Science.gov

Sample records for ace detection kit

  1. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  2. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  3. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part G. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: #22--Refrigerator Mechanic; #24--Motorcycle Repairperson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This fourth of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Competency Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Refrigerator Mechanic and Motorcycle Repairperson. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title, D.O.T. code, ACE number, career ladder, D.O.T. general educational…

  4. Theft Detection and Prevention. SPEC Kit 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    A 1977 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) survey of member institutions concerning book losses and theft detection systems found that more than half of the 90 respondents had installed or were installing electronic security systems (ESS's). This kit on theft detection and prevention in academic libraries contains: (1) planning documents from…

  5. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    SciTech Connect

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

  6. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part Q. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: #91--Meat Cutter; #92--Shipping Clerk; #93--Long Haul Truck Driver; #94--Truck Driver--Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This fourteenth of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Meat Cutter, Shipping Clerk, Long Haul Truck Driver, and Truck Driver--Light. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title, D.O.T. code, ACE number, career ladder, D.O.T.…

  7. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part R. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: #95--Bus Driver; #98--General Loader; #99--Forklift Operator; #100--Material Handler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This fifteenth of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Competency Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Bus Driver, General Loader, Forklift Operator, and Material Handler. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title, D.O.T. code, ACE number, career ladder, D.O.T.…

  8. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part F. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: #20--Body Fender Mechanic; #21--New Car Get-Ready Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This third of sixteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Body Fender Mechanic and New Car Get-Ready Person. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title, D.O.T. code, ACE number, career ladder, D.O.T. general educational developmental…

  9. Comparison of commercial kits for detection of cryptococcal antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, D C; Weinstein, M P; Fedorciw, B; Joho, K L; Thorpe, J J; Reller, L

    1994-01-01

    Although kits to detect cryptococcal antigen are used widely to diagnose cryptococcal infection, the comparative performance of commercially available assays has not been evaluated in the past decade. Therefore, we compared the sensitives and specificities of five commercially available kits for detecting cryptococcal antigen (four latex agglutination test kits--Calas [Meridian Diagnostics])--Crypto-LA [International Biological Labs], Myco-Immune [MicroScan], and Immy [Immunomycologics]--and an enzyme immunoassay kit, Premier [Meridian Diagnostics]) with culture for the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis and fungemia. Of 182 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and 90 serum samples submitted for cryptococcal antigen and fungal culture, 49 (19 and 30 samples, respectively) from 20 patients had a culture positive for Cryptococcus neoformans. For CSF specimens, the sensitivities and specificities of all kits were comparable (sensitivity, 93 to 100%; specificity, 93 to 98%). There was a significant difference in sensitivities of the kits when serum samples were tested with the International Biological Labs and MicroScan kits, which do not pretreat serum with pronase. These kits were less sensitive (sensitivity, 83%) than the Immy and Meridian latex kits (sensitivity, 97%), which do pretreat with pronase. The sensitivity of the Meridian enzyme immunoassay kit was comparable to that of the pronase-containing latex kits. These kits were of equivalent specificities (93 to 100%) when testing serum. Some of the currently available kits have limitations that need to be recognized for proper interpretation of results. Specifically, the use of pronase on serum samples reduces the number of false-positive results, and a titer of < or = 1:4 can be a false-positive result when CSF samples are being tested. PMID:7929757

  10. Adult Competency Education Kit. Basic Skills in Speaking, Math, and Reading for Employment. Part J. ACE Competency Based Job Descriptions: Sales Core Job Description; #36--Sales, Automotive Parts; #37--Sales, Retail; #38--Salesperson, Garden & Housewares; #39--Salesperson, Women's Garments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City, CA. Career Preparation Centers.

    This seventh of fifteen sets of Adult Competency Education (ACE) Competency Based Job Descriptions in the ACE kit contains job descriptions for Salesperson, Automotive Parts; Sales Clerk, Retail; Salesperson, Garden and Housewares; and Salesperson, Women's Garments. Each begins with a fact sheet that includes this information: occupational title,…

  11. Detection of hazelnuts and almonds using commercial ELISA test kits.

    PubMed

    Garber, Eric A E; Perry, Jesse

    2010-03-01

    Three commercial sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test kits for the detection of hazelnuts and almonds were evaluated. Limits of detection and dynamic ranges were determined for hazelnuts and almonds spiked into cooked oatmeal, dipping chocolate, and muffins (baked). The limit of detection values varied from 1 to 38 μg/g, depending on the food matrix and ELISA test kit. Percent recoveries based on the standards supplied with the test kits varied from 10% to 170%. It is impossible to ascertain whether the percent recoveries reflect the performance of the ELISAs or differences between the protein content of the nuts used to spike the samples and the test kit standards. Unfortunately, reference materials do not exist that can be used to compare the results from different test kits and standardize the test kit standards. Also, insufficient knowledge regarding the epitope specificity of the antibodies used in the ELISAs further hinders interpretation of the results generated by the different test kits.

  12. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    DOEpatents

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

    2014-03-11

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

  13. Foodproof Salmonella Detection Kit. Performance Tested Method 120301.

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, Charlotte; Schönenbrücher, Holger; Slaghuis, Jörg; Bubert, Andreas; Ossmer, Rolf; Junge, Benjamin; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia

    2009-01-01

    The foodproof Salmonella Detection Kit was previously validated in the Performance Tested Methods program for the detection of Salmonella species in a variety of foods, including milk powder, egg powder, coconut, cocoa powder, chicken breast, minced meat, sliced sausage, sausage, smoked fish, pasta, white pepper, cumin, dough, wet pet food, dry pet food, ice cream, watermelon, sliced cabbage, food dye, and milk chocolate. The method was shown to be equivalent to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service's Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook reference culture procedures. In the first Emergency Response Validation (ERV) extension study, peanut butter was inoculated with S. enterica. ser Typhimurium. For the low inoculation level (1.08 CFU/25 g), a Chi-square value of 2.25 indicated that there was no significant performance difference between the foodproof Salmonella Detection Kit and the FDA-BAM reference method. For high-level inoculation (11.5 CFU/25 g) and uninoculated control, there was 100% agreement between the methods. In the second ERV extension study, peanut butter was inoculated with S. enterica. ser Typhimurium. For both inoculation levels (0.1 and 0.5 CFU/25 g by most probable number), Chi-square values of 0 indicated that there was no significant performance difference between foodproof Salmonella Detection Kit and the FDA-BAM reference method. PMID:20166611

  14. Adaptive coherence estimator (ACE) for explosive hazard detection using wideband electromagnetic induction (WEMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvey, Brendan; Zare, Alina; Cook, Matthew; Ho, Dominic K. C.

    2016-05-01

    The adaptive coherence estimator (ACE) estimates the squared cosine of the angle between a known target vector and a sample vector in a transformed coordinate space. The space is transformed according to an estimation of the background statistics, which directly effects the performance of the statistic as a target detector. In this paper, the ACE detection statistic is used to detect buried explosive hazards with data from a Wideband Electromagnetic Induction (WEMI) sensor. Target signatures are based on a dictionary defined using a Discrete Spectrum of Relaxation Frequencies (DSRF) model. Results are summarized as a receiver operator curve (ROC) and compared to other leading methods.

  15. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  16. Comparison of the Anyplex(TM) II RV16 and Seeplex(®) RV12 ACE assays for the detection of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Huh, Hee Jae; Park, Kyung Sun; Kim, Ji-Youn; Kwon, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2014-08-01

    The Anyplex(TM) II RV16 detection kit (RV16; Seegene, Seoul, South Korea) is a multiplex real-time PCR assay based on tagging oligonucleotide cleavage extension. In this prospective study, we evaluated the RV16 assay by comparing with the Seeplex(®) RV12 ACE detection kit (RV12; Seegene), a multiplex end-point PCR kit. A total of 365 consecutive respiratory specimens were tested with both RV16 and RV12 assays in parallel and detected 140 (38.4%) and 89 (24.4%) positive cases, respectively. The positive percent agreement, negative percent agreement, and kappa values for the 2 assays were 95.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 89.4-98.3%), 80.4% (95% CI, 75.3-84.6%), and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.56-0.72), respectively. The monoplex PCR and sequencing for the samples with discrepant results revealed that majority of the results were concordant with the results from RV16 assays. In conclusion, the RV16 assay produces results comparable to the RV12 assay.

  17. BIOTECON diagnostics foodproof Listeria monocytogenes Detection Kit, 5' nuclease in combination with the foodproof ShortPrep II Kit.

    PubMed

    Junge, Benjamin; Grönewald, Cordt; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia

    2012-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food. The method is based on real-time PCR using hydrolysis probes (5' Nuclease). This advanced PCR method was designed to reduce the time necessary to achieve results from PCR reactions and to enable the user to monitor the amplification of the PCR product simultaneously, in real-time. After DNA isolation using the BIOTECON foodproof ShortPrep II Kit designed for the rapid preparation of L. monocytogenes DNA for direct use in PCR, the real-time detection of L. monocytogenes DNA is carried out using the foodproof Listeria monocytogenes Detection Kit. The kit provides primers and hydrolysis probes for sequence-specific detection, convenient premixed reagents, and controls for reliable interpretation of results. For the internal comparison study, three different foods (soft cheese, coalfish, and smoked ham) were analyzed, chosen from the 15 food groups recommended by the AOAC Research Institute for detection of L. monocytogenes. From each food, 20 samples were inoculated with a low level (1-10 CFU/25 g) and 20 samples with a high level (10-50 CFU/25 g) of L. monocytogenes. Additionally, five nonspiked samples were prepared from each food. Depending on the matrix, the food samples were examined with the test kits and compared with the cultural methods according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual or the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook.

  18. Low-cost field test kits for arsenic detection in water.

    PubMed

    Das, Joyati; Sarkar, Priyabrata; Panda, Jigisha; Pal, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic, a common contaminant of groundwater, affects human health adversely. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the maximum recommended contamination level of arsenic in drinking water is 10 μg/L. The purpose of this research was to develop user-friendly kits for detection of arsenic to measure at least up to 10 μg/L in drinking water, so that a preventive measure could be taken. Two different kits for detection of total arsenic in water are reported here. First, the arsenic in drinking water was converted to arsine gas by a strong reducing agent. The arsine produced was then detected by paper strips via generation of color due to reaction with either mercuric bromide (KIT-1) or silver nitrate (KIT-2). These were previously immobilized on the detector strip. The first one gave a yellow color and the second one grey. Both of these kits could detect arsenic contamination within a range of 10 μg/L-250 μg/L. The detection time for both the kits was only 7 min. The kits exhibited excellent performance compared to other kits available in the market with respect to detection time, ease of operation, cost and could be easily handled by a layman. The field trials with these kits gave very satisfactory results. A study on interference revealed that these kits could be used in the presence of 24 common ions present in the arsenic contaminated water. Though the kits were meant for qualitative assay, the results with unknown concentrations of real samples, when compared with atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) were in good agreement as revealed by the t-test. PMID:24117090

  19. Low-cost field test kits for arsenic detection in water.

    PubMed

    Das, Joyati; Sarkar, Priyabrata; Panda, Jigisha; Pal, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic, a common contaminant of groundwater, affects human health adversely. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the maximum recommended contamination level of arsenic in drinking water is 10 μg/L. The purpose of this research was to develop user-friendly kits for detection of arsenic to measure at least up to 10 μg/L in drinking water, so that a preventive measure could be taken. Two different kits for detection of total arsenic in water are reported here. First, the arsenic in drinking water was converted to arsine gas by a strong reducing agent. The arsine produced was then detected by paper strips via generation of color due to reaction with either mercuric bromide (KIT-1) or silver nitrate (KIT-2). These were previously immobilized on the detector strip. The first one gave a yellow color and the second one grey. Both of these kits could detect arsenic contamination within a range of 10 μg/L-250 μg/L. The detection time for both the kits was only 7 min. The kits exhibited excellent performance compared to other kits available in the market with respect to detection time, ease of operation, cost and could be easily handled by a layman. The field trials with these kits gave very satisfactory results. A study on interference revealed that these kits could be used in the presence of 24 common ions present in the arsenic contaminated water. Though the kits were meant for qualitative assay, the results with unknown concentrations of real samples, when compared with atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) were in good agreement as revealed by the t-test.

  20. Performances of Four Helicobacter pylori Serological Detection Kits Using Stool Antigen Test as Gold Standard

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to determine the performances of four Helicobacter pylori serological detection kits in different target groups, using Amplified IDEIA™ Hp StAR™ as gold standard. Kits studied were Rapid Immunochromatoghraphic Hexagon, Helicoblot 2.1, an EIA IgG kit and EIA IgA kit. Methods: Stool and blood samples were collected from 162 apparently healthy participants (control) and 60 Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Results: The performances of the four serological detection kits were found to be affected by gender, age, health status and ethnicity of the participants. In the control group, the Helicoblot 2.1 kit had the best performance (AUC = 0.85; p<0.05, accuracy = 86.4%), followed by EIA IgG (AUC = 0.75; p<0.05, accuracy = 75.2%). The Rapid Hexagon and EIA IgA kits had relatively poor performances. In the T2DM subgroup, the kits H2.1 and EIA IgG had best performances, with accuracies of 96.5% and 93.1% respectively. The performance of EIA IgG improved with adjustment of its cut-off value. Conclusion: The performances of the detection kits were affected by various factors which should be taken into consideration. PMID:27736910

  1. Comparison of the AdvanSure™ real-time RT-PCR and Seeplex(®) RV12 ACE assay for the detection of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Jung; Kwon, Hyeon Jeong; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-11-01

    The AdvanSure™ RV real-time PCR kit (AdvanSure; LG Life Sciences, Korea) is based on multiplex real-time PCR and can simultaneously detect 14 respiratory viruses. We compared the performance of the AdvanSure assay with the Seeplex RV 12 ACE detection kit (Seeplex; Seegene, Seoul, South Korea), a multiplex end-point PCR assay. A total of 454 consecutive respiratory specimens were tested with both AdvanSure and Seeplex assays; AdvanSure detected 153 (33.7%) positive cases and Seeplex detected 145 (31.9%) positive cases. The positive percent agreement, negative percent agreement, and kappa value for the two assays were 87.2% (95% CI, 80.3-92.1), 91.1% (95% CI, 87.2-93.9), and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.70-0.83), respectively. Compared with the Seeplex assay, the AdvanSure assay had a shorter turnaround time (3h vs. 8h) and a shorter hands-on time (<1h vs 2h). In conclusion, the AdvanSure assay demonstrated comparable performance to the Seeplex assay.

  2. [Sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA Kit for the detection of antidobies to Junin virus].

    PubMed

    Pirozhkov, A P; Timofeev, M A; Borisevich, I V; Syromiatnikova, S I; Shatokhina, I V; Pantyukhov, V B; Kovalchuk, A V; Borisevich, S V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to describe methodological approaches to determination of sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (ELISA Kit) for detection of the specific anti-Junin virus (JV) antibody. Comparison of ELISA to plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) showed direct relationship between antibody titers in the samples of serum of immunized animals, determined by either PRNT or ELISA methods. The obtained results provided an opportunity to form the panels of positive and negative serum samples to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA Kit. Sensitivity of the ELISA Kit was at least 98% when studying the samples of serum of immunized guinea pigs and rabbits (determined as positive in PRNT). The sensitivity of the ELISA Kit was at least 68% when studying the samples determined by PNRT as uncertain positive. The specificity was 98%. The specificity of the ELISA Kit was 98%.

  3. Simultaneous detection of viral and bacterial enteric pathogens using the Seeplex® Diarrhea ACE detection system.

    PubMed

    Coupland, L J; McElarney, I; Meader, E; Cowley, K; Alcock, L; Naunton, J; Gray, J

    2013-10-01

    A panel of 223 faecal samples was analysed to determine the clinical utility of the Seeplex® Diarrhea ACE Detection multiplex PCR system (Seeplex system; Seegene, Korea), a qualitative multiplexing PCR technology that enables simultaneous multi-pathogen detection of four viruses and/or ten bacteria associated with acute gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnostic methods and a norovirus-specific multiplex real-time RT–PCR detected 98 pathogens in 96 samples. The Seeplex system detected 81 pathogens in 75 samples. All samples positive for adenovirus, norovirus, Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli O157, Shigella spp. or Vibrio spp. were detected by the Seeplex system. Rotavirus, Clostridium difficile toxin B, and Salmonella spp. were not detected in 12.5%, 50% and 15.8% of samples, respectively. Additional multiple infections were detected in 19 samples by the Seeplex system. The Seeplex system provides significant additional diagnostic capability for the syndromic diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis with increased sensitivity for the majority of pathogens.

  4. Comparative evaluation of the WHO and DAKOPATTS enzyme-linked immunoassay kits for rotavirus detection.

    PubMed Central

    Flewett, T. H.; Arias, C. F.; Avendano, L. F.; Ghafoor, A.; Mathan, M. M.; Mendis, L.; Moe, K.; Bishop, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Faeces obtained from 1,163 children (including 66 newborn babies) were analysed in parallel for the presence of rotavirus particles using two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The kits had been formulated by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rotavirus (WHO-ELISA kit) and by DAKOPATTS (DAKO-ELISA kit) to be suitable for use in laboratories in developing countries. The kits were evaluated in laboratories in Burma, Chile, India, Mexico, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom. Comparison of the results obtained with the two kits indicated that the DAKO-ELISA had an overall sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 97% relative to the WHO-ELISA. In individual laboratories the DAKO-ELISA (K349) kit had a sensitivity in the range 90-100%, and a specificity of 85-100%. The kit showed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98% in assays on faeces obtained from newborn babies. We conclude that the DAKO-ELISA is as sensitive and specific as the WHO-ELISA for the detection of rotavirus antigen in faeces. PMID:2680139

  5. [Application of DNA extraction kit, 'GM quicker' for detection of genetically modified soybeans].

    PubMed

    Sato, Noriko; Sugiura, Yoshitsugu; Tanaka, Toshitsugu

    2012-01-01

    Several DNA extraction methods have been officially introduced to detect genetically modified soybeans, but the choice of DNA extraction kits depend on the nature of the samples, such as grains or processed foods. To overcome this disadvantage, we examined whether the GM quicker kit is available for both grains and processed foods. We compared GM quicker with four approved DNA extraction kits in respect of DNA purity, copy numbers of lectin gene, and working time. We found that the DNA quality of GM quicker was superior to that of the other kits for grains, and the procedure was faster. However, in the case of processed foods, GM quicker was not superior to the other kits. We therefore investigated an unapproved GM quicker 3 kit, which is available for DNA extraction from processed foods, such as tofu and boiled soybeans. The GM quicker 3 kit provided good DNA quality from both grains and processed foods, so we made a minor modification of the GM quicker-based protocol that was suitable for processed foods, using GM quicker and its reagents. The modified method enhanced the performance of GM quicker with processed foods. We believe that GM quicker with the modified protocol is an excellent tool to obtain high-quality DNA from grains and processed foods for detection of genetically modified soybeans.

  6. Comparison of Stool Antigen Detection Kits to PCR for Diagnosis of Amebiasis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; van Hal, S.; Fotedar, R.; Butcher, A.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J.; Harkness, J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare two stool antigen detection kits with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica infections by using fecal specimens submitted to the Department of Microbiology at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, and the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, Australia. A total of 279 stool samples containing the E complex (E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii) were included in this study. The stool specimens were tested by using two commercially produced enzyme immunoassays (the Entamoeba CELISA PATH and TechLab E. histolytica II kits) to detect antigens of E. histolytica. DNA was extracted from all of the samples with a Qiagen DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), and a PCR targeting the small-subunit ribosomal DNA was performed on all of the samples. When PCR was used as a reference standard, the CELISA PATH kit showed 28% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The TechLab ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) kit did not prove to be useful in detecting E. histolytica, as it failed to identify any of the E. histolytica samples which were positive by PCR. With the TechLab kit, cross-reactivity was observed for three specimens, one of which was positive for both E. dispar and E. moshkovskii while the other two samples contained E. moshkovskii. Quantitative assessment of the PCR and ELISA results obtained showed that the ELISA kits were 1,000 to 10,000 times less sensitive, and our results show that the CELISA PATH kit and the TechLab ELISA are not useful for the detection of E. histolytica in stool samples from patients in geographical regions where this parasite is not endemic. PMID:18367563

  7. Interlaboratory Study of ELISA Kits for the Detection of Egg and Milk Protein in Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shigeki; Yagi, Takahiro; Kato, Ayako; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Akimoto, Masanobu; Arihara, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The labeling of seven specific allergenic ingredients (egg, milk, wheat, buckwheat, peanut, shrimp, and crab) is mandatory in Japan. To ensure proper labeling, two kinds of ELISA kits using polyclonal antibodies have been developed. However, we developed two novel ELISA kits using monoclonal antibodies with improved specificity, the Allergeneye ELISA Egg (AE-Egg) and Allergeneye ELISA Milk (AE-Milk) Kits, to detect egg and milk proteins in processed foods, respectively. Five types of processed food containing 10 mg/kg of egg or milk soluble protein were prepared for an interlaboratory study of the performance of these kits. The kits showed a relatively high reproducibility level of interlaboratory precision (AE-Egg RSDR, 3.7-5.7%; AE-Milk RSDR, 6.8-10.5%) and satisfied the recovery rate stipulated by Japanese guidelines (AE-Egg, 61.6-89.3%; AE-Milk, 52.1-67%) for all processed foods. Our results suggest that the AE-Egg and AE-Milk Kits are precise and reliable tools for detecting egg or milk proteins in processed foods.

  8. An ELISA kit with two detection modes for the diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Wongkamchai, S; Satimai, W; Loymek, S; Nochot, H; Boitano, J J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a low-cost antifilarial immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 detection kit for the diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis. The kit was designed to be used by minimally trained personnel without the constraints of expensive laboratory equipment. We provide a description of the development and validation of a single-serum-dilution based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit with ready-to-use reagents for measuring antifilarial IgG4 antibodies. The kit was tested on residents in Brugia malayi-endemic areas in southern Thailand. Detection was performed by naked-eye observation of the resultant colour of the immunological reactivity. The coefficient of variation (CV) was used to assess the reproducibility of the results. Long-term stability was measured over a 6-month period. Sensitivity of the test kit was 97% when compared with microfilariae detection in thick blood smears. Specificity was 98.7% based on the sera of 57 patients living outside the endemic areas who were infected with other parasites and 100 parasite-free subjects. All positive CVs were < 10%. The test kit was remarkably stable over 6 months. Field validation was performed by the detection of antifilarial IgG4 in 4365 serum samples collected from residents of brugian filariasis-endemic areas and compared with outcome colours of the test samples by the naked eye. Subsequent ELISA evaluation of these results using an ELISA reader indicated high agreement by the kappa statistic. These results demonstrate that the test kit is efficient and useful for public health laboratories as an alternative tool for the diagnosis of lymphatic filarial infection.

  9. Development of an immunochromatography assay kit for rapid detection of ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Rim; Park, Seong Bin; Fagutao, Fernand F; Nho, Seong Won; Jang, Ho Bin; Cha, In Seok; Thompson, Kim D; Adams, Alexandra; Bayley, Amanda; Jung, Tae Sung

    2015-10-01

    Ranaviruses are large, double-stranded DNA viruses of the family Iridoviridae and are known to be primary pathogens in frogs, fish and other amphibians. These viruses have been shown to be highly adaptable and have the ability to cross species barriers, making them a potent threat to global biodiversity. There is therefore, a need for rapid and efficient diagnostic methods to control the spread of these viruses. To address this, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were developed against ranavirus strain FV-3 (standard frog virus 3) to detect the major capsid protein and FV-3gorf19R related hypothetical protein in both the FV-3 and KRV-1 (Korean ranavirus) strains. The antibodies were then applied on a colloidal gold-immunochromatographic assay (GICA) as a kit for the detection of ranaviruses. The kit was able to detect low concentrations of the virus (10(1)TCID50/ml) and showed analytical specificity when tested against other viral pathogens, including those belonging to the same family. It was possible to detect ranavirus in experimentally infected frogs within 30 min using the kit. The kit described here is expected to be a valuable and informative tool for on-site detection of ranavirus in frog.

  10. Comparison of nine antigen detection kits for diagnosis of urogenital infections due to Chlamydia psittaci in koalas.

    PubMed

    Wood, M M; Timms, P

    1992-12-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is the major cause of infectious disease in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). It causes four disease syndromes in the koala, namely, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, cystitis, and infertility (females only). Diagnosis of chlamydial infections in koalas relies primarily on isolation of the organism in cell culture. Serology has generally not been useful, and little use has previously been made of the commercially available antigen detection kits. We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and usefulness of three direct fluorescent-antibody kits (Vet-IF [Cell Labs], IMAGEN [Celltech], Chlamydia-Direct IF [Bio Merieux]) and six antigen detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits (Clearview [Unipath], Surecell [Kodak], Pathfinder [Kallestad], Chlamydia-EIA [Pharmacia], Chlamydiazyme [Abbott], IDEIA [Celltech]) for the detection of urogenital infections in koalas. Laboratory studies showed that the direct fluorescent-antibody kits were the least sensitive in this case and did not detect fewer than 10(4) elementary bodies per ml, while most ELISA kits detected between 130 and 600 elementary bodies per ml. Field study results showed that the Clearview kit was the most sensitive (91%) compared with the IDEIA (88%) and the Surecell (73%) kits. All three kits were more sensitive than cell culture (36%), highlighting viability loss problems that occur during transport. This study showed that the Clearview kit is sensitive, specific, and easy to use for the detection of type II (urogenital) C. psittaci from koalas in the field and warrants further evaluation. PMID:1452703

  11. Comparison of nine antigen detection kits for diagnosis of urogenital infections due to Chlamydia psittaci in koalas.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, M M; Timms, P

    1992-01-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is the major cause of infectious disease in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). It causes four disease syndromes in the koala, namely, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, cystitis, and infertility (females only). Diagnosis of chlamydial infections in koalas relies primarily on isolation of the organism in cell culture. Serology has generally not been useful, and little use has previously been made of the commercially available antigen detection kits. We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and usefulness of three direct fluorescent-antibody kits (Vet-IF [Cell Labs], IMAGEN [Celltech], Chlamydia-Direct IF [Bio Merieux]) and six antigen detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits (Clearview [Unipath], Surecell [Kodak], Pathfinder [Kallestad], Chlamydia-EIA [Pharmacia], Chlamydiazyme [Abbott], IDEIA [Celltech]) for the detection of urogenital infections in koalas. Laboratory studies showed that the direct fluorescent-antibody kits were the least sensitive in this case and did not detect fewer than 10(4) elementary bodies per ml, while most ELISA kits detected between 130 and 600 elementary bodies per ml. Field study results showed that the Clearview kit was the most sensitive (91%) compared with the IDEIA (88%) and the Surecell (73%) kits. All three kits were more sensitive than cell culture (36%), highlighting viability loss problems that occur during transport. This study showed that the Clearview kit is sensitive, specific, and easy to use for the detection of type II (urogenital) C. psittaci from koalas in the field and warrants further evaluation. PMID:1452703

  12. [Comparison of detection sensitivity in rapid-diagnosis influenza virus kits].

    PubMed

    Tokuno, Osamu; Fujiwara, Miki; Nakajoh, Yoshimi; Yamanouchi, Sumika; Adachi, Masayo; Ikeda, Akiko; Kitayama, Shigeo; Takahashi, Toshio; Kase, Tetsuo; Kinoshita, Shouhiro; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2009-09-01

    Rapid-diagnosis kits able to detect influenza A and B virus by immunochromatography developed by different manufacturers, while useful in early diagnosis, may vary widely in detection sensitivity. We compared sensitivity results for eight virus-detection kits in current use--Quick Chaser FluA, B (Mizuho Medy), Espline Influenza A & B-N (Fujirebio), Capilia Flu A + B (Nippon Beckton Dickinson & Alfesa Pharma), Poctem Influenza A/B (Otsuka Pharma & Sysmex), BD Flu Examan (Nippon Beckton Dickinson), Quick Ex-Flu "Seiken" (Denka Seiken), Quick Vue Rapid SP Influ (DP Pharma Biomedical), and Rapid Testa FLU stick (Daiichi Pure Chemicals)--against influenza virus stocks, contained five vaccination strains (one A/H1N1, two A/H3N2, and two B) and six clinical strains (two A/H1N1, two A/H3N2, and two B). Minimum detection concentrations giving immunologically positive signals in serial dilution and RNA copies in positive dilution in real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were assayed for all kits and virus stock combinations. RNA log10 copy numbers/mL in dilutions within detection limits yielded 5.68-7.02, 6.37-7,17, and 6.5-8.13 for A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B. Statistically significant differences in sensitivity were observed between some kit combinations. Detection sensitivity tended to be relatively higher for influenza A than B virus. This is assumed due to different principles in kit methods, such as monoclonal antibodies, specimen-extraction conditions, and other unknown factors.

  13. Evaluation of RealStar Reverse Transcription–Polymerase Chain Reaction Kits for Filovirus Detection in the Laboratory and Field

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Toni; Kerber, Romy; El Halas, Hussein; Pallasch, Elisa; Duraffour, Sophie; Günther, Stephan; Ölschläger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diagnosis of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) requires laboratory testing. Methods. The RealStar Filovirus Screen reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) kit and the derived RealStar Zaire Ebolavirus RT-PCR kit were validated using in vitro transcripts, supernatant of infected cell cultures, and clinical specimens from patients with EVD. Results. The Filovirus Screen kit detected EBOV, Sudan virus, Taï Forest virus, Bundibugyo virus, Reston virus, and Marburg virus and differentiated between the genera Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus. The amount of filovirus RNA that could be detected with a probability of 95% ranged from 11 to 67 RNA copies/reaction on a LightCycler 480 II. The Zaire Ebolavirus kit is based on the Filovirus Screen kit but was optimized for detection of EBOV. It has an improved signal-to-noise ratio at low EBOV RNA concentrations and is somewhat more sensitive than the Filovirus kit. Both kits show significantly lower analytical sensitivity on a SmartCycler II. Clinical evaluation revealed that the SmartCycler II, compared with other real-time PCR platforms, decreases the clinical sensitivity of the Filovirus Screen kit to diagnose EVD at an early stage. Conclusions. The Filovirus Screen kit detects all human-pathogenic filoviruses with good analytical sensitivity if performed on an appropriate real-time PCR platform. High analytical sensitivity is important for early diagnosis of EVD. PMID:27549586

  14. [Real-time PCR kits for the detection of the African Swine Fever virus].

    PubMed

    Latyshev, O E; Eliseeva, O V; Grebennikova, T V; Verkhovskiĭ, O A; Tsibezov, V V; Chernykh, O Iu; Dzhailidi, G A; Aliper, T I

    2014-01-01

    The results obtained using the diagnostic kit based on real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the DNA of the African Swine Fever in the pathological material, as well as in the culture fluid, are presented. A high sensitivity and specificity for detection of the DNA in the organs and tissues of animals was shown to be useful for detection in the European Union referentiality reagent kits for DNA detection by real time PCR of ASFV. More rapid and effective method of DNA extraction using columns mini spin Quick gDNA(TM) MiniPrep was suggested and compared to the method of DNA isolation on the inorganic sorbent. High correlation of the results of the DNA detection of ASFV by real-time PCR and antigen detection results ASFV by competitive ELISA obtained with the ELISA SEROTEST/INGEZIM COMRAC PPA was demonstrated. The kit can be used in the veterinary services for effective monitoring of ASFV to contain, eliminate and prevent further spread of the disease.

  15. Detection of the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood of systemic mastocytosis: diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Teodosio, Cristina; Sanchez-Muñoz, Laura; Álvarez-Twose, Ivan; Mayado, Andrea; Caldas, Carolina; Matito, Almudena; Morgado, José M; Muñoz-González, Javier I; Escribano, Luis; Garcia-Montero, Andrés C; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have found the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood of virtually all adult systemic mastocytosis patients once highly sensitive PCR techniques were used; thus, detection of the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood has been proposed to be included in the diagnostic work-up of systemic mastocytosis algorithms. However, the precise frequency of the mutation, the biological significance of peripheral blood-mutated cells and their potential association with involvement of bone marrow hematopoietic cells other than mast cells still remain to be investigated. Here, we determined the frequency of peripheral blood involvement by the KIT D816V mutation, as assessed by two highly sensitive PCR methods, and investigated its relationship with multilineage involvement of bone marrow hematopoiesis. Overall, our results confirmed the presence of the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood of most systemic mastocytosis cases (161/190; 85%)--with an increasing frequency from indolent systemic mastocytosis without skin lesions (29/44; 66%) to indolent systemic mastocytosis with skin involvement (124/135; 92%), and more aggressive disease subtypes (11/11; 100%)--as assessed by the allele-specific oligonucleotide-qPCR method, which was more sensitive (P<.0001) than the peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR approach (84/190; 44%). Although the presence of the KIT mutation in peripheral blood, as assessed by the allele-specific oligonucleotide-qPCR technique, did not accurately predict for multilineage bone marrow involvement of hematopoiesis, the allele-specific oligonucleotide-qPCR allele burden and the peptide nucleic acid-mediated-PCR approach did. These results suggest that both methods provide clinically useful and complementary information through the identification and/or quantification of the KIT D816V mutation in peripheral blood of patients suspected of systemic mastocytosis.

  16. Samsung Salmonella Detection Kit. AOAC Performance Tested Method(SM) 021203.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Cheung, Win Den; Opdyke, Jason; Harvey, John; Chong, Songchun; Moon, Cheol Gon

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella, one of the most common causes of foodborne illness, is a significant public health concern worldwide. There is a need in the food industry for methods that are simple, rapid, and sensitive for the detection of foodborne pathogens. In this study, the Samsung Salmonella Detection Kit, a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Salmonella, was evaluated according to the current AOAC guidelines. The validation consisted of lot-to-lot consistency, stability, robustness, and inclusivity/exclusivity studies, as well as a method comparison of 10 different food matrixes. In the validation, the Samsung Salmonella Detection Kit was used in conjunction with the Applied Biosystems StepOnePlus PCR system and the Samsung Food Testing Software for the detection of Salmonella species. The performance of the assays was compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food Safety and Inspection Service-Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (USDA/FSIS-MLG) 4.05: Isolation and Identification of Salmonella from Meat, Poultry, Pasteurized Egg, and Catfish and the and U.S. Food and Drug Administration/Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA/BAM) Chapter 5 Salmonella reference methods. The validation was conducted using an unpaired study design for detection of Salmonella spp. in raw ground beef, raw pork, raw ground pork, raw chicken wings, raw salmon, alfalfa sprouts, pasteurized orange juice, peanut butter, pasteurized whole milk, and shell eggs. The Samsung Salmonella Detection Kit demonstrated lot-to-lot consistency among three independent lots as well as ruggedness with minor modifications to changes in enrichment incubation time, enrichment incubation temperature, and DNA sample volume for PCR reaction. Stability was observed for 13 months at -20 degrees C and 3 months at 5 degrees C. For the inclusivity/exclusivity study, the Samsung Salmonella Detection Kit correctly identified 147 Salmonella species isolates out of 147 isolates tested from each of three different enrichment

  17. The use and abuse of commercial kits used to detect autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fritzler, Marvin J; Wiik, Allan; Fritzler, Mark L; Barr, Susan G

    2003-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies in human sera is an important approach to the diagnosis and management of patients with autoimmune conditions. To meet market demands, manufacturers have developed a wide variety of easy to use and cost-effective diagnostic kits that are designed to detect a variety of human serum autoantibodies. A number of studies over the past two decades have suggested that there are limitations and concerns in the use and clinical application of test results derived from commercial kits. It is important to appreciate that there is a complex chain of users and circumstances that contributes to variations in the apparent reliability of commercial kits. The goal of this review is to identify the principal links in this chain, to identify the factors that weaken the chain and to propose a plan of resolution. It is suggested that a higher level of commitment and partnership between all of the participants is required to achieve the goal of improving the quality of patient care through the use of autoantibody testing and analysis. PMID:12823850

  18. Method modification of the Legipid® Legionella fast detection test kit.

    PubMed

    Albalat, Guillermo Rodríguez; Broch, Begoña Bedrina; Bono, Marisa Jiménez

    2014-01-01

    Legipid(®) Legionella Fast Detection is a test based on combined magnetic immunocapture and enzyme-immunoassay (CEIA) for the detection of Legionella in water. The test is based on the use of anti-Legionella antibodies immobilized on magnetic microspheres. Target microorganism is preconcentrated by filtration. Immunomagnetic analysis is applied on these preconcentrated water samples in a final test portion of 9 mL. The test kit was certified by the AOAC Research Institute as Performance Tested Method(SM) (PTM) No. 111101 in a PTM validation which certifies the performance claims of the test method in comparison to the ISO reference method 11731-1998 and the revision 11731-2004 "Water Quality: Detection and Enumeration of Legionella pneumophila" in potable water, industrial water, and waste water. The modification of this test kit has been approved. The modification includes increasing the target analyte from L. pneumophila to Legionella species and adding an optical reader to the test method. In this study, 71 strains of Legionella spp. other than L. pneumophila were tested to determine its reactivity with the kit based on CEIA. All the strains of Legionella spp. tested by the CEIA test were confirmed positive by reference standard method ISO 11731. This test (PTM 111101) has been modified to include a final optical reading. A methods comparison study was conducted to demonstrate the equivalence of this modification to the reference culture method. Two water matrixes were analyzed. Results show no statistically detectable difference between the test method and the reference culture method for the enumeration of Legionella spp. The relative level of detection was 93 CFU/volume examined (LOD50). For optical reading, the LOD was 40 CFU/volume examined and the LOQ was 60 CFU/volume examined. Results showed that the test Legipid Legionella Fast Detection is equivalent to the reference culture method for the enumeration of Legionella spp.

  19. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of a kit for the rapid detection of group A streptococci.

    PubMed

    Savoia, D; Francesetti, C; Millesimo, M; Dotti, G; Gatti, G; Rurali, C

    1994-01-01

    A rapid immunoassay method using an Event Test Strip Strep A experimental kit (Boehringer Mannheim) was evaluated. Results obtained were compared with culture results to evaluate the accuracy of detection of group A streptococci directly from throat swabs or from artificial swabs containing various bacterial concentrations. A good diagnostic accuracy was obtained with a sensitivity of 96.9% in the assay of throat swabs which provided more than ten group A Streptococcus colonies per plate. Since a low level of micro-organisms may indicate infection, it is recommended that a culture be performed when the rapid test based on antigen detection is negative. PMID:8208140

  20. Comparison of commercial DNA preparation kits for the detection of Brucellae in tissue using quantitative real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The detection of Brucellae in tissue specimens using PCR assays is difficult because the amount of bacteria is usually low. Therefore, optimised DNA extraction methods are critical. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of commercial kits for the extraction of Brucella DNA. Methods Five kits were evaluated using clinical specimens: QIAamp™ DNA Mini Kit (QIAGEN), peqGold™ Tissue DNA Mini Kit (PeqLab), UltraClean™ Tissue and Cells DNA Isolation Kit (MoBio), DNA Isolation Kit for Cells and Tissues (Roche), and NucleoSpin™ Tissue (Macherey-Nagel). DNA yield was determined using a quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting IS711 that included an internal amplification control. Results Kits of QIAGEN and Roche provided the highest amount of DNA, Macherey-Nagel and Peqlab products were intermediate whereas MoBio yielded the lowest amount of DNA. Differences were significant (p < 0.05) and of diagnostic relevance. Sample volume, elution volume, and processing time were also compared. Conclusions We observed differences in DNA yield as high as two orders of magnitude for some samples between the best and the worst DNA extraction kits and inhibition was observed occasionally. This indicates that DNA purification may be more relevant than expected when the amount of DNA in tissue is very low. PMID:20403208

  1. Quality Evaluation of Five Commercial Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay Kits for Detecting Aflatoxin B1 in Feedstuffs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dan-dan; Gu, Xu; Li, Jun-guo; Yao, Ting; Dong, Ying-chao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of five commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits (A, B, C, D, and E) from different suppliers for detecting aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). AFB1-free corn samples supplemented with different levels of AFB1 (5, 10, and 20 μg/kg) were used as positive controls and 6 replicates of each control sample were tested to evaluate the accuracy and precision of these kits. In addition, we also evaluated the performance of these ELISA kits for AFB1 in 30 feed samples, including corn, distillers dried grains with soluble, wheat samples, soybean meal, and poultry feed, which were verified by high performance liquid chromatography. Results showed that the coefficients of variation ranged from 1.18% to 16.22% in intra-plate and 2.85% to 18.04% in inter-plate for the determination of AFB1. The half maximal inhibitory concentration for five kits ranged from 3.72 to 7.22 μg/kg. The quantitation limits of AFB1 were all under the legal limit in China but somewhat inconsistent with kit instructions. Although the recovery rate of four of the five kits were either less than 90% or more than 110%, all these values were acceptable in practice. Two kits had high false positive rates (C and E). In conclusion, our results revealed that the qualities of five tested ELISA kits were significantly different. PMID:25924961

  2. Relationship between DNA degradation ratios and the number of loci detectable by STR kits in extremely old seminal stain samples.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Nakanishi, H; Takahashi, S; Nagai, A; Yamamoto, T; Yoneyama, K; Saito, K; Takada, A

    2015-09-01

    The relationships between DNA degradation ratios and the number of detected loci were explored in extremely old seminal stains evaluated using three short tandem repeat (STR) kits: the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler™ PCR Amplification Kit (Identifiler), the AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit (Yfiler), and the AmpFlSTR® MiniFiler™ PCR Amplification Kit (MiniFiler). DNA degradation ratios based on 41, 129, and 305bp DNA fragments were calculated (129:41 and 305:41), and the relationships between the ratios and storage duration were also explored. Using the Identifiler kit, the number of loci detected was strongly correlated with the 129:41 ratio (r=0.887), whereas the correlation with the 305:41 ratio was moderate (r=0.656). Using the Yfiler kit, the DYS385 amplicon was detected in all samples, suggesting that DYS385 may be resistant to degradation. The number of detected loci was strongly correlated with the 129:41 ratio (r=0.768), and moderately so with the 305:41 ratio (r=0.515). MiniFiler detected at least seven loci in all samples. In samples that did not yield full profiles, the undetected loci were D7S820 and D21S11, or D21S11 only, suggesting that these loci might be easily degraded. The number of loci detected using STR kits correlated with the DNA degradation ratios. In particular, the 129:41 ratio was particularly useful for estimating the number of loci detectable by STR kits. On the other hand, we suggest that storage duration cannot be accurately estimated using DNA degradation ratios; these ratios were not strongly correlated with storage duration (129:41; r=-0.698, 305:41; r=-0.550). However, the ratios may allow the identification of samples that have been stored for more than 40years. PMID:26054579

  3. Relationship between DNA degradation ratios and the number of loci detectable by STR kits in extremely old seminal stain samples.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Nakanishi, H; Takahashi, S; Nagai, A; Yamamoto, T; Yoneyama, K; Saito, K; Takada, A

    2015-09-01

    The relationships between DNA degradation ratios and the number of detected loci were explored in extremely old seminal stains evaluated using three short tandem repeat (STR) kits: the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler™ PCR Amplification Kit (Identifiler), the AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit (Yfiler), and the AmpFlSTR® MiniFiler™ PCR Amplification Kit (MiniFiler). DNA degradation ratios based on 41, 129, and 305bp DNA fragments were calculated (129:41 and 305:41), and the relationships between the ratios and storage duration were also explored. Using the Identifiler kit, the number of loci detected was strongly correlated with the 129:41 ratio (r=0.887), whereas the correlation with the 305:41 ratio was moderate (r=0.656). Using the Yfiler kit, the DYS385 amplicon was detected in all samples, suggesting that DYS385 may be resistant to degradation. The number of detected loci was strongly correlated with the 129:41 ratio (r=0.768), and moderately so with the 305:41 ratio (r=0.515). MiniFiler detected at least seven loci in all samples. In samples that did not yield full profiles, the undetected loci were D7S820 and D21S11, or D21S11 only, suggesting that these loci might be easily degraded. The number of loci detected using STR kits correlated with the DNA degradation ratios. In particular, the 129:41 ratio was particularly useful for estimating the number of loci detectable by STR kits. On the other hand, we suggest that storage duration cannot be accurately estimated using DNA degradation ratios; these ratios were not strongly correlated with storage duration (129:41; r=-0.698, 305:41; r=-0.550). However, the ratios may allow the identification of samples that have been stored for more than 40years.

  4. [Comparison of three rapid diagnostic kits using immunochromatography for detection of influenza A virsuses].

    PubMed

    Hara, Michimaru; Takao, Shinichi; Fukuda, Shinji; Shimazu, Yukie; Miyazaki, Kazuo

    2004-11-01

    In 2004, 3 new rapid influenza diagnostic kits using immunochromatography that allow type differentiation became commercially available. They are the ESPLINE Influenza A & B-N (Fujirebio Corp., Japan: ESPLINE-N hereafter), QuickVue Rapid SP influ (Quidel Corp., USA: QuickVue), and POCTEM INFLUENZA A/B (INTERNATIONAL REAGENTS Corp., Japan: POCTEM). The authors performed a prospective study that compared the usefulness among the 3 kits in 151 children with suspected influenza, who were examined within 3 days after onset, between January and March, 2004. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected, and viruses were isolated. The residual samples were diluted and centrifuged, and the supernatant was used for the rapid diagnosis tests. Influenza virus AH3 was isolated in 95 children and influenza B virus in 3. In the 95 children with influenza virus AH3, the sensitivity and specificity of ESPLINE-N were 100% and 100%, respectively, those of QuickVue were 99% and 91%, and those of POCTEM were 91% and 100%. The sensitivity of POCTEM was significantly lower than that of the other 2 kits (p < 0.01), and the specificity of QuickVue was significantly lower than that of the other 2 kits (p < 0.05). Examination was performed within 1 day after onset in 55 of the 95 children, including 30 who underwent examination within 6 hours after the development of fever. The body temperature was less than 38.0 degrees C in 14 of the 95 children. In all children including these children, virus detection was possible by ESPLINE-N. ESPLINE-N allowed very accurate diagnosis of influenza A using samples prepared by diluting and centrifuging nasopharyngeal aspirates.

  5. Further evaluation of an ELISA kit for detection of antibodies to a nonstructural protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    PubMed Central

    FUKAI, Katsuhiko; NISHI, Tatsuya; MORIOKA, Kazuki; YAMADA, Manabu; YOSHIDA, Kazuo; KITANO, Rie; YAMAZOE, Reiko; KANNO, Toru

    2015-01-01

    An ELISA kit for detection of antibodies to a nonstructural protein of foot-and-mouth disease (FMDV) was further evaluated using sequentially collected serum samples of experimentally infected animals, because the sensitivity of the kit used in a previous study was significantly low in field animals. The kit fully detected antibodies in infected animals without vaccination; however, the first detections of antibodies by the kit were later than those by the liquid-phase blocking ELISA that is used for serological surveillance in the aftermath of outbreaks in Japan, for detection of antibodies to structural proteins of FMDV. Additionally, although the kit effectively detected antibodies in infected cattle with vaccination, there were several infected pigs with vaccination for which the kit did not detect antibodies during the experimental period. Taken together, the kit may not be suitable for serological surveillance after an FMD outbreak either with or without emergency vaccination in FMD-free countries. PMID:26498533

  6. Development and Optimization of a Homemade ELISA Kit for Detection of Antibodies Against Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Fazlolah; Fatemi, Sara; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Nikanpour, Elnaz; Malekan, Mohamad Ali; Khabiri, Ali Reza; Janani, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infection has high morbidity and mortality rate, especially in children under 5 years of age. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique is the most used method to detect antibodies against H. influenzae. Available commercial ELISA kits are expensive and not always readily available, particularly for epidemiological studies. Objectives: This study was performed to develop and optimize a homemade ELISA kit for the detection of Hib anti-polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) antibodies in children. Materials and Methods: To develop and optimize an indirect ELISA method, pure PRP was prepared. The PRP was coupled to bovine serum albumin, using sodium periodate. Then optimal conditions for ELISA, including coating antigen concentration and peroxidase labeled conjugate concentrations, incubation temperature and incubation time, were determined. To confirm the efficacy of optimized kit, 83 serum samples from non-vaccinated children, aged less than 6 years were collected and analyzed, using homemade and commercial ELISA. Results: The optimal conditions were considered to perform ELISA. Comparison between results obtained from optimized ELISA kit and commercial ELISA kit showed a good agreement. Conclusions: Taking into account these data, we elaborated a homemade ELISA kit that is an efficacious and cost-effective substitute for commercial kit, in disease control and diagnosis. PMID:27540453

  7. One-step immunochromatography assay kit for detecting antibodies to canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin-Sik; Ha, Gun-Woo; Cho, Young-Shik; Kim, Min-Jae; An, Dong-Jun; Hwang, Kyu-Kye; Lim, Yoon-Kyu; Park, Bong-Kyun; Kang, BoKyu; Song, Dae-Sub

    2006-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the feasibility of using whole serum to detect antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV) under nonlaboratory conditions and to evaluate the performance characteristics of an immunochromatography assay kit. Precise detection of levels of antibody against CPV in puppies can be used to determine a vaccination schedule, because maternal antibodies frequently result in the failure of protective vaccination, and can also be used to determine the antibody levels of infected puppies. Several methods for the titration of CPV antibodies have been reported, including the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, which is considered the "gold standard." These methods, however, require intricate and time-consuming procedures. In this study, a total of 386 serum specimens were tested. Compared to the HI assay, the rapid assay had a 97.1% sensitivity and a 76.6% specificity (with a cutoff HI titer of 1:80). This single-step assay could be performed rapidly and easily without special equipment. The kit provides a reliable method for detection of anti-CPV antibody where laboratory support and personnel are limited.

