-PA and u-PAR (3-4 fold) thus, shifting the system towards inhibition. In line with this observation, WSE reduced total and membrane-bound u-PA activity in monocytes. In neutrophils, WSE caused small (50-60%) but significant (P < 0·05) reductions in expression of u-PAR and PAI-2 but had no effect on expression of u-PA, PAI-1 and on total cell-associated and membrane-bound u-PA activity. WSE from yoghurts made from bovine or ovine milk were essentially equally effective in affecting the u-PA system except for the u-PAR gene in ovine neutrophils that was affected (reduced) by the ovine and not the bovine WSE. In conclusion, peptides present in WSE modulated the expression of u-PA related genes but the effect was much more prominent in monocytes than in neutrophils. PMID:27600972

  19. A Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitor Reduces Airway Remodeling in a Murine Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun H.; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  20. A plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor reduces airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun H; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  1. Neuroserpin Differentiates Between Forms of Tissue Type Plasminogen Activator via pH Dependent Deacylation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Karen-Sue B.; Nguyen, Lan; Schwartz, Kat; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Bradford S.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), initially characterized for its critical role in fibrinolysis, also has key functions in both physiologic and pathologic processes in the CNS. Neuroserpin (NSP) is a t-PA specific serine protease inhibitor (serpin) found almost exclusively in the CNS that regulates t-PA’s proteolytic activity and protects against t-PA mediated seizure propagation and blood–brain barrier disruption. This report demonstrates that NSP inhibition of t-PA varies profoundly as a function of pH within the biologically relevant pH range for the CNS, and reflects the stability, rather than the formation of NSP: t-PA acyl-enzyme complexes. Moreover, NSP differentiates between the zymogen-like single chain form (single chain t-PA, sct-PA) and the mature protease form (two chain t-PA, tct-PA) of t-PA, demonstrating different pH profiles for protease inhibition, different pH ranges over which catalytic deacylation occurs, and different pH dependent profiles of deacylation rates for each form of t-PA. NSP’s pH dependent inhibition of t-PA is not accounted for by differential acylation, and is specific for the NSP-t-PA serpin-protease pair. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the differential regulation of the two forms of t-PA in the CNS, and suggest a potential specific regulatory role for CNS pH in controlling t-PA proteolytic activity. PMID:27378851

  2. Enhancing the Function of CD34+ Cells by Targeting Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Sugata; Stepps, Valerie; Bhatwadekar, Ashay D.; Caballero, Sergio; Boulton, Michael E.; Higgins, Paul J.; Nikonova, Elena V.; Pepine, Carl J.; Thut, Catherine; Finney, Eva M.; Stone, David J.; Bartelmez, Stephen H.; Grant, Maria B.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we showed that transient inhibition of TGF- β1 resulted in correction of key aspects of diabetes-induced CD34+ cell dysfunction. In this report, we examine the effect of transient inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major gene target of TGF-β1 activation. Using gene array studies, we examined CD34+ cells isolated from a cohort of longstanding diabetic individuals, free of microvascular complications despite suboptimal glycemic control, and found that the cells exhibited reduced transcripts of both TGF-β1 and PAI-1 compared to age, sex, and degree of glycemic control-matched diabetic individuals with microvascular complications. CD34+ cells from diabetic subjects with microvascular complications consistently exhibited higher PAI-1 mRNA than age-matched non-diabetic controls. TGF- β1 phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligo (PMO) reduced PAI-1 mRNA in diabetic (p<0.01) and non-diabetic (p=0.05) CD34+ cells. To reduce PAI-1 in human CD34+ cells, we utilized PAI-1 siRNA, lentivirus expressing PAI-1 shRNA or PAI-1 PMO. We found that inhibition of PAI-1 promoted CD34+ cell proliferation and migration in vitro, likely through increased PI3(K) activity and increased cGMP production. Using a retinal ischemia reperfusion injury model in mice, we observed that recruitment of diabetic CD34+ cells to injured acellular retinal capillaries was greater after PAI-1-PMO treatment compared with control PMO-treated cells. Targeting PAI-1 offers a promising therapeutic strategy for restoring vascular reparative function in defective diabetic progenitors. PMID:24223881

  3. Regulation of airway contractility by plasminogen activators through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Taher; Yarovoi, Serge; Fanne, Rami Abu; Akkawi, Sa'ed; Jammal, Mahmud; Allen, Timothy Craig; Idell, Steven; Cines, Douglas B; Higazi, Abd Al-Roof

    2010-12-01

    Reactive airway disease is mediated by smooth muscle contraction initiated through several agonist-dependent pathways. Activation of type 1 N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-R1s) by plasminogen activators (PAs) has been linked to control of vascular tone, but their effect on airway smooth muscle contractility has not previously been studied to our knowledge. We observed that NMDA-R1s are expressed by human airway smooth muscle cells and constitutively inhibit the contraction of isolated rat tracheal rings in response to acetylcholine (Ach). Both tissue-type PA (tPA) and urokinase-type PA (uPA) bind to NMDA-R1 and reverse this effect, thereby enhancing Ach-induced tracheal contractility. Tracheal contractility initiated by Ach is reduced in rings isolated from tPA(-/-) and uPA(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type counterparts. The procontractile effect of uPA or tPA was mimicked and augmented by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, l-NAME. uPA and tPA further enhanced the contractility of rings denuded of epithelium, an effect that was inhibited by the NMDA-R antagonist, MK-801. Binding of PAs to NMDA-R1 and the subsequent activation of the receptor were inhibited by PA inhibitor type 1, by a PA inhibitor type 1-derived hexapeptide that recognizes the tPA and uPA docking domains, as well as by specific mutations within the docking site of tPA. These studies identify involvement of PAs and NMDA-R1 in airway contractility, and define new loci that could lead to the development of novel interventions for reactive airway disease. PMID:20097831

  4. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Mitigates Brain Injury in a Rat Model of Infection-Sensitized Neonatal Hypoxia–Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dianer; Sun, Yu-Yo; Nemkul, Niza; Baumann, Jessica M.; Shereen, Ahmed; Dunn, R. Scott; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Lindquist, Diana M.; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Intrauterine infection exacerbates neonatal hypoxic–ischemic (HI) brain injury and impairs the development of cerebral cortex. Here we used low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pre-exposure followed by unilateral cerebral HI insult in 7-day-old rats to study the pathogenic mechanisms. We found that LPS pre-exposure blocked the HI-induced proteolytic activity of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), but significantly enhanced NF-κB signaling, microglia activation, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in newborn brains. Remarkably, these pathogenic responses were all blocked by intracerebroventricular injection of a stable-mutant form of plasminogen activator protein-1 called CPAI. Similarly, LPS pre-exposure amplified, while CPAI therapy mitigated HI-induced blood-brain-barrier damage and the brain tissue loss with a therapeutic window at 4 h after the LPS/HI insult. The CPAI also blocks microglia activation following a brain injection of LPS, which requires the contribution by tPA, but not the urinary-type plasminogen activator (uPA), as shown by experiments in tPA-null and uPA-null mice. These results implicate the nonproteolytic tPA activity in LPS/HI-induced brain damage and microglia activation. Finally, the CPAI treatment protects near-normal motor and white matter development despite neonatal LPS/HI insult. Together, because CPAI blocks both proteolytic and nonproteolytic tPA neurotoxicity, it is a promising therapeutics of neonatal HI injury either with or without infection. PMID:22556277

  5. ACE-I Inhibitory Activity from Phaseolus lunatus and Phaseolus vulgaris Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Betancur-Ancona, David; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Chel-Guerrero, Luis Antonio; Torruco-Uco, Juan Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The involvement of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) as one of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure is being studied to find alternative means of control of hypertension on human beings. On the market there are synthetic drugs that can control it, but these can cause undesirable health side effects. In this work was assessed the fractionation by ultrafiltration of the Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Jamapa bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), protein hydrolysates obtained with Alcalase(®) and Flavourzyme(®) on ACE-I inhibitory activity. Four membranes of different molecular cutoffs (10, 5, 3, and 1 kDa) were used. Fractions that had a higher inhibitory activity in both legumes were denominated as E (<1 kDa) with IC50 of 30.3 and 51.8 μg/mL values for the P. lunatus with Alcalase and Flavourzyme, respectively, and for the Phaseolus vulgaris with Alcalase and Flavourzyme with about 63.8 and 65.8 μg/mL values, respectively. The amino acid composition of these fractions showed residues in essential amino acids, which make a good source of energy and amino acids. On the other hand, the presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as V and P is a determining factor in the ACE-I inhibitor effect. The results suggest the possibility of obtaining and utilizing these peptide fractions in the development and innovation of a functional product that helps with treatment and/or prevention of hypertension. PMID:26061663

  6. Cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid of neurosyphilis patients: Identification of Urokinase plasminogen activator using antibody microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Zheng, Dao-Cheng; Fang, Chang; Huang, Jin-Mei; Ke, Wu-Jian; Wang, Liu-Yuan; Zeng, Wei-Ying; Zheng, He-Ping; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-15

    Little is known regarding protein responses to syphilis infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presenting with neurosyphilis. Protein and antibody arrays offer a new opportunity to gain insights into global protein expression profiles in these patients. Here we obtained CSF samples from 46 syphilis patients, 25 of which diagnosed as having central nervous system involvement based on clinical and laboratory findings. The CSF samples were then analyzed using a RayBioH L-Series 507 Antibody Array system designed to simultaneously analyze 507 specific cytokines. The results indicated that 41 molecules showed higher levels in patients with neurosyphilis in comparison with patients without neural involvement. For validation by single target ELISA, we selected five of them (MIP-1a, I-TAC/CXCL11, Urokinase plasminogen activator [uPA], and Oncostatin M) because they have previously been found to be involved in central nervous system (CNS) disorders. The ELISA tests confirmed that uPA levels were significantly higher in the CSF of neurosyphilis patients (109.1±7.88pg/ml) versus patients without CNS involvement (63.86±4.53pg/ml, p<0.0001). There was also a clear correlation between CSF uPA levels and CSF protein levels (p=0.0128) as well as CSF-VDRL titers (p=0.0074) used to diagnose neurosyphilis. No significant difference between the two groups of patients, however, was found in uPA levels in the serum, suggesting specific activation of the inflammatory system in the CNS but not the periphery in neurosyphilis patients. We conclude that measurements of uPA levels in CSF may be an additional parameter for diagnosing neurosyphilis. PMID:27049560

  7. Polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and apolipoprotein E in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Al-Mueilo, Samir; Al-Ali, Amein; Larbi, Emmanuel; Rubaish, Abdullah; Abdulmohsen, Mohammed Fakhry; Al-Zahrani, Alhussain; Al-Ateeq, Suad

    2008-11-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism, apolipoprotein E (apo epsilon4) gene polymorphism and polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have been shown to be associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). To determine the prevalence of these mutations in Saudi patients with ESRD on hemodialysis, we studied the allelic frequency and genotype distribution in patients receiving hemodialysis and in a control group, all residing in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. The genotypes were determined using allele specific hybridization procedures and were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. The T allele frequency and homozygous genotype of MTHFR in ESRD patients were 14% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13.4% and 0%, respectively in the control group. The allele frequency and homozygous genotype of 4G/4G PAI-1 gene polymorphism were 46.4% and 4.8% respectively in ESRD patients compared to 57.1% and 32% respectively in the control group. The apo s4 allele frequency and homozygous genotype distribution in hemodialysis patients were 7% and 2.4%, respectively compared to 13% and 2% in the control group. Although allele frequency of C677T of MTHFR was statistically similar in the hemodialysis patients and in the control group, the homozygotes T allele genotype was over represented in the hemodialysis group compared to normal. The prevalence of PAI-1 4G/4G polymorphism in ESRD patients was lower when compared to the control group. The prevalence of apo s4 allele did not differ significantly between the two groups. The present results demonstrate that all three studied polymorphic mutations are present in our population and that they may contribute to the etiology of the disease in our area. PMID:18974580

  8. Direct stroke unit admission of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: safety, clinical outcome, and hospital cost savings

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Anne W.; Coleman, Kisha C.; Palazzo, Paola; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the USA, stable intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) patients have traditionally been cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU). We examined the safety of using an acuity-adaptable stroke unit (SU) to manage IV tPA patients. Methods: We conducted an observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our acuity-adaptable SU over the first 3 years of operation. Safety was assessed by symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rates, systemic hemorrhage (SH) rates, tPA-related deaths, and transfers from SU to ICU; cost savings and length of stay (LOS) were determined. Results: We admitted 333 IV tPA patients, of which 302 were admitted directly to the SU. A total of 31 (10%) patients had concurrent systemic hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise warranting direct ICU admission. There were no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores between SU and ICU patients (9.0 versus 9.5, respectively). Overall sICH rate was 3.3% (n = 10) and SH rate was 2.9 (n = 9), with no difference between SU and ICU patients. No tPA-related deaths occurred, and no SU patients required transfer to the ICU. Estimated hospital cost savings were US$362,400 for ‘avoided’ ICU days, and hospital LOS decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.8 ± 15.6 days (median 5) in year 1, to 5.2 ± 4.8 days (median 3) by year 3. Conclusions: IV tPA patients may be safely cared for in a SU when nurses undergo extensive education to ensure clinical competence. Use of the ICU solely for monitoring may constitute significant overuse of system resources at an expense that is not associated with additional safety benefit. PMID:27366237

  9. Preclinical evaluation of a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted nanoprobe in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yushu; Gong, Li; Gao, Ning; Liao, Jichun; Sun, Jiayu; Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Pengjin; Fan, Qing; Wang, Yongqiang Andrew; Zeng, Wen; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily; Gao, Fabao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To translate a recombinant peptide containing the amino-terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted magnetic iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (uPAR-targeted human ATF-IONPs) into clinical applications, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of this nanoparticle in normal rhesus monkeys. Methods We assessed the changes in the following: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals from pretreatment stage to 14 days posttreatment, serum iron concentrations from 5 minutes posttreatment to 12 weeks posttreatment, routine blood examination and serum chemistry analysis results from pretreatment stage to 12 weeks after administration, and results of staining of the liver with Perls’ Prussian Blue and hematoxylin–eosin at 24 hours and 3 months posttreatment in two rhesus monkeys following an intravenous administration of the targeted nanoparticles either with a polyethylene glycol (ATF-PEG-IONP) or without a PEG (ATF-IONP) coating. Results The levels of alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and direct bilirubin in the two monkeys increased immediately after the administration of the IONPs but returned to normal within 20 days and stayed within the normal reference range 3 months after the injection. The creatinine levels of the two monkeys stayed within the normal range during the study. In addition, red blood cells, white blood cells, hemoglobin level, and platelets remained normal during the 3 months of the study. Conclusion All of the results suggest that a transient injury in terms of normal organ functions, but no microscopic necrotic lesions, was observed at a systemic delivery dose of 5 mg/kg of iron equivalent concentration in the acute phase, and that no chronic toxicity was found 3 months after the injection. Therefore, we conclude that uPAR-targeted IONPs have the potential to be used as receptor-targeted MRI contrasts as well as theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of

  10. Production of human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Mishaneh; Javaran, Mokhtar Jalali; Moieni, Ahmad; Masoumiasl, Asad; Abdolinasab, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as a serine protease with 72 kD molecular mass and 527 amino acids plays an important role in the fibrinolytic system and the dissolution of fibrin clots in human body. The collective production of this drug in plants such as cucumber, one of the most important vegetables in the world, could reduce its production costs. In this study, after scrutiny of the appropriate regeneration of cucumber plant (Isfahan variety) on MS medium with naphthalene acetic acid hormone (NAA; 0/1 mg L⁻¹) and benzyl amino purine hormone (BAP; 3 mg L⁻¹) hormones, the cloned human tPA gene under the CaMV 35S promoter and NOS terminator into pBI121 plasmid was transferred into cotyledon explants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. Subsequent to the regeneration of inoculated explants on the selective medium, the persistence of tPA gene in recombinant plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers. To evaluate the tPA gene expression in transgenic plants, RNA was extracted and the tPA gene transcription was confirmed by reverse-transcription (RT) PCR. Followed the extraction of protein from the leaves of transgenic plants, the presence of tPA protein was confirmed by dot blot and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis in order to survey the production of recombinant tPA protein. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test was used for recombinant tPA protein level in transgenic cucumber plants. It was counted between 0.8 and 1%, and based on this, it was concluded that the presence of three expressions of regulatory factors (CaMV 35S, Kozak, NOS) and KDEL signal in the construct caused the increase of the tPA gene expression in cucumber plants. PMID:24152103

  11. Angiotensinogen and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Gene Polymorphism in Relation to Renovascular Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Kadriye Altok Onal, Baran; Gonen, Sevim; Arinsoy, Turgay; Erten, Yasemin; Ilgit, Erhan; Soylemezoglu, Oguz; Derici, Ulver; Guz, Galip; Bali, Musa; Sindel, Sukru

    2006-02-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (4G/5G) polymorphisims in relation to the occurrence of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) and recurrent stenosis. In this study, 30 patients were enrolled after angiographic demonstration of ARAS; 100 healthy subjects for AGT polymorphism and 80 healthy subjects for PAI-1 polymorphism were considered the control group. The patients were followed for a mean 46.1 {+-} 9.2 months. The patients had significantly higher frequencies of the MT genotype and the T allele than control group ({chi}{sup 2} = 18.2, p < 0.001 and {chi}{sup 2} = 11.5 p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the PAI-1 genotype and allele findings when the data for all patients were compared with that for the controls ({chi}{sup 2}= 2.45, p = 0.29 and {chi}{sup 2} = 0.019, p = 0.89). There were no significant differences in the genotype and allele findings for the patients with and without restenosis (p > 0.05). The C-reactive protein (CRP) level was higher in the patients with restenosis than in the patients without restenosis (7.694 {+-} 0.39 mg/L and 1.56 {+-} 1.08 mg/L) (p = 0.001). Our results suggest that the M235T MT genotype and T allele might be associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. The CRP level might be an independent predictor for recurrent stenosis.

  12. Leptin links with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human obesity: the SABPA study.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Chiné; Schutte, Rudolph; Schutte, Aletta E

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between obesity and the development of cardiovascular disease is well established. However, the underlying mechanisms contributing to vascular disease and increased cardiovascular risk in the obese remain largely unexplored. Since leptin exerts direct vascular effects, we investigated leptin and the relationship thereof with circulating markers of vascular damage, namely plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen (PAI-1(ag)), von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF(ag)) and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). The study included a bi-ethnic population of 409 African and Caucasian teachers who were stratified into lean (<0.5) and obese (⩾0.5) groups according to waist-to-height ratio. We obtained ambulatory blood pressure measurements and determined serum leptin levels, PAI-1(ag), vWF(ag) and ACR, as markers of vascular damage. The obese group had higher leptin (P<0.001) and PAI-1(ag) (P<0.001) levels and a tendency existed for higher vWF(ag) (P=0.068). ACR did not differ between the two groups (P=0.21). In single regression analyses positive associations existed between leptin and all markers of vascular damage (all P<0.001) only in the obese group. After adjusting for covariates and confounders in multiple regression analyses, only the association between leptin and PAI-1(ag) remained (R(2)=0.440; β=0.293; P=0.0021). After adjusting for gender, ethnicity and age, additional analyses indicated that leptin also associated with fibrinogen and clot lysis time in both lean and obese groups, which in turn is associated with 24- h blood pressure and pulse pressure. This result provides evidence that elevated circulating leptin may directly contribute to vascular damage, possibly through mechanism related to thrombotic vascular disease. PMID:25740294

  13. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor modulates epileptogenesis in mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ndode-Ekane, Xavier Ekolle; Pitkänen, Asla

    2013-06-01

    Mutation in Plaur gene encoding urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) results in epilepsy and autistic phenotype in mice. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism in PLAUR gene represents a risk for autism spectrum disorders. Importantly, the expression of uPAR is elevated in the brain after various epileptogenic insults like traumatic brain injury and status epilepticus. So far, the consequences of altered uPAR expression on brain networks are poorly known. We tested a hypothesis that uPAR regulates post-injury neuronal reorganization and consequent functional outcome, particularly epileptogenesis. Epileptogenesis was induced by intrahippocampal injection of kainate in adult male wild type (Wt) or uPAR knockout (uPAR-/-) mice, and animals were monitored with continuous (24/7) video-electroencephalogram for 30 days. The severity of status epilepticus did not differ between the genotypes. The spontaneous electrographic seizures which developed were, however, longer and their behavioral manifestations were more severe in uPAR-/- than Wt mice. The more severe epilepsy phenotype in uPAR-/- mice was associated with delayed but augmented inflammatory response and more severe neurodegeneration in the hippocampus. Also, the distribution of newly born cells in the dentate gyrus was more scattered, and the recovery of hippocampal blood vessel length from status epilepticus-induced damage was compromised in uPAR-/- mice as compared to Wt mice. Our data demonstrate that a deficiency in uPAR represents a mechanisms which results in the development of a more severe epilepsy phenotype and progressive brain pathology after status epilepticus. We suggest that uPAR represents a rational target for disease-modifying treatments after epileptogenic brain insults. PMID:23263886

  14. Genetics of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a Ghanaian Population

    PubMed Central

    White, Marquitta J.; Kodaman, Nuri M.; Harder, Reed H.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Brown, Nancy J.; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a major modulator of the fibrinolytic system, is an important factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD) susceptibility and severity. PAI-1 is highly heritable, but the few genes associated with it explain only a small portion of its variation. Studies of PAI-1 typically employ linear regression to estimate the effects of genetic variants on PAI-1 levels, but PAI-1 is not normally distributed, even after transformation. Therefore, alternative statistical methods may provide greater power to identify important genetic variants. Additionally, most genetic studies of PAI-1 have been performed on populations of European descent, limiting the generalizability of their results. We analyzed >30,000 variants for association with PAI-1 in a Ghanaian population, using median regression, a non-parametric alternative to linear regression. Three variants associated with median PAI-1, the most significant of which was in the gene arylsulfatase B (ARSB) (p = 1.09 x 10−7). We also analyzed the upper quartile of PAI-1, the most clinically relevant part of the distribution, and found 19 SNPs significantly associated in this quartile. Of note an association was found in period circadian clock 3 (PER3). Our results reveal novel associations with median and elevated PAI-1 in an understudied population. The lack of overlap between the two analyses indicates that the genetic effects on PAI-1 are not uniform across its distribution. They also provide evidence of the generalizability of the circadian pathway’s effect on PAI-1, as a recent meta-analysis performed in Caucasian populations identified another circadian clock gene (ARNTL). PMID:26322636

  15. Abnormal expression of plasminogen activator inhibitors in patients with gestational trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Estellés, A.; Grancha, S.; Gilabert, J.; Thinnes, T.; Chirivella, M.; España, F.; Aznar, J.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We previously reported significantly elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in plasma and placenta from pregnant women with severe pre-eclampsia, and pre-eclampsia is a frequent problem in molar pregnancies. As increases in PAI-1 may contribute to the placental alterations that occur in pre-eclampsia, we have begun to investigate changes in PAI-1 as well as PAI-2 and several other components of the fibrinolytic system in patients with trophoblastic disease. Significant increases in plasma PAI-1 and decreases in plasma PAI-2 levels were observed in molar pregnancies when compared with the levels in normal pregnant women of similar gestational age. PAI-1 antigen levels also were increased, and PAI-2 levels were decreased in placenta from women with molar pregnancies compared with placenta obtained by spontaneous abortion. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong positive and specific staining of PAI-1 in trophoblastic epithelium in molar pregnancies and relatively weak staining of PAI-2. No association between the distribution of PAI-1 and vitronectin was found, and no specific signal for tissue type PA, urokinase type PA, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or interleukin-1 was detected. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in PAI-1 but not PAI-2 mRNAs in placenta from molar pregnancies in comparison with placenta from abortions. These results demonstrate increased PAI-1 protein and mRNA in trophoblastic disease and suggest that localized elevated levels of PAI-1 may contribute to the hemostatic problems associated with this disorder. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8863672

  16. Retinoids regulate human amniotic tissue-type plasminogen activator gene by a two-step mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Valerie; Marceau, Geoffroy; Gallot, Denis; Blanchon, Loïc; Sapin, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The collagenolytic effects of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) leading to extracellular matrix degradation are clearly involved in the physiopathology of human foetal membranes rupture. Nevertheless, the regulation of t-PA gene expression in extraembryonic developmental contexts remains unknown. The aim of our study is to propose the retinoic acids (RAs) as molecular regulators of t-PA expression in foetal membranes. RA induced t-PA mRNA and proteins in a time-dependent manner in amniotic membrane explants and Wistar Institute Susan Hayflick (WISH) cells. Furthermore, the use of cycloheximide revealed a two-step regulation of t-PA gene. Gene reporter assays confirmed that the RA-induced t-PA gene expression occurred through interactions of retinoid receptors (RARs and RXRs) with a DR5 response element located at –7 kb from the transcription site. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region of the t-PA promoter showed that SP1 factor was also retinoid-mediated induction, and immunoprecipitation assays revealed that SP1 and RAR/RXR interacted physically. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that interactions between RARs, RXRs and t-PA promoter were time dependent: RAR-α/RXR-α bound DR5 motif before and up to 12 hrs of RA exposure, and RAR-β/RXR-α bound DR5 response element after 12 hrs of RA treatment. Finally, experiments using shRNA and RAR-β-specific antagonist revealed that reducing RAR-β induction decreased t-PA induction. Altogether, our results established that the RA-mediated regulation of t-PA in human foetal membranes occurred through two steps, with a major role played by RAR-β. PMID:19538480

  17. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Prevents Mortality from Sulfur Mustard Analog–Induced Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Loader, Joan E.; Rioux, Jacqueline S.; Garlick, Rhonda B.; White, Carl W.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes the rare but life-threatening disorder of plastic bronchitis, characterized by bronchial cast formation, resulting in severe airway obstruction that can lead to respiratory failure and death. Mortality in those requiring intubation is greater than 80%. To date, no antidote exists for SM toxicity. In addition, therapies for plastic bronchitis are solely anecdotal, due to lack of systematic research available to assess drug efficacy in improving mortality and/or morbidity. Adult rats exposed to SM analog were treated with intratracheal tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) (0.15–0.7 mg/kg, 5.5 and 6.5 h), compared with controls (no treatment, isoflurane, and placebo). Respiratory distress and pulse oximetry were assessed (for 12 or 48 h), and arterial blood gases were obtained at study termination (12 h). Microdissection of fixed lungs was done to assess airway obstruction by casts. Optimal intratracheal tPA treatment (0.7 mg/kg) completely eliminated mortality (0% at 48 h), and greatly improved morbidity in this nearly uniformly fatal disease model (90–100% mortality at 48 h). tPA normalized plastic bronchitis–associated hypoxemia, hypercarbia, and lactic acidosis, and improved respiratory distress (i.e., clinical scores) while decreasing airway fibrin casts. Intratracheal tPA diminished airway-obstructive fibrin–containing casts while improving clinical respiratory distress, pulmonary gas exchange, tissue oxygenation, and oxygen utilization in our model of severe chemically induced plastic bronchitis. Most importantly, mortality, which was associated with hypoxemia and clinical respiratory distress, was eliminated. PMID:23258228

  18. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R.

    1984-03-01

    We have tested human fetal fibroblasts for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus; this was evident by a delay in both the relaxation and the restoration of DNA supercoiling in nucleoids after irradiation. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than those derived at 8 week gestation. However, they exhibited a somewhat lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. The same fetal and non-fetal cells were also tested for induction of the protease plasminogen activator (PA) after u.v. irradiation. Enhancement of PA was higher in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 week than in those derived at 12 week gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. These results are consistent with our previous findings that in human cells u.v. light-induced PA synthesis is correlated with reduced DNA repair capacity. Excision repair and PA inducibility were found to depend on tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. Lung compared to skin fibroblasts exhibited lower repair rates and produced higher levels of PA after irradiation. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s).

  19. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Use in Cardiac Arrest Secondary to Fulminant Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Tariq; Brinton, Taylor; Ahmed, Khansa; Iskander, Joy; Woznicka, Daniel; Kramer, Jason; Kopiec, Adam; Chadaga, Amar R.; Ortiz, Kathia

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is used emergently to dissolve thrombi in the treatment of fulminant pulmonary embolism. Currently, there is a relative contraindication to tPA in the setting of traumatic or prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation > 10 minutes because of the risk of massive hemorrhage. Methods Our single-center, retrospective study investigated patients experiencing cardiac arrest (CA) secondary to pulmonary embolus. We compared the effectiveness of advanced cardiac life support with the administration of tPA vs. the standard of care consisting of advanced cardiac life support without thrombolysis. The primary endpoint was survival to discharge. Secondary endpoints were return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), major bleeding, and minor bleeding. Results We analyzed 42 patients, of whom 19 received tPA during CA. Patients who received tPA were not associated with a statistically significant increase in survival to discharge (10.5% vs. 8.7%, P = 1.00) or ROSC (47.4% vs. 47.8%, P = 0.98) compared to the control group. We observed no statistically significant difference between the groups in major bleeding events (5.3% in the tPA group vs. 4.3% in the control group, P = 1.00) and minor bleeding events (10.5% in the tPA group vs. 0.0% in the control group, P = 0.11). Conclusion This study did not find a statistically significant difference in survival to discharge or in ROSC in patients treated with tPA during CA compared to patients treated with standard therapy. However, because no significant difference was found in major or minor bleeding, we suggest that the potential therapeutic benefits of this medication should not be limited by the potential for massive hemorrhage. Larger prospective studies are warranted to define the efficacy and safety profile of thrombolytic use in this population. PMID:26858790

  20. Tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators instigate the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells in a mouse model of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Chintala, Shravan K

    2016-02-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) promotes the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during the progression of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (POAG). However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs remain unclear. Therefore, by employing a mouse model of POAG, this study examined whether elevated IOP promotes the degeneration of RGCs by up-regulating tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in the retina. IOP was elevated in mouse eyes by injecting fluorescent-microbeads into the anterior chamber. Once a week, for eight weeks, IOP in mouse eyes was measured by using Tono-Pen XL. At various time periods after injecting microbeads, proteolytic activity of tPA and uPA in retinal protein extracts was determined by fibrinogen/plasminogen zymography assays. Localization of tPA and uPA, and their receptor LRP-1 (low-density receptor-related protein-1) in the retina was determined by immunohistochemistry. RGCs' degeneration was assessed by immunostaining with antibodies against Brn3a. Injection of microbeads into the anterior chamber led to a progressive elevation in IOP, increased the proteolytic activity of tPA and uPA in the retina, activated plasminogen into plasmin, and promoted a significant degeneration of RGCs. Elevated IOP up-regulated tPA and LRP-1 in RGCs, and uPA in astrocytes. At four weeks after injecting microbeads, RAP (receptor associated protein; 0.5 and 1.0 μM) or tPA-Stop (1.0 and 4.0 μM) was injected into the vitreous humor. Treatment of IOP-elevated eyes with RAP led to a significant decrease in proteolytic activity of both tPA and uPA, and a significant decrease in IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs. Also, treatment of IOP-elevated eyes with tPA-Stop decreased the proteolytic activity of both tPA and uPA, and, in turn, significantly attenuated IOP-mediated degeneration of RGCs. Results presented in this study provide evidence that elevated IOP promotes the degeneration of

  1. Mechanisms of conversion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 from a suicide inhibitor to a substrate by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Komissarov, Andrey A; Declerck, Paul J; Shore, Joseph D

    2002-11-15

    We have delineated two different reaction mechanisms of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), MA-8H9D4 and either MA-55F4C12 or MA-33H1F7, that convert plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) to a substrate for tissue (tPA)- and urokinase plasminogen activators. MA-8H9D4 almost completely (98-99%) shifts the reaction to the substrate pathway by preventing disordering of the proteinase active site. MA-8H9D4 does not affect the rate-limiting constants (k(lim)) for the insertion of the reactive center loop cleaved by tPA (3.5 s(-1)) but decreases k(lim) for urokinase plasminogen activator from 25 to 4.0 s(-1). MA-8H9D4 does not cause deacylation of preformed PAI-1/proteinase complexes and probably acts prior to the formation of the final inhibitory complex, interfering with displacement of the acylated serine from the proteinase active site. MA-55F4C12 and MA-33H1F7 (50-80% substrate reaction) do not interfere with initial PAI-1/proteinase complex formation but retard the inhibitory pathway by decreasing k(lim) (>10-fold for tPA). Interaction of two mAbs with the same molecule of PAI-1 has been directly demonstrated for pairs MA-8H9D4/MA-55F4C12 and MA-8H9D4/MA-33H1F7 but not for MA-55F4C12/MA-33H1F7. The strong functional additivity observed for MA-8H9D4 and MA-55F4C12 demonstrates that these mAbs interact independently and affect different steps of the PAI-1 reaction mechanism. PMID:12223472

  2. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Binding to Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Covalent Versus Adsorptive Approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Ralf P; Zaloga, Jan; Schreiber, Eveline; Tóth, Ildikó Y; Tombácz, Etelka; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are frequently used to develop vehicles for drug delivery, hyperthermia, and photodynamic therapy and as tools used for magnetic separation and purification of proteins or for biomolecular imaging. Depending on the application, there are various possible covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of particles, each of them shows different advantages and disadvantages for drug release and activity at the desired location.Particularly important for the production of adsorptive and covalent bound drugs to nanoparticles is the pureness of the involved formulation. Especially the covalent binding strategy demands defined chemistry of the drug, which is stabilized by excess free amino acids which could reduce reaction efficiency. In this study, we therefore used tangential flow filtration (TFF) method to purify the drugs before the reaction and used the frequently applied and clinically available recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA; Actilyse(®)) as a proof of concept. We then coupled the tPA preparation to polyacrylic acid-co-maleic acid (PAM)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) using an amino-reactive activated ester reaction and compared these particles to PAM-coated SPIONs with electrostatically adsorbed tPA.Using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and pH-dependent electrokinetic mobility measurements, we showed that surface properties of the SPIONs were significantly greater affected after activation of the particles compared to the adsorption controls. Different in vitro assays were used to investigate the activity of tPA after coupling to the particles and purification of the ferrofluid. Covalent linkage significantly improves the reactivity and long-term stability of the conjugated SPION-tPA system compared to simple adsorption. In conclusion, we have shown an effective way to produce SPIONs with covalent and non-covalent ultra-filtrated drugs. We showed

  3. Angiotensin II regulates ACE and ACE2 in neurons through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liang; Haack, Karla K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Brain ANG II plays an important role in modulating sympathetic function and homeostasis. The generation and degradation of ANG II are carried out, to a large extent, through the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2, respectively. In disease states, such as hypertension and chronic heart failure, central expression of ACE is upregulated and ACE2 is decreased in central sympathoregulatory neurons. In this study, we determined the expression of ACE and ACE2 in response to ANG II in a neuronal cell culture and the subsequent signaling mechanism(s) involved. A mouse catecholaminergic neuronal cell line (CATH.a) was treated with ANG II (30, 100, and 300 nM) for 24 h, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. ANG II induced a significant dose-dependent increase in ACE and decrease in ACE2 mRNA and protein expression in CATH.a neurons. This effect was abolished by pretreatment of the cells with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (10 μM) 30 min before administration of ANG II or the ERK1/2 inhibitor U-0126 (10 μM). These data suggest that ANG II increases ACE and attenuates ACE2 expression in neurons via the ANG II type 1 receptor, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:23535237

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor with very long half-life (VLHL PAI-1) can reduce bleeding in PAI-1-deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Jankun, Jerzy; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) deficiency and proposes some novel treatments for this condition. PAI-1 is a fast acting inhibitor of tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA). PAI-1 controls/slows clot lysis triggered by tPA activated plasminogen. PAI-1 deficiency was once considered to be an extremely rare disorder characterized by frequent and prolonged bleeding episodes. PAI-1 deficiency is now thought to be more frequent than initially reported and is known to be caused by mutations in the PAI-1 gene that produce a dysfunctional PAI-1 protein or slow the secretion of PAI-1 into the circulation. PAI-1 deficiency is characterized by hyperfibrinolysis that results in frequent bleeding episodes. Patients with this condition form normal blood clots that are quickly lysed by unopposed tPA-activated plasmin. Spontaneous bleeding is rare in PAI-1 deficient patients, but moderate hemorrhaging of the knees, elbows, nose, and gums can be triggered by mild trauma. Additionally, prolonged bleeding after surgery is common and menstrual bleeding may be severe. Moderate PAI-1 deficiency is associated with a lifelong bleeding tendency, but severe deficiencies can be life-threatening. The diagnosis of this disorder remains challenging due to the lack of a clear definition of PAI-1 deficiency as well as a lack of standardized tests. Patients with mild PAI-1 deficiency may be treated with antifibrinolytic agents (ε-aminocaproic acid or tranexamic acid); however, not all patients respond well to these treatments. These patients may be treated with wild-type PAI-1; however, this molecule quickly converts into its inactive form. We propose to use PAI-1 with an extended half-life to treat these patients. PMID:23988002

  5. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 by Triton X-100--identification of two consecutive conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Gils, A; Declerck, P J

    1998-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a unique member of the serpin superfamily because of its conformational and functional flexibility. In the present study, we have evaluated the influence of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the functional stability and conformational transitions of PAI-1. At 37 degrees C, TX-100 induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the functional half-life of PAI-1 resulting in half-lives of 177 +/- 54 min (mean +/- SD, n = 3), 19 +/- 2 min, 1.7 +/- 0.3 min and 0.53 +/- 0.03 min in the presence of 0.005, 0.010, 0.020 and 0.2% TX-100, respectively, compared to a half-life of 270 +/- 146 min in the absence of TX-100. Conformational analysis at various time points and at different temperatures (0 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 37 degrees C) revealed that this inactivation proceeds through the formation of a substrate-like intermediate followed by the formation of the latent form. Kinetic evaluation demonstrated that this conversion fits to two consecutive first-order transitions, i.e. active k1--> substrate k2--> latent. The k1 value was strongly dependent on the concentration of TX-100 (e.g. 0.002 +/- 0.0006 s(-1) and 0.029 +/- 0.003 s(-1) for 0.01% and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C) whereas the conversion of substrate to latent (k2) was virtually independent of the TX-100 concentration (i.e. 0.012 +/- 0.002 s(-1) and 0.011 +/- 0.001 s(-1) for 0.01 and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C). Experiments with a variety of other non-ionic amphiphilic compounds revealed that the amphiphilic character of the compound is, at least in part, responsible for the observed effects and strongly indicate that the currently reported mechanism of inactivation is of general importance for the conformational transitions in PAI-1. In conclusion, TX- 100 changes the initial conformation of PAI-1 resulting in altered functional properties. This observation allows us to develop a new model for the mechanism involved in the conformational flexibility of

  6. Systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute life-threatening Blalock-Taussig shunt obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Franco; Sasser, William C.; Law, Mark A.; Alten, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (mBTS) obstruction can be life-threatening, especially when it represents the only source of pulmonary blood flow. Current therapeutic options to reverse obstruction include surgical shunt revision/replacement, interventional endovascular procedures including balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement, and a combination of local and systemic thrombolytic therapy. We report two cases of acute mBTS thrombosis successfully treated with systemic recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in infants convalescing after cardiac surgery when the clinical status and resources precluded traditionally described rescue therapies. PMID:27555699

  7. Systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute life-threatening Blalock-Taussig shunt obstruction.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Franco; Sasser, William C; Law, Mark A; Alten, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    Modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (mBTS) obstruction can be life-threatening, especially when it represents the only source of pulmonary blood flow. Current therapeutic options to reverse obstruction include surgical shunt revision/replacement, interventional endovascular procedures including balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement, and a combination of local and systemic thrombolytic therapy. We report two cases of acute mBTS thrombosis successfully treated with systemic recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in infants convalescing after cardiac surgery when the clinical status and resources precluded traditionally described rescue therapies. PMID:27555699

  8. Influence of the fast-acting inhibitor of plasminogen activator on in vivo thrombolysis induced by tissue-type plasminogen activator in rabbits. Interference of tissue-derived components.

