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Sample records for ace inhibitor therapy

  1. Ace inhibitor therapy for heart failure in patients with impaired renal function: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Valika, Ali A; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure syndromes are often associated with multi-organ dysfunction, and concomitant liver, renal, and neurologic involvement is very common. Neuro-hormonal antagonism plays a key role in the management of this syndrome, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are one of the cornerstones of therapy. Cardiorenal physiology is becoming more recognized in these patients with advanced heart failure, and the role of neuro-hormonal blockade in this setting is vaguely defined in the literature. Often, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are decreased or even withheld in these circumstances. The purpose of this article is to review the role and pathophysiology of ace inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade in patients with acute and chronic heart failure syndromes and concomitant cardiorenal physiology. PMID:22213014

  2. Renoprotective effects of combined SGLT2 and ACE inhibitor therapy in diabetic Dahl S rats

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Naoki; Williams, Jan M; Slaughter, Tiffani N; Kato, Sota; Takahashi, Teisuke; Miyata, Noriyuki; Roman, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether control of hyperglycemia with a new SGLT2 inhibitor, luseogliflozin, given alone or in combination with lisinopril could prevent the development of renal injury in diabetic Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl S) rats treated with streptozotocin (Dahl-STZ). Blood glucose levels increased from normoglycemic to hyperglycemic levels after treatment of STZ in Dahl S rats. Chronic treatment of Dahl-STZ rats with luseogliflozin (10 mg/kg/day) increased the fractional excretion of glucose and normalized blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Lisinopril (20 mg/kg/day) reduced blood pressure from 145 ± 9 to 120 ± 5 mmHg in Dahl-STZ rats, while luseogliflozin had no effect on blood pressure. Combination therapy reduced blood pressure more than that seen in the rats treated with luseogliflozin or lisinopril alone. Dahl-STZ rats exhibited hyperfiltration, mesangial matrix expansion, severe progressive proteinuria, focal glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. Control of hyperglycemia with luseogliflozin reduced the degree of hyperfiltration and renal injury but had no effect on blood pressure or the development of proteinuria. Treatment with lisinopril reduced hyperfiltration, proteinuria and renal injury in Dahl-STZ rats. Combination therapy afforded greater renoprotection than administration of either drug alone. These results suggest that long-term control of hyperglycemia with luseogliflozin, especially in combination with lisinopril to lower blood pressure, attenuates the development of renal injury in this rat model of advanced diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26169541

  3. EARLY Treatment with azilsartan compared to ACE-inhibitors in anti-hypertensive therapy – rationale and design of the EARLY hypertension registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arterial hypertension is highly prevalent but poorly controlled. Blood pressure (BP) reduction substantially reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent randomized, double-blind clinical trials demonstrated that azilsartan medoxomil (AZM) is more effective in reducing BP than the ubiquitary ACE inhibitor ramipril. Therefore, we aimed to test whether these can be verified under clinical practice conditions. Methods/Design The “Treatment with Azilsartan Compared to ACE-Inhibitors in Anti-Hypertensive Therapy” (EARLY) registry is a prospective, observational, national, multicenter registry with a follow-up of up to 12 months. It will include up to 5000 patients on AZM or ACE-inhibitor monotherapy in a ratio of 7 to 3. A subgroup of patients will undergo 24-hour BP monitoring. EARLY has two co-primary objectives: 1) Description of the safety profile of azilsartan and 2) achievement of BP targets based on recent national and international guidelines for patients treated with azilsartan in comparison to those treated with ACE-inhibitors. The most important secondary endpoints are the determination of persistence with treatment and the documentation of cardiovascular and renal events. Recruitment commenced in January 2012 and will be completed by February 2013. Conclusions The data obtained will supplement previous results from randomized controlled trials to document the potential value of utilizing azilsartan medoxomil in comparison to ACE-inhibitor treatment for target BP achievement in clinical practice. PMID:23819631

  4. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  5. ACE inhibitor potentiation of bradykinin-induced venoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Markus; Blaukat, Andree; Bara, Agnieszka T; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Busse, Rudi

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors exert their cardiovascular effects not only by preventing the formation of angiotensin II (AII), but also by promoting the accumulation of bradykinin in or at the vessel wall. In addition, certain ACE inhibitors have been shown to augment the vasodilator response to bradykinin, presumably by an interaction at the level of the B2 receptor. We have investigated whether this is a specific effect of the ACE inhibitor class of compounds in isolated endothelium-denuded segments of the rabbit jugular vein where bradykinin elicits a constrictor response which is exclusively mediated by activation of the B2 receptor. Moexiprilat and ramiprilat (⩽ 3 nM) enhanced the constrictor response to bradykinin three to four fold. Captopril and enalaprilat were less active by approximately one and quinaprilat by two orders of magnitude. Moexiprilat and ramiprilat, on the other hand, had no effect on the constrictor response to AII or the dilator response to acetylcholine. The bradykinin-potentiating effect of the ACE inhibitors was not mimicked by inhibitors of amino-, carboxy-, metallo- or serine peptidases or the synthetic ACE substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine, at a concentration which almost abolished the residual ACE activity in the vessel wall. In contrast, angiotensin-(1–7) (10 μM), an angiotensin I metabolite, significantly enhanced the constrictor response to bradykinin. Ramiprilat did not alter the binding of [3H]-bradykinin to a membrane fraction prepared from endothelium-denuded rabbit jugular veins or to cultured fibroblasts, and there was no ACE inhibitor-sensitive, bradykinin-induced cleavage of the B2 receptor in cultured endothelial cells. These findings demonstrate that ACE inhibitors selectively potentiate the B2 receptor-mediated vascular effects of bradykinin. Their relative efficacy appears to be independent of their ACE-inhibiting properties and might be related to differences in molecule structure

  6. [Trials with ACE-inhibitors in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Dalla Volta, S

    1994-12-01

    In acute myocardial infarction, the results of the trials with ACE-inhibitors have not been always good, in contrast with what has been observed in chronic heart failure. The comparison of these compounds with the placebo has demonstrated lack of reduction of mortality in the study CONSENSUS II, favorable results on the survival as first endpoint and on the secondary endpoints, as reinfarction, heart failure and stroke in the studies SOLVD, AIRE, GISSI 3, ISIS 4, and uncertain (interim report) results in the Chinese study. Nevertheless, the analysis of the recruitment of the patients with acute infarction and the way these patients have been treated seem to be the most important cause of the conflicting results. ACE-inhibitors have proved no efficacy in acute myocardial infarction without signs of left ventricular failure (CONSENSUS II), have worsened the clinical picture and the mortality in patients in shock or with severe heart failure in the acute phase. On the reverse, in presence of mild to moderate left ventricular dysfunction and failure, the use of ACE-inhibitors has been followed by reduction of mortality in the early (AIRE, GISSI 3, ISIS 4), medium term (GISSI 3) and long-term follow-up (up to 4 years in the AIRE study). In parallel with the reduction of the primary endpoint, also secondary endpoints have been favorably influenced by the different ACE-inhibitors. No differences have been observed among the different class of compounds. ACE-inhibitors seem, therefore, to have a clear indication in acute myocardial infarction with mild or moderate signs and symptoms of heart failure. PMID:7634258

  7. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  8. Characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the testis and assessment of the in vivo effects of the ACE inhibitor perindopril

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Cubela, R.B.; Sakaguchi, K.; Johnston, C.I.