  8. Comparison of six commercial ELISA kits for their specificity and sensitivity in detecting different major peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Jayasena, Shyamali; Smits, Mieke; Fiechter, Daniëlle; de Jong, Aard; Nordlee, Julie; Baumert, Joe; Taylor, Steve L; Pieters, Raymond H; Koppelman, Stef J

    2015-02-18

    Six commercial peanut enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits were assessed for their ability to recover peanut from the standard reference material 2387 peanut butter and also for their specificity in detecting four major peanut allergens, Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, and Ara h 6. The percentage recovery of peanut from peanut butter differed across different kits as well as at different sample concentrations. The highest recovery was observed with the Romer and R-Biopharm kits, while four other kits were found to underestimate the protein content of the reference peanut butter samples. Five of the kits were most sensitive in detecting Ara h 3 followed by Ara h 1, while hardly recognizing Ara h 2 and Ara h 6. The other kit showed the highest sensitivity to Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, while Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 were poorly recognized. Although Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are known to be heat stable and more potent allergens, antisera specific to any of these four peanut proteins/allergens may serve as good markers for the detection of peanut residues.

  9. Comparison of six commercial ELISA kits for their specificity and sensitivity in detecting different major peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Jayasena, Shyamali; Smits, Mieke; Fiechter, Daniëlle; de Jong, Aard; Nordlee, Julie; Baumert, Joe; Taylor, Steve L; Pieters, Raymond H; Koppelman, Stef J

    2015-02-18

    Six commercial peanut enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits were assessed for their ability to recover peanut from the standard reference material 2387 peanut butter and also for their specificity in detecting four major peanut allergens, Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, and Ara h 6. The percentage recovery of peanut from peanut butter differed across different kits as well as at different sample concentrations. The highest recovery was observed with the Romer and R-Biopharm kits, while four other kits were found to underestimate the protein content of the reference peanut butter samples. Five of the kits were most sensitive in detecting Ara h 3 followed by Ara h 1, while hardly recognizing Ara h 2 and Ara h 6. The other kit showed the highest sensitivity to Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, while Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 were poorly recognized. Although Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are known to be heat stable and more potent allergens, antisera specific to any of these four peanut proteins/allergens may serve as good markers for the detection of peanut residues. PMID:25651402

  10. A novel kit for rapid detection of Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, J A; Huq, A; Tamplin, M L; Siebeling, R J; Colwell, R R

    1994-01-01

    We report on the development and testing of a novel, rapid, colorimetric immunodiagnostic kit, Cholera SMART, for direct detection of the presence of Vibrio cholerae O1 in clinical specimens. Unlike conventional culture methods requiring several days to complete, the Cholera SMART kit can be used directly in the field by untrained or minimally skilled personnel to detect V. cholerae O1 in less than 15 min, without cumbersome laboratory equipment. A total of 120 clinical and environmental bacterial strains, including both O1 and non-O1 serotypes of V. cholerae isolated from samples collected from a variety of geographical regions, were tested, and positive reactions were observed only with V. cholerae O1. Also, results of a field trial in Bangladesh, employing Cholera SMART, showed 100% specificity and 96% sensitivity compared with conventional culture methods. Another field trial, in Mexico, showed that Cholera SMART was 100% in agreement with a recently described coagglutination test when 108 stool specimens were tested. PMID:8126193

  11. EVALUATION OF A COMMERCIAL RAPID TEST KIT FOR DETECTION OF ACUTE DENGUE INFECTION.

    PubMed

    Krishnananthasivam, Shivankari; Fernando, Anira N; Tippalagama, Rashmi; Tennekoon, Rashika; De Man, Jeroen; Seneviratne, Dammika; Premawansa, Sunil; Premawansa, Gayani; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan

    2015-07-01

    Early diagnosis is important for clinical management of dengue disease. While classic laboratory tests are often tedious and time consuming, point of care devices offer a rapid, cost-effective and user-friendly alternative provided their accuracy is acceptable. This study evaluated the sensitivity, specificity and efficiency of SD BIOLINE Dengue Duo® rapid NS1, IgM and IgG test kit for diagnosis of acute dengue virus infection. Standard laboratory diagnostics, RT-PCR, IgM and IgG capture ELISAs were carried out on 143 suspected dengue patient samples obtained from a Sri Lankan population. Using the results of these standard laboratory tests as reference, the sensitivity and specificity of the SD Dengue Duo® NS1 test was 57% and 87%, respectively, and those of the IgM test was 50% and 84%, respectively. The combined sensitivity and specificity of the SD Dengue Duo® NS1/ IgM test was 72% and 80%, respectively. The SD Dengue Duo® NS1 test detected NS1 for up to 9 days from onset of fever. Primary and secondary dengue cases were classified according to the IgG test, of which the kit identified 88% and 26% of primary and of secondary infection, respectively. Although the SD Dengue Duo® kit was not as accurate as the standard tests, it still can serve the useful reference for initial screening of suspected dengue cases, especially in poor resource hospital settings and aid in clinical disease management of dengue infection. PMID:26867379

  12. Use of a bio-wipe kit to detect fumonisin B₁ in faecal materials.

    PubMed

    Phoku, J Z; Dutton, M F; Barnard, T G; Potgieter, N

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium toxins with reference to fumonisin B1 (FB1) have long been regarded as contaminants of maize and maize-based related products. However, when consumed they can cause intoxication, especially in humans. Therefore, effective quantitative methods for assessing the dietary exposure of this toxic fungal metabolite are required. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effect on the use of a bio-wipe kit, which is a faecal material collection kit, to detect the presence of FB1. Faecal materials were collected from a rural farming community in Gauteng Province, South Africa. In total, 200 samples of faecal material were analysed for Fusarium species using a serial dilution method, while FB1 was further analysed and quantified by reversed-phase TLC and HPLC. The study showed the presence of 11 different Fusarium species grown on potato dextrose agar culture medium of which F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, producers of FB1, and F. oxysporum were the dominant species. Fumonisin B1 was recorded at an incidence rate of 65% of the total using TLC. Results from HPLC showed that 84% were positive at different ranges of concentration for FB1. This study supports the use of a bio-wipe as a rapid method to determine human exposure to FB1.

  13. SAS molecular tests Escherichia coli O157 detection kit. Performance tested method 031203.

    PubMed

    Bapanpally, Chandra; Montier, Laura; Khan, Shah; Kasra, Akif; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    The SAS Molecular tests Escherichia coli O157 Detection method, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method, performed as well as or better than the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference methods for ground beef, beef trim, bagged mixed lettuce, and fresh spinach. Ground beef (30% fat, 25 g test portion) was validated for 7-8 h enrichment, leafy greens were validated in a 6-7 h enrichment, and ground beef (30% fat, 375 g composite test portion) and beef trim (375 g composite test portion) were validated in a 16-20 h enrichment. The method performance for meat and leafy green matrixes was also shown to be acceptable under conditions of co-enrichment with Salmonella. Thus, after a short co-enrichment step, ground beef, beef trim, lettuce, and spinach can be tested for both Salmonella and E. coli O157. The SAS Molecular tests Salmonella Detection Kit was validated using the same test portions as for the SAS Molecular tests E. coli O157 Detection Kit and those results are presented in a separate report. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 50 E. coli 0157 strains, including H7 and non-motile strains, and 30 non-E. coli O157 strains examined. Finally, the method was shown to be robust when variations to DNA extract hold time and DNA volume were varied. The method comparison and robustness data suggest a full 7 h enrichment time should be used for 25 g ground beef test portions.

  14. Evaluation of the Rapidec Carba NP Test Kit for Detection of Carbapenemase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Garg, Atul; Garg, Jaya; Upadhyay, G C; Agarwal, Anurag; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-12-01

    Recently, bioMérieux, France, introduced the Rapidec Carba NP test kit for rapid detection of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria. This kit was evaluated in this study, and we report sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 92.6%, 96.2%, 95.83%, and 92.6%, respectively. The test was easy to perform and interpret and relatively inexpensive ($5/Rs 300 per test) and provides a practical solution for early detection of carbapenemase-producing, multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Development and validation of an ELISA kit for the detection of ricin toxins from biological specimens and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao Ying; Tran, Hung; Foo, Ling Yann; Sew, Tracey Wenhui; Loke, Weng Keong

    2014-08-01

    Ricin is a toxin that can be easily extracted from seeds of Ricinus communis plants. Ricin is considered to be a major bio-threat as it can be freely and easily acquired in large quantities. A deliberate release of such toxin in civilian populations would very likely overwhelm existing public health systems, resulting in public fear and social unrest. There is currently no commercially available or FDA-approved prophylaxis such as vaccines, or therapeutic antitoxins or antidotes, available for ricin intoxication. Patient treatment is typically supportive care based on symptoms, often designed to reinforce the body's natural response. This paper describes the development and validation of a robust ELISA test kit, which can be used to screen for ricin in biological specimens such as whole blood and faeces. Faecal specimens are shown in this study to have better diagnostic sensitivity and a wider diagnostic window compared to whole blood. From these results, it is concluded that faeces is the most suitable clinical specimen for diagnosis of ricin poisoning via the oral route. The ELISA test kit can also detect ricin in environmental samples. An advantage of this ELISA kit over other commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) detection kits currently on the market that are developed to screen environmental samples only is its ability to diagnose ricin poisoning from clinical specimens as well as detect ricin from environmental samples.

  16. Detection of insertion/deletion polymorphisms from challenged samples using the Investigator DIPplex® kit.

    PubMed

    Klein, Rebecca; Neumann, Cedric; Roy, Reena

    2015-05-01

    This research focuses on detection of bi-allelic insertion/deletion polymorphisms (InDels) from challenged samples using the Investigator DIPplex® Kit from Qiagen. The study included analyzing body fluids from humans, as well as pristine and degraded samples. For the purpose of assessing species specificity, samples from various animals were included. At first, an analytical threshold (AT) for the detection of alleles was established based on an assessment of the noise in the system. Then, InDel profiles were obtained from samples exposed to detrimental environmental conditions, washed bloodstains, lipsticks, ChapStick®, ancient Croatian bone samples, and every day products such as toothbrushes and dental floss. Concordant profiles were obtained from different body fluids of the same donor. InDel profiles were also generated successfully when body fluids were deposited on substrates and directly amplified without pre-treatment with buffer or washing reagents. InDels can provide additional information when only partial STR profiles are generated from challenged samples.

  17. ``Test kit'' for detection of biologically important anions: A salicylidene-hydrazine based Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalapati, Sasanka; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Jana, Sankar; Karmakar, Saswati; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-02-01

    Test paper coated with Schiff base [(N,N/-bis(5-nitro-salicylidene)hydrazine] receptor 1 (host) can selectively detect fluoride and acetate ions (guest) by developing yellow color which can be detected by naked-eye both in aqueous-acetonitrile solution and in solid supported test kit. UV-vis spectral analysis shows that the absorption peaks at 288 and 345 nm of receptor 1 gradually decrease its initial intensity and new red shifted absorption bands at 397 nm and 455 nm gradually appear upon addition of increasing amount of F- and AcO- ions over several tested anions such as HPO4-, Cl, Br, I, NO3-, NO2-, HSO4-, HSO3-, and ClO4- in aqueous-acetonitrile solvent. The colorimetric test results and UV-vis spectral analysis are in well agreement with 1H NMR titration results in d6-DMSO solvent. The receptor 1 forms 1:2 stable complexes with F- and AcO- ions. However, similar kind of observation obtained from UV-vis titrations in presence of AcOH corresponds to 1:1 complexation ratio indicating the formation of H-bonding interaction between the receptor and anions (F- and AcO- ions). So, the observed 1:2 complexation ratio can only be explained on the basis of deprotonation (˜1 eqv.) and H-bonding (˜1 eqv.) interactions [1]. The ratiometric analysis of host-guest complexes corroborates well with the proposed theoretical model optimization at Density Functional Theory (DFT) level.

  18. Comparison of commercial kits for the detection of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chikwem, J O; Mohammed, I; Ola, T O

    1990-03-01

    Four commercial kits for the detection of antibodies to HIV-1 were compared with regard to their sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value. The Wellcozyme competitive enzyme immunoassay was the least sensitive (62.5%), while Roche EIA, was the most sensitive (100%). All the commercial kits gave false negative results except the Roche EIA system. The Serodia particle agglutination test had the least positive predictive value of 26.9% while Roche EIA had the highest (88.9%). Our results show that commercial HIV-I antibody test kits are not equally sensitive in detecting positive sera. The practice of using Wellcozyme EIA alone for screening blood meant for transfusion should be discouraged because it does not detect all positive sera and might therefore increase the chances of transfusing HIV-I positive blood. The Roche EIA system appears to be the most reliable for screening blood. Test systems which detect HIV-2 should also be used for screening blood meant for transfusion.

  19. Portable kit for identification and detection of drugs in human urine using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenzhen; Liu, Honglin; Meng, Juan; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jing; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-09-15

    A portable kit was demonstrated for rapid and reliable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of drugs in human urine. This kit contains two sealed reagent tubes, a packet of standardized SERS substrates, and a mini Raman device. A 3 min pretreatment for separating amphetamines from human urine was developed with an extraction rate of >80% examined by ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Simultaneously, highly reproducible two-dimensional (2D) gold nanorod (GNR) arrays were assembled by the use of methoxymercaptopoly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG-SH) capping. Thirty batches of GNR arrays produced the 1001 cm(-1) intensity of methamphetamine (MA) molecules with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 7.9%, and a 21 × 21 μm(2) area mapping on a 2D GNR array produced a statistical RSD of <10%, implying an excellent reproducibility and uniformity. The detection limit of amphetamines in human urine was at least 0.1 ppm. Moreover, the portable kit was successfully used for detecting MA, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and methcathinone (MC) in 30 volunteers' urine samples with various clinical natures, and the dual-analyte detection of MA and MDMA implied a good capability of multiplex analysis. UPLC examination and the SERS recovery test clearly indicated that our pretreatment procedure was sufficient to lower the high background signals caused by complex components in urine and demonstrated the practicability and the resistance to false positives, which is a vital problem for law enforcement applications. The excellent performance of our portable kit promises a great prospective toward a rapid, reliable, and on-spot analyzer, especially for public safety and healthcare. PMID:26305415

  20. Evaluation of a Commercial Real-Time PCR Kit for the Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Milk.

    PubMed

    Alajmi, Ahmad; Klein, Günter; Grabowski, Nils Th; Fohler, Svenja; Akineden, Ömer; Abdulmawjood, Amir

    2016-11-01

    There are several commercial test kits for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) detection, each with different advantages, disadvantages, and applications. In the present study, a real-time PCR kit targeting the unique transposon sequence ISMAP02 was evaluated. The analytical sensitivity was determined using the type strain ATCC 19698, and the specificity was validated by testing fifteen MAP isolates, thirteen non-MAP Mycobacterium isolates, and eight non-Mycobacterium isolates. Six spiking experiments were performed using raw milk and reconstituted infant milk artificially contaminated with dilutions containing 10(0)-10(5) MAP cells mL(-1). Sensitivity and specificity were at 100 %. The detection probabilities in raw milk and reconstituted infant milk for the samples (containing 1.4 × 10(1) and 1.7 × 10(1) MAP cell 50 mL(-1)) were 16.6 and 91.6 %, respectively. Thus, the tested kit yielded satisfying results to detect MAP in milk. PMID:27502065

  1. Cross-Platform Evaluation of Commercial Real-Time SYBR Green RT-PCR Kits for Sensitive and Rapid Detection of European Bat Lyssavirus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Peytavin de Garam, Carine; Schereffer, Jean Luc; Marchal, Clotilde; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Cliquet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of five two-step SYBR Green RT-qPCR kits and five one-step SYBR Green qRT-PCR kits using real-time PCR assays. Two real-time thermocyclers showing different throughput capacities were used. The analysed performance evaluation criteria included the generation of standard curve, reaction efficiency, analytical sensitivity, intra- and interassay repeatability as well as the costs and the practicability of kits, and thermocycling times. We found that the optimised one-step PCR assays had a higher detection sensitivity than the optimised two-step assays regardless of the machine used, while no difference was detected in reaction efficiency, R2 values, and intra- and interreproducibility between the two methods. The limit of detection at the 95% confidence level varied between 15 to 981 copies/µL and 41 to 171 for one-step kits and two-step kits, respectively. Of the ten kits tested, the most efficient kit was the Quantitect SYBR Green qRT-PCR with a limit of detection at 95% of confidence of 20 and 22 copies/µL on the thermocyclers Rotor gene Q MDx and MX3005P, respectively. The study demonstrated the pivotal influence of the thermocycler on PCR performance for the detection of rabies RNA, as well as that of the master mixes. PMID:25785274

  2. Slip Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombes, S. D.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the process of developing the Science Lessons from Industrial Processes (SLIP) kits by 16 British science teachers. The content, applicability, and components of these kits (based upon local industries) are also included. (HM)

  3. [Detection of IgG antibodies against rubella virus using the "Rubella-IgG-EIA SSW" test kit].

    PubMed

    Meisegeier, B; Engelmann, A; Pustowoit, B; Thiel, B; Hehme, N; Koppatz, G; Richter, B; Mohr, J; Sandow, D

    1990-05-01

    A new commercial ELISA test kit "Rubella-IgG-EIA SSW" is described for the determination of IgG antibodies to rubella virus. A panel of 99 sera was tested by "Rubella-IgG-EIA SSW" and by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI test). The results of enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) and of HI test correlate well; the coefficient of correlation is 0.95, the specificity is 90.9% and the sensitivity is 100%. A coefficient of correlation was found out of 0.92 between EIA and HI test in the evaluation of the quantitative procedure. The test kit can be used for determination of immune status to rubella virus and for quantitative detection of rubella-IgG antibodies.

  4. Detection of C-KIT (CD117) molecule in benign and malignant salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Dimitrios; Epivatianos, Apostolos; Poulopoulos, Athanasios; Nomikos, Alexandros; Papazoglou, Georgios; Antoniades, Demetrios; Barbatis, Calypso

    2006-01-01

    C-KIT (CD117), a tyrosine kinase receptor, is involved in the growth and development of normal tissues and some types of neoplasms. In the present study we analysed the expression of this molecule in salivary gland tumours. Archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of 40 benign and 57 malignant salivary gland tumours were retrieved and retrospectively studied immunohistochemically using a polyclonal C-KIT antibody in an Envision/HRP technique. In addition five samples of chronic submandibular sialadenitis, five normal minor salivary glands and parotid or submandibular gland tissue adjacent to benign tumour were also studied. C-KIT expression was observed in cases of adenoid cystic, acinic cell polymorphous low grade, epithelial-myoepithelial, carcinosarcoma and basal cell adenocarcinomas, as in luminal cells of pleomorphic adenomas, in serous acinar and only in intercalated and a small number of striated ductal cells of inflammatory salivary gland tissue, whereas normal salivary lobules were generally negative except a weak positivity of intercalated cells. Contrary to other reports, this study suggests that, C-KIT protein does not appear to be an exclusively specific marker for benign or malignant salivary gland neoplasms, but may be useful in differential diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma from polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma. Furthermore its expression in serous acinar cells in sialadenitis and intercalated ductal cells in normal and inflammatory lesions may indicate a possible participation in pathogenesis of both neoplastic and non-neoplastic salivary gland diseases.

  5. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme immunoassay kit (RIDASCREEN) for detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B, C, D, and E in foods.

    PubMed Central

    Park, C E; Akhtar, M; Rayman, M K

    1994-01-01

    The RIDASCREEN SET kit (R-Biopharm GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany), a commercial staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) visual immunoassay kit, was evaluated for its efficacy. The kit utilizes monovalent capture antibodies against SE types A to E (SEA to SEE); therefore, it simultaneously detects and identifies the enterotoxin types. The major advantages of the kit are (i) a high degree of specificity (except for naturally occurring peroxidases, food compositions or ingredients and microbiological products due to growth of nonstaphylococcal microorganisms did not cause false-positive results; additionally, no cross-reactions among reagents of the kits were observed), (ii) excellent sensitivity (minimum detectable limits were 0.20 to 0.30 ng of SEs per ml of extracts of ham, salami, and mushroom and 0.30 to 0.35 ng of SEs per ml of cheese extracts, or 0.50 to 0.75 ng of SEs per g of foods such as noodles, ham, salami, cheese, and turkey), (iii) simplicity (the kit enabled direct assay of SEs in food extracts without the need for lengthy extraction or concentration procedures), (iv) rapidity (it took less than 3 h to complete the analysis of individual enterotoxin types SEA to SEE), and (v) its semiquantitative results (optical density values could be read against a standard curve to estimate the amount of SE in the extract). The RIDASCREEN kit is a convenient, rapid, and reliable tool for the detection and identification of SEs in foods. PMID:8135522

  6. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): MLT Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, Peter

    2010-05-01

    ACE (also known as SCISAT) is making a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of numerous trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The primary instrument is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-1). ACE was launched by NASA on 12 August 2003 for a nominal 2-year mission; after 6 years on orbit the ACE-FTS performance is still excellent. The first results of ACE have been presented in a special issue of Geophysics Research Letters (http://www.agu.org/journals/ss/ACECHEM1/) in 2005 and recently a special issue on ACE validation has been prepared for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/special_issue114.html) by K. Walker and K. Strong; more information can be found at http://www.ace.uwaterloo.ca. The ACE mission goals were initially focussed mainly on polar ozone chemistry, and more recently have shifted more to the troposphere where organic pollutants such as methanol and formaldehyde have been detected. ACE makes limb observations from about 5 km (cloud free scenes) up to nearly 150 km in the lower thermosphere, where CO2 absorption is still weakly detectable. This talk will review ACE-FTS results in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Topics covered will include the mesospheric descent of NOx in the polar winter, spectra of polar mesospheric clouds, concentration profiles of CO2 (which do not match model predictions), and combined Odin-Osiris/ACE-FTS observations.

  7. [Comparison of four rapid diagnostic kits using immunochromatography to detect influenza B viruses].

    PubMed

    Hara, Michimaru; Takao, Shinichi; Fukuda, Shinji; Shimazu, Yukie; Kuwayama, Masaru; Miyazaki, Kazuo

    2005-10-01

    We compared the usefulness of 4 rapid influenza diagnostic 1-device kits using immunochromatography, which facilitate type differentiation, i.e. ESPLINE Influenza A&B-N (Fujirebio Corp., Japan: ESPLINE), POCTEM INFLUENZA A/B (Sysmex Corp., Japan: POCTEM), Quick Vue Rapid SP influ (Quidel Corp., U.S.A.: Quick Vue), and Capilia Flu A + B (TAUNS Corp., Japan: Capilia), in 278 children in whom influenza infection was suspected in 2004 and 2005. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were diluted for virus isolation and residual samples were centrifuged. Using the supernatant, we conducted rapid diagnosis testing. Influenza virus AH3 was isolated from 40 children, and influenza B virus from 163. Of the 40 children, the sensitivity and specificity of ESPLINE, POCTEM, Quick Vue, and Capilia were 100%/100%, 95%/100%, 98%/96%, and 98%/96%. In the 163 children, the sensitivity and specificity were 89%/100%, 87%/100%, 88%/97%, and 86%/98%. ESPLINE showed the highest sensitivity and specificity to influenza viruses AH3 and B. All kits were less sensitive to influenza B virus than to influenza A virus, however. The specificity of Quick Vue and Capilia was low; so these kits must be improved.

  8. Detection and typing of human papillomavirus using the Vira Type "in situ" kit: comparison with a conventional dot blot technique.

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner-Jones, B E; Bellomarino, V M; Borg, A J; Orzeszko, K; Garland, S M

    1990-01-01

    A new commercial kit (Vira Type "in situ", Life Technologies, Inc., Molecular Diagnostics Division, Guithersburg, Maryland, USA) for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 in routinely processed human anogenital tissue was compared with a conventional dot blot assay for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Both systems use double-stranded genomic DNA probes for the detection of type specific HPV DNA. The probes used on the dot blots were labelled with 32P and visualised autoradiographically. The Vira Type probes were labelled with biotin and visualised using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate with NBT-BCIP substrate. Biopsy specimens from the cervix, vagina, and vulva of 46 women were processed by both methods and compared. The histological diagnoses ranged from benign changes, to dysplasia, and invasive carcinoma. Overall, 50% of biopsy specimens were positive for HPV DNA by dot blot hybridisation; only 39% were positive by Vira Type in situ hybridisation. Three of the specimens positive by the Vira Type "in situ" kit showed no cross hybridisation and were the same HPV type as the dot blot. A further 13 showed hybridisation, but the showed cross hybridisation, but the to the dot blot results. One biopsy specimen was positive for different HPV types by the two tests and one was positive by Vira Type and negative by dot blot. Six biopsy specimens were negative by Vira Type but positive by dot blot. It is concluded that the Vira Type "in situ" kit has a similar specificity but lower sensitivity than the dot blot hybridisation method for the detection of HPV DNA. Images PMID:2175755

  9. Time Detectives: A Visual Trip Through Life in Early Sioux Falls. Teacher's Manual for Time Detectives Loan Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gran, Stacy; Van Roessel, Nancy

    This manual was designed as part of a visual resource kit focusing on the history and culture of late 19th century Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Ten topics are addressed: (1) "Fort Dakota"; (2) "Streets of Sioux Falls"; (3) "Shops"; (4) "Businesses"; (5) "Public Schools"; (6) "Quarrying"; (7) "Harvesting"; (8) "Transportation"; (9) "Cataract Hotel";…

  10. Development of Rapid Diagnostic Kit for Identification of Hanwoo (Korean Native Cattle) Brand Meat by Detecting BIO-TAG.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyung Hoon; Park, Sung Kwon; Lee, Myung Hoon; Kim, Sung Il; Cho, Soo Hyun; Choi, Chang Bon

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to develop a rapid immuno-assay kit, by using a specific antigen to detect Hanwoo brand meat. We selected a synthetic antigen specific to our target antibody, named BIO-TAG (Tyr-D-Ala-Phe), by utilizing a computer-based analysis and literature review. BIO-TAG tagged with adjuvant was subcutaneously injected in sheep and Hanwoo. The serum and meat juice of the immunized or non-immunized animal were then analyzed, to measure the titer of antibody by ELISA and Western blot. The amount of antibodies against the BIO-TAG increased (p<0.05) in serum by vaccination. Furthermore, meat juice from the immunized Hanwoo showed greater (p<0.05) antibody titer, compared with those from non-immunized groups. To optimze the dilution factor, we performed dot-ELISA, with various combination levels of BIO-TAG. Results from dot-ELISA showed that 2 mg/mL BIO-TAG was sufficient to distinguish the immunized meat from non-immunized groups. These results support our hypothesis that simple immunization of Hanwoo generates a sufficient amount of antibodies to be detectable in the meat juice by means of the immune-assay. Therefore, specific Hanwoo brand meat can be more precisely identified by our rapid diagnostic kit. This technology can deter possible fraud of counterfeit meat brands in the Korean domestic market with ease and rapidity; and offers a new tool that guarantees consumers high quality Hanwoo brand beef.

  11. Comparative evaluation of eleven commercial DNA extraction kits for real-time PCR detection of Bacillus anthracis spores in spiked dairy samples.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Katja; Freund, Lisa; Schmoock, Gernot; Hänsel, Christoph; Melzer, Falk; Elschner, Mandy C

    2014-01-17

    Spores of Bacillus anthracis are highly resistant and can survive conditions used for food preservation. Sample size and complexity represent the major hurdles for pathogen detection in food-related settings. Eleven commercial DNA extraction kits were evaluated for detection of B. anthracis spores by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) in dairy products. DNA was extracted from serial dilutions of B. anthracis spores in milk powder, cream cheese, whole milk and buttermilk. Three kits (QIAamp DNA mini kit, Invisorb Food kit I and II) were determined to produce the lowest limit of detections (LODs) with equally good performance. These kits employed lysozyme and proteinase K treatments or proteinase K in combination with cethyltrimethylamonium bromide-mediated (CTAB) precipitation of cell debris for cell disruption and DNA release. The LODs for these three kits were determined as 10(2) spores/ml of distilled water, 10(3)s pores/20 mg of powdered milk and 10(4) spores/100 mg of cream cheese, respectively. Performance testing of the QIAamp DNA mini kit demonstrated a good reproducibility and appropriate detection limits from 10(3)/ml for butter milk, 10(4)/ml for whole milk and 10(4)/100 mg for low fat cream cheese. However, DNA extraction efficiency was strongly inhibited by cream cheese with higher fat contents with an increased LOD of 10(6)/100 mg spores. This study demonstrated that qPCR detection depends directly on the appropriate DNA extraction method for an individual food matrix and bacterial agent.

  12. Comparison of two commercial kits and an in-house ELISA for the detection of equine rotavirus in foal feces.

    PubMed

    Miño, S; Kern, A; Barrandeguy, M; Parreño, V

    2015-09-15

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are important infectious agents associated with diarrhea in the young of several animal species including foals. Currently, a variety of diagnosis methods are commercially available, like ELISA, latex agglutination and immunochromatographic assays. These commercial tests are mainly designed for the detection of human RVA; its applicability in veterinary diagnosis has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of two commercial diagnostic kits, Pathfinder™ Rotavirus and FASTest Rota® strip, with an in-house KERI ELISA, for the detection of equine RVA. A total of 172 stool samples from Thoroughbred foals with diarrhea were analyzed. The presence of equine RVA in samples in which only one of the three methods showed positive results was confirmed by RT-PCR. A sample was considered "true positive" when RVA was detected by at least two of the methods, and "true negative" when it tested negative by the three assays. Following these criteria, 50 samples were found positive and 122 were found negative, and were handled as reference population for the assay validation. Pathfinder™ Rotavirus assay showed 32% sensitivity and 97% specificity, FASTest Rota® strip, 92% sensitivity and 97% specificity, and KERI ELISA, 76% sensitivity and 93% specificity. Pathfinder™ Rotavirus showed 77%, FASTest Rota® strip 95%, and KERI ELISA 88% accuracy to correctly classify the samples as equine RVA positive or negative. Pathfinder failed specifically to detect equine RVA G3P12I6 genotype; such performance might be related to the specificity of the monoclonal antibody included in this kit. According to our results, differences among VP6 genotypes could influence the sensitivity to detect equine RVA in foal feces, and thus assay validation of diagnostic kits for each species is necessary. In conclusion, FASTest Rota® strip is more suitable than ELISA Pathfinder™ Rotavirus for the screening of rotavirus

  13. Comparative study of three screening tests, two microbiological tube tests, and a multi-sulphonamide ELISA kit for the detection of antimicrobial and sulphonamide residues in eggs.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, V; Hedou, C; Rault, A; Sanders, P; Verdon, E

    2009-04-01

    The screening of antimicrobial residues in eggs is an especially important subject. Three different commercial kits for the screening of sulphonamides and other antimicrobials in eggs were validated in accordance with Decision 2002/657/EC: one enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) kit multi-sulphonamides (from RAISIO Diagnostics) and two microbiological tests (a Premi test from DSM and an Explorer kit from Zeu-Inmunotec). The false-positive rates were lower than 2% for all kits. The detection capabilities (CCbeta) have to be as low as possible for banned substances and lower than the maximum residue limit (MRL) when MRLs have been set. The sensitivity of the Premi test was better than that of the Explorer test, probably because of the dilution of the eggs before the Explorer test was used. The CCbeta values towards most of the tested sulphonamides were satisfactory with the Premi test (< or = 100 microg kg(-1)). Performance in a proficiency test for the detection of sulphonamides in eggs with the Premi test confirmed these results. The detection capabilities of tetracycline and doxycycline were at the level of the MRL or twice the MRL maximum. The detection capabilities for chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline were higher (four to six times the MRL). The detection capabilities for amoxicillin, neomycin, tylosin and erythromycin were lower than their respective MRLs. Detection capabilities for sulphonamides were much lower for the ELISA kit than for microbiological tests. The ELISA kit could be recommended for the targeted screening of sulphonamides in eggs. On the other hand, the Explorer and Premi tests could be used as wide screening tests allowing the detection of most of the antimicrobial families.

  14. [Evaluation of the sensitivity of a densitometry system, in judging the result of influenza virus antigen-detection kit using immunochromatography].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ikuo; Aoyama, Tomoe; Yamamoto, Masaru; Kinosita, Keiko; Ito, Yumi

    2014-01-01

    Immunochromatography viral antigen-detection kits have become popular in clinical settings in Japan. Influenza virus detection kit is one of them. It is sometimes used in early phase of the disease, combined with the early treatment with anti-influenza drugs. Most of them are invented to visually read the test line on their kits. However, we should be careful about their reliability of them. Sometimes human errors occur at the visual tests, and they have different sensitivities among the kits from different companies. In this report, we evaluated the sensitivity of BD Veritor System Flu with its reader by comparing with conventional visual tests. A total of 84 people including laboratory technologists were asked to visually read test line and their answers were compared with results of BD Veritor System Reader. This study showed that the lower the concentration of standard sample was applied, the greater the error ratio of visual test became, indicating the stable sensitivity of Veritor System. Moreover, the sensitivity was compared with three other major products approved in Japan, using four influenza viruses: type A of H1N1 seasonal 2009, H1N1 pandemic 2009, H3N2 seasonal 2012 and type B of seasonal 2012. It was indicated that Veritor System had the highest limit of detection from the kits. PMID:25073199

  15. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  16. Performance evaluation of the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit for detection of entecavir resistance mutations in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hoon; Chun, Ji-Yong; Shin, Soo-Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Yoo, Wangdon; Hong, Sun Pyo; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Molecular diagnostic methods have enabled the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant mutations in hepatitis B virus (HBV) and have reduced both unnecessary therapeutic interventions and medical costs. In this study we evaluated the analytical and clinical performances of the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit (GeneMatrix, Korea) in detecting entecavir-resistance-associated mutations. Methods The HepB Typer-Entecavir kit was evaluated for its limit of detection, interference, cross-reactivity, and precision using HBV reference standards made by diluting high-titer viral stocks in HBV-negative human serum. The performance of the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit for detecting mutations related to entecavir resistance was compared with direct sequencing for 396 clinical samples from 108 patients. Results Using the reference standards, the detection limit of the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit was found to be as low as 500 copies/mL. No cross-reactivity was observed, and elevated levels of various interfering substances did not adversely affect its analytical performance. The precision test conducted by repetitive analysis of 2,400 replicates with reference standards at various concentrations showed 99.9% agreement (2398/2400). The overall concordance rate between the HepB Typer-Entecavir kit and direct sequencing assays in 396 clinical samples was 99.5%. Conclusions The HepB Typer-Entecavir kit showed high reliability and precision, and comparable sensitivity and specificity for detecting mutant virus populations in reference and clinical samples in comparison with direct sequencing. Therefore, this assay would be clinically useful in the diagnosis of entecavir-resistance-associated mutations in chronic hepatitis B. PMID:24459645

  17. Evaluation of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for detecting microbial DNA in blood culture bottles using PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungho; Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Seoyong; Park, Soon Deok; Yu, Kwangmin; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2016-09-01

    DNA extraction efficiency affects the success of PCR-based method applications. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit for extracting DNA by using paper chromatography is technically easy to use and requires just two reagents and only 10min to complete. The Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit could be offered as a rapid, accurate, and convenient method for extracting bacterial and fungal DNA from blood culture bottles. We compared the efficiencies of the commercial kit (Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit) and an in-house conventional boiling method with Chelex-100 resin for DNA extraction from blood culture bottles. The efficiency of the two DNA extraction methods was assessed by PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay (PCR-REBA, REBA Sepsis-ID) for detecting Gram positive (GP) bacteria, Gram negative (GN) bacteria, and Candida species with 196 positive and 200 negative blood culture bottles. The detection limits of the two DNA extraction methods were 10(3)CFU/mL for GP bacteria, 10(3)CFU/mL for GN bacteria, and 10(4)CFU/mL for Candida. The sensitivity and specificity of the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit by REBA Sepsis-ID were 95.4% (187/196) and 100% (200/200), respectively. The overall agreement of the two DNA extraction methods was 98.9% (392/396). Three of four samples showing discrepant results between the two extraction methods were more accurately matched up with the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit based on conventional culture methods. The results indicated that the Punch-it™ NA-Sample kit extracted bacterial and fungal DNA in blood culture bottles and allowed extracted DNA to be used in molecular assay. PMID:27263831

  18. Development and Validation of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay Test Kit for Dual Detection of Casein and β-Lactoglobulin Residues.

    PubMed

    Masiri, Jongkit; Barrios-Lopez, Brianda; Benoit, Lora; Tamayo, Joshua; Day, Jeffrey; Nadala, Cesar; Sung, Shao-Lei; Samadpour, Mansour

    2016-03-01

    Allergies to cow's milk are very common and can present as life-threatening anaphylaxis. Consequently, food labeling legislation mandates that foods containing milk residues, including casein and/or β-lactoglobulin, provide an indication of such on the product label. Because contamination with either component independent of the other can occur during food manufacturing, effective allergen management measures for containment of milk residues necessitates the use of dual screening methods. To assist the food industry in improving food safety practices, we have developed a rapid lateral flow immunoassay test kit that reliably reports both residues down to 0.01 μg per swab and 0.1 ppm of protein for foods. The assay utilizes both sandwich and competitive format test lines and is specific for bovine milk residues. Selectivity testing using a panel of matrices with potentially interfering substances, including commonly used sanitizing agents, indicated reduction in the limit of detection by one-to fourfold. With food, residues were easily detected in all cow's milk-based foods tested, but goat and sheep milk residues were not detected. Specificity analysis revealed no cross-reactivity with common commodities, with the exception of kidney beans when present at high concentrations (> 1%). The development of a highly sensitive and rapid test method capable of detecting trace amounts of casein and/or β-lactoglobulin should aid food manufacturers and regulatory agencies in monitoring for milk allergens in environmental and food samples. PMID:26939659

  19. The merits of designed ELISA avidity kit in detection of Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibody in laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sadraie, Javid; Bahadory, Ehsan Shariat; Marsusi, Vajihe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Toxoplasmosis is a parasitic disease which may cause some laboratory symptoms in infected individuals. One of the main ways to transmit this organism is placenta to the fetus pathway. If this transmission occurs in the 3rd month of pregnancy, the abortion, central nerve system and ocular disorder will happen. Because of this issue, the precise technique for the detection of Toxoplasma antibodies such as immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M IgM are important, as they contain ELISA and ELISA avidity. Materials and Methods: In this survey, the main samples are serum and amniotic fluid that were collected from 48 pregnant women infected with Toxoplasma gondii in Shariaty hospital. This survey is attempted to design ELISA avidity kit in Tarbiat Modates University. Results: The results from this survey show that, in these total pregnant women the infection by T. gondii has occurred and many of them are infected currently. Conclusions: In the simple ELISA technique, the only antibody that can be detected precisely is IgM; however, using this technique the IgG antibody can also be detected. In this new technique or ELISA avidity, in addition to detection of IgG antibody against T. gondii, the month of transmission of Toxoplasma is also interpreted. PMID:23961440

  20. ACES: Final performance report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, V. D.

    1981-04-01

    The performance of the ACES in a single family residence near Knoxville, Tennessee was compared with that of two different air to air heat pumps in an identical house. Results show that energy was saved for the testing years. In addition to reducing consumption, the ACES significantly reduced integrated peak utility demands. Reinsulation of the ice storage bin reduced heat leakage rates by about 40 percent and resulted in increasing ground temperatures by an average of 5.60 C over first year levels. The demonstration project and the ACES concept are described. Data acquisition procedures, system modifications, steady state performance, annual cycle performance, and effects of modifications are discussed.

  1. Sensitive detection of the c-KIT c.1430G>T mutation by mutant-specific polymerase chain reaction in feline mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Takanosu, M; Sato, M; Kagawa, Y

    2014-06-01

    Here, we describe the establishment of mutant-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of a c-KIT c.1430G>T mutation in feline mast cell tumours. Several mutations in feline c-KIT have been identified, with the c.1430G>T mutation accounting for a significant portion of feline mast cell tumour mutations. The c.1430G>T mutation in c-KIT exon 9 was detected in 15.7% (11 of 70) of samples by mutant-specific PCR but in only 7.1% (5 of 70) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the genomic DNA isolated from 70 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections or cells collected by fine needle aspiration. Mutant-specific PCR showed remarkably higher detection rate than did PCR-RFLP. DNA sequence analysis did not always yield identical results to those of mutant-specific PCR, suggesting heterogeneity of tumour cells. Mutant-specific PCR is a valid and efficient screening tool for detection of the c-KIT c.1430G>T point mutation in feline mast cell tumours compared with PCR-RFLP and sequencing analysis.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of ELISA methods as an alternative screening test to indirect immunofluorescence for the detection of antinuclear antibodies. Evaluation of five commercial kits.

    PubMed

    Tonuttia, Elio; Bassetti, Danila; Piazza, Anna; Visentini, Daniela; Poletto, Monica; Bassetto, Franca; Caciagli, Patrizio; Villalta, Danilo; Tozzoli, Renato; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2004-03-01

    Detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is a fundamental laboratory test for diagnosing systemic autoimmune diseases. Currently, the method of choice is indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on a HEp-2 cell substrate. The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of five commercially available enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits for ANA detection and to verify the possibility of using them as an alternative to the IIF method. The study involved 1513 patients, 315 of whom were diagnosed with a systemic autoimmune disease and 1198 in whom an autoimmune disorder was excluded. For all sera, ANA detection was performed via IIF and with five different EIA kits. The results were evaluated in relation to clinical diagnosis and the presence of possible specific autoantibodies (anti-ENA or anti-dsDNA); lastly, they were compared with the results obtained using ANA-IIF as the method of reference. The positive rate of the ANA-IIF test in subjects with systemic autoimmune diseases was 92%, whereas in the five ANA-EIA kits there was broad diversity in terms of response, with positive rates ranging from 74 to 94%. All the EIA kits correctly detected the presence of antibodies (anti-dsDNA, anti-RNP, anti-Ro/SSA) responsible for homogeneous and speckled fluorescence pattern, but at the same time they showed substantial inaccuracy with the nucleolar pattern, with a mean sensitivity of approximately 50% in this case. Instead, there was a large kit-to-kit difference in terms of identification of anti-Scl70 and centromere patterns, for which sensitivities ranged between 45 and 91%, and between 49 and 100%, respectively. The results of the study demonstrate that the commercially available ANA-EIA kits show different levels of sensitivity and specificity. Some of them have a diagnostic accuracy that is comparable and, in some cases, even higher than the IIF method. Consequently, these could be used as an alternative screening test to IIE. However, others do not ensure acceptable

  3. The Slidex-mĕningite-Kit (Bio-Mĕrieux) tested for exoantigen detection in spinal fluids from purulent meningitis cases.

    PubMed

    Kuzemenská, P; Komínková, B; Mackŭ, M; Duniewicz, M; Jezek, P; Stanková, M

    1982-01-01

    The Slidex-méningite-Kit allows the used of the rather highly sensitive and specific latex-agglutination method for the detection of N. meningitis group A and C and H. influenzae b exoantigens within a few minutes. In model experiments positive results persisted at unchanged intensity for prolonged periods of time regardless of storage temperature. However, in practical trials performed in a set of 60 spinal fluids from purulent meningitis patients etiological agent identification by the slidex-méningite-Kit failed at least as frequently as by cultivation; in the case of meningococci the kit even failed more often than cultivation. Hence the Slidex-méningite-Kit should be regarded as an auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of purulent meningitis and one that cannot replace the classical methods of cultivation and preparation staining. In the case of positive results, advantages of the Slides-méingite-Kit are rapidity in etiological agent identification and prolonged persistence of positivity in the spinal fluid samples. PMID:6806356

  4. Development of a Rapid Diagnostic Kit That Uses an Immunochromatographic Device To Detect Antibodies in Human Sparganosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Maleewong, Wanchai; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Takayama, Katsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Yukuharu

    2014-01-01

    A diagnostic kit using an immunochromatographic device was developed to replace the time-consuming immunodiagnostic methods for human sparganosis. The kit was found to be faster and easier to use than an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and showed higher sensitivity and specificity. It will be useful for the laboratory diagnosis of hospitalized cases of sparganosis. PMID:24990912

  5. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:138-139.

  6. Molecular and recombinational mapping of mutations in the Ace locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Nagoshi, R.N.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-11-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region with which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace/sup -/ phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/ is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region.

  7. Evaluation of viral-lysate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits for detecting human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) infections using human sera standardized by quantitative western blotting.

    PubMed

    Hardy, C T; Damrow, T A; Villareal, D B; Kenny, G E

    1992-06-01

    The first generation of proprietary reagents for detecting antibodies to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used as antigen partially purified virus from cell culture lysates. These tests, which are still in use, may vary in their antibody measurement capabilities if different proportions of the viral polypeptides are present in the viral lysate mixtures. We determined the quantities of antibodies in the serum of persons infected with HIV-1 by dilution analysis using 3 ELISA kits: Abbott [A], Du Pont [D], Genetic Systems [G]. The proportionate antibody titres of each serum to p24gag and gp160env/120env were established by quantitative Western blotting. Serum antibody titres were high, frequently over 1:10,000, a result observed both by ELISA and Western blot. For Kit D, sera with high proportions of antibody to p24gag produced antibody titration curves with steep slopes whereas shallower slopes were found in sera with high proportions of antibody to gp160env. In contrast, Kit A gave steeper slopes with sera enriched for gp160env antibodies. Kit G gave results with slopes intermediate between Kits A and D. Serum antibody titres differed between kits depending upon the proportion and concentration of antibodies in a given serum to gp160env and p24gag. The findings that both the concentration and proportion of antibodies to specific viral polypeptides in human sera markedly affect the signal intensity produced by proprietary ELISAs suggest the need for several control sera which reflect the diversity of human serum responses. Standardization of human reference sera by quantitative Western blotting will assist in evaluation and quality control of ELISA tests.

  8. Prospective assessment of the false positive rate of the Australian snake venom detection kit in healthy human samples.

    PubMed

    Nimorakiotakis, Vasilios Bill; Winkel, Kenneth D

    2016-03-01

    The Snake Venom Detection Kit (SVDK; bioCSL Pty Ltd, Australia) distinguishes venom from the five most medically significant snake immunotypes found in Australia. This study assesses the rate of false positives that, by definition, refers to a positive assay finding in a sample from someone who has not been bitten by a venomous snake. Control unbroken skin swabs, simulated bite swabs and urine specimens were collected from 61 healthy adult volunteers [33 males and 28 females] for assessment. In all controls, simulated bite site and urine samples [a total of 183 tests], the positive control well reacted strongly within one minute and no test wells reacted during the ten minute incubation period. However, in two urine tests, the negative control well gave a positive reaction (indicating an uninterpretable test). A 95% confidence interval for the false positive rate, on a per-patient rate, derived from the findings of this study, would extend from 0% to 6% and, on a per-test basis, it would be 0-2%. It appears to be a very low incidence (0-6%) of intrinsic true false positives for the SVDK. The clinical impresssion of a high SVDK false positive rate may be mostly related to operator error.

  9. Evaluation of two commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits for the detection of serum antibodies against Akabane virus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, Reinhold; McFadden, Andrew M J; Kirkland, Peter D; Hannah, Michaela J; Orr, Della; Bueno, Rudolfo; Swainsbury, Richard; Keen, Denise; Jenner, Judy; French, Jennifer; Pigott, Clive J

    2013-09-01

    In New Zealand, an arbovirus surveillance program has been operating for more than 20 years, which includes testing of cattle with the Akabane virus neutralization test. With the aim to replace this laborious test by an easier-to-perform enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 2 commercial ELISA kits, ELISA-1 from France (originally from Australia) and ELISA-2 from Japan, were compared, using 334 serum samples from noninfected New Zealand cattle, and 548 serum samples from naturally infected cattle herds in Australia. Diagnostic specificities for the test methods were high, ranging from 99.4% to 100%. The diagnostic sensitivities varied considerably between the test methods and differed from the values reported by the manufacturers (94% for each ELISA). The diagnostic sensitivities relative to the virus neutralization test (n = 378) were 96.0% for ELISA-1 or 98.9% when suspect samples were included, and 78.0% for ELISA-2. Differences in the commercial ELISA kits may be explained by the presence of other Simbu serogroup viruses in Australian cattle herds, causing cross-reactions in ELISA-1. Both commercial ELISA kits would be fit for purpose and could replace the virus neutralization test for Akabane virus surveillance in New Zealand. ELISA-1 may be able to detect other Simbu serogroup viruses, should they be present. The current study shows that despite comparable ELISA test characteristics given by the manufacturers, evaluation on the target population revealed marked differences in the ELISA kits test methods' characteristics.

  10. Detection of Inorganic Arsenic in Rice Using a Field Test Kit: A Screening Method.

    PubMed

    Bralatei, Edi; Lacan, Severine; Krupp, Eva M; Feldmann, Jörg

    2015-11-17

    Rice is a staple food eaten by more than 50% of the world's population and is a daily dietary constituent in most South East Asian countries where 70% of the rice export comes from and where there is a high level of arsenic contamination in groundwater used for irrigation. Research shows that rice can take up and store inorganic arsenic during cultivation, and rice is considered to be one of the major routes of exposure to inorganic arsenic, a class I carcinogen for humans. Here, we report the use of a screening method based on the Gutzeit methodology to detect inorganic arsenic (iAs) in rice within 1 h. After optimization, 30 rice commodities from the United Kingdom market were tested with the field method and were compared to the reference method (high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, HPLC-ICP-MS). In all but three rice samples, iAs compound can be determined. The results show no bias for iAs using the field method. Results obtained show quantification limits of about 50 μg kg(-1), a good reproducibility for a field method of ±12%, and only a few false positives and negatives (<10%) could only be recorded at the 2015 European Commission (EC) guideline for baby rice of 100 μg kg(-1), while none were recorded at the maximum level suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) and implemented by the EC for polished and white rice of 200 μg kg(-1). The method is reliable, fast, and inexpensive; hence, it is suggested to be used as a screening method in the field for preselection of rice which violates legislative guidelines.