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, M; Paramo, J A; Stassen, J M; Collen, D

    1986-01-01

    The influence of endotoxin-induced elevated plasma levels of the fast-acting inhibitor of plasminogen activator (PA-inhibitor) on thrombolysis was investigated in rabbits with a jugular vein thrombus. Infusion of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) produced similar degrees of thrombolysis in control and endotoxin-treated rabbits, although no free t-PA could be demonstrated in plasma of endotoxin-treated animals. Infusion of t-PA in an extracorporeal arteriovenous shunt resulted in loss of thrombolytic activity in endotoxin-treated animals but not in control animals. Blood clots superfused in vitro with mixtures of t-PA and normal plasma lysed in contrast to clots superfused with t-PA and PA-inhibitor-rich plasma. However, addition of rabbit lung slices to the plasma surrounding the blood clot, reversed the inhibition of thrombolysis by PA-inhibitor-rich plasma. This indicates that tissue-derived factor(s) are involved in the regulation of in vivo thrombolysis. These hypothetical factor(s) are, however, very unstable in plasma, which has thus far precluded their further characterization. PMID:3088040

  9. Radiation-induced hypomethylation triggers urokinase plasminogen activator transcription in meningioma cells.

    PubMed

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2013-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD) expression. However, oxidative damage by H(2)O(2) or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor) blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation triggers u

  10. Radiation-Induced Hypomethylation Triggers Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Transcription in Meningioma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gogineni, Venkateswara Rao; Nalla, Arun Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD) expression. However, oxidative damage by H2O2 or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor) blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation triggers u

  11. Ultrasound-triggered Release of Recombinant Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator from Echogenic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Denise A.B.; Vaidya, Sampada S.; Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Huang, Shao-Ling; Klegerman, Melvin E.; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2009-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) were developed as ultrasound-triggered targeted drug or gene delivery vehicles (Lanza et al., 1997; Huang et al., 2001). Recombinant tissue-type Plasminogen Activator (rt-PA), a thrombolytic, has been loaded into ELIP (Tiukinhoy-Laing et al., 2007). These vesicles have the potential to be used for ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, deep vein thrombosis, or pulmonary embolus. A clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner (Philips HDI 5000) equipped with a linear array transducer (L12-5) was employed for in vitro studies using rt-PA-loaded ELIP (T-ELIP). The goal of this study was to quantify ultrasound-triggered drug release from rt-PA-loaded echogenic liposomes. T-ELIP samples were exposed to 6.9-MHz B-mode pulses at a low pressure amplitude (600 kPa) to track the echogenicity over time under four experimental conditions: 1) flow alone to monitor gas diffusion from the T-ELIP, 2) pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler exposure above the acoustically driven threshold (0.8 MPa) to force gas out of the liposome gently, 3) pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler above the rapid fragmentation threshold (2.6 MPa), or 4) Triton X-100 to rupture the T-ELIP chemically as a positive control. Release of rt-PA for each ultrasound exposure protocol was assayed spectrophotometrically. T-ELIP were echogenic in the flow model (5 ml/min) for thirty minutes. The thrombolytic drug remained associated with the liposome when exposed to low-amplitude B-mode pulses over 60 min and was released when exposed to color Doppler pulses or Triton X-100. The rt-PA released from the liposomes had similar enzymatic activity as the free drug. These T-ELIP are robust and echogenic during continuous fundamental 6.9-MHz B-mode imaging at a low exposure output level (600 kPa). Furthermore, a therapeutic concentration of rt-PA can be released by fragmenting the T-ELIP with pulsed 6.0-MHz color Doppler ultrasound above the rapid

  12. Urine soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor levels correlate with proteinuria in Puumala hantavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Outinen, Tuula K.; Mäkelä, Satu; Huttunen, Reetta; Mäenpää, Niina; Libraty, Daniel; Vaheri, Antti; Mustonen, Jukka; Aittoniemi, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is upregulated during inflammation and known to bind to β3-integrins, receptors used by pathogenic hantaviruses to enter endothelial cells. It has been proposed that soluble uPAR (suPAR) is a circulating factor that causes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proteinuria by activating β3-integrin in kidney podocytes. Proteinuria is also a characteristic feature of hantavirus infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between urine suPAR levels and disease severity in acute Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection. Design A single-centre, prospective cohort study. Subjects and methods Urinary suPAR levels were measured twice during the acute phase and once during convalescence in 36 patients with serologically confirmed PUUV infection. Fractional excretion of suPAR (FE suPAR) and of albumin (FE alb) were calculated. Results The FE suPAR was significantly elevated during the acute phase of PUUV infection compared to the convalescent phase (median 3.2%, range 0.8–52.0%, vs. median 1.9%, range 1.0–5.8%, P = 0.005). Maximum FE suPAR was correlated markedly with maximum FE alb (r = 0.812, P < 0.001), and with several other variables that reflect disease severity. There was a positive correlation with the length of hospitalization (r = 0.455, P = 0.009) and maximum plasma creatinine level (r = 0.780, P < 0.001), and an inverse correlation with minimum urinary output (r = −0.411, P = 0.030). There was no correlation between FE suPAR and plasma suPAR (r = 0.180, P = 0.324). Conclusion Urinary suPAR is markedly increased during acute PUUV infection and is correlated with proteinuria. High urine suPAR level may reflect local production of suPAR in the kidney during the acute infection. PMID:24717117

  13. Lack of Association Between ACE Indel Polymorphism and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Physically Active and Sedentary Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Verlengia, Rozangela; Rebelo, Ana C.; Crisp, Alex H.; Kunz, Vandeni C.; dos Santos Carneiro Cordeiro, Marco A.; Hirata, Mario H.; Crespo Hirata, Rosario D.; Silva, Ester

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polymorphisms at the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE), such as the indel [rs1799752] variant in intron 16, have been shown to be associated with aerobic performance of athletes and non-athletes. However, the relationship between ACE indel polymorphism and cardiorespiratory fitness has not been always demonstrated. Objectives: The relationship between ACE indel polymorphism and cardiorespiratory fitness was investigated in a sample of young Caucasian Brazilian women. Patients and Methods: This study investigated 117 healthy women (aged 18 to 30 years) who were grouped as physically active (n = 59) or sedentary (n = 58). All subjects performed an incremental exercise test (ramp protocol) on a cycle-ergometer with 20-25 W/min increments. Blood samples were obtained for DNA extraction and to analyze metabolic and hormonal profiles. ACE indel polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fragment size analysis. Results: The physically active group had higher values of peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak), carbon dioxide output (VCO2), ventilation (VE) and power output than the sedentary group (P < 0.05) at the peak of the exercise test. However, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) did not differ between groups. There was no relationship between ACE indel polymorphism and cardiorespiratory variables during the test in both the physically active and sedentary groups, even when the dominant (DD vs. D1 + 2) and recessive (2 vs. DI + DD) models of inheritance were tested. Conclusions: These results do not support the concept that the genetic variation at the ACE locus contributes to the cardiorespiratory responses at the peak of exercise test in physically active or sedentary healthy women. This indicates that other factors might mediate these responses, including the physical training level of the women. PMID:25520764

  14. ACE1, a copper-dependent transcription factor, activates expression of the yeast copper, zinc superoxide dismutase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gralla, E B; Thiele, D J; Silar, P; Valentine, J S

    1991-01-01

    Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene product) (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) is a copper-containing enzyme that functions to prevent oxygen toxicity. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, copper levels exert some control over the level of SOD1 expression. We show that the ACE1 transcriptional activator protein, which is responsible for the induction of yeast metallothionein (CUP1) in response to copper, also controls the SOD1 response to copper. A single binding site for ACE1 is present in the SOD1 promoter region, as demonstrated by DNase I protection and methylation interference experiments, and is highly homologous to a high-affinity ACE1 binding site in the CUP1 promoter. The functional importance of this DNA-protein interaction is demonstrated by the facts that (i) copper induction of SOD1 mRNA does not occur in a strain lacking ACE1 and (ii) it does not occur in a strain containing a genetically engineered SOD1 promoter that lacks a functional ACE1 binding site. Images PMID:1924315

  15. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  16. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  17. Relationship between urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and the invasion of human prenatal hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiangguo; Fu, Gang; Huang, Gang; Lian, Xiaohua; Yu, Jin; Yang, Tian

    2010-08-01

    During the morphogenesis of hair follicles, the invasive migration of basal keratinocytes resembles cell's dissemination of tissue remodeling. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) appears to be a key molecule in the metastasis. In order to elucidate the relationship between uPAR and the invasion of the human hair follicle, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, plasmids transfection, and western blot were used. The results showed that uPAR was expressed in the outermost epithelial cells of the hair follicle and the basal keratinocytes of epidermis, and that the expression decreased with the development of the hair follicle. The cells of the outer root sheath (ORS) and interfollicle epidermis, which overexpressed uPAR, acquired increased invasiveness; however, they showed decreased invasion with overexpression of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator amino terminal fragment (uPA ATF), which inhibited the combination of uPAR and uPA competitively, and the cell invasive migration with overexpressed uPAR was required activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). These results implied that overexpression of uPAR promote the invasive migration of hair follicle into the dermis in uPA-dependent and independent manner during human prenatal development. PMID:20012874

  18. Interferons Induce STAT1-Dependent Expression of Tissue Plasminogen Activator, a Pathogenicity Factor in Puumala Hantavirus Disease.

    PubMed

    Strandin, Tomas; Hepojoki, Jussi; Laine, Outi; Mäkelä, Satu; Klingström, Jonas; Lundkvist, Åke; Julkunen, Ilkka; Mustonen, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-05-15

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses that show various degrees of vasculopathy in humans. In this study, we analyzed the regulation of 2 fibrinolytic parameters, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its physiological inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), in Puumala hantavirus (PUUV)-infected patients and in human microvascular endothelial cells. We detected strong upregulation of tPA in the acute phase of illness and in PUUV-infected macaques and found the tPA level to positively correlate with disease severity. The median levels of PAI-1 during the acute stage did not differ from those during the recovery phase. In concordance, hantaviruses induced tPA but not PAI-1 in microvascular endothelial cells, and the induction was demonstrated to be dependent on type I interferon. Importantly, type I and II interferons directly upregulated tPA through signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), which regulated tPA gene expression via a STAT1-responsive enhancer element. These results suggest that tPA may be a general factor in the immunological response to viruses. PMID:26704613

  19. Recombinant Human Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Accelerates Odontoblastic Differentiation of Human Stem Cells from Apical Papilla.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bin; Choung, Pill-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Dental caries, the most prevalent oral disease in dental patients, involves the phases of demineralization and destruction of tooth hard tissues like enamel, dentin, and cementum. Dentin is a major component of the root and is also the innermost layer that protects the tooth nerve, exposure of which results in pain. In this study, we used human stem cells from apical papilla (hSCAP), which are early progenitor cells, to examine the effects of recombinant human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (rhPAI-1) on odontogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that rhPAI-1 promoted the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hSCAP and increased the expression levels of odontoblast-associated markers. We also observed that rhPAI-1 upregulated the expression of Smad4, nuclear factor I-C (NFI-C), Runx2, and osterix (OSX) during odontogenic differentiation. Notably, transplantation of rhPAI-1-treated hSCAP effectively induced odontoblastic differentiation and dentinal formation. And the differentiated odontoblast-like cells showed numerous odontoblast processes inserted in dentin tubules and arranged collagen fibers. Furthermore, odontoblast-associated markers were more highly expressed in the rhPAI-1-induced differentiated odontoblast-like cells compared with the control group. These markers were also more highly expressed in the newly formed dentin-like tissue of the rhPAI-1-treated group compared with the control group. Consistent with our in vitro results, the expression levels of Smad4, NFI-C, and OSX were also increased in the rhPAI-1-treated group compared with the control group. Taken together, these results suggest that rhPAI-1 promotes odontoblast differentiation and dentin formation of hSCAP, and Smad4/NFI-C/OSX may play critical roles in the rhPAI-1-induced odontogenic differentiation. Thus, dental stem cells from apical papilla combined with rhPAI-1 could lead to dentin regeneration in clinical implications. PMID:27046084

  20. [Variations in hemostasis and fibrinolysis during the treatment of acute myocardial infarct (AMI) with tissue-type plasminogen activator (TTPA). A study of 17 cases].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, R; Ruiz de Chávez Cervantes, A; Villavicencio, R; Gómez Trigos, A; Mar Chavira, R; Spíndola, M del C; Casanova, J M

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to estimate changes in the coagulation and fibrinolysis systems during the thrombolytic treatment with recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with acute myocardial infarction and correlate with hemorrhagic complications. We studied 17 patients with a 3 hours-continuous systemic infusion of 100 mg of rt-PA. Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen splits products, plasminogen, alfa-2-antiplasmin (a-2AP) and antithrombin III (AT-III) were performed before, during and after infusion. Most patients showed lengthening coagulation times. Fibrinogen and plasminogen were decreased and PDF was increased. No variations in alpha-2AP or AT-III were observed. The recuperation of fibrinogen levels occurred in 3 hours and there was hyperfibrinogenemia after day 3. No hemorrhagic complication was observed in patients with abnormalities in these coagulation or fibrinolytic tests. PMID:8347053

  1. Hyperacute Carotid Stent Thrombosis During Emergent Revascularization Treated with Intraarterial Eptifibatide After Systemic Administration of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Grant C; Dumont, Travis M.; Mokin, Maxim; Eller, Jorge L.; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Levy, Elad I.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 26 was found to have an acute left carotid occlusion with tandem left M1 thrombus within 1.5 hours of symptom onset. After no neurologic improvement following standard-dose intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), emergent neuroendovascular revascularization with carotid stenting and intracranial thrombectomy were performed under conscious sedation. Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI)-3 flow restoration and symptom resolution were achieved postprocedure; however, complete carotid stent thrombosis was noted on final angiographic runs (25 minutes later), correlating with neurologic decline. Rapid administration of an intraarterial (IA) bolus dose of eptifibatide resulted in TIMI-3 flow restoration, with neurologic improvement. The patient was discharged three days postrevascularization on dual antiplatelet therapy with an NIHSS score of 1. Intraarterial (IA) eptifibatide can be an effective option for acute stent occlusion during emergent neuroendovascular revascularization after IV rtPA administration. ABBREVIATIONS CLEAR Combined approach to lysis utilizing eptifibatide and RtPA CT computed tomographic Fr French GP glycoprotein IA intraarterial ICA internal carotid artery IV intravenous MCA middle cerebral artery NIHSS National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale rtPA recombinant tissue plasminogen activator TIMI thrombolysis in myocardial infarction PMID:26301032

  2. Mammalian protein secretion without signal peptide removal. Biosynthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 in U-937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, R.D.; Wun, T.C.; Sadler, J.E.

    1988-04-05

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) is a serine protease inhibitor that regulates plasmin generation by inhibiting urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. The primary structure of PAI-2 suggests that it may be secreted without cleavage of a single peptide. To confirm this hypothesis we have studied the glycosylation and secretion of PAI-2 in human monocytic U-937 cells by metabolic labeling, immunoprecipitation, glycosidase digestion, and protein sequencing. PAI-2 is variably glycosylated on asparagine residues to yield intracellular intermediates with zero, one, two, or three high mannose-type oligosaccharide units. Secretion of the N-glycosylated species began by 1 h of chase and the secreted molecules contained both complex-type N-linked and O-linked oligosaccharides. Enzymatically deglycosylated PAI-2 had an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of the nonglycosylated precursor and also to that of PAI-2 synthesized in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate from synthetic mRNA derived from full length PAI-2 cDNA. The amino-terminal protein sequence of secreted PAI-2 began with the initiator methionine residue. These results indicate that PAI-2 is glycosylated and secreted efficiently without the cleavage of a signal peptide. PAI-2 shares this property with its nearest homologue in the serine protease inhibitor family, chicken ovalbumin, and appears to be the first well characterized example of this phenomenon among natural mammalian proteins.

  3. Interaction of urokinase A chain with the receptor of human keratinocytes stimulates release of urokinase-like plasminogen activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Magnelli, L.; Pucci, M.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of a fibrinolytic assay with {sup 125}I-fibrin, zymography, and immunoprobing with anti-human urokinase antibody, the authors have observed that the in vitro established NCTC human keratinocyte cell line releases into the culture medium a 54,000-Da plasminogen activator which is indistinguishable from human urokinase. Only the early release following the washing of keratinocyte monolayers is accounted for by secretion of preformed enzyme, while late secretory events require the de novo synthesis of urokinase. The released enzyme can interact by autocriny with its own receptor present on keratinocytes. The addition to the keratinocyte culture medium of the urokinase A chain can stimulate a concentration-dependent urokinase oversecretion, which is not paralleled by oversecretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Since stimulation of urokinase production can be obtained by an A chain concentration which was previously shown to be efficient in inducing keratinocyte mobilization in an in vitro migration model system, they hypothesize that this mechanism may be important in vivo during the process of wound repair.

  4. QSAR study of substituted 2-pyridinyl guanidines as selective urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, C; Moorthy, N S Hari Narayana; Trivedi, Piyush

    2009-02-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis was conducted on two different series of pyridinylguanidines acting as inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator using QuaSAR descriptors of molecular modeling software MOE. Multiple linear regression analysis following a stepwise scheme was employed to generate QSARs that relate molecular descriptors to uPA inhibitory activity data of the title compounds. Among the several QSARs generated by MLR analysis, the best models were selected on the basis of their statistical significance and predictive potential. The interpretation of the selected QSAR models suggest that uPA inhibitory activity of compounds in series 1 is influenced by their molecular shape, molecular flexibility and halogen atoms in the molecule whereas the uPA inhibitory potency of compounds in series 2 is dependent on molecular lipophilicity, number of double bonds and spatial orientation of bulky substituents in the molecule. PMID:19012070

  5. The conformation changes of the finger domain of tissue type plasminogen activator during the activator-inhibitor reaction.

    PubMed

    Wilczyńska, M; Cierniewski, C S

    1990-04-12

    A peptide fragment of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) corresponding to amino acid residues 4-8 (tPA4-8) was synthesized, coupled to thyroglobulin and injected into rabbits. Antibodies specific to the peptide tPA4-8 were purified immunochemically on the pentapeptide coupled to CNBr-Sepha rose 4B. Anti-tPA4-8 antibodies, reacted with iodinated peptide tPA4-8, showing a relatively high binding affinity (KD = 2.3 x 10(-8) M). There was no interaction between anti-tPA4-8 antibodies and native one- or two-chain tPA. However, reduction of disulfide bonds unmasked the epitope on the heavy chain of tPA which became accessible to anti-tPA4-8 antibodies. Similarly, complexing of tPA with alpha 1-antitrypsin inhibitor resulted in unmasking of the epitope formed by amino acid residues in the positions 4-8. Presented data suggest that complexing of tPA with inhibitors results in conformational changes occurring in the "finger" domain of tPA molecule and such conformational transition can be detected by antipeptide antibodies. Therefore, anti-tPA4-8 antibodies may be employed as sequence-specific reporter molecules to monitor local conformational changes in tPA molecule. PMID:2114044

  6. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor in the reciprocal regulation of bovine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cell migration by TGF-beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Petzelbauer, E.; Springhorn, J. P.; Tucker, A. M.; Madri, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells exhibit reciprocal migratory responses after transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 treatment. Endothelial cells exhibit a decreased migratory rate and smooth muscle cells exhibit an increased migratory rate. Previous studies have demonstrated increases in extracellular matrix and integrin synthesis and expression in response to TGF-beta 1. In this report, we illustrate the roles of plasminogen activator inhibitor in modulating the migratory rates in these two cell types. Endothelial cells appear to require a proteolytic phenotype for rapid migration, whereas vascular smooth muscle cells appear to require an anti-proteolytic phenotype. Modulation of proteinase/anti-proteinase activity ratios was accomplished via TGF-beta 1 induction, addition of exogenous plasminogen activator inhibitor, addition of anti-catalytic antibodies directed against urokinase plasminogen activator, overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor utilizing stable transfectants, and the use of vitronectin as a substratum. The reciprocal migratory behaviors exhibited by these two vascular cell types in response to TGF-beta 1 is discussed in the context that these two vascular cell types utilize distinct adhesive and signaling pathways in their interactions with extracellular matrix components and responsiveness to proteolytic activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8780396

  7. Plasminogen activator/coagulase gene of Yersinia pestis is responsible for degradation of plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sodeinde, O A; Sample, A K; Brubaker, R R; Goguen, J D

    1988-01-01

    The related family of virulence plasmids found in the three major pathogens of the genus Yersinia all have the ability to encode a set of outer membrane proteins. In Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, these proteins are major constituents of the outer membrane when their synthesis is fully induced. In contrast, they have been difficult to detect in Y. pestis. It has recently been established that Y. pestis does synthesize these proteins, but that they are rapidly degraded due to some activity determined by the 9.5-kilobase plasmid commonly found in Y. pestis strains. We show that mutations in the pla gene of this plasmid, which encodes both the plasminogen activator and coagulase activities, blocked this degradation. A cloned 1.4-kilobase DNA fragment carrying pla was also sufficient to cause degradation in the absence of the 9.5-kilobase plasmid. Images PMID:2843471

  8. The Role of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator and Plasmin Activator Inhibitor-1 on Vein Wall Remodeling in Experimental Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Joe F.; Sood, Vikram; Elfline, Megan A.; Luke, Cathy E.; Dewyer, Nicholas A.; Diaz, Jose A.; Myers, Dan D.; Wakefield, Thomas; Henke, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) resolution instigates an inflammatory response, resulting in vessel wall damage and scarring. Urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), are integral components of the fibrinolytic system, essential for VT resolution. This study determined the vein wall response when exposed to increased and decreased plasmin activity. Methods A mouse inferior vena cava (IVC) ligation model in uPA −/− or PAI-1 −/− and their genetic wild types (B6/SvEv and C57/BL6, respectively) was used to create stasis thrombi, with tissue harvest at either 8 or 21d. Tissue analysis included gene expression of vascular smooth muscle cells (alpha SMA [αSMA], SM22) and endothelial marker (CD31), by real time PCR, ELISA, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2 and 9 activity by zymography and vein wall collagen by picrosirius red histological analysis. A P < .05 was considered significant. RESULTS Thrombi were significantly larger in both 8d and 21d uPA −/− as compared to WT, and were significantly smaller in both 8 and 21d PAI-1 −/− as compared to WT. Correspondingly, 8d plasmin levels were reduced in half in uPA −/− and increased 3 fold in PAI-1 −/− when compared to respective WT thrombi (P < .05, N = 5 – 6). The endothelial marker CD31 was elevated 2 fold in PAI-1 −/− mice at 8d, but reduced 2.5 fold at 21d in uPA −/− as compared with WT (P = .02, N = 5 – 6), suggesting less endothelial preservation. Vein wall VSMC gene expression showed that 8d and 21d PAI-1 −/− mice had 2.3 and 3.8 fold more SM22 and 1.8 and 2.3 fold more αSMA expression than respective WT (P < .05, N = 5 – 7), as well as 1.8 fold increased αSMA (+) cells (N = 3 – 5, P ≤ .05). No significant difference in MMP2 or 9 activity was found in the PAI-1 −/− mice compared with WT, while 5.4 fold more MMP9 was present in 21d WT than 21d uPA −/− (P = .03, N = 5). Lastly, collagen was ~2 fold

  9. The profibrinolytic enzyme subtilisin NAT purified from Bacillus subtilis Cleaves and inactivates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1.

    PubMed

    Urano, T; Ihara, H; Umemura, K; Suzuki, Y; Oike, M; Akita, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Suzuki, I; Takada, A

    2001-07-01

    In this report, we demonstrate an interaction between subtilisin NAT (formerly designated BSP, or nattokinase), a profibrinolytic serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). Subtilisin NAT was purified to homogeneity (molecular mass, 27.7 kDa) from a saline extract of B. subtilis (natto). Subtilisin NAT appeared to cleave active recombinant prokaryotic PAI-1 (rpPAI-1) into low molecular weight fragments. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in combination with time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and peptide sequence analysis revealed that rpPAI-1 was cleaved at its reactive site (P1-P1': Arg(346)-Met(347)). rpPAI-1 lost its specific activity after subtilisin NAT treatment in a dose-dependent manner (0.02-1.0 nm; half-maximal effect at approximately 0.1 nm). Subtilisin NAT dose dependently (0.06-1 nm) enhanced tissue-type plasminogen activator-induced fibrin clot lysis both in the absence of rpPAI-1 (48 +/- 1.4% at 1 nm) and especially in the presence of rpPAI-1 (78 +/- 2.0% at 1 nm). The enhancement observed in the absence of PAI-1 seems to be induced through direct fibrin dissolution by subtilisin NAT. The stronger enhancement by subtilisin NAT of rpPAI-1-enriched fibrin clot lysis seems to involve the cleavage and inactivation of active rpPAI-1. This mechanism is suggested to be important for subtilisin NAT to potentiate fibrinolysis. PMID:11325965

  10. Copper(II) Ions Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Dynamics in Key Structural Regions That Govern Stability.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Joel C; Trelle, Morten Beck; McClintock, Carlee S; Qureshi, Tihami; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2016-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates the fibrinolysis pathway by inhibiting the protease activity of plasminogen activators. PAI-1 works in concert with vitronectin (VN), an extracellular protein that aids in localization of active PAI-1 to tissues. The Peterson laboratory demonstrated that Cu(II) and other transition metals modulate the stability of PAI-1, exhibiting effects that are dependent on the presence or absence of the somatomedin B (SMB) domain of VN. The study presented here dissects the changes in molecular dynamics underlying the destabilizing effects of Cu(II) on PAI-1. We utilize backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to assess PAI-1 dynamics in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions with and without the SMB domain of VN. We show that Cu(II) produces an increase in dynamics in regions important for the function and overall stability of PAI-1, while the SMB domain elicits virtually the opposite effect. A mutant form of PAI-1 lacking two N-terminal histidine residues at positions 2 and 3 exhibits similar increases in dynamics upon Cu(II) binding compared to that of active wild-type PAI-1, indicating that the observed structural effects are not a result of coordination of Cu(II) to these histidine residues. Finally, addition of Cu(II) results in an acceleration of the local unfolding kinetics of PAI-1 presumed to be on pathway to the latency conversion. The effect of ligands on the dynamics of PAI-1 adds another intriguing dimension to the mechanisms for regulation of PAI-1 stability and function. PMID:27416303

  11. Effects of Lewis lung carcinoma on trabecular microstructural changes in wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone is a major target organ of metastasis. The present study investigated the effects of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) on trabecular microstructural changes, using tomographic analysis, in distal femur and lumbar 4 vertebra from LLC-bearing wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) defi...

  12. Effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient and wild-type mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1-/-) and wildtype mice (C57BL/6J background) fed the AIN93G diet or that diet modified with 45% calories from fat. The high-fat diet i...

  13. Defect of vacuolar protein sorting stimulates proteolytic processing of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael; Romanova, Nina; Sokolov, Sviatoslav; Iline, Anna; Kalebina, Tatyana; Gellissen, Gerd; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is poorly secreted by yeast cells. Here, we have selected Hansenula polymorpha mutants with increased productivity of active extracellular uPA. Several of the obtained mutants also demonstrated a defect of sorting of carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole and the mutant loci have been identified in six of them. All these mutations damaged genes involved in protein traffic between the Golgi apparatus and the vacuole, namely PEP3, VPS8, VPS10, VPS17, and VPS35. We have shown that inactivation of the VPS10 gene encoding the vacuolar protein sorting receptor does not increase uPA secretion but stimulates its proteolytic processing. PMID:16181812

  14. Clearance of the heavy and light polypeptide chains of human tissue-type plasminogen activator in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rijken, D C; Emeis, J J

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess which part of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) molecule should be (genetically) modified to obtain more-slowly-clearing mutants, two-chain t-PA and its isolated heavy and light chains were radiolabelled and injected into rats. The vast majority of t-PA and the heavy chain disappeared from the blood circulation with half-lives of 2.3 and 1.0 min respectively. The clearance of the light chain was biphasic, owing to complex-formation with plasma proteinase inhibitors. The disappearance of di-isopropylphospho-light chain, which has a blocked active site, was nearly monophasic, with a half-life of 5.7 min. Organ distribution studies showed that hepatic clearance constituted the major pathway in all cases. These results strongly suggest that t-PA is recognized by the liver primarily through the heavy chain. PMID:3099771

  15. Hypoxia-ischemia or excitotoxin-induced tissue plasminogen activator- dependent gelatinase activation in mice neonate brain microvessels.