    1988-07-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was characterized by radioligand studies utilizing the potent ACE inhibitor 351A, a derivative of lisinopril. Ligand binding characteristics were similar for ACE derived from testis, lung, and kidney, despite known differences in structure between ACe from these sources. This observation suggests that the ACE active enzymatic site is similar in different tissues. The effect of the orally active ACE inhibitor perindopril was studied ex vivo in tissues of the rat after oral gavage. Radioligand bound to tissue ACE was reduced after perindopril treatment, in tissue homogenates of lung and kidney, but not testis. Autoradiographs of radioligand binding to tissue sections obtained ex vivo after oral perindopril showed inhibition of ACE in the aorta, lung, and kidney, but did not reveal any inhibition of ACE in the testis. ACE in small vessels of the testis was inhibited as in the aorta, while at the same time testicular ACE was unaffected. ACE in rat testis appears to have a similar enzymatic binding site to ACE from the lung and kidney. Perindopril inhibited ACE in the lung and kidney but did not affect ACE in the testis, suggesting the drug is limited in testicular penetration by the blood-testis barrier. This may explain the lack of any reports of adverse effects of ACE inhibitors on testicular function.

  9. Choice of ACE inhibitor combinations in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes: update after recent clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Gentile, Giorgio; Angeli, Fabio; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The diabetes epidemic continues to grow unabated, with a staggering toll in micro- and macrovascular complications, disability, and death. Diabetes causes a two- to fourfold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease, and represents the first cause of dialysis treatment both in the UK and the US. Concomitant hypertension doubles total mortality and stroke risk, triples the risk of coronary heart disease and significantly hastens the progression of microvascular complications, including diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, blood pressure reduction is of particular importance in preventing cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Successful antihypertensive treatment will often require a combination therapy, either with separate drugs or with fixed-dose combinations. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor plus diuretic combination therapy improves blood pressure control, counterbalances renin-angiotensin system activation due to diuretic therapy and reduces the risk of electrolyte alterations, obtaining at the same time synergistic antiproteinuric effects. ACE inhibitor plus calcium channel blocker provides a significant additive effect on blood pressure reduction, may have favorable metabolic effects and synergistically reduce proteinuria and the rate of decline in glomerular filtration rate, as evidenced by the GUARD trial. Finally, the recently published ACCOMPLISH trial showed that an ACE inhibitor/calcium channel blocker combination may be particularly useful in reducing cardiovascular outcomes in high-risk patients. The present review will focus on different ACE inhibitor combinations in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, in the light of recent clinical trials, including GUARD and ACCOMPLISH. PMID:19475778

  10. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  11. Risk-benefit ratio of angiotensin antagonists versus ACE inhibitors in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, D A; Gehr, T W; Fernandez, A

    2000-05-01

    The effective treatment of hypertension is an extremely important consideration in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Virtually any drug class--with the possible exception of diuretics--can be used to treat hypertension in the patient with ESRD. Despite there being such a wide range of treatment options, drugs which interrupt the renin-angiotensin axis are generally suggested as agents of choice in this population, even though the evidence in support of their preferential use is quite scanty. ACE inhibitors, and more recently angiotensin antagonists, are the 2 drug classes most commonly employed to alter renin-angiotensin axis activity and therefore produce blood pressure control. ACE inhibitor use in patients with ESRD can sometimes prove an exacting proposition. ACE inhibitors are variably dialysed, with compounds such as catopril, enalapril, lisinopril and perindopril undergoing substantial cross-dialyser clearance during a standard dialysis session. This phenomenon makes the selection of a dose and the timing of administration for an ACE inhibitor a complex issue in patients with ESRD. Furthermore, ACE inhibitors are recognised as having a range of nonpressor effects that are pertinent to patients with ESRD. Such effects include their ability to decrease thirst drive and to decrease erythropoiesis. In addition, ACE inhibitors have a unique adverse effect profile. As is the case with their use in patients without renal failure, use of ACE inhibitors in patients with ESRD can be accompanied by cough and less frequently by angioneurotic oedema. In the ESRD population, ACE inhibitor use is also accompanied by so-called anaphylactoid dialyser reactions. Angiotensin antagonists are similar to ACE inhibitors in their mechanism of blood pressure lowering. Angiotensin antagonists are not dialysable and therefore can be distinguished from a number of the ACE inhibitors. In addition, the adverse effect profile for angiotensin antagonists is remarkably bland

  12. Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors from Marine Resources: Prospects in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekara, Isuru; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1; ACE) plays an important physiological role in regulation of blood pressure by converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor. Therefore, the inhibition of ACE activity is a major target in the prevention of hypertension. Recently, the search for natural ACE inhibitors as alternatives to synthetic drugs is of great interest to prevent several side effects and a number of novel compounds such as bioactive peptides, chitooligosaccharide derivatives (COS) and phlorotannins have been derived from marine organisms as potential ACE inhibitors. These inhibitory derivatives can be developed as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals with potential to prevent hypertension. Hence, the aim of this review is to discuss the marine-derived ACE inhibitors and their future prospects as novel therapeutic drug candidates for treat hypertension. PMID:20479968

  13. One-year effectiveness and safety of open-label losartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy in Japanese patients with hypertension uncontrolled with ARBs or ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Toshihiro; Yokota, Naoto; Ichiki, Yoshinari; Ayabe, Takao; Etoh, Takuma; Tamaki, Noboru; Kato, Johji; Eto, Tanenao; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2010-04-01

    The long-term antihypertensive efficacy and safety of losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) combinations have not been appropriately evaluated in Japan. In this study, treated hypertensive patients taking angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) regimens not at blood pressure (BP) goals proposed by the Japanese Society of Hypertension (JSH) were switched to losartan/HCTZ combinations and followed for 1 year. Data analysis included 244 patients aged 64.5+/-10.7 years, 56% male, 27% with diabetes mellitus and 36% with dyslipidemia. Pre-switching BP 157+/-16/88+/-10 mm Hg promptly decreased and maintained a steady state, reaching 132+/-15/77+/-9 mm Hg (P<0.001) 1 year later. After 1 year of treatment, 50% of patients cleared the goals of the JSH guideline for systolic BP and 79% for diastolic BP. Patients with maximal doses of ARBs tended to show larger decreases in BP (159+/-11/90+/-10 to 128+/-10/75+/-8 mm Hg, P<0.001, n=32). Clinical and laboratory adverse events were reported for 29 patients (11%), but serious abnormalities were not observed. In particular, plasma levels of uric acid (UA) were well-maintained for 1 year, and significant decreases in UA were observed in patients with higher levels of UA (>/=7.0 mg dl(-1)). Losartan/HCTZ combinations showed strong and steady hypotensive abilities and acceptable safety and tolerability in patients currently not at BP goals with regimens including ARBs or ACEIs in Japan. PMID:20075934

  14. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  15. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabdtitis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  16. [The new drug is much more effective than ACE inhibitors in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Sr, Jiří Widimský