  11. Evaluation of the NucliSens Basic Kit for Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Genital Tract Specimens Using Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, J. B.; Song, X.; Chong, S.; Faught, M.; Salonga, T.; Kapala, J.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated a new RNA amplification and detection kit, the NucliSens Basic Kit (Organon Teknika), for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in genitourinary specimens. The Basic Kit provides an open platform for RNA amplification and detection and contains isolation reagents for nucleic acid extraction, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reagents (enzymes and buffers), and a generic ruthenium-labeled probe for electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of amplified product. Using freshly purified and titrated stocks of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae and in vitro-generated RNA transcripts for sensitivity determinations, the Basic Kit detected 1 inclusion-forming unit of C. trachomatis, 1 CFU of N. gonorrhoeae, and 100 RNA molecules of 16S rRNA for both bacteria. The clinical performance of the Basic Kit was evaluated by testing a total of 250 specimens for N. gonorrhoeae by culture and NASBA and a total of 96 specimens for C. trachomatis by PCR and NASBA. The Basic Kit detected 139 of 142 N. gonorrhoeae culture-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 73 of 74 culture-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 97.9 and 98.7%, respectively. For C. trachomatis, the Basic Kit detected 24 of 24 PCR-positive specimens and gave a negative result for 71 of 72 PCR-negative specimens, for a sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 98.6%, respectively. The Basic Kit also detected specimens containing both N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis, using a multiplex NASBA assay using primers for both bacteria. The NucliSens Basic Kit offers a versatile platform for the development of sensitive RNA detection assays for sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:11283067

  12. Evaluation of the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ Kit for Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B in Clinical Stool Specimens.

    PubMed

    Jazmati, Nathalie; Wiegel, Pia; Ličanin, Božica; Plum, Georg

    2015-06-01

    We compared the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ kit, a new nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of Clostridium difficile toxins in stool specimens, with the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile test. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ test were 100%, 89.5%, 60.9%, and 100%, and those for the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile test were 100%, 90%, 62.2%, and 100%, respectively.

  13. Validation and comparison of two commercial ELISA kits and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays for the detection of potentially allergenic mustard in food.

    PubMed

    Palle-Reisch, Monika; Hochegger, Rupert; Štumr, Stepan; Korycanova, Kveta; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2015-05-01

    The study compares the applicability of two commercial mustard ELISA kits (Mustard ELISA Kit-specific and Mustard ELISA Kit-total) and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays (singleplex assay for white mustard, singleplex assay for black/brown mustard and duplex assay for the detection of white, black and brown mustard). Analyses of raw and brewed model sausages containing white and black/brown mustard in the range from 1 to 50 ppm indicate that both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays allow the detection of traces of mustard in raw and in brewed sausages. The ELISAs were found to be more sensitive than the real-time PCR assays. When the ELISAs and real-time PCR assays were applied to the analysis of 15 commercial foodstuffs differing in their labelling concerning mustard, in one sample mustard was detected with both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays although mustard was not indicated on the food ingredient list. PMID:25529654

  14. Validation and comparison of two commercial ELISA kits and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays for the detection of potentially allergenic mustard in food.

    PubMed

    Palle-Reisch, Monika; Hochegger, Rupert; Štumr, Stepan; Korycanova, Kveta; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2015-05-01

    The study compares the applicability of two commercial mustard ELISA kits (Mustard ELISA Kit-specific and Mustard ELISA Kit-total) and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays (singleplex assay for white mustard, singleplex assay for black/brown mustard and duplex assay for the detection of white, black and brown mustard). Analyses of raw and brewed model sausages containing white and black/brown mustard in the range from 1 to 50 ppm indicate that both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays allow the detection of traces of mustard in raw and in brewed sausages. The ELISAs were found to be more sensitive than the real-time PCR assays. When the ELISAs and real-time PCR assays were applied to the analysis of 15 commercial foodstuffs differing in their labelling concerning mustard, in one sample mustard was detected with both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays although mustard was not indicated on the food ingredient list.

  15. Comparison of the Carba NP, Modified Carba NP, and Updated Rosco Neo-Rapid Carb Kit Tests for Carbapenemase Detection.

    PubMed

    AbdelGhani, Sameh; Thomson, Gina K; Snyder, James W; Thomson, Kenneth S

    2015-11-01

    The accurate detection of carbapenemase-producing organisms is a major challenge for clinical laboratories. The Carba NP test is highly accurate but inconvenient, as it requires frequent preparation of fresh imipenem solution. The current study was designed to compare the Carba NP test to two alternative tests for accuracy and convenience. These were a modified Carba NP test that utilized intravenous (i.v.) imipenem-cilastatin, which is less expensive than reference standard imipenem powder, and an updated version of the Rosco Neo-Rapid Carb kit, which does not require the preparation of imipenem solution and has a shelf life of 2 years. The comparison included 87 isolates that produced class A carbapenemases (including KPC-2, -3, -4, -5, -6, and -8, NMC-A, and SME type), 40 isolates that produced metallo-β-lactamases (including NDM-1, GIM-1, SPM-1, IMP-1, -2, -7, -8, -18, and -27, and VIM-1, -2, and -7), 11 isolates that produced OXA-48, and one isolate that produced OXA-181. Negative controls consisted of 50 isolates that produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpCs (including hyperproducers), K1, other limited-spectrum β-lactamases, and porin and efflux mutants. Each test exhibited 100% specificity and high sensitivity (Carba NP, 100%; Rosco, 99% using modified interpretation guidelines; and modified Carba NP, 96%). A modified approach to interpretation of the Rosco test was necessary to achieve the sensitivity of 99%. If the accuracy of the modified interpretation is confirmed, the Rosco test is an accurate and more convenient alternative to the Carba NP test. PMID:26311862

  16. Development and validation of an ELISA kit (YF MAC-HD) to detect IgM to yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Basile, Alison Jane; Goodman, Christin; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Laven, Janeen; Panella, Amanda J; Kosoy, Olga; Lanciotti, Robert S; Johnson, Barbara W

    2015-12-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, with around 180,000 human infections a year occurring in Africa. Serologic testing is the chief laboratory diagnostic means of identifying an outbreak and to inform the decision to commence a vaccination campaign. The World Health Organization disseminates the reagents for YFV testing to African reference laboratories, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is charged with producing and providing these reagents. The CDC M-antibody capture ELISA is a 2-day test, requiring titration of reagents when new lots are received, which leads to inconsistency in testing and wastage of material. Here we describe the development of a kit-based assay (YF MAC-HD) based upon the CDC method, that is completed in approximately 3.5h, with equivocal samples being reflexed to an overnight protocol. The kit exhibits >90% accuracy when compared to the 2-day test. The kits were designed for use with a minimum of equipment and are stored at 4°C, removing the need for freezing capacity. This kit is capable of tolerating temporary sub-optimal storage conditions which will ease shipping or power outage concerns, and a shelf life of >6 months was demonstrated with no deterioration in accuracy. All reagents necessary to run the YF MAC-HD are included in the kit and are single-use, with 8 or 24 sample options per kit. Field trials are envisioned for the near future, which will enable refinement of the method. The use of the YF MAC-HD is anticipated to reduce materials wastage, and improve the quality and consistency of YFV serologic testing in endemic areas.

  17. Development and validation of an ELISA kit (YF MAC-HD) to detect IgM to yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Basile, Alison Jane; Goodman, Christin; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Laven, Janeen; Panella, Amanda J; Kosoy, Olga; Lanciotti, Robert S; Johnson, Barbara W

    2015-12-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is endemic in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, with around 180,000 human infections a year occurring in Africa. Serologic testing is the chief laboratory diagnostic means of identifying an outbreak and to inform the decision to commence a vaccination campaign. The World Health Organization disseminates the reagents for YFV testing to African reference laboratories, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is charged with producing and providing these reagents. The CDC M-antibody capture ELISA is a 2-day test, requiring titration of reagents when new lots are received, which leads to inconsistency in testing and wastage of material. Here we describe the development of a kit-based assay (YF MAC-HD) based upon the CDC method, that is completed in approximately 3.5h, with equivocal samples being reflexed to an overnight protocol. The kit exhibits >90% accuracy when compared to the 2-day test. The kits were designed for use with a minimum of equipment and are stored at 4°C, removing the need for freezing capacity. This kit is capable of tolerating temporary sub-optimal storage conditions which will ease shipping or power outage concerns, and a shelf life of >6 months was demonstrated with no deterioration in accuracy. All reagents necessary to run the YF MAC-HD are included in the kit and are single-use, with 8 or 24 sample options per kit. Field trials are envisioned for the near future, which will enable refinement of the method. The use of the YF MAC-HD is anticipated to reduce materials wastage, and improve the quality and consistency of YFV serologic testing in endemic areas. PMID:26342907

  18. Validation of the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Instrument for the Detection of Salmonellae with SureTect Salmonella Species PCR Kit.

    PubMed

    Cloke, Jonathan; Evans, Katharine; Crabtree, David; Hughes, Annette; Simpson, Helen

    2016-07-01

    The Thermo Scientific SureTect™ Salmonella species real-time PCR assay is a rapid alternative method designed for the detection of salmonellae in a wide range of foods, animal feeds, and production-environment samples. The assay has previously been validated according to the AOAC Research Institute Performance Tested Methods(SM) program using Thermo Scientific PikoReal™ PCR cycler and Thermo Scientific SureTect Software Performance Tested Method 051303). This report details the method-modification study performed to validate an updated assay format, utilizing a reduced target probe concentration and an extension of the PCR cycler platform to enable the use of the kit with a Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast PCR cycler and Applied Biosystems RapidFinder™ Express 2.0 software. During this validation study, a matrix study was conducted on a subset of the method's claimed matrixes, comparing the performance of the modified SureTect Salmonella species kit (a reduced target probe concentration with a 7500 Fast platform) to the reference method detailed in ISO 6579:2002. No significant difference by probability of detection statistical analysis was found between SureTect or International Organization for Standardization methods for any of the matrixes analyzed during the study. Inclusivity and exclusivity studies using the modified method demonstrated accurate results for the 117 Salmonella and 36 non-Salmonella strains tested. Multiple production lots of the newly formatted kit were evaluated and found to be consistent with the current assay. Robustness studies confirmed that the change to the kit had no impact on the assay's performance when alterations were made to method parameters having the greatest potential impact on assay performance. PMID:27328669

  19. Validation, use, and disadvantages of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits for detection of cortisol in channel catfish, largemouth bass, red pacu, and golden shiners.

    PubMed

    Sink, T D; Lochmann, R T; Fecteau, K A

    2008-03-01

    Measurement of cortisol response is an important tool to asses stress in fisheries research. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is a common method for the measure of cortisol in fish. Use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to detect cortisol would eliminate health hazards, costs of handling radioisotopes, and the short stability time associated with RIA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays have been used for the determination of cortisol in several fish species. However, the ELISA method of cortisol determination in fish lacks proper validation testing. We conducted validation procedures for multiple commercial cortisol ELISA kits and compared the results to RIA. The assays were tested for four species: (1) channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, (2) largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, (3) red pacu Piaractus brachypomus, and (4) golden shiners Notemigonus crysoleucas. We evaluated the ELISA methods against RIA, and determined that at least one kit is suitable (accuracy: mean recovery of spiked samples, 102.8%; reproducibility: interassay coefficient of variation < 10.5% for all species; precision: intra-assay coefficient of variation < 16.8% for all species; linearity: R (2) > 0.96 for all species) for the measurement of cortisol response in fish and comparative determination of stress. All of the ELISA assay results varied by more than 10% from the cortisol concentrations detected by the RIA. The high variability of the kit results indicates that commercial ELISA kits could be utilized for qualitative determination of cortisol in fish, but should be fully validated in each laboratory for each species before being used for research. PMID:18649027

  20. Comparison of a Stool Antigen Detection Kit and PCR for Diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar Infections in Asymptomatic Cyst Passers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Rezaian, Mostafa; Babaei, Zahra; Rajabpour, Azam; Meamar, Ahmad R.; Pourbabai, Ahmad A.; Petri, William A.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare stool antigen detection with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba sp. infection in asymptomatic cyst passers from Iran. Entamoeba dispar and, in one case, E. moshkovskii were the Entamoeba spp. found in the amebic cyst passers. There was a 100% correlation between the results from the TechLab E. histolytica II stool antigen kit and those from nested PCR. We concluded that E. dispar is much more common in asymptomatic cyst passers in Iran and that antigen detection and PCR are comparable diagnostic modalities. PMID:16757634

  1. [The development and testing of reagents kit for detection and qualitative evaluation of DNA of methicillin sensitive and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and also methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. applying technique of polymerase chain reaction in "real time" mode].

    PubMed

    Skachkova, T S; Shipulina, O Iu; Domonova, É A; Subbotovskaia, A I; Kozyreva, V S; Il'ina, V N; Shipulin, G A

    2013-06-01

    The reagents kit is developed to identify and quantitatively detect DNA of methicillin sensitive and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. in biological material using technique of polymerase chain reaction with hybridizational fluorescent detection and having higher analytical and diagnostic characteristics. The application of the given reagents kit makes it possible to optimize the epidemiologic monitoring of propagation of methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp. Significantly decreasing duration and laboriousness of study.

  2. ACE to Ulysses Coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2006-12-01

    The EPAM charged particle instrument on ACE is the backup for the HISCALE instrument on Ulysses making the two ideally suited for spatial coherence studies over large heliosphere distances. Fluxes of low-energy ( ~50 - 200 keV) electrons are detected in eight spatial sectors on both spacecraft. A spherical harmonic description of the particle flux as a function of time using only the l=0 and l=1 degree coefficients describes most of the observed flux. Here we concentrate on the three l=1 coefficients for the 60--100 kev electrons.Between the two spacecraft these result in nine coherence estimates that are all typically moderately coherent, but the fact that the different coefficients at each spacecraft are also coherent with each other makes interpretation difficult. To avoid this difficulty we estimated the canonical coherences between the two groups of three series. This, in effect, chooses an optimum coordinate system at each spacecraft and for each frequency and estimates the coherence in this frame. Using one--minute data, we find that the canonical coherences are generally larger at high frequencies (3 mHz and above) than they are at low frequencies. This appears to be generally true and does not depend particularly on time, range, etc. However, if the data segment is chosen too long, say > 30 days with 1--minute sampling, the coherence at high frequencies drops. This may be because the spatial and temporal features of the mode are confounded, or possibly because the solar modes p--modes are known to change frequency with solar activity, so do not appear coherent on long blocks.The coherences are not smooth functions of frequency, but have a bimodal distribution particularly in the 100 μHz to 5 mHz range. Classifying the data at frequencies where the canonical coherences are high in terms of apparent polarization and orientation, we note two major families of modes that appear to be organized by the Parker spiral. The magnetic field data on the two

  3. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit for the detection of botulinum neurotoxins A, B, E, and F in selected food matrices.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay; Datta, Shomik; Sachdeva, Amita; Maslanka, Susan; Dykes, Janet; Skinner, Guy; Burr, Donald; Whiting, Richard C; Sharma, Shashi K

    2015-01-01

    The mouse bioassay (MBA) is the only accepted standard method for detection of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) in foods. The ELISA method has several advantages over the MBA and is therefore widely used for in vitro detection of BoNTs. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted a precollaborative study to evaluate the applicability of Botulinum Toxin ELISA kits for the detection of BoNT serotypes A, B, E, and F in a variety of food matrices. In this study, food samples (e.g., broccoli, salami, smoked salmon, green beans, orange juice, tomato juice, low-fat plain yogurt, whole milk, liquid infant formula milk, and liquid eggs) were spiked with high, medium, and low concentration BoNT serotypes A, B, E, and F. Samples (unspiked and spiked) were tested at both laboratories by the ELISA kits. All food samples were positive for BoNTs by ELISA in both laboratories at medium and high spiking levels; a positive ELISA result in low spiked samples was both serotype and laboratory dependent. Overall, the ELISA method appears to be an effective preliminary screening method for BoNT detection in food matrices.

  4. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit for the detection of botulinum neurotoxins A, B, E, and F in selected food matrices.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay; Datta, Shomik; Sachdeva, Amita; Maslanka, Susan; Dykes, Janet; Skinner, Guy; Burr, Donald; Whiting, Richard C; Sharma, Shashi K

    2015-01-01

    The mouse bioassay (MBA) is the only accepted standard method for detection of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) in foods. The ELISA method has several advantages over the MBA and is therefore widely used for in vitro detection of BoNTs. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted a precollaborative study to evaluate the applicability of Botulinum Toxin ELISA kits for the detection of BoNT serotypes A, B, E, and F in a variety of food matrices. In this study, food samples (e.g., broccoli, salami, smoked salmon, green beans, orange juice, tomato juice, low-fat plain yogurt, whole milk, liquid infant formula milk, and liquid eggs) were spiked with high, medium, and low concentration BoNT serotypes A, B, E, and F. Samples (unspiked and spiked) were tested at both laboratories by the ELISA kits. All food samples were positive for BoNTs by ELISA in both laboratories at medium and high spiking levels; a positive ELISA result in low spiked samples was both serotype and laboratory dependent. Overall, the ELISA method appears to be an effective preliminary screening method for BoNT detection in food matrices. PMID:25812427

  5. Evaluation of the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ Kit for Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B in Clinical Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wiegel, Pia; Ličanin, Božica; Plum, Georg

    2015-01-01

    We compared the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ kit, a new nucleic acid amplification test for the detection of Clostridium difficile toxins in stool specimens, with the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile test. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the Qiagen artus C. difficile QS-RGQ test were 100%, 89.5%, 60.9%, and 100%, and those for the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile test were 100%, 90%, 62.2%, and 100%, respectively. PMID:25809977

  6. Comparison of radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay kits for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen in both concentrated and nonconcentrated urine samples.

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, J A; Matas, L; Manterola, J M; Blavia, R; Sopena, N; Belda, F J; Padilla, E; Giménez, M; Sabrià, M; Morera, J; Ausina, V

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 soluble antigen by comparing it to radioimmunoassay (RIA), using both concentrated and nonconcentrated urine samples. The sensitivity of EIA was 67.4% in nonconcentrated urine samples and 82.6% in concentrated urine samples. The sensitivity of RIA was 60.9% and 84.8% in nonconcentrated and concentrated urine samples, respectively. Our study indicates that the sensitivity and specificity of EIA are comparable to those of RIA, and that concentrating the antigen by selective ultrafiltration increases sensitivity for both EIA and RIA, with no significant decrease in specificity. PMID:9163502

  7. Assessment of different commercial RNA-extraction and RT-PCR kits for detection of hepatitis A virus in mussel tissues.

    PubMed

    Ribao, Cristina; Torrado, Ignacio; Vilariño, M Luz; Romalde, Jesús L

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, the efficiency of several nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR commercial kits for the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) from seeded mussel tissue samples was evaluated in comparison with the "in-house" method used currently in our laboratory. The best results were achieved with Total Quick RNA Cells & Tissues version mini (Talent) for RNA extraction and the Superscript One-Step RT-PCR System (Life Technologies) for the RT-PCR reaction, obtaining a detection limit of 0.1-1pfu/mg of mussel tissue. A slightly lower sensitivity (in 1logunit) was achieved using the Rneasy plant mini kit (Qiagen) and the Total Quick RNA Cells & Tissues version maxi in combination with the Superscript RT-PCR system. The conventional method usually employed in our laboratory resulted in a sensitivity of 300pfu/mg of tissue. Taken together, these findings indicate that the combination of Total Quick RNA Cells & Tissues version mini and Superscript One-Step RT-PCR System cannot only improve significantly the sensitivity for the HAV detection from mussel, but are also labor and time saving and easy to standardize.

  8. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  9. Performance of a TthPrimPol-based whole genome amplification kit for copy number alteration detection using massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Deleye, Lieselot; De Coninck, Dieter; Dheedene, Annelies; De Sutter, Petra; Menten, Björn; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Starting from only a few cells, current whole genome amplification (WGA) methods provide enough DNA to perform massively parallel sequencing (MPS). Unfortunately, all current WGA methods introduce representation bias which limits detection of copy number aberrations (CNAs) smaller than 3 Mb. A recent WGA method, called TruePrime single cell WGA, uses a recently discovered DNA primase, TthPrimPol, instead of artificial primers to initiate DNA amplification. This method could lead to a lower representation bias, and consequently to a better detection of CNAs. The enzyme requires no complementarity and thus should generate random primers, equally distributed across the genome. The performance of TruePrime WGA was assessed for aneuploidy screening and CNA analysis after MPS, starting from 1, 3 or 5 cells. Although the method looks promising, the single cell TruePrime WGA kit v1 is not suited for high resolution CNA detection after MPS because too much representation bias is introduced. PMID:27546482

  10. Performance of a TthPrimPol-based whole genome amplification kit for copy number alteration detection using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Deleye, Lieselot; De Coninck, Dieter; Dheedene, Annelies; De Sutter, Petra; Menten, Björn; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Starting from only a few cells, current whole genome amplification (WGA) methods provide enough DNA to perform massively parallel sequencing (MPS). Unfortunately, all current WGA methods introduce representation bias which limits detection of copy number aberrations (CNAs) smaller than 3 Mb. A recent WGA method, called TruePrime single cell WGA, uses a recently discovered DNA primase, TthPrimPol, instead of artificial primers to initiate DNA amplification. This method could lead to a lower representation bias, and consequently to a better detection of CNAs. The enzyme requires no complementarity and thus should generate random primers, equally distributed across the genome. The performance of TruePrime WGA was assessed for aneuploidy screening and CNA analysis after MPS, starting from 1, 3 or 5 cells. Although the method looks promising, the single cell TruePrime WGA kit v1 is not suited for high resolution CNA detection after MPS because too much representation bias is introduced. PMID:27546482

  11. Analytical specificity and sensitivity of the novel dual-target GeneProof Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR kit for detection of N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Golparian, Daniel; Hellmark, Bengt; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-11-01

    Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae relies increasingly on nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs). The specificity of many gonococcal NAATs has been suboptimal and supplementary testing remains recommended in Europe and several additional countries. The novel dual-target GeneProof Neisseria gonorrhoeae PCR kit, targeting porA pseudogene and 16S rRNA gene, showed a high specificity and sensitivity when isolates of non-gonococcal Neisseria and related species (n = 144), and gonococci (n = 104) were tested. However, rare gonococcal porA mutants were only detected in the 16S rRNA gene target and two non-gonococcal isolates showed a low-level cross-reactivity in the 16S rRNA gene target. The detection limit for both targets was 1.5 copies per reaction.

  12. Development and evaluation of NucliSens basic kit NASBA for diagnosis of parainfluenza virus infection with 'end-point' and 'real-time' detection.

    PubMed

    Hibbitts, Sam; Rahman, Amanna; John, Rhiannon; Westmoreland, Diana; Fox, Julie D

    2003-03-01

    New methods for the detection of human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) were developed. These were based on nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and utilised the NucliSens Basic Kit. Primers and probes were selected from the haemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN) gene of HPIV1, HPIV2 and HPIV3, and from the phosphoprotein (P) of HPIV4a and -4b. Synthetic RNA, titrated control virus stocks and respiratory specimens (n=44) were utilised to evaluate performance of the assays. Detection of NASBA products was by probe hybridisation and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) ('end-point' detection) or using molecular beacons ('real-time' detection). The assays using ECL detection proved to be both sensitive and specific. Typically, less than or equal to 100 RNA copies or one TCID(50) input was detectable with no cross-reaction between the specific HPIV assays and other respiratory viruses. Results for clinical samples were concordant with those obtained by 'conventional' procedures by classical viral diagnostic methods. 'Real-time' detection utilised probes specific for either HPIV1 or HPIV3 with similar performance characteristics to the assays with 'end-point' detection. The feasibility of multiplexing targets together was confirmed using a combined HPIV1 and HPIV3 assay with good results for ECL and molecular beacon detection on control material and clinical samples.

  13. Highly Sensitive and Novel Point-of-Care System, aQcare Chlamydia TRF Kit for Detecting Chlamydia trachomatis by Using Europium (Eu) (III) Chelated Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Ji Yeon; Jung, Jaean; Hwang, Byung-Gap; Kim, Won-Jung; Kim, Young-Seop; Kim, Eun-Ju; Cho, Mi-Yeon; Hwang, Mi-Sun; Won, Dong Il

    2015-01-01

    Background The bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the leading causes of sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Since no simple and effective tool exists to diagnose C. trachomatis infections, we evaluated a novel point-of-care (POC) test, aQcare Chlamydia TRF kit, which uses europium-chelated nanoparticles and a time-resolved fluorescence reader. Methods The test performance was evaluated by comparing the results obtained using the novel POC testing kit with those obtained using a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT), using 114 NAAT-positive and 327 NAAT-negative samples. Results The cut-off value of the novel test was 20.8 with a detection limit of 0.27 ng/mL. No interference or cross-reactivity was observed. Diagnostic accuracy showed an overall sensitivity of 93.0% (106/114), specificity of 96.3% (315/327), positive predictive value (PPV) of 89.8% (106/118), and negative predictive value (NPV) of 97.5% (315/323). The sensitivity of the novel test was much higher than that of currently available POC tests. Furthermore, the relative ease and short turnaround time (30 min) of this assay enables C. trachomatis-infected individuals to be treated without a diagnostic delay. Conclusions This simple and novel test is a potential tool to screen a larger population, especially those in areas with limited resources. PMID:25553280

  14. Comparison of Five Commercial Nucleic Acid Extraction Kits for the PCR-based Detection of Burkholderia Pseudomallei DNA in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Obersteller, Sonja; Neubauer, Heinrich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    The extraction and further processing of nucleic acids (NA) from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for microbiological diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approaches is challenging. Here, we assessed the effects of five different commercially available nucleic acid extraction kits on the results of real-time PCR. FFPE samples from organs of Burkholderia pseudomallei-infected Swiss mice were subjected to processing with five different extraction kits from QIAGEN (FFPE DNA Tissue Kit, EZ1 DNA Tissue Kit, DNA Mini Kit, DNA Blood Mini Kit, and FlexiGene DNA Kit) in combination with three different real-time PCRs targeting B. pseudomallei-specific sequences of varying length after 16 years of storage. The EZ1 DNA Tissue Kit and the DNA Mini Kit scored best regarding the numbers of successful PCR reactions. In case of positive PCR, differences regarding the cycle-threshold (Ct) values were marginal. The impact of the applied extraction kits on the reliability of PCR from FFPE material seems to be low. Interfering factors like the quality of the dewaxing procedure or the sample age appear more important than the selection of specialized FFPE kits. PMID:27766174

  15. Kits in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Maureen

    1975-01-01

    Discusses three kits developed by museums in British Columbia for use in rural classrooms. The science kit on marine biology consists of modules which included specimens, books, audiovisual materials and student activities. (BR)

  16. Johnny Horizon Environmental Test Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Richard; Bentley, William

    Derived from tests presently used by state and federal agencies involved with pollution detection, this Environmental Test Kit contains materials and instructions for ten experiments. Each experiment is designed to test a different aspect of air and water, to find out whether or not the air and water in the tester's immediate area has been…

  17. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  18. Using a combination of MLPA kits to detect chromosomal imbalances in patients with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation is a valuable choice for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Takamori, Jean Tetsuo; Medeiros, Paula F Vasconcelos; Pordeus, Ana Carolina B; Latini, Flavia Roche M; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2011-01-01

    Conventional karyotyping detects anomalies in 3-15% of patients with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation (MCA/MR). Whole-genome array screening (WGAS) has been consistently suggested as the first choice diagnostic test for this group of patients, but it is very costly for large-scale use in developing countries. We evaluated the use of a combination of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) kits to increase the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in MCA/MR patients. We screened 261 MCA/MR patients with two subtelomeric and one microdeletion kits. This would theoretically detect up to 70% of all submicroscopic abnormalities. Additionally we scored the de Vries score for 209 patients in an effort to find a suitable cut-off for MLPA screening. Our results reveal that chromosomal abnormalities were present in 87 (33.3%) patients, but only 57 (21.8%) were considered causative. Karyotyping detected 15 abnormalities (6.9%), while MLPA identified 54 (20.7%). Our combined MLPA screening raised the total detection number of pathogenic imbalances more than three times when compared to conventional karyotyping. We also show that using the de Vries score as a cut-off for this screening would only be suitable under financial restrictions. A decision analytic model was constructed with three possible strategies: karyotype, karyotype + MLPA and karyotype + WGAS. Karyotype + MLPA strategy detected anomalies in 19.8% of cases which account for 76.45% of the expected yield for karyotype + WGAS. Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) of MLPA is three times lower than that of WGAS, which means that, for the same costs, we have three additional diagnoses with MLPA but only one with WGAS. We list all causative alterations found, including rare findings, such as reciprocal duplications of regions deleted in Sotos and Williams-Beuren syndromes. We also describe imbalances that were considered polymorphisms or rare variants, such as the new SNP

  19. Evaluation of commercial kit based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection of low levels of uninjured and injured Salmonella on duck meat, bean sprouts, and fishballs in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hazel Sin Yue; Zheng, Qianwang; Miks-Krajnik, Marta; Turner, Matthew; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate performance of the commercial kit based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) in comparison with the International Organization for Standardization method for detecting uninjured and sublethally injured Salmonella cells artificially inoculated at levels of 10(0) and 10(1) CFU/25 g on raw duck wing, raw mung bean sprouts, and processed fishballs. Injured cells were prepared by a heat treatment for duck wings and fishball samples and a chlorine treatment for bean sprout samples. Additionally, a validation study was performed on naturally contaminated food samples sold in Singapore. A total of 110 samples of each commodity were analyzed in this study. Regardless of inoculum levels, the detection by the commercial LAMP kit showed 100% sensitivity and specificity for both inoculated and uninoculated samples compared with the International Organization for Standardization method, with the exception of bean sprout samples. Only 20% of bean sprout samples inoculated with 10(0) CFU/25 g injured Salmonella cells were positive by using the commercial LAMP-based kit. However, all negative samples became positive following a secondary enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis medium with soy broth or after concentration by centrifugation. These results suggest that secondary enrichment or centrifugation should be considered as an additional step to increase the sensitivity of the commercial LAMP-based kit with low numbers of injured target cells in samples with high background microflora (such as mung bean sprouts). The validation study also showed that the commercial LAMP-based kit provided 91% sensitivity and 95% specificity for naturally contaminated samples. Thus, this study demonstrates that the commercial LAMP-based kit might be a cost-effective method, as this system could provide rapid, accurate detection of both uninjured and injured Salmonella cells on raw duck wings, raw mung bean sprouts, and processed fishballs in

  20. Detection of Legionella species in reclaimed water and air with the EnviroAmp Legionella PCR kit and direct fluorescent antibody staining.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, C J; Bonilla, G F; Roll, B; Paszko-Kolva, C; Sangermano, L R; Fujioka, R S

    1995-01-01

    Reclaimed water is an important resource for areas with inadequate water supplies. However, there have been few studies on the variety of microorganisms found in this type of water, since typically reclaimed water is examined only for the presence of coliform bacteria. Many microorganisms, including the legionellae, are known to be more resistant to chlorine than are coliform bacteria. Previously, we detected > 10(3) Legionella cells per ml in primary and secondary sewage effluents and observed no significant reduction in population numbers throughout the treatment process. In this study, we detected Legionella spp. in chlorinated effluent by using an EnviroAmp Legionella PCR kit and direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining. However, we were not able to isolate Legionella spp. from either natural or seeded reclaimed water samples. This suggests that the Legionella spp. detected by the PCR and DFA methods may be injured or viable but nonculturable after exposure to the high residual chlorine levels typically found in this type of water source. The numbers of coliform bacteria were low (< 2 cells per 100 ml) in most reclaimed water samples and were not correlated with the presence or absence of Legionella spp. We also collected air samples from above a secondary aeration basin and analyzed them by using the PCR, DFA, and plate culture methods. Legionella spp. were detected in the air obtained from above the secondary basin with all three methods. We concluded that the PCR was superior to the culture and DFA methods for detecting Legionella spp. in environmental water samples. PMID:7574578

  1. Crystal Diagnostics Xpress™ E7 STEC Kit for the Rapid Multiplex Detection of E. coli O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weidong; Stumpf, Curtis H; Bullard, Brian; Kuzenko, Stephanie; Niehaus, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    The Crystal Diagnostics (CDx) Xpress E7 STEC kit is a rapid and sensitive detection assay for the detection of Escherichia coli O157 and six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (serogroups O26, O45, O1O3, O111, O121, and O145, collectively referred to as STEC) at 1 CFU/325 g of raw ground beef and raw beef trim, or 200 g of spinach. The system comprises an automatic Crystal Diagnostics Xpress System Reader that integrates immunochemical and optical processes for the liquid crystal-based detection of microorganisms, a CDx BioCassette that incorporates antibody-coupled microspheres and liquid crystal for selective identification of the intended microbe, and additional commercially available components. The Crystal Diagnostics Xpress System(TM) combines proprietary liquid crystal technology with antibody-coated paramagnetic microspheres to selectively capture and detect STEC from food matrixes. The Xpress System expeditiously (9.5 h enrichment) provides the sensitivity and specificity of the U. S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration reference methods in screening as low as 1 STEC CFU/test portion. The inclusivity validation demonstrated detection of 53 of 54 STEC test strains. Shelf life testing of the antibody-coated microspheres and other Crystal Diagnostic consumables indicated that all materials were stable for a minimum of 3 months (ongoing), and lot-to-lot testing demonstrated consistent results between lots (data not shown). The internal and independent laboratory tests demonstrate that the method is rapid and sensitive for screening of the target STEC. PMID:26651567

  2. Detection of enterovirus in environmental waters: a new optimized method compared to commercial real-time RT-qPCR kits.

    PubMed

    Wurtzer, Sebastien; Prevost, Benoit; Lucas, Francoise S; Moulin, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    Despite the progress in water and wastewater treatment technologies, waterborne diseases are still a major concern of public health. In the reported water-related outbreaks, viruses constitute one of the main causal agents. Enteroviruses are one of the most viruses monitored in water and are often used as an indicator of viral pollution. Isolation and identification of this virus are now regularly based on molecular tools. However published or commercial protocols for detection of these viruses in water are frequently lacking of validation processes and performance evaluation in such complex samples. A method for enterovirus detection in environmental water has been developed, its performance has been evaluated and compared with several commercial kits. The sensitivity of commercial methods in clinical samples, ranged between 89% and 100%, while the sensitivity in seeded environmental matrices fell between 16% and 91%. This method showed the best performance in environmental samples and was subsequently applied on surface and treated wastewater. The results showed the large dissemination of enteroviruses in an urbanized river. The results also emphasized the importance of good knowledge of the method's limits for its utilization in environmental samples in order to minimize false negatives and to avoid underestimating viral concentration.

  3. Creation of learning kits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stow, D. A.; Estes, J. E.; Mertz, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    A learning kit is an essential part of any remote sensing workshop, course, or in-house training program to provide the "hands-on" experience of working with remotely sensed imagery. This is the objective of laboratory and field exercises as well as the reason behind the production of imagery/map kits. The way in which these learning kits (containing conventional remotely sensed and collateral data products) are put together is described and some concerns that influence the creation of learning kits are discussed. These include budgetary constraints, number of imagery types, and number of collateral data types.

  4. ALTUS Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tony; Blakeslee, Richard; Russell, Larry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ALTUS Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV)-based project that will investigate thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES is being conducted to both investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and validate Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite measurements. In addition, as part of NASA's UAV-based science demonstration program, this project will provide a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. Part of the demonstration involves getting approvals from the Federal Aviation Administration and the NASA airworthiness flight safety review board. ACES will employ the ALTUS II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and (3) provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload, already developed and flown on ALTUS, includes electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES will contribute important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) offers a useful 'cloud-top' perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the ALTUS will be flown near, and when possible, above (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time, allowing investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations will enable the UAV measurements to be more completely interpreted and evaluated in the context of the thunderstorm structure, evolution, and

  5. Comparison of six commercial DNA extraction kits for detection of Brucella neotomae in Mexican and Central American-style cheese and other milk products.

    PubMed

    Lusk, Tina S; Strain, Errol; Kase, Julie A

    2013-05-01

    Raw or inadequately pasteurized milk from infected animals and cheese made with such milk are a frequent vehicle for human brucellosis infection. Also, biological terrorism is a concern with certain Brucella spp. Due to matrix-associated real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) inhibitors, robust sample preparations are crucial. We compared six commercial nucleic acid extraction kits using nine Mexican and Central American-style soft cheeses or creams and three liquid milk products inoculated with Brucella neotomae, a surrogate for pathogenic Brucella spp. Kits were evaluated by purity and quantity of DNA as determined by qPCR Ct values, reproducibility across cheese and milk types, and cost. At 10(7) CFU/g in four different cheeses, Qiagen statistically outperformed all other kits. When two cheese styles were inoculated at dual levels, Qiagen and High Pure kit extracted samples at 1.5 × 10(5) CFU/g produced average Ct values of 34-39, while PrepSEQ and MagMAX kit extracted samples exhibited higher or no Ct values. High Pure and Qiagen kits excelled also with liquid milk products. Considering matrices, inoculation levels, and kits evaluated, High Pure and Qiagen products produced Brucella DNA of high quality and quantity indicated by the lowest Ct values and were the least expensive.

  6. HPV16 detection by qPCR method in relation to quantity and quality of DNA extracted from archival formalin fixed and paraffin embedded head and neck cancer tissues by three commercially available kits.

    PubMed

    Biesaga, Beata; Janecka, Anna; Mucha-Małecka, Anna; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Szostek, Sława; Słonina, Dorota; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare HPV16 detection by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in relation to the quantity and quality of DNA isolated from 21 formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) head and neck cancer tissues by three commercially available kits: EX-WAX™ DNA Extraction Kit (M) (Merck Millipore, Darmstadt, Germany), QIAamp(®) DNA FFPE Tissue (Q) (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) and ReliaPrep™ FFPE gDNA Miniprep System (P) (Promega, Madison, USA). Quantity of extracted DNA was assessed spectrophometrically and fluorometrically. Its quality was analyzed using A260/280 and A260/230 ratios and the β-actin fragment amplifiability in qPCR. HPV16 presence was detected by qPCR, using specific primers and TaqMan probe. HPV infection was found in 8 DNA samples extracted with M kit (38.1%) and in 7 (33.3%) isolated with Q and P kits. Three samples from M and Q kits were characterized by HPV16 positivity and lack of β-actin amplifiability. They had significantly lower A260/280 ratio (M: 1.6±0.0, p=0.044 and Q: 1.7±0.0, p=0.016) compared to samples with both fragments amplification (M: 1.7±0.0 and Q: 1.9±0.0). Therefore, for HPV detection by qPCR in FFPE tissues we recommend ReliaPrep™ FFPE gDNA Miniprep System.

  7. HPV16 detection by qPCR method in relation to quantity and quality of DNA extracted from archival formalin fixed and paraffin embedded head and neck cancer tissues by three commercially available kits.

    PubMed

    Biesaga, Beata; Janecka, Anna; Mucha-Małecka, Anna; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Szostek, Sława; Słonina, Dorota; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare HPV16 detection by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in relation to the quantity and quality of DNA isolated from 21 formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) head and neck cancer tissues by three commercially available kits: EX-WAX™ DNA Extraction Kit (M) (Merck Millipore, Darmstadt, Germany), QIAamp(®) DNA FFPE Tissue (Q) (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) and ReliaPrep™ FFPE gDNA Miniprep System (P) (Promega, Madison, USA). Quantity of extracted DNA was assessed spectrophometrically and fluorometrically. Its quality was analyzed using A260/280 and A260/230 ratios and the β-actin fragment amplifiability in qPCR. HPV16 presence was detected by qPCR, using specific primers and TaqMan probe. HPV infection was found in 8 DNA samples extracted with M kit (38.1%) and in 7 (33.3%) isolated with Q and P kits. Three samples from M and Q kits were characterized by HPV16 positivity and lack of β-actin amplifiability. They had significantly lower A260/280 ratio (M: 1.6±0.0, p=0.044 and Q: 1.7±0.0, p=0.016) compared to samples with both fragments amplification (M: 1.7±0.0 and Q: 1.9±0.0). Therefore, for HPV detection by qPCR in FFPE tissues we recommend ReliaPrep™ FFPE gDNA Miniprep System. PMID:27456982

  8. An evaluation of conventional culture, invA PCR, and the real-time PCR iQ-Check kit as detection tools for Salmonella in naturally contaminated premarket and retail turkey.

    PubMed

    Nde, Chantal W; Fakhr, Mohamed K; Doetkott, Curt; Logue, Catherine M

    2008-02-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the ability of conventional culture, the iQ-Check real-time PCR kit, and invA PCR to detect Salmonella in naturally contaminated premarket and retail turkey parts. Premarket (n = 120) turkey parts collected from a commercial turkey processing plant, and retail turkey parts (n = 138) were examined. Both PCR methods detected a significantly greater (P < 0.05) number of positive samples when compared with the conventional culture method for the premarket turkey parts. The indices of total agreement between the conventional culture method and the iQ-Check kit for the premarket and retail parts were 79.2% (95% CI: 70.8, 86) and 90.6% (95% CI: 84.4, 94.9), respectively. When the conventional culture method was compared with invA PCR for Salmonella detection in the premarket and retail parts, the indices of total agreement were 75.8% (95% CI: 67.2, 83.2) and 84.1% (95% CI: 76.9, 89.7), respectively. The rates of false positives (premarket: 31.9%, retail: 9.7%) and false negatives (premarket: 5.9%, retail: 9.7%) were determined between the culture method and the iQ-Check kit. When invA PCR was compared with the culture method, the rates of false positives (premarket: 37.7%, retail: 11.1%) and false negatives (premarket: 5.9%, retail: 18.3%) were obtained. The higher total agreement and the lower rates of both false positives and false negatives for the iQ-Check kit compared with invA PCR for both premarket and retail turkey parts corroborates the use of the iQ-Check kit as a screening tool for Salmonella in poultry meat.

  9. An evaluation of conventional culture, invA PCR, and the real-time PCR iQ-Check kit as detection tools for Salmonella in naturally contaminated premarket and retail turkey.

    PubMed

    Nde, Chantal W; Fakhr, Mohamed K; Doetkott, Curt; Logue, Catherine M

    2008-02-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the ability of conventional culture, the iQ-Check real-time PCR kit, and invA PCR to detect Salmonella in naturally contaminated premarket and retail turkey parts. Premarket (n = 120) turkey parts collected from a commercial turkey processing plant, and retail turkey parts (n = 138) were examined. Both PCR methods detected a significantly greater (P < 0.05) number of positive samples when compared with the conventional culture method for the premarket turkey parts. The indices of total agreement between the conventional culture method and the iQ-Check kit for the premarket and retail parts were 79.2% (95% CI: 70.8, 86) and 90.6% (95% CI: 84.4, 94.9), respectively. When the conventional culture method was compared with invA PCR for Salmonella detection in the premarket and retail parts, the indices of total agreement were 75.8% (95% CI: 67.2, 83.2) and 84.1% (95% CI: 76.9, 89.7), respectively. The rates of false positives (premarket: 31.9%, retail: 9.7%) and false negatives (premarket: 5.9%, retail: 9.7%) were determined between the culture method and the iQ-Check kit. When invA PCR was compared with the culture method, the rates of false positives (premarket: 37.7%, retail: 11.1%) and false negatives (premarket: 5.9%, retail: 18.3%) were obtained. The higher total agreement and the lower rates of both false positives and false negatives for the iQ-Check kit compared with invA PCR for both premarket and retail turkey parts corroborates the use of the iQ-Check kit as a screening tool for Salmonella in poultry meat. PMID:18326192

  10. Benchmarking Tool Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Health Libraries Association.

    Nine Canadian health libraries participated in a pilot test of the Benchmarking Tool Kit between January and April, 1998. Although the Tool Kit was designed specifically for health libraries, the content and approach are useful to other types of libraries as well. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to…

  11. Communications Survival Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Shirley Porter; Braden, Bill

    The purpose of the Communications Survival Kit is to serve as a guide for counselors to assist in planning, developing and implementing a public relations program for the guidance department at the local school level. The kit contains practical information in three categories. First is a rationale for a public relations (PR) program, what PR is…

  12. Community Consultation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulder Area Growth Study Commission, CO.

    This kit, designed for leaders and participants, provides a model for organizing and taking part in Community Consultation Groups. The kit was designed to be used in connection with community concerns about growth in Boulder, Colorado. These groups build upon a previous survey to assist the Commission in determining specific growth concerns in the…

  13. The utilization of a commercial soil nucleic acid extraction kit and PCR for the detection of Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei on farms after flooding in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shr-Wei; Chan, Jacky Peng-Wen; Shia, Wei-Yau; Shyu, Chin-Lin; Tung, Kwon-Chung; Wang, Chi-Young

    2013-05-01

    Clostridial diseases are zoonoses and are classified as soil-borne diseases. Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium tetani cause blackleg disease and tetanus, respectively. Since bacteria and spores are re-distributed by floods and then, subsequently, contaminate soils, pastures and water; the case numbers associated with clostridial diseases usually increase after floods. Because Taiwan is often affected by flood damage during the typhoon season, possible threats from these diseases are present. Thus, this study's aim is to apply a combination of a commercial nucleic acid extraction kit and PCR to assess the prevalence of Clostridia spp. in soil and to compare the positivity rates for farms before and after floods. The minimum amounts of Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei that could be extracted from soils and detected by PCR were 10 and 50 colony forming units (cfu), respectively. In total, 76 samples were collected from the central and southern regions of Taiwan, which are the areas that are most frequently damaged by typhoons. Noteworthy, the positive rates for Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium chauvoei in Pingtung county after the severe floods caused by a typhoon increased significantly from 13.73 and 7.84% to 53.85 and 50.00%, respectively. This study for the first time provides the evidence from surveillance data that there are changes in the environmental distribution of Clostridium spp. after floods. This study indicates that screening for soil-related zoonotic pathogens is a potential strategy that may help to control these diseases.

  14. ACEE program rationale and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, W.S. Jr.; Petersen, R.H.

    1982-08-01

    The impact of the Aircraft Energy Efficiency program (ACEE) on commercial aviation is examined. In addition to the emphasis on air transport fuel efficiency, topics such as airline operating costs, air transport effects on U.S. trade, and fuel price forecasts are addressed. An overview of the program and its contribution to aviation technology is included.

  15. The Indonesia Kit. A Study Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briere, Elaine; Gage, Susan

    This document is designed for Canadians interested in the South Pacific island chain nation of Indonesia. The kit includes information, photographs, and illustrations concerning Indonesia, West Papua (Irian Jaya), and East Timor. There are discussions of Indonesia's environment, its transmigration program, development refugees, and ties with…

  16. Performance Enhancement of the Automated Concrete Evaluation System (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart,C.W.; Cave,S.P.; Linder,K.E.

    2002-02-14

    The objective of this proposed research is to improve and expand the detection and analysis capabilities of the automated, concrete evaluation (ACE) system. MoDOT and Honeywell jointly developed this system. The focus of this proposed research will be on the following: Coordination of concrete imaging efforts with other states, Validation and testing of the ACE system on a broad range of concrete samples, and Identification and development of software and hardware enhancements. These enhancements will meet the needs of diverse users in the field of concrete materials, construction, and research.

  17. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  18. Comparison of Quantifiler(®) Trio and InnoQuant™ human DNA quantification kits for detection of DNA degradation in developed and aged fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Goecker, Zachary C; Swiontek, Stephen E; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Roy, Reena

    2016-06-01

    The development techniques employed to visualize fingerprints collected from crime scenes as well as post-development ageing may result in the degradation of the DNA present in low quantities in such evidence samples. Amplification of the DNA samples with short tandem repeat (STR) amplification kits may result in partial DNA profiles. A comparative study of two commercially available quantification kits, Quantifiler(®) Trio and InnoQuant™, was performed on latent fingerprint samples that were either (i) developed using one of three different techniques and then aged in ambient conditions or (ii) undeveloped and then aged in ambient conditions. The three fingerprint development techniques used were: cyanoacrylate fuming, dusting with black powder, and the columnar-thin-film (CTF) technique. In order to determine the differences between the expected quantities and actual quantities of DNA, manually degraded samples generated by controlled exposure of DNA standards to ultraviolet radiation were also analyzed. A total of 144 fingerprint and 42 manually degraded DNA samples were processed in this study. The results indicate that the InnoQuant™ kit is capable of producing higher degradation ratios compared to the Quantifiler(®) Trio kit. This was an expected result since the degradation ratio is a relative value specific for a kit based on the length and extent of amplification of the two amplicons that vary from one kit to the other. Additionally, samples with lower concentrations of DNA yielded non-linear relationships of degradation ratio with the duration of aging, whereas samples with higher concentrations of DNA yielded quasi-linear relationships. None of the three development techniques produced a noticeably different degradation pattern when compared to undeveloped fingerprints, and therefore do not impede downstream DNA analysis.

  19. Spontaneous meningitis due to Streptococcus salivarius subsp. salivarius: cross-reaction in an assay with a rapid diagnostic kit that detected Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens.

    PubMed

    Shirokawa, Taijiro; Nakajima, Jun; Hirose, Kazuhito; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Nagaoka, Shoko; Suzuki, Masatsune

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius subsp. salivarius occasionally causes meningitis associated with iatrogenic or traumatic events. We herein describe a case of meningitis caused by this organism in a patient without any apparent risk factors. In an assay of the patient's cerebrospinal fluid, cross-reaction occurred with Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen-coated latex particles in the Pastorex Meningitis Kit. In the in vitro assays, three of the five clinically isolated S. salivarius strains showed cross-reactions with the kit, indicating that these strains expressed pneumococcal antigen-like antigens. This case shows that meningitis caused by S. salivarius can occur spontaneously and it may sometimes be misdiagnosed as S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24492701

  20. Comparison of presumptive blood test kits including hexagon OBTI.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Emma; Ames, Carole E; Dagnall, Kathryn E; Foster, John; Daniel, Barbara E

    2008-05-01

    Four presumptive blood tests, Hexagon OBTI, Hemastix(R), Leucomalachite green (LMG), and Kastle-Meyer (KM) were compared for their sensitivity in the identification of dried bloodstains. Stains of varying blood dilutions were subjected to each presumptive test and the results compared. The Hexagon OBTI buffer volume was also reduced to ascertain whether this increased the sensitivity of the kit. The study found that Hemastix(R) was the most sensitive test for trace blood detection. Only with the reduced buffer volume was the Hexagon OBTI kit as sensitive as the LMG and KM tests. However, the Hexagon OBTI kit has the advantage of being a primate specific blood detection kit. This study also investigated whether the OBTI buffer within the kit could be utilized for DNA profiling after presumptive testing. The results show that DNA profiles can be obtained from the Hexagon OBTI kit buffer directly.