    PubMed

    Omouendze, Priscilla L; Henry, Vincent J; Porte, Baptiste; Dupré, Nicolas; Carmeliet, Peter; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and excitotoxicity are validated causes of neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor-mediated pathways. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from neonates in culture, contain and release more t-PA and gelatinases upon glutamate challenge than adult cells. We have studied t-PA to gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activity links in HI and excitotoxicity lesion models in 5 day-old pups in wild type and in t-PA or its inhibitor (PAI-1) genes inactivated mice. Gelatinolytic activities were detected in SDS-PAGE zymograms and by in situ fluorescent DQ-gelatin microscopic zymographies. HI was achieved by unilateral carotid ligature followed by a 40 min hypoxia (8%O₂). Excitotoxic lesions were produced by intra parenchymal cortical (i.c.) injections of 10 µg ibotenate (Ibo). Gel zymograms in WT cortex revealed progressive extinction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities near day 15 or day 8 respectively. MMP-2 expression was the same in all strains while MMP-9 activity was barely detectable in t-PA⁻/⁻ and enhanced in PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice. HI or Ibo produced activation of MMP-2 activities 6 hours post-insult, in cortices of WT mice but not in t-PA⁻/⁻ mice. In PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice, HI or vehicle i.c. injection increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. In situ zymograms using DQ-gelatin revealed vessel associated gelatinolytic activity in lesioned areas in PAI-1⁻/⁻ and in WT mice. In WT brain slices incubated ex vivo, glutamate (200 µM) induced DQ-gelatin activation in vessels. The effect was not detected in t-PA⁻/⁻ mice, but was restored by concomitant exposure to recombinant t-PA (20 µg/mL). In summary, neonatal brain lesion paradigms and ex vivo excitotoxic glutamate evoked t-PA-dependent gelatinases activation in vessels. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities appeared t-PA-dependent. The data suggest that vascular directed protease inhibition may have neuroprotection

  16. Cytokines induce urokinase-dependent adhesion of human myeloid cells. A regulatory role for plasminogen activator inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, D A; Sailor, L Z; Chapman, H A

    1993-01-01

    Differentiation of monocytic precursors often results in adhesive properties thought to be important in migration. In this study, the influence of cytokines, known to induce macrophage differentiation, on the adhesiveness of the monocytic cell line U937 was examined in vitro. Despite development of a macrophage morphology, < 5% of cytokine-stimulated U937 cells were adherent at 24 h. Addition of 1-10 nM urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) induced adherence in the presence of transforming growth factor type beta-1, 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D3, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, or tumor necrosis factor alpha. uPA-dependent adhesiveness was reversible after 24 h of stimulation with cytokines and uPA as adherence was prevented by the subsequent addition of anti-uPA antibodies. Adherence induced by diisopropylfluorophosphate-inactivated uPA was severalfold greater than that seen with active uPA. This difference was largely due to cell-surface turnover of active uPA complexed with plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). These data indicate that cytokines prime monocyte progenitors for uPA receptor-mediated signals leading to adherence, continued uPA receptor occupancy is required for adherence, and PAI decreases adherence by promoting clearance of uPA/PAI complexes. Thus the interaction of uPA and PAI at the cell surface, known to affect extracellular matrix proteolysis and hence myeloid cell migration, also regulates adhesion. The coordinated regulation of these two uPA functions by PAI may enhance the migratory potential of monocytic cells. Images PMID:8386190

  17. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Elicit Anti-Tumorigenic and Anti-Angiogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Placencio, Veronica R.; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Miyata, Toshio; DeClerck, Yves A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown a paradoxical positive correlation between elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitior-1 (PAI-1) in tumors and blood of cancer patients with poor clinical outcome, suggesting that PAI-1 could be a therapeutic target. Here we tested two orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitors of PAI-1 (TM5275 and TM5441) for their efficacy in pre-clinical models of cancer. We demonstrated that these inhibitors decreased cell viability in several human cancer cell lines with an IC50 in the 9.7 to 60.3 μM range and induced intrinsic apoptosis at concentrations of 50 μM. In vivo, oral administration of TM5441 (20 mg/kg daily) to HT1080 and HCT116 xenotransplanted mice increased tumor cell apoptosis and had a significant disruptive effect on the tumor vasculature that was associated with a decrease in tumor growth and an increase in survival that, however, were not statistically significant. Pharmacokinetics studies indicated an average peak plasma concentration of 11.4 μM one hour after oral administration and undetectable levels 23 hours after administration. The effect on tumor vasculature in vivo was further examined in endothelial cells (EC) in vitro and this analysis indicated that both TM5275 and TM5441 inhibited EC branching in a 3D Matrigel assay at concentrations where they had little effect on EC apoptosis. These studies bring novel insight on the activity of PAI-1 inhibitors and provide important information for the future design of inhibitors targeting PAI-1 as therapeutic agents in cancer. PMID:26207899

  18. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  19. Clinical significance of the plasminogen activator system in relation to grade of tumor and treatment response in colorectal carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Halamkova, J; Kiss, I; Pavlovsky, Z; Tomasek, J; Jarkovsky, J; Cech, Z; Tucek, S; Hanakova, L; Moulis, M; Zavrelova, J; Man, M; Benda, P; Robek, O; Kala, Z; Penka, M

    2011-01-01

    Urokinase (uPA) plays an essential role in the activation of plasminogen to plasmin, and together with its receptor (uPAR), tissue activator (tPA) and urokinase inhibitors (PAI 1, PAI 2, PAI 3 and protease nexin) forms the plasminogen activator system (PAS), a component of metastatic cascade importantly contributing to the invasive growth and angiogenesis of malignant tumours. In our project we examined the expression of uPA, uPAR, PAI 1 and PAI 2 in tumor tissue and we also studied the plasma levels of PAI 1 before and after the initiation of therapy in patients with colorectal carcinoma in relationship to grade of tumor and the treatment response. In our prospective evaluation we included 80 patients treated for adenocarcinoma of the colon and rectum. Analysis of collected data revealed statistically significant evidence of a relationship between the level of PAI 1 in plasma before treatment and grade of the tumor, which increases with tumor grade (p=0.025). We demonstrated that there exists a statistically significant relationship between the expression of PAI 2 (p<0.001) and uPAR (p=0.031) and grade of tumor. We also confirmed a statistically significant relationship between soluble levels of PAI 1 before treatment and therapeutic response (p=0.021). In our group of patients the expression of uPA, uPAR, PAI 1 and 2 in tumor tissue in relation to response to treatment was also assessed. Our results suggest that the greater expression of these parameters in tumor tissue is linked to a worse response to therapy. In conclusion, PAS factors help as a prognostic indicators and could also act as a predictive factor in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:21744990

  20. Repurposing an Old Drug to Improve the Use and Safety of Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration–approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Minocycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that has been found to be a neuroprotective agent in preclinical ischemic stroke models. Minocycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9, a biomarker for ICH associated with tPA use. Minocycline is also an anti-inflammatory agent and inhibits poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Minocycline has been safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:20410869

  1. Effect of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin expression on growth and specific tissue plasminogen activator productivity in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pendse, G.J.; Bailey, J.E. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that secretion of cloned proteins synthesized by recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells can be adenosine triphosphate (ATP) limited. Other research indicates that the presence of cloned Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) enhances ATP production in oxygen-limited Escherichia coli. To evaluate the influence of VHb expression on recombinant CHO cell productivity, the vhb gene has been fused to the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter and cloned in a CHO cell line previously engineered to express human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Western blot analysis confirms dexamethasone-inducible VHb expression in all of the clones tested. Batch cultivation experiments with one VHb-expressing clone and the parental CHO-tPA cells show a reduced specific growth rate in the VHb-expressing cells. The VHb-expressing clone exhibits specific tPA production 40 to 100% greater than the parental CHO-tPA culture.

  2. Repurposing an old drug to improve the safety and use of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C; Fagan, Susan

    2014-01-01

    There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Minocycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic that has been found to be a neuroprotective agent in preclinical ischemic stroke models. Minocycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9, a biomarker for ICH associated with tPA use. Minocycline is also an anti-inflammatory agent and inhibits poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase- 1. Minocycline has been safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:20575623

  3. Excessive Fibrin Deposition in Nasal Polyps Caused by Fibrinolytic Impairment through Reduction of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression

    PubMed Central

    Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Kato, Atsushi; Peters, Anju T.; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick; Norton, James; Grammer, Leslie C.; Tan, Bruce K.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Conley, David B.; Kern, Robert C.; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Nasal polyps (NPs) are characterized by intense edema or formation of pseudocysts filled with plasma proteins, mainly albumin. However, the mechanisms underlying NP retention of plasma proteins in their submucosa remain unclear. Objectives: We hypothesized that formation of a fibrin mesh retains plasma proteins in NPs. We assessed the fibrin deposition and expression of the components of the fibrinolytic system in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Methods: We assessed fibrin deposition in nasal tissue from patients with CRS and control subjects by means of immunofluorescence. Fibrinolytic components, d-dimer, and plasminogen activators were measured using ELISA, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. We also performed gene expression and protein quantification analysis in cultured airway epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: Immunofluorescence data showed profound fibrin deposition in NP compared with uncinate tissue (UT) from patients with CRS and control subjects. Levels of the cross-linked fibrin cleavage product protein, d-dimer, were significantly decreased in NP compared with UT from patients with CRS and control subjects, suggesting reduced fibrinolysis (P < 0.05). Expression levels of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) mRNA and protein were significantly decreased in NP compared with UT from patients with CRS and control subjects (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated clear reduction of t-PA in NP, primarily in the epithelium and glands. Th2 cytokine–stimulated cultured airway epithelial cells showed down-regulation of t-PA, suggesting a potential Th2 mechanism in NP. Conclusions: A Th2-mediated reduction of t-PA might lead to excessive fibrin deposition in the submucosa of NP, which might contribute to the tissue remodeling and pathogenesis of CRS with nasal polyps. PMID:23155140

  4. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  5. Hypotensive, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Diuretic Activities of the Aqueous-methanol Extract of Ipomoea reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Qaiser; Aslam, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Ipomoea reniformis Roxb. (Convolvulaceae) is a small, weedy herb used for the management of cardiac problems in traditional systems of medicine in India and Pakistan. Objective of the present study was to investigate the hypotensive, diuretic and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of the aqueous-methanol (30:70) crude extract of the dried aerial parts of I. reniformis (Ir.Cr.) in rats. To record blood pressure lowering effects of the Ir.Cr, different doses of the extract were administered through jugular vein to the ketamine-diazepam anesthetized normotensive rats and blood pressure was recorded via carotid artery. ACE inhibitory activity of the extract was studied in-vitro; using hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine as substrate, the product hippurate was quantified spectrophotometrically after reacting with cyanuric chloride/dioxane reagent. Effects of intraperitoneal administration of the extract on urine and urinary electrolyte excretion were also investigated in rats. The extract (Ir.Cr.) produced 21.51 ± 3.41, 28.99 ± 2.30, 53.34 ± 0.88 and 61.71 ± 3.37% fall in mean arterial blood pressure of the anesthetized rats at the doses of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/Kg, respectively. Ir.Cr. was found to have serum ACE inhibitory activity, with IC50 value of 422 ± 21.16 μg/mL. The extract also increased urine volume and urinary Na+ excretion significantly at the doses of 30 and 50 mg/Kg in rats. The study concludes that the crude extract of Ipomoea reniformis (Ir.Cr.) has hypotensive, ACE inhibitory and diuretic activities, which provide the scientific justification for the traditional uses of the plant as cardioprotective, antihypertensive and diuretic remedy. PMID:24523757

  6. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  7. CCl4 induces tissue-type plasminogen activator in rat brain; protective effects of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Lavrentiadou, Sophia N; Tsantarliotou, Maria P; Zervos, Ioannis A; Nikolaidis, Efstathios; Georgiadis, Marios P; Taitzoglou, Ioannis A

    2013-11-01

    The high metabolic rate and relatively low antioxidant defenses of the lipid-rich brain tissue render it highly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, whereas the implication of ROS in the pathogenesis of several diseases in the central nervous system is well-established. The plasminogen activator (PA) system is a key modulator of extracellular proteolysis, extracellular matrix remodeling and neuronal cell signaling and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases. This study evaluates the role of tissue-type PA (t-PA) in oxidative stress and the protective role of dietary antioxidants in the rat brain. We used the CCl4 experimental model of ROS-induced lipid peroxidation and evaluated the antioxidant effect of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E. CCl4-treated Wistar rats exhibited elevated brain t-PA activity, which was decreased upon long-term administration of oregano, rosemary or vitamin E. PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity was also slightly elevated by CCl4, but this increase was not affected by the antioxidants. We hypothesize that the CCl4-induced t-PA activity indicates extracellular proteolytic activity that may be linked to neuronal cell death and brain damage. Vitamin E or antioxidants present in oregano or rosemary are effective in inhibiting t-PA elevation and can be considered as a potential protection against neuronal damage. PMID:23831191

  8. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation. PMID:25683686

  9. Interferon-alpha 2b increases fibrolysis in fibrotic livers from bile duct ligated rats: possible participation of the plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fragoso, L; González, M P; Muriel, P

    1995-12-01

    Interferons are known to prevent liver collagen by an antifibrogenic mechanism that involves mRNA procollagen regulation. The aim of the present work was to determine whether interferon could also decrease collagen by increasing its degradation. Fibrosis was induced in male Wistar rats by double ligation and section of the common bile duct. Interferon-alpha 2b (100,000 IU/rat s.c.) was administered to bile duct ligated rats daily after surgery for 4 weeks. Interferon increased the capacity of the liver to degrade type I and III collagens and matrigel. In addition, the plasminogen activator activity also increased. Since plasminogens are thought to be key participants in the balance of proteolytic activities that regulate extracellular matrix degradation, their elevation may also provide another antifibrotic (proteolytic) mechanism of action of interferon. PMID:8966190

  10. Conformations of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) orchestrate neuronal survival by a crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, T; Lesept, F; Chevilley, A; Lenoir, S; Aimable, M; Briens, A; Hommet, Y; Bardou, I; Parcq, J; Vivien, D

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a pleiotropic serine protease of the central nervous system (CNS) with reported neurotrophic and neurotoxic functions. Produced and released under its single chain form (sc), the sc-tPA can be cleaved by plasmin or kallikrein in a two chain form, tc-tPA. Although both sc-tPA and tc-tPA display a similar fibrinolytic activity, we postulated here that these two conformations of tPA (sc-tPA and tc-tPA) could differentially control the effects of tPA on neuronal survival. Using primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons, our present study reveals that sc-tPA is the only one capable to promote N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced calcium influx and subsequent excitotoxicity. In contrast, both sc-tPA and tc-tPA are capable to activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), a mechanism mediating the antiapoptotic effects of tPA. Interestingly, we revealed a tPA dependent crosstalk between EGFR and NMDAR in which a tPA-dependent activation of EGFRs leads to downregulation of NMDAR signaling and to subsequent neurotrophic effects. PMID:26469972

  11. High-level expression of a novel recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) in the milk of transgenic rabbits and its thrombolytic bioactivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozheng; Ge, Xin; Cheng, Yaobin; Lu, Rui; Zhang, Ting; Yu, Baoli; Ji, Xueqiao; Qi, Zhengqiang; Rong, Yao; Yuan, Yuguo; Cheng, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a key kinase of fibrinolysis that plays an important role in dissolving fibrin clots to promote thrombolysis. The recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) has more thrombolytic advantages than the wild type tPA. To increase the half-life and thrombolytic activity of tPA, a mutant containing only the essential K2 fibrin-binding and P activating plasminogen domains of the wild type tPA was cloned. This fragment was then inserted into goat β-casein regulatory sequences. Then, a mammary gland-specific expression vector, PCL25/rhPA, was constructed, and the transgenic rabbits were generated. In this study, 18 live transgenic founders (12♀, 6♂) were generated using pronuclear microinjection. Six transgenic rabbits were obtained, and the expression levels of rhPA in the milk had a range of 15.2-630 µg/ml. A fibrin agarose plate assay of rhPA showed that it had strong thrombolytic bioactivity in vitro, and the highest specific activity was >360 (360 times more than that of alteplase). The results indicated that the rhPA containing only the K2 and P domains is efficiently expressed with higher thrombolytic bioactivity in the milk of transgenic rabbits. Our study also demonstrated a new method for the large-scale production of clinically relevant recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in the mammary glands of transgenic rabbits. PMID:27230577

  12. Anti-tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as an effective therapy of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia with and without inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is an important cause of neurodevelopmental deficits in neonates. Intrauterine infection and the ensuing fetal inflammatory responses augment hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and attenuate the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia. Here, we review evidences from preclinical studies suggesting that the induction of brain parenchymal tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) plays an important pathogenic role in these conditions. Moreover, administration of a stable-mutant form of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 called CPAI confers potent protection against hypoxic-ischemic injury with and without inflammation via different mechanisms. Besides intracerebroventricular injection, CPAI can also be administered into the brain using a noninvasive intranasal delivery strategy, adding to its applicability in clinical use. In sum, the therapeutic potential of CPAI in neonatal care merits further investigation with large-animal models of hypoxia-ischemia and cerebral palsy. PMID:25475942

  13. Nucleotide sequence of the plasminogen activator gene of Yersinia pestis: relationship to ompT of Escherichia coli and gene E of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Sodeinde, O A; Goguen, J D

    1989-05-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the 1.4-kilobase DNA fragment containing the plasminogen activator gene (pla) of Yersinia pestis, which determines both plasminogen activator and coagulase activities of the species. The sequence revealed the presence of a 936-base-pair open reading frame that constitutes the pla gene. This reading frame encodes a 312-amino-acid protein of 34.6 kilodaltons and containing a putative 20-amino-acid signal sequence. The presence of a single large open reading frame is consistent with our previous conclusion that the two Pla proteins which appear in the outer membrane of pla+ Y. pestis are derived from a common precursor. The deduced amino acid sequence of Pla revealed that it possesses a high degree of homology to the products of gene E of Salmonella typhimurium and ompT of Escherichia coli but does not possess significant homology to other plasminogen activators of known sequence. We also identified a transcription unit that resides on the complimentary strand and overlaps the pla gene. PMID:2651310

  14. [Massive endocardial thrombosis in a patient with a peritoneo-jugular shunt for refractory ascites: the therapeutic success of tissue plasminogen activator and defibrotide].

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, C; Pederzoli, S; Tamborrino, E; Grandi, M

    1994-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient with a refractory ascites due to extrahepatic portal thrombosis in course of idiopathic thrombocythemia. A peritoneovenous shunt was applied and as a late complication a massive thrombosis of the intracardiac portion of the duct developed. Thrombolysis was obtained with tissue plasminogen activator at doses usually administered for acute myocardial infarction. Prophylaxis of recurrence was pursued with pictomide and defibrotide. PMID:8079040

  15. Risk factors associated with serum levels of the inflammatory biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in a general population.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Thomas H; Kallemose, Thomas; Ladelund, Steen; Rasmussen, Line Jh; Thorball, Christian W; Andersen, Ove; Pisinger, Charlotta; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker of mortality risk in various patient populations. However, little is known about the implications of lifestyle for suPAR levels in the general population. Lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor data were collected from 5,538 participants in the Danish population-based Inter99 study. Their suPAR levels were measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the final adjusted model, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher suPAR levels (P < 0.001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population. Diet and alcohol consumption also seemed to impact suPAR levels. Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers. PMID:25574132

  16. Glioma-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) regulates the recruitment of LRP1 positive mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananya; Coum, Antoine; Marinescu, Voichita D; Põlajeva, Jelena; Smits, Anja; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Tchougounova, Elena

    2015-09-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a high-grade glioma with a complex microenvironment, including various inflammatory cells and mast cells (MCs) as one of them. Previously we had identified glioma grade-dependent MC recruitment. In the present study we investigated the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in MC recruitment.PAI-1, a primary regulator in the fibrinolytic cascade is capable of forming a complex with fibrinolytic system proteins together with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We found that neutralizing PAI-1 attenuated infiltration of MCs. To address the potential implication of LRP1 in this process, we used a LRP1 antagonist, receptor-associated protein (RAP), and demonstrated the attenuation of MC migration. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of PAI-1 in a large cohort of human glioma samples was observed. Our study demonstrated the expression of LRP1 in human MC line LAD2 and in MCs in human high-grade glioma. The activation of potential PAI-1/LRP1 axis with purified PAI-1 promoted increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and subsequently exocytosis in MCs.These findings indicate the influence of the PAI-1/LRP1 axis on the recruitment of MCs in glioma. The connection between high-grade glioma and MC infiltration could contribute to patient tailored therapy and improve patient stratification in future therapeutic trials. PMID:26164207

  17. Risk Factors Associated with Serum Levels of the Inflammatory Biomarker Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Thomas H; Kallemose, Thomas; Ladelund, Steen; Rasmussen, Line JH; Thorball, Christian W; Andersen, Ove; Pisinger, Charlotta; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker of mortality risk in various patient populations. However, little is known about the implications of lifestyle for suPAR levels in the general population. Lifestyle, demographic, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor data were collected from 5,538 participants in the Danish population-based Inter99 study. Their suPAR levels were measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the final adjusted model, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher suPAR levels (P < 0.001). An unhealthy diet and alcohol abstinence in men were also associated with higher suPAR levels. Physical activity in leisure time had a modest impact on suPAR levels in univariate analysis, but not in the final adjusted model. In conclusion, smoking and morbid obesity were strongly associated with higher serum suPAR levels in this general population. Diet and alcohol consumption also seemed to impact suPAR levels. Lifestyle changes are likely to affect suPAR since ex-smokers had suPAR levels comparable to those of never-smokers. PMID:25574132

  18. Toxicogenomic analysis of mainstream tobacco smoke-exposed mice reveals repression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene in heart.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina; Stampfli, Martin R; Berndt-Weis, Lynn; Williams, Andrew; Douglas, George R; Yauk, Carole L

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is associated with cardiovascular pathology. However, the molecular mechanisms of tobacco smoke exposure that lead to initiation or exacerbation of cardiovascular disease are unclear. In this study, the effects of mainstream tobacco smoke (MTS) on global transcription in the heart were investigated. Male C57B1/CBA mice were exposed to MTS from 2 cigarettes daily, 5 days/wk for 6 or 12 wk. Mice were sacrificed immediately, or 6 wk following the last cigarette. High-density DNA microarrays were used to characterize global gene expression changes in whole heart. Fifteen genes were significantly differentially expressed following exposure to MTS. Among these genes, cytochrome P-450 1A1 (Cyp1A1) was upregulated by 12-fold, and Serpine-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, PAI-1) was downregulated by 1.7-fold. Concomitant increase in Cyp1A1 protein levels and decrease in total and active PAI-1 protein was observed in tissue extracts by Western blot assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Observed changes were transient and were partially reversed during break periods. Thus, gene expression profiling of heart tissue revealed a novel cardiovascular mechanism operating in response to MTS. Our results suggest a potential role for PAI-1 in MTS-induced cardiovascular pathology. PMID:18925475

  19. The human urokinase-plasminogen activator gene (PLAU) is located on chromosome 10q24 centromeric to the HOX11 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, P.M.; Stass, S.A.; Kagan, J. )

    1993-04-01

    Urokinase-plasminogen activator is one of two soluble serine proteases that are produced by humans and that convert plasminogen, an inactive proenzyme present in plasma and other extracellular fluids, to plasmin, a protease with broad substrate specificities. Its activity is involved in processes requiring localized extracellular proteolysis such as fibrinolysis, tissue remodeling, and cell migration. Increased production of urokinase has been associated with cancer metastases. The gene for urokinase-plasminogen activator, PLAU, was mapped to chromosome 10q24-qter. By employing somatic cell genetics, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and Southern blot analysis, the authors assign PLAU to chromosome 10q24. Human chromosome segment 10q23-q25 contains the genes for terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase, cytochrome P450IIC, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, and plasma retinol binding protein, which form a syntenic group on murine chromosome 19. It is therfore of interest that PLAU and glutamate dehydrogenase, which are on murine chromosome 14, also map in or close to this region of human chromosome 10.

  20. Enhancement or Suppression of ACE Inhibitory Activity by a Mixture of Tea and Foods for Specified Health Uses (FOSHU) That Are Marketed as "Support for Normal Blood Pressure".

    PubMed

    Murakami, Isao; Hosono, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shigeto; Kurihara, Junichi; Itagaki, Fumio; Watanabe, Machiko

    2011-01-01

    The ACE inhibitory activities of mixtures of FOSHUs (Healthya, Goma-Mugicha, Lapis Support and Ameal) were examined in order to identify any antihypertensive interactions. Among combinations of Healthya with other samples that contain active peptides, only that with Ameal was found to have no inhibitory activity. Enhanced activity was observed in 2 other mixtures. The activity of a mixture of tea polyphenols and the whey component extracted from an Ameal solution was significantly decreased, thus demonstrating that whey protein lowered the ACE inhibitory activity of Healthya. Although oral administration of tea polyphenols alone significantly decreased SBP in SHR at 2 and 4 hr, combined administration with Ameal failed to decrease SBP at the same time points. In conclusion, the simultaneous intake of tea and FOSHUs that contain active peptides might affect daily self-antihypertensive management via enhancement or suppression of ACE inhibitory activity. PMID:22389857

  1. Hemothorax under thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue: plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in a 16-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Varnholt, V; Ringe, H; Nietsch, L; Gaedicke, G

    1999-12-01

    We present the case of a 16-year-old girl with an extended thrombosis of the femoral and iliac vein and the inferior vena cava during pleuropneumonia; predisposing risk factors for thrombophilia were: use of contraceptives, nicotine abuse and congenital deficiency of antithrombin III (not previously diagnosed). Thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA; initial dose: 0.08 mg/kg/h) was started. 2 days later--after diagnosis of an extended hemothorax: 1500 ml blood were obtained after thoracocentesis, transfusion of packed red blood cells was necessary--rt-PA was stopped, with only heparin (400 U/kg/d) being administered. 36 h later--the thrombosis had not yet changed--the thrombolytic therapy with rt-PA was continued in a markedly reduced dose (0.015 mg/kg/d) with no further bleeding complications. 8 days later--after successful thrombolysis--t-PA was stopped, heparin was given for another 10 days, then cumarin was administered orally. PMID:10650854

  2. Development of Genetically Modified Chinese Hamster Ovary Host Cells for the Enhancement of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rahimpour, Azam; Ahani, Roshanak; Najaei, Azita; Adeli, Ahmad; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used host system for the expression of high quality recombinant proteins. However, the development of stable, high-yielding CHO cell lines is a major bottleneck in the industrial manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Therefore, different strategies such as the generation of more efficient expression vectors and establishment of genetically engineered host cells have been employed to increase the efficiency of cell line development. In order to examine the possibility of generating improved CHO host cells, cell line engineering approaches were developed based on ceramide transfer protein (CERT), and X-box binding protein 1s (XBP1s). Methods CHO cells were transfected with CERT S132A, a mutant variant of CERT which is resistant to phosphorylation, or XBP1s expression plasmids, and then stable cell pools were generated. Transient expression of t-PA was examined in engineered cell pools in comparison to un-modified CHO host cells. Results Overexpression of CERT S132A led to the enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) expression in transient expression by 50%. On the other hand, it was observed that the ectopic expression of the XBP1s, did not improve the t-PA expression level. Conclusion The results obtained in this study indicate successful development of the improved CHO host cells through CERT S132A overexpression. PMID:27547109

  3. Establishment of a rat model of lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis using intraarticular injection of urinary plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar facet joint (LFJ) osteoarthritis (OA) is an important etiology of low back pain. Several animal models of LFJ OA have been established using intraarticular injection of various chemicals. This study aimed to establish a rat model of LFJ OA using urinary plasminogen activator (uPA). Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with intraarticular injection in the L5-L6 facet joints with uPA (OA group, n = 40) or normal saline (vehicle group, n = 40). Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hind paws were evaluated using von Frey hairs and a thermoalgesia instrument, respectively. Toluidine blue staining, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunohistochemical examination of the LFJ was performed. Treatment with uPA induced cartilage damage, synovitis, and proliferation of synovial cells in the fact joints. The OA group showed significantly higher hyperalgesia in the hind paws in comparison with the vehicle group and normal controls (P < 0.05). Expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS in the LFJ cartilage in the OA group was significantly increased (P < 0.05). A rat model of LFJ OA was successfully established using intraarticular injection of uPA. This animal model is convenient and shows good resemblance to human OA pathology. PMID:25892493

  4. Intraocular Lens Opacification following Intracameral Injection of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator to Treat Inflammatory Membranes after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon S. M.; Islam, Niaz M.; Zambarakji, Hadi J.; Khoramnia, Ramin; Auffarth, Gerd U.; Parmar, Dipak N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report 7 cases of intraocular lens (IOL) opacification following treatment of postoperative anterior chamber fibrin with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) after cataract surgery. Methods. Retrospective case series of 7 eyes in 7 patients who developed IOL opacification after receiving rtPA for anterior chamber inflammatory membrane formation resulting from phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Three explanted IOLs were investigated with light microscopy, histochemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray spectrometry. Results. All patients underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery and posterior chamber hydrophilic IOL implantation. Anterior chamber inflammatory membranes developed between 1 and 4 weeks of surgery and were treated with intracameral rtPA. IOL opacification was noted between 4 weeks and 6 years after rtPA treatment with reduced visual acuity, and IOL exchange was carried out in 3 patients. Light microscopy evaluation revealed diffuse fine granular deposits on the anterior surface/subsurface of IOL optic that stained positive for calcium salts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) confirmed the presence of calcium and phosphate on the IOL. Conclusions. Intracameral rtPA, though rapidly effective in the treatment of anterior chamber inflammatory membranes following cataract surgery, may be associated with IOL opacification. PMID:25861464

  5. Mutation of the protein-O-mannosyltransferase enhances secretion of the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael O; Sokolov, Sviatoslav S; Romanova, Nina V; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Kim, So-Young; Kalebina, Tatyana S; Choi, Eui-Sung; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D

    2005-10-15

    Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is poorly secreted and aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of yeast cells due to inefficient folding. A screen for Hansenula polymorpha mutants with improved uPA secretion revealed a gene encoding a homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein-O-mannosyltransferase Pmt1p. Expression of the H. polymorpha PMT1 gene (HpPMT1) abolished temperature sensitivity of the S. cerevisiae pmt1 pmt2 double mutant. As in S. cerevisiae, inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene affected electrophoretic mobility of the O-glycosylated protein, extracellular chitinase. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, disruption of HpPMT1 alone caused temperature sensitivity. Inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene decreased intracellular aggregation of uPA, suggesting that enhanced secretion of uPA was due to improvement of its folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Unlike most of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins, HpPmt1p possesses the C-terminal KDEL retention signal. PMID:16200504

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, James; Bordin Barbieri, Natália; Weinmann, Tobias; Ziegelmann, Patricia K.; Duncan, Bruce B.; Inês Schmidt, Maria

    2016-01-01

    An emerging body of evidence has implicated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), though findings have not always been consistent. We systematically reviewed epidemiological studies examining the association of PAI-1 with T2D. EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify studies for inclusion. Fifty-two studies (44 cross-sectional with 47 unique analytical comparisons and 8 prospective) were included. In pooled random-effects analyses of prospective studies, a comparison of the top third vs. bottom third of baseline PAI-1 values generated a RR of T2D of 1.67 (95% CI 1.28–2.18) with moderate heterogeneity (I2 = 38%). Additionally, of 47 cross-sectional comparisons, 34(72%) reported significantly elevated PAI-1 among diabetes cases versus controls, 2(4%) reported significantly elevated PAI-1 among controls, and 11(24%) reported null effects. Results from pooled analyses of prospective studies did not differ substantially by study design, length of follow-up, adjustment for various putative confounding factors, or study quality, and were robust to sensitivity analyses. Findings from this systematic review of the available epidemiological literature support a link between PAI-1 and T2D, independent of established diabetes risk factors. Given the moderate size of the association and heterogeneity across studies, future prospective studies are warranted. PMID:26813008

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Intraarterial Treatment as an Adjunct to Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leppert, Michelle H; Campbell, Jonathan D; Simpson, Jennifer R; Burke, James F

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The objective of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of intraarterial treatment within the 0- to 6- hour window after intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 0- to 4.5-hours compared to IV tPA alone, in the US setting and from a social perspective. Methods A decision analytic model estimated the lifetime costs and outcomes associated with the additional benefit of intraarterial therapy compared to standard treatment with IV tPA alone. Model inputs were obtained from published literature, the MR CLEAN study, and claims databases in the United States. Health outcomes were measured in quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Treatment benefit was assessed by calculating the cost per QALY gained. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate the overall uncertainty of model results. Results The addition of intraarterial therapy compared with standard treatment alone yielded a lifetime gain of 0.7 QALY for an additional cost of $9,911, which resulted in a cost of $14,137 per QALY. Multivariable sensitivity analysis predicted cost-effectiveness (≤$50,000 per QALY) in 97.6% of simulation runs. Conclusion Intraarterial treatment after IV tPA for patients with anterior circulation strokes within the 6 hour window is likely cost effective. From a societal perspective, increased investment in access to intraarterial treatment for acute stroke may be justified. PMID:26012639

  8. Left ventricular apical thrombus after systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in a patient with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Doepp, Florian; Sanad, Wasiem; Schreiber, Stephan J; Baumann, Gert; Borges, Adrian C

    2005-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is an established treatment in acute stroke. To prevent rethrombosis after rtPA therapy, secondary anticoagulation with heparin is commonly performed. However, the recommended time-point and extent of heparin treatment vary and are not well investigated. Case presentation We report a 61-year-old man who developed an acute global aphasia and right-sided hemiparesis. Cranial CT was normal and systemic thrombolytic therapy with tPA was started 120 minutes after symptom onset. Low-dose subcutaneous heparin treatment was initiated 24 hours later. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) 12 hours after admission showed slightly reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) but was otherwise normal. 48 hours later the patient suddenly deteriorated with clinical signs of dyspnea and tachycardia. TTE revelead a large left ventricular apical thrombus as well as a reduction of LVEF to 20 %. Serial further TTE investigations demonstrated a complete resolution of the thrombus and normalisation of LVEF within two days. Conclusion Our case demonstrates an intracardiac thrombus formation following rtPA treatment of acute stroke, probably caused by secondary hypercoagulability. Rethrombosis or new thrombus formation might be an underestimated complication of rtPA therapy and potentially explain cases of secondary stroke progression. PMID:15918893

  9. Multifunctional roles of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in cancer stemness and chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Stepanova, Victoria; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Holterman, AiXuan L.; Estes, Norman; Cines, Douglas B.; Rao, Jasti S.; Gondi, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is almost always lethal. One of the underlying reasons for this lethality is believed to be the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC), which impart chemoresistance and promote recurrence, but the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Recently the poor prognosis of PDAC has been correlated with increased expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). In the present study we examine the role of uPA in the generation of PDAC CSC. We observe a subset of cells identifiable as a side population (SP) when sorted by flow cytometry of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells that possess the properties of CSC. A large fraction of these SP cells are CD44 and CD24 positive, are gemcitabine resistant, possess sphere-forming ability, and exhibit increased tumorigenicity, known characteristics of cancer stemness. Increased tumorigenicity and gemcitabine resistance decrease after suppression of uPA. We observe that uPA interacts directly with transcription factors LIM homeobox-2 (Lhx2), homeobox transcription factor A5 (HOXA5), and Hey to possibly promote cancer stemness. uPA regulates Lhx2 expression by suppressing expression of miR-124 and p53 expression by repressing its promoter by inactivating HOXA5. These results demonstrate that regulation of gene transcription by uPA contributes to cancer stemness and clinical lethality. PMID:23864708

  10. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Treatment with Thrombus Fragmentation and Local Fibrinolysis with Recombinant Human-Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Klaus Wilhelm; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Schnabel, Karl Jakob; Bongartz, Georg; Steinbrich, Wolfgang

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To report the results of thrombus fragmentation in combination with local fibrinolysis using recombinant human-tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Methods: Five patients with massive pulmonary embolism were treated with thrombus fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary injection of rtPA. Clot fragmentation was performed with a guidewire, angiographic catheter, and balloon catheter. Three patients had undergone recent surgery; one of them received a reduced dosage of rtPA. Results: All patients survived and showed clinical improvement with a resultant significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the pulmonary blood pressure (mean systolic pulmonary blood pressure before treatment, 49 mmHg; 4 hr after treatment, 28 mmHg). Angiographic follow-up in three patients revealed a decrease in thrombus material and an increase in pulmonary perfusion. Two patients developed retroperitoneal hematomas requiring transfusion. Conclusion: Clot fragmentation and local fibrinolysis with rtPA was an effective therapy for massive pulmonary embolism. Bleeding at the puncture site was a frequent complication.

  11. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light. [Development associated changes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1984-03-01

    Human fetal fibroblasts have been tested for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than at 8 weeks. However, they exhibited a lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. Enhancement of protease plasminogen activator (PA) was higher after u.v. irradiation in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 weeks than at 12 weeks gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. Excision repair and PA inducibility depended on the tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s).