    2015-02-01

    PARADIGM-HF study observed clinical outcomes after treatment by new drug LCZ696 or enalapril in patients with systolic chronic heart failure. It was randomized double-blind trial with LCZ696 (200 mg twice a day) and enalapril (10 mg twice a day). 8442 patients were enrolled with NYHA class II or III and left ventricular ejection fiction of 40% or less. Study drugs were added to other recommended medication. The trial was prematurely terminated after median follow-up of 27 months. The primary endpoint of the study was a combination of cardiovascular mortality and the first hospitalization for heart failure. LCZ696 drug, an inhibitor of angiotensin receptor and neprilysin (Arnie), has led to a reduction in the primary composite target by 20% (p <0.001). The treatment has decreased cardiovascular mortality by 20%, p <0.001 and hospitalization for worsening heart failure by 21%, p <0.001. LCZ696 has also decreased total mortality by 16%, p <0.001. The use of LCZ696 has been accompanied by frequent symptomatic hypotension and hypotension with a decrease in systolic blood pressure below 90 mm Hg, however, LCZ696 was less often associated with an increase in serum creatinine and serum potassium than enalapril. In addition, cough has occurred less frequently after LCZ696 than after enalapril. Discontinuation of therapy occurred in 746 patients (17.8%) treated with LCZ696 and in 833 patients (19.8%) treated with enalapril (19.8%) (p = 0.02). PARADIGM-HF study has also shown superiority of LCZ696 compared to ACE inhibitors in stable outpatients with chronic systolic heart failure NYHA stages II and III. Therefore, LCZ696 is more effective than ACE inhibitors (and angiotensin receptor blockers). Moreover, it is well tolerated. LCZ696 seems to replace the ACE inhibitors in mentioned patients. The authors also discuss the results of the first randomized study PARAMOUNT investigating LCZ696 efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure and good left ventricular ejection

  17. [Liver damage in a patient treated with a vitamin K antagonist, a statin and an ACE inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Bruggisser, M; Terraciano, L; Rätz Bravo, A; Haschke, M

    2010-10-20

    We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient who presented at the emergency room with episodes of epistaxis and jaundice. The patient was on therapy with phenprocoumon, atorvastatin and perindopril. Findings on admission included prominent elevation of transaminases and bilirubin and a high INR due to impaired liver function and oral anticoagulation. After exclusion of other causes like viral or autoimmune hepatitis and after having obtained a liver biopsy, a diagnosis of drug induced liver damage (DILI) was made. Epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical signs of DILI are discussed with a special focus on coumarines, statins and ACE-inhibitors. PMID:20960395

  18. Exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias in congestive heart failure and role of ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hasija, P K; Karloopia, S D; Shahi, B N; Chauhan, S S

    1998-02-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are considered to be related to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. ACE inhibitors though improve LV function their beneficial role on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias is not established. To study the effects of ACE inhibitors on exercise capacity vis-a-vis their role on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias, 25 patients of congestive heart failure (CHF) of various etiologies in NYHA Class II and III were subjected to a prospective randomised controlled trial. The control group comprising of 12 patients received conventional treatment (digitalis and diuretics) and the test group was given enalapril/captopril in addition as tolerated. They were followed up for 3 months. Exercise testing on treadmill and monitoring of clinical and biochemical parameters were done at the beginning and end of study in all cases. Ventricular arrhythmias observed during exercise and post-exercise for 10 minutes was analysed using Lown's grading for frequency and severity of ventricular arrhythmia. The mean exercise duration showed significant improvement on ACE inhibitor as compared to the control group (p < 0.05) however there was no significant change in the grades of arrhythmia. Serum electrolytes and other bio-chemical parameter were within normal range. It is concluded that effect of ACE inhibitor on improving functional capacity in CHF is independent of it's any effect on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:11273109

  19. ACE Inhibitor Delapril Prevents Ca(2+)-Dependent Blunting of IK1 and Ventricular Arrhythmia in Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Thireau, J; Zalvidea, S; Meschin, P; Pasquie, J-L; Aimond, F; Richard, S

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) improve clinical outcome in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and chronic heart failure. We investigated potential anti-arrhythmic (AA) benefits in a mouse model of ischemic HF. We hypothesized that normalization of diastolic calcium (Ca(2+)) by ACE-I may prevent Ca(2+)-dependent reduction of inward rectifying K(+) current (IK1) and occurrence of arrhythmias after MI. Mice were randomly assigned to three groups: Sham, MI, and MI-D (6 weeks of treatment with ACE-I delapril started 24h after MI). Electrophysiological analyses showed that delapril attenuates MI-induced prolongations of electrocardiogram parameters (QRS complex, QT, QTc intervals) and conduction time from His bundle to ventricular activation. Delapril improved the sympatho-vagal balance (LF/HF) and reduced atrio-ventricular blocks and ventricular arrhythmia. Investigations in cardiomyocytes showed that delapril prevented the decrease of IK1 measured by patch-clamp technique. IK1 reduction was related to intracellular Ca(2+) overload. This reduction was not observed when intracellular free-Ca(2+) was maintained low. Conversely, increasing intracellular free-Ca(2+) in Sham following application of SERCA2a inhibitor thapsigargin reduced IK1. Thapsigargin had no effect in MI animals and abolished the benefits of delapril on IK1 in MI-D mice. Delapril prevented both the prolongation of action potential late repolarization and the depolarization of resting membrane potential, two phenomena known to trigger abnormal electrical activities, promoted by MI. In conclusion, early chronic therapy with delapril after MI prevented Ca(2+)-dependent reduction of IK1. This mechanism may significantly contribute to the antiarrhythmic benefits of ACE-I in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. PMID:26321755

  20. Acute abdomen due to intestinal angioedema induced by ACE inhibitors: not so rare?

    PubMed

    Dobbels, P; Van Overbeke, L; Vanbeckevoort, D; Hiele, M

    2009-01-01

    During the last 5 years we identified 7 patients with a history of episodic acute abdominal pain and subobstruction due to intestinal angioedema secondary to the use of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. These cases were all diagnosed in one gastroenterology department. This is thereby the largest single centre case series of ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema that has been published until now. Our findings suggest that this syndrome is far more frequent than international literature would let us believe. We also describe one of the first male cases diagnosed with this entity for which there is a significant female predominance. In the presence of an appropriate history and suggestive findings on CT scan, this diagnosis can relatively easily be made if one is sufficiently intent on it. An appropriate diagnosis can save these patients a lot of unnecessary diagnostic procedures and discomfort. PMID:20163043

  1. Investigation of interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors in various buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Arayne, Muhammad Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Abbas, Hira Fatima

    2015-02-01

    This work describes a RP-HPLC method for the determination and interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors (captopril, enalapril and lisinopril) in various buffers. The separation and interaction of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors was achieved on a Purospher Star, C18 (5 μm, 250 × 4.6 mm) column. Mobile phase consisted of methanol: water (80:20, v/v, pH 3.3); however, for the separation of lisinopril, it was modified to methanol-water (40:60, v/v, pH 3.3) and pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. In all cases, UV detection was performed at 225 nm. Interactions were carried out in physiological pH i.e., pH 1 (simulated gastric juice), 4 (simulated full stomach), 7.4 (blood pH) and 9 (simulated GI), drug contents were analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Method was found linear in the concentration range of 1.0-50.0 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999. Precision (RSD%) was less than 2.0%, indicating good precision of the method and accuracy was 98.0-100.0%. Furthermore, cefpirome-ACE-inhibitors' complexes were also synthesized and results were elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, and 1H NMR. The interaction results show that these interactions are pH dependent and for the co-administration of cefpirome and ACE-inhibitors, a proper interval should be given.