  1. Occurrence and fate of ACE-inhibitor peptides in cheeses and in their digestates following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, Milda; Cattaneo, Stefano; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of the casein-derived angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACE-I) peptides VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP and HLPLP were investigated in 12 different cheese samples by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The total amount of ACE-I peptides was in the range 0.87-331mgkg(-1). VPP and IPP largely prevailed in almost all cheeses. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion of Cheddar, Gorgonzola, Maasdam and Grana Padano cheeses, type and amount of ACE-I peptides changed, and only VPP, IPP, HLPLP and LHLPLP were detected in the intestinal digestates. The results evidenced that the degree of proteolysis itself cannot be regarded as a promoting or hindering factor for ACE-I peptide release during cheese digestion. Moreover, the data indicated that the ACE-I potential of cheeses cannot be inferred based on the type and amount of ACE-I peptides present in undigested samples.

  2. MeshKit

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-05

    MeshKit is an open-source library of mesh generation functionality. MeshKit has general mesh manipulation and generation functions such as Copoy, Move, Rotate and Extrude mesh. In addition, new quad mesh and embedded boundary Cartesian mesh algorithm (EB Mesh) are included. Interfaces to several public domain meshing algorithms (TetGen, netgen, triangle, Gmsh, camal) are also offered. This library interacts with mesh data mostly through iMesh including accessing the mesh in parallel. It also can interact with iGeom interface to provide geometry functionality such as importing solid model based geometries. iGeom and IMesh are implemented in the CGM and MOAB packages, respectively. For some non-existing function in iMesh such as tree-construction and ray-tracing, MeshKit also interacts with MOAB functions directly.

  3. MeshKit

    2010-10-05

    MeshKit is an open-source library of mesh generation functionality. MeshKit has general mesh manipulation and generation functions such as Copoy, Move, Rotate and Extrude mesh. In addition, new quad mesh and embedded boundary Cartesian mesh algorithm (EB Mesh) are included. Interfaces to several public domain meshing algorithms (TetGen, netgen, triangle, Gmsh, camal) are also offered. This library interacts with mesh data mostly through iMesh including accessing the mesh in parallel. It also can interact withmore » iGeom interface to provide geometry functionality such as importing solid model based geometries. iGeom and IMesh are implemented in the CGM and MOAB packages, respectively. For some non-existing function in iMesh such as tree-construction and ray-tracing, MeshKit also interacts with MOAB functions directly.« less

  4. Membrane-associated zinc peptidase families: comparing ACE and ACE2.

    PubMed

    Guy, J L; Lambert, D W; Warner, F J; Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    2005-08-01

    In contrast to the relatively ubiquitous angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), expression of the mammalian ACE homologue, ACE2, was initially described in the heart, kidney and testis. ACE2 is a type I integral membrane protein with its active site domain exposed to the extracellular surface of endothelial cells and the renal tubular epithelium. Here ACE2 is poised to metabolise circulating peptides which may include angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor and the product of angiotensin I cleavage by ACE. To this end, ACE2 may counterbalance the effects of ACE within the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Indeed, ACE2 has been implicated in the regulation of heart and renal function where it is proposed to control the levels of angiotensin II relative to its hypotensive metabolite, angiotensin-(1-7). The recent solution of the structure of ACE2, and ACE, has provided new insight into the substrate and inhibitor profiles of these two key regulators of the RAS. As the complexity of this crucial pathway is unravelled, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of agents that modulate the activity of ACE2.

  5. Travel Medical Kit.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne C; Haulman, N Jean

    2016-03-01

    "The traveler's medical kit is an essential tool for both the novice and expert traveler. It is designed to treat travel-related illness and injury and to ensure preexisting medical conditions are managed appropriately. Travelers are at increased risk for common gastrointestinal issues during travel. Respiratory illnesses make up approximately 8% of the ailments present in returned international travelers. Approximately 12% of travelers experience a travel-related skin condition. First aid treatment for minor injuries is essential to all travel medical kits. The complexity ranges from a small, simple case for the urban traveler to a larger, extensive case for wilderness travel." PMID:26900112

  6. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar) Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E.; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes. PMID:25123137

  7. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and ACE inhibitory peptides of salmon (Salmo salar) protein hydrolysates obtained by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-08-13

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  8. Evaluation of Presto(plus) assay and LightMix kit Trichomonas vaginalis assay for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in dry vaginal swabs.

    PubMed

    de Waaij, Dewi J; Ouburg, Sander; Dubbink, Jan Henk; Peters, Remco P H; Morré, Servaas A

    2016-08-01

    This is an evaluation study of the Presto(plus) Assay for T. vaginalis by comparing to the TIB MOLBIOL LightMix Kit Trichomonas vaginalis Assay using 615 dry collected vaginal and rectal swabs. Discordant samples were analyzed by the Qiagen® Microbial DNA qPCR for TV Assay. Both assays showed comparable performances (McNemar p>0.05). PMID:27268968

  9. A new ELISA kit which uses a combination of Plasmodium falciparum extract and recombinant Plasmodium vivax antigens as an alternative to IFAT for detection of malaria antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Doderer, Cecile; Heschung, Aurelie; Guntz, Phillippe; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Hansmann, Yves; Senegas, Alexandre; Pfaff, Alexander W; Abdelrahman, Tamer; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2007-01-01

    Background The methods most commonly used to measure malarial antibody titres are the Indirect Fluorescence Antibody Test (IFAT), regarded as the gold standard, and the Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). The objective here was to assess the diagnostic performance, i.e. the sensitivity and specificity, of a new malaria antibody ELISA kit in comparison to IFAT. This new ELISA kit, the ELISA malaria antibody test (DiaMed), uses a combination of crude soluble Plasmodium falciparum extract and recombinant Plasmodium vivax antigens. Methods Two groups were used: 95 samples from malaria patients to assess the clinical sensitivity and 2,152 samples from blood donors, who had not been exposed to malaria, to assess the clinical specificity. Results The DiaMed ELISA test kit had a clinical sensitivity of 84.2% and a clinical specificity of 99.6% as compared with 70.5% and 99.6% respectively, using the IFAT method. The ELISA method was more sensitive than the IFAT method for P. vivax infections (75% vs. 25%). However, in 923 malaria risk donors the analytical sensitivity of the ELISA test was 40% and its specificity 98.3%, performances impaired by large numbers of equivocal results non-concordant between ELISA and IFAT. When the overall analytical performances of ELISA was compared to IFAT, the ELISA efficiency J index was 0.84 versus 0.71 for IFAT. Overall analytical sensitivity was 93.1% and the analytical specificity 96.7%. Overall agreement between the two methods reached 0.97 with a reliability k index of 0.64. Conclusion The DiaMed ELISA test kit shows a good correlation with IFAT for analytical and clinical parameters. It may be an interesting method to replace the IFAT especially in blood banks, but further extensive investigations are needed to examine the analytical performance of the assay, especially in a blood bank setting. PMID:17313669

  10. Evaluation of new immunochromatographic assay kit for adenovirus detection in throat swab: comparison with culture and real-time PCR results.

    PubMed

    Morozumi, Miyuki; Shimizu, Hideaki; Matsushima, Yuki; Mitamura, Keiko; Tajima, Takeshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2014-05-01

    A new immunochromatographic (IC) assay kit, BD Veritor System Adeno was evaluated to comparing with commercial available kit, BD Adeno Examan, cell culture, and real-time PCR using throat swab samples. Specimens were collected from 146 pediatric patients between July 2011 and January 2012. Mean age of patients was 4 years (8 months-15 years old). Patients were diagnosed with pharyngitis (n = 67), tonsillitis (n = 45), pharyngoconjunctival fever (n = 26), upper respiratory tract infection (n = 6), conjunctivitis (n = 1), or bronchitis (n = 1). Thirty-one of the patients (21.2%) had more than one disease. Among all samples, 61 (41.8%) were positive for adenovirus with BD Veritor System Adeno; 68 (46.6%) with BD Adeno Examan; 63 (43.2%) with real-time PCR; and 65 (44.5%) with cell culture. Serotype 3 (n = 41; 63.1%) was predominant among the 65 adenovirus isolates, followed by serotype 2 (n = 12; 18.5%), 1 (n = 6; 9.2%), 5 (n = 4; 6.2%), and 4 (n = 2; 3.1%). Relative sensitivity and specificity of BD Veritor System Adeno, BD Adeno Examan, and real-time PCR were 93.8% and 98.7%, 96.9% and 93.8%, and 96.9% and 100%, respectively. Positive predictive and negative predictive values for these methods were 98.4% and 95.1%, 92.6% and 97.4%, and 100% and 97.6%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR was greater than that of IC assay kits. However, IC assay kits also showed high sensitivity and specificity appropriate for clinical use.

  11. Projectable Basic Electronics Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    H'ng, John; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Outlines advantages derived from constructing and using a Projectable Basic Electronics Kit and provides: (1) list of components; (2) diagrams of 10 finished components (resistor; capacitor; diode; switch; bulb; transistor; meter; variable capacitor; coil; connecting terminal); and (3) diode and transistor activities. (JN)

  12. Theme Kits Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslinger, Leslie Silk

    Recognizing the long-lasting impact of young childrens learning through themes as well as the amount of teacher time spent in preparing for this type of teaching, this kit is designed to help teachers avoid the shortcomings of theme-based teaching, while capitalizing on the benefits of this approach. The book is presented in two sections. The…

  13. Ohio EPA Teachers Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus.

    In an effort to provide teachers in Ohio with assistance in environmental education, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has produced this teachers kit. It is designed to describe what the Ohio EPA is doing to protect Ohio's air, land, and water. The background information provides an historical account of some of the events that have…

  14. [Conference Time Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Public Relations Association, Washington, DC.

    This multimedia kit, for use with and by teachers from kindergarten through the upper elementary grades, consists of four components: 1) a filmstrip for teachers; 2) the 1970 edition of a handbook, "Conference Time for Teachers and Parents"; 3) a filmstrip for parents; 4) a supporting parent information leaflet "How To Confer Successfully with…

  15. User Authentication. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plum, Terry, Comp.; Bleiler, Richard, Comp.

    2001-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to examine the systems research libraries use to authenticate and authorize the users of their online networked information resources. A total of 52 of 121 ARL member libraries responded to…

  16. Personalized Thematic Kits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontrager, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Teaching Spanish at the K-5 level is a passion of mine, and the author would like to share some of the practical applications that she finds most rewarding and effective. She has found enthusiastic response to the creation of detailed language learning kits that are rooted in storytelling, but expanded to include home-made board games,…

  17. Kaleo's Safe Walking Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    This pedestrian safety kit for kindergarten through the third grade consists of 16 lessons encompassing many safety concepts, guidelines and skills that emphasize pedestrian safety rules, alertness, and responsible reaction to hazardous situations. Lessons include activities of varying difficulty for large group, small group or individual…

  18. Voter Education Training Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multi-District Inst. for Political Education, Pitman, NJ.

    Guides and resources in this kit are prepared for a six week to two month secondary voter education course. The objectives are to prepare and motivate eligible students to register and vote in the presidential election, to participate in the presidential election campaigning, and to increase their overall knowledge concerning the presidential…

  19. Chat Reference. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronan, Jana, Comp.; Turner, Carol, Comp.

    2002-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to gather data on chat reference service. A total of 66 of 124 ARL member libraries responded to the survey. A copy of the questionnaire with tabulated results is presented. Representative…

  20. World Disarmament Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woito, Robert, Ed.

    This kit presents a comprehensive introduction for students to arms control and disarmament issues. Included are copies of published and unpublished articles for each topic. Section I provides a self-survey to enable students to assess their own attitudes, values, and knowledge. The survey poses questions for which students select one of several…

  1. Balloons and Science Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balloon Council, Washington, DC.

    This document provides background information on balloons including: (1) the history of balloons; (2) balloon manufacturing; (3) biodegradability; (4) the fate of latex balloons; and (5) the effect of balloons on the rainforest and sea mammals. Also included as part of this instructional kit are four fun experiments that allow students to…

  2. The ESL Starter Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond. Virginia Adult Education and Literacy Resource Center.

    The kit is intended for teachers beginning to teach English as a Second Language (ESL). The first part offers some ideas for testing, registering, and placing students according to their needs and goals. A sample registration form, placement test, list of commercially-available tests, and sample needs assessments are included here. The second…

  3. Early Childhood Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials, the bibliography covers 80 kits for developing skills at the early childhood level. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession number and include the following information:…

  4. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: CLOR-N-SOIL PCB TEST KIT L2000 PCB/CHLORIDE ANALYZER - DEXSIL CORP.

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEXSIL CORP(Environmental Test Kits)The Dexsil Corporation (Dexsil) produces two test kits that detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in soil: the Dexsil Clor-N-Soil PCB Screening Kit, and the Dexsil L2000 PCB/Chloride Analyzer. The Dexsil Clor-N-Soil PCB Screening Kit extr...

  5. Supplementary Kits for Individualized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Roberta

    The purpose of the kits is to facilitate the teaching of basic science skills. The kits can be used in the regular classroom for which they were designed or as instruments for teaching of students in learning disability classes. The kits are designed in the areas of plants, animals, metric measurement, chemistry, geology, and space study. Each kit…

  6. Design and development of low cost, simple, rapid and safe, modified field kits for the visual detection and determination of arsenic in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Cherukurii, Jyotsna; Anjaneyulu, Y

    2005-08-01

    Arsenic is naturally found in surface and ground waters and the inorganic forms of arsenic are the most toxic forms. The adverse health effects of arsenic may involve the respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, nervous, and haematopoietic systems. Arsenic contamination in drinking water is a global problem widely seen in Bangladesh and West Bengal of the Indian sub continent. As there is a great demand for field test kits due to the anticipated reduction of the US EPA arsenic standard from 50ppb to 10ppb a field kit which offers rapid, simple and safe method for precise estimation of arsenic at 10ppb in drinking water samples is developed. Field methods, based on the mercuric-bromide-stain, consist of three different major parts, which are carried out stepwise. The first part of the procedure is to remove serious interference caused by hydrogen sulphide. In commercially available kits either the sulphide is oxidized to sulphate and the excess oxidizing reagent removed prior to the hydride generation step or, the hydrogen sulphide is filtered out by passing the gas stream through a filter impregnated with lead acetate during the hydride generation step. The present method employs cupric chloride in combination with ferric chloride or Fentonis reagent for the removal of hydrogen sulphide, which is rapid, simple and more efficient. Other interferences at this step of the analyses are normally not expected for drinking water analysis. In the second step, the generation of the arsine gas involves the classical way of using zinc metal and hydrochloric acid, which produce the enascenti hydrogen, which is the actual reducing agent. Hydrochloric acid can be replaced by sulfamic acid, which is solid and avoids a major disadvantage of having to handle a corrosive liquid in the field. The arsine gas produces a yellowish spot on the reagent paper. Depending on the arsenic content, either, Yellow n H (HgBr)2 As (10-50ppb), Brown n (HgBr)3 As (50-100ppb) or Black n Hg3 As2

  7. Brief Communication: Use of field test kit for detection of lead in drinking water in Philippines post the disaster typhoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K. Y.; Cong, L. M.; Lan, Z. J.; Ma, R. P.; Yu, L.; Song, Q.; Wang, Y. F.; Ren, S.; Lu, B. N.; Deng, R. S.; Li, G. R.; Li, W. P.

    2015-09-01

    On 8 November 2013, super typhoon Haiyan made landfall in Philippines. On 24 November, the Chinese hospital ship arrived in Philippines to help with disaster relief efforts. Drinking water was collected at a variety of locations, and the concentration levels of lead were determined with field test kit. The results showed that the levels of lead in 67% of total collected water samples exceeded WHO's standard. Afterwards, the local government had taken many measures to ensure a safe water supply in next few months. This is the first report about water quality in Philippines after the disaster.

  8. HNU-HANBY PCP IMMUNOASSAY TEST KIT - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HNU-Hanby pentachlorophenol (PCP) test kit rapidly analyzes for PCP in soil samples. The test kit can only detect those PCP carriers that contain aromatic compounds. The test kit estimates PCP concentrations in soil samples indirectly by measuring petroleum hydrocarbon carrie...

  9. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  10. FIRE_ACE_ER2_MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) NASA ER-2 Moderate Resolution Imaging ... SSFR Location:  Northern Alaska Arctic Ocean Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  11. ACE-FTS measurements of HCFC-22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Strahan, S.; McLinden, C. A.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.; Bernath, P. F.

    2012-04-01

    In the 1980s scientists discovered an annual springtime minimum in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic. It was determined that the decline in ozone concentration was primarily caused by catalytic reactions of ozone and chlorine. The emissions of anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were determined to be major sources of the chlorine. The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (with its subsequent amendments) restricts the emissions of ozone depleting substances. To fulfill the need for safe, stable replacements of CFCs, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were developed. The use of HCFC-22 as a replacement has led to an increase in its atmospheric abundance. This is of concern due to its ozone depletion potential and its global warming potential. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT. The primary instrument on SCISAT is a high-resolution infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). With its wide spectral range, the ACE-FTS is capable of measuring an extensive range of gases including key CFC and HCFC species. The altitude distribution from the ACE-FTS profiles provides information that is complementary to the ground-based measurements that have been used to monitor these species. The global distribution of HCFC-22 has been computed from measurements by ACE-FTS. Both seasonal variations and an inter-hemispheric difference are observed. Additionally, a rapid increase in the global concentration of HCFC-22 has been observed since the start of the ACE mission in 2004. Comparisons to ground-based and air-borne measurements show good agreement with the ACE-FTS measurements. The global distributions of HCFC-22 have also been compared to a chemistry and transport model (CTM), the Global Modelling Initiative Combined Stratospheric-Tropospheric Model. There are distinct differences between the model results and ACE-FTS measurements. The causes and

  12. The Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The goals and measurement strategy of the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE) are described. ACE will help to answer fundamental science questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and global ocean ecosystems. Specifically, the goals of ACE are: 1) to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions and to assess the impact of aerosols on the hydrological cycle and 2) determine Ocean Carbon Cycling and other ocean biological processes. It is expected that ACE will: narrow the uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction and quantify the role of aerosols in climate change; measure the ocean ecosystem changes and precisely quantify ocean carbon uptake; and, improve air quality forecasting by determining the height and type of aerosols being transported long distances. Overviews are provided of the aerosol-cloud community measurement strategy, aerosol and cloud observations over South Asia, and ocean biology research goals. Instruments used in the measurement strategy of the ACE mission are also highlighted, including: multi-beam lidar, multiwavelength high spectra resolution lidar, the ocean color instrument (ORCA)--a spectroradiometer for ocean remote sensing, dual frequency cloud radar and high- and low-frequency micron-wave radiometer. Future steps for the ACE mission include refining measurement requirements and carrying out additional instrument and payload studies.

  13. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2007-10-02

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  14. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  15. Telescience Resource Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Michelle; Lippincott, Jeff; Chubb, Steve; Whitaker, Jimmy; Rice, Jim; Gillis, Robert; Sims, Chris; Sellers, Donna; Bailey, Darrell (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Telescience Resource Kit (TReK) is a PC based ground control system. It can be used by a single individual or in a group environment to monitor and control spacecraft systems and payloads. Capabilities include data receipt, data processing, data storage, data management, and data transmission. Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) hardware and software have been employed to reduce development costs, operations and maintenance costs, and to effectively take advantage of new commercial products as they become available. The TReK system is currently being used to monitor and control payloads aboard the International Space Station. It is located at sites around the world.

  16. KIT — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    SCF-sR, also known as KIT, is the human homolog of the proto-oncogene c-kit. C-kit was first identified as the cellular homolog of the feline sarcoma viral oncogene v-kit. Human KIT is a tyrosine-protein kinase that acts as cell-surface receptor for the cytokine KITLG/SCF and plays an essential role in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, hematopoiesis, stem cell maintenance, gametogenesis, mast cell development, migration and function, and in melanogenesis. KIT is a type 3 transmembrane receptor for MGF (mast cell growth factor, also known as stem cell factor). Mutations in this gene are associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors, mast cell disease, acute myelogenous lukemia, and piebaldism. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene.

  17. Optics learning through affordable kit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    P, Anusha N.; Shaji, Chitra; Sharan, Alok

    2014-10-01

    An affordable kit which helps to understand some of the optical phenomena qualitatively and quantitatively is presented in this paper. It supplements optics taught in classes. The kit consists of equipments which are available in the market at nominal cost such as laser pointer, lenses, glass plates, razor blades, coins, ball bearing etc. Experiments which come under wave optics (interference and diffraction) and ray optics (reflection and refraction) are explained using this kit.

  18. Education Payload Operation - Kit D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Kit D (EPO-Kit D) includes education items that will be used to support the live International Space Station (ISS) education downlinks and Education Payload Operation (EPO) demonstrations onboard the ISS. The main objective of EPO-Kit D supports the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goal of attracting students to study and seek careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

  19. Optics learning through affordable kit

    SciTech Connect

    P, Anusha N E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com Shaji, Chitra E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com Sharan, Alok E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    An affordable kit which helps to understand some of the optical phenomena qualitatively and quantitatively is presented in this paper. It supplements optics taught in classes. The kit consists of equipments which are available in the market at nominal cost such as laser pointer, lenses, glass plates, razor blades, coins, ball bearing etc. Experiments which come under wave optics (interference and diffraction) and ray optics (reflection and refraction) are explained using this kit.

  20. ELISA Detection of 30 New Amphetamine Designer Drugs in Whole Blood, Urine and Oral Fluid using Neogen® "Amphetamine" and "Methamphetamine/MDMA" Kits.

    PubMed

    Nieddu, Maria; Burrai, Lucia; Baralla, Elena; Pasciu, Valeria; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Briguglio, Irene; Demontis, Maria Piera; Boatto, Gianpiero

    2016-09-01

    Amphetamine designer drugs are central nervous system stimulants that are widely disseminated in the illegal market. Generally, in forensic laboratories, immunoassay methods are the first line of screening for these types of drugs in a biological specimen (typically blood, urine or oral fluid). In this article, we describe the cross-reactivity profiles of 30 new amphetamine designer drugs, using the Neogen(®) [Amphetamine Specific and Methamphetamine/3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) assays] drug tests. To assess the potential matrix influence on the response, each assay was tested on whole blood, urine and oral fluid. Concentrations of 10,000 ng/mL were not sufficient to produce a positive response for the majority of the analyzed amphetamines. This clearly demonstrates that, although these kits are extremely effective for the target drugs for which they are intended (amphetamine, methamphetamine and MDMA), they cannot be used to reliably identify the tested designer drugs in real cases, as these concentrations greatly exceed those expected to be found in forensic samples. PMID:27405364

  1. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time PCR kit Amplidiag® Bacterial GE in the detection of bacterial pathogens from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Anniina; Munukka, Eveliina; Weintraub, Andrej; Ullberg, Måns; Eerola, Erkki

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available multiplex real-time PCR kit Amplidiag® Bacterial GE in the systematic screening of bacterial pathogens causing gastroenteritis. Stool samples from 1168 patients were analyzed with Amplidiag® Bacterial GE, stool culture, and molecular reference tests, and the sensitivity and specificity of Amplidiag® Bacterial GE were determined by comparing the results to the reference tests. The evaluation showed good performance for Amplidiag® Bacterial GE: sensitivity and specificity of the test was 100/99.7% for Salmonella, 100/99.8% for Yersinia, 98.8/99.2% for Campylobacter, 92.9/100% for Shigella/EIEC, 100/99.9% for EHEC, 92.9/99.8% for ETEC, 98.9/99.2% for EPEC, and 100/99.8% EAEC, respectively. When compared with stool culture, Amplidiag® Bacterial GE was found to be more sensitive. This study suggests that Amplidiag® Bacterial GE is suitable for screening bacterial pathogens from stool samples. However, this study only demonstrates the performance of Amplidiag® Bacterial GE in low endemic settings, as the number of positive findings in this study was relatively low. PMID:27425376

  2. Laboratory and field assessment of arsenic testing field kits in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Pande, S P; Deshpande, L S; Kaul, S N

    2001-04-01

    High concentrations of arsenic in ground waters in West Bengal and Bangladesh have become a major cause for concern in recent years. Given the enormity and the severity of the problem of arsenic poisoning, a task of evaluating the commercially available arsenic detection field kits for their capabilities was undertaken. In the light of the findings, generic specifications were recommended which could form the basis for indigenous manufacture of these kits in the arsenic affected countries. This article presents the results of the laboratory and field evaluation conducted in Bangladesh and West Bengal of five arsenic testing field kits. The salient features of the kits, their merits and limitations have been brought out. Based on the criteria of kit design, quality of chemicals used, colour comparator charts, detection range, time required for analysis, cost etc., a comparative ranking of the kits has been made to facilitate the choice of the kit to meet specific requirements.

  3. International Literacy Day Tool Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This tool kit suggests various International Literacy Day activities to raise awareness of the issues of adult literacy and language learning, to connect local literacy programs with national programs, and to help achieve the National Literacy Summit goal by 2010. The kit is intended for individuals, programs, and organizations that want to call…

  4. Look Around You, Kit I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    Developing pupils' awareness of their environment, learning to distinguish between what is pleasant and unpleasant, and examining acts of man to determine which are destructive and which are in harmony with nature are the purposes of Scholastic's Earth Corps Environmental Study Kits for grades 1-6. This kit is designed to help the child develop…

  5. Cosmic Light EDU kit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    In 2015 we celebrate the International Year of Light, a great opportunity to promote awareness about the importance of light coming from the Cosmos and what messages it is bringing to mankind. In parallel a unique moment to attract the attention of stakeholders on the dangers of light pollution and its impact in our lives and our pursuit of more knowledge. In this presentation I want to present one of the conrnerstones of IYL2015, a partnership between the Galileo Teacher Training Program, Universe Awareness and Globe at Night, the Cosmic Light EDU kit. The aim of this project is to assemble a core set of tools and resources representing our basic knowledge pilars about the Universe and simple means to preserve our night sky.

  6. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 121 - First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits A... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. A Appendix A to Part 121—First Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits Approved first-aid kits, at least one approved emergency medical kit,...

  7. The role of ACE2 in cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Oudit, Gavin Y; Crackower, Michael A; Backx, Peter H; Penninger, Josef M

    2003-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is critically involved in cardiovascular and renal function and in disease conditions, and has been shown to be a far more complex system than initially thought. A recently discovered homologue of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)--ACE2--appears to negatively regulate the RAS. ACE2 cleaves Ang I and Ang II into the inactive Ang 1-9 and Ang 1-7, respectively. ACE2 is highly expressed in kidney and heart and is especially confined to the endothelium. With quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, ACE2 was defined as a QTL on the X chromosome in rat models of hypertension. In these animal models, kidney ACE2 messenger RNA and protein expression were markedly reduced, making ACE2 a candidate gene for this QTL. Targeted disruption of ACE2 in mice failed to elicit hypertension, but resulted in severe impairment in myocardial contractility with increased angiotensin II levels. Genetic ablation of ACE in the ACE2 null mice rescued the cardiac phenotype. These genetic data show that ACE2 is an essential regulator of heart function in vivo. Basal renal morphology and function were not altered by the inactivation of ACE2. The novel role of ACE2 in hydrolyzing several other peptides-such as the apelin peptides, opioids, and kinin metabolites-raises the possibility that peptide systems other than angiotensin and its derivatives also may have an important role in regulating cardiovascular and renal function.

  8. Preliminary evaluation on the efficiency of the kit Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag-ELISA to detect dengue virus in dried Aedes aegypti: a potential tool to improve dengue surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveillance is a critical component of any dengue prevention and control programme. Herein, we investigate the efficiency of the commercial kit Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag-ELISA to detect dengue virus (DENV) antigens in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected under laboratory conditions. Methods Under insectary conditions, four to five day-old mosquitoes were orally challenged with DENV-2 titer of 3.6 x 105 PFU equivalent/ml, incubated for 14 days and then killed. At ten time-points following mosquito death (0, 6, 12, 24, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h), i.e., during a one-week period, dried mosquitoes were comparatively tested for the detection of the NS1 antigen with other methods of detection, such as qRT-PCR and virus isolation in C6/36 cells. Results We first observed that the NS1 antigen was more effective in detecting DENV-2 in Ae. aegypti between 12 and 72 h after mosquito death when compared with qRT-PCR. A second round involved comparing the sensitivity of detection of the NS1 antigen and virus isolation in C6/36 cells. The NS1 antigen was also more effective than virus isolation, detecting DENV-2 at all time-points, i.e., up to 168 h after mosquito death. Meanwhile, virus isolation was successful up to 96 h after Ae. aegypti death, but the number of positive samples per time period presented a tendency to decline progressively over time. From the 43 samples positive by the virus isolation technique, 38 (88.4%) were also positive by the NS1 test. Conclusion Taken together, these results are the first to indicate that the NS1 antigen might be an interesting complementary tool to improve dengue surveillance through DENV detection in dried Ae. aegypti females. PMID:24690324

  9. KIT (CD117) Expression in Benign and Malignant Sweat Gland Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Haruto; Daa, Tsutomu; Kashima, Kenji; Arakane, Motoki; Urabe, Shogo; Yoshikawa, Yasuji; Gamachi, Ayako; Yokoyama, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    KIT (CD117, c-kit) is a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the tumorigenesis of several neoplasms. KIT is expressed by the secretory cells of normal sweat glands. We studied the KIT expression and KIT mutational status in various benign and malignant tumors of eccrine and apocrine glands. We included a total of 108 cases comprising 10 benign and 6 malignant sweat gland tumors, and KIT expression was immunohistochemically detected (positive rate): 10 syringomas (0%), 8 poromas (25%), 20 mixed tumors (40%), 21 spiradenomas (43%), 1 cylindroma (0%), 5 hidradenomas (40%), 7 syringocystadenoma papilliferum cases (0%), 1 papillary hidradenoma (100%), 2 tubulopapillary hidradenomas (50%), 8 hidrocystomas (29%), 2 adenoid cystic carcinomas (100%), 5 porocarcinomas (20%), 6 apocrine carcinomas (33%), 10 extramammary Paget diseases (30%), 1 spiradenocarcinoma (100%), and 1 syringocystadenocarcinoma papilliferum (0%). Most KIT-positive cells were luminal cells, arising from glandular structures. We performed polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism for detecting KIT mutational status. All cases showed no mutations at hot spots for KIT (exons 9, 11, 13, and 17). KIT mutation does not seem to be mechanism for KIT expression, but the expression may be from native sweat glands.

  10. A Java commodity grid kit.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Foster, I.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we report on the features of the Java Commodity Grid Kit. The Java CoG Kit provides middleware for accessing Grid functionality from the Java framework. Java CoG Kit middleware is general enough to design a variety of advanced Grid applications with quite different user requirements. Access to the Grid is established via Globus protocols, allowing the Java CoG Kit to communicate also with the C Globus reference implementation. Thus, the Java CoG Kit provides Grid developers with the ability to utilize the Grid, as well as numerous additional libraries and frameworks developed by the Java community to enable network, Internet, enterprise, and peer-to peer computing. A variety of projects have successfully used the client libraries of the Java CoG Kit to access Grids driven by the C Globus software. In this paper we also report on the efforts to develop server side Java CoG Kit components. As part of this research we have implemented a prototype pure Java resource management system that enables one to run Globus jobs on platforms on which a Java virtual machine is supported, including Windows NT machines.

  11. Optimizing Medical Kits for Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, A. B,; Foy, Millennia; Myers, G.

    2014-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that estimates medical event occurrences and mission outcomes for different mission profiles. IMM simulation outcomes describing the impact of medical events on the mission may be used to optimize the allocation of resources in medical kits. Efficient allocation of medical resources, subject to certain mass and volume constraints, is crucial to ensuring the best outcomes of in-flight medical events. We implement a new approach to this medical kit optimization problem. METHODS We frame medical kit optimization as a modified knapsack problem and implement an algorithm utilizing a dynamic programming technique. Using this algorithm, optimized medical kits were generated for 3 different mission scenarios with the goal of minimizing the probability of evacuation and maximizing the Crew Health Index (CHI) for each mission subject to mass and volume constraints. Simulation outcomes using these kits were also compared to outcomes using kits optimized..RESULTS The optimized medical kits generated by the algorithm described here resulted in predicted mission outcomes more closely approached the unlimited-resource scenario for Crew Health Index (CHI) than the implementation in under all optimization priorities. Furthermore, the approach described here improves upon in reducing evacuation when the optimization priority is minimizing the probability of evacuation. CONCLUSIONS This algorithm provides an efficient, effective means to objectively allocate medical resources for spaceflight missions using the Integrated Medical Model.

  12. [KIT and KIT: from biology to clinical use].

    PubMed

    Curtit, Elsa; Mansi, Laura; Viel, Erika; Dobi, Erion; Chaigneau, Loïc; Nguyen, Thierry; Pivot, Xavier; Blay, Jean-Yves; Kalbacher, Elsa

    2012-02-01

    Scientific knowledge on gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) has highly progressed over the last 10 years. The molecular bases of oncogenic transformation, KIT activating mutations, were identified in 1998 by Hirota et al. The product of KIT proto-oncogene, KIT protein, is a transmembrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting these mutated activated kinases, namely imatinib and more recently sunitinib, nilotinib, masitinib or sorafenib, have deeply modified GIST prognosis. Molecular biology in GIST is now becoming a routine tool for treatment selection. In patients with advanced GIST, imatinib should be given until progression, and then, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting KIT should be used. In the adjuvant setting, the optimal duration of imatinib treatment remains unknown.

  13. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P.

    2003-04-01

    The ACE mission goals are: (1) to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region; (2) to explore the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and climate change; (3) to study the effects of biomass burning in the free troposphere; (4) to measure aerosol number density, size distribution and composition in order to reduce the uncertainties in their effects on the global energy balance. ACE will make a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols, and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) will give ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The solar occultation advantages are high sensitivity and self-calibration. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4100 cm-1) will measure the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. The ACE concept is derived from the now-retired ATMOS FTS instrument, which flew on the Space Shuttle in 1985, 1992, 1993, 1994. Climate-chemistry coupling may lead to the formation of an Arctic ozone hole. ACE will provide high quality data to confront these model predictions and will monitor polar chemistry as chlorine levels decline. The ACE-FTS can measure water vapor and HDO in the tropical tropopause region to study dehydration and strat-trop exchange. The molecular signatures of massive forest fires will evident in the ACE infrared spectra. The CO_2 in our spectra can be used to either retrieve atmospheric pressure or (if the instrument pointing knowledge proves to be satisfactory) for an independent retrieval of a CO_2 profile for carbon cycle science. Aerosols and clouds will be monitored using the extinction of solar

  14. Shedding of the germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) involves a serine protease and is activated by epididymal fluid.

    PubMed

    Thimon, Véronique; Métayer, Sonia; Belghazi, Maya; Dacheux, Françoise; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Gatti, Jean-Luc

    2005-11-01

    The present report describes how the soluble germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) appears in the epididymal fluid, where it has been identified in some laboratory rodents and domestic ungulates. We showed that this gACE results from an active proteolytic process that releases the enzyme's extracellular domain from sperm in a precise spatiotemporal location during epididymal transit and that this process involves serine protease activity. Using polyclonal antibodies against the C-terminal intracellular sequence of ACE, a fragment of approximately 10 kDa was detected on the sperm extract only in the epididymal region, where the gACE release occurs. The fluid enzyme was purified, and the cleavage site was determined by mass spectrometry to be between Arg622 and Leu623 of the mature sheep gACE sequence (equivalent to Arg627 and Arg1203 of the human mature gACE and somatic ACE sequences, respectively). Thereafter, the C-terminal Arg was removed, leaving Ala621 as a C-terminal. Using an in vitro assay, gACE cleavage from sperm was strongly increased by the presence of epididymal fluid from the release zone, and this increase was inhibited specifically by the serine protease-inhibitor AEBSF but not by para-aminobenzamidine. None of the other inhibitors tested, such as metallo- or cystein-protease inhibitors, had a similar effect on release. It was also found that this process did not involve changes in gACE phosphorylation. PMID:15987822

  15. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  16. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  17. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  18. Ace the Verbal on the SAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meierding, Loren

    2005-01-01

    Many students are not accepted in to certain colleges and universities because of low SAT scores. Loren Meierding has written Ace the Verbal on the SAT to help students with minimal preparation do well by improving their vocabulary and use better techniques for finding the answers to the questions. This book provides strategies needed to score…

  19. Build an Emergency Preparedness Kit

    MedlinePlus

    ... tire traction -Red or brightly- colored cloth -NOAA weather radio For more information on building emergency kits, ... and a flashlight with extra batteries. A NOAA weather radio warns the public of severe weather and ...

  20. Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1987-02-01

    The Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit was designed to help engineering educators develop and teach energy management courses. Montana State University and Oklahoma State University courses are embodied in the model curriculum given. The curricula offered at many other universities throughout the United States are also presented. The kit was designed specifically to train engineering students to be good energy managers. Courses at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level are presented.

  1. Kidney scintigraphy after ACE inhibition in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Ghione, S.; Fommei, E.; Palombo, C.; Giaconi, S.; Mantovanelli, A.; Ragazzini, A.; Palla, L.

    1986-01-01

    Suppression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition may induce renal failure in patients with bilateral renal artery stenosis. Recent scintigraphic studies with the glomerular tracer technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetate (99m-Tc DTPA) indicate that in patients with unilateral renal artery stenosis, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) may be markedly reduced in the affected kidney after inhibition of ACE. This finding reflects the important role of the RAS in maintaining GFR (by increasing postglomerular resistance) in states of low renal perfusion pressure. Preliminary observations suggest that this scintigraphic test might be useful in the detection of renovascular hypertension.

  2. Changes in c-Kit expression levels during the course of radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Bicheng; Xu, Jing; Shui, Yongjie; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Ren, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Xiaozhong; Shen, Li; Wei, Qichun

    2016-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy, distant metastasis is currently the main cause of treatment failure for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Additional therapeutic strategies are required to control the metastasis and improve survival. One strategy is targeted therapy, for example against c-Kit. In the current study, the frequency of c-Kit expression was determined immunohistochemically in 106 NPC patients. c-Kit expression changes during the course of radiation therapy were detected in 41 cases via weekly biopsy. Twelve cases (11.3%) had c-Kit expression scores of 3+ and 16 (15.1%) had scores of 2+. Thus, c-Kit overexpression (2+ or 3+) was observed in 28 (26.4%) patients. There were 35 (33.0%) and 43 (40.6%) patients with c-Kit expression scores of 1+ and 0, respectively. Furthermore, a trend of decreased c-Kit expression was observed after commencing radiotherapy according to the 41 NPC patients who were biopsied weekly. Therefore, c-Kit overexpression was identified to be common in NPC, and evaluating c-Kit as a therapeutic target for metastatic NPC via c-Kit overexpression subsequent to first line treatment may be of interest. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate a trend of decreased c-Kit expression during the course of radiotherapy.

  3. c-kit protein, a transmembrane kinase: identification in tissues and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, S; Brown, K; Qiu, F H; Besmer, P

    1988-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-kit encodes a transmembrane kinase which is related to the receptors for colony-stimulating factor type 1 and platelet-derived growth factor, as well as to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Antibodies specific for the kinase domain of the P80 gag-kit protein of the Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma virus were prepared. These kit-specific antibodies were used to identify and characterize the c-kit protein in cat brain tissue. The c-kit protein product displays an autophosphorylating activity in immune complex kinase assays, and, in turn, this activity was used to identify the c-kit protein in different tissues. In cat brain, a single 145-kilodalton (kDa) glycoprotein was detected. Its N-linked carbohydrates were found to be sensitive to digestion with the endoglycosidases (neuraminidase, endoglycosidase F, and endoglycosidase H), indicating hybrid and/or complex and high-mannose structures. A partial purification of the c-kit protein was achieved by wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, and the autophosphorylating activity of the partially purified c-kit protein was characterized and found to be specific for tyrosine. The kit antibodies cross-react with the murine c-kit protein product, and variant c-kit proteins in different mouse tissues were identified, with sizes of about 145 kDa (brain), 160 kDa (spleen), and 150 kDa (testis). Images PMID:2463468

  4. Role of Serratia marcescens ACE2 on diesel degradation and its influence on corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Babu, Thambidurai Ganesh; Pandian, Shunmugiah Thevar Karutha; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Palaniswamy, Narayanan; Rajendran, Annamalai

    2007-09-01

    A facultative anaerobic species Serratia marcescens ACE2 isolated from the corrosion products of diesel transporting pipeline in North West, India was identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The role of Serratia marcesens ACE2 on biodegradation of diesel and its influence on the corrosion of API 5LX steel has been elucidated. The degrading strain ACE2 is involved in the process of corrosion of steel API 5LX and also utilizes the diesel as an organic source. The quantitative biodegradation efficiency (BE) of diesel was 58%, calculated by gas-chromatography-mass spectrum analysis. On the basis of gas-chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), the involvement of Serratia marcescens on degradation and corrosion has been investigated. This basic study will be useful for the development of new approaches for detection, monitoring and control of microbial corrosion.

  5. A cladistic model of ACE sequence variation with implications for myocardial infarction, Alzheimer disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Katzov, Hagit; Bennet, Anna M; Kehoe, Patrick; Wiman, Björn; Gatz, Margaret; Blennow, Kaj; Lenhard, Boris; Pedersen, Nancy L; de Faire, Ulf; Prince, Jonathan A

    2004-11-01

    Sequence variation in ACE, which encodes angiotensin I converting enzyme, contributes to a large proportion of variability in plasma ACE levels, but the extent to which this impacts upon human disease is unresolved. Most efforts to associate ACE with other heritable traits have involved a single Alu insertion/deletion polymorphism, despite the probable existence of other functional sequence variants with effects that may not be consistently detectable by solely typing the Alu indel. Here, utilizing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that differentiate major ACE clades in European populations, we demonstrate a number of significant phenotype associations across more than 4000 Swedish individuals. In a systematic analysis of metabolic phenotypes, effects were detected upon several traits, including fasting plasma glucose levels, insulin levels and measures of obesity (P-values ranging from 0.046 to 8.4 x 10(-6)). Extending cladistic models to the study of myocardial infarction and Alzheimer disease, significant associations were observed with greater effect sizes than those typically obtained in large-scale meta-analyses based on the Alu indel. Population frequencies of ACE genotypes were also found to change with age, congruent with previous data suggesting effects upon longevity. Clade models consistently outperformed those based upon single markers, reinforcing the importance of taking into consideration the possible confounding effects of allelic heterogeneity in this genomic region. Utilizing computational tools, potential functional variants are highlighted that may underlie phenotypic variability, which is discussed along with the broader implications these results may have for studies attempting to link variation in ACE to human disease.

  6. Cardiac and renal distribution of ACE and ACE-2 in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Segev, Ravit; Francis, Bahaa; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Awad, Hoda; Lazarovich, Aviva; Kabala, Aviva; Aronson, Doron; Abassi, Zaid

    2014-10-01

    Congestive heart failure is often associated with impaired kidney function. Over-activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) contributes to avid salt and water retention in heart failure. While the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a key enzyme in the synthesis of angiotensin II (Ang II), is well established, the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), an enzyme responsible for angiotensin 1-7 generation, is largely unknown. This issue is of a special interest since angiotensin 1-7 counteracts many of the proliferative and hypertensive effects of angiotensin II. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the expression of both enzymes in the kidney and heart of rats with heart failure. Heart failure (CHF) was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats (n=9) by the creation of a surgical aorto-caval fistula. Sham-operated rats served as controls (n=8). Two weeks after surgery, the animals were sacrificed and their hearts and kidneys were harvested for assessment of cardiac remodeling and ACE and ACE-2 immunoreactivity by immunohistochemical staining. ACE immunostaining was significantly increased in the kidneys (4.34 ± 0.39% vs. 2.96 ± 0.40%, P<0.05) and hearts (4.57 ± 0.54% vs. 2.19 ± 0.37%, P<0.01) of CHF rats as compared with their sham controls. In a similar manner, ACE-2 immunoreactivity was also elevated in the kidneys (4.65 ± 1.17% vs. 1.75 ± 0.29%, P<0.05) and hearts (5.48 ± 1.11% vs. 1.13 ± 0.26%, P<0.01) of CHF rats as compared with their healthy controls. This study showed that both ACE and ACE-2 are overexpressed in the cardiac and renal tissues of animals with heart failure as compared with their sham controls. The increased expression of the beneficial ACE-2 in heart failure may serve as a compensatory response to the over-activity of the deleterious isoform, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme 1(ACE-1).

  7. Performance evaluation of the PelvoCheck CT/NG test kit for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Thomas; Klos, Christian; Kofler, Regina; Kilic, Annett; Hänel, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assessment of the performance of the PelvoCheck CT/NG test (Greiner-Bio-One GmbH) to detect Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) in first-void urine (FVU) of females. Design A cross-sectional study to compare the PelvoCheck CT/NG with COBAS TaqMan CT Test V.2.0 (Roche) for the detection of CT and with an in-house porA-based PCR for the detection of NG in FVU specimens. In addition, pools of 5 FVU specimens containing only CT-negative or 1 CT-positive and 4 CT-negative samples were tested. Abbott RealTime CT/NG was used as an additional test to resolve discordant results. Setting Samples sent from six laboratories were tested at the University Medical Center Hamburg. Participants Urine samples were from 1622 female patients attending gynaecological practices for chlamydia screening, another 120 urine samples were from patients pretested for NG at Synlab, Medical Service Center, Weiden GmbH. In addition, 50 urine samples spiked with various concentrations of reference material were used. Results For the detection of CT and NG, the sensitivity and specificity of the PelvoCheck CT/NG test were 98.8% and 100%, and 98.3% and 98.2%, respectively. The data obtained with the PelvoCheck CT/NG for pooled urine specimens resulted in a positive agreement of 90.9% and a negative agreement of 100%. Conclusions The PelvoCheck CT/NG assay is a suitable test method for the detection of CT and NG in female FVU samples, with sensitivity and specificity comparable with other Food and Drug Administration approved CT/NG nucleic acid amplification tests. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first commercial test system validated for the analysis of pooled urine specimens. No false-positive or invalid result was observed in 55 analysed pools. Nevertheless, 5 samples were false negative due to a target concentration below the limit of detection of the PelvoCheck CT/NG test as a consequence of pooling-associated dilution. PMID:26729391

  8. The sensitivity and specificity of the RSID-saliva kit for the detection of human salivary amylase in the Forensic Science Laboratory, Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Casey, David G; Price, Judy

    2010-01-30

    We demonstrate here that the RSID-saliva test can be used as a test for human salivary alpha-amylase on samples routinely examined in forensic casework. We show that the RSID-saliva test detects salivary alpha-amylase at lower concentrations than the Phadebas Quantitative test, that the RSID-saliva test does not cross-react with forensically important human fluids and that the RSID-saliva test can be successfully integrated into the whole swab semen extraction method.

  9. Suppression of plasma virus load below the detection limit of a human immunodeficiency virus kit is associated with longer virologic response than suppression below the limit of quantitation.

    PubMed

    Raboud, J M; Rae, S; Hogg, R S; Yip, B; Sherlock, C H; Harrigan, P R; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Montaner, J S

    1999-10-01

    Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 plasma virus load (PVL) to <20 copies/mL is associated with a longer virologic response after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The relationship between duration of virologic response and PVL nadir according to a less sensitive assay was explored. When compared with subjects with a PVL nadir >500 copies/mL, the relative risks of PVL rising above 1000 copies/mL for participants in the INCAS trial and the British Columbia Drug Treatment Program with a PVL nadir below the limit of detection (LOD) were 0.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.09) and 0.06 (95% CI, 0.03-0.12), respectively. The corresponding relative risks for persons with a detectable but not quantifiable PVL nadir were 0.25 (95% CI, 0.13-0.50) and 0.54 (95% CI, 0.25-1.19). The relative risks of virologic failure associated with a PVL nadir detectable but not quantifiable and a PVL nadir below the LOD were statistically different (P<.0001) in both data sets.

  10. Validation of ozone measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, E.; Walker, K. A.; Kar, J.; Boone, C. D.; McElroy, C. T.; Bernath, P. F.; Drummond, J. R.; Skelton, R.; McLeod, S. D.; Hughes, R. C.; Nowlan, C. R.; Dufour, D. G.; Zou, J.; Nichitiu, F.; Strong, K.; Baron, P.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Bodeker, G. E.; Borsdorff, T.; Bourassa, A. E.; Bovensmann, H.; Boyd, I. S.; Bracher, A.; Brogniez, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Catoire, V.; Ceccherini, S.; Chabrillat, S.; Christensen, T.; Coffey, M. T.; Cortesi, U.; Davies, J.; de Clercq, C.; Degenstein, D. A.; de Mazière, M.; Demoulin, P.; Dodion, J.; Firanski, B.; Fischer, H.; Forbes, G.; Froidevaux, L.; Fussen, D.; Gerard, P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Goutail, F.; Granville, J.; Griffith, D.; Haley, C. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Höpfner, M.; Jin, J. J.; Jones, A.; Jones, N. B.; Jucks, K.; Kagawa, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; Kleinböhl, A.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Kramer, I.; Küllmann, H.; Kuttippurath, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Lambert, J.-C.; Livesey, N. J.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lloyd, N. D.; Mahieu, E.; Manney, G. L.; Marshall, B. T.; McConnell, J. C.; McCormick, M. P.; McDermid, I. S.; McHugh, M.; McLinden, C. A.; Mellqvist, J.; Mizutani, K.; Murayama, Y.; Murtagh, D. P.; Oelhaf, H.; Parrish, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Piccolo, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Randall, C. E.; Robert, C.; Roth, C.; Schneider, M.; Senten, C.; Steck, T.; Strandberg, A.; Strawbridge, K. B.; Sussmann, R.; Swart, D. P. J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Taylor, J. R.; Tétard, C.; Thomason, L. W.; Thompson, A. M.; Tully, M. B.; Urban, J.; Vanhellemont, F.; Vigouroux, C.; von Clarmann, T.; von der Gathen, P.; von Savigny, C.; Waters, J. W.; Witte, J. C.; Wolff, M.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents extensive {bias determination} analyses of ozone observations from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite instruments: the ACE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instrument. Here we compare the latest ozone data products from ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO with coincident observations from nearly 20 satellite-borne, airborne, balloon-borne and ground-based instruments, by analysing volume mixing ratio profiles and partial column densities. The ACE-FTS version 2.2 Ozone Update product reports more ozone than most correlative measurements from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. At altitude levels from 16 to 44 km, the average values of the mean relative differences are nearly all within +1 to +8%. At higher altitudes (45-60 km), the ACE-FTS ozone amounts are significantly larger than those of the comparison instruments, with mean relative differences of up to +40% (about +20% on average). For the ACE-MAESTRO version 1.2 ozone data product, mean relative differences are within ±10% (average values within ±6%) between 18 and 40 km for both the sunrise and sunset measurements. At higher altitudes ( 35-55 km), systematic biases of opposite sign are found between the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise and sunset observations. While ozone amounts derived from the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise occultation data are often smaller than the coincident observations (with mean relative differences down to -10%), the sunset occultation profiles for ACE-MAESTRO show results that are qualitatively similar to ACE-FTS, indicating a large positive bias (mean relative differences within +10 to +30%) in the 45-55 km altitude range. In contrast, there is no significant systematic difference in bias found for the ACE-FTS sunrise and sunset measurements.