  12. TNF-alpha, but not IL-6, stimulates plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Plomgaard, Peter; Keller, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2005-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is produced by adipose tissue, and elevated PAI-1 levels in plasma are a risk factor in the metabolic syndrome. We investigated the regulatory effects of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on PAI-1 gene induction in human adipose tissue. Twenty healthy men underwent a 3-h infusion of either recombinant human TNF-alpha (n = 8), recombinant human IL-6 (n = 6), or vehicle (n = 6). Biopsies were obtained from the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue at preinfusion, at 1, 2, and 3 h during the infusion, and at 2 h after the infusion. The mRNA expression of PAI-1 in the adipose tissue was measured using real-time PCR. The plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 reached 18 and 99 pg/ml, respectively, during the infusions. During the TNF-alpha infusion, adipose PAI-1 mRNA expression increased 2.5-fold at 1 h, 6-fold at 2 h, 9-fold at 3 h, and declined to 2-fold 2 h after the infusion stopped but did not change during IL-6 infusion and vehicle. These data demonstrate that TNF-alpha rather than IL-6 stimulates an increase in PAI-1 mRNA in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, suggesting that TNF-alpha may be involved in the pathogenesis of related metabolic disorders. PMID:15677734

  13. Current perspectives on the use of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sherita N; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Johansen, Michelle C; McMurry, Timothy L; Johnston, Karen C; Southerland, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    In 1995, the NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) Stroke Study Group published the results of a large multicenter clinical trial demonstrating efficacy of intravenous tPA by revealing a 30% relative risk reduction (absolute risk reduction 11%–15%) compared with placebo at 90 days in the likelihood of having minimal or no disability. Since approval in 1996, tPA remains the only drug treatment for acute ischemic stroke approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Over the years, an abundance of research and clinical data has supported the safe and efficacious use of intravenous tPA in all eligible patients. Despite such supporting data, it remains substantially underutilized. Challenges to the utilization of tPA include narrow eligibility and treatment windows, risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, perceived lack of efficacy in certain high-risk subgroups, and a limited pool of neurological and stroke expertise in the community. With recent US census data suggesting annual stroke incidence will more than double by 2050, better education and consensus among both the medical and lay public are necessary to optimize the use of tPA for all eligible stroke patients. Ongoing and future research should continue to improve upon the efficacy of tPA through more rapid stroke diagnosis and treatment, refinement of advanced neuroimaging and stroke biomarkers, and successful demonstration of alternative means of reperfusion. PMID:24591838

  14. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I exert different effects on plasminogen activator production or cell growth in the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS.

    PubMed

    Degryse, B; Maisonobe, F; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1991-11-01

    Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) are evaluated for their capacity to affect cell proliferation and plasminogen activator (PA) activity production in an ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS. Insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses induces cell proliferation and increases PA activity. IGF-I, which is also clearly mitogenic for these cells, surprisingly does not modulate PA activity. The results indicate that the growth promoting effect is mediated through the insulin and IGF-I receptors whereas PA activity is solely regulated via the insulin receptors. PMID:1802921

  15. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help diagnose and monitor a disorder called sarcoidosis . People with sarcoidosis may have their ACE level tested regularly to ... normal ACE level may be a sign of sarcoidosis. ACE levels may rise or fall as sarcoidosis ...

  16. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098–4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  17. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  18. Plasminogen activator and serine protease inhibitor-E2 (protease nexin-1) expression by bovine granulosa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingju; Sahmi, Malha; Lussier, Jacques G; Price, Christopher A

    2004-09-01

    Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs during antral follicle growth, and the plasminogen activators (PA) have been implicated in this process in rodents. In the present study, we measured the expression and secretion of PA and the PA inhibitor protease nexin-1 (SerpinE2) in antral and basal bovine granulosa cells from small (<6 mm), medium (6-8 mm), and large follicles (>8 mm) during 6 days of culture in serum-free medium. Casein zymography revealed that the cells secreted predominantly tissue-type PA (tPA) with urokinase (uPA) being associated mainly with cell lysates, and Western blot demonstrated that the cells secreted SerpinE2. Overall, secreted tPA activity was higher in cultures of cells from small follicles compared with large follicles, and secreted SerpinE2 levels were higher in cultures of cells from large follicles. In cultures of cells from small follicles, secreted tPA levels increased with time of culture for antral but not basal cells, and SerpinE2 levels increased with time for basal but not antral cells. In cultures of granulosa cells from large follicles, tPA activity increased significantly with time of culture, whereas SerpinE2 levels decreased. Cell-associated uPA activity decreased with time in cells from medium and large follicles. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot analysis showed that SerpinE2 secretion was regulated largely at the transcriptional level, whereas tPA secretion was not. The data suggest stage-dependent regulation of granulosa cell PA and SerpinE2 production, consistent with a role in ECM remodeling during follicle growth. PMID:15128599

  19. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1-Induced Antibodies Cross-React with Human Plasminogen and Enhance Its Activation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Jessica; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wang, Shuying; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease, and it can cause life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Abnormal activation of the coagulation and fibrinolysis system is one of the hallmarks of DHF/DSS. However, the mechanism underlying hemorrhage in DHF/DSS remains elusive. In previous studies, plasminogen (Plg) cross-reactive Abs, which can recognize DENV nonstructural protein (NS) 1, have been found in dengue patients. However, it is unclear whether these Abs are indeed induced by DENV NS1. Thus, we immunized mice with recombinant NS1 from both bacteria and drosophila to determine whether NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs. The results from the NS1-immunized mouse sera indicated that NS1 immunization induced Abs that could cross-react with Plg. To study the effects of these NS1-induced Plg cross-reactive Abs on fibrinolysis, we isolated several Plg cross-reactive anti-NS1 mAbs from these mice and found that some of them could enhance Plg activation. In addition, epitope mapping with a phage-displayed random peptide library revealed that one of these mAbs (2A5) could recognize NS1 C-terminal residues 305-311, which share sequence homology with Plg residues 590-597. A synthetic peptide of NS1 residues 305-311 could inhibit the binding of both 2A5 and its Fab to Plg and its enhanced activation. Thus, our results suggest that DENV NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs through molecular mimicry, which can enhance Plg activation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS. PMID:26712948

  20. RAM: A Conserved Signaling Network That Regulates Ace2p Transcriptional Activity and Polarized MorphogenesisD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Bryce; Kurischko, Cornelia; Horecka, Joe; Mody, Manali; Nair, Pradeep; Pratt, Lana; Zougman, Alexandre; McBroom, Linda D.B.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Boone, Charlie; Luca, Francis C.

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, polarized morphogenesis is critical for bud site selection, bud development, and cell separation. The latter is mediated by Ace2p transcription factor, which controls the daughter cell-specific expression of cell separation genes. Recently, a set of proteins that include Cbk1p kinase, its binding partner Mob2p, Tao3p (Pag1p), and Hym1p were shown to regulate both Ace2p activity and cellular morphogenesis. These proteins seem to form a signaling network, which we designate RAM for regulation of Ace2p activity and cellular morphogenesis. To find additional RAM components, we conducted genetic screens for bilateral mating and cell separation mutants and identified alleles of the PAK-related kinase Kic1p in addition to Cbk1p, Mob2p, Tao3p, and Hym1p. Deletion of each RAM gene resulted in a loss of Ace2p function and caused cell polarity defects that were distinct from formin or polarisome mutants. Two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments reveal a complex network of interactions among the RAM proteins, including Cbk1p–Cbk1p, Cbk1p–Kic1p, Kic1p–Tao3p, and Kic1p–Hym1p interactions, in addition to the previously documented Cbk1p–Mob2p and Cbk1p–Tao3p interactions. We also identified a novel leucine-rich repeat-containing protein Sog2p that interacts with Hym1p and Kic1p. Cells lacking Sog2p exhibited the characteristic cell separation and cell morphology defects associated with perturbation in RAM signaling. Each RAM protein localized to cortical sites of growth during both budding and mating pheromone response. Hym1p was Kic1p- and Sog2p-dependent and Sog2p and Kic1p were interdependent for localization, indicating a close functional relationship between these proteins. Only Mob2p and Cbk1p were detectable in the daughter cell nucleus at the end of mitosis. The nuclear localization and kinase activity of the Mob2p–Cbk1p complex were dependent on all other RAM proteins, suggesting that Mob2p–Cbk1p functions late in the

  1. Assessment of activity in Sarcoidosis. Sensitivity and specificity of 67Gallium scintigraphy, serum ACE levels, chest roentgenography, and blood lymphocyte subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Klech, H.; Kohn, H.; Kummer, F.; Mostbeck, A.

    1982-12-01

    The value of different factors are examined to assess activity in 60 patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis. In patients with active sarcoidosis (n . 35), /sup 67/Ga scans proved to be the most sensitive method (94 percent sensitivity), followed by serum angiotensin I converting enzyme (S-ACE) levels, chest x-ray films, and lymphocyte assays. In patients with peripheral pulmonary lesions, chest x-ray films failed in 32 percent of cases to document activity (68 percent sensitivity) whereas /sup 67/Ga scans and S-ACE levels remained to give reliable results. Despite poor specificity, negative /sup 67/Ga scans together with normal ACE levels have a high predictive value for exclusion of active sarcoidosis. In patients with peripheral pulmonary lesions, chest roentgenography is of doubtful value for staging lung involvement and assessment of activity including monitoring and control of therapy.

  2. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1{sup -/-} knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1{sup -/-} mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  3. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is elevated, but not essential, in the development of bleomycin-induced murine scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, M; Yamamoto, T; Nishioka, K

    2005-01-01

    Accumulative data have demonstrated that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) plays an important role in the extracellular matrix metabolism; however, the involvement of PAI-1 in scleroderma has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of PAI-1 in bleomycin-induced murine scleroderma. 100 µg of bleomycin was injected subcutaneously to the back skin of C3H/HeJ mice on alternate day for 4 weeks. Histopathological findings revealed that PAI-1 was positive in macrophage-like cells and fibroblastic cells in the dermis, in parallel with the induction of dermal sclerosis. PAI-1 mRNA expression in the whole skin was up-regulated at 1 and 4 weeks. The production of active PAI-1 protein in the lesional skin was significantly increased 3 and 4 weeks after bleomycin treatment. Next, we examined whether dermal sclerosis is induced by bleomycin in PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1–/–) mice. 10 µg of bleomycin was subcutaneously injected to PAI-1–/– and wild type (WT) mice 5 days per week for 4 weeks. Histological examination revealed that dermal sclerosis was similarly induced even in PAI-1–/– as well as WT mice. Dermal thickness and collagen contents in the skin were significantly increased by bleomycin injection in both PAI-1–/– and WT mice, and the rate of increase was similar. These data suggest that PAI-1 plays an important role, possibly via TGF-β pathway activation. However, the fact that PAI-1 deficiency did not ameliorate skin sclerosis suggest that PAI-1 is not the essential factor in the development of bleomycin-induced scleroderma, and more complex biochemical effects other than PA/plasmin system are greatly suspected. PMID:15730388

  4. Sulfated polysaccharides from common smooth hound: Extraction and assessment of anti-ACE, antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Abdelhedi, Ola; Nasri, Rim; Souissi, Nabil; Nasri, Moncef; Jridi, Mourad

    2016-11-01

    The present study investigates biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) isolated from smooth hound by precipitation with cetylpyridinium chloride (SP1) or ethanol (SP2). SP1 showed the highest amounts of sulfated groups (10.2%) and proteins (7.84%) and high molecular weight sugars. Infrared spectroscopic analysis showed typical peaks of sulfated polysaccharides, particularly for the SP1 that was characterized by the presence of O=S=O groups and acetyl groups. Interestingly, SPs displayed important angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory (IC50=1.04 and 0.75mg/ml for SP1 and SP2, respectively), antibacterial (Gram+ and Gram-) and antioxidant activities (reducing power, metal chelating activity, β-carotene bleaching inhibition and DNA nicking assay). Moreover, SPs fractionation by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography showed one peak during the buffer elution phase and three major fractions during the linear gradient of NaCl. The overall data suggested that SPs could be used as natural antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-ACE ingredient to formulate functional foods. PMID:27516310

  5. The Influence of Differentially Expressed Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Lisa Cm; Nasa, Zeyad; Chung, JieYu; Niego, Be'eri; Tarlac, Volga; Ho, Heidi; Galle, Adam; Petratos, Steven; Lee, Jae Young; Alderuccio, Frank; Medcalf, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that levels of t-PA mRNA and activity are increased ~4 fold in the spinal cords of wild-type mice that are mice subjected to EAE. This was also accompanied with a significant increase in the levels of pro-matrix metalloproteinase 9 (pro-MMP-9) and an influx of fibrinogen. We next compared EAE severity in wild-type mice, t-PA-/- mice and T4+ transgenic mice that selectively over-express (~14-fold) mouse t-PA in neurons of the central nervous system. Our results confirm that t-PA deficient mice have an earlier onset and more severe form of EAE. T4+ mice, despite expressing higher levels of endogenous t-PA, manifested a similar rate of onset and neurological severity of EAE. Levels of proMMP-9, and extravasated fibrinogen in spinal cord extracts were increased in mice following EAE onset regardless of the absence or over-expression of t-PA wild-type. Interestingly, MMP-2 levels also increased in spinal cord extracts of T4+ mice following EAE, but not in the other genotypes. Hence, while the absence of t-PA confers a more deleterious form of EAE, neuronal over-expression of t-PA does not overtly protect against this condition with regards to symptom onset or severity of EAE. PMID:27427941

  6. Thrombosis recanalization by paeoniflorin through the upregulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator via the MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    YE, SONGSHAN; MAO, BINGYU; YANG, LEI; FU, WEIYUN; HOU, JUNRAN

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin, the major component of Paeonia lactiflora pall, has previously been reported to prevent thrombosis. Plasminogen activator urokinase (uPA) is a serine protease that markedly facilitates normal thrombosis resolution. Paeoniflorin and uPA have been linked to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In the current study, the influence of paeoniflorin on the expression of uPA was investigated and the underlying regulatory mechanism was preliminarily determined. The prothrombotic state of the model animals treated with paeoniflorin were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures was estimated using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and the possible pathways involved in the interaction between paeoniflorin and uPA were evaluated using western blot analysis. The ELISA results demonstrated that the levels of 6-keto prostaglandin F1a, fibronectin and uPA were significantly upregulated by treatment with paeoniflorin compared with control (P<0.05). By contrast, the expression of fibrinogen, D-dimer and thromboxane B2 were inhibited. With an increase in the concentration of paeoniflorin the cell viability of HUVECs decreased gradually. The results of western blot analysis demonstrated that paeoniflorin increased the phosphorylation of MAPK 14 (p38) and MAPK 8 (JNK). The present study demonstrated that paeoniflorin has the potential to improve the prethrombotic state and recanalize thrombosis by increasing the expression of uPA, which may be mediated via regulation of the p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. However, this treatment effect was dependent on the concentration of paeoniflorin used, an unsuitable concentration of the agent would result in a negative effect on the anti-thrombosis pathways. PMID:27082639

  7. Iron and carbon monoxide attenuate Crotalus atrox venom-enhanced tissue-type plasminogen activator-initiated fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Boyer, Leslie V; Matika, Ryan W; Amos, Quinlan; Redford, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    In addition to degrading fibrinogen as a source of consumptive coagulopathy, rattlesnake venom has also been demonstrated to enhance fibrinolysis and degrade alpha-2-antiplasmin. The goals of this investigation was to characterize the kinetic fibrinolytic profile of Crotalus atrox venom in the absence and presence of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), and to also ascertain if iron and carbon monoxide (CO, a positive modulator of alpha-2-antiplasmin) could attenuate venom-enhanced fibrinolysis. Utilizing thrombelastographic methods, the coagulation and fibrinolytic kinetic profiles of human plasma exposed to C. atrox venom (0-2 μg/ml) were determined in the absence or presence of tPA (0-100 IU/ml). Then, either separately or in combination, plasma was exposed to iron (ferric chloride, 10 μmol/l) or CO (carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2, 100 μmol/l) prior to incubation with venom; the plasma sample was subsequently subjected to thrombelastographic analysis with addition of tPA. Venom exposure in the absence of tPA did not result in detectable fibrinolysis. In the presence of tPA, venom markedly enhanced fibrinolysis. Iron and CO, markedly attenuated venom enhancement of fibrinolysis. C. atrox venom enhances tPA-mediated fibrinolysis, and interventions that enhance/protect alpha-2-antiplasmin activity significantly attenuate venom-enhanced fibrinolysis. Future preclinical investigation is required to determine if iron and CO can attenuate venom-mediated degradation of alpha-2-antiplasmin-dependent fibrinolytic resistance. PMID:26575490

  8. Southern copperhead venom enhances tissue-type plasminogen activator induced fibrinolysis but does not directly lyse human plasma thrombi.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G

    2016-07-01

    In addition to degrading fibrinogen as a source of consumptive coagulopathy, purified fractions of southern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix; A. c. contortrix) venom has been demonstrated to enhance fibrinolysis. The goal of this investigation was to characterize the kinetic fibrinolytic profile of A. c. contortrix venom in the absence and presence of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) to determine if intact venom had tPA independent fibrinolytic properties. Utilizing thrombelastographic methods, the coagulation and fibrinolytic kinetic profiles of human plasma exposed to A. c. contortrix venom (0-6 μg/ml) were determined in the absence or presence of tPA (0-100 IU/ml). Then, plasma was exposed to 0-6 μg/ml of venom without tPA added and coagulation observed for 3 h. Venom significantly prolonged the onset of coagulation, decreased the velocity of thrombus growth but did not significantly decrease clot strength. In the presence of tPA, venom significantly decreased clot strength, shortened the time of onset of fibrinolysis, decreased clot lysis time but did not significantly affect the maximum rate of lysis. Lastly, while venom exposure in the absence of tPA significantly prolonged the onset of coagulation and decreased the velocity of clot growth, venom exposure did not result in detectable fibrinolysis over the 3 h observation period. A. c. contortrix venom enhances tPA mediated fibrinolysis by degrading plasma coagulation kinetics. Intact A. c. contortrix venom does not possess sufficient fibrinolytic activity to cause fibrinolysis in human plasma at the concentration tested. PMID:26407681

  9. Hypoxia dysregulates the production of adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 independent of reactive oxygen species in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Baoying; Lam, Karen S.L.; Wang Yu; Wu Donghai; Lam, Michael C.; Shen Jiangang; Wong Laiching; Hoo, Ruby L.C.; Zhang Jialiang; Xu Aimin . E-mail: amxu@hkucc.hku.hk

    2006-03-10

    Low plasma levels of adiponectin (hypoadiponectinemia) and elevated circulating concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 are causally associated with obesity-related insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism that mediates the aberrant production of these two adipokines in obesity remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on production of adiponectin and PAI-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Quantitative PCR and immunoassays showed that ambient hypoxia markedly suppressed adiponectin mRNA expression and its protein secretion, and increased PAI-1 production in mature adipocytes. Dimethyloxallyl glycine, a stabilizer of hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), mimicked the hypoxia-mediated modulations of these two adipokines. Hypoxia caused a modest elevation of ROS in adipocytes. However, ablation of intracellular ROS by antioxidants failed to alleviate hypoxia-induced aberrant production of adiponectin and PAI-1. On the other hand, the antioxidants could reverse hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced dysregulation of adiponectin and PAI-1 production. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment decreased the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP{alpha}), but had no effect on HIF-1{alpha}, whereas hypoxia stabilized HIF-1{alpha} and decreased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, but not PPAR{gamma}. Taken together, these data suggest that hypoxia and ROS decrease adiponectin production and augment PAI-1 expression in adipocytes via distinct signaling pathways. These effects may contribute to hypoadiponectinemia and elevated PAI-1 levels in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

  10. The Influence of Differentially Expressed Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Lisa CM; Nasa, Zeyad; Chung, JieYu; Niego, Be’eri; Tarlac, Volga; Ho, Heidi; Galle, Adam; Petratos, Steven; Lee, Jae Young; Alderuccio, Frank; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that levels of t-PA mRNA and activity are increased ~4 fold in the spinal cords of wild-type mice that are mice subjected to EAE. This was also accompanied with a significant increase in the levels of pro-matrix metalloproteinase 9 (pro-MMP-9) and an influx of fibrinogen. We next compared EAE severity in wild-type mice, t-PA-/- mice and T4+ transgenic mice that selectively over-express (~14-fold) mouse t-PA in neurons of the central nervous system. Our results confirm that t-PA deficient mice have an earlier onset and more severe form of EAE. T4+ mice, despite expressing higher levels of endogenous t-PA, manifested a similar rate of onset and neurological severity of EAE. Levels of proMMP-9, and extravasated fibrinogen in spinal cord extracts were increased in mice following EAE onset regardless of the absence or over-expression of t-PA wild-type. Interestingly, MMP-2 levels also increased in spinal cord extracts of T4+ mice following EAE, but not in the other genotypes. Hence, while the absence of t-PA confers a more deleterious form of EAE, neuronal over-expression of t-PA does not overtly protect against this condition with regards to symptom onset or severity of EAE. PMID:27427941

  11. Thrombosis recanalization by paeoniflorin through the upregulation of urokinase‑type plasminogen activator via the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Songshan; Mao, Bingyu; Yang, Lei; Fu, Weiyun; Hou, Junran

    2016-06-01

    Paeoniflorin, the major component of Paeonia lactiflora pall, has previously been reported to prevent thrombosis. Plasminogen activator urokinase (uPA) is a serine protease that markedly facilitates normal thrombosis resolution. Paeoniflorin and uPA have been linked to the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In the current study, the influence of paeoniflorin on the expression of uPA was investigated and the underlying regulatory mechanism was preliminarily determined. The prothrombotic state of the model animals treated with paeoniflorin were assessed by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures was estimated using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and the possible pathways involved in the interaction between paeoniflorin and uPA were evaluated using western blot analysis. The ELISA results demonstrated that the levels of 6‑keto prostaglandin F1a, fibronectin and uPA were significantly upregulated by treatment with paeoniflorin compared with control (P<0.05). By contrast, the expression of fibrinogen, D‑dimer and thromboxane B2 were inhibited. With an increase in the concentration of paeoniflorin the cell viability of HUVECs decreased gradually. The results of western blot analysis demonstrated that paeoniflorin increased the phosphorylation of MAPK 14 (p38) and MAPK 8 (JNK). The present study demonstrated that paeoniflorin has the potential to improve the prethrombotic state and recanalize thrombosis by increasing the expression of uPA, which may be mediated via regulation of the p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. However, this treatment effect was dependent on the concentration of paeoniflorin used, an unsuitable concentration of the agent would result in a negative effect on the anti‑thrombosis pathways. PMID:27082639

  12. CFTR suppresses tumor progression through miR-193b targeting urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, C; Jiang, X H; Zhang, J T; Sun, T T; Dong, J D; Sanders, A J; Diao, R Y; Wang, Y; Fok, K L; Tsang, L L; Yu, M K; Zhang, X H; Chung, Y W; Ye, L; Zhao, M Y; Guo, J H; Xiao, Z J; Lan, H Y; Ng, C F; Lau, K M; Cai, Z M; Jiang, W G; Chan, H C

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed in the epithelial cells of a wide range of organs/tissues from which most cancers are derived. Although accumulating reports have indicated the association of cancer incidence with genetic variations in CFTR gene, the exact role of CFTR in cancer development and the possible underlying mechanism have not been elucidated. Here, we report that CFTR expression is significantly decreased in both prostate cancer cell lines and human prostate cancer tissue samples. Overexpression of CFTR in prostate cancer cell lines suppresses tumor progression (cell growth, adhesion and migration), whereas knockdown of CFTR leads to enhanced malignancies both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that CFTR knockdown-enhanced cell proliferation, cell invasion and migration are significantly reversed by antibodies against either urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or uPA receptor (uPAR), which are known to be involved in various malignant traits of cancer development. More interestingly, overexpression of CFTR suppresses uPA by upregulating the recently described tumor suppressor microRNA-193b (miR-193b), and overexpression of pre-miR-193b significantly reverses CFTR knockdown-enhanced malignant phenotype and abrogates elevated uPA activity in prostate cancer cell line. Finally, we show that CFTR gene transfer results in significant tumor repression in prostate cancer xenografts in vivo. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated a previously undefined tumor-suppressing role of CFTR and its involvement in regulation of miR-193b in prostate cancer development. PMID:22797075

  13. Low-molecular-weight heparin modulates vein wall fibrotic response in a plasminogen activator inhibitor 1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Andrea T.; Diaz, Jose A.; Ballard-Lipka, Nicole L.; Roelofs, Karen J.; Farris, Diana M.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Henke, Peter K.; Wakefield, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) favorably alters the vein wall response to deep venous thrombosis (DVT), although the mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have suggested that LMWH alters the levels of circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a known mediator of fibrosis, and may improve endogenous fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that LMWH favorably alters the vein wall response by binding of PAI-1 and acceleration of fibrinolysis. Methods Wild-type and PAI-1 −/− mice underwent treatment with LMWH after induction of occlusive DVT. Vein wall and plasma were harvested and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, zymography, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. Results Wild-type mice treated with LMWH exhibited diminished vein wall fibrosis (0.6 ± 0.6 vs 1.4 ± 0.2; P < .01; n = 5) and elevation of circulating PAI-1 (1776 ± 342 vs 567 ± 104 ρg/mL; P < .01; n = 5) compared with untreated controls after occlusive DVT. PAI-1−/− mice treated with LMWH were not similarly protected from fibrosis, despite improved thrombus resolution. Treatment with LMWH was associated with decreased intrathrombus interleukin-lβ (68.6 ± 31.0 vs 223.4 ± 28.9 ρg/mg total protein; P < .01; n = 5) but did not alter inflammatory cell recruitment to the vein wall. PAI-1 −/− mice exhibited significantly elevated intrathrombus (257.2 ± 51.5 vs 4.3 ± 3.8 ρg/mg total protein; n = 5) and vein wall interleukin-13 (187.2 ± 57.6 vs 9.9 ± 1.1 ρg/mg total protein; P < .05; n = 5) as well as vein wall F4/80 positively staining monocytes (53 ± 11 vs 16 ± 2 cells/5 high-power fields; P < .05; n = 4). Conclusions LMWH did not accelerate venous thrombosis resolution but did protect against vein wall fibrosis in a PAI-1-dependent manner in an occlusive DVT model. Lack of PAI-1 correlated with accelerated venous thrombosis resolution but no protection from fibrosis. PAI-1 inhibition as a treatment strategy

  14. Serum Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels and Idiopathic FSGS in Children: A Single-Center Report

    PubMed Central

    Price, Heather E.; Gallon, Lorenzo; Langman, Craig B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives FSGS is the primary cause of childhood nephrotic syndrome leading to ESRD. Permeability factors, including circulating serum soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), have been postulated as putative causes in adults with primary FSGS. Similar results have yet to be proven in children. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This cross-sectional single-center study assessed the association of serum suPAR in children with FSGS or other glomerular and nonglomerular kidney diseases. Results This study examined 110 samples retrieved from 99 individuals (between January 2011 and April 2012), aged 1–21 years; of these individuals, 20 had primary FSGS, 24 had non-FSGS glomerular disease, 26 had nonglomerular kidney disease, and 29 were healthy controls. suPAR levels were not significantly different in children with FSGS, non-FSGS glomerular disease, and healthy controls (P>0.05). However, suPAR levels (median [25%–75%]) were higher in children with nonglomerular kidney disease (3385 pg/ml [2695–4392]) versus FSGS (2487 pg/ml [2191–3351]; P<0.05). Female patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria (U-Pr/Cr >2) had lower suPAR levels than those without proteinuria (2380 pg/ml [2116–2571] versus 3125 pg/ml [2516–4198], respectively; P<0.001). This trend was not seen among male participants; suPAR levels in all female participants were lower than in male participants (P=0.03). Thirty-four patients studied were kidney transplant recipients; transplant status was not associated with suPAR levels in patients with FSGS or non-FSGS diagnoses, independent of proteinuria, race, or sex (P>0.05). Conclusions On the basis of these results, circulating suPAR is unlikely the leading cause for childhood idiopathic FSGS. PMID:23620441

  15. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-02-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors may affect the serum levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) associated with triglyceride (TG) metabolism, which is a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease, in diabetic patients. We conducted an 8-week, prospective, randomized study in which we assigned type 2 diabetic patients who were inadequately controlled with antidiabetic therapy to the vildagliptin group (50 mg bid, n = 49) or the control group (n = 49). The primary efficacy parameter was the change in the serum level of PAI-1, and the secondary end point was the change in the serum levels of TG-rich lipoproteins. In the vildagliptin group, significant decrease of the serum PAI-1 level by 16.3% (p <0.0001) and significant decreases of the serum TG, remnant-like particle cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels by 12.1% (p = 0.002), 13.9% (p = 0.003), and 9.5% (p <0.0001), respectively, were observed. No such changes were observed in the control group. Multivariate regression analyses identified the absolute change from the baseline (Δ) of the PAI-1, but not that of the fasting blood glucose or hemoglobin A1c, as independent predictors of the ΔTG, Δ remnant-like particle cholesterol, and Δ apolipoprotein B. In conclusion, treatment of type 2 diabetes with vildagliptin might prevent the progression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients by decreasing the serum PAI-1 levels and improving TG metabolism. PMID:25637323

  16. Ascorbic Acid Reduces the Adverse Effects of Delayed Administration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator in a Rat Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Amin, Fatemeh; Esmaeeli-Nadimi, Ali; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Kazemi-Arababadi, Mohammad; Kennedy, Derek

    2015-11-01

    Delayed treatment of stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) induces overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) which leads to breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and causes more injuries to the brain parenchyma. In this study, the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), an antioxidant agent, on the delayed administration of r-tPA in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was investigated. Forty male rats were randomly divided into four groups: untreated control rats (ischaemic animals), AA-treated (500 mg/kg; 5 hr after stroke) rats, r-tPA-treated (5 hr after stroke 1 mg/kg) rats and rats treated with the combination of AA and r-tPA. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced by occluding the right middle cerebral artery (MCA). Infarct size, BBB, brain oedema and the levels of MMP-9 were measured at the end of study. Neurological deficits were evaluated at 24 and 48 hr after stroke. Compared to the control or r-tPA-treated animals, AA alone (p < 0.001) or in combination with r-tPA (p < 0.05) significantly decreased infarct volume. Ascorbic acid alone or r-tPA + AA significantly reduced BBB permeability (p < 0.05), levels of MMP-9 (p < 0.05 versus control; p < 0.01 versus r-tPA) and brain oedema (p < 0.001) when compared to either the control or the r-tPA-treated animals. Latency to the removal of sticky labels from the forepaw was also significantly decreased after the administration of AA + r-tPA (p < 0.05) at 24 or 48 hr after stroke. Based on our data, acute treatment with AA may be considered as a useful candidate to reduce the side effects of delayed application of r-tPA in stroke therapy. PMID:25899606

  17. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Antagonist TM5484 Attenuates Demyelination and Axonal Degeneration in a Mice Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pelisch, Nicolas; Dan, Takashi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Vaughan, Douglas E; van Ypersele de Strihou, Charles; Miyata, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by inflammatory demyelination and deposition of fibrinogen in the central nervous system (CNS). Elevated levels of a critical inhibitor of the mammalian fibrinolitic system, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) have been demonstrated in human and animal models of MS. In experimental studies that resemble neuroinflammatory disease, PAI-1 deficient mice display preserved neurological structure and function compared to wild type mice, suggesting a link between the fibrinolytic pathway and MS. We previously identified a series of PAI-1 inhibitors on the basis of the 3-dimensional structure of PAI-1 and on virtual screening. These compounds have been reported to provide a number of in vitro and in vivo benefits but none was tested in CNS disease models because of their limited capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The existing candidates were therefore optimized to obtain CNS-penetrant compounds. We performed an in vitro screening using a model of BBB and were able to identify a novel, low molecular PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, with the highest penetration ratio among all other candidates. Next, we tested the effects on inflammation and demyelination in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice model. Results were compared to either fingolimod or 6α-methylprednisolone. Oral administration of TM5484 from the onset of signs, ameliorates paralysis, attenuated demyelination, and axonal degeneration in the spinal cord of mice. Furthermore, it modulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which plays a protective role in neurons against various pathological insults, and choline acetyltransferase, a marker of neuronal density. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, in the treatment of MS. PMID:25915660

  18. Transcatheter Thrombolysis with High-Dose Bolus Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Iatrogenic Arterial Occlusion after Femoral Arterial Catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios K.; Kochiadakis, George E.; Hatzidakis, Adam A.; Skalidis, Emannuel I.; Chryssou, Evangelia G.; Tritou, Ioanna N.; Vardas, Panos E.; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of percutaneous local thrombolysis with high-dose bolus recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with acute limb ischemia due to arterial thrombosis after cardiac catheterization.Methods: We treated eight patients (7 men; mean age 56 years) with thrombotic occlusion of both the common femoral artery (CFA) and external iliac artery (EIA) in six patients and of the CFA only in two patients. Two 5 mg boluses of rt-PA were injected into the proximal clot through a 5 Fr end-hole catheter and subsequently two additional boluses of 5 mg rt-PA were given through a catheter with multiple side-holes. In case of a significant amount of residual thrombus, a continuous infusion of 2.5 mg/hr of rt-PA was started.Results: Successful lysis was achieved in all patients. The mean duration of lysis was 2 hr 41 min. The mean total amount of rt-PA delivered was 23.16 mg. In four patients unmasked flow-limited dissections confined to the CFA were managed by prolonged balloon dilatation, while in the remaining four patients with extension of the dissection to the external iliac artery one or two Easy Wallstents were implanted. There was prompt relief of lower limb ischemic symptoms and signs in all patients. Two groin hematomas were conservatively treated.Clinical and color Doppler flow imaging follow-up with a mean duration of 15 months, showed no reappearance of ischemic symptoms or development of restenosis in any of the patients. One patient died 6 months after thrombolysis.Conclusions: Transcatheter thrombolysis with high-dose bolus rt-PA is a safe and effective treatment inpatients with iatrogenic arterial occlusion after femoral catheterization. Underlying dissections should be treated by prolonged balloon dilatation but stent implantation is often required.