  2. Application of quantitative NMR for purity determination of standard ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi; Yang, Xing; Shi, Yaqin

    2015-10-10

    This study investigated the accuracy of the quantitative NMR method for purity determination of ACE inhibitors reference standards and the discovery of two pairs of new diastereoisomers. Six types of ACE inhibitors, imidapril hydrochloride, benazepril hydrochloride, lisinopril, enalapril maleate, quinapril hydrochloride, and captopril were quantificated and validated for the qNMR method by discussing factors that affect parameters of the qNMR experiment, internal standards, integration, pH-effect, and uncertainty. The results were compared with data obtained by the mass balance method. The study found that maleic acid influenced the quantification of captopril in deuteroxide because of a chemical reaction. The mixtures of the reaction products were isolated by HPLC and structurally elucidated by NMR as two pairs of new diastereoisomers, 1-[(2S,4R)-thio-2-methylpropionyl-5-d-ethanedicarboxylicacid]-L-proline and 1-[(2S,4S)-thio-2-methylpropionyl-5-d-ethanedicarboxylicacid]-L-proline. The results showed that the accuracy and precision of quantitative (1)H NMR spectroscopy satisfied the requirements for quantitative analysis of chemical reference standards and provided a simple, rapid, and reliable method for purity determination of ACE inhibitors systematically. PMID:26070161

  3. Inequity of access to ACE inhibitors in Swedish heart failure patients: a register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Bertil; Hanning, Marianne; Westerling, Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    Background Several international studies suggest inequity in access to evidence-based heart failure (HF) care. Specifically, studies of ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) point to reduced ACEI access related to female sex, old age and socioeconomic position. Thus far, most studies have either been rather small, lacking diagnostic data, or lacking the possibility to account for several individual-based sociodemographic factors. Our aim was to investigate differences, which could reflect inequity in access to ACEIs based on sex, age, socioeconomic status or immigration status in Swedish patients with HF. Methods Individually linked register data for all Swedish adults hospitalised for HF in 2005–2010 (n=93 258) were analysed by multivariate regression models to assess the independent risk of female sex, high age, low employment status, low income level, low educational level or foreign country of birth, associated with lack of an ACEI dispensation within 1 year of hospitalisation. Adjustment for possible confounding was made for age, comorbidity, Angiotensin receptor blocker therapy, period and follow-up time. Results Analysis revealed an adjusted OR for no ACEI dispensation for women of 1.31 (95% CI 1.27 to 1.35); for the oldest patients of 2.71 (95% CI 2.53 to 2.91); and for unemployed patients of 1.59 (95% CI 1.46 to 1.73). Conclusions Access to ACEI treatment was reduced in women, older patients and unemployed patients. We conclude that access to ACEIs is inequitable among Swedish patients with HF. Future studies should include clinical data, as well as mortality outcomes in different groups. PMID:26261264

  4. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  5. The binding of metal ions and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor by 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Sakamoto, Yuko; Ishii, Tomoko; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1991-06-01

    Enalaprilat (MK-422, 1- [ N- [1 (S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-alanyl]- L-proline (1)) and Lisinopril (MK521, N- N- [ (s)-l-carboxy-3- phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline, (2)) exhibit the capacity to act as a chelate, unidentate or bridge towards metal ions in aqueous solution, as determined by 13C NMR. By adding metal ions, in the series of Zn 2+, Ni 2+, Pb 2+, Pd 2+ and Cd 2+, the active site of the ACE inhibitor was well defined. MK-521 was more influenced by nuclei that were distant from the active site than MK-422.

  6. ACE inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Cardiology; American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the science: promoting self-care in persons with heart failure: ...

  7. ACE inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... your dose helps. But sometimes your doctor will switch you to a different medication. Do not lower ... American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Circulation . 2013 Oct 15; ...

  8. ACE inhibitors can induce circulating antibodies directed to antigens of the superficial epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Rosa, Gian Marco; Drosera, Massimo; Intra, Chiara; Barsotti, Antonio; Parodi, Aurora

    2011-07-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus has been reported in patients receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The aim of this work was to study a group of hypertensive patients without skin diseases treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors (I), to verify the presence of serum circulating anti-antibodies. The indirect immunofluorescence showed that 33 sera (52.38%) presented autoantibodies directed to an antigen of the cytoplasm of the superficial epidermal keratinocytes. Two of the 33 positive sera had antibodies to Dsg1 and/or 3 in ELISA. Immunoblot analyses were negative. All the 48 control sera were found to have no circulating antibodies using the three assays. Our results would confirm that ACEI drugs may trigger the production of circulating autoantibodies also in patients without clinical manifestations of pemphigus. PMID:20563876

  9. Occurrence and fate of ACE-inhibitor peptides in cheeses and in their digestates following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, Milda; Cattaneo, Stefano; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of the casein-derived angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACE-I) peptides VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP and HLPLP were investigated in 12 different cheese samples by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The total amount of ACE-I peptides was in the range 0.87-331mgkg(-1). VPP and IPP largely prevailed in almost all cheeses. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion of Cheddar, Gorgonzola, Maasdam and Grana Padano cheeses, type and amount of ACE-I peptides changed, and only VPP, IPP, HLPLP and LHLPLP were detected in the intestinal digestates. The results evidenced that the degree of proteolysis itself cannot be regarded as a promoting or hindering factor for ACE-I peptide release during cheese digestion. Moreover, the data indicated that the ACE-I potential of cheeses cannot be inferred based on the type and amount of ACE-I peptides present in undigested samples. PMID:25172679

  10. Risk of Hospitalized Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Persons Randomized to Diuretic, ACE-Inhibitor, or Calcium-Channel Blocker in ALLHAT

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William; Piller, Linda B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Whittle, Jeffrey; Jafri, Syed Z.A.; Ford, Charles E.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Oparil, Suzanne; Furberg, Curt D.; Grimm, Richard H.; Alderman, Michael H.; Davis, Barry R.; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium channel-blockers (CCB) are an important class of medication useful in the treatment of hypertension. Several observational studies have suggested an association between CCB therapy and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Using administrative databases, we re-examined in a post-hoc analysis whether the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants randomized to the calcium-channel blocker amlodipine had a greater risk of hospitalized gastrointestinal bleeding (a pre-specified outcome) compared to those randomized to the diuretic chlorthalidone or the ACE-inhibitor lisinopril. Participants randomized to chlorthalidone did not have a reduced risk for gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations compared to participants randomized to amlodipine (HR, 1.09, 95% CI 0.92-1.28). Those randomized to lisinopril were at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding compared those randomized to chlorthalidone (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.00-1.36). In a post-hoc comparison, participants assigned lisinopril therapy had a higher risk of hospitalized gastrointestinal hemorrhage (HR,1.27, 95% CI 1.06-1.51) versus those assigned to amlodipine. In-study use of atenolol prior to first gastrointestinal hemorrhage was related to a lower incidence of GI bleeding (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.83). In conclusion, hypertensive patients on amlodipine do not have an increased risk of GI bleeding hospitalizations compared to those on either chlorthalidone or lisinopril. PMID:24283598

  11. STAT inhibitors for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) proteins are a family of cytoplasmic transcription factors consisting of 7 members, STAT1 to STAT6, including STAT5a and STAT5b. STAT proteins are thought to be ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy since cancer cells are more dependent on the STAT activity than their normal counterparts. Inhibitors targeting STAT3 and STAT5 have been developed. These included peptidomimetics, small molecule inhibitors and oligonucleotides. This review summarized advances in preclinical and clinical development of these compounds. PMID:24308725

  12. A role for the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan in kidney dysfunction during ACE-inhibitor fetopathy.