  11. Validation of ozone measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, E.; Walker, K. A.; Kar, J.; Boone, C. D.; McElroy, C. T.; Bernath, P. F.; Drummond, J. R.; Skelton, R.; McLeod, S. D.; Hughes, R. C.; Nowlan, C. R.; Dufour, D. G.; Zou, J.; Nichitiu, F.; Strong, K.; Baron, P.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Bodeker, G. E.; Borsdorff, T.; Bourassa, A. E.; Bovensmann, H.; Boyd, I. S.; Bracher, A.; Brogniez, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Catoire, V.; Ceccherini, S.; Chabrillat, S.; Christensen, T.; Coffey, M. T.; Cortesi, U.; Davies, J.; de Clercq, C.; Degenstein, D. A.; de Mazière, M.; Demoulin, P.; Dodion, J.; Firanski, B.; Fischer, H.; Forbes, G.; Froidevaux, L.; Fussen, D.; Gerard, P.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Goutail, F.; Granville, J.; Griffith, D.; Haley, C. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Höpfner, M.; Jin, J. J.; Jones, A.; Jones, N. B.; Jucks, K.; Kagawa, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; Kleinböhl, A.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Kramer, I.; Küllmann, H.; Kuttippurath, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Lambert, J.-C.; Livesey, N. J.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lloyd, N. D.; Mahieu, E.; Manney, G. L.; Marshall, B. T.; McConnell, J. C.; McCormick, M. P.; McDermid, I. S.; McHugh, M.; McLinden, C. A.; Mellqvist, J.; Mizutani, K.; Murayama, Y.; Murtagh, D. P.; Oelhaf, H.; Parrish, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Piccolo, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Randall, C. E.; Robert, C.; Roth, C.; Schneider, M.; Senten, C.; Steck, T.; Strandberg, A.; Strawbridge, K. B.; Sussmann, R.; Swart, D. P. J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Taylor, J. R.; Tétard, C.; Thomason, L. W.; Thompson, A. M.; Tully, M. B.; Urban, J.; Vanhellemont, F.; von Clarmann, T.; von der Gathen, P.; von Savigny, C.; Waters, J. W.; Witte, J. C.; Wolff, M.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents extensive validation analyses of ozone observations from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite instruments: the ACE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instrument. The ACE satellite instruments operate in the mid-infrared and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectral regions using the solar occultation technique. In order to continue the long-standing record of solar occultation measurements from space, a detailed quality assessment is required to evaluate the ACE data and validate their use for scientific purposes. Here we compare the latest ozone data products from ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO with coincident observations from satellite-borne, airborne, balloon-borne and ground-based instruments, by analysing volume mixing ratio profiles and partial column densities. The ACE-FTS version 2.2 Ozone Update product reports more ozone than most correlative measurements from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. At altitude levels from 16 to 44 km, the mean differences range generally between 0 and +10% with a slight but systematic positive bias (typically +5%). At higher altitudes (45-60 km), the ACE-FTS ozone amounts are significantly larger than those of the comparison instruments by up to ~40% (typically +20%). For the ACE-MAESTRO version 1.2 ozone data product, agreement within ±10% (generally better than ±5%) is found between 18 and 40 km for the sunrise and sunset measurements. At higher altitudes (45-55 km), systematic biases of opposite sign are found between the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise and sunset observations. While ozone amounts derived from the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise occultation data are often smaller than the coincident observations (by as much as -10%), the sunset occultation profiles for ACE-MAESTRO show results that are qualitatively similar to ACE-FTS and indicate a large positive bias (+10 to +30

  12. /sup 125/I-labeled radioimmunoassay kits for progesterone evaluated for use in an in vitro fertilization program

    SciTech Connect

    Blight, L.F.; White, G.H.

    1983-06-01

    We have evaluated two commercially available /sup 125/I radioimmunoassay kits (Diagnostic Products Corp., DPC; and Radioassay Systems Laboratories, RSL) for measurement of serum or plasma progesterone, to determine their suitability for use in in vitro fertilization programs. Both kits were suitably rapid for program requirements. Results by both were linear with concentration up to 60 nmol/L, and both had acceptable lower detection limits of 0.3 nmol/L. Kit-determined progesterone concentrations (y) for 100 patients' samples correlated well with results by our existing 3H radioimmunoassay method (y . 1.11x + 0.2, r . 0.965 for the DPC kit; y . 1.01x + 1.4, r . 0.974 for the RSL kit). Mean analytical recovery for the RSL kit was 116%, that for the DPC kit, 202%. Within-batch precision, expressed as the mean CV for three concentrations of progesterone, was 6.5% for the RSL kit, and 16.4% for the DPC kit; between-day CV was 8.1% for the RSL kit, 17.7% for the DPC kit. We conclude that the RSL kit provides a rapid, precise, and accurate assay for serum progesterone, suitable for use in a fertilization program, but do not recommend the DPC kit for either this purpose or the more general purpose of tracking menstrual cycles.

  13. The Relevance of CD117-Immunocytochemistry Staining Patterns to Mutational Exon-11 in c-kit Detected by PCR from Fine-Needle Aspirated Canine Mast Cell Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sailasuta, A.; Ketpun, D.; Piyaviriyakul, P.; Theerawatanasirikul, S.; Theewasutrakul, P.; Rungsipipat, A.

    2014-01-01

    Canine cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCT) are the lethal skin tumors. The biological behavior of the MCT cells is quite varied and unpredictable. Almost MCT dogs usually require a rapid diagnosis and therapy. However, MCT diagnosis and prognosis are still dependent on histopathology which is rather inconvenient, time-consuming, painful, and harmful for some cases. Indeed, MCT can be easily accessible using fine-needle aspiration (FNA). In this study, our biopsy specimens were classified as low- and high-grade MCT based on the novel 2-tier histopathologic grading system. We have demonstrated the usage of fine-needle aspirated MCT cells (FNA-MCT cells) from these specimens as a primary cell source to study the distribution of CD117-immunocytochemistry (CD117-ICC) staining patterns and the frequency of internal tandem duplication- (ITD-) mutant exon-11 of c-kit. The result has substantially shown that there were three staining patterns identified in the cells. Only paranuclear pattern was significantly increased in the cells from high-grade MCT. Altogether, the ITD-mutant exon-11 was also detectable only in these cells. Therefore, the result has supported our hypothesis that there was an increased opportunity to observe a higher CD117-ICC staining pattern and exon-11 mutation in high-grade MCT; even these two parameters may not precisely indicate a histopathological grade. PMID:24701365

  14. Are antigen test kits efficient for detecting heartworm-infected dogs at the southern distribution limit of the parasite in South America? Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, D; Fontanarrosa, M F; Eiras, D F

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of commercial heartworm antigen tests in dogs harbouring Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae near its distribution limit in South America. A total of 4934 blood samples of adult dogs from Southern Greater Buenos Aires were examined to detect circulating microfilariae in the buffy coat interface between December 2005 and April 2006. Microfilariae were detected in 88 (1.8%) blood samples and all the microfilariae observed were identified as D. immitis by acid phosphatase stain technique. In a first trial, 69 (78.4%) out of the 88 serum were positive by Speed((R)) Diro. Then, a new test was performed over 25 microfilariae-positive serum samples randomly selected among the 88 previously tested samples and using simultaneously Speed((R)) Diro, Witness((R)) Dirofilaria and Snap((R)) 3dx. This second trial showed identical results for the three different tests, in which 19 (76%) samples were positive. Therefore, more than 20% of microfilaremic dogs were antigen negative. The main hypothesis that could explain our finding is a low worm burden in the study area. According to our preliminary results, it is highly recommendable the complementary use of antigen tests and other procedures to obtain an accurate diagnostic near the distribution limit of the parasite.

  15. Detection of T-2 mycotoxin metabolites in urines of exposed rats. Comparison of a potentially fieldable kit with a laboratory assay. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewetson, J.F.; Wannemacher, R.W.; Hawley, R.J.

    1988-03-09

    Rapid methods to detect toxin exposure have been a concern of the Army since the reported use of T-2 mycotoxin as a biological warfare agent in Southeast Asia and Afghanistan. T-2 toxin was included in an exploratory development program of rapid identification systems for biological agents sponsored by the United States Army Medical Materiel Development Activity. Reported here is evidence of T-2W exposure in urines collected up to 2 weeks after rats were exposed to a sublethal dose of T-2 toxin. A laboratory radioimmunoassay (RIA) using polyclonal antibody was used to assay the urines for HT-2 or T-2 tetraol. The sensitivity of the RIA for HT-2 was 5 ng/ml and 50 ng/ml for T-2 tetraol. Some of the urines were assayed in parallel with a potentially fieldable enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) developed for T-2 with a monoclonal antibody that cross reacts with HT-2.

  16. Leptospirosis in Kuala Lumpur and the comparative evaluation of two rapid commercial diagnostic kits against the MAT test for the detection of antibodies to leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, W Y; Soo, E H; Gopalakrishnan, V; Devi, S

    2000-08-01

    The aim of the study was to look into the epidemiology of serodiagnosed cases of leptospirosis at the University Hospital and compare two commercial ELISA Assays to the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). Demographic data for all serodiagnosed cases for the years 1991-1997 were collected. From this data, 104 sera (n = 104) were selected as samples for comparative evaluation of the commercial ELISAs (INDX Dip-S-Ticks and PanBio ELISA) to the MAT test. Thirty two (n = 32) negative control sera were selected from serodiagnosed cases of other differential diagnosis of leptospira infection. The MAT test is a standard test that detects agglutination antibodies to leptospira biflexa, while the INDX Dip-S-Ticks is an ELISA dot test assaying for total anti-leptospira antibodies. The PanBio ELISA is a colorometric assay in test well strips to detect anti-leptospira IgM. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of tests were calculated at a MAT cut-off value of 1:320. Demographic data showed that leptospirosis peaks during March-May and Aug-Nov coinciding with the inter-monsoon period with more men being infected than women and more adults than children. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of test for the INDX Dip-S-Ticks were 83.3%, 93.8% and 87.5% while the values for the PanBio ELISA were 54.2%, 96.9% and 71.3%. The suboptimal PanBio result could be related to the blocking effect of high IgG titres or could be related to the diagnostic MAT cut-off values used in this study. The data hence reflects a pattern of transmission that is related to "wet" occupational risk factors. The commercial assays evaluated, are easier to perform but interpretation of results should be based on level of endemicity. The INDX Dip-S-Ticks allows this flexibility and is a practical alternative to the MAT test.

  17. Leptospirosis in Kuala Lumpur and the comparative evaluation of two rapid commercial diagnostic kits against the MAT test for the detection of antibodies to leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, W Y; Soo, E H; Gopalakrishnan, V; Devi, S

    2000-08-01

    The aim of the study was to look into the epidemiology of serodiagnosed cases of leptospirosis at the University Hospital and compare two commercial ELISA Assays to the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). Demographic data for all serodiagnosed cases for the years 1991-1997 were collected. From this data, 104 sera (n = 104) were selected as samples for comparative evaluation of the commercial ELISAs (INDX Dip-S-Ticks and PanBio ELISA) to the MAT test. Thirty two (n = 32) negative control sera were selected from serodiagnosed cases of other differential diagnosis of leptospira infection. The MAT test is a standard test that detects agglutination antibodies to leptospira biflexa, while the INDX Dip-S-Ticks is an ELISA dot test assaying for total anti-leptospira antibodies. The PanBio ELISA is a colorometric assay in test well strips to detect anti-leptospira IgM. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of tests were calculated at a MAT cut-off value of 1:320. Demographic data showed that leptospirosis peaks during March-May and Aug-Nov coinciding with the inter-monsoon period with more men being infected than women and more adults than children. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of test for the INDX Dip-S-Ticks were 83.3%, 93.8% and 87.5% while the values for the PanBio ELISA were 54.2%, 96.9% and 71.3%. The suboptimal PanBio result could be related to the blocking effect of high IgG titres or could be related to the diagnostic MAT cut-off values used in this study. The data hence reflects a pattern of transmission that is related to "wet" occupational risk factors. The commercial assays evaluated, are easier to perform but interpretation of results should be based on level of endemicity. The INDX Dip-S-Ticks allows this flexibility and is a practical alternative to the MAT test. PMID:11256343

  18. Solid phase microextraction field kit

    DOEpatents

    Nunes, Peter J.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-08-16

    A field kit for the collection, isolation and concentration of trace amounts of high explosives (HE), biological weapons (BW) and chemical weapons (CW) residues in air, soil, vegetation, swipe, and liquid samples. The field kit includes a number of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) fiber and syringe assemblies in a hermetically sealed transportation container or tubes which includes a sampling port, a number of extra SPME fiber and syringe assemblies, the fiber and syringe assemblies including a protective cap for the fiber, and an extractor for the protective cap, along with other items including spare parts, protective glove, and an instruction manual, all located in an airtight container.

  19. ACE and ACTN3 genes polymorphisms among female Hungarian athletes in the aspect of sport disciplines.

    PubMed

    Bosnyák, E; Trájer, E; Udvardy, A; Komka, Z; Protzner, A; Kováts, T; Györe, I; Tóth, M; Pucsok, J; Szmodis, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the importance of two sport-associated gene polymorphisms, alpha-actinin-3 R577X (ACTN3) and angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D (ACE), among Hungarian athletes in different sports. The examination was carried out only on women (n = 100). Sport-specific groups were formed in order to guarantee the most homogeneous clusters. Human genomic DNA was isolated from blood, and genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction. To measure the differences between the participating groups, Chi-squared test was performed using Statistica 9.0 for Windows® (significance level: p < 0.05). In comparing the ACE I/D allele frequencies, significant difference was detected between water polo (I = 61.11%; D = 38.89%) and combat sports (I = 35.71%, D = 64.29%) athletes (p < 0.03). There was no statistical difference when ACE I/D alleles in combat sports and kayaking/rowing (p > 0.05) were compared. A similarity was detectable in the I allele frequencies of the water polo (61.11%) and kayaking/rowing (56.67%) groups. The ACTN3 R/X polymorphism showed no differences in comparison with the sport groups. R allele frequencies were higher in every group compared to the X allele. The potential significance of the ACE I allele in sports of an aerobic nature was not clearly confirmed among Hungarian athletes. PMID:26690037

  20. Occurrence and fate of ACE-inhibitor peptides in cheeses and in their digestates following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, Milda; Cattaneo, Stefano; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of the casein-derived angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACE-I) peptides VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP and HLPLP were investigated in 12 different cheese samples by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The total amount of ACE-I peptides was in the range 0.87-331mgkg(-1). VPP and IPP largely prevailed in almost all cheeses. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion of Cheddar, Gorgonzola, Maasdam and Grana Padano cheeses, type and amount of ACE-I peptides changed, and only VPP, IPP, HLPLP and LHLPLP were detected in the intestinal digestates. The results evidenced that the degree of proteolysis itself cannot be regarded as a promoting or hindering factor for ACE-I peptide release during cheese digestion. Moreover, the data indicated that the ACE-I potential of cheeses cannot be inferred based on the type and amount of ACE-I peptides present in undigested samples. PMID:25172679

  1. Functional study on the mutations in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) acetylcholinesterase type 1 gene (ace1) and its recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju-mei; Wang, Bin-bin; Xie, Yi; Sun, Shan-shan; Gu, Zhi-ya; Ma, Lie; Li, Fan-chi; Zhao, Yi-fan; Yang, Bin; Shen, Wei-de; Li, Bing

    2014-01-01

    The acetylcholinesterase of Lepidoptera insects is encoded by two genes, ace1 and ace2. The expression of the ace1 gene is significantly higher than that of the ace2 gene, and mutations in ace1 are one of the major reasons for pesticide resistance in insects. In order to investigate the effects of the mutations in ace1's characteristic sites on pesticide resistance, we generated mutations for three amino acids using site-directed mutagenesis, which were Ala(GCG)303Ser(TCG), Gly(GGA)329Ala(GCA) and Leu (TCT)554Ser(TTC). The Baculovirus expression system was used for the eukaryotic expression of the wild type ace1 (wace1) and the mutant ace1 (mace1). SDS-PAGE and Western blotting were used to detect the targeting proteins with expected sizeof about 76 kDa. The expression products were purified for the determination of AChE activity and the inhibitory effects of physostigmine and phoxim. We observed no significant differences in the overall activity of the wild type and mutant AChEs. However, with 10 min of physostigmine (10 μM) inhibition, the remaining activity of the wild type AChE was significantly lower than that of the mutant AChE. Ten min inhibition with 33.4 μM phoxim also resulted in significantly lower remaining activity of the wild type AChE than that of the mutant AChE. These results indicated that mutations for the three amino acids reduced the sensitivity of AChE to physostigmine and phoxim, which laid the foundation for future in vivo studies on AChE's roles in pesticide resistance.

  2. The Canadian Arctic ACE/OSIRIS Validation Project at PEARL: Validating Satellite Observations Over the High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kaley A.; Strong, Kimberly; Fogal, Pierre F.; Drummond, James R.

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based measurements provide critical data for the validation of satellite retrievals of atmospheric trace gases and for the assessment of long-term stability of these measurements. As of February 2016, the Canadian-led Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite mission has been making measurements of the Earth's atmosphere for nearly twelve years and Canada's Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite has been operating for fourteen years. As ACE and OSIRIS operations have extended beyond their planned two-year missions, there is an ongoing need to validate the trace gas data profiles from the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) and OSIRIS. In particular, validation comparisons are needed during Arctic springtime to understand better the measurements of species involved in stratospheric ozone chemistry. To this end, thirteen Canadian Arctic ACE/OSIRIS Validation Campaigns have been conducted during the spring period (February - April in 2004 - 2016) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut (80N, 86W). For the past decade, these campaigns have been undertaken in collaboration with the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The spring period coincides with the most chemically active time of year in the Arctic, as well as a significant number of satellite overpasses. A suite of as many as 12 ground-based instruments, as well as frequent balloon-borne ozonesonde and radiosonde launches, have been used in each campaign. These instruments include: a ground-based version of the ACE-FTS (PARIS - Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer), a terrestrial version of the ACE-MAESTRO, a SunPhotoSpectrometer, two CANDAC zenith-viewing UV-visible grating spectrometers, a Bomem DA8 Fourier transform spectrometer

  3. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  4. User Surveys. SPEC Kit 148.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Pamela Noyes

    Based on responses to a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members in March 1988, this Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) flyer and kit are designed to assist administrators of large academic libraries in the selection of useful methods of conducting user surveys for particular library concerns. The flyer provides a brief…

  5. Active Parenting Now: Program Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkin, Michael H.

    Based largely on the theories of Alfred Adler and Rudolf Dreikurs, this parent education curriculum is a video-based interactive learning experience that teaches a comprehensive model of parenting to parents of children ages 5 to 12 years. The kit provides parents with the skills needed to help their children develop courage, responsibility, and…

  6. Evaluation of America's Career Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The Employment and Training Administration's (ETA's) development and implementation of America's Career Kit (ACK), which is an online career development resource for individuals needing job search assistance, career guidance, salary data, and training and educational resources, was evaluated. The evaluation was designed to determine whether ACK…

  7. No-Fuss Kindi Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klawitter, Pamela

    1981-01-01

    Presents instructions for making six learning kits which kindergarteners can use independently to review such fundamental skills as matching or recognizing letters, numbers, shapes, and colors, as well as to explore such topics as community helpers, the senses, nutrition, and animals. (Author/SJL)

  8. Higher Education Salary Evaluation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Elizabeth L.

    The kit is the result of a study undertaken to provide a method for flagging women and minority faculty members whose salaries appear to be low compared to the salaries of white males in the same faculty who have the same attributes and experience. The recommended method also provides an estimate of what the woman's or minority individual's salary…

  9. Architectural Environment: A Resource Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY.

    There are many ways to approach the investigation of architecture. One can look at structural form, climate and topography, the aesthetics of style and decoration, building function, historical factors, cultural meanings, or technology and techniques associated with construction. This resource kit touches upon a few of these approaches, ranging…

  10. [Indonesian Information Kit No. 1036.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY. United States Committee.

    The goals of this United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) kit are to present information about Indonesia, its problems and its needs and to describe how UNICEF helps improve children's lives. The materials consisting of a pamphlet, a booklet, an information sheet and a wall chart, are designed to be used in elementary or secondary school…

  11. Croatian Ethnic Heritage Studies Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA.

    The audiovisual kit is designed to help fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students explore the cultural heritage of Croatians and trace past folklore to modern life styles of Croatian immigrants in America. Its multimedia format, which includes two cassette tapes, four filmstrips, two phonograph records, a miniature musical instrument, and seven…

  12. Cubic Unit Cell Construction Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Presents instructions for building a simple interactive unit-cell construction kit that allows for the construction of simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic lattices. The lit is built from inexpensive and readily available materials and can be built in any number of sizes. (WRM)

  13. Work and Family Resource Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This kit is designed to help employers understand the range of family needs emerging in the workplace and the numerous options for a company response. An introduction discusses the need for child care services, dependent care problems, and how employers respond and benefit. Sections address the following: selecting the right option in relation to…

  14. Sharing the Earth, Kit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    Introducing the pupil to the science of ecology is the purpose of Scholastic's Earth Corps Ecology/Conservation Study Kits for grades 3-6. Simple terms are used to show how all living things are inter-related to their environment, to demonstrate the intricate and delicate balance of nature, and to point out how man's interference with nature's…

  15. Natural Gas Energy Educational Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    Prepared by energy experts and educators to introduce middle school and high school students to natural gas and its role in our society, this kit is designed to be incorporated into existing science and social studies curricula. The materials and activities focus on the origin, discovery, production, delivery, and use of natural gas. The role of…

  16. Care Bears Environmental Awareness Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Greetings Corp., Cleveland, OH.

    Studies show that the three most frequently cited sources of environmental information are family, school, and the media. This kit provides parents with an opportunity to increase a child's environmental awareness through activities which focus on the environment in a way children ages four to nine can understand. A workbook uses the popular Care…

  17. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  18. Basic Teaching Kit on Consumer Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH.

    This advertising kit was developed by Procter and Gamble in response to requests from teachers and consumer educators who asked for materials from business about business. The kit is not intended to cover the entire field of advertising. Rather, it centers on advertising as it is known and practiced by Procter and Gamble. The purpose of the kit is…

  19. 21 CFR 876.5210 - Enema kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enema kit. 876.5210 Section 876.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5210 Enema kit. (a) Identification. An enema kit is...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5210 - Enema kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enema kit. 876.5210 Section 876.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5210 Enema kit. (a) Identification. An enema kit is...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5210 - Enema kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enema kit. 876.5210 Section 876.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5210 Enema kit. (a) Identification. An enema kit is...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5210 - Enema kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enema kit. 876.5210 Section 876.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5210 Enema kit. (a) Identification. An enema kit is...

  3. Multiphysics Applications of ACE3P

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Lee, C. Ko, Z. Li, C.-K. Ng, L. Xiao, G. Cheng, H. Wang

    2012-07-01

    The TEM3P module of ACE3P, a parallel finite-element electromagnetic code suite from SLAC, focuses on the multiphysics simulation capabilities, including thermal and mechanical analysis for accelerator applications. In this pa- per, thermal analysis of coupler feedthroughs to supercon- ducting rf (SRF) cavities will be presented. For the realistic simulation, internal boundary condition is implemented to capture RF heating effects on the surface shared by a di- electric and a conductor. The multiphysics simulation with TEM3P matched the measurement within 0.4%.

  4. Development of an immunochromatographic assay kit using fluorescent silica nanoparticles for rapid diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Toriyama, Koji; Suzuki, Takashi; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshi, Saichi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Aizawa, Hideki; Miyoshi, Kazutomi; Ohkubo, Michio; Hiwatashi, Eiji; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    We developed an immunochromatographic assay kit that uses fluorescent silica nanoparticles bound to anti-Acanthamoeba antibodies (fluorescent immunochromatographic assay [FICGA]) and evaluated its efficacy for the detection of Acanthamoeba and diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). The sensitivity of the FICGA kit was evaluated using samples of Acanthamoeba trophozoites and cysts diluted to various concentrations. A conventional immunochromatographic assay kit with latex labels (LICGA) was also evaluated to determine its sensitivity in detecting Acanthamoeba trophozoites. To check for cross-reactivity, the FICGA was performed by using samples of other common causative pathogens of infectious keratitis, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Candida albicans. Corneal scrapings from patients with suspected AK were tested with the FICGA kit to detect the presence of Acanthamoeba, and the results were compared with those of real-time PCR. The FICGA kit detected organisms at concentrations as low as 5 trophozoites or 40 cysts per sample. There were no cross-reactivities with other pathogens. The FICGA was approximately 20 times more sensitive than the LICGA for the detection of Acanthamoeba trophozoites. The FICGA kit yielded positive results for all 10 patients, which corresponded well with the real-time PCR results. The FICGA kit demonstrated high sensitivity for the detection of Acanthamoeba and may be useful for the diagnosis of AK.

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Kit gene in Chinese indigenous horses.

    PubMed

    Han, Haoyuan; Mao, Chunchun; Chen, Ningbo; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Lei, Chuzhao; Dang, Ruihua

    2016-02-01

    Kit gene is a genetic determinant of horse white coat color which has been a highly valued trait in horses for at least 2,000 years. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Kit are of importance due to their strong associations with melanoblast survival during embryonic development. In this study, a mutation analysis of all 21 Kit exons in 14 Chinese domestic horse breeds revealed six SNPs (g.91214T>G, g.143245T>G, g.164297C>T, g.170189C>T, g.171356C>G, and g.171471G>A), which located in 5'-UTR region, intron 6, exon 15, exon 20, intron 20, and exon 21 of the equine Kit gene, respectively. Subsequently, these six SNPs loci were genotyped in 632 Chinese horses by PCR-RFLP or direct sequencing. The six SNPs together defined 18 haplotypes, demonstrating abundant haplotype diversities in Chinese horses. All the mutant alleles and haplotypes were shared among different breeds. But fewer mutations were detected in horses from China than that from abroad, indicating that Chinese horses belong to a more ancient genetic pool. This study will provide fundamental genetic information for evaluating the genetic diversity of Kit gene in Chinese indigenous horse breeds.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Kit gene in Chinese indigenous horses.

    PubMed

    Han, Haoyuan; Mao, Chunchun; Chen, Ningbo; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Lei, Chuzhao; Dang, Ruihua

    2016-02-01

    Kit gene is a genetic determinant of horse white coat color which has been a highly valued trait in horses for at least 2,000 years. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Kit are of importance due to their strong associations with melanoblast survival during embryonic development. In this study, a mutation analysis of all 21 Kit exons in 14 Chinese domestic horse breeds revealed six SNPs (g.91214T>G, g.143245T>G, g.164297C>T, g.170189C>T, g.171356C>G, and g.171471G>A), which located in 5'-UTR region, intron 6, exon 15, exon 20, intron 20, and exon 21 of the equine Kit gene, respectively. Subsequently, these six SNPs loci were genotyped in 632 Chinese horses by PCR-RFLP or direct sequencing. The six SNPs together defined 18 haplotypes, demonstrating abundant haplotype diversities in Chinese horses. All the mutant alleles and haplotypes were shared among different breeds. But fewer mutations were detected in horses from China than that from abroad, indicating that Chinese horses belong to a more ancient genetic pool. This study will provide fundamental genetic information for evaluating the genetic diversity of Kit gene in Chinese indigenous horse breeds. PMID:27348891

  7. Humoral immune response to oral rabies vaccination in raccoon kits: problems and implications.

    PubMed

    Fry, Tricia L; Vandalen, Kaci K; Shriner, Susan A; Moore, Susan M; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Vercauteren, Kurt C

    2013-06-10

    Little is known about the immunogenicity of RABORAL V-RG(®) (V-RG), an oral rabies vaccine, in raccoon kits (Procyon lotor). The objectives of this study were to characterize the immunogenicity of V-RG in young kits and investigate the potential impact of maternal antibodies on response to vaccination of nursing raccoon kits. Raccoon kits (n=30) were vaccinated at either 3 weeks of age, 7 weeks of age, or assigned as contact controls. Nineteen kits (73%) that were whelped by unvaccinated mothers responded to V-RG exposure (orally or indirect contact) by production of detectable rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) while 7 (27%) kits did not respond to V-RG exposure. Four kits were whelped by a mother with high levels of RVNA and all four kits acquired maternal rabies antibodies. At approximately 9 months of age, all kits were inoculated with a killed rabies vaccine, IMRAB3(®). The kits which initially responded to V-RG oral vaccination or contact with vaccinated littermates demonstrated a rapid anamnestic response. In contrast, the V-RG non-responders and those with acquired maternal antibodies exhibited a primary immune response to IMRAB3(®), where RVNA levels were substantially lower on days 5 and 7 than the levels in the animals with an anamnestic response. These findings suggest that the naïve contact kits and the nonresponsive kits most likely remained susceptible to rabies virus infection whereas the ones demonstrating response to V-RG would not have been susceptible to a rabies virus infection.

  8. Comparison of the Cobas 4800 HPV Test and the Seeplex HPV4A ACE with the Hybrid Capture 2 Test

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Eun Young; Kim, Hee Eun; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Park, Jong-Sup; Kang, Chang Seok; Lee, Ahwon

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is well-known that persistent cervical infections with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) are related to the development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer and that infection with HPV 16 and HPV 18 accounts for approximately 70% of all cases of invasive cervical cancer. Methods: We performed 3 HPV molecular tests―the Cobas 4800 HPV test, the Seeplex HPV4A ACE, and the hybrid capture 2 (HC2) test―in 146 cervical swab samples to compare between these three tests. Results: There was a concordance rate of 82.8% between the results of the Cobas 4800 HPV and the HC2 test and a concordance rate of 84.9% between the results of the Seeplex HPV4A ACE and the HC2 test. Between the Cobas 4800 HPV test and the Seeplex HPV4A ACE, there was a concordance rate of 89.6% in the detection of high-risk HPV between the results and a concordance rate of 98.7% in the detection of HPV 16 or 18. When an abnormal Pap test was defined as ≥low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), the sensitivity of the Cobas 4800 HPV test, the Seeplex HPV4A ACE and the HC2 test were 71.1%, 80.0%, and 88.9%, respectively, while their specificities were 76.4%, 74.5%, and 67.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the Cobas 4800 HPV test and the Seeplex HPV4A ACE may be as effective as the HC2 test in detecting HR HPV and that the concordance between the results of the Cobas 4800 HPV test and the Seeplex HDV4A ACE may be higher in the detection of HPV 16 and HPV18 than concerning high-risk HPV. PMID:23329882

  9. The FOT tool kit concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatig, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Flight operations and the preparation for it has become increasingly complex as mission complexities increase. Further, the mission model dictates that a significant increase in flight operations activities is upon us. Finally, there is a need for process improvement and economy in the operations arena. It is therefore time that we recognize flight operations as a complex process requiring a defined, structured, and life cycle approach vitally linked to space segment, ground segment, and science operations processes. With this recognition, an FOT Tool Kit consisting of six major components designed to provide tools to guide flight operations activities throughout the mission life cycle was developed. The major components of the FOT Tool Kit and the concepts behind the flight operations life cycle process as developed at NASA's GSFC for GSFC-based missions are addressed. The Tool Kit is therefore intended to increase productivity, quality, cost, and schedule performance of the flight operations tasks through the use of documented, structured methodologies; knowledge of past lessons learned and upcoming new technology; and through reuse and sharing of key products and special application programs made possible through the development of standardized key products and special program directories.

  10. Sex Hormones Promote Opposite Effects on ACE and ACE2 Activity, Hypertrophy and Cardiac Contractility in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalpiaz, P. L. M.; Lamas, A. Z.; Caliman, I. F.; Ribeiro, R. F.; Abreu, G. R.; Moyses, M. R.; Andrade, T. U.; Gouvea, S. A.; Alves, M. F.; Carmona, A. K.; Bissoli, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in sex differences and RAS components. However, whether gender influences cardiac angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) activity is still unknown. In the present work, we determined the relationship between ACE and ACE2 activity, left ventricular function and gender in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Methodology / Principal Findings Twelve-week-old female (F) and male (M) SHRs were divided into 2 experimental groups (n = 7 in each group): sham (S) and gonadectomized (G). Fifty days after gonadectomy, we measured positive and negative first derivatives (dP/dt maximum left ventricle (LV) and dP/dt minimum LV, respectively), hypertrophy (morphometric analysis) and ACE and ACE2 catalytic activity (fluorimetrically). Expression of calcium handling proteins was measured by western blot. Male rats exhibited higher cardiac ACE and ACE2 activity as well as hypertrophy compared to female rats. Orchiectomy decreased the activity of these enzymes and hypertrophy, while ovariectomy increased hypertrophy and ACE2, but did not change ACE activity. For cardiac function, the male sham group had a lower +dP/dt than the female sham group. After gonadectomy, the +dP/dt increased in males and reduced in females. The male sham group had a lower -dP/dt than the female group. After gonadectomy, the -dP/dt increased in the male and decreased in the female groups when compared to the sham group. No difference was observed among the groups in SERCA2a protein expression. Gonadectomy increased protein expression of PLB (phospholamban) and the PLB to SERCA2a ratio in female rats, but did not change in male rats. Conclusion Ovariectomy leads to increased cardiac hypertrophy, ACE2 activity, PLB expression and PLB to SERCA2a ratio, and worsening of hemodynamic variables, whereas in males the removal of testosterone has the opposite effects on RAS components. PMID:26010093

  11. ACE: A Collaborative School Consultation Program for Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Caroline; Massé, Line

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a description of ACE (Accompagnement collaboratif des enseignants (Collaborative teacher accompaniment)), a new program designed to guide secondary school teachers in integrating students with behavioral problems in their classrooms. ACE proposes collaborative accompaniment inspired by behavioral and mental health…

  12. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion. PMID:23145508

  13. Association of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1-ILE105VAL and ACE I/D polymorphisms with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    İnal, Esra Erkol; Görükmez, Orhan; Eroğlu, Selma; Görükmez, Özlem; Solak, Özlem; Topak, Ali; Yakut, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown origin. The aim of this study is to clarify the relationships between susceptibility and severity of AS and GST-mu1 (GSTM1), GST-theta1 (GSTT1), GST-pi1 (GSTP1)-Ile105Val and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphisms in AS patients. One hundred thirty-eight AS patients and seventy-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of the AS patients were recorded. The scores of the numeric rating scale (NRS) pain, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Activity Index, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index were calculated. The genotypes distributions and allele frequencies of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1-Ile105Val and ACE I/D polymorphisms were compared between patients and healthy controls. The Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods were used to detect the polymorphisms of ACE I/D, the GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes and the GSTP1-Ile105Val polymorphism, respectively. There were significantly higher levels of the GSTT1 null and the ACE II genotypes in AS patients compared to those in healthy controls (p = 0.002 and 0.005, respectively). We found significantly higher levels of CRP and the NRS pain scores in the patients with ACE ID or DD genotypes compared to those in the patients with ACE II genotypes (p = 0.005 and 0.035, respectively). The present results showed that genes involved in protection from oxidative stress and ACE gene may influence disease development and course in AS.

  14. Desert Dust Layers Over Polluted Marine Boundary Layers: ACE-2 Measurements and ACE-Asia Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosols in ACE-Asia are expected to have some commonalties with those in ACE-2, along with important differences. Among the commonalities are occurrences of desert dust layers over polluted marine boundary layers. Differences include the nature of the dust (yellowish in the East Asia desert outflow, vs. reddish-brown in the Sahara Outflow measured in ACE-2) and the composition of boundary-layer aerosols (e.g., more absorbing, soot and organic aerosol in-the Asian plume, caused by coal and biomass burning, with limited controls). In this paper we present ACE-2 measurements and analyses as a guide to our plans for ACE-2 Asia. The measurements include: (1) Vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth and extinction (380-1558 nm), and of water vapor column and concentration, from the surface through the elevated desert dust, measured by the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14); (2) Comparisons of airborne and shipborne sunphotometer optical depths to satellite-retrieved values, with and without desert dust; (3) Comparisons between airborne Sunphotometer optical depth and extinction spectra and those derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption; (4) Comparisons between size distributions measured in situ and retrieved from sunphotometer optical depth spectra; (5) Comparisons between aerosol single scattering albedo values obtained by several techniques, using various combinations of measurements of backscatter, extinction, size distribution, scattering, absorption, and radiative flux. We show how analyses of these data can be used to address questions important to ACE-Asia, such as: (1) How do dust and other absorbing aerosols affect the accuracy of satellite optical depth retrievals? How important are asphericity effects? (2) How important are supermicron dust and seasalt aerosols to overall aerosol optical depth and radiative forcing? How well are these aerosols sampled by aircraft

  15. Lysozyme and bilirubin bind to ACE and regulate its conformation and shedding

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Sergei M.; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Akinbi, Henry T.; Nesterovitch, Andrew B.; Epshtein, Yuliya; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Kryukova, Olga V.; Piegeler, Tobias; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Kost, Olga A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) hydrolyzes numerous peptides and is a critical participant in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. Elevated tissue ACE levels are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Blood ACE concentrations are determined by proteolytic cleavage of ACE from the endothelial cell surface, a process that remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified a novel ACE gene mutation (Arg532Trp substitution in the N domain of somatic ACE) that increases blood ACE activity 7-fold and interrogated the mechanism by which this mutation significantly increases blood ACE levels. We hypothesized that this ACE mutation disrupts the binding site for blood components which may stabilize ACE conformation and diminish ACE shedding. We identified the ACE-binding protein in the blood as lysozyme and also a Low Molecular Weight (LMW) ACE effector, bilirubin, which act in concert to regulate ACE conformation and thereby influence ACE shedding. These results provide mechanistic insight into the elevated blood level of ACE observed in patients on ACE inhibitor therapy and elevated blood lysozyme and ACE levels in sarcoidosis patients. PMID:27734897

  16. Egg ovotransferrin‐derived ACE inhibitory peptide IRW increases ACE2 but decreases proinflammatory genes expression in mesenteric artery of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Kaustav; Liang, Guanxiang; Chen, Yanhong; Guan, LeLuo; Davidge, Sandra T.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Egg ovotransferrin‐derived angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide IRW was previously shown to reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats through reduced vascular inflammation and increased nitric oxide‐mediated vasorelaxation. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of this peptide through transcriptome analysis by RNAseq technique. Methods and results Total RNA was extracted from kidney and mesenteric arteries; the RNAseq libraries (from untreated and IRW‐treated groups) were constructed and subjected to sequence using HiSeq 2000 system (Illumina) system. A total of 12 764 and 13 352 genes were detected in kidney and mesenteric arteries, respectively. The differentially expressed (DE) genes between untreated and IRW‐treated groups were identified and the functional analysis through ingenuity pathway analysis revealed a greater role of DE genes identified from mesenteric arteries than that of kidney in modulating various cardiovascular functions. Subsequent qPCR analysis further confirmed that IRW significantly increased the expression of ACE‐2, ABCB‐1, IRF‐8, and CDH‐1 while significantly decreased the expression ICAM‐1 and VCAM‐1 in mesenteric arteries. Conclusion Our research showed for the first time that ACE inhibitory peptide IRW could contribute to its antihypertensive activity through increased ACE2 and decreased proinflammatory genes expression. PMID:26016560

  17. Evaluation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), its homologue ACE2 and neprilysin in angiotensin peptide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    In the RAS (renin–angiotensin system), Ang I (angiotensin I) is cleaved by ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) to form Ang II (angiotensin II), which has effects on blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis. We have examined the kinetics of angiotensin peptide cleavage by full-length human ACE, the separate N- and C-domains of ACE, the homologue of ACE, ACE2, and NEP (neprilysin). The activity of the enzyme preparations was determined by active-site titrations using competitive tight-binding inhibitors and fluorogenic substrates. Ang I was effectively cleaved by NEP to Ang (1–7) (kcat/Km of 6.2×105 M−1·s−1), but was a poor substrate for ACE2 (kcat/Km of 3.3×104 M−1·s−1). Ang (1–9) was a better substrate for NEP than ACE (kcat/Km of 3.7×105 M−1·s−1 compared with kcat/Km of 6.8×104 M−1·s−1). Ang II was cleaved efficiently by ACE2 to Ang (1–7) (kcat/Km of 2.2×106 M−1·s−1) and was cleaved by NEP (kcat/Km of 2.2×105 M−1·s−1) to several degradation products. In contrast with a previous report, Ang (1–7), like Ang I and Ang (1–9), was cleaved with a similar efficiency by both the N- and C-domains of ACE (kcat/Km of 3.6×105 M−1·s−1 compared with kcat/Km of 3.3×105 M−1·s−1). The two active sites of ACE exhibited negative co-operativity when either Ang I or Ang (1–7) was the substrate. In addition, a range of ACE inhibitors failed to inhibit ACE2. These kinetic data highlight that the flux of peptides through the RAS is complex, with the levels of ACE, ACE2 and NEP dictating whether vasoconstriction or vasodilation will predominate. PMID:15283675

  18. Pathological Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch in the stressed heart is transcriptionally controlled by the endothelial Brg1-FoxM1 complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Feng, Xuhui; Zhou, Qiong; Cheng, Wei; Shang, Ching; Han, Pei; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Quertermous, Thomas; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2016-09-20

    Genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzymes (Ace and Ace2) are essential for heart function regulation. Cardiac stress enhances Ace, but suppresses Ace2, expression in the heart, leading to a net production of angiotensin II that promotes cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The regulatory mechanism that underlies the Ace2-to-Ace pathological switch, however, is unknown. Here we report that the Brahma-related gene-1 (Brg1) chromatin remodeler and forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) transcription factor cooperate within cardiac (coronary) endothelial cells of pathologically stressed hearts to trigger the Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch, angiotensin I-to-II conversion, and cardiac hypertrophy. In mice, cardiac stress activates the expression of Brg1 and FoxM1 in endothelial cells. Once activated, Brg1 and FoxM1 form a protein complex on Ace and Ace2 promoters to concurrently activate Ace and repress Ace2, tipping the balance to Ace2 expression with enhanced angiotensin II production, leading to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Disruption of endothelial Brg1 or FoxM1 or chemical inhibition of FoxM1 abolishes the stress-induced Ace2-to-Ace switch and protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy. In human hypertrophic hearts, BRG1 and FOXM1 expression is also activated in endothelial cells; their expression levels correlate strongly with the ACE/ACE2 ratio, suggesting a conserved mechanism. Our studies demonstrate a molecular interaction of Brg1 and FoxM1 and an endothelial mechanism of modulating Ace/Ace2 ratio for heart failure therapy.

  19. Pathological Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch in the stressed heart is transcriptionally controlled by the endothelial Brg1-FoxM1 complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Feng, Xuhui; Zhou, Qiong; Cheng, Wei; Shang, Ching; Han, Pei; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Quertermous, Thomas; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2016-09-20

    Genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzymes (Ace and Ace2) are essential for heart function regulation. Cardiac stress enhances Ace, but suppresses Ace2, expression in the heart, leading to a net production of angiotensin II that promotes cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The regulatory mechanism that underlies the Ace2-to-Ace pathological switch, however, is unknown. Here we report that the Brahma-related gene-1 (Brg1) chromatin remodeler and forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) transcription factor cooperate within cardiac (coronary) endothelial cells of pathologically stressed hearts to trigger the Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch, angiotensin I-to-II conversion, and cardiac hypertrophy. In mice, cardiac stress activates the expression of Brg1 and FoxM1 in endothelial cells. Once activated, Brg1 and FoxM1 form a protein complex on Ace and Ace2 promoters to concurrently activate Ace and repress Ace2, tipping the balance to Ace2 expression with enhanced angiotensin II production, leading to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Disruption of endothelial Brg1 or FoxM1 or chemical inhibition of FoxM1 abolishes the stress-induced Ace2-to-Ace switch and protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy. In human hypertrophic hearts, BRG1 and FOXM1 expression is also activated in endothelial cells; their expression levels correlate strongly with the ACE/ACE2 ratio, suggesting a conserved mechanism. Our studies demonstrate a molecular interaction of Brg1 and FoxM1 and an endothelial mechanism of modulating Ace/Ace2 ratio for heart failure therapy. PMID:27601681

  20. Inhibition of ACE Retards Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Signs of Neuronal Degeneration in Aged Rats Subjected to Chronic Mild Stress.

    PubMed

    AbdAlla, Said; El Hakim, Ahmed; Abdelbaset, Ahmed; Elfaramawy, Yasser; Quitterer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of age-associated dementia are on the rise worldwide. Treatment approaches for dementia are insufficient and novel therapies are not readily available. In this context repurposing of established drugs appears attractive. A well-established class of cardiovascular drugs, which targets the angiotensin II system, is such a candidate, which currently undergoes a paradigm shift with regard to the potential benefit for treatment of neurodegenerative symptoms. In search for additional evidence, we subjected aged rats to chronic unpredictable mild stress, which is known to enhance the development of AD-related neuropathological features. We report here that four weeks of chronic mild stress induced a strong upregulation of the hippocampal angiotensin-converting enzyme (Ace) at gene expression and protein level. Concomitantly, tau protein hyperphosphorylation developed. Signs of neurodegeneration were detected by the significant downregulation of neuronal structure proteins such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and synuclein-gamma (Sncg). Ace was involved in neurodegenerative symptoms because treatment with the brain-penetrating ACE inhibitor, captopril, retarded tau hyperphosphorylation and signs of neurodegeneration. Moreover, ACE inhibitor treatment could counteract glutamate neurotoxicity by preventing the downregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2). Taken together, ACE inhibition targets neurodegeneration triggered by environmental stress. PMID:26697495

  1. Inhibition of ACE Retards Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Signs of Neuronal Degeneration in Aged Rats Subjected to Chronic Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    AbdAlla, Said; el Hakim, Ahmed; Abdelbaset, Ahmed; Elfaramawy, Yasser; Quitterer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of age-associated dementia are on the rise worldwide. Treatment approaches for dementia are insufficient and novel therapies are not readily available. In this context repurposing of established drugs appears attractive. A well-established class of cardiovascular drugs, which targets the angiotensin II system, is such a candidate, which currently undergoes a paradigm shift with regard to the potential benefit for treatment of neurodegenerative symptoms. In search for additional evidence, we subjected aged rats to chronic unpredictable mild stress, which is known to enhance the development of AD-related neuropathological features. We report here that four weeks of chronic mild stress induced a strong upregulation of the hippocampal angiotensin-converting enzyme (Ace) at gene expression and protein level. Concomitantly, tau protein hyperphosphorylation developed. Signs of neurodegeneration were detected by the significant downregulation of neuronal structure proteins such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and synuclein-gamma (Sncg). Ace was involved in neurodegenerative symptoms because treatment with the brain-penetrating ACE inhibitor, captopril, retarded tau hyperphosphorylation and signs of neurodegeneration. Moreover, ACE inhibitor treatment could counteract glutamate neurotoxicity by preventing the downregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2). Taken together, ACE inhibition targets neurodegeneration triggered by environmental stress. PMID:26697495

  2. Usefulness of ED036 kit for measuring serum PIVKA-II levels in small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuromatsu, R; Tanaka, M; Shimauchi, Y; Shimada, M; Tanikawa, K; Watanabe, K; Yokoo, T

    1997-08-01

    As a tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), serum protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) has high specificity, yet its sensitivity is relatively low, marking it less suitable to serve as an adjunct in the diagnosis of small HCC. Recently, the ED036 kit (Eisai, Tokyo, Japan), whose detection limit is approximately ten times superior to that of a conventional kit (Eitest MONOP II, Eisai) has been developed. In this study, serum PIVKA-II levels in serum samples from 83 patients with benign chronic liver diseases (CLD) and 129 patients with HCC were measured with those two kits. With the ED036 kit, the cut-off value was set at 40 mAU/ml. For PIVKA-II measured with the ED036 kit, sensitivity was 45.0%, specificity 92.8%, and accuracy 63.7%, when we discriminated patients with HCC from those with CLD without HCC. While maintaining a high specificity, of 92.8%, the ED036 kit showed a significantly higher sensitivity than the conventional kit (45.0% versus 27.9%; P < 0.0001). With patients who had HCC consisting of a single nodule 30 mm or less in diameter, the positivity rate for serum PIVKA-II with the ED036 kit was significantly greater than the rate with the conventional kit (21.4% versus 9.5%; P < 0.005). Thus, the ED036 kit was thought to be more useful than the conventional kit as a tumor marker for small HCC.

  3. Expression of the lipid transfer protein Ace-AMP1 in transgenic wheat enhances antifungal activity and defense responses.