  19. Cigarette Smoke and the Induction of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor In Vivo: Selective Contribution of Isoforms to Bronchial Epithelial Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Michael A; Stewart, Ceri E; Hall, Ian P; Brightling, Christopher E; Sayers, Ian

    2015-08-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) gene (PLAUR) has been identified as an asthma susceptibility gene, with polymorphisms within that gene being associated with baseline lung function, lung function decline, and lung function in a smoking population. Soluble cleaved uPAR (scuPAR), a molecule identified as a marker of increased morbidity and mortality in a number of diseases, has been shown to be elevated in the airways of patients with asthma and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the functionality of soluble receptor isoforms and their relationship with an important initiator for obstructive lung disease, cigarette smoke, remains undefined. In this study, we set out to determine the effect of cigarette smoke on soluble uPAR isoforms, its regulatory pathway and the resultant effect on bronchial epithelial cell function. We identified a positive association between cigarette pack-years and uPAR expression in the airway bronchial epithelium of biopsies from patients with asthma (n = 27; P = 0.0485). In vitro, cigarette smoke promoted cleavage of uPAR from the surface of bronchial epithelial cells (1.5× induction; P < 0.0001) and induced the soluble spliced isoform through changes in messenger RNA expression (∼2× change; P < 0.001), driven by loss of endogenous 3' untranslated region suppression. Elevated expression of the soluble isoforms resulted in a proremodeling cell phenotype, characterized by increased proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in primary bronchial epithelial cells. This suggests that cigarette smoke elevates soluble receptor isoforms in bronchial epithelial cells through direct (cleavage) and indirect (messenger RNA expression) means. These findings provide further insight into how cigarette smoke may influence changes in the airways of importance to airway remodeling and obstructive lung disease progression. PMID:25490122

  20. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Antagonist TM5484 Attenuates Demyelination and Axonal Degeneration in a Mice Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Nicolas; Dan, Takashi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Vaughan, Douglas E.; van Ypersele de Strihou, Charles; Miyata, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by inflammatory demyelination and deposition of fibrinogen in the central nervous system (CNS). Elevated levels of a critical inhibitor of the mammalian fibrinolitic system, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) have been demonstrated in human and animal models of MS. In experimental studies that resemble neuroinflammatory disease, PAI-1 deficient mice display preserved neurological structure and function compared to wild type mice, suggesting a link between the fibrinolytic pathway and MS. We previously identified a series of PAI-1 inhibitors on the basis of the 3-dimensional structure of PAI-1 and on virtual screening. These compounds have been reported to provide a number of in vitro and in vivo benefits but none was tested in CNS disease models because of their limited capacity to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The existing candidates were therefore optimized to obtain CNS-penetrant compounds. We performed an in vitro screening using a model of BBB and were able to identify a novel, low molecular PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, with the highest penetration ratio among all other candidates. Next, we tested the effects on inflammation and demyelination in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice model. Results were compared to either fingolimod or 6α-methylprednisolone. Oral administration of TM5484 from the onset of signs, ameliorates paralysis, attenuated demyelination, and axonal degeneration in the spinal cord of mice. Furthermore, it modulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which plays a protective role in neurons against various pathological insults, and choline acetyltransferase, a marker of neuronal density. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, TM5484, in the treatment of MS. PMID:25915660

  1. Para-aminobenzamidine linked regenerated cellulose membranes for plasminogen activator purification: Effect of spacer arm length and ligand density

    PubMed Central

    Fasoli, Ezio; Reyes, Yiaslin Ruiz; Guzman, Osiris Martinez; Rosado, Alexandra; Cruz, Vivian Rodriguez; Borges, Amaris; Martinez, Edmarie; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    Despite membrane-based separations offering superior alternative to packed bed chromatographic processes, there has been a substantial lacuna in their actual application to separation processes. One of the major reasons behind this is the lack of availability of appropriately modified or end-group modifiable membranes. In this paper, an affinity membrane was developed using a commercially available serine protease inhibitor, para-aminobenzamidine (pABA). The membrane modification was optimized for protein binding capacity by varying: i) the length of the spacer arm (SA; 5-atoms, 7-atoms, and 14-atoms) linking the ligand to membrane surface; ii) the affinity ligand (pABA) density on membrane surface (5–25 nmoles per cm2). Resulting membranes were tested for their ability to bind plasminogen activators (PAs) from mono- and multi- component systems in batch mode. The membrane containing pABA linked through 7-atoms SA but similar ligand density as in the case of 5- or 14- atoms long SA was found to bind up to 1.6-times higher amounts of PA per nmole of immobilized ligand from conditioned HeLa cell culture media. However, membranes with similar ligand densities but different lengths of SA, showed comparable binding capacities in monocomponent system. In addition, the length of SA did not affect the selectivity of the ligand for PA. A clear inverse linear correlation was observed between ligand density and binding capacity until the point of PA binding optima was reached (11±1.0 nmoles per cm2) in mono- and multi- component systems for 7- as well as 14- atoms SA. Up to 200-fold purification was achieved in a single step separation of PA from HeLa conditioned media using these affinity membranes. The issues of ligand leaching and reuse of the membranes were also investigated. An extensive regeneration procedure allowed the preservation of approximately 95% of the PA binding capacity of the membranes even after five cycles of use. PMID:23703544

  2. Prognostic relevance of urokinase plasminogen activator detection in micrometastatic cells in the bone marrow of patients with primary breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Solomayer, E. F.; Diel, I. J.; Wallwiener, D.; Bode, S.; Meyberg, G.; Sillem, M.; Gollan, C.; Kramer, M. D.; Krainick, U.; Bastert, G.

    1997-01-01

    Patients with an elevated level of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in breast cancer tissue have an adverse prognosis. This study evaluated the prognostic relevance of uPA detection in disseminated tumour cells in bone marrow. Bone marrow was sampled intraoperatively from both iliac crests in 280 patients with primary breast cancer. Interphase cells were enhanced and stained immunocytologically with two antibodies: 2E11, which detects TAG 12--a tumour-associated glycoprotein typically expressed by almost all breast cancer cells--and the anti-uPA antibody HD-UK9. Thirty-five of the 2E11-positive women (n = 132, 47%) developed metastatic disease (median follow-up time 44 months). Of these, most were uPA positive (n = 23, 65%) and only 12 were uPA negative. Patients with uPA-positive cells in bone marrow (n = 98, 35%) had a significantly shorter metastasis-free interval (36 months) than women who were uPA negative (44.5 months). The worst prognosis was seen in patients positive for both markers (29.5 months), followed by those who were uPA negative and 2E11 positive (37 months). The detection of uPA on disseminated tumour cells characterizes a subgroup of patients with an even worse prognosis, who should undergo more aggressive adjuvant systemic therapy. For the first time, it was possible to evaluate an important qualitative parameter involved in the process of breast cancer metastases. Images Figure 1 PMID:9310251

  3. Preliminary experience with air transfer of patients for rescue endovascular therapy after failure of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Enomoto, Yukiko; Yamada, Noriaki; Matsumaru, Naoki; Kumada, Keisuke; Toyoda, Izumi; Ogura, Shinji; Iwama, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes our experience with air transfer of patients with acute ischemic stroke in whom intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) failed for rescue endovascular therapy (EVT). Twenty-three consecutive patients in whom IV t-PA failed were transferred to our hospital for rescue EVT between February 2011 and April 2013. The amount of time required for transfer, distance, clinical outcomes, and complications were compared between patients transferred by ground (TG group; n = 17) and by air (TA group; n = 6). Computed tomography imaging on arrival revealed hemorrhagic transformation in 1 (5.9%) patient in the TG group, whereas none of the patients in the TA group developed any type of complication. The remaining 22 patients received rescue EVT. The elapsed time from the request call to arrival at our hospital did not significantly differ between the TG and TA groups (45.8 ± 4.9 min vs. 41.6 ± 2.3 min). However, the distance from the primary hospital to our institution was significantly longer for the TA group than for the TG group (38.8 ± 10.4 km vs. 13.5 ± 1.2 km, p = 0.001). The frequency of favorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale 0-1 at 90 days after onset) in the TG and TA groups were 25.0% and 50.0%, respectively (p = 0.267). Air transfer for patients after IV t-PA failure allowed for more rapid delivery of patients over longer distances than ground transfer. PMID:25739430

  4. Perception Versus Actual Performance in Timely Tissue Plasminogen Activation Administration in the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheryl B; Cox, Margueritte; Olson, DaiWai M; Britz, Gavin W; Constable, Mark; Fonarow, Gregg C; Schwamm, Lee; Peterson, Eric D; Shah, Bimal R

    2015-01-01

    Background Timely thrombolytic therapy can improve stroke outcomes. Nevertheless, the ability of US hospitals to meet guidelines for intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains suboptimal. What is unclear is whether hospitals accurately perceive their rate of tPA “door-to-needle” (DTN) time within 60 minutes and how DTN rates compare across different hospitals. Methods and Results DTN performance was defined by the percentage of treated patients who received tPA within 60 minutes of arrival. Telephone surveys were obtained from staff at 141 Get With The Guidelines hospitals, representing top, middle, and lowDTN performance. Less than one-third (29.1%) of staff accurately identified their DTN performance. Among middle- and low-performing hospitals (n=92), 56 sites (60.9%) overestimated their performance; 42% of middle performers and 85% of low performers overestimated their performance. Sites that overestimated tended to have lower annual volumes of tPA administration (median 8.4 patients [25th to 75th percentile 5.9 to 11.8] versus 10.2 patients [25th to 75th percentile 8.2 to 17.3], P=0.047), smaller percentages of eligible patients receiving tPA (84.7% versus 89.8%, P=0.008), and smaller percentages of DTN ≤60 minutes among treated patients (10.6% versus 16.6%, P=0.002). Conclusions Hospitals often overestimate their ability to deliver timely tPA to treated patients. Our findings indicate the need to routinely provide comparative provider performance rates as a key step to improving the quality of acute stroke care. PMID:26201547

  5. Plasminogen Activator of the Blood Vessels in Tumours and in Carrageenin-induced Granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Pick, C. R.; Cater, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    Fibrinolytic activity in tumours was studied by the fibrin slide technique. The tumour cells were inactive and fibrinolysis was seen only in areas with young blood vessels. In carrageenin-induced granulomas at 6 days the fibrinolytic activity was small and confined to mature veins, but from 7-14 days activity was high in zones containing young vessels supplying the terminal capillary buds; these latter showed no activity. In old fibrosed granulomas there was no fibrinolytic activity. The vascular permeability changes of inflammation (detected by the colloidal carbon technique) showed no correlation with fibrinolytic activity, and systemic injection of inflammatory agents had no effect on the fibrinolytic activity of the vessels. These findings are discussed in relationship to tumour vascularization. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 1-4 PMID:5547651

  6. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of sardinelle (Sardinella aurita) by-products protein hydrolysates obtained by treatment with microbial and visceral fish serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Bougatef, Ali; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima; Ravallec-Plé, Rozenn; Leroy, Yves; Guillochon, Didier; Barkia, Ahmed; Nasri, Moncef

    2008-11-15

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of protein hydrolysates prepared from heads and viscera of sardinelle (Sardinella aurita) by treatment with various proteases were investigated. Protein hydrolysates were obtained by treatment with Alcalase(®), chymotrypsin, crude enzyme preparations from Bacillus licheniformis NH1 and Aspergillus clavatus ES1, and crude enzyme extract from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) viscera. All hydrolysates exhibited inhibitory activity towards ACE. The alkaline protease extract from the viscera of sardine produced hydrolysate with the highest ACE inhibitory activity (63.2±1.5% at 2mg/ml). Further, the degrees of hydrolysis and the inhibitory activities of ACE increased with increasing proteolysis time. The protein hydrolysate generated with alkaline proteases from the viscera of sardine was then fractionated by size exclusion chromatography on a Sephadex G-25 into eight major fractions (P1-P8). Biological functions of all fractions were assayed, and P4 was found to display a high ACE inhibitory activity. The IC50 values for ACE inhibitory activities of sardinelle by-products protein hydrolysates and fraction P4 were 1.2±0.09 and 0.81±0.013mg/ml, respectively. Further, P4 showed resistance to in vitro digestion by gastrointestinal proteases. The amino acid analysis by GC/MS showed that P4 was rich in phenylalanine, arginine, glycine, leucine, methionine, histidine and tyrosine. The added-value of sardinelle by-products may be improved by enzymatic treatment with visceral serine proteases from sardine. PMID:26047434

  7. Stimulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression by PMA requires JNK1-dependent and -independent signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Gum, R; Juarez, J; Allgayer, H; Mazar, A; Wang, Y; Boyd, D

    1998-07-16

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) has been implicated in tumor progression, and previous studies have shown that the expression of this gene is strongly up-regulated by PMA. Although the signaling mechanism by which PMA modulates u-PAR expression is not known, the effect of this phorbol ester on the expression of other genes has been ascribed to activation of the c-Raf-1-ERK signaling pathway. However, in the current study we examined an alternate possibility that the inductive effect of PMA on u-PAR expression also required a JNK1-dependent signaling cascade usually associated with stress-inducing stimuli. PMA treatment of the u-PAR-deficient OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells, which contain low JNK activities, resulted in a rapid (5 min) increase in JNK activity. Maximal JNK activity (12-fold induction) occurred after 30 min; this preceding the earliest detected rise in u-PAR protein (2 h). Dose-response studies with PMA also indicated that the increased JNK activity was tightly correlated with elevated u-PAR protein levels. The stimulation of u-PAR promoter activity by PMA required an intact upstream AP-1 motif (-184) and in PMA-treated cells this motif was bound with c-Jun as indicated from mobility shift assays. PMA up-regulated the c-Jun trans acting activity as indicated by the higher activity of a GAL4-regulated luciferase reporter in phorbol-ester-treated cells co-transfected with an expression vector encoding the c-Jun transactivation domain fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. The ability of PMA to stimulate u-PAR promoter activity was effectively titrated out by the co-expression of either a kinase-defective JNK1 or a dominant negative MEKK1 the latter being an upstream activator of JNK1. Conversely, u-PAR promoter activity was stimulated by the co-expression of a constitutively active MEKK1 and this induction was antagonized by the inclusion of the kinase-defective JNK1 plasmid. We also determined the biological significance of the

  8. Fructose-induced steatosis in mice: role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Spruss, Astrid; Wagnerberger, Sabine; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bergheim, Ina

    2011-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is an acute-phase protein known to be involved in alcoholic liver disease and hepatic fibrosis. In the present study, the hypothesis that PAI-1 is causally involved in the onset of fructose-induced hepatic steatosis was tested in a mouse model. Wild-type C57BL/6J and PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice were fed with 30% fructose solution or water for 8 weeks. Markers of hepatic steatosis, expression of PAI-1, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), cluster of differentiation 1d (CD1d), markers of natural killer T (NKT) cells, protein levels of phospho-c-Met and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined. Activity of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) was measured in liver tissue. In comparison with water controls, chronic intake of 30% fructose solution caused a significant increase in hepatic triglycerides, PAI-1 expression and plasma alanine aminotransferase levels in wild-type mice. This effect of fructose feeding was markedly attenuated in PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice. Despite no differences in portal endotoxin levels and hepatic TNF-α protein levels between fructose-fed groups, the protective effect of the loss of PAI-1 against the onset of fructose-induced steatosis was associated with a significant increase in phospho-c-Met, phospho Akt, expression of ApoB and activity of MTTP in livers of PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice in comparison with fructose-fed wild types. Moreover, in PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice, expressions of CD1d and markers of CD1d-reactive NKT cells were markedly higher than in wild-type mice; however, expression of markers of activation of CD1d-reactive NKT cells (eg, interleukin-15 and interferon-γ) were only found to be increased in livers of fructose-fed PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice. Taken together, these data suggest that PAI-1 has a causal role in mediating the early phase of fructose-induced liver damage in mice through signaling cascades downstream of Kupffer cells and TNF-α. PMID:21423135

  9. Interaction of staphylokinase with different molecular forms of plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Collen, D

    1993-01-15

    In order to obtain more information on the mechanism of plasminogen activation by staphylokinase (STA), we have studied the interaction between recombinant STA (STAR) and different molecular forms of human plasminogen, including Glu-plasminogen (native moiety), Lys-plasminogen (partially degraded moiety) and low-molecular-mass (LMM) plasminogen (moiety lacking kringles 1-4). Addition of 2 microM STAR to 0.4 microM Glu-plasminogen, Lys-plasminogen or LMM plasminogen resulted in the generation of proteolytic activity towards the chromogenic substrate D-Val-Leu-Lys-NH-PhNO2 (S-2251) corresponding to the exposure of 1 active center/plasminogen molecule. Complex formation was associated with conversion of the one-chain plasminogen moieties to two-chain plasmin, and with quantitative conversion of Glu-plasminogen to Lys-plasmin. The stoichiometry of the plasminogen-STAR complex, determined by binding of the complex to Lys-Sepharose and measurement of residual STAR, was found to be equimolar. The plasminogen-STAR complexes were inhibited by alpha 2-antiplasmin with second-order rate constants of 2.4 +/- 0.17 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 for Glu-plasminogen, 2.4 +/- 0.21 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 for Lys-plasminogen and 9.4 +/- 1.5 x 10(4) M-1 s-1 for LMM plasminogen. Glu-plasmin-STAR, Lys-plasmin-STAR and LMM plasmin-STAR had comparable catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) for the activation of Glu-plasminogen (0.24-0.29 microM-1 s-1), Lys-plasminogen (0.57-0.79 microM-1 s-1) or LMM plasminogen (0.11-0.16 microM-1 s-1). In a human plasma milieu in vitro STAR, Glu-plasmin-STAR, Lys-plasmin-STAR and LMM-plasmin-STAR were equally effective for the lysis of 125I-fibrin-labeled human plasma clots [50% clot lysis in 2 h (EC50) with 11-13 nM test compound] and equally fibrin-selective (residual fibrinogen levels of 72-84% after 2 h at EC50). Our results thus confirm that plasminogen and STAR form a 1:1 stoichiometric complex in which plasminogen is converted to plasmin and Glu-plasminogen to Lys

  10. Aggravation of gingival inflammatory symptoms during pregnancy associated with the concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) in gingival fluid.

    PubMed

    Kinnby, B; Matsson, L; Astedt, B

    1996-05-01

    Gingival inflammatory symptoms are aggravated during pregnancy. In vitro studies suggest a hormonal influence on the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2), and a disturbed balance of the fibrinolytic system could help to explain pregnancy gingivitis. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was sampled in 14 women in pregnant and post-pregnant states. The gingival condition was assessed by the gingival index of Løe & Silness (GI) and the amount of bacterial plaque by the plaque index of Silness & Løe (PI). The ratio of sites with gingivitis to sites with bacterial plaque was calculated (G/P-ratio). Antigen levels of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitors type 1 (PAI-1) and PAI-2 in GCF were determined with ELISAs and 17 beta-oestradiol and progesterone in serum with radioimmunoassays. For each individual the differences (delta) in hormone levels and PAs and PAIs between pregnancy and post-pregnancy were calculated. Based on differences in G/P-ratio between pregnancy and post-pregnancy, subgrouping was done into a high-reacting and a low-reacting group. For the total group, the mean G/P-ratio was 2.0 during and 1.2 after pregnancy (p = 0.064). A statistically significant correlation between delta progesterone and delta PAI-2 was noted: the higher delta progesterone, the lower delta PAI-2. No other significant correlations between hormone levels and components of the fibrinolytic system were found. For the total group of women, the concentrations of PAI-2, PAI-1 and t-PA were significantly higher during than after pregnancy. The individuals in the high-reacting group, however, showed a lower or unchanged production of PAI-2 during pregnancy, while those in the low-reacting group showed a greatly increased production. The lower inhibitory capacity in terms of a low production of PAI-2 during pregnancy in women with a higher inflammatory reaction indicates that the components of the

  11. Synergistic and multidimensional regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 expression by transforming growth factor type β and epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiaoling; Thalacker, F.W.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2012-04-06

    The major physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activator, type I plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), controls blood clotting and tissue remodeling events that involve cell migration. Transforming growth factor type β (TGFβ) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) interact synergistically to increase PAI-1 mRNA and protein levels in human HepG2 and mink Mv1Lu cells. Other growth factors that activate tyrosine kinase receptors can substitute for EGF. EGF and TGFβ regulate PAI-1 by synergistically activating transcription, which is further amplified by a decrease in the rate of mRNA degradation, the latter being regulated only by EGF. The combined effect of transcriptional activation and mRNA stabilization results in a rapid 2-order of magnitude increase in the level of PAI-1. TGFβ also increases the sensitivity of the cells to EGF, thereby recruiting the cooperation of EGF at lower than normally effective concentrations. The contribution of EGF to the regulation of PAI-1 involves the MAPK pathway, and the synergistic interface with the TGFβ pathway is downstream of MEK1/2 and involves phosphorylation of neither ERK1/2 nor Smad2/3. Synergism requires the presence of both Smad and AP-1 recognition sites in the promoter. This work demonstrates the existence of a multidimensional cellular mechanism by which EGF and TGFβ are able to promote large and rapid changes in PAI-1 expression.

  12. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Binding to Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle—Covalent Versus Adsorptive Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Ralf P.; Zaloga, Jan; Schreiber, Eveline; Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Tombácz, Etelka; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are frequently used to develop vehicles for drug delivery, hyperthermia, and photodynamic therapy and as tools used for magnetic separation and purification of proteins or for biomolecular imaging. Depending on the application, there are various possible covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of particles, each of them shows different advantages and disadvantages for drug release and activity at the desired location.

  13. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Matthias Peter; Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  14. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  15. Endogenous Nitric Oxide Contributes to Bradykinin-Stimulated Glucose Uptake but Attenuates Vascular Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Release

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Bradykinin causes vasodilation, stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) release and, in rodents, increases muscle glucose uptake. Although bradykinin causes vasodilation partly by activating nitric-oxide synthase (NOS), the role of nitric oxide in regulating bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release is uncertain. This study examined the effect of high-dose NOS inhibition on bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release and glucose uptake in humans. We studied 24 healthy (12 women and 12 men), overweight and obese (body mass index >25 kg/m2), normotensive, nondiabetic subjects with normal cholesterol. We measured the effect of intra-arterial Nω-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA, 12 μmol/min) on forearm blood flow (FBF), net t-PA release, and glucose uptake at baseline and in response to intra-arterial bradykinin (50–200 ng/min) in subjects pretreated with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor aspirin. Measurements were repeated after isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN; 5 mg) or sildenafil (50 mg). l-NMMA decreased baseline FBF (P < 0.001), increased baseline forearm vascular resistance (P < 0.001), and increased the t-PA arterial-venous gradient (P = 0.04) without affecting baseline net t-PA release or glucose uptake. During l-NMMA, ISDN tended to decrease baseline net t-PA release (P = 0.06). l-NMMA blunted bradykinin-stimulated vasodilation (P < 0.001 for FBF and FVR). Bradykinin increased net glucose extraction (from −80 ± 23 to −320 ± 97 μg/min/100 ml at 200 ng/min bradykinin, P = 0.02), and l-NMMA (−143 ± 50 μg/min/100 ml at 200 ng/min, P = 0.045) attenuated this effect. In contrast, l-NMMA enhanced bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release (39.9 ± 7.0 ng/min/100 ml versus 30.0 ± 4.2 ng/min/100 ml at 200 ng/min, P = 0.04 for l-NMMA). In gender-stratified analyses, l-NMMA significantly increased bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release in women (F = 6.7, P = 0.02) but not in men. Endogenous NO contributes to bradykinin-stimulated vasodilation and glucose uptake but attenuates the

  16. Plasma Levels of Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Associate with the Clinical Severity of Acute Puumala Hantavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Outinen, Tuula K.; Tervo, Laura; Mäkelä, Satu; Huttunen, Reetta; Mäenpää, Niina; Huhtala, Heini; Vaheri, Antti; Mustonen, Jukka; Aittoniemi, Janne

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor is a multifunctional glycoprotein, the expression of which is increased during inflammation. It is known to bind to β3-integrins, which are elementary for the cellular entry of hantaviruses. Plasma soluble form of the receptor (suPAR) levels were evaluated as a predictor of severe Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection and as a possible factor involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Design A single-centre prospective cohort study. Subjects and Methods Plasma suPAR levels were measured twice during the acute phase and once during the convalescence in 97 patients with serologically confirmed acute PUUV infection using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The plasma suPAR levels were significantly higher during the acute phase compared to the control values after the hospitalization (median 8.7 ng/ml, range 4.0–18.2 ng/ml vs. median 4.7 ng/ml, range 2.4–12.2 ng/ml, P<0.001). The maximum suPAR levels correlated with several variables reflecting the severity of the disease. There was a positive correlation with maximum leukocyte count (r = 0.475, p<0.001), maximum plasma creatinine concentration (r = 0.378, p<0.001), change in weight during the hospitalization (r = 0.406, p<0.001) and the length of hospitalization (r = 0.325, p = 0.001), and an inverse correlation with minimum platelet count (r = −0.325, p = 0.001) and minimum hematocrit (r = −0.369, p<0.001). Conclusion Plasma suPAR values are markedly increased during acute PUUV infection and associate with the severity of the disease. The overexpression of suPAR possibly activates β3-integrin in PUUV infection, and thus might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:23990945

  17. Plasminogen is a critical regulator of cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sulniute, Rima; Shen, Yue; Guo, Yong-Zhi; Fallah, Mahsa; Ahlskog, Nina; Ny, Lina; Rakhimova, Olena; Broden, Jessica; Boija, Hege; Moghaddam, Aliyeh; Li, Jinan; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Ny, Tor

    2016-05-01

    Wound healing is a complicated biological process that consist of partially overlapping inflammatory, proliferation and tissue remodelling phases. A successful wound healing depends on a proper activation and subsequent termination of the inflammatory phase. The failure to terminate the inflammation halts the completion of wound healing and is a known reason for formation of chronic wounds. Previous studies have shown that wound closure is delayed in plasminogen-deficient mice, and a role for plasminogen in dissection of extracellular matrix was suggested. However, our finding that plasminogen is transported to the wound by inflammatory cells early during the healing process, where it potentiates inflammation, indicates that plasminogen may also have other roles in the wound healing process. Here we report that plasminogen-deficient mice have extensive fibrin and neutrophil depositions in the wounded area long after re-epithelialisation, indicating inefficient debridement and chronic inflammation. Delayed formation of granulation tissue suggests that fibroblast function is impaired in the absence of plasminogen. Therefore, in addition to its role in the activation of inflammation, plasminogen is also crucial for subsequent steps, including resolution of inflammation and activation of the proliferation phase. Importantly, supplementation of plasminogen-deficient mice with human plasminogen leads to a restored healing process that is comparable to that in wild-type mice. Besides of being an activator of the inflammatory phase during wound healing, plasminogen is also required for the subsequent termination of inflammation. Based on these results, we propose that plasminogen may be an important future therapeutic agent for wound treatment. PMID:26791370

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1: Mechanisms of its synergistic regulation by growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiaoling

    2010-01-01

    My research is on the synergistic regulation of PAI-1 by EGF and TGF-β. The mechanism of synergistic regulation of PAI-1 by EGF and TGF-β are addressed. Methods are described for effective identification of RNA accessible sites for antisense oligodexoxynucleotides (ODNs) and siRNA. In this study effective AS-ODN sequences for both Lcn2 and Bcl2 were identified by in vitro tiled microarray studies. Our results suggest that hybridization of ODN arrays to a target mRNA under physiological conditions might be used as a rapid and reliable in vitro method to accurately identify targets on mRNA molecules for effective antisense and potential siRNA activity in vivo.

  19. p75 neurotrophin receptor regulates tissue fibrosis through inhibition of plasminogen activation via a PDE4/cAMP/PKA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Benjamin D.; Baillie, George S.; McCall, Julianne R.; Passino, Melissa A.; Schachtrup, Christian; Wallace, Derek A.; Dunlop, Allan J.; MacKenzie, Kirsty F.; Klussmann, Enno; Lynch, Martin J.; Sikorski, Shoana L.; Nuriel, Tal; Tsigelny, Igor; Zhang, Jin; Houslay, Miles D.; Chao, Moses V.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Clearance of fibrin through proteolytic degradation is a critical step of matrix remodeling that contributes to tissue repair in a variety of pathological conditions, such as stroke, atherosclerosis, and pulmonary disease. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate fibrin deposition are not known. Here, we report that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a TNF receptor superfamily member up-regulated after tissue injury, blocks fibrinolysis by down-regulating the serine protease, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and up-regulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). We have discovered a new mechanism in which phosphodiesterase PDE4A4/5 interacts with p75NTR to enhance cAMP degradation. The p75NTR-dependent down-regulation of cAMP results in a decrease in extracellular proteolytic activity. This mechanism is supported in vivo in p75NTR-deficient mice, which show increased proteolysis after sciatic nerve injury and lung fibrosis. Our results reveal a novel pathogenic mechanism by which p75NTR regulates degradation of cAMP and perpetuates scar formation after injury. PMID:17576803

  20. Cumulative influence of elastin peptides and plasminogen on matrix metalloproteinase activation and type I collagen invasion by HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huet, Eric; Brassart, Bertrand; Cauchard, Jean-Hubert; Debelle, Laurent; Birembaut, Philippe; Wallach, Jean; Emonard, Herve; Polette, Myriam; Hornebeck, William

    2002-01-01

    HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells express at their plasma membrane the elastin-binding protein (EBP). Occupancy of EBP by elastin fragments, tropoelastin or XGVAPG peptides was found to trigger procollagenase-1 (proMMP-1) overproduction by HT-1080 cells at the protein and enzyme levels. RT-PCR analysis indicated that elastin peptides did not modify the MMP-1 mRNA steady state levels, suggesting the involvement of a post-transcriptional mechanism. We previously reported that binding of elastin peptides to EBP induced other matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MT1-MMP) expression. Since those peptides were here found to also accelerate the secretion of urokinase from HT-1080 cells, culture medium was supplemented with plasminogen together with elastin peptides at aims to induce or potentiate MMPs activation cascades. In such conditions, plasmin activity was generated and exacerbate proMMP-1 and proMMP-2 activation. As a consequence, elastin peptides and plasminogen-treated HT-1080 cells displayed a significant type I collagen matrix invasive capacity. PMID:11964074

  1. Collagenase and tissue plasminogen activator production in developing rat calvariae: normal progression despite fetal exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. A.; Sipe, B.; Gershan, L. A.; Fiacco, G. J.; Lorenz, T. C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to zero gravity has been shown to cause a decrease in bone formation. This implicates osteoblasts as the gravity-sensing cell in bone. Osteoblasts also are known to produce neutral proteinases, including collagenase and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), which are thought to be important in bone development and remodeling. The present study investigated the effects of zero gravity on development of calvariae and their expression of collagenase and tPA. After in utero exposure to zero gravity for 9 days on the NASA STS-70 space shuttle mission, the calvariae of rat pups were examined by immunohistochemistry for the presence and location of these two proteinases. The ages of the pups were from gestational day 20 (G20) to postnatal (PN) day 35. Both collagenase and tPA were found to be present at all ages examined, with the greatest amount of both proteinases present in the PN14 rats. At later ages, high amounts were maintained for tPA but collagenase decreased substantially between ages PN21 to PN35. The location of collagenase was found to be associated with bone-lining cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and in the matrix along cement lines. In contrast, tPA was associated with endothelial cells lining the blood vessels entering bone. The presence and developmental expression of these two proteinases appeared to be unaffected by the exposure to zero gravity. The calvarial thickness of the pups was also examined; again the exposure to zero gravity showed little to no effect on the growth of the calvariae. Notably, from G20 to PN14, calvarial thickness increased dramatically, reaching a plateau after this age. It was apparent that elevated collagenase expression correlated with rapid bone growth in the period from G20 to PN14. To conclude, collagenase and tPA are present during the development of rat calvariae. Despite being produced by the same cell in vitro, i.e., the osteoblast, they are located in distinctly different places in bone in vivo. Their presence

  2. Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Acute Ischemic Stroke–Enhanced Regimen Stroke Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pancioli, Arthur M.; Adeoye, Opeolu; Schmit, Pamela A.; Khoury, Jane; Levine, Steven R.; Tomsick, Thomas A.; Sucharew, Heidi; Brooks, Claudette E.; Crocco, Todd J.; Gutmann, Laurie; Hemmen, Thomas M.; Kasner, Scott E.; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Knight, William A.; Martini, Sharyl; McKinney, James S.; Meurer, William J.; Meyer, Brett C.; Schneider, Alexander; Scott, Phillip A.; Starkman, Sidney; Warach, Steven; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose In a previous study, 0.3 and 0.45 mg/kg of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) were safe when combined with eptifibatide 75 mcg/kg bolus and a 2-hour infusion (0.75 mcg/kg per minute). The Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and rt-PA in Acute Ischemic Stroke–Enhanced Regimen (CLEAR-ER) trial sought to determine the safety of a higher-dose regimen and to establish evidence for a phase III trial. Methods CLEAR-ER was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized safety study. Ischemic stroke patients were randomized to 0.6 mg/kg rt-PA plus eptifibatide (135 mcg/kg bolus and a 2-hour infusion at 0.75 mcg/kg per minute) versus standard rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg). The primary safety end point was the incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage within 36 hours. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≤1 or return to baseline mRS at 90 days. Analysis of the safety and efficacy outcomes was done with multiple logistic regression. Results Of 126 subjects, 101 received combination therapy, and 25 received standard rt-PA. Two (2%) patients in the combination group and 3 (12%) in the standard group had symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (odds ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–1.40; P=0.053). At 90 days, 49.5% of the combination group had mRS ≤1 or return to baseline mRS versus 36.0% in the standard group (odds ratio, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.70–4.31; P=0.23). After adjusting for age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, time to intravenous rt-PA, and baseline mRS, the odds ratio was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 0.51–3.76; P=0.52). Conclusions The combined regimen of intravenous rt-PA and eptifibatide studied in this trial was safe and provides evidence that a phase III trial is warranted to determine efficacy of the regimen. PMID:23887841

  3. Regulatory role of microRNA-30b and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the pathogenesis of cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIUQIN; GAO, YONG; MENG, ZHAOYUN; ZHANG, CUI; QI, QINDE

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in drug-induced early cognitive impairment and the underlying mechanism concerning microRNA (miR)-30b. A mouse model of cognitive impairment was established by intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine (2 mg/kg body weight) for 13 days. Behavioral performance was assessed using the Morris water maze (MWM) test. The mRNA expression levels of PAI-1 and miR-30b were detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The protein expression levels of PAI-1 in the hippocampus and blood were determined using western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The MWM test demonstrated that, on days 3 and 4, the escape latency was significantly elevated in the model mice in comparison with control group (P<0.05). In addition, the length of swimming path was significantly increased (P<0.05), while the number of times of crossing the platform location was significantly reduced in the model mouse group (P<0.05) in comparison with the control group. qPCR demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of PAI-1 in the model mice was significantly elevated in the hippocampus and blood in comparison with the control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that the protein expression levels of PAI-1 were significantly elevated in the hippocampus and blood in the model group, in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). Notably, the levels of miR-30b in the hippocampus and blood were significantly decreased in the model mice in comparison with the control group (P<0.01). To conclude, the expression levels of PAI-1 were significantly elevated in mice with scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment, which may be associated with the downregulation of miR-30b. The findings from the present study suggest that miR-30b may be involved in the regulation of PAI-1, which would contribute to the pathogenesis of cognitive

  4. Utility of a single mid-trimester measurement of plasminogen activator Type 1 and fibronectin to predict preeclampsia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ajibola, S. O.; Adeyemo, T. A.; Afolabi, B. B.; Akanmu, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia (PE) is the second most common cause of maternal death after obstetric hemorrhage in Africa, a resource-limited region. This study was designed to examine the potential usefulness of a single screening plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibronectin (FN) level for the prediction of PE in pregnant women. Materials and Methods: In a cohort of 180 pregnant women who were normotensive at baseline, venous blood samples were obtained before 20 weeks of gestation for the assay of plasma levels of PAI-1 and FN levels measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay technique. Twenty nonpregnant normotensive women were also evaluated as a control group. Outcomes of gestation were evaluated and correlated with the plasma levels of PAI and FN measured at mid-trimester. Mean plasma values of PAI-1 and FN were also compared between the different outcome groups. Results: Plasma PAI-1 level was significantly higher in the pregnant women (8.68 ± 0.56 ng/ml) than in nonpregnant controls (5.55 ± 0.32 ng/ml) (P = 0.01). However, plasma FN did not show any significant difference in pregnant women (2.60 ± 0.37 μg/ml) and nonpregnant controls (2.60 ± 0.23 μg/ml) (P = 0.9). Mid-trimester mean plasma PAI-1 level measured in women who developed PE (7.08 ± 5.49 ng/ml, n = 12) and gestational hypertension (GH) (9.78 ± 6.2 ng/ml, n = 13) was not significantly different in comparison to normotensive pregnant women (8.78 ± 5.63 ng/ml, n = 153) (P = 0.75). Likewise, the mean FN level in women who developed PE was also not significantly different from nonpreeclamptics; however, the FN level in the pregnant women who developed GH was significantly different from women who remained normotensive throughout pregnancy (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Single mid-trimester assessment of PAI-1 and FN levels in maternal plasma was not found to be useful in predicting PE as an outcome of pregnancy in the study population.