    PubMed

    Hansell, P; Palm, F

    2015-04-01

    Despite data showing that inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system increase the risks of fetal morbidity and dysfunctionality later in life, their use during pregnancy has increased. The fetopathy induced by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is characterized by anuria, hypotension and growth restriction, but can also be associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. In the kidney, this fetopathy includes atrophy of the medulla, reduced number of glomeruli, developmental lesions of tubules and vessels, tubulointerstitial inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. Although angiotensin II (Ang II) inhibition during nephrogenesis interferes with normal growth and development, this review will focus on effects of the heavily accumulated matrix component hyaluronan (HA). An important mechanism of HA accumulation during nephrogenesis is disruption of its normal reduction as a consequence of lack of Ang II activation of hyaluronidase. Hyaluronan has very large water-attracting properties and is pro-inflammatory when fragmented. The ensuing inflammation and interstitial oedema affect kidney function. Hyaluronan is colocalized with CD44 overexpression and infiltrating immune cells. These properties make HA a plausible contributor to the observed structural and functional kidney defects associated with the fetopathy. Available data support an involvement of HA in kidney dysfunction of the foetus and during adulthood due to the physico-chemical characteristics of HA. No clinical treatment for HA accumulation exists. Treatment with the HA-degrading enzyme hyaluronidase and an HA synthesis inhibitor has been tested successfully in experimental models in the kidney, heart and pancreas. Reduced HA accumulation to reduce interstitial oedema and inflammation may improve organ function, but this concept needs to be tested in a controlled study before causal relationships can be established. PMID:25600777

  13. Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of Different ACE Inhibitors in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, WeiPing; Zhang, HaiBin; Guo, JinCheng; Zhang, XueKun; Zhang, LiXin; Li, ChunLei; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure is a public health problem and a great economic burden for patients and healthcare systems. Suppression of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors remains the mainstay of treatment for heart failure. However, the abundance of ACE inhibitors makes it difficult for doctors to choose. We performed this network meta-analysis of ACEIs in patients with heart failure in order to address this area of uncertainty. We searched PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, and Medline. Any randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, ramipril, or trandolapril or combined interventions of 2 or more of these drugs. Two reviewers extracted the data and made the quality assessment. At first, we used Stata software (version 12.0, StataCorp, College Station, TX) to make traditional pairwise meta-analyses for studies that directly compared different interventions. Then, network meta-analysis was performed using WinBUGS (version 1.4.3, MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK). A total of 29 studies were included. Lisinopril was associated with a higher rate of all-cause mortality compared with placebo (odds ratio 65.9, 95% credible interval 1.91 to 239.6) or ramipril (14.65, 1.23 to 49.5). Enalapril significantly reduced systolic blood pressure when compared with placebo (standardized mean differences −0.6, 95% credible interval −1.03 to −0.18). Both captopril (odds ratio 76.2, 95% credible interval 1.56 to 149.3) and enalapril (274.4, 2.4 to 512.9) were associated with a higher incidence of cough compared to placebo. Some important outcomes such as rehospitalization and cardiac death were not included. The sample size and the number of studies were limited, especially for ramipril. Our results suggest that enalapril might be the best option when considering factors such as increased ejection fraction, stroke volume, and decreased mean arterial pressure. However, enalapril was

  14. Preclinical development and characterization of an intravenous dosage form for the ACE inhibitor RS-10029.

    PubMed

    Visor, G C; Lin, L H; Henry, P; Singer, L

    1989-01-01

    Preclinical development of an intravenous dosage form for the ACE inhibitor RS-10029 involved the formulation and characterization of the drug's chemical/physical stability in two prototype formulations (injectable solution and lyophilized powder). Included in these studies were quantitative evaluations of various processing and administration parameters (membrane qualification, terminal sterilization, compatibility/delivery of the drug with typical infusion fluids and administration sets) on finished product integrity and quality. Analytical methodology used in these studies consisted primarily of a stability specific HPLC assay and a light obscuration based sensor (HIAC) for particulate matter analysis. Results of these studies indicate that the drug is relatively stable at ambient temperature and under accelerated storage conditions (predicted T90 at 25 degrees C greater than 2 yr, and T90 at 50 degrees C greater than 2 mo). However, the ability of the product to withstand a full terminal sterilization cycle is limited, and therefore other approaches toward sterile processing were examined. With regard to the stability and compatibility of the drug in a variety of fluids and devices there appears to be no overt limitations in its use for either bolus or infusion delivery. PMID:2600732

  15. Cardiovascular risk reduction by reversing endothelial dysfunction:ARBs, ACE inhibitors, or both? Expectations from The ONTARGET Trial Programme

    PubMed Central

    Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Redón, Josep; Schmieder, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is the initial pathophysiological step in a progression of vascular damage that leads to overt cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Angiotensin II, the primary agent of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), has a central role in endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, RAS blockade with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor provides a rational approach to reverse endothelial dysfunction, reduce microalbuminuria, and, thus, improves cardiovascular and renal prognosis. ARBs and ACE inhibitors act at different points in the RAS pathway and recent evidence suggests that there are differences regarding their effects on endothelial dysfunction. In addition to blood pressure lowering, studies have shown that ARBs reduce target-organ damage, including improvements in endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, the progression of renal dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes, proteinuria, and left ventricular hypertrophy. The ONgoing Telmisartan Alone in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) Programme is expected to provide the ultimate evidence of whether improved endothelial function translates into reduced cardiovascular and renal events in high-risk patients, and to assess possible differential outcomes with telmisartan, the ACE inhibitor ramipril, or a combination of both (dual RAS blockade). Completion of ONTARGET is expected in 2008. PMID:17583170

  16. Discovery of new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from medicinal plants to treat hypertension using an in vitro assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors plays a critical role in treating hypertension. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate ACE inhibition activity of 50 Iranian medicinal plants using an in vitro assay. Methods The ACE activity was evaluated by determining the hydrolysis rate of substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine (HHL), using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and DPPH radical scavenging assay respectively. Results Six extracts revealed > 50% ACE inhibition activity at 330 μg/ml concentration. They were Berberis integerrima Bunge. (Berberidaceae) (88.2 ± 1.7%), Crataegus microphylla C. Koch (Rosaceae) (80.9 ± 1.3%), Nymphaea alba L. (Nymphaeaceae) (66.3 ± 1.2%), Onopordon acanthium L. (Asteraceae) (80.2 ± 2.0%), Quercus infectoria G. Olivier. (Fagaceae) (93.9 ± 2.5%) and Rubus sp. (Rosaceae) (51.3 ± 1.0%). Q. infectoria possessed the highest total phenolic content with 7410 ± 101 mg gallic acid/100 g dry plant. Antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria (IC50 value 1.7 ± 0.03 μg/ml) was more than that of BHT (IC50 value of 10.3 ± 0.15 μg/ml) and Trolox (IC50 value of 3.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml) as the positive controls. Conclusions In this study, we introduced six medicinal plants with ACE inhibition activity. Despite the high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria, due to its tannin content (tannins interfere in ACE activity), another plant, O. acanthium, which also had high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity, but contained no tannin, could be utilized in further studies for isolation of active compounds. PMID:24359711