    PubMed

    Roy-Barman, Subhankar; Sautter, Christof; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2006-08-01

    To enhance fungal disease resistance, wheat plants (cv. Bobwhite) were engineered to constitutively express the potent antimicrobial protein Ace-AMP1 from Allium cepa, driven by a maize ubiquitin promoter along with its first intron. The bar gene was used for selection of putative transformants on medium containing phosphinothricin (PPT). Transgene inheritance, integration and stability of expression were confirmed over two generations by PCR, Southern, northern and western blot analyses, respectively. The levels of Ace-AMP1 in different transgenic lines correlated with the transcript levels of the transgene. Up to 50% increase in resistance to Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici was detected in detached leaf assays. In ears of transgenic wheat inoculated with Neovossia indica, Ace-AMP1 intensified expression of defense-related genes. Elevated levels of salicylic acid and of transcripts of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), glucanase (PR2) and chitinase (PR3) in the transgenic plants indicated manifestation of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). PMID:16906444

  4. Aflatoxin plate kit. Performance Tested Method 081003.

    PubMed

    Trombley, Arthur; Fan, Titan; LaBudde, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The level of total aflatoxin contamination was analyzed in naturally contaminated and spiked samples of corn and peanut using the Aflatoxin Plate Kit. This kit is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suitable for rapid testing of grains and peanuts. The assay was evaluated for ruggedness and linearity of the standard curve. The test kit results were then statistically evaluated for accuracy, precision, and correlation to a validated HPLC method (AOAC 994.08). The results were verified by an independent laboratory.

  5. ACE Inhibitor in the treatment of cutaneous and lymphatic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kaura, Vinod; Kaura, Samantha H; Kaura, Claire S

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme is used as a marker for sarcoid activity. We describe a case of remission of cutaneous and lymphatic sarcoidosis in a patient treated with an ACE inhibitor for congestive heart failure and hypertension; the remission has continued over 4 years of follow-up. Because this is a report of only one case, there is a possibility of sampling error. Whether the patient's remission in this case was a serendipitous spontaneous remission that happened to occur during ACE inhibitor therapy or whether ACE inhibitor therapy can play a role in the treatment of sarcoidosis needs to be determined in a large clinical trial.

  6. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  7. Comparison of detection of Bovine virus diarrhea virus antigen in various types of tissue and fluid samples collected from persistently infected cattle.

    PubMed

    VanderLey, Brian; Ridpath, Julia; Sweiger, Shaun

    2011-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses are economically important pathogens of cattle. Most infections in susceptible animals are acquired from animals persistently infected with the virus. Surveillance programs rely on skin biopsies of persistently infected (PI) cattle to detect the infection. The purpose of this study was to compare antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACE) testing results using different types of samples from PI animals. The intent was to determine comparative detection rates in types of samples that are frequently submitted to diagnostic laboratories for evaluation of cases of unknown etiology or samples that could be easily collected for Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) screening. Eight types of samples were collected from 40 PI animals. The sample types were ear notches, serum, nasal swabs, conjunctival swabs, oral swabs, rectal swabs, vaginal/preputial swabs, and a tail skin fold biopsy. Each type of sample (n  =  8) for each animal (n  =  40) was evaluated with a commercial ACE kit. When using ACE, tail-skin fold and nasal swab samples were 100% sensitive compared with results using ear notches. Sensitivity using other samples was as follows: serum and vaginal/preputial swabs, 92%; conjunctival swabs, 64%; rectal swabs, 10%; oral swabs, 8%. Testing of tail skin fold biopsies, nasal swabs, and ear notch samples resulted in reliable results. In contrast, other sample types were unreliable for diagnosis of persistent infection in calves.

  8. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... liquid hazardous materials contained in the kits. The contents must be separated, placed, or packed, and... materials within the kits must not contain more than 250 ml for liquids or 250 g for solids per receptacle... the following requirements: (1) The kits may only contain hazardous materials for which...

  9. The Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Validation Project: Overview and results from ten years of ACE operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kaley; Strong, Kimberly

    2014-05-01

    As of February 2014, the Canadian-led Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite mission has been making measurements of the Earth's atmosphere for ten years. As ACE operations have extended beyond the initial two-year mission, there is a continuing need to validate the trace gas data products from the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instruments. Ground-based measurements provide critical data for the validation of satellite retrievals of trace gases and for the assessment of long-term stability of these measurements. In particular, validation comparisons are needed for ACE during Arctic springtime to understand better the measurements of species involved in stratospheric ozone chemistry. To this end, eleven Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Validation Campaigns have been conducted during the spring period (February - April in 2004 - 2014) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W). This period coincides with the most chemically active time of year in the Arctic, as well as a significant number of satellite overpasses. A suite of as many as 12 ground-based instruments, as well as frequent balloon-borne ozonesonde and radiosonde launches, have been used in each campaign. These instruments include: a ground-based version of the ACE-FTS (PARIS - Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer), a terrestrial version of the ACE-MAESTRO, a SunPhotoSpectrometer, two zenith-viewing UV-visible grating spectrometers, a Bomem DA8 Fourier transform spectrometer, a Bruker 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer, a Systeme d'Analyse par Observations Zenithales (SAOZ) instrument, and several Brewer spectrophotometers. In the past several years, these results have been used to validate the measurements by the ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO instruments on SCISAT as well

  10. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University assist in guiding the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) as it is hoisted over a platform for solar array installation in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The ACE observatory will contribute to the understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  11. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory Engineer Cliff Willey (kneeling) and Engineering Assistant Jim Hutcheson from Johns Hopkins University install solar array panels on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles for a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  12. ACE inhibition can improve orthostatic proteinuria associated with nutcracker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Sun; Lee, Eun-Ju

    2006-11-01

    Left renal vein entrapment syndrome (nutcracker syndrome) was documented by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as a cause of orthostatic proteinuria in a 14-year-old girl female adolescent. Because of continuous proteinuria we performed a left renal biopsy which showed moderate mesangial hypercellularity. Her overt orthostatic proteinuria disappeared after a treatment of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. Nutcracker syndrome remains a rare but important cause of elevated protein excretion, which can induce mesangial changes and be improved by ACE inhibitor treatment.

  13. Standards for Excellence in Education. [Multimedia Kit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Basic Education, Washington, DC.

    This multimedia kit contains information on academic standards and includes supplementary materials. The kit includes a 286-page book that presents condensed, edited, and commonly formatted versions of national standards in the arts, civics, foreign languages, geography, history, and science. Mathematics and English-language arts standards have…

  14. Kid's PACK: Population Awareness Campaign Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This fun and educational kit is designed specifically for elementary students. The "Kid's PACK" (Population Awareness Campaign Kit) entertains and informs children on the environment and human population growth through stories, games, and concrete ideas for making a difference. In three booklets, the "Kid's PACK" offers elementary students…

  15. Anatomy of a Minicourse. Audiovisual Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rex

    This kit explains the use of minicourses at Macquarie University in New South Wales, Australia, which were designed for the inservice training of teachers. The kit contains the script of the audio commentary, a cassette tape, color slides, and a booklet entitled "Anatomy of the Minicourse." The tape briefly describes the minicourses in general and…

  16. Building Use Policies. SPEC Kit 144.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Patrick

    This Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) flyer/kit addresses some of the needs of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members regarding library building use and the aesthetics and well-being of the materials and people in the building. The kit draws upon documents gathered as part of a 1986 Quick-SPEC survey that dealt with food and…

  17. Features of the Java commodity grid kit.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Rehn, N.; Russell, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we report on the features of the Java Commodity Grid Kit (Java CoG Kit). The Java CoG Kit provides middleware for accessing Grid functionality from the Java framework. Java CoG Kit middleware is general enough to design a variety of advanced Grid applications with quite different user requirements. Access to the Grid is established via Globus Toolkit protocols, allowing the Java CoG Kit to also communicate with the services distributed as part of the C Globus Toolkit reference implementation. Thus, the Java CoG Kit provides Grid developers with the ability to utilize the Grid, as well as numerous additional libraries and frameworks developed by the Java community to enable network, Internet, enterprise and peer-to-peer computing. A variety of projects have successfully used the client libraries of the Java CoG Kit to access Grids driven by the C Globus Toolkit software. In this paper we also report on the efforts to develop serverside Java CoG Kit components. As part of this research we have implemented a prototype pure Java resource management system that enables one to run Grid jobs on platforms on which a Java virtual machine is supported, including Windows NT machines.

  18. Culture Kits for the Elementary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, M. Gail

    1997-01-01

    Outlines an instructional unit where students construct culture kits illustrating a specific culture. Culture kits are constructed out of realia and other material including maps, travel brochures, photographs, newspapers, souvenirs, and other items. Discusses collecting these items and possible multicultural applications. (MJP)

  19. The Project Manager's Tool Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, W. Scott

    2003-01-01

    Project managers are rarely described as being funny. Moreover, a good sense of humor rarely seems to be one of the deciding factors in choosing someone to be a project manager, or something that pops up as a major discussion point at an annual performance review. Perhaps this is because people think you aren't serious about your work if you laugh. I disagree with this assessment, but that's not really my point. As I talk to people either pursuing a career in project management, or broadening their assignment to include project management, I encourage them to consider what tools they need to be successful. I suggest that they consider any strength they have to be part of their Project Management (PM) Tool Kit, and being funny could be one of the tools they need.

  20. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TESTING OF THREE IMMUNOASSAY TEST KITS FOR ANTHRAX, BOTULINUM TOXIN AND RICIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunoassay test kits are based on immunoassay methods, where specific antibodies are used to detect and measure the contaminants of interest. Immunoassay test kits rely on the reaction of a contaminant or antigen with a selective antibody to give a product that can be measures....

  1. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE INDUSTRIAL TEST SYSTEM, INC. CYANIDE REAGENTSTRIP™ TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanide can be present in various forms in water. The cyanide test kit evaluated in this verification study (Industrial Test System, Inc. Cyanide Regent Strip ™ Test Kit) was designed to detect free cyanide in water. This is done by converting cyanide in water to cyanogen...

  2. Comparison of the Simplexa™ Flu A/B & RSV kit (nucleic acid extraction-dependent assay) and the Prodessa ProFlu+™ assay for detecting influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Bambach, Adrienne V; Leber, Amy L; Patru, Maria-Magdalena; Patel, Anami; Menegus, Marilyn A

    2014-09-01

    The relative performance of 2 widely used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, the Focus diagnostics Simplexa™ Flu A/B & RSV kit (nucleic acid extraction-dependent assay) and the Prodessa Proflu+™ assay, was evaluated using 735 prospectively and retrospectively collected nasopharyngeal swab specimens. Overall, the assays showed positive and negative agreements of 100% and 99.7% for influenza A, 98.1% and 99.9% for influenza B, and 99.3% and 99.5% for respiratory syncytial virus. The relative analytical sensitivity of the 2 assays was also similar.

  3. New and Improved Infrared Spectroscopy of Halogen-Containing Species for ACE-FTS Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2014-06-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), onboard the SCISAT-1 satellite, is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) instrument covering the 750-4400 cm-1 spectral region in solar occultation mode. Launched in August 2003, the ACE-FTS has been taking atmospheric measurements for over ten years. With long atmospheric pathlengths (˜300 km) and the sun as a radiation source, the ACE-FTS provides a low detection threshold for trace species in the atmosphere. In fact, it measures the vertical profiles of more molecules in the atmosphere than any other satellite instrument.

    Fluorine- and chlorine-containing molecules in the atmosphere are very strong greenhouse gases, meaning that even small amounts of these gases contribute significantly to the radiative forcing of climate. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are regulated by the 1987 Montreal Protocol because they deplete the ozone layer. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which do not deplete the ozone layer and are not regulated by the Montreal Protocol, have been introduced as replacements for CFCs and HCFCs. HFCs have global-warming potentials many times greater than carbon dioxide, and are increasing in the atmosphere at a very fast rate. The quantification of the atmospheric abundances of such molecules from measurements taken by the ACE-FTS and other satellite instruments crucially requires accurate quantitative infrared spectroscopy. HITRAN contains absorption cross section datasets for a number of these species, but many of them have minor deficiencies that introduce systematic errors into satellite retrievals. This talk will focus on new and improved laboratory measurements for a number of important halogenated species.

  4. Investigation of interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors in various buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Arayne, Muhammad Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Abbas, Hira Fatima

    2015-02-01

    This work describes a RP-HPLC method for the determination and interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors (captopril, enalapril and lisinopril) in various buffers. The separation and interaction of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors was achieved on a Purospher Star, C18 (5 μm, 250 × 4.6 mm) column. Mobile phase consisted of methanol: water (80:20, v/v, pH 3.3); however, for the separation of lisinopril, it was modified to methanol-water (40:60, v/v, pH 3.3) and pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. In all cases, UV detection was performed at 225 nm. Interactions were carried out in physiological pH i.e., pH 1 (simulated gastric juice), 4 (simulated full stomach), 7.4 (blood pH) and 9 (simulated GI), drug contents were analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Method was found linear in the concentration range of 1.0-50.0 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999. Precision (RSD%) was less than 2.0%, indicating good precision of the method and accuracy was 98.0-100.0%. Furthermore, cefpirome-ACE-inhibitors' complexes were also synthesized and results were elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, and 1H NMR. The interaction results show that these interactions are pH dependent and for the co-administration of cefpirome and ACE-inhibitors, a proper interval should be given.

  5. Intratumoral CD3+ T-lymphocytes immunoexpression and its association with c-Kit, angiogenesis, and overall survival in malignant canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Pires, Isabel; Dias, Marlene; Prada, Justina; Gregório, Hugo; Lobo, Luis; Queiroga, Felisbina

    2015-01-01

    In this study 80 malignant CMT were submitted to immunohistochemical detection of CD3, c-kit, VEGF, and CD31, together with clinicopathological parameters of tumor aggressiveness. CD3+ T-cells and c-kit overexpression revealed a positive correlation with VEGF (r = 0.503, P < 0.0001; r = 0.284, P = 0.023 for CD3 and c-kit, resp.) and CD31 (r = 0.654, P < 0.0001; r = 0.365, P = 0.003 for CD3 and c-kit, resp.). A significant association (P = 0.039) and a positive correlation (r = 0.263, P = 0.039) between CD3 and c-kit were also observed. High CD3/VEGF, c-kit/VEGF, and CD3/c-kit tumors were associated with elevated grade of malignancy (P < 0.0001 for all groups), presence of intravascular emboli (P < 0.0001 for CD3/VEGF and CD3/c-kit; P = 0.002 for c-kit/VEGF), and presence of lymph node metastasis (P < 0.0001 for all groups). Tumors with high CD3/VEGF (P = 0.006), c-kit/VEGF (P < 0.0001), and CD3/c-kit (P = 0.002) were associated with poor prognosis. Interestingly high c-kit/VEGF tumors retained their significance by multivariate analysis arising as independent prognostic factor. PMID:26346272

  6. [Evaluation of a self-prepared anti-WNV-IgG diagnostic ELISA kit with a panel of serum samples collected from the people from areas in which West Nile fever is endemic].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Shao, Qiang; Zhang, Li-Ping; Zhen, Wei; Wu, Xue-Min; Ma, Xue-Zheng; Zhao, Yong; Hu, Kong-Xin

    2014-09-01

    In view of that there is no report of west Nile virus infection cases in our country, evaluation the self-prepared anti-WNV-IgG diagnostic ELISA kit should be employed with the establishment of the serum sample panel collected from the entry personnel. All individuals of entry personnel were traveled from epidemic area of infectious west Nile disease. In our study, the serum samples were both detected by self-prepared anti-WNV-IgG diagnostic ELISA kit and the FDA certified kits ,which are FOCUS West Nile Virus IgG Dxselect and Panbio Dengue IgG Capture ELISA kits. The self-prepared kit and FDA certified kits were compared and assessed simultaneously. Furthermore, the specificity, repeatability and stability of the kits were also evaluated. The results indicated that no significant difference of detective rates (35. 6% for self-prepared kit vs. 32.5% for FOCUS kit, χ2 = 3. 05, P > 0.05) and good consistency (Kappa = 0.8372) between the self-prepared kit and FDA certified kits. Also, the positive coincidence rate, the negative coincidence rate and the total coincidence rate were calculated as 91.18%, 95.34% and 92.66%, respectively. The laboratory self-developed kit presented similar quality as the counterpart kits with FDA certificate. The development of our self-prepared anti-WNV-IgG diagnostic ELISA kit will provide technical support for the prevention and control of west Nile virus entry.

  7. Climate-active Trace Gases from ACE Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.; Brown, A.; Harrison, J.; Chipperfield, M.; Boone, C.; Wilson, C.; Walker, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    ACE (also known as SCISAT) is making a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of more than 30 trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-1) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. Launched by NASA in August 2003 for a nominal two-year mission, ACE performance remains excellent after 8 years in orbit. Volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles of sixteen halogenated trace gases are routinely retrieved from ACE-FTS atmospheric spectra: CCl4, CF4, CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), C2Cl3F3 (CFC-113), CH3Cl, ClONO2, COF2, COCl2, COClF, CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3CCl2F (HCFC-141b), CH3CClF2 (HCFC-142b), HCl, HF and SF6. ACE also provides VMR profiles for CH4, N2O and OCS; HCFC-23 (CHF3) is a recent research product. ACE-FTS measurements were compared to surface measurements made by the AGAGE network and output from the SLIMCAT three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model, which is constrained by similar surface data. ACE-FTS measurements of CFCs (and HCl) show declining trends which agree with both AGAGE and SLIMCAT values. The concentrations of HCFCs are increasing with ACE-FTS, SLIMCAT and AGAGE all showing positive trends. These results illustrate the success of the Montreal Protocol in reducing ozone depleting substances. The replacement of CFCs with HCFCs has led to an increase in the VMR of HF in the stratosphere. As chlorine containing compounds continue to be phased out and replaced by fluorine-containing molecules, it is likely that total atmospheric fluorine will continue increasing in the near future. These species are all powerful greenhouse gases. ACE provides near global VMR

  8. Evaluation of GenoFlow Thrombophilia Array Test Kit in Its Detection of Mutations in Factor V Leiden (G1691A), Prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T and A1298C in Blood Samples from 113 Turkish Female Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, Ebru; Ergun, Sezen Guntekin; Percin, Ferda E.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombophilia is a heritable blood disease characterized by an increased tendency to form abnormal blood clots that can block blood vessels. In obstetrics and gynecology, it has been shown by a number of reports that a proportion of recurrent miscarriages involve thrombophilia-related mutations, in particular, Factor V G1691A, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T and A1298C. In this study, we examined the frequency of these four mutations in 113 female Turkish patients who had prior complications in pregnancy, using the DiagCor GenoFlow Thrombophilia Array Test kit. Heterozygous MTHFR C677T and A1298C mutations were detected in 46% of the patients, and among these patients, 60% of them carried double heterozygous mutations. In contrast, the heterozygous Factor V G1691A and prothrombin G20210A were detected only in a smaller number of patients, respectively, 13% and 3%. The GenoFlow kit demonstrated 100% concordance with results from Sanger sequencing, which can be translated into sensitivity and specificity both at 100% within this series of patients. PMID:25153695

  9. Direct qPCR quantification using the Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA quantification kit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jason Yingjie

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a direct quantification assay is essential to the adoption of the combined direct quantification/direct STR workflow. In this paper, the feasibility of using the Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA quantification kit for the direct quantification of forensic casework samples was investigated. Both low-level touch DNA samples and blood samples were collected on PE swabs and quantified directly. The increased sensitivity of the Quantifiler(®) Trio kit enabled the detection of less than 10pg of DNA in unprocessed touch samples and also minimizes the stochastic effect experienced by different targets in the same sample. The DNA quantity information obtained from a direct quantification assay using the Quantifiler(®) Trio kit can also be used to accurately estimate the optimal input DNA quantity for a direct STR amplification reaction. The correlation between the direct quantification results (Quantifiler(®) Trio kit) and the direct STR results (GlobalFiler™ PCR amplification kit(*)) for low-level touch DNA samples indicates that direct quantification using the Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA quantification kit is more reliable than the Quantifiler(®) Duo DNA quantification kit for predicting the STR results of unprocessed touch DNA samples containing less than 10pg of DNA.

  10. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Strong, K.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Brohede, S.; Boone, C.; Degenstein, D.; Daffer, W. H.; Drummond, J. R.; Fogal, P. F.; Farahani, E.; Fayt, C.; Fraser, A.; Goutail, F.; Hendrick, F.; Kolonjari, F.; Lindenmaier, R.; Manney, G.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C. A.; Mendonca, J.; Park, J.-H.; Pavlovic, B.; Pazmino, A.; Roth, C.; Savastiouk, V.; Walker, K. A.; Weaver, D.; Zhao, X.

    2012-05-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W) and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14-52 km ozone and 17-40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2) plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% and -0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.0 ozone and NO2, respectively. Ozone columns were constructed from 14-52 km satellite and 0-14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree with the ground

  11. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Strong, K.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Brohede, S.; Boone, C.; Degenstein, D.; Daffer, W. H.; Drummond, J. R.; Fogal, P. F.; Farahani, E.; Fayt, C.; Fraser, A.; Goutail, F.; Hendrick, F.; Kolonjari, F.; Lindenmaier, R.; Manney, G.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C. A.; Mendonca, J.; Park, J.-H.; Pavlovic, B.; Pazmino, A.; Roth, C.; Savastiouk, V.; Walker, K. A.; Weaver, D.; Zhao, X.

    2012-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W) and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14-52 km ozone and 17-40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2) plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% for ozone and -0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.3 NO2. Ozone columns were constructed from 14-52 km satellite and 0-14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree with the ground-based ozone total

  12. 100G Deployment@(DE-KIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, Bruno; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The Steinbuch Centre for Computing (SCC) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has been involved fairly early in 100GE network technology. Initiated by DFN1 (the German NREN), a first 100GE wide area network testbed over a distance of approx. 450 km was deployed between the national research organizations KIT and FZ-Jülich in 2010. Three years later in 2013. KIT joined the Caltech SuperComputing 2013 (SC132) 100GE "show floor" initiative using the transatlantic ANA-100GE link to transfer LHC data from a storage at DE-KIT (GridKa) in Europe to hard disks at the show floor of SC13 in Denver (USA). The network infrastructure of KIT as well as of the German Tier-1 installation DE-KIT (GridKa). however. is still based on 10Gbps. As highlighted in the contribution "Status and Trends in Networking at LHC Tier1 Facilities" to CHEP 2012. proactive investment is required at the Tier-1 sites. Bandwidth requirements will grow beyond current capacity and the required upgrades are expected in 2015. In close cooperation with DFN. KIT drives the upgrade from 10GE to 100GE. The process is divided into several phases. due to upgrade costs and differing requirements in different parts of the network infrastructure. The requirements of the different phases as well as the planned topology will be described. Some of the obstacles we discovered during the deployment will be discussed and solutions or workarounds presented.

  13. Combination therapy for KIT-mutant mast cells: targeting constitutive NFAT and KIT activity.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Alison C; Klug, Lillian R; Patterson, Janice; Griffith, Diana J; Beadling, Carol; Town, Ajia; Heinrich, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    Resistant KIT mutations have hindered the development of KIT kinase inhibitors for treatment of patients with systemic mastocytosis. The goal of this research was to characterize the synergistic effects of a novel combination therapy involving inhibition of KIT and calcineurin phosphatase, a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) regulator, using a panel of KIT-mutant mast cell lines. The effects of monotherapy or combination therapy on the cellular viability/survival of KIT-mutant mast cells were evaluated. In addition, NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity was monitored in a representative cell line to evaluate the mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of combination therapy. Finally, shRNA was used to stably knockdown calcineurin expression to confirm the role of calcineurin in the observed synergy. The combination of a KIT inhibitor and a calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor (CNPI) synergized to reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis in six distinct KIT-mutant mast cell lines. Both KIT inhibitors and CNPIs were found to decrease NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity. NFAT-specific inhibitors induced similar synergistic apoptosis induction as CNPIs when combined with a KIT inhibitor. Notably, NFAT was constitutively active in each KIT-mutant cell line tested. Knockdown of calcineurin subunit PPP3R1 sensitized cells to KIT inhibition and increased NFAT phosphorylation and cytoplasmic localization. Constitutive activation of NFAT appears to represent a novel and targetable characteristic of KIT-mutant mast cell disease. Our studies suggest that combining KIT inhibition with NFAT inhibition might represent a new treatment strategy for mast cell disease.

  14. Telescience Resource Kit Software Lifecycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, Carolyn S.; Schneider, Michelle

    1998-01-01

    The challenge of a global operations capability led to the Telescience Resource Kit (TReK) project, an in-house software development project of the Mission Operations Laboratory (MOL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The TReK system is being developed as an inexpensive comprehensive personal computer- (PC-) based ground support system that can be used by payload users from their home sites to interact with their payloads on board the International Space Station (ISS). The TReK project is currently using a combination of the spiral lifecycle model and the incremental lifecycle model. As with any software development project, there are four activities that can be very time consuming: Software design and development, project documentation, testing, and umbrella activities, such as quality assurance and configuration management. In order to produce a quality product, it is critical that each of these activities receive the appropriate amount of attention. For TReK, the challenge was to lay out a lifecycle and project plan that provides full support for these activities, is flexible, provides a way to deal with changing risks, can accommodate unknowns, and can respond to changes in the environment quickly. This paper will provide an overview of the TReK lifecycle, a description of the project's environment, and a general overview of project activities.

  15. The SCRAM tool-kit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamir, David; Flanigan, Lee A.; Weeks, Jack L.; Siewert, Thomas A.; Kimbrough, Andrew G.; McClure, Sidney R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a new series of on-orbit capabilities to support the near-term Hubble Space Telescope, Extended Duration Orbiter, Long Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, other orbital platforms, and even the future manned Lunar/Mars missions. These proposed capabilities form a toolkit termed Space Construction, Repair, and Maintenance (SCRAM). SCRAM addresses both intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) and Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) needs. SCRAM provides a variety of tools which enable welding, brazing, cutting, coating, heating, and cleaning, as well as corresponding nondestructive examination. Near-term IVA-SCRAM applications include repair and modification to fluid lines, structure, and laboratory equipment inside a shirt-sleeve environment (i.e. inside Spacelab or Space Station). Near-term EVA-SCRAM applications include construction of fluid lines and structural members, repair of punctures by orbital debris, refurbishment of surfaces eroded by contaminants. The SCRAM tool-kit also promises future EVA applications involving mass production tasks automated by robotics and artificial intelligence, for construction of large truss, aerobrake, and nuclear reactor shadow shields structures. The leading candidate tool processes for SCRAM, currently undergoing research and development, include Electron Beam, Gas Tungsten Arc, Plasma Arc, and Laser Beam. A series of strategic space flight experiments would make SCRAM available to help conquer the space frontier.

  16. Contemplating Synergistic Algorithms for the NASA ACE Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Starr, David O.; Marchand, Roger; Ackerman, Steven A.; Platnick, Steven E.; Fridlind, Ann; Cooper, Steven; Vane, Deborah G.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2013-01-01

    ACE is a proposed Tier 2 NASA Decadal Survey mission that will focus on clouds, aerosols, and precipitation as well as ocean ecosystems. The primary objective of the clouds component of this mission is to advance our ability to predict changes to the Earth's hydrological cycle and energy balance in response to climate forcings by generating observational constraints on future science questions, especially those associated with the effects of aerosol on clouds and precipitation. ACE will continue and extend the measurement heritage that began with the A-Train and that will continue through Earthcare. ACE planning efforts have identified several data streams that can contribute significantly to characterizing the properties of clouds and precipitation and the physical processes that force these properties. These include dual frequency Doppler radar, high spectral resolution lidar, polarimetric visible imagers, passive microwave and submillimeter wave radiometry. While all these data streams are technologically feasible, their total cost is substantial and likely prohibitive. It is, therefore, necessary to critically evaluate their contributions to the ACE science goals. We have begun developing algorithms to explore this trade space. Specifically, we will describe our early exploratory algorithms that take as input the set of potential ACE-like data streams and evaluate critically to what extent each data stream influences the error in a specific cloud quantity retrieval.

  17. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    accessible with the availability of the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) on ISS. To meet these goals, the ACE experiment is being built-up in stages, with the availability of confocal microscopy being the ultimate objective. Supported by NASAs Physical Sciences Research Program, ESAESTEC, and the authors respective governments.

  18. Development of a forensic evidence protection kit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, Brian; Kelly, Roy

    1999-02-01

    A kit has been developed for the preservation of vital forensic evidence on a suspect following a serious assault, murder or other offense where contamination may occur. This also includes the handling of firearms, explosives and/or drugs.

  19. Village Green Project and Air Sensor Kits

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation for the OAQPS Teachers Workshop. Will provide a background overview on the Village Green Project and our air sensor kit for outreach, then have the teachers try putting it together.

  20. Torch kit for welding in difficult areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Miniature tungsten inert gas welding torch, used with variously formed interchangeable soft copper tubing extensions, provides inexpensive, accurate welding capability for inaccessible joints. Kit effectively welds stainless steel tubing 0.089 cm thick. Other applications are cited.

  1. [Job satisfaction among the professionals of AceS Baixo Vouga II].

    PubMed

    Santana, Silvina; Cerdeira, José

    2011-12-01

    Job satisfaction is a measure of quality of life at work and is related to emotional states. The interest for this theme is increasing and, in the last years, many studies have attempted to demonstrate its relation with professional performance. Primary care professionals are in the first line of the Serviço Nacional de Saúde (SNS). Therefore, it is necessary that they feel satisfaction with their jobs, in order to perform the tasks with the quality required. Several factors seem to have impact in the satisfaction of these professionals, such as payment, promotion, recognition from supervisors and peers, physical conditions at work and available resources, opportunities for personal development, among others. Insatisfaction may lead to absentism and in the limit to job quit. The main objective of this work is to study job satisfaction among the professionals working at the health centers of ACeS Baixo Vouga II, namely, the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction and between job characteristics and considering job quit as a serious option. All the professionals working in the four health centers were inquired. Results show that job characteristics are defined by six dimensions: leadership and supervision, task characteristics and autonomy, payment, personal and professional development and promotion, peers and relations inside the organization and work environment. Globally, payment and opportunities for personal and professional development and promotion are perceived at low level by all the professional groups. Results also show that there are differences by gender and professional groups regarding job satisfaction and the will to quit job. Considering the specificity of the tasks performed by these professionals, measures should be taken in order to improve job satisfaction in the Portuguese health centers. PMID:22849951

  2. [Job satisfaction among the professionals of AceS Baixo Vouga II].

    PubMed

    Santana, Silvina; Cerdeira, José

    2011-12-01

    Job satisfaction is a measure of quality of life at work and is related to emotional states. The interest for this theme is increasing and, in the last years, many studies have attempted to demonstrate its relation with professional performance. Primary care professionals are in the first line of the Serviço Nacional de Saúde (SNS). Therefore, it is necessary that they feel satisfaction with their jobs, in order to perform the tasks with the quality required. Several factors seem to have impact in the satisfaction of these professionals, such as payment, promotion, recognition from supervisors and peers, physical conditions at work and available resources, opportunities for personal development, among others. Insatisfaction may lead to absentism and in the limit to job quit. The main objective of this work is to study job satisfaction among the professionals working at the health centers of ACeS Baixo Vouga II, namely, the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction and between job characteristics and considering job quit as a serious option. All the professionals working in the four health centers were inquired. Results show that job characteristics are defined by six dimensions: leadership and supervision, task characteristics and autonomy, payment, personal and professional development and promotion, peers and relations inside the organization and work environment. Globally, payment and opportunities for personal and professional development and promotion are perceived at low level by all the professional groups. Results also show that there are differences by gender and professional groups regarding job satisfaction and the will to quit job. Considering the specificity of the tasks performed by these professionals, measures should be taken in order to improve job satisfaction in the Portuguese health centers.

  3. Expression of protooncogene c-kit and its ligand stem cell factor (SCF) in gastric carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hassan, S; Kinoshita, Y; Kawanami, C; Kishi, K; Matsushima, Y; Ohashi, A; Funasaka, Y; Okada, A; Maekawa, T; He-Yao, W; Chiba, T

    1998-01-01

    We examined 13 human gastric carcinoma cell lines for the expression of both c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF). Expression of mRNAs was detected by both Northern blot analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and expression of translated proteins was detected by western blotting. Using RT-PCR we confirmed the expression of c-kit in five (ECC12, TMK1, MKN7, GCIY, and HGC27) cell lines. Northern blot analysis showed coexpression of both c-kit and SCF in ECC12 and expression of SCF in five other (MKN74, MKN1 OKAJIMA, KATOIII, and TMK1) cell lines. SCF stimulated both tyrosine phosphorylation of c-kit and growth of ECC12, whereas it did not stimulate those of GCIY. The sizes of c-kit transcript and protein in GCIY were slightly smaller than those of the reported ones, suggesting the presence of a biologically inactive truncated form of c-kit in GCIY. The present study suggests that c-kit/SCF system might play an important role in the carcinogenesis and tumor growth of ECC12 and that the truncated form of c-kit in GCIY might not be associated with malignant transformation. PMID:9508539

  4. LEM-CF Premixed Tool Kit

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-19

    The purpose of LEM-CF Premixed Tool Kit is to process premixed flame simulation data from the LEM-CF solver (https://fileshare.craft-tech.com/clusters/view/lem-cf) into a large-eddy simulation (LES) subgrid model database. These databases may be used with a user-defined-function (UDF) that is included in the Tool Kit. The subgrid model UDF may be used with the ANSYS FLUENT flow solver or other commercial flow solvers.

  5. Final Overview of ACES Simulation for Evaluation SARP Well-Clear Definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, Confesor; Johnson, Marcus A.; Isaacson, Doug; Hershey, David

    2014-01-01

    The UAS in the NAS project is studying the minimum operational performance standards for unmanned aerial systems (UAS's) detect-and-avoid (DAA) system in order to operate in the National Airspace System. The DoD's Science and research Panel (SARP) Well-Clear Workshop is investigating the time and spatial boundary at which an UAS violates well-clear. NASA is supporting this effort through use of its Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES) simulation platform. This briefing presents the final results to the SARP, which will be used to judge the three candidate well-clear definitions, and for the selection of the most operationally suitable option.

  6. A cost effective hydrogel test kit for pre and post blast trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Choodum, Aree; Malathong, Khanitta; NicDaeid, Niamh; Limsakul, Wadcharawadee; Wongniramaikul, Worawit

    2016-09-01

    A cost effective hydrogel test kit was successfully developed for the detection of pre- and post-blast trinitrotoluene (TNT). A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel matrix was used to entrap the potassium hydroxide (KOH) colourimetric reagent. The easily portable test kit was fabricated in situ in a small tube to which the sample could be added directly. The test kit was used in conjunction with digital image colourimetry (DIC) to demonstrate the rapid quantitative analysis of TNT in a test soil sample. The built-in digital camera of an iPhone was used to capture digital images of the colourimetric products from the test kit. Red-Green-Blue (RGB) colour data from the digital images of TNT standard solutions were used to establish a calibration graph. The validation of the DIC method indicated excellent inter day precision (0.12-3.60%RSD) and accuracy (93-108% relative accuracy). Post-blast soil samples containing TNT were analysed using the test kit and were in good agreement with spectrophotometric analysis. The intensity of the RGB data from the TNT complex deviated by +6.3%, +5.1%, and -4.9% after storage of the test kits in a freezer for 3 months. The test kit was also reusable for up to 12 times with only -5.4%, +0.3%, and +4.0% deviations. The hydrogel test kit was applied in the detection of trace explosive residues at the scene of the recent Bangkok bombing at the Ratchaprasong intersection and produced positive results for TNT demonstrating its operational field application as a rapid and cost effective quantitative tool for explosive residue analysis. PMID:27314546

  7. A cost effective hydrogel test kit for pre and post blast trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Choodum, Aree; Malathong, Khanitta; NicDaeid, Niamh; Limsakul, Wadcharawadee; Wongniramaikul, Worawit

    2016-09-01

    A cost effective hydrogel test kit was successfully developed for the detection of pre- and post-blast trinitrotoluene (TNT). A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel matrix was used to entrap the potassium hydroxide (KOH) colourimetric reagent. The easily portable test kit was fabricated in situ in a small tube to which the sample could be added directly. The test kit was used in conjunction with digital image colourimetry (DIC) to demonstrate the rapid quantitative analysis of TNT in a test soil sample. The built-in digital camera of an iPhone was used to capture digital images of the colourimetric products from the test kit. Red-Green-Blue (RGB) colour data from the digital images of TNT standard solutions were used to establish a calibration graph. The validation of the DIC method indicated excellent inter day precision (0.12-3.60%RSD) and accuracy (93-108% relative accuracy). Post-blast soil samples containing TNT were analysed using the test kit and were in good agreement with spectrophotometric analysis. The intensity of the RGB data from the TNT complex deviated by +6.3%, +5.1%, and -4.9% after storage of the test kits in a freezer for 3 months. The test kit was also reusable for up to 12 times with only -5.4%, +0.3%, and +4.0% deviations. The hydrogel test kit was applied in the detection of trace explosive residues at the scene of the recent Bangkok bombing at the Ratchaprasong intersection and produced positive results for TNT demonstrating its operational field application as a rapid and cost effective quantitative tool for explosive residue analysis.

  8. ACE inhibition, ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) axis in kidney and cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Simões E Silva, Ana Cristina; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-05-01

    The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a pivotal physiological regulator of heart and kidney homeostasis, but also plays an important role in the pathophysiology of heart and kidney diseases. Recently, new components of the RAS have been discovered, including angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7), Mas receptor, Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine. These new components of RAS are formed by the hydrolysis of Ang I and Ang II and, in general, counteract the effects of Ang II. In experimental models of heart and renal diseases, Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine produced vasodilation, inhibition of cell growth, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. Recent pharmacological strategies have been proposed to potentiate the effects or to enhance the formation of Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9), including ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, cyclized form of Ang-(1-7) and nonpeptide synthetic Mas receptor agonists. Here, we review the role and effects of ACE2, ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) and synthetic Mas receptor agonists in the control of inflammation and fibrosis in cardiovascular and renal diseases and as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. We briefly comment on the therapeutic potential of the novel members of RAS, Ang-(1-9) and alamandine, and the interactions between classical RAS inhibitors and new players in heart and kidney diseases. PMID:26995300

  9. Deletion of the aceE gene (encoding a component of pyruvate dehydrogenase) attenuates Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ervinna; Tien-Lin, Chang; Selvaraj, Madhan; Chang, Jason; Kwang, Jimmy

    2011-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major food-borne pathogen. From a transposon insertion mutant library created previously using S. Enteritidis 10/02, one of the mutants was identified to have a 50% lethal dose (LD(50) ) at least 100 times that of the parental strain in young chicks, with an attenuation in a poorly studied gene encoding a component of pyruvate dehydrogenase, namely the aceE gene. Evaluation of the in vitro virulence characteristics of the ΔaceE∷kan mutant revealed that it was less able to invade epithelial cells, less resistant to reactive oxygen intermediate, less able to survive within a chicken macrophage cell line and had a retarded growth rate compared with the parental strain. Young chicks vaccinated with 2 × 10(9) CFU of the ΔaceE∷kan mutant were protected from the subsequent challenge of the parental strain, with the mutant colonized in the liver and spleen in a shorter time than the group infected with the parental strain. In addition, compared with the parental strain, the ΔaceE∷kan mutant did not cause persistent eggshell contamination of vaccinated hens.

  10. Improved ACE-FTS observations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy; Chipperfield, Martyn; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), on board the SCISAT satellite, has been recording solar occultation spectra through the Earth's atmosphere since 2004 and continues to take measurements with only minor loss in performance. ACE-FTS time series are available for a range of chlorine 'source' gases, including CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3Cl and CCl4. Recently there has been much community interest in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a substance regulated by the Montreal Protocol because it leads to the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. Estimated sources and sinks of CCl4 remain inconsistent with observations of its abundance. Satellite observations of CCl4 in the stratosphere are particularly useful in validating stratospheric loss (photolysis) rates; in fact the atmospheric loss of CCl4 is essentially all due to photolysis in the stratosphere. However, the latest ACE-FTS v3.5 CCl4 retrieval is biased high by ˜ 20-30%. A new ACE-FTS retrieval scheme utilising new laboratory spectroscopic measurements of CCl4 and improved microwindow selection has recently been developed. This improves upon the v3.5 retrieval and resolves the issue of the high bias; this new scheme will form the basis for the upcoming v4 processing version of ACE-FTS data. This presentation will outline the improvements made in the retrieval, and a subset of data will be compared with modelled CCl4 distributions from SLIMCAT, a state-of-the-art three-dimensional chemical transport model. The use of ACE-FTS data to evaluate the modelled stratospheric loss rate of CCl4 will also be discussed. The evaluated model, which also includes a treatment of surface soil and ocean sinks, will then be used to quantify current uncertainties in the global budget of CCl4.

  11. 46 CFR 184.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First-aid kits. 184.710 Section 184.710 Shipping COAST... CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 184.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit approved under approval series 160.041 or a kit with equivalent...

  12. 40 CFR 745.88 - Recognized test kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recognized test kits. 745.88 Section... Renovation § 745.88 Recognized test kits. (a) Effective June 23, 2008, EPA recognizes the test kits that have... publicizes its recognition of the first test kit that meets both the negative response and positive...

  13. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Except for transportation by aircraft, polyester resin kits consisting of a base.... Additionally, unless otherwise excepted in this subchapter, polyester resin kits must be packaged...

  14. 46 CFR 184.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false First-aid kits. 184.710 Section 184.710 Shipping COAST... CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 184.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit approved under approval series 160.041 or a kit with equivalent...

  15. 46 CFR 184.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false First-aid kits. 184.710 Section 184.710 Shipping COAST... CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 184.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit approved under approval series 160.041 or a kit with equivalent...

  16. 46 CFR 184.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false First-aid kits. 184.710 Section 184.710 Shipping COAST... CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 184.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit approved under approval series 160.041 or a kit with equivalent...

  17. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  18. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  19. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  20. 19 CFR 122.132 - Sealing of aircraft liquor kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. 122.132 Section... OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Liquor Kits § 122.132 Sealing of aircraft liquor kits. (a) Sealing required. Aircraft liquor kits shall be sealed on board the aircraft by...

  1. The onboard imagers for the Canadian ACE SCISAT-1 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, K. L.; Turnbull, D. N.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; McLeod, S. D.; Butler, M.; Skelton, R.; Bernath, P. F.; Chateauneuf, F.; Soucy, M.-A.

    2007-06-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) onboard the Canadian Space Agency's SCISAT-1 satellite has been in orbit since August of 2003. Its broad objective is to study the problem of stratospheric ozone depletion, particularly in the Arctic. The main instruments are two spectrometers, one an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer and the other a dual optical spectrophotometer sensitive in the UV and visible. Also included are two filtered imagers used to measure altitude profiles of atmospheric extinction and detect thin clouds. The nominal center wavelengths of the filters are 525 nm for the visible (VIS) imager and 1020 nm for the near-infrared (NIR) imager. With the decommissioning of other satellite instruments used to monitor global aerosols [i.e., Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), SAGE III, Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III, Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE)], the imagers provide much needed continuity in this data record. The data product from the imagers is still, however, in a preliminary state. Funding restrictions in the prelaunch period were responsible for an incomplete characterization of the imagers' optics and electronics and prevented corrections being made for the problems found during testing. Postlaunch data analysis to correct for image artifacts is ongoing. A comparison with coincidental measurements from SAGE II shows that systematic errors from the preliminary analysis are within 5 and 20% for the VIS and NIR imagers, respectively, for uninverted profiles of optical depth. Despite the preliminary nature of the imager results, a paper describing the imagers and the initial operational data processing code is timely because the data are already being used.

  2. Clinical usefulness of WT1 mRNA expression in bone marrow detected by a new WT1 mRNA assay kit for monitoring acute myeloid leukemia: a comparison with expression of WT1 mRNA in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kunio; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Ishiyama, Ken; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Miyazaki, Kanji; Suzuki, Kenshi; Masaie, Hiroaki; Okada, Masaya; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Imai, Kiyotoshi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki; Yokoyama, Yasuhisa; Chiba, Shigeru; Hata, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Takeuchi, Jin; Nannya, Yasuhito; Kurokawa, Mineo; Ueda, Yasunori; Koga, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Haruo; Takaku, Fumimaro

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown the clinical usefulness of Wilms' tumor 1 gene (WT1) mRNA expression in peripheral blood (PB) as a minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring marker in 191 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients using the WT1 mRNA assay kit "Otsuka" (Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.; "former kit"). In contrast, the usefulness of WT1 mRNA expression in bone marrow (BM) has been investigated in only a limited number of subjects using former kit. Following that previous study, a next-generation kit, WT1 mRNA assay kit II "Otsuka" (Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.; "new kit") has been newly developed. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the performance of the new kit and to investigate the clinical usefulness of WT1 mRNA expression in BM. The PB and BM were collected on the same day from 164 blood disease patients, including 118 AML patients. WT1 mRNA expression was determined using the new and former kits and the values obtained were compared. The performance of new kit was shown to be equivalent to that of former kit. As reported in PB, WT1 mRNA expression in BM was found to be a useful marker for monitoring disease status as well as for a diagnosis of early stage relapse in AML patients. PMID:26520650

  3. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transportation by passenger aircraft or cargo aircraft may not be included in the kits. (2) The packing group... so there will be no possibility of the mixture of contents causing dangerous evolution of heat or gas... pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel. Chemical kits and...

  4. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... transportation by passenger aircraft or cargo aircraft may not be included in the kits. (2) The packing group... so there will be no possibility of the mixture of contents causing dangerous evolution of heat or gas... pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel. Chemical kits and...

  5. Evaluation of commercial HTLV-1 test kits by a standard HTLV-1 serum panel.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyama, C.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Matsumoto, D.; Tamashiro, H.; Sonoda, S.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of currently available test kits for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), we examined two particle agglutination (PA) tests and nine enzyme immunoassays (EIA) using a standard serum panel consisting of HTLV-1-positive and HTLV-1-negative sera that had been characterized by immunofluorescence and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PA kits exhibited 94.0-100.0% sensitivity and 99.5-100.0% specificity; the sensitivity range was ascribed to the quality of the HTLV-1 antigens coated on the particles. The EIA kits had 99.5-100% sensitivity and 98.5-100% specificity; the 98.5%-99.5% specificity exhibited by five of the EIA kits could have been due to nonspecific reactions that were detected through use of an inadequate cut-off value and the use of recombinant proteins. It can be concluded that the sensitivity of the currently available PA and EIA kits is sufficient to permit their use for screening purposes; however, the specificity of some EIA kits should be optimized. PMID:7554024

  6. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and is Upregulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Evan C.; Karl, Taylor A.; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K.; O’Brien, Catherine A.; Longacre, Teri A.; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R.; Clarke, Michael F.; Rothenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. Methods An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib following injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. Results KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice, compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5-associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cell lines. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44+ cells indicated that KIT may promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT+ colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in

  7. MAIIA EPO SeLect-a rapid screening kit for the detection of recombinant EPO analogues in doping control: inter-laboratory prevalidation and normative study of athlete urine and plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Dehnes, Yvette; Myrvold, Linda; Ström, Helene; Ericsson, Magnus; Hemmersbach, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant analogues of erythropoietin (EPO), epoetins, have been misused by athletes due to their performance enhancing effect since the first pharmaceutical epoetin was launched in 1987. The current methods for screening urine and plasma samples for the presence of epoetins, IEF and SAR-PAGE, have high sensitivity but are time-consuming to carry out. In an effort to ease and speed up the screening procedure for EPO, MAIIA Diagnostics has developed a combined affinity chromatography and lateral flow immunoassay, MAIIA EPO SeLect, which determines the percentage of migrated isoforms (PMI) of EPO in a sample. The reproducibility of the kit was tested by analyzing a set of negative and positive urine and plasma samples in three different laboratories. All data were analyzed with both curve fit parameters from the individual assay runs, and with lot-specific predefined curve calibration. To get a measure of endogenous variation, a normative study with athlete urine and plasma samples was conducted. The average intra-laboratory variation was 6.7% while the inter-laboratory variation for all samples was calculated to 8.8%. The athlete samples yielded an average PMI and standard deviation of 71.4 ± 7.7 for urine and 83.1 ± 10.2 for plasma, respectively. There were no signs of deviating results from tested effort urines. The results also support the use of predefined curve parameters.

  8. An evaluation of chemical screening test kits for lead in paint

    SciTech Connect

    Oglesby, L.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act (Title X) requires abatement and management of lead-based paint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three chemical screening test kits using materials and methods from one study and subjecting the results to the statistical analysis of another. The three kits were used to predict the presence of lead in paint at ten weight concentrations from 0.04 to 3.97%. Paint was applied to four wood boards yielding a sample size of 40. Four boards were painted with lead-free paint and used as blanks. All of the boards were tested with the three test kits by an untrained individual having no knowledge of the actual lead content. Sensitivity, specificity, and false positive and negative rates were calculated for the test kit results. The manufactures` detection limits, the observed sensitivity ranged from 1.00 to 0.80, specificity ranged from 1.00 to 0.42, false positive ranged from 0 to 58%, and false negatives ranged from 0 to 20%. At the 0.5% Federal threshold level, the observed sensitivity ranged from 1.00 to 0.94, specificity ranged from 1.00 to 0.5, false positives ranged from 0 to 11.1%, and false negatives ranged from 0 to 20%. The observed false positive and false negative rates for all three kits were found to be significantly lower than those reported in a previous study. These results indicate that the kits perform very well at the Federal threshold, with two of the kits having false negative rates below 12.5% and false positive rates of 3.13%. These results indicate that these two kits would probably be acceptable screening tests for lead in paint.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  14. Evaluation of the relationship between c-Kit expression and mean platelet volume in classic Kaposi's sarcoma*

    PubMed Central

    Sehitoglu, Ibrahim; Bedir, Recep; Cure, Erkan; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Yuce, Suleyman; Dilek, Nursel

    2016-01-01

    Background c-Kit is a proto-oncogene that encodes tyrosine kinase receptor (CD117). Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a useful marker, providing information on platelet function and diameter. Objective To investigate c-Kit expression and intensity in patients with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and to investigate the relation between Ki-67 proliferation and MPV. Methods A total of 32 patients, diagnosed with classic cutaneous KS, were included in this study. We reevaluated the histopathological reports with the preparations, confirmed the diagnosis and then determined the patients' histopathological stages. c-Kit expression and Ki-67 proliferation were investigated immunohistochemically in KS cases, while MPV in all cases was checked. Results Although c-Kit expression was detected in 22 cases (68.8%), it was not expressed in 10 cases (31.2%). We detected 8 cases with + (25%), 6 with ++ (18.8%) and 8 with +++ (25%). Ki-67 expression was 5.0% (min-max 1.0-20.0). Relapse was observed in 5 cases (15.6%) out of 32. There was positive correlation between c-Kit expression and MPV (rs=0.598, p<0.001), and between c-Kit intensity and MPV (rs=0.588, p<0.001). Conclusion c-Kit is highly positive in KS. c-Kit positivity indicates a high risk of tumor growth, invasion and relapse. Furthermore, c-Kit expression stimulates megakaryocytes to release young and large thrombocytes into the periphery. Thus, high MPV, c-Kit expression and immunostaining intensity indicate high invasion and relapse in KS subjects. PMID:27579736

  15. Accuracy of the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Robert M.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Johnson, Victoria A.; Mellors, John W.; Sullivan, John L.; Swanstrom, Ronald; D'Aquila, Richard T.; Van Gorder, Mark; Holodniy, Mark; Lloyd, Jr., Robert M.; Reid, Caroline; Morgan, Gillian F.; Winslow, Dean L.