  5. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis and radial immunodiffusion assay using plasminogen purified from fresh human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Magoon, E. H.; Austen, K. F.; Spragg, Jocelyn

    1974-01-01

    Plasminogen was purified from fresh human plasma by affinity chromatography and gel filtration and was characterized functionally, electrophoretically and on a weight basis. After antibody raised against this material was demonstrated to be monospecific for plasminogen/plasmin, it was employed in an immunoelectrophoretic analysis of plasminogen activated in several ways and in a radial immunodiffusion assay of human plasma plasminogen, where the mean level found was 476 μg/ml. ImagesFIG. 5FIG. 8 PMID:4143118

  6. Pneumatic displacement with perfluoropropane gas and intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator for subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage after focal laser photocoagulation in central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Al Rubaie, Khalid; Espinoza, Juan V; Lasave, Andres F; Savino-Zari, Dario; Arevalo, Fernando A; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report the visual and anatomic outcomes of pneumatic displacement with perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas and intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator (IVTPA) for subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage after focal laser photocoagulation in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Method. Interventional, retrospective case report of one eye (one patient). Outcome measures included visual acuity (VA), central macular thickness (CMT), and size of the lesion at two weeks of followup. Fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) were used to measure anatomic outcomes. Results. A 35-year-old man with history of chronic CSCR received focal laser photocoagulation in the right eye two days before presentation. At initial examination, VA was 20/200 (ETDRS chart), CMT was 398 μ, and a subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage was seen. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) at a dose of 25 µg/0.1 mL was injected intravitreally before intravitreal C3F8 injection, and prone positioning was indicated postoperatively. At 24 hours, the hemorrhage had been displaced inferiorly and VA improved to 20/100. Two weeks later, VA improved to 20/80, CMT decreased to 225 μ, and the hemorrhage decreased without foveal involvement. Conclusions. The technique seems safe and effective in treating visually significant subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage. PMID:25485161

  7. Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

  8. Pneumatic Displacement with Perfluoropropane Gas and Intravitreal Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Subretinal Subfoveal Hemorrhage after Focal Laser Photocoagulation in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Juan V.; Lasave, Andres F.; Savino-Zari, Dario; Arevalo, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report the visual and anatomic outcomes of pneumatic displacement with perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas and intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator (IVTPA) for subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage after focal laser photocoagulation in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Method. Interventional, retrospective case report of one eye (one patient). Outcome measures included visual acuity (VA), central macular thickness (CMT), and size of the lesion at two weeks of followup. Fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) were used to measure anatomic outcomes. Results. A 35-year-old man with history of chronic CSCR received focal laser photocoagulation in the right eye two days before presentation. At initial examination, VA was 20/200 (ETDRS chart), CMT was 398 μ, and a subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage was seen. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) at a dose of 25 µg/0.1 mL was injected intravitreally before intravitreal C3F8 injection, and prone positioning was indicated postoperatively. At 24 hours, the hemorrhage had been displaced inferiorly and VA improved to 20/100. Two weeks later, VA improved to 20/80, CMT decreased to 225 μ, and the hemorrhage decreased without foveal involvement. Conclusions. The technique seems safe and effective in treating visually significant subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage. PMID:25485161

  9. Inhibitory effect of berberine on the invasion of human lung cancer cells via decreased productions of urokinase-plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, P.-L.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Wang, C.-J.; Hsu, J.-L.; Chou, F.-P. . E-mail: fpchou@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-07-01

    Berberine, a compound isolated from medicinal herbs, has been reported with many pharmacological effects related to anti-cancer and anti-inflammation capabilities. In this study, we observed that berberine exerted a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the motility and invasion ability of a highly metastatic A549 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. In cancer cell migration and invasion process, matrix-degrading proteinases are required. A549 cell treated with berberine at various concentrations showed reduced ECM proteinases including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA) by gelatin and casein zymography analysis. The inhibitory effect is likely to be at the transcriptional level, since the reduction in the transcripts levels was corresponding to the proteins. Moreover, berberine also exerted its action via regulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The upstream mediators of the effect involved c-jun, c-fos and NF-{kappa}B, as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation of the proteins. These findings suggest that berberine possesses an anti-metastatic effect in non-small lung cancer cell and may, therefore, be helpful in clinical treatment.

  10. High Expression of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Is Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis of Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Do, Sung-Im; Hyun, Keehoon; Park, Yong Lai; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Chae, Seoung Wan; Sohn, Jin Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we evaluated the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by performing immunohistochemical staining to determine whether they were reliable prognostic markers in patients with breast cancer. Methods Demographic and clinicopathological parameters of 214 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 80 patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who were diagnosed and treated from 2006 to 2010 were analyzed. Tissue microarray was constructed and immunohistochemical staining was performed for each specimen. Results Univariate analyses showed that age at diagnosis, history of hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, skin and chest wall invasion, Paget disease, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen receptor positivity, and triple-negative subtype were significantly associated with patient prognosis (p<0.005). Patients with DCIS showed higher PAI-1 expression than patients with IDC (82.5% and 36.2%, respectively; p=0.012). Lymph node metastasis was more frequent in patients with high uPA levels than in patients with low uPA levels (p=0.001). Conclusion Our results suggested that PAI-1 was involved in tumor progression in the early stages of breast cancer, such as DCIS. In addition, our results suggested that high uPA levels were associated with the lymph node metastasis of IDC. PMID:27382391

  11. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene is located at region q21. 3-q22 of chromosome 7 and genetically linked with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, K.W.; Winqvist, R.; Riccio, A.; Andreasen, P.A.; Sartorio, R.; Nielsen, L.S.; Stuart, N.; Stanislovitis, P.; Watkins, P.; Douglas, R.

    1987-12-01

    The regional chromosomal location of the human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1) was determined by three independent methods of gene mapping. PAI1 was localized first to 7cen-q32 and then to 7q21.3-q22 by Southern blot hybridization analysis of a panel of human and mouse somatic cell hybrids with a PAI1 cDNA probe and in situ hybridization, respectively. The authors frequent HindIII restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the PAI1 gene with an information content of 0.369. In family studies using this polymorphism, genetic linkage was found between PAI1 and the loci for erythropoietin (EPO), paraoxonase (PON), the met protooncogene (MET), and cystic fibrosis (CF), all previously assigned to the middle part of the long arm of chromosome 7. The linkage with EPO was closest with an estimated genetic distance of 3 centimorgans, whereas that to CF was 20 centimorgans. A three-point genetic linkage analysis and data from previous studies showed that the most likely order of these loci is EPO, PAI1, PON, (MET, CF), with PAI1 being located centromeric to CF. The PAI1 RFLP may prove to be valuable in ordering genetic markers in the CF-linkage group and may also be valuable in genetic analysis of plasminogen activation-related diseases, such as certain thromboembolic disorders and cancer.

  12. Calnexin and calreticulin bind to enzymically active tissue-type plasminogen activator during biosynthesis and are not required for folding to the native conformation.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, S; Bulleid, N J

    1997-01-01

    The roles of the endoplasmic-reticulum lectins calnexin and calreticulin in the folding of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) have been investigated using an in vitro translation system that reconstitutes these processes as they would occur in the intact cell. Using co-immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized tPA with antibodies to calnexin and calreticulin, it was demonstrated that the interaction of tPA with both lectins was dependent upon tPA glycosylation and glucosidase trimming. When tPA was synthesized in the presence of semi-permeabilized cells under conditions preventing complex formation with calnexin and calreticulin, the translation product had a specific plasminogenolytic activity identical with that when synthesized under conditions permitting interactions with both lectins. Furthermore, complexes of tPA bound to calnexin and calreticulin were shown to be enzymically active. These results demonstrate that calnexin and calreticulin can form a stable interaction with correctly folded tPA; however, such interactions are not required for the synthesis of enzymically active tPA. PMID:9359841

  13. Cell-free synthesis of enzymically active tissue-type plasminogen activator. Protein folding determines the extent of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Bulleid, N J; Bassel-Duby, R S; Freedman, R B; Sambrook, J F; Gething, M J

    1992-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is synthesized in mammalian cells as a mixture of two forms that differ in their extent of N-linked glycosylation. We have investigated the mechanism underlying this variation in glycosylation, using a cell-free system that consists of a rabbit reticulocyte lysate optimized for the formation of disulphide bonds and supplemented with dog pancreas microsomal membranes. Molecules of human t-PA synthesized in vitro are enzymically active and responsive to natural activators and inhibitors, and are glycosylated in a pattern identical with that of the protein produced in vivo. This demonstrates that t-PA synthesized in vitro folds into the same conformation as the protein synthesized in vivo. We show that the extent of glycosylation of individual t-PA molecules is dependent on the state of folding of the polypeptide chain, since the probability of addition of an oligosaccharide side chain at Asn-184 is decreased under conditions that promote the formation of enzymically active molecules. This variation in glycosylation is independent of the rate of protein synthesis. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1520279

  14. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven- and freeze-dried protein hydrolysate from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Elavarasan, K; Shamasundar, B A; Badii, Faraha; Howell, Nazlin

    2016-09-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven-dried (OD-FPH) and freeze-dried (FD-FPH) protein hydrolysates derived from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala) muscle, using papain, were investigated. Amino acid profiles indicated a higher proportion of hydrophobic residues in OD-FPH and hydrophilic residues in FD-FPH samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed random coil structure in OD-FPH and β-sheet in FD-FPH samples. The approximate molecular weight of peptides in OD-FPH and FD-FPH was in the range of 7030-339Da. The IC50 values for ACE inhibition by OD-FPH and FD-FPH samples were found to be 1.15 and 1.53mg of proteinml(-1), respectively. The ACE-inhibitory activity of OD-FPH was more stable (during sequential digestion, using pepsin and pancreatin) than that of FD-FPH sample. The study suggested that the ACE inhibitory activity of protein hydrolysate was not affected by oven-drying. PMID:27041318

  15. Dissecting Mannose 6-Phosphate-Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 Receptor Complexes That Control Activation and Uptake of Plasminogen in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Leksa, Vladimir; Pfisterer, Karin; Ondrovičová, Gabriela; Binder, Brigitte; Lakatošová, Silvia; Donner, Clemens; Schiller, Herbert B.; Zwirzitz, Alexander; Mrvová, Katarína; Pevala, Vladimir; Kutejová, Eva; Stockinger, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    The plasminogen (Plg) activation cascade on the cell surface plays a central role in cell migration and is involved in a plethora of physiological and pathological processes. Its regulation is coordinated by many receptors, in particular the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR, CD87), receptors that physically interact and functionally cooperate with uPAR, and Plg binding molecules. Here we studied the impact of one of the Plg binding molecules, the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (M6P-IGF2R, CD222), on cellular Plg activation. By developing both in vitro and in vivo Plg activation assays on size-fractionated lysates of M6P-IGF2R-silenced cells, we identified Plg-associated complexes with M6P-IGF2R as the regulatory factor. Using lipid raft preserving versus dissolving detergents, we found lipid dependence of the Plg regulatory function of these complexes. Furthermore, M6P-IGF2R-silencing in uPAR-positive human cell lines reduced internalization of Plg, resulting in elevated Plg activation. In contrast, the expression of human M6P-IGF2R in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from M6P-IGF2R knock-out mice enhanced Plg internalization. Finally, peptide 18–36 derived from the Plg-binding site within M6P-IGF2R enhanced Plg uptake. Thus, by targeting Plg to endocytic pathways, M6P-IGF2R appears to control Plg activation within cells that might be important to restrict plasmin activity to specific sites and substrates. PMID:22613725

  16. Design, synthesis, and antihypertensive activity of curcumin-inspired compounds via ACE inhibition and vasodilation, along with a bioavailability study for possible benefit in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiao-Dong; Liao, Li-Zhen; Dong, Xiao-Bian; Hu, Xun; Guo, Yue; Du, Zhi-Min; Liao, Xin-Xue; Wang, Li-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of a novel series of curcumin-inspired compounds via a facile synthetic route. The structures of these derivatives were ascertained using various spectroscopic and analytic techniques. The pharmacological effects of the target analogs were assessed by assaying their inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). All of the synthesized derivatives exhibited considerable inhibition of ACE, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 1.23 to 120.32 μM. In a docking analysis with testicular ACE (tACE), the most promising inhibitor (4j) was efficiently accommodated in the deep cleft of the protein cavity, making close interatomic contacts with Glu162, His353, and Ala356, comparable with lisinopril. Compounds 4i, 4j, 4k, and 4l were further selected for determination of their vasodilator activity (cardiac output and stroke volume) on isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. The bioavailability of compound 4j was determined in experimental mice. PMID:26792980

  17. Design, synthesis, and antihypertensive activity of curcumin-inspired compounds via ACE inhibition and vasodilation, along with a bioavailability study for possible benefit in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiao-dong; Liao, Li-zhen; Dong, Xiao-bian; Hu, Xun; Guo, Yue; Du, Zhi-min; Liao, Xin-xue; Wang, Li-chun

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of a novel series of curcumin-inspired compounds via a facile synthetic route. The structures of these derivatives were ascertained using various spectroscopic and analytic techniques. The pharmacological effects of the target analogs were assessed by assaying their inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). All of the synthesized derivatives exhibited considerable inhibition of ACE, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 1.23 to 120.32 μM. In a docking analysis with testicular ACE (tACE), the most promising inhibitor (4j) was efficiently accommodated in the deep cleft of the protein cavity, making close interatomic contacts with Glu162, His353, and Ala356, comparable with lisinopril. Compounds 4i, 4j, 4k, and 4l were further selected for determination of their vasodilator activity (cardiac output and stroke volume) on isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. The bioavailability of compound 4j was determined in experimental mice. PMID:26792980

  18. Biochemical, thrombolytic and pharmacokinetic properties of rt-PA P47G, K49N, a substitution variant of human tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Nelles, L; Li, X K; Vanlinthout, I; De Cock, F; Lijnen, H R; Collen, D

    1992-04-01

    rt-PA P47G, K49N, a substitution variant of recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA), in which proline at position 47 and lysine at position 49 were replaced by glycine and asparagine respectively, was previously described by Ahern et al. (J Biol Chem 1990; 265:5540-5) to have an extended in vivo half-life with unaltered in vitro fibrinolytic properties. Because this variant might possess an increased in vivo thrombolytic potency, we have constructed its cDNA, expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells and determined its biochemical, thrombolytic and pharmacokinetic properties relative to those of home-made rt-PA and of alteplase (Actilyse). The specific fibrinolytic activities on fibrin plates were 160,000 +/- 17,000, 210,000 +/- 88,000 and 460,000 +/- 72,000 IU/mg (mean +/- SEM) for rt-PA P47G, K49N, rt-PA and alteplase, respectively, while the catalytic efficiencies for plasminogen activation (k2/Km) in the absence of fibrin were comparable (1.1 to 1.7 x 10(-3) microM-1s-1). Fibrin enhanced the rate of plasminogen activation by rt-PA P47G, K49N 100-fold and by both wild-type molecules 390-fold. Binding of the variant rt-PA to fibrin was significantly reduced, but its affinity for lysine-Sepharose was unaltered. In an in vitro clot lysis system, consisting of a radiolabeled human plasma clot submersed in plasma, 50% clot lysis in 2 h required 0.67 +/- 0.14 micrograms/ml rt-PA P47G, K49N, 0.36 +/- 0.01 micrograms/ml rt-PA and 0.17 +/- 0.01 micrograms/ml alteplase, respectively (mean +/- SEM; n = 3 or 4). At these doses residual fibrinogen levels at 2 h were in excess of 80%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1631793

  19. Isolation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) from human placenta. Evidence for vitronectin/PAI-2 complexes in human placenta extract.

    PubMed

    Radtke, K P; Wenz, K H; Heimburger, N

    1990-12-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2), found in human placenta and pregnancy plasma, was prepared in a highly purified and functionally active form from human placenta. The purification was achieved by a combination of Rivanol and ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by chromatography on DEAE Affigel Blue, hydroxylapatite and phenylalanine-Sepharose. PAI-2, which is precipitated by low Rivanol concentrations, can be selectively redissolved from the pellet by increasing the Rivanol concentration in the presence of a reducing agent, i.e. dithiothreitol. The purified protein shows a molecular mass of 45 kDa in SDS PAGE, cross-reacts with monoclonal antibodies against PAI-2 (Mab'PAI-2), and inhibits the amidolytic activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) towards the chromogenic substrate Glu-Gly-Arg-pNA (S-2444). The specific activity of the purified inhibitor was 52,300 units/mg, attaining 71,000 units/mg in peak fractions. In the immunopurification of placental extract on anti-PAI-2 Sepharose, the eluate showed the expected reaction with Mab' PAI-2, and it also cross-reacted with anti-vitronectin serum. In order to complement these results, anti-vitronectin Sepharose was used for immunopurification of placenta extract. In Western Blot experiments the eluates of anti PAI-2 Sepharose and anti-vitronectin Sepharose both showed a heterogeneous pattern of high molecular weight bands recognized by either polyclonal antiserum against vitronectin or Mab'PAI-2. In either case, reduction of the eluates releases mainly a 45-kDa band, which is recognized by Mab'PAI-2, or 80-kDa and 76-kDa bands recognized by anti-serum against vitronectin. These data suggest that the predominant form of PAI-2 in placenta extract is heterogeneous and of high molecular mass, containing complexes in which vitronectin is covalently bound to PAI-2 by disulfide bridges. PMID:1708670

  20. In vitro and in vivo antiangiogenic activity of a novel deca-peptide derived from human tissue-type plasminogen activator kringle 2

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Li; Xu, Xun; Zhao, Hui; Gu, Qing; Zou, Haidong

    2010-06-11

    A synthetic deca-peptide corresponding to the amino acid sequence Arg{sup 54}-Trp{sup 63} of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) kringle 2 domain, named TKII-10, is produced and tested for its ability to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation, migration, tube formation in vitro, and angiogenesis in vivo. At the same time, another peptide TKII-10S composed of the same 10 amino acids as TKII-10, but in a different sequence, is also produced and tested. The results show that TKII-10 potently inhibits VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent, as well as sequence-dependent, manner in vitro while it is inactive in inhibiting endothelial cell proliferation. Furthermore, TKII-10 potently inhibits angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane and mouse cornea. The middle four amino acids DGDA in their sequence play an important role in TKII-10 angiogenesis inhibition{sub .} These results suggest that TKII-10 is a novel angiogenesis inhibitor that may serve as a prototype for antiangiogenic drug development.

  1. Treatment of High-risk Venous Thrombosis Patients Using Low-dose Intraclot Injections of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Regional Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Richard; Butman, John A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Sherry, Richard M.; Pandalai, Prakash K.; Horne, McDonald K.; Lozier, Jay N.

    2013-01-01

    Seven patients with venous thrombosis and contraindications to traditional thrombolytic therapy, consisting of recent intracranial surgery, recent pineal or retroperitoneal hemorrhage, active genitourinary or gastrointestinal bleeding, epidural procedures, and impending surgery, were successfully treated with a modified thrombolytic regimen. To improve safety, prolonged continuous infusions of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was eliminated in favor of once-daily low-dose intraclot injections of tPA to minimize the amount and duration of tPA in the systemic circulation, and low-therapeutic or regional anticoagulation was used to reduce anticoagulant risks. These modifications may allow thrombolytic treatment for selected patients with severe venous thrombosis who are deemed to be at high risk. PMID:23273695

  2. PACAP Interacts with PAC1 Receptors to Induce Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA) Expression and Activity in Schwann Cell-Like Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Castorina, Alessandro; Waschek, James A.; Marzagalli, Rubina; Cardile, Venera; Drago, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of peripheral nerves depends on the abilities of rejuvenating axons to migrate at the injury site through cellular debris and altered extracellular matrix, and then grow along the residual distal nerve sheath conduit and reinnervate synaptic targets. Considerable evidence suggest that glial cells participate in this process, although the mechanisms remain to be clarified. In cell culture, regenerating neurites secrete PACAP, a peptide shown to induce the expression of the protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in neural cell types. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that PACAP can stimulate peripheral glial cells to produce tPA. More specifically, we addressed whether or not PACAP promoted the expression and activity of tPA in the Schwann cell line RT4-D6P2T, which shares biochemical and physical properties with Schwann cells. We found that PACAP dose- and time-dependently stimulated tPA expression both at the mRNA and protein level. Such effect was mimicked by maxadilan, a potent PAC1 receptor agonist, but not by the PACAP-related homolog VIP, suggesting a PAC1-mediated function. These actions appeared to be mediated at least in part by the Akt/CREB signaling cascade because wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, prevented peptide-driven CREB phosphorylation and tPA increase. Interestingly, treatment with BDNF mimicked PACAP actions on tPA, but acted through both the Akt and MAPK signaling pathways, while causing a robust increase in PACAP and PAC1 expression. PACAP6-38 totally blocked PACAP-driven tPA expression and in part hampered BDNF-mediated effects. We conclude that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, stimulates tPA expression and activity in a Akt/CREB-dependent manner to promote proteolytic activity in Schwann-cell like cultures. PMID:25658447

  3. ACE inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Cardiology; American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the science: promoting self-care in persons with heart failure: ...

  4. Pulmonary embolism treated with a single dose of anisoylated lys-plasminogen streptokinase activator complex and systemic heparinization; a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Schalij, M J; van de Meeberg, P C; Marsman, J W; Maingay, D

    1992-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. Systemic heparinization is usually applied as the treatment of first choice. However, a subgroup of patients presenting with massive PE and haemodynamic deterioration die in the acute phase or remain severely disabled. Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of massive PE. This communication presents two patients with clinically massive PE of recent onset (confirmed by lung perfusion scans) who were successfully treated with a single i.v. dose of 30 mg of anisoylated lys-plasminogen streptokinase activator complex (APSAC, comparable to 1,500,000 U of streptokinase) followed by systemic heparinization for 7 days. Both patients showed a considerable improvement in their clinical condition shortly after APSAC administration. Control perfusion scans made after two days revealed marked reduction of perfusion defects. PMID:1579188

  5. Optimization of Crystals of an Inhibitory Antibody of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) with Hydrogen Peroxide and Low Protein Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongdong; Shi, Xiaoli; Parry, Graham; Chen, Liqing; Callahan, Jennifer A.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-07-19

    Optimization of protein crystal formation is often a necessary step leading to diffraction-quality crystals to enable collection of a full X-ray data set. Typical protein crystal optimization involves screening different components, e.g., pH, precipitants, and additives of the precipitant solution. Here we present an example using an inhibitory antibody of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) where such procedures did not yield diffracting crystals. In contrast, it was the treatment of the protein with hydrogen peroxide incubation and the protein concentration reduction that were found to be key factors in obtaining diffracting crystals. Final crystals diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom}, and belong to orthorhombic P212121 space group with unit cell parameters a = 37.162 {angstrom}, b = 84.474 {angstrom}, c = 134.030 {angstrom}, and contain one molecule of Fab fragment of anti-uro kinase receptor antibody in the asymmetric unit.

  6. The implementation of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke--a scientific position statement from the National Stroke Foundation and the Stroke Society of Australasia.

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been licensed in Australia for thrombolysis in selected patients with acute ischaemic stroke since 2003. The use of tPA is low but is increasing across Australia and national audits indicate efficacy and safety outcomes equivalent to international benchmarks. Implementing tPA therapy in clinical practice is, however, challenging and requires a coordinated multidisciplinary approach to acute stroke care across prehospital, emergency department and inpatient care sectors. Stroke care units are an essential ingredient underpinning safe implementation of stroke thrombolysis. Support systems such as care pathways, therapy delivery protocols, and thrombolysis-experienced multidisciplinary care teams are also important enablers. Where delivery of stroke thrombolysis is being planned, health systems need to be re-configured to provide these important elements. This consensus statement provides a review of the evidence for, and implementation of, tPA in acute ischaemic stroke with specific reference to the Australian health-care system. PMID:19545242

  7. TNFalpha-mediated plasminogen activation on neutrophils is involved in the high plasmin activity in mammary secretion of drying-off cows.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen K; Yu, Ting C; Chen, Shuen E; Peh, Ho C; Liu, Wen B; Chen, Ming T; Nagahata, Hajime; Chang, Chai J

    2009-11-01

    Interactions between inflammatory cytokines and plasminogen (Pg) activation system on immune cells are yet to be established. In previous studies we reported a somatic cell-associated elevation of proteolytic activity in mammary secretion of drying-off goats and cows. The purposes of the present study were to examine the role of TNF-alpha in polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-associated Pg activation, and the significance of this activation pathway for overall plasmin (Pm) activity in mammary secretion of drying-off cows. Results of experiments in vitro showed that the spontaneous Pg activation observed on fresh preparations of bovine blood PMN was completely blocked by anti bovine TNF-alpha antibody, and was further up-regulated by exogenous bovine TNF-alpha. Monitoring the parameters of mammary secretion of drying-off cows revealed that both somatic cell counts and differential PMN ratio was significantly elevated at weeks 1, 2 and 3 of milk stasis. Nevertheless, specific activity of soluble Pm in mammary secretion increased and the level of 17-kDa TNF-alpha decreased immediately following milk stasis. Iimmunoblotting revealed that although both 26-kDa pro-TNF-alpha and 17-kDa TNF-alpha were consistently present in somatic cells of mammary secretion collected at weeks 0, 1, 2 and 3 of milk stasis, only 26-kDa pro-TNF-alpha was present in somatic cells of milk during lactation. In-vitro assay indicated that cell-free mammary secretion of drying-off cows exerted no Pg activation bioactivity towards bovine blood PMN. Altogether, the current study suggests the existence of an active TNF-alpha-Pg-Pm autocrine/paracrine loop on the massively infiltrated PMN inside udders of drying-off cows, which involves extensive binding and internalization of 17-kDa TNF-alpha on PMN and consequently activation of Pg, resulting in high Pm activity and low 17-kDa TNF-alpha level in mammary secretion. These coordinated mechanisms may play a role in the defence of drying-off mammary

  8. Autocrine regulation of growth stimulation in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma by serine-proteinase-catalysed release of the urinary-type-plasminogen-activator N-terminal fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, D A; Kearns, A; Larsh, S; Enghild, J J; Stack, M S

    1999-01-01

    Ovarian carcinomas secrete single-chain urinary-type plasminogen activator (scuPA) and expression of uPA is up-regulated relative to normal ovarian epithelium, leading to an enhanced proteolytic capacity which may facilitate invasion. Furthermore, the uPA receptor (uPAR) is present on ovarian carcinoma cells and is occupied in tumour tissues. In the present study, incubation of scuPA with serum-free conditioned medium from ovarian carcinoma cells resulted in release of a 14 kDa polypeptide. N-terminal sequence analysis identified this fragment as the uPA N-terminal fragment (NTF), which contains a growth-factor and a kringle domain. NTF generation was abolished by serine-proteinase inhibitors, but not inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, and was not enhanced by the addition of plasminogen or plasmin. To determine whether ovarian carcinoma-cell growth is altered by uPA, the effect of exogenous scuPA or NTF on proliferation was analysed. Both NTF and scuPA induced a dose-dependent increase in proliferation, with maximal stimulation obtained at 10-20 nM. Furthermore, blocking the interaction of endogenous uPA with uPAR using anti-NTF antibodies significantly inhibited proliferation. Together these data indicate that, in addition to enhancing the invasive activity of ovarian carcinoma cells via increased pericellular proteolysis, uPA also acts as a mitogen for ovarian carcinoma cells, suggesting a biochemical mechanism whereby uPA may contribute to ovarian carcinoma progression by modulating both cell invasion and proliferation. PMID:10417342

  9. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, You-Dong; Liu, Yi-Yun; Ren, Yi-Fei; Liang, Zi-Hong; Wang, Hai-Yang; Zhao, Li-Bo; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke. Methods Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable score. Subgroup analysis, meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Trim and Fill method and Egger’s test were obtained to detect publication bias. Results We found that both endogenous tPA and rtPA had not enlarged infarction volume, or deteriorated neurological function. However, rtPA would disrupt blood-brain barrier, aggravate brain edema, induce intracerebral hemorrhage and increase mortality rate. Conclusions This meta-analysis reveals rtPA can lead to neurological side effects besides thrombolysis in mechanical animal stroke, which may account for clinical exacerbation for stroke patients that do not achieve vascular recanalization with rtPA. PMID:27387385

  10. Mapping the topographic epitope landscape on the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) by surface plasmon resonance and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai; Luo, Zhipu; Li, Rui; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Sidenius, Nicolai; Huang, Mingdong; Ploug, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR or CD87) is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein often expressed in the microenvironment of invasive solid cancers and high levels are generally associated with poor patient prognosis (Kriegbaum et al., 2011 [1]). uPAR is organized as a dynamic modular protein structure composed of three homologous Ly6/uPAR domains (LU).This internally flexible protein structure of uPAR enables an allosteric regulation of the interactions with its two principal ligands: the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the provisional matrix protein vitronectin (Vn) (Mertens et al., 2012; Gårdsvoll et al., 2011; Madsen et al., 2007 [2-4]). The data presented here relates to the non-covalent trapping of one of these biologically relevant uPAR-conformations by a novel class of monoclonal antibodies (Zhao et al., 2015 [5]) and to the general mapping of the topographic epitope landscape on uPAR. The methods required to achieve these data include: (1) recombinant expression and purification of a uPAR-hybrid protein trapped in the desired conformation [patent; WO 2013/020898 A12013]; (2) developing monoclonal antibodies with unique specificities using this protein as antigen; (3) mapping the functional epitope on uPAR for these mAbs by surface plasmon resonance with a complete library of purified single-site uPAR mutants (Zhao et al., 2015; Gårdsvoll et al., 2006 [5,6]); and finally (4) solving the three-dimensional structures for one of these mAbs by X-ray crystallography alone and in complex with uPAR [deposited in the PDB database as 4QTH and 4QTI, respectively]. PMID:26504891

  11. Project ACE Activity Sets. Book I: Grades 3, 4, and 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden City Schools, NC.

    Eleven activity sets suitable for supplementing social studies units in grades 3, 4, and 5 are presented. Each set lists appropriate resources, concepts, general objectives and instructional objectives for each activity within the set. Grade 3 sets are "You Can Help Conserve Our Natural Resources,""Urban Decay and Urban Renewal,""The Use of…

  12. Recovery of casein-derived peptides with in vitro inhibitory activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) using aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Evaldo Cardozo; Coimbra, Jane Sélia Dos Reis; de Oliveira, Eduardo Basílio; Bonomo, Renata Cristina Ferreira

    2014-10-22

    Peptides inhibiting the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) were obtained by trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of bovine milk casein, performed at 37°C, during 1, 2, 5, 8 and 24h. Results of in vitro inhibitory activity ranged between 13.4% and 78.5%. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was evidenced for hydrolysates obtained after 2h of reaction. Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) formed by polyethylene glycol of 1500gmol(-1) (PEG 1500)+sodium phosphate or potassium phosphates were produced and evaluated, in terms of partition coefficients (K) and extraction yields (y), to recovery the casein hydrolysates at room temperature. In ATPS containing sodium phosphate, the peptides showed a slightly greater affinity toward the bottom salt-rich phase (0.1≤K≤0.9; 5.7%≤y≤47%). In the case of ATPS containing potassium phosphates, these molecules showed substantially greater affinity toward the top polymer-rich phase (137≤K≤266; y≥99%). These results point out extraction using PEG 1500/potassium phosphate ATPS is an efficient technique to recover casein hydrolysates containing ACE inhibitors peptides. Outlined data will be helpful in integrating such unit operation to larger scale processes. PMID:25464099

  13. In Vitro and In Vivo Assessment of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Milk by Lactobacillus casei Strains.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhijie; Chi, Yujie

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of fermented soybean milk (FSM) by Lactobacillus casei strains in vitro was investigated in this study. Effects of fermented soybean milk administration by gavage on systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure was also evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) rats and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Results showed that, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM showed high ACE inhibitory activity in vitro test and ACE inhibitory activity of CICC 23184 FSM was higher than CICC 20280 FSM. The bioactive substances of FSM were peptide and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Their contents in CICC 20280 FSM and CICC 23184 FSM were 3.97 ± 0.67 mg/ml (peptide), 1.71 ± 0.36 mg/ml (GABA) and 5.17 ± 0.22 mg/ml (peptide), 1.57 ± 0.21 mg/ml (GABA), respectively. Moreover, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM administration by gavage could effectively lower the blood pressure of SHR to a normal level, while there was no effect on blood pressure of WKY rats. This result indicated that the bioactive substances could play an antihypertensive role when the blood pressure was not within the normal levels (high levels). PMID:27139252

  14. Nicotine stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression and cell invasiveness through mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species signaling in ECV304 endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khoi, Pham Ngoc; Park, Jung Sun; Kim, Nam Ho; Jung, Young Do

    2012-03-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression is elevated during inflammation, tissue remodeling and in many human cancers. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco, on uPAR expression and cell invasiveness in ECV304 endothelial cells. Nicotine stimulated uPAR expression in a dose-dependent manner and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 (Erk-1/2), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Specific inhibitors of MEK-1 (PD98059) and JNK (SP600125) inhibited the nicotine-induced uPAR expression, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 did not. Expression vectors encoding dominant negative MEK-1 (pMCL-K97M) and JNK (TAM67) also prevented nicotine-induced uPAR promoter activity. The intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content was increased by nicotine treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented nicotine-activated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and uPAR expression. Furthermore, exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased uPAR mRNA expression. Deleted and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the involvement of the binding sites of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and activator protein (AP)-1 in the nicotine-induced uPAR expression. Studies with expression vectors encoding mutated NF-κB signaling molecules and AP-1 decoy confirmed that NF-κB and AP-1 were essential for the nicotine-stimulated uPAR expression. MAPK (Erk-1/2 and JNK) and ROS functioned as upstream signaling molecules in the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, respectively. In addition, ECV304 endothelial cells treated with nicotine displayed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by uPAR neutralizing antibodies. The data indicate that nicotine induces uPAR expression via the MAPK/AP-1 and ROS/NF-κB signaling pathways and, in turn, stimulates invasiveness in human ECV304 endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells

  15. Characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the testis and assessment of the in vivo effects of the ACE inhibitor perindopril

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Cubela, R.B.; Sakaguchi, K.; Johnston, C.I.