  17. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  18. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor-II Antagonist Prescribing and Hospital Admissions with Acute Kidney Injury: A Longitudinal Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Laurie A.; Abel, Gary A.; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tomson, Charles R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Roland, Martin O.; Payne, Rupert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background ACE Inhibitors (ACE-I) and Angiotensin-Receptor Antagonists (ARAs) are commonly prescribed but can cause acute kidney injury (AKI) during intercurrent illness. Rates of hospitalization with AKI are increasing. We aimed to determine whether hospital AKI admission rates are associated with increased ACE-I/ARA prescribing. Methods and Findings English NHS prescribing data for ACE-I/ARA prescriptions were matched at the level of the general practice to numbers of hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of AKI. Numbers of prescriptions were weighted for the demographic characteristics of general practices by expressing prescribing as rates where the denominator is Age, Sex, and Temporary Resident Originated Prescribing Units (ASTRO-PUs). We performed a mixed-effect Poisson regression to model the number of admissions for AKI occurring in each practice for each of 4 years from 1/4/2007. From 2007/8-2010/11, crude AKI admission rates increased from 0.38 to 0.57 per 1000 patients (51.6% increase), and national annual ACE-I/ARA prescribing rates increased by 0.032 from 0.202 to 0.234 (15.8% increase). There was strong evidence (p<0.001) that increases in practice-level prescribing of ACE-I/ARA over the study period were associated with an increase in AKI admission rates. The increase in prescribing seen in a typical practice corresponded to an increase in admissions of approximately 5.1% (rate ratio = 1.051 for a 0.03 per ASTRO-PU increase in annual prescribing rate, 95%CI 1.047-1.055). Using the regression model we predict that 1,636 (95%CI 1,540-1,780) AKI admissions would have been avoided if prescribing rates were at the 2007/8 level, equivalent to 14.8% of the total increase in AKI admissions. Conclusion In this ecological analysis, up to 15% of the increase in AKI admissions in England over a 4-year time period is potentially attributable to increased prescribing of ACE-I and ARAs. However, these findings are limited by the lack of patient level

  19. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  20. Identification of a new angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor from Thai edible plants.

    PubMed

    Simaratanamongkol, Arunee; Umehara, Kaoru; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2014-12-15

    Eight Thai edible plants were tested for their inhibitory activity against an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) using an in vitro assay. The methanol extract of Apium graveolens exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.7 mg/ml, and was then subjected to an isolation procedure that resulted in identification of a pure active constituent, junipediol A 8-O-β-d-glucoside (1-β-d-glucosyloxy-2-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-propane-1,3-diol) (1), which had good ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 76 μg/ml. Another eight known compounds, isofraxidin-β-d-glucoside (2), roseoside (3), apigenin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (4), luteolin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (5), icariside D2 (6), apiin (7), chrysoeriol-7-O-β-d-apiosylglucoside (8), and 11,21-dioxo-3 β,15 α,24-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-24-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (9) were also identified. Although each of these five constituents (2-6) isolated from the same fraction as 1 showed no activity at concentrations of 500 μM, together, when each was present at 300 μg/ml, they enhanced the inhibitory activity of 500 μM of 1 from 64% to 81%. PMID:25038653

  1. Refill Adherence in Relation to Substitution and the Use of Multiple Medications: A Nationwide Population Based Study on New ACE-Inhibitor Users

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Anna K.; Lesén, Eva; Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte; Sundell, Karolina Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Objective Generic substitution has contributed to economic savings but switching products may affect patient adherence, particularly among those using multiple medications. The aim was to analyse if use of multiple medications influenced the association between switching products and refill adherence to angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in Sweden. Study Design and Setting New users of ACE-inhibitors, starting between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007, were identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Refill adherence was assessed using the continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA) and analysed with linear regression and analysis of covariance. Results The study population included 42735 individuals whereof 51.2% were exposed to switching ACE-inhibitor and 39.6% used multiple medications. Refill adherence was higher among those exposed to switching products than those not, but did not vary depending on the use of multiple medications or among those not. Refill adherence varied with age, educational level, household income, country of birth, previous hospitalisation and previous cardiovascular diagnosis. Conclusion The results indicate a positive association between refill adherence and switching products, mainly due to generic substitution, among new users of ACE-inhibitors in Sweden. This association was independent of use of multiple medications. PMID:27192203

  2. The effects of drug market regulation on pharmaceutical prices in Europe: overview and evidence from the market of ACE inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study provides an overview of policy measures targeting pharmaceutical expenditure in Europe and analyses their impact on originator pharmaceutical prices. Panel data methods are used to examine the market of ACE Inhibitors in six European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, United Kingdom) over period 1991-2006. We find that although some measures are effective in reducing originator prices, others appear to have an insignificant effect. Results suggest that supply side measures such as mandatory generic substitution, regressive pharmacy mark-ups and claw-backs are effective in reducing pharmaceuticals prices. Results are not as strong for demand side measures. Profit controls and the use of cost-effectiveness analysis appear to have a negative effect on prices, while results on reference pricing are inconclusive. Findings also indicate that, although originator prices are not immediately affected by generic entry, they may be influenced by changes in generic prices post patent expiry. PMID:22828053

  3. [Cancer therapy by PARP inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases(PARP) synthesize the ADP-ribose polymers onto proteins and play a role in DNA repair. PARP inhibitors block the repair of single-strand breaks, which in turn gives rise to double-strand breaks during DNA replication. Thus, PARP inhibitors elicit synthetic lethality in cancer with BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations that hamper homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks. Olaparib, the first-in-class PARP inhibitor, was approved for treatment of BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer in Europe and the United States in 2014. Other PARP inhibitors under clinical trials include rucaparib, niraparib, veliparib, and the "PARP-trapping" BMN-673. BRCA1/2 sequencing is an FDA-approved companion diagnostics, which predicts the cancer vulnerability to PARP inhibition. Together, synthetic lethal PARP inhibition is a novel promising strategy for cancer intervention even in cases without prominent driver oncogenes. PMID:26281686

  4. The ACE inhibitor ( sup 3 H)SQ29,852 identifies a high affinity recognition site located in the human temporal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Egli, P.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 identified a single high affinity recognition site (defined by 10.0 microM captopril) in the human temporal cortex (pKD 8.62 +/- 0.03; Bmax 248 +/- 24 fmol mg-1 protein, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). ACE inhibitors and thiorphan competed to a similar level for the ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 binding site in the human temporal cortex with a rank order of affinity (pKi values mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), lisinopril (9.49 +/- 0.02), captopril (9.16 +/- 0.08), SQ29,852 (8.58 +/- 0.04), epicaptopril (7.09 +/- 0.08), fosinopril (7.08 +/- 0.05) and thiorphan (6.40 +/- 0.04). Since this rank order of affinity is similar to the affinity of these compounds to inhibit brain ACE activity it is concluded that ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 selectively labels the inhibitor recognition site of ACE in the human temporal cortex.