    2003-01-01

    Drug resistance and poor virological responses are associated with well-characterized mutations in the viral reading frames that encode the proteins that are targeted by currently available antiretroviral drugs. An integrated system was developed that includes target gene amplification, DNA sequencing chemistry (TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit), and hardware and interpretative software (the OpenGene DNA Sequencing System) for detection of mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease and reverse transcriptase sequences. The integrated system incorporates reverse transcription-PCR from extracted HIV-1 RNA, a coupled amplification and sequencing step (CLIP), polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, semiautomated analysis of data, and generation of an interpretative report. To assess the accuracy and robustness of the assay system, 270 coded plasma specimens derived from nine patients were sent to six laboratories for blinded analysis. All specimens contained HIV-1 subtype B viruses. Results of 270 independent assays were compared to “gold standard” consensus sequences of the virus populations determined by sequence analysis of 16 to 20 clones of viral DNA amplicons derived from two independent PCRs using primers not used in the kit. The accuracy of the integrated system for nucleotide base identification was 98.7%, and the accuracy for codon identification at 54 sites associated with drug resistance was 97.6%. In a separate analysis of plasma spiked with infectious molecular clones, the assay reproducibly detected all 72 different drug resistance mutations that were evaluated. There were no significant differences in accuracy between laboratories, between technologists, between kit lots, or between days. This integrated assay system for the detection of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations has a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility in several laboratories. PMID:12682149

  16. Young & ACE: Young Unemployed People and Adult and Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult, Community, and Further Education Board, Melbourne (Australia).

    Pilot projects designed to increase the access of young unemployed Australians to adult and community education (ACE) were undertaken in one rural and one metropolitan adult, community and further education region with significant rates of unemployment among individuals aged 15-24 years. Two consortia were selected to conduct the pilot programs,…

  17. Linkages between ACE Vocational Provision and Mainstream VET.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, John

    A study investigated linkages between adult community education (ACE) and mainstream vocational education and training (VET) in Australia, which enable people to move between the two sectors in their pursuit of vocational learning, and the ways in which linkages might be improved or new ones developed. The data from the study were derived from 69…

  18. The Economics of ACE Delivery. A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, John; Brown, Tony; Ferrier, Fran

    The financial operations of providers of adult and community education (ACE) in New South Wales, Australia, were examined in a conceptual and empirical study. Enrollment data were analyzed and case studies of three community colleges and two community adult education centers in metropolitan, coastal, and rural communities were conducted. Four…

  19. POMB/ACE chemotherapy for mediastinal germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Bower, M; Brock, C; Holden, L; Nelstrop, A; Makey, A R; Rustin, G J; Newlands, E S

    1997-05-01

    Mediastinal germ cell tumours (MGCT) are rare and most published series reflect the experiences of individual institutions over many years. Since 1979, we have treated 16 men (12 non-seminomatous germ cell tumours and 4 seminomas) with newly diagnosed primary MGCT with POMB/ACE chemotherapy and elective surgical resection of residual masses. This approach yielded complete remissions in 15/16 (94%) patients. The median follow-up was 6.0 years and no relapses occurred more than 2 years after treatment. The 5 year overall survival in the non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT) is 73% (95% confidence interval 43-90%). One patient with NSGCT developed drug-resistant disease and died without achieving remission and 2 patients died of relapsed disease. In addition, 4 patients with bulky and/or metastatic seminoma were treated with POMB/ACE. One died of treatment-related neutropenic sepsis in complete remission and one died of relapsed disease. Finally, 4 patients (2 NSGCT and 2 seminomas) referred at relapse were treated with POMB/ACE and one was successfully salvaged. The combination of POMB/ACE chemotherapy and surgery is effective management for MGCT producing high long-term survival rates.

  20. The Fluid Dynamics Demo Kit: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Karen; Underhill, Patrick; Prestridge, Kathy

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a fluid dynamics demonstration/experiment kit that can be used by professors and graduate students at high school outreach events. The demonstrations in the kit will be easy to use and true crowd pleasers in order to inspire understanding and pique curiosity about the physics of flow. The kits will be inexpensive, containing readily available materials so that teachers can duplicate the demonstrations and experiments. The kits will be left with the teachers as a gift from the American Physics Society. The experiments and demonstrations cover the concepts of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, Bernoulli's equation, frictional losses and the ideal gas law. For each experiment, the teachers will receive presentation material, access to instructional videos, plus a worksheet that can be used in a high school physics classroom. This kit has been developed through the efforts of the APS-DFD Mentoring and Outreach Committee and has received funding from the APS-DFD. Work funded by the APS-DFD.

  1. Control of Oocyte Reawakening by Kit.

    PubMed

    Saatcioglu, Hatice Duygu; Cuevas, Ileana; Castrillon, Diego H

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, females are born with finite numbers of oocytes stockpiled as primordial follicles. Oocytes are "reawakened" via an ovarian-intrinsic process that initiates their growth. The forkhead transcription factor Foxo3 controls reawakening downstream of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the identity of the presumptive upstream cell surface receptor controlling the PI3K-AKT-Foxo3 axis has been questioned. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase Kit controls reawakening. Oocyte-specific expression of a novel constitutively-active KitD818V allele resulted in female sterility and ovarian failure due to global oocyte reawakening. To confirm this result, we engineered a novel loss-of-function allele, KitL. Kit inactivation within oocytes also led to premature ovarian failure, albeit via a contrasting phenotype. Despite normal initial complements of primordial follicles, oocytes remained dormant with arrested oocyte maturation. Foxo3 protein localization in the nucleus versus cytoplasm explained both mutant phenotypes. These genetic studies provide formal genetic proof that Kit controls oocyte reawakening, focusing future investigations into the causes of primary ovarian insufficiency and ovarian aging. PMID:27500836

  2. Control of Oocyte Reawakening by Kit

    PubMed Central

    Castrillon, Diego H.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, females are born with finite numbers of oocytes stockpiled as primordial follicles. Oocytes are “reawakened” via an ovarian-intrinsic process that initiates their growth. The forkhead transcription factor Foxo3 controls reawakening downstream of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the identity of the presumptive upstream cell surface receptor controlling the PI3K-AKT-Foxo3 axis has been questioned. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase Kit controls reawakening. Oocyte-specific expression of a novel constitutively-active KitD818V allele resulted in female sterility and ovarian failure due to global oocyte reawakening. To confirm this result, we engineered a novel loss-of-function allele, KitL. Kit inactivation within oocytes also led to premature ovarian failure, albeit via a contrasting phenotype. Despite normal initial complements of primordial follicles, oocytes remained dormant with arrested oocyte maturation. Foxo3 protein localization in the nucleus versus cytoplasm explained both mutant phenotypes. These genetic studies provide formal genetic proof that Kit controls oocyte reawakening, focusing future investigations into the causes of primary ovarian insufficiency and ovarian aging. PMID:27500836

  3. Shuttle Kit Freezer Refrigeration Unit Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The refrigerated food/medical sample storage compartment as a kit to the space shuttle orbiter is examined. To maintain the -10 F in the freezer kit, an active refrigeration unit is required, and an air cooled Stirling Cycle refrigerator was selected. The freezer kit contains two subsystems, the refrigeration unit, and the storage volume. The freezer must provide two basic capabilities in one unit. One requirement is to store 215 lbs of food which is consumed in a 30-day period by 7 people. The other requirement is to store 128.3 lbs of medical samples consisting of both urine and feces. The unit can be mounted on the lower deck of the shuttle cabin, and will occupy four standard payload module compartments on the forward bulkhead. The freezer contains four storage compartments.

  4. KIT Mutation Analysis in Mast Cell Neoplasms: Recommendations of the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Arock, Michel; Sotlar, Karl; Akin, Cem; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Hoermann, Gregor; Escribano, Luis; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Hermine, Olivier; Dubreuil, Patrice; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Hartmann, Karin; Gotlib, Jason; Cross, Nicholas CP; Haferlach, Torsten; Garcia-Montero, Andres; Orfao, Alberto; Schwaab, Juliana; Triggiani, Massimo; Horny, Hans-Peter; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Reiter, Andreas; Valent, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although acquired mutations in KIT are commonly detected in various categories of mastocytosis, the methodologies applied to detect and quantify the mutant type and -burden in various tissues and cells are poorly defined. We here propose a consensus on methodologies used to detect KIT mutations in patients with mastocytosis at diagnosis and in the follow up with sufficient precision and sensitivity in daily practice. In addition, we provide recommendations for sampling and storage of diagnostic material as well as a robust diagnostic algorithm. Using highly-sensitive assays, KIT D816V can be detected in peripheral blood leukocytes in most patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) which is a major step forward in screening and SM detection. In addition, the KIT D816V allele burden can be followed quantitatively during the natural course or during therapy in these patients. Our recommendations should greatly facilitate diagnostic and follow up investigations in SM in daily practice as well as in clinical trials. In addition, the new tools and algorithms proposed should lead to a more effective screen, early detection of SM, and help avoid unnecessary referrals. PMID:25650093

  5. FES kinase participates in KIT-ligand induced chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Voisset, Edwige; Lopez, Sophie; Chaix, Amandine; Vita, Marina; George, Coralie; Dubreuil, Patrice; De Sepulveda, Paulo

    2010-02-26

    FES is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase activated by several membrane receptors, originally identified as a viral oncogene product. We have recently identified FES as a crucial effector of oncogenic KIT mutant receptor. However, FES implication in wild-type KIT receptor function was not addressed. We report here that FES interacts with KIT and is phosphorylated following activation by its ligand SCF. Unlike in the context of oncogenic KIT mutant, FES is not involved in wild-type KIT proliferation signal, or in cell adhesion. Instead, FES is required for SCF-induced chemotaxis. In conclusion, FES kinase is a mediator of wild-type KIT signalling implicated in cell migration.

  6. FES kinase participates in KIT-ligand induced chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Voisset, Edwige; Lopez, Sophie; Chaix, Amandine; Vita, Marina; George, Coralie; Dubreuil, Patrice; De Sepulveda, Paulo

    2010-02-26

    FES is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase activated by several membrane receptors, originally identified as a viral oncogene product. We have recently identified FES as a crucial effector of oncogenic KIT mutant receptor. However, FES implication in wild-type KIT receptor function was not addressed. We report here that FES interacts with KIT and is phosphorylated following activation by its ligand SCF. Unlike in the context of oncogenic KIT mutant, FES is not involved in wild-type KIT proliferation signal, or in cell adhesion. Instead, FES is required for SCF-induced chemotaxis. In conclusion, FES kinase is a mediator of wild-type KIT signalling implicated in cell migration.

  7. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-05-31

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

  8. Affinity purification of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory peptides using immobilized ACE.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, María del Mar; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2006-09-20

    A lung extract rich in angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and pure ACE were immobilized by reaction with the activated support 4 BCL glyoxyl-agarose. These immobilized ACE derivatives were used for purification of ACE inhibitory peptides by affinity chromatography. The immobilized lung extract was used to purify inhibitory peptides from sunflower and rapeseed protein hydrolysates that had been obtained by treatment of protein isolates with alcalase. The ACE binding peptides that were retained by the derivatives were specifically released by treatment with the ACE inhibitor captopril and further purified by reverse-phase C18 HPLC chromatography. Inhibitory peptides with IC50 50 and 150 times lower than those of the original sunflower and rapeseed hydrolysates, respectively, were obtained. The derivative prepared using pure ACE was used for purification of ACE inhibitory peptides from the same type of sunflower protein hydrolysate. ACE binding peptides were released from the ACE-agarose derivatives by treatment with 1 M NaCl and had an IC50 a little higher than those obtained using immobilized extract and elution with captopril. Affinity chromatography facilitated the purification of ACE inhibitory peptides and potentially other bioactive peptides present in food proteins.

  9. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  10. [Effect of Astragali Radix in improving early renal damage in metabolic syndrome rats through ACE2/Mas pathway].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong-ying; Liang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Ning-yin; Xu, Han; Yang, Mi-na; Lin, Xin; Yu, Heng; Chang, Peng; Yu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To study the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin (Ang) 1-7 specific receptor Mas protain in renal blood vessels of metabolic syndrome ( MS) rats and its anti-oxidative effect. A total of 80 male SD rats were divided into four groups: the normal control group (NC, the same volume of normal saline), the MS group (high fat diet), the MS + Astragali Radix group (MS + HQ, 6 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage) and the MS + Valsartan group (MS + XST, 30 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage). After four weeks of intervention, their general indexes, biochemical indexes and blood pressure were measured; plasma and renal tissue Ang II, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide demutase (SOD) levels were measured with radioimmunoassay. The protein expressions of Mas receptor, AT1R, ACE and ACE2 were detected by western blot analysis. According to the result, compared with the NC group, the MS group and the MS + HQ group showed significant increases in systolic and diastolic pressures, body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, free fatty acid and Ang II level of MS rats (P < 0.05). The MS + XST group showed notable decreases in systolic and diastolic pressures than that of the MS group. The MS group showed significant increases in the SOD activity and NO level and decrease in the MDA level after being intervened with Astragali Radix. ACE and AT1R protein expressions in renal tissues of the MS group were higher than that in the NC group, but with lower ACE2 and -Mas receptor expressions (all P < 0.05). Compared with the MS group, the MS + HQ group showed significant increase in Mas receptor expression in renal tissues, whereas the MS + XST group showed notable decrease in AT1R (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, Astragali Radix can increase the Mas receptor expressions in renal tissues, decrease ACE expression and change local Ang II, MDA, NO and SOD in kidneys, so as to protect early damages in renal tissues. PMID:27071265

  11. Test kit testing certifies soil screening accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, L.K.

    1994-08-01

    With quality controls and validation, site managers can use immunoassay with confidence. It is not enough to know which hazardous substances have contaminated a site. A manager must have an idea about how much is present and where. Traditionally, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry answered these questions, but today immunoassay soil test kits often provide more immediate results at a lower cost.

  12. 47 CFR 15.25 - Kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... product to be marketed. If all components required to fully complete the kit (other than those specified... the recommended components. The assembled units shall be certified or authorized under the Declaration... interference that may cause undesired operation. (e) For the purpose of this section, circuit boards used...

  13. Beyond the Science Kit: Inquiry in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Wendy, Ed.; Reardon, Jeanne, Ed.

    The essays in this book are about values that are being used to drive science instruction in remarkable ways. The essays are divided into three sections. The first section contains two essays about science kits and determines the problem that the rest of the book addresses. The essays in the second section offer a glimpse of what five teachers see…

  14. Networked Information Resources. SPEC Kit 253.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleiler, Richard, Comp.; Plum, Terry, Comp.

    1999-01-01

    This SPEC Kit, published six times per year, examines how Association of Research Libraries (ARL) libraries have structured themselves to identify networked information resources in the market, to evaluate them for purchase, to make purchasing decisions, to publicize them, and to assess their continued utility. In the summer of 1999, the survey…

  15. Learning Disabilities In-Service Training Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bickley

    Included in the training kit for teachers in the area of learning disabilities are materials developed by Project Lighthouse for experimental field usage to test the materials. The problem of educating children with learning disabilities is summarized, as is Piaget's model of logical activity. The major divisions of the text then deal with the…

  16. Thermal protection system flight repair kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A thermal protection system (TPS) flight repair kit required for use on a flight of the Space Transportation System is defined. A means of making TPS repairs in orbit by the crew via extravehicular activity is discussed. A cure in place ablator, a precured ablator (large area application), and packaging design (containers for mixing and dispensing) for the TPS are investigated.

  17. Lifeprints ESL for Adults: Literacy. [Multimedia Kit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham Florez, MaryAnn

    Lifeprints is a four-level program that helps adult English- as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students gain the English language skills they need to participate effectively at work and in their communities. This multimedia kit contains the first level in the series. Level one is divided into six units: "Welcome to English Class"; "Personal Information";…

  18. Countdown to Six Billion Teaching Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This teaching kit features six activities focused on helping students understand the significance of the world population reaching six billion for our society and our environment. Featured activities include: (1) History of the World: Part Six Billion; (2) A Woman's Place; (3) Baby-O-Matic; (4) Earth: The Apple of Our Eye; (5) Needs vs. Wants; and…

  19. Lead Paint Test Kits Workshop: Summary Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) designed and conducted the Lead Paint Test Kits Workshop on October 19 and 20, 2006, at the Environmental Protection Agency's Research Triangle Park, NC campus. The workshop was conducted as...

  20. Teen PACK: Population Awareness Campaign Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This packet of instructional materials is designed to teach teenagers about the effects of overpopulation on the world and on the individual. Information is presented in three related booklets. The first of the three parts of the "Teen Population Awareness Campaign Kit," illustrates overpopulation through profiles of teens living in Shanghai,…

  1. Library Photocopy Operations. SPEC Kit 209.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almony, Robert A., Jr., Comp.; O'Brien, Francis, Comp.

    The kit and flyer examine library photocopy operations, including services, personnel, equipment, and financial management practices by member institutions of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). To find out about these operations, ARL surveyed its 112 members, and received 93 replies. Forty-nine academic libraries (58%) described their…

  2. The Interview Process. SPEC Kit 260.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Heidi, Comp.; Nicholson, Shawn, Comp.; Dickson, Laura, Comp.; Miller, Terri Tickle, Comp.

    2000-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit reports results of a survey of ARL (Association of Research Libraries) that examined the nature and structure of the interview process at large research and academic libraries in the United States and Canada. By determining the nature and structure of the interview, it is hoped that candidates…

  3. Working with Older People. A Resource Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Commission on Aging, Columbus.

    This resource kit for working with older people consists of an instructor's guide, a package of simulation training materials, and performance-based teacher education modules. Topics covered in the instructor's guide are understanding the common problems of working with older people, selecting problem areas for trainees, developing plans for using…

  4. Press kit kicks off new branding.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2004-01-01

    A smartly produced press kit resulted in unprecedented news coverage when Denver's Porter Adventist Hospital recently unveiled plans for an extensive 80 million dollars redevelopment. A news conference was held to announce this plan, along with the opening of the hospital's new emergency department. The overall effort is part of the new branding strategy of the 75-year-old hospital.

  5. SunWise[R] Meteorologist Tool Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The SunWise Program is designed to help meteorologists raise sun safety awareness by addressing the science of the sun, the risk of overexposure to its ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and what students and their families can do to protect themselves from overexposure. This Tool Kit has been designed for use all over the United States and its…

  6. Allocation of Resources. SPEC Kit 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    This kit on resource allocation in academic and research libraries contains nine primary source documents and a concise summary of a 1976 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) survey on management of fiscal spending activities in ARL libraries. Based on responses from 70 libraries, the summary discusses 3 specific subjects within the general…

  7. Career and Occupational Development Kit. Instruction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    This manual is part of a kit consisting of four documents which bring together different types of items that measure a number of career and occupational development (COD) objectives developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). (NAEP--which completed a national survey measuring the achievement of knowledge, skills,…

  8. Earth Is My Home, Kit I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    Introducing the pupil to the science of ecology is the purpose of Scholastic's Earth Corps Ecology/Conservation Study Kits for grades 3-6. Simple terms are used to show how all living things are inter-related to their environment, to demonstrate the intricate and delicate balance of nature, and to point out how man's interference with nature's…

  9. You Be the Chemist [Multimedia Kit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Chemical Distributors, Arlington, VA. Educational Foundation.

    This multimedia kit includes a teacher's manual, video, and activity packet. The unique interactive course uses safe, controlled dynamic experiments to teach kids about chemistry, the proper handling of chemicals, and responsible product stewardship. Students are asked to hypothesize about chemical substances, collect and analyze data, and share…

  10. Haitian Component Bibliography. Migrant Heritage Studies Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roark-Calnek, Sue, Comp.

    This 587-item annotated bibliography, designed as a supplement to the Haitian Component of the Migrant Heritage Studies Kit, provides access to additional information, including audiovisual materials, on resources on Haiti and Haitian immigrants, published between 1877 and 1984. Part I is a "General Bibliography" which includes 313 sources on…

  11. Fee-Based Services. SPEC Kit 259.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenda, Claudine, Comp.

    2000-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit reports results of a survey that examined how many Association of Research Libraries (ARL) libraries offer fee-based services to their external users, the procedures and organizational structures of such services, and the factors that contribute to a successful fee-based service program. For…

  12. Managing Printing Services. SPEC Kit 254.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blixrud, Julia C., Comp.

    2000-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit reports results of a survey that examined how Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members currently provide printing services to their users and how the costs of those services are covered. Of the 122 members surveyed, 62 responded. Included in the responses was information on main, law,…

  13. The EZ:Faast family of amino acid analysis kits: application of the GC-FID kit for rapid determination of plasma tryptophan and other amino acids.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2012-01-01

    Plasma tryptophan (Trp) and other amino acids (AA) can be determined rapidly by gas (GC) or liquid (LC) chromatography using the Phenomenex EZ:Faast(™) family of kits. Three kits are available: (1) GC-FID or -NPD, (2) GC-MS, (3) LC-MS. The two GC kits can determine 32 AA, whereas the LC-MS can determine five additional AA. All three kits, however, share the same experimental procedure up to and including the preparation of derivatised AA. The method is based on solid-phase extraction (SPE), thus saving time on prior removal of plasma or other proteins and interfering substances, and can be applied to other body fluids and experimental media and to supernatants of extracts of solid material. Briefly, SPE is performed using a proprietary cation-exchange mechanism. The acid solution of the internal standard ensures that the free amino acids are in an anionic form suitable for cationic binding. The alkaline nature of the elution medium ensures that the AA cations are released prior to derivatisation. The latter involves production of chloroformate derivatives of both the amino and carboxylic acid groups. With experience, six plasma samples can be so processed within 12 min. The shortest analytical run is <7 min per sample using the GC-FID/NPD kit. Despite its many steps, the procedure becomes second nature and an enjoyable task. I have now used the GC-FID kit with manual injection to process >1,600 plasma and other samples. Limit of detection of AA is 1 μM or less. The procedure has been validated and optimised for Trp and its main five brain uptake competitors. PMID:22125144

  14. Regional aerosol properties: Comparisons of boundary layer measurements from ACE 1, ACE 2, Aerosols99, INDOEX, ACE Asia, TARFOX, and NEAQS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2005-07-01

    Means and variability of aerosol chemical composition and optical properties are compared for the first and second Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE 1 and ACE 2), a cruise across the Atlantic (Aerosols99), the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), the Asian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE Asia), the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX), and the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS). These experiments were focused either on the remote marine atmosphere (ACE 1) or areas downwind of continental aerosol source regions including western Europe, North America, Africa, India, and Asia. Presented here are size-segregated concentrations of aerosol mass, sea salt, non-sea-salt (nss) SO4=, NH4+, NO3-, dust, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and nss K+, as well as mass ratios that are commonly used to identify aerosol sources and to assess aerosol processing (Cl- to Na+, OC to nss SO4=, EC to total carbon (TC), EC to nss SO4=, nss K+ to EC, Fe to Al, and Si to Al). Optical properties that are compared include size-segregated scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients, and single-scattering albedo at 550 nm. Size-segregated mass scattering and mass absorption efficiencies for the total aerosol and mass extinction efficiencies for the dominant chemical components also are compared. In addition, we present the contribution to light extinction by the dominant chemical components for each region. All data are based on shipboard measurements performed at a relative humidity of 55 ± 5%. Scattering coefficients and single-scattering albedos also are reported at ambient relative humidity (RH) using published values of f(RH). Finally, aerosol optical depths from each region are compared. Identical sampling protocols were used in all experiments in order to eliminate sampling biases and to make the data directly comparable. Major findings include (1) nss SO4= makes up only 16 to 46% of the submicron aerosol mass

  15. "Ten Years in a Box": A Multi-Media Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Television International, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Discussed are the preparation and contents of a multimedia kit designed to supplement educational television programs dealing with the Depression. The article is condensed from a report. The 1930s Multi-Media Kit, by Anthony Barton. (LS)

  16. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  19. Test/QA Plan for Verification of Microcystin Test Kits

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcystin test kits are used to quantitatively measure total microcystin in recreational waters. These test kits are based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with antibodies that bind specifically to microcystins or phosphate activity inhibition where the phosphatas...

  20. Parallel Signal Processing and System Simulation using aCe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular for both signal processing and system simulation. A new language is ideally suited for parallel signal processing applications and system simulation since it allows the programmer to explicitly express the computations that can be performed concurrently. In addition, the new C based parallel language (ace C) for architecture-adaptive programming allows programmers to implement algorithms and system simulation applications on parallel architectures by providing them with the assurance that future parallel architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of ace C and present a signal processing application (FFT).

  1. Curriculum innovation in an accelerated BSN program: the ACE Model.

    PubMed

    Suplee, Patricia D; Glasgow, Mary Ellen

    2008-01-01

    As the demand for registered nurses continues to rise, so too has the creation of accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs for second-degree students. This article describes an 11-month Accelerated Career Entry (ACE) Nursing Program's innovative curriculum design, which has a heavy emphasis on technology, professional socialization, and the use of a standardized patient experience as a form of summative evaluation. In addition, challenges of this program are presented. Since 2002, the ACE Program has graduated over 500 students with an average first-time NCLEX pass rate of 95-100%. Although the number of graduates from accelerated programs does not solve the severe nursing shortage, the contributions of these intelligent, assertive, pioneering graduates are important for health care.

  2. Possible Improvements of the ACE Diversity Interchange Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Zhou, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Ma, Jian; Guttromson, Ross T.; McManus, Bart; Loutan, Clyde

    2010-07-26

    North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) grid is operated by about 131 balancing authorities (BA). Within each BA, operators are responsible for managing the unbalance (caused by both load and wind). As wind penetration levels increase, the challenges of managing power variation increases. Working independently, balancing area with limited regulating/load following generation and high wind power penetration faces significant challenges. The benefits of BA cooperation and consolidation increase when there is a significant wind energy penetration. To explore the benefits of BA cooperation, this paper investigates ACE sharing approach. A technology called ACE diversity interchange (ADI) is already in use in the western interconnection. A new methodology extending ADI is proposed in the paper. The proposed advanced ADI overcoming some limitations existing in conventional ADI. Simulations using real statistical data of CAISO and BPA have shown high performance of the proposed advanced ADI methodology.

  3. C-kit overexpression correlates with KIT gene copy numbers increases in phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junjun; Liu, Xiaozhen; Feng, Xiaolong; Liu, Jian; Lv, Shuhua; Zhang, Wei; Niu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We determined c-kit expression in the stroma and epithelia of benign, borderline, and malignant phyllodes tumors (PTs), respectively, as well as the relationship between c-kit expression in stromal elements and KIT gene copy number variations (CNVs). To assess c-kit expression and KIT CNVs, 348 PT cases were studied: 120 (34.4 %) benign cases, 115 (33.1 %) borderline cases, and 113 (32.5 %) malignant cases. All of these cases were evaluated for c-kit (CD117) expression using immunohistochemistry. Forty-two cases (29 c-kit-positive in the stromal cells cases and 13 negative cases) were investigated for KIT gene CNVs via genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The overall rate of c-kit positivity in the stroma was 46.8 %, as well as 24.2, 53.1, and 64.6 %, respectively, in PTs of three different grades. However, in the majority of cases, the epithelia were c-kit positive (98.2 %), and the positivity was 100, 99.1, and 95 % in PTs of three different grades, respectively. There was a significant change in the expression of c-kit in the stroma and epithelia according to grade (P < 0.001, P = 0.014). From the genomic PCR results, we can confirm that c-kit positivity in the stroma is directly correlated with KIT gene copy numbers increases (P = 0.003, P = 0.041). We demonstrated that c-kit expression in the stroma of PTs is positively associated with malignancy. c-Kit epithelial positivity was inversely correlated with PTs malignancy. c-Kit overexpression in the stroma was related to KIT gene copy numbers increases. PMID:25534827

  4. 46 CFR 121.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First-aid kits. 121.710 Section 121.710 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 121.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit... kits, the contents must be stowed in a suitable, watertight container that is marked “First-Aid Kit”....

  5. 46 CFR 121.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false First-aid kits. 121.710 Section 121.710 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 121.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit... kits, the contents must be stowed in a suitable, watertight container that is marked “First-Aid Kit”....

  6. 46 CFR 121.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false First-aid kits. 121.710 Section 121.710 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 121.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit... kits, the contents must be stowed in a suitable, watertight container that is marked “First-Aid Kit”....

  7. 46 CFR 121.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false First-aid kits. 121.710 Section 121.710 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 121.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit... kits, the contents must be stowed in a suitable, watertight container that is marked “First-Aid Kit”....

  8. 46 CFR 121.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false First-aid kits. 121.710 Section 121.710 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 121.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit... kits, the contents must be stowed in a suitable, watertight container that is marked “First-Aid Kit”....

  9. Acetylcholinesterase (Ace-1) target site mutation 119S is strongly diagnostic of carbamate and organophosphate resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles coluzzii across southern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With high DDT resistance present throughout much of West Africa, carbamates and organophosphates are increasingly important alternatives to pyrethroids for indoor residual spraying (IRS). Though less widespread, resistance to both of these alternative insecticide classes has also been documented within the Anopheles gambiae species pair (formerly the M and S molecular forms) in West Africa. To manage insecticide efficacy, it is important to predict how and where resistance is likely to occur and spread, which could be aided by using molecular diagnostics with high predictive value. Methods Anopheles coluzzii and An. gambiae s.s. were collected from 18 sites throughout southern Ghana and bioassayed with bendiocarb, the most commonly applied carbamate, and an organophosphate, fenitrothion. The Ace-1 target site substitution G119S was genotyped by qPCR. Results Fenitrothion induced higher mortality than bendiocarb, though phenotypes correlated strongly across populations. Ace-1 119S was found at much higher frequency in An. gambiae s.s than An. coluzzii, exceeding 90% in a population from Greater Accra, the highest frequency reported to date. Ace-1 G119S was very strongly associated with resistance to both insecticides, providing high predictive power for diagnosis, though with some evidence for a differential effect between molecular forms for bendiocarb. Sequencing of the gene revealed a lack of variation in resistant alleles precluding determination of origin, but Ace-1 copy number variation was detected for the first time in Ghana. Conclusions The results validate G119S as a useful diagnostic of organophosphate and carbamate resistance within and among populations, whilst highlighting the potential for an aggregate nature of Ace-1 genotypes, which may comprise both single-copy and duplicated genes. Further work is now required to determine the distribution and resistance-association of Ace-1 duplication. PMID:24206629

  10. ACE-FTS instrument: activities in preparation for launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucy, Marc-Andre; Walker, Kaley A.; Fortin, Serge; Deutsch, Christophe

    2003-11-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is the mission selected by the Canadian Space Agency for its next science satellite, SCISAT-1. ACE consists of a suite of instruments in which the primary element is an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) coupled with an auxiliary 2-channel visible (525 nm) and near infrared imager (1020 nm). A secondary instrument, MAESTRO, provides spectrographic data from the near ultra-violet to the near infrared, including the visible spectral range. In combination the instrument payload covers the spectral range from 0.25 to 13.3 micron. A comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature will be made by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. The ACE mission will measure and analyse the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. A high inclination (74 degrees), low earth orbit (650 km) allows coverage of tropical, mid-latitude and polar regions. This paper presents the instrument-related activities in preparation for launch. In particular, activities related to the integration of instrument to spacecraft are presented as well as tests of the instrument on-board the SciSat-1 bus. Environmental qualification activities at spacecraft-level are described. An overview of the characterization and calibration campaign is presented. Activities for integration and verification at launch site are also covered. The latest status of the spacecraft is also presented.

  11. ACES: An Enabling Technology for Next Generation Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Wuerl, Adam M.; Andrews, Jason E.; Andrews, Dana G.

    2004-02-01

    Andrews Space has developed the ``Alchemist'' Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES), a dual-mode propulsion system that enables safe, economical launch systems that take off and land horizontally. Alchemist generates liquid oxygen through separation of atmospheric air using the refrigeration capacity of liquid hydrogen. The key benefit of Alchemist is that it minimizes vehicle takeoff weight. All internal and NASA-funded activities have shown that ACES, previously proposed for hypersonic combined cycle RLVs, is a higher payoff, lower-risk technology if LOX generation is performed while the vehicle cruises subsonically. Andrews Space has developed the Alchemist concept from a small system study to viable Next Generation launch system technology, conducting not only feasibility studies but also related hardware tests, and it has planned a detailed risk reduction program which employs an experienced, proven contractor team. Andrews also has participated in preliminary studies of an evolvable Next Generation vehicle architecture-enabled by Alchemist ACES-which could meet civil, military, and commercial space requirements within two decades.

  12. 46 CFR 108.707 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First aid kit. 108.707 Section 108.707 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.707 First aid kit. Each unit must have a first-aid kit approved by the Mine...

  13. 46 CFR 169.725 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First aid kit. 169.725 Section 169.725 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.725 First aid kit. Each vessel must carry an approved first aid kit, constructed and fitted in accordance with subpart 160.041 of this chapter....

  14. 33 CFR 144.01-30 - First-aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false First-aid kit. 144.01-30 Section...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-30 First-aid kit. On each manned platform a first-aid kit approved by the Commandant or the U.S. Bureau of Mines shall...

  15. 21 CFR 864.2260 - Chromosome culture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromosome culture kit. 864.2260 Section 864.2260...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2260 Chromosome culture kit. (a) Identification. A chromosome culture kit is a device containing the necessary...

  16. 21 CFR 864.2260 - Chromosome culture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromosome culture kit. 864.2260 Section 864.2260...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2260 Chromosome culture kit. (a) Identification. A chromosome culture kit is a device containing the necessary...

  17. 21 CFR 864.2260 - Chromosome culture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromosome culture kit. 864.2260 Section 864.2260...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2260 Chromosome culture kit. (a) Identification. A chromosome culture kit is a device containing the necessary...

  18. 21 CFR 864.2260 - Chromosome culture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromosome culture kit. 864.2260 Section 864.2260...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2260 Chromosome culture kit. (a) Identification. A chromosome culture kit is a device containing the necessary...

  19. 21 CFR 864.2260 - Chromosome culture kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromosome culture kit. 864.2260 Section 864.2260...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2260 Chromosome culture kit. (a) Identification. A chromosome culture kit is a device containing the necessary...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5140 - Anesthesia conduction kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction kit. 868.5140 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5140 Anesthesia conduction kit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction kit is a device used to administer to a patient conduction, regional,...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5140 - Anesthesia conduction kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction kit. 868.5140 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5140 Anesthesia conduction kit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction kit is a device used to administer to a patient conduction, regional,...

  2. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  7. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended...

  8. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended...

  9. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended...

  10. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended...

  11. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870... repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace the... effect the repair or replacement. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA...

  13. Working with Self-Injurious Adolescents Using the Safe Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a guide for using the Safe Kit when working with clients who self-injure. The Safe Kit can be used as a supplement to more traditional approaches to counseling and offers clients alternatives to self-injury when they need alternatives the most. The Safe Kit works under the assumption that individuals differ in the meaning they…

  14. 33 CFR 144.01-30 - First-aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false First-aid kit. 144.01-30 Section...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-30 First-aid kit. On each manned platform a first-aid kit approved by the Commandant or the U.S. Bureau of Mines shall...

  15. 46 CFR 169.725 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false First aid kit. 169.725 Section 169.725 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.725 First aid kit. Each vessel must carry an approved first aid kit, constructed and fitted in accordance with subpart 160.041 of this chapter....

  16. 46 CFR 169.725 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false First aid kit. 169.725 Section 169.725 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.725 First aid kit. Each vessel must carry an approved first aid kit, constructed and fitted in accordance with subpart 160.041 of this chapter....

  17. 46 CFR 108.707 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false First aid kit. 108.707 Section 108.707 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.707 First aid kit. Each unit must have a first-aid kit approved by the Mine...

  18. 46 CFR 108.707 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false First aid kit. 108.707 Section 108.707 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.707 First aid kit. Each unit must have a first-aid kit approved by the Mine...

  19. 46 CFR 108.707 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false First aid kit. 108.707 Section 108.707 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.707 First aid kit. Each unit must have a first-aid kit approved by the Mine...

  20. 33 CFR 144.01-30 - First-aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false First-aid kit. 144.01-30 Section...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-30 First-aid kit. On each manned platform a first-aid kit approved by the Commandant or the U.S. Bureau of Mines shall...

  1. 46 CFR 169.725 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false First aid kit. 169.725 Section 169.725 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.725 First aid kit. Each vessel must carry an approved first aid kit, constructed and fitted in accordance with subpart 160.041 of this chapter....

  2. 46 CFR 108.707 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false First aid kit. 108.707 Section 108.707 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.707 First aid kit. Each unit must have a first-aid kit approved by the Mine...

  3. 33 CFR 144.01-30 - First-aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false First-aid kit. 144.01-30 Section...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-30 First-aid kit. On each manned platform a first-aid kit approved by the Commandant or the U.S. Bureau of Mines shall...

  4. 46 CFR 169.725 - First aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false First aid kit. 169.725 Section 169.725 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.725 First aid kit. Each vessel must carry an approved first aid kit, constructed and fitted...

  5. Home Pregnancy Test Kits: How Readable Are the Instructions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Carol Ann

    At the conclusion of their study on home pregnancy test kits, Valinas and Perlman (1982) suggested that the instructions accompanying the kits be revised to make them easier to read. A study was undertaken to determine the readability of the printed instructions accompanying five home pregnancy test kits (Daisy II, Answer, Acu-Test, Predictor, and…

  6. Comparison of four commercial DNA extraction kits for the recovery of Bacillus spp. spore DNA from spiked powder samples.

    PubMed

    Mölsä, Markos; Kalin-Mänttäri, Laura; Tonteri, Elina; Hemmilä, Heidi; Nikkari, Simo

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus spp. include human pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a biothreat agent. Bacillus spp. form spores that are physically highly resistant and may remain active over sample handling. We tested four commercial DNA extraction kits (QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, RTP Pathogen Kit, ZR Fungal/Bacterial DNA MiniPrep, and genesig Easy DNA/RNA Extraction kit) for sample inactivation and DNA recovery from two powders (icing sugar and potato flour) spiked with Bacillus thuringiensis spores. The DNA was analysed using a B. thuringiensis-specific real-time PCR assay. The detection limit was 3×10(1)CFU of spiked B. thuringiensis spores with the QIAamp DNA Mini, RTP Pathogen, and genesig Easy DNA/RNA Extraction kits, and 3×10(3)CFU with the ZR Fungal/Bacterial DNA MiniPrep kit. The results showed that manual extraction kits are effective and safe for fast and easy DNA extraction from powder samples even in field conditions. Adding a DNA filtration step to the extraction protocol ensures the removal of Bacillus spp. spores from DNA samples without affecting sensitivity. PMID:27435532

  7. A chromosome inversion near the KIT gene and the Tobiano spotting pattern in horses.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S A; Lear, T L; Adelson, D L; Bailey, E

    2007-01-01

    Tobiano is a white spotting pattern in horses caused by a dominant gene, Tobiano(TO). Here, we report TO associated with a large paracentric chromosome inversion on horse chromosome 3. DNA sequences flanking the inversion were identified and a PCR test was developed to detect the inversion. The inversion was only found in horses with the tobiano pattern, including horses with diverse genetic backgrounds, which indicated a common genetic origin thousands of years ago. The inversion does not interrupt any annotated genes, but begins approximately 100 kb downstream of the KIT gene. This inversion may disrupt regulatory sequences for the KIT gene and cause the white spotting pattern.

  8. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  9. Role of ACE and AGT gene polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility to diabetes mellitus type 2 in a Brazilian sample.

    PubMed

    Wollinger, L M; Dal Bosco, S M; Rempe, C; Almeida, S E M; Berlese, D B; Castoldi, R P; Arndt, M E; Contini, V; Genro, J P

    2015-12-29

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between the InDel polymorphism in the angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) and the rs699 polymorphism in the angiotensinogen gene (AGT) and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) in a sample population from Southern Brazil. A case-control study was conducted with 228 patients with DM2 and 183 controls without DM2. The ACE InDel polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers, followed by electrophoresis on 1.5% agarose gel. The AGT rs699 polymorphism was genotyped using a real-time PCR assay. No significant association between the ACE InDel polymorphism and DM2 was detected (P = 0.97). However, regarding the AGT rs699 polymorphism, DM2 patients had a significantly higher frequency of the AG genotype and lower frequency of the GG genotype when compared to the controls (P = 0.03). Our results suggest that there is an association between the AGT rs699 polymorphism and DM2 in a Brazilian sample.

  10. A convenient first aid kit for chemical and biological agents and for radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Bhaskar, A S B; Gautam, Anshoo; Gopalan, N; Singh, A K; Singh, Beer; Flora, S J S

    2012-05-01

    The chemical and biological warfare agents are extremely toxic in nature. They act rapidly even in very small quantities and death may occur in minutes. Hence, physical and medical protection must be provided immediately to save life or avoid serious injury. A first aid kit has thus been developed for providing immediate relief from chemical and biological warfare agents (FAKCBW) with the objective of easy detection, personal decontamination, antidote for chemical warfare agents (like nerve agents, sulphur mustard, phosgene, cyanide, radiation exposure and bacterial agents), along with basic medication aid for pain, fever and inflammation. The kit box also includes a user friendly handbook with a simple standard operating procedure. In addition, the kit is rugged to withstand normal jerks, vibration and is water-proof. PMID:23029921

  11. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-01-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key points Significantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power capacity in

  12. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-06-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key pointsSignificantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power

  13. Optimizing Medical Kits for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minard, Charles G.; FreiredeCarvalho, Mary H.; Iyengar, M. Sriram

    2010-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) uses Monte Carlo methodologies to predict the occurrence of medical events, their mitigation, and the resources required during space flight. The model includes two modules that utilize output from a single model simulation to identify an optimized medical kit for a specified mission scenario. This poster describes two flexible optimization routines built into SAS 9.1. The first routine utilizes a systematic process of elimination to maximize (or minimize) outcomes subject to attribute constraints. The second routine uses a search and mutate approach to minimize medical kit attributes given a set of outcome constraints. There are currently 273 unique resources identified that are used to treat at least one of 83 medical conditions currently in the model.

  14. User`s guide for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) software

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, P.R.; Horak, K.E.; Hagan, D.; Evanko, D.; Nelson, J.; Ryder, C.; Hedlund, D.

    1997-09-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspection Teams (inspectors) and Inspected Parties (host). Current training techniques include table-top inspections and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT has been designed to provide training for challenge inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); however, this training tool can be modified for other inspection regimes. Although ACE-IT provides training from notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities, the primary emphasis of ACE-IT is in the inspection itself--particularly with the concept of managed access. ACE-IT also demonstrates how inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information. This User`s Guide describes the use of the ACE-IT training software.

  15. Decontaminating breast pump kits: new guidance.

    PubMed

    Oxtoby, Kathy

    Various methods can be used to decontaminate breast pump milk collection kits and items related to infant feeding but they have some drawbacks and risks. In 2015, the Joint Working Group of the Healthcare Infection Society and Infection Prevention Society published guidance to support the safe decontamination of this equipment at home and in hospital. This article summarises its recommendations for health professionals to use and communicate to other groups, such as parents and carers. PMID:27400623

  16. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  17. Shuttle orbiter TPS flight repair kit development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and application of a TPS repair kit is presented. The repair kit is designed for on orbit use by a crew member working in the manned maneuvering unit (MMU). The kit includes the necessary equipment and materials to accomplish the repair tasks which include the following: HRSI emittance coating repair, damaged tile repair, missing tile repair, and multiple tile repair. Two types of repair materials required to do the small area repair and the large area repair are described. The materials area cure in place, silicone base ablator for small damaged areas and precured ablator tile for repair of larger damaged areas is examined. The cure in place ablator is also used as an adhesive to bond the precured tiles in place. An applicator for the cure in place ablator, designed to contain a two-part silicon compound, mix the two components at correct ratio, and dispense the materials at rates compatible with mission timelines established for the EVA is described.

  18. Extension of the ACE solar panels is tested in SAEF-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the solar panels is tested on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II (SAEF-II). Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  19. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M.; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them—and perhaps also the other dipeptides—as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  20. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study.

    PubMed

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them-and perhaps also the other dipeptides-as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  1. Rediscovering ACE: Novel insights into the many roles of the angiotensin-converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Janjulia, Tea; Taylor, Brian; Giani, Jorge F.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Shi, Peng D.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Bernstein, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is best known for the catalytic conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. However, the use of gene-targeting techniques has led to mouse models highlighting many other biochemical properties and actions of this enzyme. This review discusses recent studies examining the functional significance of ACE tissue-specific expression and the presence in ACE of two independent catalytic sites with distinct substrates and biological effects. It is these features which explain why ACE makes important contributions to many different physiological processes including renal development, blood pressure control, inflammation and immunity. PMID:23686164

  2. A survival Kit for pancreatic beta cells: stem cell factor and c-Kit receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhi-Chao; Riopel, Matthew; Popell, Alex; Wang, Rennian

    2015-04-01

    The interactions between c-Kit and its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), play an important role in haematopoiesis, pigmentation and gametogenesis. c-Kit is also found in the pancreas, and recent studies have revealed that c-Kit marks a subpopulation of highly proliferative pancreatic endocrine cells that may harbour islet precursors. c-Kit governs and maintains pancreatic endocrine cell maturation and function via multiple signalling pathways. In this review we address the importance of c-Kit signalling within the pancreas, including its profound role in islet morphogenesis, islet vascularisation, and beta cell survival and function. We also discuss the impact of c-Kit signalling in pancreatic disease and the use of c-Kit as a potential target for the development of cell-based and novel drug therapies in the treatment of diabetes.

  3. Validation of a commercial receptor kit Sulfasensor Honey for the screening of sulfonamides in honey according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, V; Rault, A; Verdon, E

    2012-01-01

    The Sulfasensor Honey kit is a receptor test dedicated to the screening of sulphonamide residues respectively in different matrices. The aim of this project was to evaluate and validate this kit according to the Community Reference Laboratory (CRL) guideline for the validation of screening methods to achieve the French control plan for honey. The test is robust, quick (90 min for 40 samples), easy to perform and easy to read. The false-positive rate was estimated to be 12.5%. The detection capabilities CCβ of the kit were lower than or equal to 25 µg kg(-1) for sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, sulfathiazole and sulfapyridine, and between 25 and 50 µg kg(-1) for sulfadiazine and sulfadimethoxine, 150 µg kg(-1) for sulfaquinoxaline, and 1000 µg kg(-1) for sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethizole. Sulfanilamide was not detected by the kit. The kit was applicable to a wide variety of honeys (different floral and geographical origins, liquid or solid). This kit was used to implement the French control plan for the detection of antibiotic residues in honey in 2010 in parallel with an HPLC method. However, in 2011 the kit was replaced by an LC-MS/MS method for the screening and confirmation of sulfonamide residues in honey, which detects all the sulfonamides of interest. PMID:22455559

  4. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-08-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis.

  5. Development and clinical evaluation of a rapid diagnostic kit for feline leukemia virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Shik; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Kim, Hak-Yong; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Jeong, Wooseog; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Lee, Jae-In

    2014-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) causes a range of neoplastic and degenerative diseases in cats. To obtain a more sensitive and convenient diagnosis of the disease, we prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for the FeLV p27 to develop a rapid diagnostic test with enhanced sensitivity and specificity. Among these antibodies, we identified two clones (hybridomas 8F8B5 and 8G7D1) that specifically bound to FeLV and were very suitable for a diagnostic kit. The affinity constants for 8F8B5 and 8G7D1 were 0.35 × 109 and 0.86 × 109, respectively. To investigate the diagnostic abilities of the rapid kit using these antibodies, we performed several clinical studies. Assessment of analytical sensitivity revealed that the detection threshold of the rapid diagnostic test was 2 ng/mL for recombinant p27 and 12.5 × 104 IU/mL for FeLV. When evaluating 252 cat sera samples, the kit was found to have a kappa value of 0.88 compared to polymerase chain reaction (PCR), indicating a significant correlation between data from the rapid diagnostic test and PCR. Sensitivity and specificity of the kit were 95.2% (20/21) and 98.5% (257/261), respectively. Our results demonstrated that the rapid diagnostic test would be a suitable diagnostic tool for the rapid detection of FeLV infection in cats. PMID:24136209

  6. Validation of NO2 and NO from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzenmacher, T.; Wolff, M. A.; Strong, K.; Dupuy, E.; Walker, K. A.; Amekudzi, L. K.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Berthet, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Boone, C. D.; Bramstedt, K.; Brogniez, C.; Brohede, S.; Burrows, J. P.; Catoire, V.; Dodion, J.; Drummond, J. R.; Dufour, D. G.; Funke, B.; Fussen, D.; Goutail, F.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Haley, C. S.; Hendrick, F.; Höpfner, M.; Huret, N.; Jones, N.; Kar, J.; Kramer, I.; Llewellyn, E. J.; López-Puertas, M.; Manney, G.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C. A.; Melo, S.; Mikuteit, S.; Murtagh, D.; Nichitiu, F.; Notholt, J.; Nowlan, C.; Piccolo, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Randall, C.; Raspollini, P.; Ridolfi, M.; Richter, A.; Schneider, M.; Schrems, O.; Silicani, M.; Stiller, G. P.; Taylor, J.; Tétard, C.; Toohey, M.; Vanhellemont, F.; Warneke, T.; Zawodny, J. M.; Zou, J.