    1988-07-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was characterized by radioligand studies utilizing the potent ACE inhibitor 351A, a derivative of lisinopril. Ligand binding characteristics were similar for ACE derived from testis, lung, and kidney, despite known differences in structure between ACe from these sources. This observation suggests that the ACE active enzymatic site is similar in different tissues. The effect of the orally active ACE inhibitor perindopril was studied ex vivo in tissues of the rat after oral gavage. Radioligand bound to tissue ACE was reduced after perindopril treatment, in tissue homogenates of lung and kidney, but not testis. Autoradiographs of radioligand binding to tissue sections obtained ex vivo after oral perindopril showed inhibition of ACE in the aorta, lung, and kidney, but did not reveal any inhibition of ACE in the testis. ACE in small vessels of the testis was inhibited as in the aorta, while at the same time testicular ACE was unaffected. ACE in rat testis appears to have a similar enzymatic binding site to ACE from the lung and kidney. Perindopril inhibited ACE in the lung and kidney but did not affect ACE in the testis, suggesting the drug is limited in testicular penetration by the blood-testis barrier. This may explain the lack of any reports of adverse effects of ACE inhibitors on testicular function.

  16. Polysaccharide with antioxidant, α-amylase inhibitory and ACE inhibitory activities from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hwee-Feng; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2016-04-01

    Functional polysaccharide was isolated from Momordica charantia, with a yield of 36% (w/w). M. charantia bioactive polysaccharide (MCBP) was an acidic and branched heteropolysaccharide with a molecular weight of 92 kDa. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis indicated that MCBP was a pectin-like polysaccharide with an esterification degree of 53% and it contains numerous monosaccharides, predominantly glucose, galactose, and galaturonic acid. The results also showed that MCBP exhibited free radical scavenging activity (31.9%), ferric reducing antioxidant power (0.95 mM), α-amylase inhibition (89.1%), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (94.1%). In the terms of functionality, MCBP showed a lower water-holding capacity but higher in oil-holding capacity, emulsifying activity and foaming capacity compared to citrus pectin. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated that MCBP formed gels with a porous structure, and flow analysis showed that the gel solution exhibited pseudoplastic shear-thinning behavior. These findings indicated that MCBP is a promising functional macromolecular carbohydrate for the food and nutraceutical industries. PMID:26778156

  17. Renal ACE immunohistochemical localization in NIDDM patients with nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Yoshikawa, H; Tanegashima, M; Miyagi, M; Kobayashi, M; Sakai, K; Hayashi, I; Aikawa, A; Ohara, T; Hasegawa, A

    1998-02-01

    A role of renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in diabetic nephropathy has been suggested. Immunohistochemical localization of ACE was studied in 20 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic nephropathy and 17 healthy kidney transplant donors, with ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism also examined in the latter. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that ACE staining was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced in glomeruli and slightly decreased in proximal tubules in diabetic patients. Glomeruli positive for ACE immunostaining were observed in 23.5% of the healthy subjects and in 80% of the diabetic patients. All patients with nodular lesions had ACE-positive glomeruli and showed significantly (P < 0.01) more intense glomerular ACE immunostaining than patients without nodular lesions. Among healthy controls, subjects with the DD genotype had ACE-positive glomeruli more frequently and tended to show slightly increased intensity on proximal tubule ACE immunostaining compared with subjects with other genotypes. These observations suggest that increased ACE localization in glomeruli is likely to be one of the factors in the increased renin-angiotensin system activity in glomeruli in patients with diabetic nephropathy. There is a possibility that ACE gene I/D polymorphism may be related to renal ACE immunohistochemical localization. PMID:9469501

  18. Staurosporine induces ganglion cell differentiation in part by stimulating urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression and activation in the developing chick retina

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeoun-Hee; Chang, Yongmin; Jung, Jae-Chang

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Staurosporine mediates stimulation of RGC differentiation in vitro cultured retinal neuroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Staurosporine mediates uPA activation during RGC differentiation in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of uPA blocks the staurosporine mediated RGC differentiation both in vitro and in ovo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, uPA may play a role in the staurosporine-mediated stimulation of RGC differentiation. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether staurosporine-mediated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activation is involved in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) differentiation. Retinal cells were isolated from developing chick retinas at embryonic day 6 (E6). Relatively few control cells grown in serum-free medium started to form processes by 12 h. In contrast, staurosporine-treated cells had processes within 3 h, and processes were evident at 8 h. Immunofluorescence staining showed that Tuj-1-positive cells with shorter neurites could be detected in control cultures at 18 h, whereas numerous Tuj-1 positive ganglion cells with longer neuritic extensions were seen in staurosporine-treated cultures. BrdU-positive proliferating cells were more numerous in control cultures than in staurosporine-treated cultures, and the BrdU staining was not detected in post-mitotic Tuj-1 positive ganglion cells. Western blotting of cell lysates showed that staurosporine induced high levels of the active form of uPA. The staurosporine-induced uPA signal was localized predominantly in the soma, neurites and axons of Tuj-1-positive ganglion cells. Amiloride, an inhibitor of uPA, markedly reduced staurosporine-induced Tuj-1 staining, neurite length, neurite number, and uPA staining versus controls. In developing retinas in ovo, amiloride administration remarkably reduced the staurosporine-induced uPA staining and RGC differentiation. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo data collectively indicate that

  19. Binding of human plasminogen to basement-membrane (type IV) collagen.

    PubMed

    Stack, M S; Moser, T L; Pizzo, S V

    1992-05-15

    Plasminogen, the zymogen form of the serine proteinase plasmin, has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes involving extracellular-matrix remodelling. We have previously demonstrated that the activation of plasminogen catalysed by tissue plasminogen activator is dramatically stimulated in the presence of basement-membrane-specific type IV collagen [Stack, Gonzalez-Gronow & Pizzo (1990) Biochemistry 29, 4966-4970]. The present paper describes the binding of plasminogen to type IV collagen. Plasminogen binds to both the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of basement-membrane collagen, with binding to the alpha 2(IV) chain preferentially inhibited by 6-aminohexanoic acid. This binding is specific and saturable, with Kd,app. values of 11.5 and 12.7 nM for collagen and gelatin respectively. Although collagen also binds to immobilized plasminogen, this interaction is unaffected by 6-aminohexanoic acid. Limited elastase proteolysis of plasminogen generated distinct collagen-binding fragments, which were identified as the kringle 1-3 and kringle 4 domains. No binding of collagen to mini-plasminogen was observed. These studies demonstrate a specific interaction between plasminogen and type IV collagen and provide further evidence for regulation of plasminogen activation by protein components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:1599390

  20. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  1. Ochratoxin A inhibits the production of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 by human blood mononuclear cells: Another potential mechanism of immune-suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiello, Maria R.; Rotunno, Crescenzia; Coluccia, Addolorata; Carratu, Maria R.; Di Santo, Angelomaria; Evangelista, Virgilio; Semeraro, Nicola; Colucci, Mario

    2008-06-01

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA), an ubiquitous contaminant of food products endowed with a wide spectrum of toxicity, affects several functions of mononuclear leukocytes. Monocytes/macrophages play a major role in fibrin accumulation associated with immune-inflammatory processes through the production of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 (PAI-2). We studied the effect of OTA on TF and PAI-2 production by human blood mononuclear cells (MNC). The cells were incubated for 3 or 18 h at 37 deg. C with non toxic OTA concentrations in the absence and in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or other inflammatory agents. TF activity was measured by a one-stage clotting test. Antigen assays were performed by specific ELISAs in cell extracts or conditioned media and specific mRNAs were assessed by RT-PCR. OTA had no direct effect on TF and PAI-2 production by MNC. However, OTA caused a dose-dependent reduction in LPS-induced TF (activity, antigen and mRNA) and PAI-2 (antigen and mRNA) production with > 85% inhibition at 1 {mu}g/ml. Similar results were obtained when monocyte-enriched preparations were used instead of MNC. TF production was also impaired by OTA (1 {mu}g/ml) when MNC were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (98% inhibition), IL-1{beta} (83%) or TNF-{alpha} (62%). The inhibition of TF and PAI-2 induction might represent a hitherto unrecognized mechanism whereby OTA exerts immunosuppressant activity.

  2. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  3. Stimulatory effect of an algal fucoidan on the release of vascular endothelial tissue-type plasminogen activator as a mechanism of fucoidan-mediated thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Min, Soon-Ki; Han, Sung-Mi; Jang, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-07-01

    Identifying a pharmacological means for increasing the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is always desirable to cure impaired production of this enzyme. An algal fucoidan has been shown to exhibit both novel thrombolytic and synergistic stimulatory effects in a mouse thrombosis model. The plasma levels of active t-PA were measured in mouse arterial thrombus models that were treated with various fucoidans to investigate the mechanism of thrombolysis. The mean plasma level of active t-PA after the infusion of fucoidan was 2.136 ± 0.231 ng/ml for nonthrombolytic Fucus fucoidan and 3.917 ± 0.0.529 ng/ml for thrombolytic Undaria fucoidan, which resulted in a 1.56-2.29-fold increase compared with the healthy control group (1.706 ± 0.194 ng/ml) and the untreated thrombus group (2.506 ± 0.301 ng/ml) (P < 0.01). An algal fucoidan has demonstrated to exert a thrombolytic and stimulatory effect via the induction of t-PA release in a dose-dependent manner in an arterial thrombosis model. PMID:26829364

  4. Cytoskeletal reorganization and TPA differently modify AP-1 to induce the urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene in LLC-PK1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; von der Ahe, D; Kiefer, B; Nagamine, Y

    1993-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is an extracellular protease and expressed in various cells that exhibit dynamic changes in cell morphology, suggesting a link between cytoskeletal reorganization (CSR) and uPA expression. CSR can be induced by pharmacological agents, such as by colchicine for microtubule cytoskeleton and by cytochalasin for microfilament cytoskeleton. Using these agents, we previously showed that CSR induced the uPA gene in LLC-PK1 cells independently of the protein kinase C and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Here we show that the induction of the uPA gene by CSR is mediated by the activation of c-Jun which interacts with an AP-1-like site located 2 kb upstream of the uPA gene. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) induces the uPA gene through the same elements, but additionally utilizes an adjacent PEA3 element and induces c-fos. Furthermore, CSR induces a greater accumulation and a more pronounced phosphorylation of c-Jun than TPA induction. AP-1 is a positive regulator of growth and oncogenesis, and CSR is an integral part of these processes. Our results provide a view how CSR and AP-1 could be coupled in these processes. We also show that TPA and CSR act synergistically, suggesting a model where an initial activation signal could be amplified by CSR. Images PMID:8346015

  5. Moraxella catarrhalis Binds Plasminogen To Evade Host Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim; Voraganti, Chandrashekar; Andersson, Tobias; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Su, Yu-Ching; Zipfel, Peter; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    Several bacterial species recruit the complement regulators C4b-binding protein, factor H, and vitronectin, resulting in resistance against the bactericidal activity of human serum. It was recently demonstrated that bacteria also bind plasminogen, which is converted to plasmin that degrades C3b and C5. In this study, we found that a series of clinical isolates (n = 58) of the respiratory pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis, which is commonly isolated from preschool children and adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), significantly binds human plasminogen. Ubiquitous surface protein A2 (UspA2) and hybrid UspA2 (UspA2H) were identified as the plasminogen-binding factors in the outer membrane proteome of Moraxella. Furthermore, expression of a series of truncated recombinant UspA2 and UspA2H proteins followed by a detailed analysis of protein-protein interactions suggested that the N-terminal head domains bound to the kringle domains of plasminogen. The binding affinity constant (KD) values of full-length UspA2(30-539) (amino acids 30 to 539 of UspA2) and full-length UspA2H(50-720) for immobilized plasminogen were 4.8 × 10(-8) M and 3.13 × 10(-8) M, respectively, as measured by biolayer interferometry. Plasminogen bound to intact M. catarrhalis or to recombinant UspA2/UspA2H was readily accessible for a urokinase plasminogen activator that converted the zymogen into active plasmin, as verified by the specific substrate S-2251 and a degradation assay with fibrinogen. Importantly, plasmin bound at the bacterial surface also degraded C3b and C5, which consequently may contribute to reduced bacterial killing. Our findings suggest that binding of plasminogen to M. catarrhalis may lead to increased virulence and, hence, more efficient colonization of the host. PMID:26099590

  6. Moraxella catarrhalis Binds Plasminogen To Evade Host Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim; Voraganti, Chandrashekar; Andersson, Tobias; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Su, Yu-Ching; Zipfel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Several bacterial species recruit the complement regulators C4b-binding protein, factor H, and vitronectin, resulting in resistance against the bactericidal activity of human serum. It was recently demonstrated that bacteria also bind plasminogen, which is converted to plasmin that degrades C3b and C5. In this study, we found that a series of clinical isolates (n = 58) of the respiratory pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis, which is commonly isolated from preschool children and adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), significantly binds human plasminogen. Ubiquitous surface protein A2 (UspA2) and hybrid UspA2 (UspA2H) were identified as the plasminogen-binding factors in the outer membrane proteome of Moraxella. Furthermore, expression of a series of truncated recombinant UspA2 and UspA2H proteins followed by a detailed analysis of protein-protein interactions suggested that the N-terminal head domains bound to the kringle domains of plasminogen. The binding affinity constant (KD) values of full-length UspA230–539 (amino acids 30 to 539 of UspA2) and full-length UspA2H50–720 for immobilized plasminogen were 4.8 × 10−8 M and 3.13 × 10−8 M, respectively, as measured by biolayer interferometry. Plasminogen bound to intact M. catarrhalis or to recombinant UspA2/UspA2H was readily accessible for a urokinase plasminogen activator that converted the zymogen into active plasmin, as verified by the specific substrate S-2251 and a degradation assay with fibrinogen. Importantly, plasmin bound at the bacterial surface also degraded C3b and C5, which consequently may contribute to reduced bacterial killing. Our findings suggest that binding of plasminogen to M. catarrhalis may lead to increased virulence and, hence, more efficient colonization of the host. PMID:26099590

  7. Enhancement or Suppression of ACE Inhibitory Activity by a Mixture of Tea and Foods for Specified Health Uses (FOSHU) That Are Marketed as “Support for Normal Blood Pressure”

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Isao; Hosono, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shigeto; Kurihara, Junichi; Itagaki, Fumio; Watanabe, Machiko

    2011-01-01

    The ACE inhibitory activities of mixtures of FOSHUs (Healthya, Goma-Mugicha, Lapis Support and Ameal) were examined in order to identify any antihypertensive interactions. Among combinations of Healthya with other samples that contain active peptides, only that with Ameal was found to have no inhibitory activity. Enhanced activity was observed in 2 other mixtures. The activity of a mixture of tea polyphenols and the whey component extracted from an Ameal solution was significantly decreased, thus demonstrating that whey protein lowered the ACE inhibitory activity of Healthya. Although oral administration of tea polyphenols alone significantly decreased SBP in SHR at 2 and 4 hr, combined administration with Ameal failed to decrease SBP at the same time points. In conclusion, the simultaneous intake of tea and FOSHUs that contain active peptides might affect daily self-antihypertensive management via enhancement or suppression of ACE inhibitory activity. PMID:22389857

  8. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    PubMed

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association. PMID:26555266

  9. NFkappaB-dependent regulation of urokinase plasminogen activator by proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract: effect on invasion by prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Ryoji; Madhyastha, Radha; Madhyastha, Harishkumar; Dhungana, Sandra; Nakajima, Yuichi; Omura, Sayuri; Maruyama, Masugi

    2010-09-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis present major obstacles to successful control of androgen-independent prostate cancer. Cell migration is a fundamental aspect of cancer cell metastasis. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system is implicated in cell migration and cancer metastasis and has potential to be developed as therapeutic target. In recent years, efficacy of dietary nutrients in preventing and curing cancer has gained increasing attention. One such promising candidate is proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract (GSE). We investigated the efficacy of GSE in regulating uPA expression and cell migration using highly metastatic androgen-independent PC3 prostate cancer cells as a model. GSE down-regulated uPA as a function of concentration. Additional studies showed that GSE inhibited DNA-binding activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB), which in turn decreased NFkappaB-dependent uPA transcription. Invasion assays revealed the inhibitory effect of GSE on PC3 cell migration. These in-vitro experiments demonstrate the therapeutic property of GSE as an antimetastatic agent by targeting uPA. PMID:20502321

  10. Elevated expression and release of tissue-type, but not urokinase-type, plasminogen activator after binding of autoantibodies to bullous pemphigoid antigen 180 in cultured human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, E; WEHR, B; TABENGWA, E M; REIMER, S; BRÖCKER, E-B; ZILLIKENS, D

    2004-01-01

    In bullous pemphigoid (BP), the binding of BP180-specific antibodies to their hemidesmosomal target antigen is not sufficient for blister formation, but must be accompanied by the release of proteases. Using plasminogen activator (PA) knock-out mice, the PA system has previously been shown to be a prerequisite for blister formation in experimental murine BP. Here, we found elevated levels of plasmin and tPA, but not of uPA, in blister fluid from BP patients (n = 7) compared to blisters from patients with toxic epidermal necrolysis (n = 4) and suction blisters in healthy controls (n = 7). Subsequently, we addressed the question whether keratinocytes release PA in response to the binding of anti-BP180 antibodies. Treatment of cultured normal human keratinocytes with BP IgG, but not with control IgG, led to both increased protein and mRNA levels of tPA, but not of uPA, as determined by ELISA and RT-PCR, respectively. The specificity of this finding was confirmed using BP180-deficient keratinocytes from a patient with generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa, where no tPA release was observed after stimulation with BP IgG. Our results show the elevated expression and release of tPA from normal human keratinocytes upon stimulation with antibodies to human BP180. Keratinocytes, by secreting tPA, may thus play an active role in blister formation of BP. PMID:15008985

  11. A systemic non-lytic state and local thrombolytic failure of anistreplase (anisoylated plasminogen streptokinase activator complex, APSAC) in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Brügemann, J; van der Meer, J; Takens, B H; Hillege, H; Lie, K I

    1990-01-01

    The relation between coronary thrombolysis and coagulation variables after administration of anistreplase (anisoylated plasminogen streptokinase activator complex, APSAC) was studied in patients with an acute myocardial infarction. Fifty eight consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction were given 30 U of anistreplase intravenously within 4 hours of the onset of symptoms. A fall in the plasma concentration fibrinogen to less than 1.0 g/l 90 minutes after administration of anistreplase was considered to reflect a systemic lytic state. Coronary angiography was performed 48 hours after thrombolytic treatment. The overall patency rate was 74% (43/58). Patency rates were significantly different in patients with a systemic lytic (83% (43/52)) and a systemic non-lytic state (0% (0/6)). The absence of a systemic lytic state after anistreplase administration seemed to be highly predictive of the failure of coronary thrombolysis. Coagulation studies showed evidence of inhibition of anistreplase induced fibrinolytic activity which may explain the failure of thrombolytic treatment in patients with evidence of a systemic non-lytic state. PMID:2271340

  12. Apigenin Attenuates Atherogenesis through Inducing Macrophage Apoptosis via Inhibition of AKT Ser473 Phosphorylation and Downregulation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-2

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ping; Liu, Bin; Wang, Qun; Fan, Qin; Diao, Jian-Xin; Tang, Jing; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Sun, Xue-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage survival is believed to be a contributing factor in the development of early atherosclerotic lesions. Dysregulated apoptosis of macrophages is involved in the inflammatory process of atherogenesis. Apigenin is a flavonoid that possesses various clinically relevant properties such as anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, and antitumor activities. Here we showed that apigenin attenuated atherogenesis in apoE−/− mice in an in vivo test. In vitro experiments suggested that apigenin induced apoptosis of oxidized low density lipoprotein- (OxLDL-) loaded murine peritoneal macrophages (MPMs). Proteomic analysis showed that apigenin reduced the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor 2 (PAI-2). PAI-2 has antiapoptotic effects in OxLDL-loaded MPMs. Enhancing PAI-2 expression significantly reduced the proapoptosis effects of apigenin. Molecular docking assay with AutoDock software predicted that residue Ser473 of Akt1 is a potential binding site for apigenin. Lentiviral-mediated overexpression of Akt1 wild type weakened the proapoptosis effect of apigenin in OxLDL-loaded MPMs. Collectively, apigenin executes its anti-atherogenic effects through inducing OxLDL-loaded MPMs apoptosis. The proapoptotic effects of apigenin were at least partly attributed to downregulation of PAI-2 through suppressing phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473. PMID:25960827

  13. Discovery and SAR of Novel and Selective Inhibitors of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator (uPA) with an Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gladysz, Rafaela; Adriaenssens, Yves; De Winter, Hans; Joossens, Jurgen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2015-12-10

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a biomarker and therapeutic target for several cancer types. Its inhibition is regarded as a promising, noncytotoxic approach in cancer therapy by blocking growth and/or metastasis of solid tumors. Earlier, we reported the modified substrate activity screening (MSAS) approach and applied it for the identification of fragments with affinity for uPA's S1 pocket. Here, these fragments are transformed into a novel class of uPA inhibitors with an imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine scaffold. The SAR for uPA inhibition around this scaffold is explored, and the best compounds in the series have nanomolar uPA affinity and selectivity with respect to the related trypsin-like serine proteases (thrombin, tPA, FXa, plasmin, plasma kallikrein, trypsin, FVIIa). Finally, the approach followed for translating fragments into small molecules with a decorated scaffold architecture is conceptually straightforward and can be expected to be broadly applicable in fragment-based drug design. PMID:26575094

  14. Attachment of primary neonatal rat astrocytes to vitronectin is mediated by integrins alphavbeta5 and alpha8beta1: modulation by the type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gladson, C L; Stewart, J E; Olman, M A; Chang, P L; Schnapp, L M; Grammer, J R; Benveniste, E N

    2000-04-01

    Vitronectin is expressed in a cell-specific manner in the developing brain and concentrated in the brain during disease processes, such as germinal matrix hemorrhage and infarction, in which there is breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we identified the integrin receptors that mediate attachment of primary neonatal rat astrocytes to vitronectin. Using fluorescent activated cell sorter and immunoprecipitation analyses, we established that the vitronectin receptor integrins alphavbeta5 and alpha8beta1, but not alphavbeta3, are expressed on neonatal rat astrocytes. Attachment of the neonatal astrocytes to vitronectin was inhibited (85%) in an additive manner by neutralizing anti-alphavbeta5 and anti-beta1 antibodies. Attachment to vitronectin was also inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the type I plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that unstimulated primary neonatal rat astrocytes attach to vitronectin, utilizing integrins alphavbeta5 and alpha8beta1, and that this attachment is regulated by PAI-1. PMID:10739899

  15. Regulated proteolytic processing of Reelin through interplay of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5, and their modulators.

    PubMed

    Krstic, Dimitrije; Rodriguez, Myriam; Knuesel, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular signaling protein Reelin, indispensable for proper neuronal migration and cortical layering during development, is also expressed in the adult brain where it modulates synaptic functions. It has been shown that proteolytic processing of Reelin decreases its signaling activity and promotes Reelin aggregation in vitro, and that proteolytic processing is affected in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, neither the pathophysiological significance of dysregulated Reelin cleavage, nor the involved proteases and their modulators are known. Here we identified the serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and two matrix metalloproteinases, ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5, as Reelin cleaving enzymes. Moreover, we assessed the influence of several endogenous protease inhibitors, including tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), α-2-Macroglobulin, and multiple serpins, as well as matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) on Reelin cleavage, and described their complex interplay in the regulation of this process. Finally, we could demonstrate that in the murine hippocampus, the expression levels and localization of Reelin proteases largely overlap with that of Reelin. While this pattern remained stable during normal aging, changes in their protein levels coincided with accelerated Reelin aggregation in a mouse model of AD. PMID:23082219

  16. Evaluation of Serum Fibrinogen, Plasminogen, α2-Anti-Plasmin, and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Levels (PAI) and Their Correlation with Presence of Retinopathy in Patients with Type 1 DM

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Sefika Burcak; Ugurlu, Nagihan; Yulek, Fatma; Simavli, Huseyin; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir; Erel, Ozcan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the world. Retinopathy can still progress despite optimal metabolic control. The aim of the study was to determine whether different degrees of DR (proliferative or nonproliferative) were associated with abnormally modulated hemostatic parameters in patients with T1DM. Method. 52 T1DM patients and 40 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Patients were subdivided into three categories. Group I was defined as those without retinopathy, group II with NPRP, and group III with PRP. We compared these subgroups with each other and the control group (Group IV) according to the serum fibrinogen, plasminogen, alpha2-anti-plasmin (α2-anti-plasmin), and PAI. Results. We detected that PAI-1, serum fibrinogen, and plasminogen levels were similar between the diabetic and control groups (P = 0.209, P = 0.224, and P = 0.244, resp.), whereas α2-anti-plasmin was higher in Groups I, II, and III compared to the control group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, resp.). There was a positive correlation between serum α2-anti-plasmin and HbA1c levels (r = 0,268, P = 0.031). Conclusion. To our knowledge there is scarce data in the literature about α2-anti-plasmin levels in type 1 diabetes. A positive correlation between α2-anti-plasmin with HbA1c suggests that fibrinolytic markers may improve with disease regulation and better glycemic control. PMID:24818165

  17. Cross-Talk between Human Mast Cells and Bronchial Epithelial Cells in Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Production via Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun H.; Kato, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Kulka, Marianna; Shin, Soon C.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promotes airway remodeling and that human and mouse mast cells (MCs) are an important source of PAI-1. In the present study we investigated MC–epithelial cell (EC) interactions in the production of PAI-1. We stimulated the human MC line LAD2 with IgE-receptor cross-linking and collected the supernatants. We incubated the human bronchial EC line BEAS-2B with the LAD2 supernatants and measured the level of PAI-1. When the supernatants from IgE-stimulated LAD2 were added to BEAS-2B, there was a significant enhancement of PAI-1 production by BEAS-2B. When we treated the MC supernatants with a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 neutralizing antibody, the MC-derived induction of PAI-1 from BEAS-2B was completely abrogated. Although TGF-β1 mRNA was constitutively expressed in resting LAD2, it was not highly induced by IgE-mediated stimulation. Nonetheless, active TGF-β1 protein was significantly increased in LAD2 after IgE-mediated stimulation. Active TGF-β1 produced by primary cultured human MCs was significantly reduced in the presence of a chymase inhibitor, suggesting a role of MC chymase as an activator of latent TGF-β1. This study indicates that stimulation of human MCs by IgE receptor cross-linking triggers activation of TGF-β1, at least in part via chymase, which in turn induces the production of PAI-1 by bronchial ECs. Our data suggest that human MCs may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma as a direct source of PAI-1 and by activating bronchial ECs to produce further PAI-1 via a TGF-β1–mediated activation pathway. PMID:24987792

  18. Cross-talk between human mast cells and bronchial epithelial cells in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production via transforming growth factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong H; Lee, Sun H; Kato, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Kulka, Marianna; Shin, Soon C; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promotes airway remodeling and that human and mouse mast cells (MCs) are an important source of PAI-1. In the present study we investigated MC-epithelial cell (EC) interactions in the production of PAI-1. We stimulated the human MC line LAD2 with IgE-receptor cross-linking and collected the supernatants. We incubated the human bronchial EC line BEAS-2B with the LAD2 supernatants and measured the level of PAI-1. When the supernatants from IgE-stimulated LAD2 were added to BEAS-2B, there was a significant enhancement of PAI-1 production by BEAS-2B. When we treated the MC supernatants with a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 neutralizing antibody, the MC-derived induction of PAI-1 from BEAS-2B was completely abrogated. Although TGF-β1 mRNA was constitutively expressed in resting LAD2, it was not highly induced by IgE-mediated stimulation. Nonetheless, active TGF-β1 protein was significantly increased in LAD2 after IgE-mediated stimulation. Active TGF-β1 produced by primary cultured human MCs was significantly reduced in the presence of a chymase inhibitor, suggesting a role of MC chymase as an activator of latent TGF-β1. This study indicates that stimulation of human MCs by IgE receptor cross-linking triggers activation of TGF-β1, at least in part via chymase, which in turn induces the production of PAI-1 by bronchial ECs. Our data suggest that human MCs may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma as a direct source of PAI-1 and by activating bronchial ECs to produce further PAI-1 via a TGF-β1-mediated activation pathway. PMID:24987792

  19. BBA70 of Borrelia burgdorferi Is a Novel Plasminogen-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Koenigs, Arno; Hammerschmidt, Claudia; Jutras, Brandon L.; Pogoryelov, Denys; Barthel, Diana; Skerka, Christine; Kugelstadt, Dominik; Wallich, Reinhard; Stevenson, Brian; Zipfel, Peter F.; Kraiczy, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi lacks endogenous, surface-exposed proteases. In order to efficiently disseminate throughout the host and penetrate tissue barriers, borreliae rely on recruitment of host proteases, such as plasmin(ogen). Here we report the identification of a novel plasminogen-binding protein, BBA70. Binding of plasminogen is dose-dependent and is affected by ionic strength. The BBA70-plasminogen interaction is mediated by lysine residues, primarily located in a putative C-terminal α-helix of BBA70. These lysine residues appear to interact with the lysine-binding sites in plasminogen kringle domain 4 because a deletion mutant of plasminogen lacking that domain was unable to bind to BBA70. Bound to BBA70, plasminogen activated by urokinase-type plasminogen activator was able to degrade both a synthetic chromogenic substrate and the natural substrate fibrinogen. Furthermore, BBA70-bound plasmin was able to degrade the central complement proteins C3b and C5 and inhibited the bacteriolytic effects of complement. Consistent with these functional activities, BBA70 is located on the borrelial outer surface. Additionally, serological evidence demonstrated that BBA70 is produced during mammalian infection. Taken together, recruitment and activation of plasminogen could play a beneficial role in dissemination of B. burgdorferi in the human host and may possibly aid the spirochete in escaping the defense mechanisms of innate immunity. PMID:23861404

  20. Human Recombinant ACE2 Reduces the Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oudit, Gavin Y.; Liu, George C.; Zhong, JiuChang; Basu, Ratnadeep; Chow, Fung L.; Zhou, Joyce; Loibner, Hans; Janzek, Evelyne; Schuster, Manfred; Penninger, Josef M.; Herzenberg, Andrew M.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Scholey, James W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most common causes of end-stage renal failure. Inhibition of ACE2 function accelerates diabetic kidney injury, whereas renal ACE2 is downregulated in diabetic nephropathy. We examined the ability of human recombinant ACE2 (hrACE2) to slow the progression of diabetic kidney injury. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male 12-week-old diabetic Akita mice (Ins2WT/C96Y) and control C57BL/6J mice (Ins2WT/WT) were injected daily with placebo or with rhACE2 (2 mg/kg, i.p.) for 4 weeks. Albumin excretion, gene expression, histomorphometry, NADPH oxidase activity, and peptide levels were examined. The effect of hrACE2 on high glucose and angiotensin II (ANG II)–induced changes was also examined in cultured mesangial cells. RESULTS Treatment with hrACE2 increased plasma ACE2 activity, normalized blood pressure, and reduced the urinary albumin excretion in Akita Ins2WT/C96Y mice in association with a decreased glomerular mesangial matrix expansion and normalization of increased α-smooth muscle actin and collagen III expression. Human recombinant ACE2 increased ANG 1–7 levels, lowered ANG II levels, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. mRNA levels for p47phox and NOX2 and protein levels for protein kinase Cα (PKCα) and PKCβ1 were also normalized by treatment with hrACE2. In vitro, hrACE2 attenuated both high glucose and ANG II–induced oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase activity. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with hrACE2 attenuates diabetic kidney injury in the Akita mouse in association with a reduction in blood pressure and a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity. In vitro studies show that the protective effect of hrACE2 is due to reduction in ANG II and an increase in ANG 1–7 signaling. PMID:19934006

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitor m-carboxycinnamic acid bis-hydroxamide attenuates plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in human pleural mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chi-Li; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chou, Yung-Chen; Hsiao, Che-Jen; Hsiao, Shih-Hsin; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Hsiao, George

    2012-04-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), primarily up-regulated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, is essential in the development of fibrosis. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) was shown to modulate gene expression and fibrogenesis in various tissues. However, the implications of HDAC in terms of PAI-1 expression and pleural fibrosis remain unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of m-carboxycinnamic acid bis-hydroxamide (CBHA), a hybrid-polar HDAC inhibitor, on the TGF-β1-induced expression of PAI-1 in a human pleural mesothelial cell line (MeT-5A). MeT-5A cells were treated with TGF-β1 in the presence or absence of CBHA. We assayed the expression and stability of PAI-1 mRNA and protein, PAI-1 promoter activity, the activation of Smad signaling, the protein-protein interactions of Smads with transcriptional cofactors Sp1 and coactivator p300, and the expression of the mRNA-stabilizing protein nucleolin. The results indicate that CBHA significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression, and attenuated PAI-1 promoter activity in MeT-5A cells. CBHA abrogated TGF-β1-induced Smad4 nuclear translocation, but not Smad2/3 activation. Furthermore, the association of Smad4 with p300, but not with Sp1, was disrupted by CBHA. Alternatively, CBHA suppressed TGF-β1-induced nucleolin expression, and thereby destabilized PAI-1 mRNA and decreased PAI-1 protein concentrations. These findings suggest that the inhibition of HDAC activity by CBHA may attenuate PAI-1 expression through the modulation of cellular signaling at multiple levels. Given the down-regulating effect of CBHA on PAI-1 expression, HDAC inhibitors should be tested further in animal models as potential therapeutic agents for pleural fibrosis. PMID:22033265

  2. Antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) protein hydrolysates produced by the proteases AFP, HT, Pro-G, actinidin and zingibain.

    PubMed

    Teh, Sue-Siang; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Carne, Alan; Birch, John

    2016-07-15

    Hemp protein isolates (HPIs) were hydrolysed by proteases (AFP, HT, ProG, actinidin and zingibain). The enzymatic hydrolysis of HPIs was evaluated through the degree of hydrolysis and SDS-PAGE profiles. The bioactive properties of the resultant hydrolysates (HPHs) were accessed through ORAC, DPPḢ scavenging and ACE-inhibitory activities. The physical properties of the resultant HPHs were evaluated for their particle sizes, zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity. HT had the highest rate of caseinolytic activity at the lowest concentration (0.1 mg mL(-1)) compared to other proteases that required concentration of 100 mg mL(-1) to achieve their maximum rate of caseinolytic activity. This led to the highest degree of hydrolysis of HPIs by HT in the SDS-PAGE profiles. Among all proteases and substrates, HT resulted in the highest bioactivities (ORAC, DPPḢ scavenging and ACE-inhibitory activities) generated from alkali extracted HPI in the shortest time (2 h) compared to the other protease preparations. PMID:26948606

  3. Gene Therapy to Promote Thromboresistance: Local Overexpression of Tissue Plasminogen Activator to Prevent Arterial Thrombosis in an in vivo Rabbit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, J. M.; Kattash, M.; Li, J.; Yuksel, E.; Kuo, M. D.; Lussier, M.; Weinfeld, A. B.; Saxena, R.; Rabinovsky, E. D.; Thung, S.; Woo, S. L. C.; Shenaq, S. M.