  5. Alternative therapies for the management of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shima, M; Lillicrap, D; Kruse-Jarres, R

    2016-07-01

    The development of inhibitors to factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) remains a major treatment complication encountered in the treatment of haemophilia. Not all patients with even the same severity and genotype develop inhibitors suggesting an underlying mechanism of tolerance against FVIII- or FIX-related immunity. One mechanism may be central tolerance observed in patients in whom the FVIII mutation enables some production of the protein. The other is a peripheral tolerance mechanism which may be evident in patients with null mutation. Recently, recombinant porcine FVIII (rpFVIII, Obixur, OBI-1, BAX801) has been developed for the haemostatic treatment of both congenital haemophilia with inhibitor (CHAWI) and acquired haemophilia A (AHA). In 28 subjects with AHA with life-/limb-threatening bleeding, rpFVIII reduced or stopped bleeding in all patients within 24 h. The cross-reactivity of anti-human FVIII antibodies to rpFVIII remains around 30-50%. Recently, new therapeutics based on the quite novel concepts have been developed and clinical studies are ongoing. These are humanized asymmetric antibody mimicking FVIIIa function by maintaining a suitable interaction between FIXa and FX (Emicizumab, ACE910), and small interfering RNAs (siRNA, ALN-AT3) suppress liver production of AT through post-transcriptional gene silencing and a humanized anti-TFPI monoclonal antibody (Concizumab). Their main advantages are longer half-life, subcutaneous applicability and efficacy irrespective of the presence of inhibitors which will make it easier to initiate more effective treatment especially early childhood. PMID:27405674

  6. Cardiorespiratory effects of continuous i.v. administration of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat in the critically ill.

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, J; Müller, M; Heesen, M; Härter, K; Hempelmann, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Cardiorespiratory effects of long-term, continuous i.v. administration of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat were studied. 2. Forty-five consecutive critically patients suffering from trauma or postoperative complications were randomly separated into three groups (15 patients in each group) receiving either 0.25 mg h-1 or 0.50 mg h-1 enalaprilat, respectively, or saline solution as placebo (= control group). The infusion was continued for 5 days. 3. Haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were intensively monitored on admission to the intensive care unit (= 'baseline' values) and daily during the next 5 days. 4. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased significantly only in the enalaprilat-treated patients, whereas heart rate (HR) remained unchanged in these patients. 5. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were decreased by enalaprilat (0.50 mg h-1: PAP (mean +/- s.d.) decreased from 28.0 +/- 4.1 to 24.0 +/- 3.0 mm Hg) and remained significantly lower than in the control group. In the untreated control group, cardiac index (CI), oxygen consumption (VO2I) and oxygen delivery (DO2I) significantly decreased, which was blunted by enalaprilat infusion. Oxygen extraction (O2-extr) increased in both enalaprilat groups (0.25 mg h-1: from 26.1 +/- 5.5 to 30.4 +/- 4.0%; 0.50 mg h-1: 25.2 +/- 5.6 to 30.9 +/- 4.4%) and decreased in the control patients. 6. Right ventricular haemodynamics improved by enalaprilat infusion (0.50 mg h-1: RVEF increased from 40.0 +/- 3.5 to 45.5 +/- 4.0%). Lactate plasma concentrations decreased in the group with 0.50 mg h-1 enalaprilat (from 1.9 +/- 1.0 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg dl-1) and increased in the control patients. 7. Continuous infusion of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat exerted beneficial cardiorespiratory effects in the critically ill. The widespread common risk of altered perfusion with decreased CI, DO2, VO2, O2-extr and increased lactate concentration was blunted by enalaprilat infusion. 8. Although

  7. Life-threatening angio-oedema after the first dose of an ACE inhibitor-not an anaphylactic reaction.

    PubMed

    Krogh Nielsen, Troels; Bygum, Anette; Rye Rasmussen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old Caucasian woman, with no prior history of swellings, who was admitted to a hospital due to life-threatening angio-oedema. She had, the previous day, been prescribed an ACE inhibitor for her essential hypertension. She had taken one tablet at night-time, and awoke in the morning with a swollen face progressing to involve the tongue and throat within a few hours. On arrival at her doctor's office, her voice had altered. Corticosteroids and antihistamine were administered while awaiting an ambulance. Arriving at the emergency department, she had dyspnoea due to increasingly severe angio-oedema of the upper airways. Neither adrenaline inhalations, intravenously administrated corticosteroids, atropine nor furosemide were effective and the patient soon become bradycardic. A tracheotomy was performed and the patient was placed on a ventilator. She eventually made a full recovery. It was concluded that she had suffered from life-threatening angio-oedema due to her new medication. PMID:27229746

  8. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study.

    PubMed

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them-and perhaps also the other dipeptides-as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  9. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M.; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them—and perhaps also the other dipeptides—as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  10. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Use and Mortality in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Lott, Evan H; Lu, Jun Ling; Malakauskas, Sandra M; Ma, Jennie Z; Quarles, Darryl L; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between ACEI/ARB use and mortality in CKD patients. Background There is insufficient evidence about the association of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) with mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods A logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the propensity of ACEI/ARB initiation in 141,413 US veterans with non-dialysis CKD previously unexposed to ACEI/ARB treatment. We examined the association of ACEI/ARB administration with all-cause mortality in patients matched by propensity scores, using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox models in “intention-to-treat” analyses, and in generalized linear models with binary outcomes and inverse probability treatment weighing (IPTW) in “as-treated” analyses. Results The mean±SD age of the patients at baseline was 75±10 years, 8% of patients were black, and 22% were diabetic. ACEI/ARB administration was associated with significantly lower risk of mortality both in the intention-to-treat analysis (HR=0.81; 95%CI: 0.78-0.84, p<0.001) and in the as-treated analysis with IPTW (OR=0.37; 95%CI: 0.34-0.41, p<0.001). The association of ACEI/ARB treatment with lower risk of mortality was present in all examined subgroups. Conclusions In this large contemporary cohort of non-dialysis dependent CKD patients, ACEI/ARB administration was associated with greater survival. PMID:24269363

  11. Can ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers be detrimental in CKD patients?

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay A C

    2011-01-01

    Current epidemiological data from the USA, Europe, Asia and the Indian subcontinent, Africa, the Far East, South America, the Middle East and Eastern Europe all point to the increasing incidence of renal failure encompassing acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While the explanations for these worldwide epidemics remain speculative, it must be acknowledged that these increases in AKI, CKD and ESRD, happening worldwide, have occurred despite the universal application of strategies of renoprotection over the last 2 decades, more especially the widespread use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). We note that many of the published large renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade randomized controlled trials, upon which current evidence-based practice for the increasing use of ACEIs and ARBs for renoprotection derived from, have strong deficiencies that have been highlighted over the years. From reports in the literature, there is an increasing association of exacerbations of renal failure with ACEIs and ARBs, more so in the older hypertensive patient, >65 years old. The biological plausibility for ACEI and ARB to protect the kidneys against a background of potential multiple pathogenetic pathways to account for CKD progression appears to be not very defensible. We reviewed the literature along these lines and submit that ACEIs and ARBs often cause unrecognized significant worsening renal failure in CKD patients, sometimes irreversible, and that more caution is required regarding their use, especially in the older hypertensive patients, with likely ischemic hypertensive nephropathy. Given the increasing association of concomitant RAAS blockade with worsening renal failure following exposure to iodinated contrast, during acute illness, in the perioperative period and following lower bowel preparations prior to colonoscopy, we submit that, preferably

  12. Photodynamic therapy using a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fingar, V H; Wieman, T J; McMahon, K S; Haydon, P S; Halling, B P; Yuhas, D A; Winkelman, J W

    1997-10-15

    The use of endogenously created porphyrins as an alternative to photosensitizer injection for photodynamic therapy is a rapidly evolving area of study. One common method to induce porphyrin synthesis and accumulation in cells is the topical, oral, or parenteral administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid, a precursor for heme biosynthesis. Porphyrin accumulation may also be elicited by the use of enzyme inhibitors of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Groups of DBA/2 mice bearing SMT-F mammary tumors were placed on a diet containing 0-4000 ppm of a protoporphyrinogen oxidase inhibitor, FP-846. This agent blocks a critical step in porphyrin metabolism and results in elevated intracellular levels of protoporphyrin IX. Light treatment of tumors produced both initial and long-term regression that was dependent on the amount of inhibitor, the duration of inhibitor exposure to animals, and the amount of light used in PDT. Tumor regression occurred without significant destruction of normal tissues in the treatment field and without initial vascular constriction or blood flow stasis. Tumor cure in animals given 4000 ppm FP-846 in feed for 3 days and 300 J/cm2 602-670 nm light (23% cure) was similar to the response in animals given 10 mg/kg Photofrin and the same light dose (20%). PMID:9377568

  13. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology.