    2008-10-01

    Vertical profiles of NO2 and NO have been obtained from solar occultation measurements by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), using an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and (for NO2) an ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectrometer, MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation). In this paper, the quality of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 NO2 and NO and the MAESTRO version 1.2 NO2 data are assessed using other solar occultation measurements (HALOE, SAGE II, SAGE III, POAM III, SCIAMACHY), stellar occultation measurements (GOMOS), limb measurements (MIPAS, OSIRIS), nadir measurements (SCIAMACHY), balloon-borne measurements (SPIRALE, SAOZ) and ground-based measurements (UV-VIS, FTIR). Time differences between the comparison measurements were reduced using either a tight coincidence criterion, or where possible, chemical box models. ACE-FTS NO2 and NO and the MAESTRO NO2 are generally consistent with the correlative data. The ACE-FTS and MAESTRO NO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) profiles agree with the profiles from other satellite data sets to within about 20% between 25 and 40 km, with the exception of MIPAS ESA (for ACE-FTS) and SAGE II (for ACE-FTS (sunrise) and MAESTRO) and suggest a negative bias between 23 and 40 km of about 10%. MAESTRO reports larger VMR values than the ACE-FTS. In comparisons with HALOE, ACE-FTS NO VMRs typically (on average) agree to ±8% from 22 to 64 km and to +10% from 93 to 105 km, with maxima of 21% and 36%, respectively. Partial column comparisons for NO2 show that there is quite good agreement between the ACE instruments and the FTIRs, with a mean difference of +7.3% for ACE-FTS and +12.8% for MAESTRO.

  7. ACE2 overexpression inhibits acquired platinum resistance-induced tumor angiogenesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Ling; Zhou, Jianping; Wan, Huanying; Li, Qingyun; Feng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a multifunctional bioactive peptide in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a newly identified component of RAS. We previously reported that ACE2 overexpression may inhibit cell growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ACE2 on tumor-associated angiogen-esis after the development of acquired platinum resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Four NSCLC cell lines, A549, LLC, A549-DDP and LLC-DDP, were used in vitro, while A549 and A549-DDP cells were used in vivo. A549-DDP and LLC-DDP cells were newly established at our institution as acquired platinum-resistant sublines by culturing the former parent cells in cisplatin (CDDP)-containing conditioned medium for 6 months. These platinum-resistant cells showed significantly higher angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), ACE and VEGF production and lower ACE2 expression than their corresponding parent cells. We showed that ACE2 overexpression inhibited the production of VEGF in vitro and in vivo compared to their corresponding parent cells. We also found that ACE2 overexpression reduced the expression of AT1R and ACE. Additionally, we confirmed that ACE2 overexpres-sion inhibited cell growth and VEGF production while simultaneously suppressing ACE and AT1R expression in human lung cancer xenografts. Our findings indicate that ACE2 overexpression may potentially suppress angiogenesis in NSCLC after the development of acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27460845

  8. ACE-Asia: Size/Time/Compositionally Resolved Aerosols During ACE-Asia Using Continuously Sampling DRUM Technology and Synchrotron-XRF Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, T. A.; Cliff, S. S.; Jimenez-Cruz, M.; Perry, K. D.

    2001-12-01

    The adaptation of focused beam technology to continuously sampling drum impactors (DRUMs) has allowed for an unprecedented number of size/time/compositional analyses of aerosols during the Spring, 2001 ACE-Asia study and a summer follow-on. While continuously sampling and sizing inertial drum impactors have been available for aerosol monitoring and research for the past 30 years, cost and sensitivity considerations have generally limited their use, even in research studies. These constraints have been greatly relaxed by our application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (S-XRF) analysis for elemental analysis of aerosols, both increasing sensitivity and decreasing cost. The intense polarized x-ray beams of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source (ALS) allows us to eliminate 99% of all the background normally present in x-ray analysis while matching the x-ray beam spot to the 0.2 mm "footprint" of our DRUM impactors. This combination allows non-destructive analyses of elements from sodium to uranium (with some minor elements masked by interferences) with a time resolution set during analysis, not during sampling. The DELTA Group and its many collaborators executed a 21 site network of continuously sampling 3 and 8 stage DRUM impactors for the 6 weeks of ACE-Asia. Fewer than 5% of the potential 80,000 samples were lost due to sampling problems. During S-XRF analysis, a nominal time resolution of 6 hrs was chosen, with 2 hrs available as needed during aerosol episodes. The 168 mm drum strips were mounted in frames and exposed to the "white" polarized x-ray beam of ALS Beam Line 10.3.1 for 30 seconds, yielding quantitative elemental determinations from sodium through molybdenum plus heavy elements, certified by 80 analytical standards and NIST SRMs. Minimum detectable limits ranged from 0.1 ng/m3 for sulfur to 0.005 ng/m3 for transition metals such as zinc, allowing scores of positive elemental determinations in each spectrum. During ACE

  9. Signatures of interchange reconnection: STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations combined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Rouillard, A. P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Démoulin, P.; Harra, L. K.; Lavraud, B.; Davies, J. A.; Opitz, A.; Luhmann, J. G.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Galvin, A. B.

    2009-10-01

    Combining STEREO, ACE and Hinode observations has presented an opportunity to follow a filament eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME) on 17 October 2007 from an active region (AR) inside a coronal hole (CH) into the heliosphere. This particular combination of "open" and closed magnetic topologies provides an ideal scenario for interchange reconnection to take place. With Hinode and STEREO data we were able to identify the emergence time and type of structure seen in the in-situ data four days later. On the 21st, ACE observed in-situ the passage of an ICME with "open" magnetic topology. The magnetic field configuration of the source, a mature AR located inside an equatorial CH, has important implications for the solar and interplanetary signatures of the eruption. We interpret the formation of an "anemone" structure of the erupting AR and the passage in-situ of the ICME being disconnected at one leg, as manifested by uni-directional suprathermal electron flux in the ICME, to be a direct result of interchange reconnection between closed loops of the CME originating from the AR and "open" field lines of the surrounding CH.

  10. ACE: A distributed system to manage large data archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, Mike I.; Allen, Frank W.

    1993-01-01

    Competitive pressures in the oil and gas industry are requiring a much tighter integration of technical data into E and P business processes. The development of new systems to accommodate this business need must comprehend the significant numbers of large, complex data objects which the industry generates. The life cycle of the data objects is a four phase progression from data acquisition, to data processing, through data interpretation, and ending finally with data archival. In order to implement a cost effect system which provides an efficient conversion from data to information and allows effective use of this information, an organization must consider the technical data management requirements in all four phases. A set of technical issues which may differ in each phase must be addressed to insure an overall successful development strategy. The technical issues include standardized data formats and media for data acquisition, data management during processing, plus networks, applications software, and GUI's for interpretation of the processed data. Mass storage hardware and software is required to provide cost effective storage and retrieval during the latter three stages as well as long term archival. Mobil Oil Corporation's Exploration and Producing Technical Center (MEPTEC) has addressed the technical and cost issues of designing, building, and implementing an Advanced Computing Environment (ACE) to support the petroleum E and P function, which is critical to the corporation's continued success. Mobile views ACE as a cost effective solution which can give Mobile a competitive edge as well as a viable technical solution.

  11. Uncertainty quantification for accident management using ACE surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Varuttamaseni, A.; Lee, J. C.; Youngblood, R. W.

    2012-07-01

    The alternating conditional expectation (ACE) regression method is used to generate RELAP5 surrogates which are then used to determine the distribution of the peak clad temperature (PCT) during the loss of feedwater accident coupled with a subsequent initiation of the feed and bleed (F and B) operation in the Zion-1 nuclear power plant. The construction of the surrogates assumes conditional independence relations among key reactor parameters. The choice of parameters to model is based on the macroscopic balance statements governing the behavior of the reactor. The peak clad temperature is calculated based on the independent variables that are known to be important in determining the success of the F and B operation. The relationship between these independent variables and the plant parameters such as coolant pressure and temperature is represented by surrogates that are constructed based on 45 RELAP5 cases. The time-dependent PCT for different values of F and B parameters is calculated by sampling the independent variables from their probability distributions and propagating the information through two layers of surrogates. The results of our analysis show that the ACE surrogates are able to satisfactorily reproduce the behavior of the plant parameters even though a quasi-static assumption is primarily used in their construction. The PCT is found to be lower in cases where the F and B operation is initiated, compared to the case without F and B, regardless of the F and B parameters used. (authors)

  12. The Fluid Dynamics Demo Kit: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underhill, Patrick; Fix, Hannah; Haines, Timothy; Prestridge, Kathy; Flack, Karen

    2012-11-01

    This talk will focus on the current contents and efforts building a fluid dynamics demonstration/experiment kit through the APS-DFD Mentoring and Outreach Committee and with funding from the APS DFD. The current experiments include predicting how far the water from a water gun will go, predicting how long a Heron's fountain will run, measuring the viscosity of corn syrup by measuring terminal velocity, and measuring the flow rate through a siphon. We will discuss the testing and development of these experiments and the results of field testing. Ideas for future experiments will also be discussed.

  13. Food kit used by Mercury astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Food kit used by Mercury astronauts. Some is dehydrated and needs water, other packets are ready to eat. Size is measured relative to a ruler. Included are packets of mushroom soup, orange-grapefruit juice, cocoa beverage, pineapple juice, chicken with gravy, pears, strawberries, beef and vegetables and other assorted food containers (08742-3); mechanism for connecting water dispensor to dehydrated food containers to facilitate rehydration (08744); Group packets of ready to eat space food, with size being measured by a ruler (8745).

  14. Characterization of various types of mast cells derived from model mice of familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors with KIT-Asp818Tyr mutation.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Noriko; Nakai, Norihiro; Ohkouchi, Mizuka; Hashikura, Yuka; Liu-Kimura, Ning-Ning; Isozaki, Koji; Hirota, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic mast cell neoplasms and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) often have various types of somatic gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, KIT. Several types of germline gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene have been detected in families with multiple GISTs. All three types of model mice for the familial GISTs with germline c-kit gene mutations at exon 11, 13 or 17 show development of GIST, while they are different from each other in skin mast cell number. Skin mast cell number in the model mice with exon 17 mutation was unchanged compared to the corresponding wild-type mice. In the present study, we characterized various types of mast cells derived from the model mice with exon 17 mutation (KIT-Asp818Tyr) corresponding to human familial GIST case with human KIT-Asp820Tyr to clarify the role of the c-kit gene mutation in mast cells. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs) derived from wild-type mice, heterozygotes and homozygotes were used for the experiments. Immortalized BMMCs, designated as IMC-G4 cells, derived from BMMCs of a homozygote during long-term culture were also used. Ultrastructure, histamine contents, proliferation profiles and phosphorylation of various signaling molecules in those cells were examined. In IMC-G4 cells, presence of additional mutation(s) of the c-kit gene and effect of KIT inhibitors on both KIT autophosphorylation and cell proliferation were also analyzed. We demonstrated that KIT-Asp818Tyr did not affect ultrastructure and proliferation profiles but did histamine contents in BMMCs. IMC-G4 cells had an additional novel c-kit gene mutation of KIT-Tyr421Cys which is considered to induce neoplastic transformation of mouse mast cells and the mutation appeared to be resistant to a KIT inhibitor of imatinib but sensitive to another KIT inhibitor of nilotinib. IMC-G4 cells might be a useful mast cell line to investigate mast cell biology.

  15. KIT D816V-mutated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in indolent systemic mastocytosis are associated with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Montero, Andres C; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Alvarez-Twose, Ivan; Teodosio, Cristina; Sanchez-Muñoz, Laura; Muñiz, Carmen; Muñoz-Gonzalez, Javier I; Mayado, Andrea; Matito, Almudena; Caldas, Carolina; Morgado, Jose M; Escribano, Luis; Orfao, Alberto

    2016-02-11

    Multilineage involvement of bone marrow (BM) hematopoiesis by the somatic KIT D816V mutation is present in a subset of adult indolent systemic mastocytosis (ISM) patients in association with a poorer prognosis. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from ISM patients by the KIT D816V mutation and its potential impact on disease progression and outcome. This mutation was investigated in highly purified BM MSCs and other BM cell populations from 83 ISM patients followed for a median of 116 months. KIT D816V-mutated MSCs were detected in 22 of 83 cases. All MSC-mutated patients had multilineage KIT mutation (100% vs 30%, P = .0001) and they more frequently showed involvement of lymphoid plus myeloid BM cells (59% vs 22%; P = .03) and a polyclonal pattern of inactivation of the X-chromosome of KIT-mutated BM mast cells (64% vs 0%; P = .01) vs other multilineage ISM cases. Moreover, presence of KIT-mutated MSCs was associated with more advanced disease features, a greater rate of disease progression (50% vs 17%; P = .04), and a shorter progression-free survival (P ≤ .003). Overall, these results support the notion that ISM patients with mutated MSCs may have acquired the KIT mutation in a common pluripotent progenitor cell, prior to differentiation into MSCs and hematopoietic precursor cells, before the X-chromosome inactivation process occurs. From a clinical point of view, acquisition of the KIT mutation in an earlier BM precursor cell confers a significantly greater risk for disease progression and a poorer outcome.

  16. The Steel/W transduction pathway: kit autophosphorylation and its association with a unique subset of cytoplasmic signaling proteins is induced by the Steel factor.

    PubMed Central

    Rottapel, R; Reedijk, M; Williams, D E; Lyman, S D; Anderson, D M; Pawson, T; Bernstein, A

    1991-01-01

    The W/c-kit and Steel loci respectively encode a receptor tyrosine kinase (Kit) and its extracellular ligand, Steel factor, which are essential for the development of hematopoietic, melanocyte, and germ cell lineages in the mouse. To determine the biochemical basis of the Steel/W developmental pathway, we have investigated the response of the Kit tyrosine kinase and several potential cytoplasmic targets to stimulation with Steel in mast cells derived from normal and mutant W mice. In normal mast cells, Steel induces Kit to autophosphorylate on tyrosine and bind to phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K) and phospholipase C-gamma 1 but not detectably to Ras GTPase-activating protein. Additionally, we present evidence that Kit tyrosine phosphorylation acts as a switch to promote complex formation with PI3K. In mast cells from mice homozygous for the W42 mutant allele, Kit is not tyrosine phosphorylated and fails to bind PI3K following Steel stimulation. In contrast, in the transformed mast cell line P815, Kit is constitutively phosphorylated and binds to PI3K in the absence of ligand. These results suggest that Kit autophosphorylation and its physical association with a unique subset of cytoplasmic signaling proteins are critical for mammalian development. Images PMID:1710023

  17. Formative Evaluation of ACES Program: Findings from Surveys and Interviews Year One, Grades 11 and 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolanin, Natalie; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2015-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability (OSA) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) is conducting a multiyear evaluation of the Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success (ACES) program. The ACES program is a collaboration between MCPS, Montgomery College (MC), and the Universities at Shady Grove (USG) to create a seamless pathway…

  18. Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), Concept Simulations using Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don

    2006-01-01

    Project Objectives include: a) CNS Model Development; b Design/Integration of baseline set of CNS Models into ACES; c) Implement Enhanced Simulation Capabilities in ACES; d) Design and Integration of Enhanced (2nd set) CNS Models; and e) Continue with CNS Model Integration/Concept evaluations.

  19. Validation of NO2 and NO from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzenmacher, T.; Wolff, M. A.; Stong, K.; Dupuy, E.; Walker, K. A.; Amekudzi, L. K.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Berthet, G.; Blumenstock, T.; Boone, C. D.; Bramstedt, K.; Brogniez, C.; Brohede, S.; Burrows, J. P.; Catoire, V.; Dodion, J.; Drummond, J. R.; Dufour, D. G.; Funke, B.; Fussen, D.; Goutail, F.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Haley, C. S.; Hendrick, F.; Höpfner, M.; Huret, N.; Jones, N.; Kar, J.; Kramer, I.; Llewellyn, E. J.; López-Puertas, M.; Manney, G.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C. A.; Melo, S.; Mikuteit, S.; Murthag, D.; Nichitiu, F.; Notholt, J.; Nowlan, C.; Piccolo, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Randall, C.; Raspollini, P.; Ridolfi, M.; Richter, A.; Schneider, M.; Schrems, O.; Silicani, M.; Stiller, G. P.; Taylor, J.; Tétard, C.; Toohey, M.; Vanhellemont, F.; Warneke, T.; Zawodny, J. M.; Zou, J.

    2008-02-01

    Vertical profiles of NO2 and NO have been obtained from solar occultation measurements by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), using an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer, ACE-FTS, and an ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectrometer, MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation). In this paper, the quality of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 NO2 and NO and the MAESTRO version 1.2 NO2 data are assessed using other solar occultation measurements (HALOE, SAGE II, SAGE III, POAM III, SCIAMACHY), stellar occultation measurements (GOMOS), limb measurements (MIPAS, OSIRIS), nadir measurements (SCIAMACHY), balloon measurements (SPIRALE, SAOZ) and ground-based measurements (UV-VIS, FTIR). Time differences between the comparison measurements were reduced using either a tight coincidence criterion, or where possible, chemical box models. ACE-FTS NO2 and NO and the MAESTRO NO2 are generally consistent with the correlative data. The ACE-FTS NO2 VMRs agree with the satellite data sets to within about 20% between 25 and 40 km, and suggest a negative bias between 23 and 40 km of about textminus10%. In comparisons with HALOE, ACE-FTS NO VMRs typically agree to ±8% from 22 to 64 km and to +10% from 93 to 105 km. Partial column comparisons for NO2 show that there is fair agreement between the ACE instruments and the FTIRs, with a mean difference of +7.3% for ACE-FTS and +12.8% for MAESTRO.

  20. Cutaneous allergy to insulin: could statins and ACE inhibitors play a role? A case report.

    PubMed

    Pitrola, D; MacIver, C; Mallipedhi, A; Udiawar, M; Price, D E; Stephens, J W

    2014-04-01

    Insulin allergy is rare. Both statins and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may cause local urticarial skin reactions and have been implicated to precipitate local reactions to insulin. We describe a case of a localised urticarial allergic reaction related to insulin use in a patient co-prescribed an ACE inhibitor and statin. PMID:24534533

  1. Preparing GMAT for Operational Maneuver Planning of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qureshi, Rizwan Hamid; Hughes, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is an open-source space mission design, analysis and trajectory optimization tool. GMAT is developed by a team of NASA, private industry, public and private contributors. GMAT is designed to model, optimize and estimate spacecraft trajectories in flight regimes ranging from low Earth orbit to lunar applications, interplanetary trajectories and other deep space missions. GMAT has also been flight qualified to support operational maneuver planning for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission. ACE was launched in August, 1997 and is orbiting the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. The primary science objective of ACE is to study the composition of both the solar wind and the galactic cosmic rays. Operational orbit determination, maneuver operations and product generation for ACE are conducted by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF). This paper discusses the entire engineering lifecycle and major operational certification milestones that GMAT successfully completed to obtain operational certification for the ACE mission. Operational certification milestones such as gathering of the requirements for ACE operational maneuver planning, gap analysis, test plans and procedures development, system design, pre-shadow operations, training to FDF ACE maneuver planners, shadow operations, Test Readiness Review (TRR) and finally Operational Readiness Review (ORR) are discussed. These efforts have demonstrated that GMAT is flight quality software ready to support ACE mission operations in the FDF.

  2. 75 FR 64737 - Automated Commercial Environment (ACE): Announcement of a National Customs Automation Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Automated Commercial Environment (ACE): Announcement of a... required advance ocean and rail data through the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE). This notice... application period for participation, outlines the development and evaluation methodology to be used,...

  3. 77 FR 20835 - National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Portal Accounts and Subsequent Revision Notices: 67 FR 21800 (May 1, 2002); 70 FR 5199 (February 1, 2005); 69 FR 5360 and 69 FR 5362 (February 4, 2004); 69 FR 54302 (September 8, 2004). ACE System of Records Notice: 71 FR 3109 (January 19, 2006). Terms/Conditions for Access to the ACE Portal and...

  4. 76 FR 34246 - Automated Commercial Environment (ACE); Announcement of National Customs Automation Program Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ..., 2003, CBP published a final rule in the Federal Register (68 FR 68140) to effectuate the provisions of... 27, 2006 (71 FR 62922), CBP designated the ACE Truck Manifest System as the approved system for... in which CBP had planned to require the use of ACE. See, 72 FR 53789, September 20, 2007....

  5. Absence of cell surface expression of human ACE leads to perinatal death.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Annie; Acharya, K Ravi; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Quenech'du, Nicole; Gribouval, Olivier; Morinière, Vincent; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Corvol, Pierre

    2014-03-15

    Renal tubular dysgenesis (RTD) is a recessive autosomal disease characterized most often by perinatal death. It is due to the inactivation of any of the major genes of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), one of which is the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). ACE is present as a tissue-bound enzyme and circulates in plasma after its solubilization. In this report, we present the effect of different ACE mutations associated with RTD on ACE intracellular trafficking, secretion and enzymatic activity. One truncated mutant, R762X, responsible for neonatal death was found to be an enzymatically active, secreted form, not inserted in the plasma membrane. In contrast, another mutant, R1180P, was compatible with life after transient neonatal renal insufficiency. This mutant was located at the plasma membrane and rapidly secreted. These results highlight the importance of tissue-bound ACE versus circulating ACE and show that the total absence of cell surface expression of ACE is incompatible with life. In addition, two missense mutants (W594R and R828H) and two truncated mutants (Q1136X and G1145AX) were also studied. These mutants were neither inserted in the plasma membrane nor secreted. Finally, the structural implications of these ACE mutations were examined by molecular modelling, which suggested some important structural alterations such as disruption of intra-molecular non-covalent interactions (e.g. salt bridges).

  6. SCORE/ACE Counselor Handbook. Service Corps of Retired Executives. Active Corps of Executives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsverk, Arvel; And Others

    This counselor handbook is intended to help Service Corps of Retired Executives/Active Corps of Executives (SCORE/ACE) counselors to plan and conduct counseling services more effectively. Included in the introductory section are an overview of the SCORE/ACE counseling program, a discussion of what the counselor does, directions for completing…

  7. Education for 2001 and Beyond: Imperatives and Possibilities. Outcomes from the ACE "Education 2000" International Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unicorn: Journal of the Australian College of Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This issue of "Unicorn," the journal of the Australian College of Education (ACE), contains extracts and summaries of 13 presentations given at the international ACE conference, "Education 2000: Priorities for the New Millennium." The papers not only address the five themes of the conference (priorities for learning, priorities for supporting…

  8. Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance Models in ACES: Design Implementation and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don; Satapathy, Goutam; Kumar, Anil; Khanna, Manu

    2006-01-01

    Presentation objectives include: a) Overview of the ACES/CNS System Models Design and Integration; b) Configuration Capabilities available for Models and Simulations using ACES with CNS Modeling; c) Descriptions of recently added, Enhanced CNS Simulation Capabilities; and d) General Concepts Ideas that Utilize CNS Modeling to Enhance Concept Evaluations.

  9. Data Center Energy Efficiency Measurement Assessment Kit Guide and Specification

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-26

    A portable and temporary wireless mesh assessment kit can be used to speed up and reduce the costs of a data center energy use assessment and overcome the issues with respect to shutdowns. The assessment kit is comprised of temperature, relative humidity, and pressure sensors. Also included are power meters that can be installed on computer room air conditioners (CRACs) without intrusive interruption of data center operations. The assessment kit produces data required for a detailed energy assessment of the data center.

  10. 21 CFR 880.5960 - Lice removal kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lice removal kit. 880.5960 Section 880.5960 Food... § 880.5960 Lice removal kit. (a) Identification. The lice removal kit is a comb or comb-like device intended to remove and/or kill lice and nits from head and body hair. It may or may not be battery...

  11. 33 CFR 144.01-30 - First-aid kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false First-aid kit. 144.01-30 Section 144.01-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-30 First-aid kit. On each manned platform a first-aid kit...

  12. 46 CFR 184.710 - First-aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false First-aid kits. 184.710 Section 184.710 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) VESSEL CONTROL AND MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous § 184.710 First-aid kits. A vessel must carry either a first-aid kit approved...

  13. To Kit or Not to Kit? Evaluating and Implementing Science Materials and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Ellen; Melin, Jacque; Bair, Mary

    2016-01-01

    With the release of the "Next Generation Science Standards," many schools are reexamining the science materials they are using. Textbook companies and kit developers are eager to meet the demand for "NGSS"-aligned teaching materials. Teacher may have been asked to serve on a science curriculum committee, or to evaluate current…

  14. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... outer package (excluding dry ice). For transportation by aircraft, no more than 1 L or 1 kg of hazardous material may be contained in one kit (excluding dry ice); (4) Each package must conform to the packaging... dioxide, solid (Dry ice), UN1845, no other hazardous materials may be packed within the same...

  15. Selling Addiction: A Workshop Kit on Tobacco and Alcohol Advertising. A Media Literacy Workshop Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Mary Ellen; And Others

    This kit consists of: (1) a leader's guide; (2) an 18-minute videotape containing three 6-minute discussion starter segments analyzing typical commercials and advertising techniques; (3) a special issue of "Media Values" magazine on the theme "Fatal Attraction: The Selling of Addiction"; (4) an 8-page booklet "Awareness to Action: Media Literacy…

  16. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

    2002-09-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel

  17. An ace-1 gene duplication resorbs the fitness cost associated with resistance in Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Assogba, Benoît S.; Djogbénou, Luc S.; Milesi, Pascal; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Perez, Julie; Ayala, Diego; Chandre, Fabrice; Makoutodé, Michel; Labbé, Pierrick; Weill, Mylène

    2015-01-01

    Widespread resistance to pyrethroids threatens malaria control in Africa. Consequently, several countries switched to carbamates and organophophates insecticides for indoor residual spraying. However, a mutation in the ace-1 gene conferring resistance to these compounds (ace-1R allele), is already present. Furthermore, a duplicated allele (ace-1D) recently appeared; characterizing its selective advantage is mandatory to evaluate the threat. Our data revealed that a unique duplication event, pairing a susceptible and a resistant copy of the ace-1 gene spread through West Africa. Further investigations revealed that, while ace-1D confers less resistance than ace-1R, the high fitness cost associated with ace-1R is almost completely suppressed by the duplication for all traits studied. ace-1 duplication thus represents a permanent heterozygote phenotype, selected, and thus spreading, due to the mosaic nature of mosquito control. It provides malaria mosquito with a new evolutionary path that could hamper resistance management. PMID:26434951

  18. The effect of saturation of ACE binding sites on the pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, J R; Meredith, P A; Hughes, D M; Elliott, H L

    1992-01-01

    1. Eight healthy male volunteers received oral enalapril, 10 mg, in the presence and absence of pretreatment with captopril, 50 mg, twice daily for 5 days. 2. Enalaprilat pharmacokinetics were characterised after both doses of enalapril to investigate the effect of saturating ACE binding sites by pretreatment with captopril. 3. The pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat were best described by a one compartment model with zero order input incorporating saturable binding to plasma and tissue ACE. 4. Values of AUC (0.72 h) for enalaprilat were 419 +/- 97 and 450 +/- 87 ng ml-1 h in the presence and absence of captopril, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant nor were there any other differences in model parameters. 5. Induction of ACE by captopril resulting in an increase in the number of ACE binding sites, may have obscured any effect of captopril on the occupancy of ACE binding sites by enalapril. PMID:1312853

  19. Tissue and plasma angiotensin converting enzyme and the response to ACE inhibitor drugs.

    PubMed Central

    MacFadyen, R J; Lees, K R; Reid, J L

    1991-01-01

    1. There is a body of circumstantial and direct evidence supporting the existence and functional importance of a tissue based RAS at a variety of sites. 2. The relation between circulatory and tissue based systems is complex. The relative importance of the two in determining haemodynamic effects is unknown. 3. Despite the wide range of ACE inhibitors already available, it remains unclear whether there are genuine differences related to tissue specificity. 4. Pathological states such as chronic cardiac failure need to be explored with regard to the contribution of tissue based ACE activities in generating acute and chronic haemodynamic responses to ACE inhibitors. 5. The role of tissue vs plasma ACE activity may be clarified by study of the relation between drug concentration and haemodynamic effect, provided that the temporal dissociation is examined and linked to circulating and tissue based changes in ACE activity, angiotensin peptides and sympathetic hormones. PMID:1849731

  20. Adolescent parents and their children: a multifaceted approach to prevention of adverse childhood experiences (ACE).

    PubMed

    Mayer, Lynn Milgram; Thursby, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Childhood experiences can have long-term effects. Research shows that children who undergo adverse childhood experiences (ACE) often have negative health and mental health outcomes later in life. Children of adolescent parents with high ACE Scores are at greater risk of ACE. As such, an intergenerational approach to preventing ACE is proposed in this article, addressing the needs of both the adolescent parent and their children. A review of the literature indicates that a public health perspective can guide the development of a prevention model aimed at reducing the effects of ACE. The current article proposes a universal, multifaceted, and interdisciplinary prevention science model that has two targets: adolescent parents and their children. Schools and early childhood programs can be mobilized to offer community prevention strategies across realms to include the individual, community, provider, coalitions/networks, organizational practices, and policy/legislation. PMID:22970783

  1. Evaluate the Application of TPH test kits to Identify the Potential Contaminants in Gas Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, P. Y.; Liu, C. W.; Liu, W. Y.

    2012-04-01

    This study is focusing on the utility and applicability of the portable equipments such as, photo ionization detector (PID) and flame ionization detector (FID) for the determination of contaminants during the investigation of various gas stations. According to the onsite screening results, high contaminated soil samples were sent to analytical laboratory for the detection and quantification of the contaminants present therein. However, due to limitations, PID and FID cannot detect the low vapor pressure components. Hence, they cannot reflect the real situation of the contaminated soil samples and areas. This study summarizes the analytical results of total 37 soil samples, collecting from 17 gas stations. Soil samples were not only analyzed according to the standard method of Taiwan EPA in the laboratory, but also tested using the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) test kits, following the USEPA method 9074, to evaluate the TPH concentration in soil samples. With test kits, onsite, first the TPH was extracted from the soil samples using methanol and then mixed with emulsifier to produce turbidity, and finally then measured using the turbidity meter. The TPH test kits method is simple and rapid, and not time consuming like the laboratory method. A positive relationship has been observed (co-efficient of determination, R2 = 0.74) comparing between the results obtained from the laboratory test and kits test methods, especially for the high carbon content oil such as, diesel, but it does not show the obvious relationship with gasoline. Number of advantages has been considered in using the TPH test kits including, easily portable, simple and rapid testing, cost-effective, and onsite quantification. The technique can be applied for high carbon content oil contamination sites during soil sampling, to realize the actual situations and the promoting confirmation efficiency.

  2. Phase II Study of Nilotinib in Melanoma Harboring KIT Alterations Following Progression to Prior KIT Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Richard D.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Gonzalez, Rene; Lutzky, Jose; O’Day, Steven J.; Hamid, Omid; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Teitcher, Jerrold B.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Bastian, Boris C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hodi, F. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although durable responses can be achieved with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib in melanomas harboring KIT mutations, the efficacy of alternative inhibitors after progression to imatinib and the activity of these agents on brain metastases is unknown. Experimental Design We conducted a phase II study of nilotinib 400 mg BID in two cohorts of patients with melanomas harboring KIT mutations or amplification: A) those refractory or intolerant to a prior KIT inhibitor; and B) those with brain metastases. The primary endpoint was 4-month disease control rate. Secondary endpoints included response rate, time-to-progression and overall survival. A Simon two-stage and a single-stage design was planned to assess for the primary endpoint in Cohorts A and B, respectively. Results Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 treated (11-Cohort A; 8-Cohort B). Three patients on Cohort A (27%; 95% CI, 8% – 56%) and 1 on Cohort B (12.5%; 90% CI, 0.6% – 47%) achieved the primary endpoint. Two partial responses were observed in Cohort A (18.2%, 90% CI, 3% – 47%); none were observed in Cohort B. The median time-to-progression and overall survival was 3·3 (90% CI, 2.1 – 3.9 months) and 9.1 months (90% CI, 4.3 – 14.2 months), respectively, in all treated patients. Conclusion Nilotinib may achieve disease control in patients with melanoma harboring KIT alterations and whose disease progressed after imatinib therapy. The efficacy of this agent in KIT altered melanoma with brain metastasis is limited. PMID:25695690

  3. [First aid kits: for whom and why?].

    PubMed

    Tessier, D

    1997-01-01

    Anyone traveling far from home should take along a first aid kit. Contents should be chosen carefully with the awareness that infection is not the main problem facing travelers. The basic kit is the same regardless of the purpose or duration of the trip or of the health and knowledge of the traveler. Priority should be given to allergic risks, to the quality of the thermometer, to the packaging of indispensable medications to a medical certificate justifying transport of drugs and syringes for personal medical use, and to preventive devices for sexually transmitted diseases. Travel in tropical zones raises special requirements especially with regard to infectious risks such as traveler's diarrhea, malaria, fungal and bacterial contamination. Protection against insect-borne disease and sun exposure are also important considerations for travel in the tropics. Depending on planned activities, travelers should carry medication for prevention and treatment of motion sickness and emergency treatment of envenimation. Due to local inavailabilities, it may be necessary to pack contraceptives, personal hygiene products, and common medications.

  4. The Virtual Physiological Human ToolKit.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jonathan; Cervenansky, Frederic; De Fabritiis, Gianni; Fenner, John; Friboulet, Denis; Giorgino, Toni; Manos, Steven; Martelli, Yves; Villà-Freixa, Jordi; Zasada, Stefan; Lloyd, Sharon; McCormack, Keith; Coveney, Peter V

    2010-08-28

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) is a major European e-Science initiative intended to support the development of patient-specific computer models and their application in personalized and predictive healthcare. The VPH Network of Excellence (VPH-NoE) project is tasked with facilitating interaction between the various VPH projects and addressing issues of common concern. A key deliverable is the 'VPH ToolKit'--a collection of tools, methodologies and services to support and enable VPH research, integrating and extending existing work across Europe towards greater interoperability and sustainability. Owing to the diverse nature of the field, a single monolithic 'toolkit' is incapable of addressing the needs of the VPH. Rather, the VPH ToolKit should be considered more as a 'toolbox' of relevant technologies, interacting around a common set of standards. The latter apply to the information used by tools, including any data and the VPH models themselves, and also to the naming and categorizing of entities and concepts involved. Furthermore, the technologies and methodologies available need to be widely disseminated, and relevant tools and services easily found by researchers. The VPH-NoE has thus created an online resource for the VPH community to meet this need. It consists of a database of tools, methods and services for VPH research, with a Web front-end. This has facilities for searching the database, for adding or updating entries, and for providing user feedback on entries. Anyone is welcome to contribute. PMID:20643685

  5. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  6. The Qiagen Investigator® Quantiplex HYres as an alternative kit for DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Laurin, Nancy

    2015-05-01

    The Investigator® Quantiplex HYres kit was evaluated as a potential replacement for dual DNA quantification of casework samples. This kit was determined to be highly sensitive with a limit of quantification and limit of detection of 0.0049ng/μL and 0.0003ng/μL, respectively, for both human and male DNA, using full or half reaction volumes. It was also accurate in assessing the amount of male DNA present in 96 mock and actual casework male:female mixtures (various ratios) processed in this exercise. The close correlation between the male/human DNA ratios expressed in percentages derived from the Investigator® Quantiplex HYres quantification results and the male DNA proportion calculated in mixed AmpFlSTR® Profiler® Plus or AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® Plus profiles, using the Amelogenin Y peak and STR loci, allowed guidelines to be developed to facilitate decisions regarding when to submit samples to Y-STR rather than autosomal STR profiling. The internal control (IC) target was shown to be more sensitive to inhibitors compared to the human and male DNA targets included in the Investigator® Quantiplex HYres kit serving as a good quality assessor of DNA extracts. The new kit met our criteria of enhanced sensitivity, accuracy, consistency, reliability and robustness for casework DNA quantification. PMID:25603128

  7. Coagulase testing compared with commercial kits for routinely identifying Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Rossney, A S; English, L F; Keane, C T

    1990-01-01

    Five commercial Staphylococcus aureus identification kits--Staphaurex (Wellcome), Staphylase (Oxoid), Staphyslide (bioMèrieux), Biostaph (Medlabs) and Bacto Latex (Difco)--were evaluated for the routine identification of S aureus from primary plates in the routine microbiology laboratory. Comparison was made with two methods of tube coagulase testing and five slide methods for detecting clumping factor (slide coagulase testing). Performances were assessed for two groups of organisms, staphylococcal species alone and a combined staphylococcal and non-staphylococcal species group. The effects of growth on selective media and storage of isolates at room temperature and 4 degrees C were investigated. Selective media cannot be recommended, nor can storage of isolates before testing. Ranked according to efficiency value with the combined staphylococcal and non-staphylococcal species group, the kits and coagulase methods performed as follows (the figures in parentheses are the efficiency values for the staphylococcal group alone): tube coagulase reference method 100% (100%), tube coagulase SJH method 99% (99%), Staphaurex 94% (97%), Staphylase 93% (96%), slide coagulase method No 4 93% (94%), slide coagulase method No 5 93% (93%), Bacto Latex 92% (95%), Staphyslide 92% (95%), and Biostaph 87% (91%). It is concluded that a commercial S aureus identification kit should not replace tube coagulase testing for the routine identification of the organism from primary plates and that, even the kits with the best performances, have little advantage over a good slide coagulase test method. PMID:2185284

  8. Polar Vortex Structure with ACE and OSIRIS Ozone Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, W. F.

    2005-12-01

    The polar vortex is the dominant feature of stratospheric wind field. The ACE instrument on SCISAT-1 can map ozone fields from 8 to 50 km in 16 days. The OSIRIS instrument on ODIN can map the ozone fields at 2 km intervals from 10 km to over 65 km on a daily basis. They can also provide aerosol maps at the lower levels. These can be used for dynamical studies such as vortex breakdown. Four years of ozone data from the OSIRIS instrument on ODIN have been processed using the Kerr three wavelength algorithm. The OSIRIS ozone data is on the web as orbital slices. TOMS like maps have been formed at 2 km intervals from 10 km to 42 km by mapping the OSIRIS ozone product onto polar map projections. This mapset allows investigations of the vertical structure and evolution of the vortex. The downward motion in the vortex is clearly demonstrated by aerosol maps which show a clean vortex due to the descent within the vortex. The Antarctic vortex and the Arctic vortex were investigated using the ACE profiles and the OSIRIS ozone product. OSIRIS data is available from Oct 1, 2001 to April 30, 2005 as maps at 2km intervals from 10 km to 42 km. An example is demonstrated using the split vortex event of September 25, 2002; the split extends from 14 km up to 42 km. However, the 10 km and 12 km levels showed no vortex during the split. There is a close relationship of vortex ozone with PV and hence to the vortex wind. These maps are used to study the vortex in the Arctic and the Antarctic. In particular, the vortex breakdown in the two hemispheres is compared. The ozone vortex extends up to 55 km at the wind null region. There are significant differences in the hemispheres in the vortex below 24 km. A comparison of the features of the Arctic and Antarctic vorticies was conducted. The Antarctic vortex usually extends from 10 km up to over 42 km whereas in the Arctic, the vortex is only obvious from 16 km to 42km. The main hemispheric differences seem to be in the lower stratosphere

  9. Synthetic copolymer kit for radionuclide blood-pool imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, A.A. Jr.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    A synthetic blood pool imaging agent labeled with {sup 99m}Tc is reported. The agent, methoxypolyethylene glycolpoly-L-Iysyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate monoamide was synthesized from a covalent graft copolymer of methoxypolyethylene glycol succinate (molecular weight 5.1 kD) with subsequent modification of the product with diethylenetriamineacetyl residues. The polymer was formulated into a kit that contained Sn(II) and sodium acetate for radiolabeling with {sup 99m}Tc. Biodistribution studies were performed in rats. Blood-pool imaging and blood clearance determination was carried out in rabbits and in a rhesus monkey. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled agent [specific activity greater than 3.7 GBq/mg; radiochemical purity more than 98% by thin-layer and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)] demonstrated remarkable stability in solution (pH 5.5-6.5) with no radioactive products of degradation detectable by HPLC even at 24 hr postlabeling. The agent exhibited prolonged circulation in the blood with a half-life of 31.5 hr in rabbits. Bio-distribution in rats showed a lack of substantial accumulation of the agent in the reticuloendothelial system. Sequential acquisitions were performed in a rhesus monkey. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled polymer kit was compared with the {sup 99m}Tc-red blood cells (RBCs) labeled in vitro. Both methods produced similar heart-to-lung ratios. The ratios remained essentially unchanged for up to 15 hr postinjection. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled methaxypolyethylene glycol-poly-L-lysyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate monoamide is an attractive alternative to radiolabeled RBCs for blood pool imaging applications. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Imatinib mesylate treatment in a dog with gastrointestinal stromal tumors with a c-kit mutation.

    PubMed

    Irie, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Ohtake, Yuzo; Suzuki, Hitomi; Nagata, Nao; Miyoshi, Takuma; Kagawa, Yumiko; Yamagami, Tetsushi

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old spayed mixed-breed dog was diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) after histopathological examination of an abdominal mass. Five months after surgical resection of the tumor, we detected the recurrence of GIST with multiple disseminated abdominal lesions. A sequence analysis of cDNA obtained from a biopsy of the recurrent tumors revealed a mutation within exon 9 of the c-kit gene (1523A>T, Asn(508)Ile), which has been shown to cause ligand-independent phosphorylation of the KIT protein in GISTs and canine mast cell tumors (MCTs). Upon detection of the recurrent tumors, we initiated treatment with imatinib mesylate (10 mg/kg, q 24 hr). After 2 months, the dog achieved complete remission. Our findings indicate that canine GIST, and possibly MCT, may be responsive to molecular-targeted therapy.

  11. Detector Data Simulation and Filtering Strategy for the European Laser Timing (ELT) Experiment On-board ACES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamann, Christoph; Schlicht, Anja; Hugentobler, Urs; Pühl, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    Due to the rapid progress of frequency standards in the optical domain and increasingly demanding applications in metrology and fundamental physics studies, accuracy requirements on frequency and time transfer are continuously increasing. Most present satellite based clock comparison systems work in the microwave domain and are based on GPS and TWSTFT (Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer). Recently, systems such as LASSO (LAser Synchronization from a Stationary Orbit) and T2L2 (Time Transfer by Laser Link) promised even better performance in the optical domain. In 2016 the ESA mission ACES (Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space) will bring a new generation of atomic clocks into the microgravity environment of the ISS, which will distribute a stable and accurate time base. In the frame of this mission an optical link called ELT (European Laser Timing) is presently under study, which is subject of our work. The on-board hardware of ELT consists of a corner cube retro-reflector (CCR), a single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD), and an event timer connected to the ACES time scale. The SPAD detects laser pulses fired towards the payload and the CCR reflects these pulses back to the ground station. The detection dates are recorded in the ACES time scale, while the two-way time of flight can be used for precise ranging. Consequently, time transfer and clock analysis can be performed based on data triplets comprising the time of transmission of a laser pulse, its time of reception at the ELT-detector and its time of reception back at the station-detector. We present simulations of these triplets based on simple ISS orbits including preset attitude and accurate Earth orientation data. In addition, we consider experimentally derived detector, reflector, and background noise characteristics as well as simulations of the ACES clocks. The ELT data center, which will be hosted by our institution, will have to extract the data triplets from the large amount of noisy detector dates

  12. Cosmic Ray Helium Intensities over the Solar Cycle from ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeNolfo, G. A.; Yanasak, N. E.; Binns, W. R.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink. P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Lave, K.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Ogliore, R.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenback, M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of cosmic-ray helium energy spectra provide important constraints on cosmic ray origin and propagation. However, helium intensities measured at Earth are affected by solar modulation, especially below several GeV/nucleon. Observations of helium intensities over a solar cycle are important for understanding how solar modulation affects galactic cosmic ray intensities and for separating the contributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays. The Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on ACE has been measuring cosmic ray isotopes, including helium, since 1997 with high statistical precision. We present helium elemental intensities between approx. 10 to approx. 100 MeV/nucleon from the Solar Isotope Spectrometer (SIS) and CRIS observations over a solar cycle and compare these results with the observations from other satellite and balloon-borne instruments, and with GCR transport and solar modulation models.

  13. Statins, ACE inhibitors and ARBs in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Mach, François

    2009-06-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in developed and developing countries. It is well accepted that several diseases - including hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus - increase CVD. More recently also chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, have been shown to accelerate CVD. This association further supports a responsible role for inflammatory processes in all stages of CVD pathophysiology. Clinically, CVD ranges through different acute and chronic syndromes with ischemic symptoms in distal tissues, including heart, cerebral region or peripheral arteries. Several treatments for reducing CVD are under investigation. In this review we focus on statins, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs), updating therapeutic evidence from the last clinical trials with particular relevance to diabetic patients. PMID:19520311

  14. Risk-benefit ratio of angiotensin antagonists versus ACE inhibitors in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, D A; Gehr, T W; Fernandez, A

    2000-05-01

    The effective treatment of hypertension is an extremely important consideration in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Virtually any drug class--with the possible exception of diuretics--can be used to treat hypertension in the patient with ESRD. Despite there being such a wide range of treatment options, drugs which interrupt the renin-angiotensin axis are generally suggested as agents of choice in this population, even though the evidence in support of their preferential use is quite scanty. ACE inhibitors, and more recently angiotensin antagonists, are the 2 drug classes most commonly employed to alter renin-angiotensin axis activity and therefore produce blood pressure control. ACE inhibitor use in patients with ESRD can sometimes prove an exacting proposition. ACE inhibitors are variably dialysed, with compounds such as catopril, enalapril, lisinopril and perindopril undergoing substantial cross-dialyser clearance during a standard dialysis session. This phenomenon makes the selection of a dose and the timing of administration for an ACE inhibitor a complex issue in patients with ESRD. Furthermore, ACE inhibitors are recognised as having a range of nonpressor effects that are pertinent to patients with ESRD. Such effects include their ability to decrease thirst drive and to decrease erythropoiesis. In addition, ACE inhibitors have a unique adverse effect profile. As is the case with their use in patients without renal failure, use of ACE inhibitors in patients with ESRD can be accompanied by cough and less frequently by angioneurotic oedema. In the ESRD population, ACE inhibitor use is also accompanied by so-called anaphylactoid dialyser reactions. Angiotensin antagonists are similar to ACE inhibitors in their mechanism of blood pressure lowering. Angiotensin antagonists are not dialysable and therefore can be distinguished from a number of the ACE inhibitors. In addition, the adverse effect profile for angiotensin antagonists is remarkably bland

  15. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  16. Determining the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) status of FIV-vaccinated cats using point-of-care antibody kits.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mark E; Malik, Richard; Hall, Evelyn; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2015-10-01

    This study challenges the commonly held view that the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection status of FIV-vaccinated cats cannot be determined using point-of-care antibody test kits due to indistinguishable antibody production in FIV-vaccinated and naturally FIV-infected cats. The performance of three commercially available point-of-care antibody test kits was compared in a mixed population of FIV-vaccinated (n=119) and FIV-unvaccinated (n=239) cats in Australia. FIV infection status was assigned by considering the results of all antibody kits in concert with results from a commercially available PCR assay (FIV RealPCR™). Two lateral flow immunochromatography test kits (Witness FeLV/FIV; Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV) had excellent overall sensitivity (100%; 100%) and specificity (98%; 100%) and could discern the true FIV infection status of cats, irrespective of FIV vaccination history. The lateral flow ELISA test kit (SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo) could not determine if antibodies detected were due to previous FIV vaccination, natural FIV infection, or both. The sensitivity and specificity of FIV RealPCR™ for detection of viral and proviral nucleic acid was 92% and 99%, respectively. These results will potentially change the way veterinary practitioners screen for FIV in jurisdictions where FIV vaccination is practiced, especially in shelter scenarios where the feasibility of mass screening is impacted by the cost of testing. PMID:26459979

  17. Evaluation of six commercial DNA extraction kits for recovery of Burkholderia pseudomallei DNA.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Angela de Mello; Zimmermann, Pia; Messelhäußer, Ute; Sing, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Six commercially available DNA extraction kits, as well as thermal lysis and proteinase K DNA extraction were evaluated regarding bacterial inactivation, DNA yield and purity, and their use in a Burkholderia pseudomallei real-time PCR. While all methods successfully inactivated the bacteria, by measuring DNA purity and the level of detection by real-time PCR, the proteinase K method was the most sensitive.

  18. 21 CFR 880.5740 - Suction snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suction snakebite kit. 880.5740 Section 880.5740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5740 Suction snakebite kit....

  19. Music Makes the Difference: Action Kit for Music Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    This kit provides information on campaigning to increase the study of music in local schools and communities. The kit includes: (1) a "how-to" manual with worksheets, sample letters, and reproducible materials; (2) videotapes to help present your case to different audiences - "Let's Make Music" and "School Music and 'Reverse Economics'"; (3)…

  20. Serials Control and Deselection Projects. SPEC Kit 147.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    This Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) Kit on serials control and deselection projects provides a timely review of the efforts of research libraries to control the increasing costs of serial subscriptions. This kit contains documents from 13 libraries: University of California at Los Angeles and Riverside; Universities of Florida,…