    1999-02-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) catalyzes the rate-limiting initial step in the fibrinolytic cascade. Systemic infusion of tPA has become the standard of care for acute myocardial infarction. However, even the relatively short-duration protocols currently employed have encountered significant hemorrhagic complications, as well as complications from rebound thrombosis. Gene therapy offers a method of local high-level tPA expression over a prolonged time period to avoid both systemic hemorrhage and local rebound thrombosis. To examine the impact of local tPA overexpression, an adenoviral vector expressing tPA was created. The construct was characterized functionally in vitro, and the function of the vector was confirmed in vivo by delivery to the rabbit common femoral artery. Systemic coagulation parameters were not perturbed at any of the doses examined. The impact of local overexpression of tPA on in vivo thrombus formation was examined subsequently in a stasis/injury model of arterial thrombosis. The construct effectively prevented arterial thrombosis in treated animals, whereas viral and nonviral controls typically developed occluding thrombi. This construct thus offers a viable technique for promoting a locally thromboresistant small-caliber artery.

  4. A milk protein gene promoter directs the expression of human tissue plasminogen activator cDNA to the mammary gland in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pittius, C.W.; Hennighausen, L.; Lee, E.; Westphal, H.; Nicols, E.; Vitale, J.; Gordon, K. )

    1988-08-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP) is a major whey protein in mouse milk. Its gene is expressed in the lactating mammary gland and is inducible by steroid and peptide hormones. A series of transgenic mice containing a hybrid gene in which human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) cDNA is under the control of the murine WAP gene promoter had previously been generated. In this study, 21 tissues from lactating and virgin transgenic female mice containing the WAP-tPA hybrid gene were screened for the distribution of murine WAP and human tPA transcripts. Like the endogenous WAP RNA, WAP-tPA RNA was expressed predominantly in mammary gland tissue and appeared to be inducible by lactation. Whereas WAP transcripts were not detected in 22 tissues of virgin mice, low levels of WAP-tPA RNA, which were not modulated during lactation, were found in tongue, kidney, and sublingual gland. These studies demonstrate that the WAP gene promoter can target the expression of a transgene to the mammary gland and that this expression is inducible during lactation.

  5. The diagnostic value of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor compared with C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in children with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Sirinoglu, Melis; Soysal, Ahmet; Karaaslan, Ayşe; Kepenekli Kadayifci, Eda; Cinel, Ismail; Koç, Ahmet; Tokuç, Gülnur; Yaman, Ali; Haklar, Goncagül; Şirikçi, Önder; Turan, Serap; Altınkanat Gelmez, Gülşen; Söyletir, Güner; Bakır, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the diagnostic value of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia. A prospective case-control study was performed. Patients included 29 children with febrile neutropenia (FN) and 27 control subjects without any infection or immunosuppressive condition. Blood samples were obtained on the day of admission and on the 4th to 7th days of the hospital stay. The median (minimum-maximum) serum levels of suPAR obtained on the first day of the admission were 2.08 (0.93-9.42) and 2.22 (1.08-5.13) ng/mL for the FN group and the control group, respectively. The median serum levels of suPAR in the FN and control groups were not significantly different (P = .053). The mean serum suPAR level was significantly higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors in the FN group (P < .05). In the FN group, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUCROC) for suPAR was 0.546, but no optimum cutoff value, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), or positive predictive value (PPV) was obtained. We conclude that suPAR is not useful as a diagnostic biomarker in children with febrile neutropenia; however, persistent high serum suPAR level may predict mortality in FN in children. PMID:27057782

  6. The mRNA expression of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor in human adipose tissue is positively correlated with body mass index.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hien Fuh; Chin, Kin Fah; Chan, Kok-Gan; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2015-06-01

    suPLAUR is the transcript variant that encodes the soluble form of the urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor (suPLAUR). This soluble protein has been shown to enhance leukocyte migration and adhesion, and its circulatory level is increased in inflammatory states. In this pilot study, we used RNA-Seq to examine the splicing pattern of PLAUR in omental adipose tissues from obese and lean individuals. Of the three transcript variants of the PLAUR gene, only the proportion of suPLAUR (transcript variant 2) increases in obesity. After removing the effects of gender and age, the expression of suPLAUR is positively correlated with body mass index. This observation was validated using RT-qPCR with an independent cohort of samples. Additionally, in our RNA-Seq differential expression analysis, we also observed, in obese adipose tissues, an up-regulation of genes encoding other proteins involved in the process of chemotaxis and leukocyte adhesion; of particular interest is the integrin beta 2 (ITGB2) that is known to interact with suPLAUR in leukocyte adhesion. These findings suggest an important role for suPLAUR in the recruitment of immune cells to obese adipose tissue, in the pathogenesis of obesity. PMID:26284904

  7. Neuroproteome Changes after Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Tissue Plasminogen Activator Administration in Rats: A Quantitative iTRAQ Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Merali, Zamir; Gao, Meah MingYang; Bowes, Tim; Chen, Jian; Evans, Kenneth; Kassner, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The thrombolytic, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the only approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). When administered after AIS, rt-PA has many adverse pleiotropic actions, which are currently poorly understood. The identification of proteins showing differential expression after rt-PA administration may provide insight into these pleiotropic actions. In this study we used a 2D-LC MS/MS iTRAQ proteomic analysis, western blotting, and pathway analysis to analyze changes in protein expression 24-hours after rt-PA administration in the cortical brain tissue of 36 rats that underwent a sham or transient middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery. After rt-PA administration we reported alterations in the expressions of 18 proteins, many of which were involved in excitatory neurotransmitter function or cytoskeletal structure. The expression changes of GAD2 and EAAT1 were validated with western blot. The interactions between the identified proteins were analyzed with the IPA pathway analysis tool and three proteins: DPYSL2, RTN4, and the NF-kB complex, were found to have characteristics of being key proteins in the network. The differential protein expressions we observed may reflect pleiotropic actions of rt-PA after experimental stroke, and shine light on the mechanisms of rt-PA's adverse effects. This may have important implications in clinical settings where thrombolytic therapy is used to treat AIS. PMID:24879061

  8. Preparation of ultrasound microbubbles crosslinked to albumin nanoparticles packaged with tissue-type plasminogen activator gene plasmid and method of in vivo transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Ji; Shang-Yi, Ji; Xia, He; Wen-Ping, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Aims To observe the effect of constructed ultrasound microbubble crosslinked to albium nanoparticles packaged with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) gene plasmid on the in vivo transfection. Methods The rabbits were chosen for all experiments. A highly expressive gene plasmid for tPA was constructed and packaged into a prepared nanoparticle with bovine serum albumin (BSA). This albium nanoparticle packaged with tPA gene plasmid was crosslinked to an ultrasound microbubble prepared with BSA and sucrose to form a nano-targeting vector system for tPA gene transfection. The transfection and effective expression of tPA in heart, liver, leg skeletal muscle and the cervical rib were detected with polyclonal antibodies to tPA using immunohistochemical method; the tPA level and D-dimer content of blood were also tested. Results The expression of tPA could be seen in the tissues mentioned above, with the increase in blood tPA level and D-dimer content from 0.20 ± 0.05 µg/L and 81.76 ± 9.84 µg/L before the operation, to the higher levels of 0.44 ± 0.05 µg/L and 669.28 ± 97.74 µg/L after transfection. Conclusion The nano-targeting vector system for tPA gene was contructed successfully. This provides a new theory and experimental method for the nano-targeted transgene.

  9. Recombinant T-cell Receptor Ligand Treatment Improves Neurological Outcome in the Presence of Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenbin; Libal, Nicole L.; Casper, Amanda; Bodhankar, Sheetal; Offner, Halina; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2014-01-01

    RTL1000 is a partial human MHC molecule coupled to a human myelin peptide. We previously demonstrated that RTL1000 was protective against experimental ischemic stroke in HLA-DR2 transgenic (DR2-Tg) mice. Since thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a standard therapy for stroke, we determined if RTL1000 efficacy is altered when combined with t-PA in experimental stroke. Male DR2-Tg mice underwent 60 min of intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). t-PA or vehicle was infused intravenously followed by either a single or 4 daily subcutaneous injections of RTL1000 or vehicle. Infarct size was measured by 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining at 24h or 96 h of reperfusion. Our data showed that t-PA alone reduced infarct size when measured at 24 h but not at 96 h after MCAO. RTL1000 alone reduced infarct size both at 24 and 96h after MCAO. Combining RTL1000 with t-PA did not alter its ability to reduce infarct size at either 24 or 96 h after MCAO and provides additional protection in t-PA treated mice at 24 h after ischemic stroke. Taken together, RTL1000 treatment alone improves outcome and provides additional protection in t-PA treated mice in experimental ischemic stroke. PMID:24953050

  10. Effect of ascorbate on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression and release from platelets and endothelial cells in an in-vitro model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Swarbreck, Scott B; Secor, Dan; Ellis, Christopher G; Sharpe, Michael D; Wilson, John X; Tyml, Karel

    2015-06-01

    The microcirculation during sepsis fails due to capillary plugging involving microthrombosis. We demonstrated that intravenous injection of ascorbate reduces this plugging, but the mechanism of this beneficial effect remains unclear. We hypothesize that ascorbate inhibits the release of the antifibrinolytic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) from endothelial cells and platelets during sepsis. Microvascular endothelial cells and platelets were isolated from mice. Cells were cultured and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), or thrombin (agents of sepsis), with/without ascorbate for 1-24 h. PAI-1 mRNA was determined by quantitative PCR. PAI-1 protein release into the culture medium was measured by ELISA. In platelets, PAI-1 release was measured after LPS, TNFα, or thrombin stimulation, with/without ascorbate. In endothelial cells, LPS and TNFα increased PAI-1 mRNA after 6-24 h, but no increase in PAI-1 release was observed; ascorbate did not affect these responses. In platelets, thrombin, but not LPS or TNFα, increased PAI-1 release; ascorbate inhibited this increase at low extracellular pH. In unstimulated endothelial cells and platelets, PAI-1 is released into the extracellular space. Thrombin increases this release from platelets; ascorbate inhibits it pH-dependently. The data suggest that ascorbate promotes fibrinolysis in the microvasculature under acidotic conditions in sepsis. PMID:25730478

  11. Induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene expression in murine liver by lipopolysaccharide. Cellular localization and role of endogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Fearns, C.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) gene expression primarily in endothelial cells in most organs of the mouse, with maximal induction by 3 hours. Here we show that induction in the liver occurs in a distinctly different pattern. For example, the increase in PAI-1 mRNA in liver was biphasic with an initial peak at 1 to 2 hours and a second peak at 6 to 8 hours. Moreover, in situ hybridization experiments revealed that PAI-1 mRNA was induced in both endothelial cells and hepatocytes. The endothelial cell response was monophasic and maximal between 1 and 4 hours, whereas the hepatocyte response was biphasic, peaking at 2 hours and again at 6 to 8 hours. To determine possible mechanisms involved in the induction of PAI-1 by LPS, we analyzed the tissues for changes in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha LPS caused a rapid induction of TNF-alpha mRNA in Kupffer cells, detectable within 15 minutes. Pretreatment of mice with anti-TNF antiserum before challenge with LPS reduced the subsequent increase in plasma levels of PAI-1 by 50 to 70% and significantly reduced the level of induction of PAI-1 mRNA in the liver at both early and late times. Pretreatment appeared to inhibit induction primarily within hepatocytes. These results suggest that LPS may induce PAI-1 in endothelial cells and hepatocytes by different mechanisms. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9033272

  12. Coagulation alterations due to local fibrinolytic therapy with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rauber, Klaus; Heidinger, Kathrin S.; Kemkes-Matthes, Bettina

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the systemic effects of local fibrinolytic therapy with low-dose recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA). Methods. Ten patients received intrathrombal infusion of 20 mg rt-PA and heparin for local thrombolysis and had subsequent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Eight controls underwent PTA and received heparin alone. We measured t-PA, D-Dimer, and fibrinogen levels before, directly after, and 20, 40, and 60 min and 24 hr after therapy. Results. In the thrombolysis group the t-PA level peaked immediately after infusion and then declined within 1 hr. D-Dimer increased and remained elevated, whereas in the control group only t-PA levels increased, and only after 24 hr. Fibrinogen remained within the normal range in both groups. Eight of ten patients in the thrombolysis group and seven of eight with PTA had clinical improvement after the procedure. Conclusions. The increase in D-Dimer in the rt-PA group indicates a good local fibrinolytic effect. The fact that fibrinogen levels remained unchanged indicates that there is a lack of systemic fibrinogenolysis.

  13. Conjunctive effects of the 5HT(2) receptor antagonist, sarpogrelate, on thrombolysis with modified tissue plasminogen activator in different laser-induced thrombosis models.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, T; Kitamori, K; Hashimoto, M; Watanabe, S; Giddings, J C; Yamamoto, J

    2000-01-01

    The effect of the serotonin (5HT(2)) receptor antagonist, sarpogrelate, was compared with that of the selective thrombin inhibitor, argatroban, in modified tissue plasminogen activator (mt-PA)-induced thrombolysis using two laser-induced thrombosis models reflecting different levels of vascular endothelial cell damage. Bolus intravenous infusions of mt-PA (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mg/kg) induced thrombolysis in a dose-dependent manner. Sarpogrelate (4.7 mg/kg b.i. + 1.0 mg/kg/h i.v.) given together with mt-PA (0.2 mg/kg b.i.) optimally enhanced thrombolysis (p < 0.05) in a helium-neon laser-induced model where endothelial damage was minimal but not in an argon laser model where desquamation of endothelial cells was recognized. In contrast, argatroban (0.5 mg/kg b.i. + 0.1 mg/kg/h i.v.) given with mt-PA (0.2 mg/kg b.i.) significantly enhanced thrombolysis in both laser models. The findings indicate that the effectiveness of sarpogrelate in thrombolytic therapy might depend on the extent of vascular damage. PMID:11357001

  14. Macromolecular interaction on a cAMP responsive region in the urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene: a role of protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    von der Ahe, D; Pearson, D; Nagamine, Y

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the regulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator gene expression by cAMP in LLC-PK1 cells. We found a cAMP responsive region 3.4 kb upstream of the transcription initiation site, which comprised three protein-binding domains designated A, B, and C. Domains A and B both contain a sequence, TGACG, homologous to a consensus cAMP response element (CRE; TGACGTCA). Effective cAMP-mediated induction was achieved when these two domains were linked with domain C, which by itself did not confer cAMP responsiveness to a heterologous promoter nor contained CRE-like sequence, suggesting a functional cooperation among these domains. Results of competition studies using gel retardation and DNase I footprinting assays suggest that there is a protein-protein interaction between a CRE binding protein and a domain C binding protein. In gel retardation assays, binding of a nuclear protein to domains A and B was strongly augmented by addition of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, whereas the protein binding to domain C was slightly inhibited, suggesting that protein phosphorylation is involved in the regulation of protein-DNA interaction. Images PMID:2159633

  15. Lack of association between Ser413/Cys polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) and premature coronary atherosclerotic disease

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Babak; Jooyan, Najmeh; Bahari, Marzieh; Senemar, Sara; Yavarian, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2) is a serine protease inhibitor of the fibrinolytic system produced predominantly by the macrophages and monocytes. It has been demonstrated that fibrinolysis regulation has a great importance in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic plaques. Thus in the current investigation, we sought to determine whether Ser413/Cys polymorphism (rs6104) of PAI-2 gene could be associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk factors. Ser413/Cys polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP technique using Mwo I restriction enzyme for 184 men under 50 years of age and 216 women less than 55 years of age who underwent diagnostic coronary angiography. Data on the history of familial myocardial infarction or other heart diseases, hypertension, and smoking habit were collected by a simple questionnaire. Fasting levels of blood sugar, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were also measured by enzymatic methods. Frequencies of the Ser413 and Cys413 alleles were 0.760 and 0.240 in the whole population, respectively. The PAI-2 gene variant analyzed was not significantly associated with either the prevalence of premature CAD or the classical risk factors of CAD development such as diabetes, serum cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, hypertension, familial history of heart dysfunction or smoking.

  16. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Resulting from Endometrial Carcinogenesis Enhances Tumor Invasion and Correlates with Poor Outcome of Endometrial Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Yen; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Yun; Huang, Ching-Ting; Tang, Yu-Chien; Huang, Hsien-Da; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the dysregulated genes involved in the tumorigenesis and progression of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEC), and their possible mechanisms. Endometrial specimens including normal endometrial tissues, atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and EEC were analyzed. The expression profiles were compared using GeneChip Array. The gene expression levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR in the training and testing sets to correlate the clinico-pathological parameters of EEC. Immunoblotting, in vitro cell migration and invasion assays were performed in human endometrial cancer cell lines and their transfectants. In microarray analysis, seven dysregulated genes were identified. Only the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were higher in EEC with deep myometrial invasion, positive lympho-vascular space invasion, lymph node metastasis, and advanced stages. After multivariate analysis, uPA was the only independent poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival in the EEC patients (hazard ratio: 4.65, p = 0.03). uPA may enhance the migratory and invasive capabilities of endometrial tumor cells by the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p38 molecules. uPA is a dysregulated gene involved in the tumorigenesis, bio-pathological features and outcomes of EEC. uPA may be a potential molecule and target for the detection and treatment of EEC. PMID:26033187

  17. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor induced non-small cell lung cancer invasion and metastasis requires NHE1 transporter expression and transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Provost, J.J.; Rastedt, D.; Canine, J.; Ngyuen, T.; Haak, A.; Kutz, C.; Berthesen, N.; Slusser, A.; Anderson, K.; Dorsam, G; Wallert, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancers (NSLC) are aggressive cancers that are insensitive to chemotherapies and accounts for nearly 33% of all cancer deaths in the United States. Two hallmarks of cancer that allow cells to invade and metastasize are sustained proliferation and enhanced motility. In this study we investigate the relationship between urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) signaling and Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) expression and activity. Methods and Results The addition of 10nM uPA increased the carcinogenic potential of three NSCLC cell lines, NCI-H358, NCI-H460, and NCI-H1299. This included an increase in the rate of cell proliferation 1.6 to 1.9 fold; an increase in the percentage of cells displaying stress fibers 3.05 to 3.17 fold; and an increase in anchorage-independent growth from 1.64 to 2.0 fold. In each of these cases the increase was blocked when the experiments were performed with NHE1 inhibited by 10 μM EIPA (ethylisopropyl amiloride). To further evaluate the role of uPA/uPAR and NHE1 in tumor progression we assessed signaling events using full-length uPA compared to the uPA amino terminal fragment (ATF). Comparing uPA and ATF signaling in H460 cells, we found that both uPA and ATF increased stress fiber formation approximately 2 fold, while uPA increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activity 5.44 fold compared to 2.81 fold for ATF. To expand this signaling study, two new cell lines were generated, one with reduced NHE1 expression (H460 NHE1 K/D) and one with reduced uPAR expression (H460 uPAR K/D). Using the K/D cell lines we found that neither uPA nor ATF could stimulate stress fiber formation or MMP9 activity in cells with dramatically decreased NHE1 or uPAR expression. Finally, using in vivo tumor formation studies in athymic mice we found that when mice were injected with H460 cells 80% of mice formed tumors with an average volume of 390 mm3. This was compared to 20% of H460 uPAR K/D injected mice

  18. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:138-139.

  19. The receptor for urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPAR) controls plasticity of cancer cell movement in mesenchymal and amoeboid migration style.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Luciani, Cristina; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Elisa; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Chillà, Anastasia; Chiarugi, Paola; Fibbi, Gabriella; Del Rosso, Mario

    2014-03-30

    The receptor for the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) is up-regulated in malignant tumors. Historically the function of uPAR in cancer cell invasion is strictly related to its property to promote uPA-dependent proteolysis of extracellular matrix and to open a path to malignant cells. These features are typical of mesenchymal motility. Here we show that the full-length form of uPAR is required when prostate and melanoma cancer cells convert their migration style from the "path generating" mesenchymal to the "path finding" amoeboid one, thus conferring a plasticity to tumor cell invasiveness across three-dimensional matrices. Indeed, in response to a protease inhibitors-rich milieu, prostate and melanoma cells activated an amoeboid invasion program connoted by retraction of cell protrusions, RhoA-mediated rounding of the cell body, formation of a cortical ring of actin and a reduction of Rac-1 activation. While the mesenchymal movement was reduced upon silencing of uPAR expression, the amoeboid one was almost completely abolished, in parallel with a deregulation of small Rho-GTPases activity. In melanoma and prostate cancer cells we have shown uPAR colocalization with β1/β3 integrins and actin cytoskeleton, as well integrins-actin co-localization under both mesenchymal and amoeboid conditions. Such co-localizations were lost upon treatment of cells with a peptide that inhibits uPAR-integrin interactions. Similarly to uPAR silencing, the peptide reduced mesenchymal invasion and almost abolished the amoeboid one. These results indicate that full-length uPAR bridges the mesenchymal and amoeboid style of movement by an inward-oriented activity based on its property to promote integrin-actin interactions and the following cytoskeleton assembly. PMID:24681666

  20. The receptor for urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPAR) controls plasticity of cancer cell movement in mesenchymal and amoeboid migration style

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Elisa; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Chillà, Anastasia; Chiarugi, Paola; Fibbi, Gabriella; Rosso1, Mario Del

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) is up-regulated in malignant tumors. Historically the function of uPAR in cancer cell invasion is strictly related to its property to promote uPA-dependent proteolysis of extracellular matrix and to open a path to malignant cells. These features are typical of mesenchymal motility. Here we show that the full-length form of uPAR is required when prostate and melanoma cancer cells convert their migration style from the “path generating” mesenchymal to the “path finding” amoeboid one, thus conferring a plasticity to tumor cell invasiveness across three-dimensional matrices. Indeed, in response to a protease inhibitors-rich milieu, prostate and melanoma cells activated an amoeboid invasion program connoted by retraction of cell protrusions, RhoA-mediated rounding of the cell body, formation of a cortical ring of actin and a reduction of Rac-1 activation. While the mesenchymal movement was reduced upon silencing of uPAR expression, the amoeboid one was almost completely abolished, in parallel with a deregulation of small Rho-GTPases activity. In melanoma and prostate cancer cells we have shown uPAR colocalization with β1/β3 integrins and actin cytoskeleton, as well integrins-actin co-localization under both mesenchymal and amoeboid conditions. Such co-localizations were lost upon treatment of cells with a peptide that inhibits uPAR-integrin interactions. Similarly to uPAR silencing, the peptide reduced mesenchymal invasion and almost abolished the amoeboid one. These results indicate that full-length uPAR bridges the mesenchymal and amoeboid style of movement by an inward-oriented activity based on its property to promote integrin-actin interactions and the following cytoskeleton assembly. PMID:24681666

  1. Spatio-temporal course of macrophage-like cell accumulation after experimental embolic stroke depending on treatment with tissue plasminogen activator and its combination with hyperbaric oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, D.; Heindl, M.; Kacza, J.; Laignel, F.; Küppers-Tiedt, L.; Schneider, D.; Grosche, J.; Boltze, J.; Löhr, M.; Hobohm, C.; Härtig, W.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation following ischaemic stroke attracts high priority in current research, particularly using human-like models and long-term observation periods considering translational aspects. The present study aimed on the spatio-temporal course of macrophage-like cell accumulation after experimental thromboembolic stroke and addressed microglial and astroglial reactions in the ischaemic border zone. Further, effects of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as currently best treatment for stroke and the potentially neuroprotective co-administration of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) were investigated. Rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion and were assigned to control, tPA or tPA+HBO. Twenty-four hours, 7, 14 and 28 days were determined as observation time points. The accumulation of macrophage-like cells was semiquantitatively assessed by CD68 staining in the ischaemic area and ischaemic border zone, and linked to the clinical course. CD11b, ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) were applied to reveal delayed glial and neuronal alterations. In all groups, the accumulation of macrophage-like cells increased distinctly from 24 hours to 7 days post ischaemia. tPA+HBO tended to decrease macrophage-like cell accumulation at day 14 and 28. Overall, a trend towards an association of increased accumulation and pronounced reduction of the neurological deficit was found. Concerning delayed inflammatory reactions, an activation of microglia and astrocytes with co-occurring neuronal loss was observed on day 28. Thereby, astrogliosis was found circularly in contrast to microglial activation directly in the ischaemic area. This study supports previous data on long-lasting inflammatory processes following experimental stroke, and additionally provides region-specific details on glial reactions. The tendency towards a decreasing macrophage-like cell accumulation after tPA+HBO needs to be discussed

  2. Inhibition of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Attenuates Transforming Growth Factor-β-Dependent Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition and Differentiation of Fibroblasts to Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Omori, Keitaro; Hattori, Noboru; Senoo, Tadashi; Takayama, Yusuke; Masuda, Takeshi; Nakashima, Taku; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Hamada, Hironobu; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is central during the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, in which the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) also has an established role. TGF-β is also known to be the strongest inducer of PAI-1. To investigate the link between PAI-1 and TGF-β in fibrotic processes, we evaluated the effect of SK-216, a PAI-1-specific inhibitor, in TGF-β-dependent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation. In human alveolar epithelial A549 cells, treatment with TGF-β induced EMT, whereas co-treatment with SK-216 attenuated the occurrence of EMT. The inhibition of TGF-β-induced EMT by SK-216 was also confirmed in the experiment using murine epithelial LA-4 cells. Blocking EMT by SK-216 inhibited TGF-β-induced endogenous production of PAI-1 and TGF-β in A549 cells as well. These effects of SK-216 were not likely mediated by suppressing either Smad or ERK pathways. Using human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells, we demonstrated that SK-216 inhibited TGF-β-dependent differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. We also observed this inhibition by SK-216 in human primary lung fibroblasts. Following these in vitro results, we tested oral administration of SK-216 into mice injected intratracheally with bleomycin. We found that SK-216 reduced the degree of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Although the precise mechanisms underlying the link between TGF-β and PAI-1 regarding fibrotic process were not determined, PAI-1 seems to act as a potent downstream effector on the pro-fibrotic property of TGF-β. In addition, inhibition of PAI-1 activity by a PAI-1 inhibitor exerts an antifibrotic effect even in vivo. These data suggest that targeting PAI-1 as a downstream effector of TGF-β could be a promising therapeutic strategy for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26859294

  3. Effect of Temperature Downshift on the Transcriptomic Responses of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Using Recombinant Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Production Culture.

    PubMed

    Bedoya-López, Andrea; Estrada, Karel; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Ramírez, Octavio T; Altamirano, Claudia; Segovia, Lorenzo; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Trujillo-Roldán, Mauricio A; Valdez-Cruz, Norma A

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are widely used as biopharmaceuticals, but their production by mammalian cell culture is expensive. Hence, improvement of bioprocess productivity is greatly needed. A temperature downshift (TDS) from 37°C to 28-34°C is an effective strategy to expand the productive life period of cells and increase their productivity (qp). Here, TDS in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures, initially grown at 37°C and switched to 30°C during the exponential growth phase, resulted in a 1.6-fold increase in the qp of recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (rh-tPA). The transcriptomic response using next-generation sequencing (NGS) was assessed to characterize the cellular behavior associated with TDS. A total of 416 (q > 0.8) and 3,472 (q > 0.9) differentially expressed transcripts, with more than a 1.6-fold change at 24 and 48 h post TDS, respectively, were observed in cultures with TDS compared to those at constant 37°C. In agreement with the extended cell survival resulting from TDS, transcripts related to cell growth arrest that controlled cell proliferation without the activation of the DNA damage response, were differentially expressed. Most upregulated genes were related to energy metabolism in mitochondria, mitochondrial biogenesis, central metabolism, and avoidance of apoptotic cell death. The gene coding for rh-tPA was not differentially expressed, but fluctuations were detected in the transcripts encoding proteins involved in the secretory machinery, particularly in glycosylation. Through NGS the dynamic processes caused by TDS were assessed in this biological system. PMID:26991106

  4. Effect of Temperature Downshift on the Transcriptomic Responses of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Using Recombinant Human Tissue Plasminogen Activator Production Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya-López, Andrea; Estrada, Karel; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Ramírez, Octavio T.; Altamirano, Claudia; Segovia, Lorenzo; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Trujillo-Roldán, Mauricio A.; Valdez-Cruz, Norma A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are widely used as biopharmaceuticals, but their production by mammalian cell culture is expensive. Hence, improvement of bioprocess productivity is greatly needed. A temperature downshift (TDS) from 37°C to 28–34°C is an effective strategy to expand the productive life period of cells and increase their productivity (qp). Here, TDS in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures, initially grown at 37°C and switched to 30°C during the exponential growth phase, resulted in a 1.6-fold increase in the qp of recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (rh-tPA). The transcriptomic response using next-generation sequencing (NGS) was assessed to characterize the cellular behavior associated with TDS. A total of 416 (q > 0.8) and 3,472 (q > 0.9) differentially expressed transcripts, with more than a 1.6-fold change at 24 and 48 h post TDS, respectively, were observed in cultures with TDS compared to those at constant 37°C. In agreement with the extended cell survival resulting from TDS, transcripts related to cell growth arrest that controlled cell proliferation without the activation of the DNA damage response, were differentially expressed. Most upregulated genes were related to energy metabolism in mitochondria, mitochondrial biogenesis, central metabolism, and avoidance of apoptotic cell death. The gene coding for rh-tPA was not differentially expressed, but fluctuations were detected in the transcripts encoding proteins involved in the secretory machinery, particularly in glycosylation. Through NGS the dynamic processes caused by TDS were assessed in this biological system. PMID:26991106

  5. Irradiation-Induced Regulation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type-1 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Six Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lines of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Artman, Tuuli; Schilling, Daniela; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in neo-angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the irradiation-induced regulation of PAI-1 and VEGF in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines of varying radiation sensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six cell lines derived from SCCHN were investigated in vitro. The colorimetric AlamarBlue assay was used to detect metabolic activity of cell lines during irradiation as a surrogate marker for radiation sensitivity. PAI-1 and VEGF secretion levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 24, 48, and 72 h after irradiation with 0, 2, 6, and 10 Gy. The direct radioprotective effect of exogenous PAI-1 was measured using the clonogenic assay. For regulation studies, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha), or both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha were downregulated using siRNA. Results: Although baseline levels varied greatly, irradiation led to a comparable dose-dependent increase in PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in all six cell lines. Addition of exogenous stable PAI-1 to the low PAI-1-expressing cell lines, XF354 and FaDu, did not lead to a radioprotective effect. Downregulation of TGF-beta1 significantly decreased VEGF secretion in radiation-sensitive XF354 cells, and downregulation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha reduced PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in radiation-resistant SAS cells. Conclusions: Irradiation dose-dependently increased PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in all SCCHN cell lines tested regardless of their basal levels and radiation sensitivity. In addition, TGF-beta1 and HIF-1alpha could be partly responsible for VEGF and PAI-1 upregulation after irradiation.

  6. Optimization of some conditions of Neutrase-catalyzed plastein reaction to mediate ACE-inhibitory activity in vitro of casein hydrolysate prepared by Neutrase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Kong, Bao-Hua; Zhao, Xin-Huai

    2014-02-01

    Casein hydrolysate was prepared by hydrolyzing casein with Neutrase and then modified by a Neutrase-catalyzed plastein reaction. The prepared hydrolysate had a degree of hydrolysis of 13.0% and exhibited ACE inhibition in vitro with an IC50 value of 40.4 μg⋅mL(-1). With the decreased amount of free amino groups of the modified hydrolysate as the response, some conditions of the plastein reaction including substrate concentration, enzyme to substrate ratio, reaction temperature and time were studied by single factor experiments and response surface methodology, and optimized finally as 62% (w/w), 3.0 kU⋅g(-1) peptides, 30 °C and 6.3 h, respectively. The maximum decreased amount of free amino groups of the modified hydrolysate prepared under these optimized conditions was 210.0 μmol⋅g(-1) peptides, while corresponding IC50 value was lowered to 14.7 μg⋅mL(-1). The present result indicates that Neutrase-catalyzed plastein reaction was capable of enhancing ACE-inhibitory activity in vitro of casein hydrolysate, and also highlights the importance of a forthcoming study to investigate the peptide compositions of the modified hydrolysate and the role of protease used in the plastein reaction. PMID:24493884

  7. Effects of Intravenous and Catheter Directed Thrombolytic Therapy with Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator (Alteplase) in Non-Traumatic Acute Limb Ischemia; A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saroukhani, Abbas; Ravari, Hassan; Pezeshki Rad, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous and catheter directed thrombolysis by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) in the patients with non-traumatic acute limb ischemia (ALI). Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial being performed between 2009 and 2011 in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. We included those patients who were<75 years, with symptoms of less than 14 days duration, ALI of grade IIa and IIb (according to Rutherford classification) and absence of distal run off. Baseline assessment of peripheral circulation performed in all the patients. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo intravenous (n=18) or catheter directed thrombolysis (n=20) with Alteplase. The primary endpoint of the study was improvement of clinical status measured by Rutherford classification, ankle brachial index (ABI), visual analogue scale (VAS) score measured at 1, 3 and 6 months. The secondary endpoint of the study was complete or near complete recanalization of the occluded artery. Results: A total number of 38 patients with mean age of 54.13±13.5 years were included in the study. There were 23 (60.5%) men and 15 (39.5%) women among the patients. Overall 3 (7.9%) patients had upper and 35 (92.1%) lower extremity ischemia. There was no significant difference between two study groups. None of the patients experienced major therapeutic side effects. Both ABI and VAS score improved in patients who have received first dose of t-PA within 24-hourof ALI. There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the 6-month clinical grade (p=0.088), VAS score (p=0.316) and ABI (p=0.360). The angiographic improvement was significantly higher in CDT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Intravenous and catheter directed thrombolysis with t-PA is a safe and effective method in treatment of acute arteriolar ischemia of extremities. However there both intravenous thrombolysis and CDT are comparable regarding the clinical outcome. PMID

  8. Epithelial and Stromal Cell Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Expression Differentially Correlates with Survival in Rectal Cancer Stages B and C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seong Beom; Chan, Charles; Dent, Owen F.; Mohamedali, Abidali; Kwun, Sun Young; Clarke, Candice; Fletcher, Julie; Chapuis, Pierre H.; Nice, Edouard C.; Baker, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been proposed as a potential prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. However, CRC uPAR expression remains controversial, especially regarding cell types where uPAR is overexpressed (e.g., epithelium (uPARE) or stroma-associated cells (uPARS)) and associated prognostic relevance. In this study, two epitope-specific anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) could discriminate expression of uPARE from uPARS and were used to examine this association with survival of stages B and C rectal cancer (RC) patients. Using immunohistochemistry, MAbs #3937 and R4 were used to discriminate uPARE from uPARS respectively in the central and invasive frontal regions of 170 stage B and 179 stage C RC specimens. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to determine association with survival. uPAR expression occurred in both epithelial and stromal compartments with differential expression observed in many cases, indicating uPARE and uPARS have different cellular roles. In the central and invasive frontal regions, uPARE was adversely associated with overall stage B survival (HR = 1.9; p = 0.014 and HR = 1.5; p = 0.031, respectively) reproducing results from previous studies. uPARS at the invasive front was associated with longer stage C survival (HR = 0.6; p = 0.007), reflecting studies demonstrating that macrophage peritumoural accumulation is associated with longer survival. This study demonstrates that different uPAR epitopes should be considered as being expressed on different cell types during tumour progression and at different stages in RC. Understanding how uPARE and uPARS expression affects survival is anticipated to be a useful clinical prognostic marker of stages B and C RC. PMID:25692297

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