  14. Ventricular dilatation in the absence of ACE inhibitors: influence of haemodynamic and neurohormonal variables following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J; Batin, P; Hawkins, M; McEntegart, D; Cowley, A

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To examine the relation between patterns of ventricular remodelling and haemodynamic and neurohormonal variables, at rest and during symptom limited exercise, in the year following acute myocardial infarction in patients not receiving angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.
Design—A prospective observational study.
Patients—65 patients recruited following hospital admission with a transmural anterior myocardial infarction.
Methods—Central haemodynamics and neurohormonal activation at rest and during symptom limited treadmill exercise were measured at baseline before hospital discharge, one month later, and at three monthly intervals thereafter. Patients were classified according to individual patterns of change in left ventricular end diastolic volumes at rest, assessed at each visit using transthoracic echocardiography.
Results—In most patients (n = 43, 66%) ventricular volumes were unchanged or reduced. Mean (SEM) treadmill exercise capacity and peak exercise cardiac index increased at month 12 by 200 (24) seconds (p < 0.001 v baseline) and by 0.8 (0.4) l/min/m2 (p<0.05 v baseline), respectively, in this group. In patients with limited ventricular dilatation (n = 11, 17%) exercise capacity increased by 259 (52) seconds (p < 0.001 v baseline) and peak exercise cardiac index improved by 0.8 (0.7) l/min/m2 (NS). In the remaining 11 patients with progressive left ventricular dilatation, exercise capacity increased by 308 (53) seconds (p< 0.001 v baseline) and peak exercise cardiac index similarly improved by 1.3 (0.7) l/min/m2 (NS). There were trends towards increased atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) secretion at rest and at peak exercise in this group.
Conclusions—Ventricular dilatation after acute myocardial infarction is a heterogeneous process that is progressive in only a minority of patients. Compensatory mechanisms, including ANF release, appear capable of maintaining and improving exercise capacity in

  15. High Incidence of ACE/PAI-1 in Association to a Spectrum of Other Polymorphic Cardiovascular Genes Involving PBMCs Proinflammatory Cytokines in Hypertensive Hypercholesterolemic Patients: Reversibility with a Combination of ACE Inhibitor and Statin

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Charbel; Haddad, Katia; Hamoui, Samar; Azar, Albert; Fajloun, Ziad; Makdissy, Nehman

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are significantly high in the Lebanese population with the two most predominant forms being atherosclerosis and venous thrombosis. The purpose of our study was to assess the association of a spectrum of CVD related genes and combined state of hypertension hypercholesterolemia (HH) in unrelated Lebanese. Twelve polymorphisms were studied by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization of DNA from 171 healthy individuals and 144 HH subjects. Two genes were significantly associated with HH: ACE (OR: 9.20, P<0.0001) and PAI-1 (OR: 2.29, P = 0.007), respectively with the occurrence of the risky alleles “Del” and “4G”. The frequencies of the Del and 4G alleles were found to be 0.98 and 0.90 in the HH group versus 0.84 and 0.79 in the healthy group, respectively. Serum ACE activity and PAI-I increased significantly with Del/Del and 4G/5G genotypes. The co-expression of Del/4G(+/+) was detected in 113 out of 171 (66.0%) controls and 125 out of 144 (86.8%) HH subjects. Del/4G(-/-) was detected in only 6 (3.5%) controls and undetected in the HH group. Three venous thrombosis related genes [FV(Leiden), MTHFR(A1298C) and FXIII(V34L)] were significantly related to the prominence of the co-expression of Del/4G(+/+). A range of 2 to 8 combined polymorphisms co-expressed per subject where 5 mutations were the most detected. In Del/4G(+/+) subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced significant elevated levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α contrary to IL-10, and no variations occurred for IL-4. ACE inhibitor (ramipril) in combination with statin (atorvastatin) and not alone reversed significantly the situation. This first report from Lebanon sheds light on an additional genetic predisposition of a complex spectrum of genes involved in CVD and suggests that the most requested gene FVL by physicians may not be sufficient to diagnose eventual future problems that can occur in the cardiovascular system. Subjects expressing the double mutations

  16. Multifactorial Model and Treatment Approaches of Refractory Hypotension in a Patient Who Took an ACE Inhibitor the Day of Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Karan; Sacher, Vikas Y.; Nelson, Craig T.; Lew, John I.

    2013-01-01

    In the field of anesthesiology, there is wide debate on discontinuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy the day of noncardiac surgery. Although there have been many studies attributing perioperative hypotension to same-day ACEI and ARB use, there are many additional variables that play a role in perioperative hypotension. Additionally, restoring blood pressure in these patients presents a unique challenge to anesthesiologists. A case report is presented in which a patient took her ACEI the day of surgery and developed refractory hypotension during surgery. The evidence of ACEI use on the day of surgery and development of hypotension is reviewed, and additional variables that contributed to this hypotensive episode are discussed. Lastly, current challenges in restoring blood pressure are presented, and a basic model on treatment approaches for refractory hypotension in the setting of perioperative ACEI use is proposed. PMID:23662213

  17. The effect of treatment with low dose ACE inhibitor and/or diuretic on coronary microvasculature in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Maurin, A; Guez, D; Schiavi, P

    2000-03-01

    Angiotensin II is considered to have angiogenic properties. Nevertheless, several authors reported an increase in coronary capillary density after treatment with ACE inhibitors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of treatment with low doses of ACE inhibitor perindopril, low doses of the diuretic indapamide, or a combination of the two on microvascular structure in hearts from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-sp). Young adult male SHR treated with indapamide (0.24 mg/kg/day), perindopril (0.76 mg/kg/day), or both were compared with untreated animals after 8 or 14 weeks of treatment. Survival of SHR-sp was significantly increased after treatment. Only perindopril alone or in combination with indapamide significantly decreased blood pressure and cardiac mass. Treatment also significantly increased capillary and myocyte densities but arteriolar density tended to decrease. External and internal diameters significantly increased in treated animals while arteriolar thickness remained the same. Thus, thickness in vessels of the same size was the greatest in untreated animals, followed by indapamide- and perindopril-treated rats with the thinnest walls in rats with combined treatment, and the treatment resulted in a significant increase in the lumen to wall ratio. Capillary and arteriolar growth responses in treated animals seem to indicate that the two are independently regulated processes. Treatment with indapamide alone at this dosage did not significantly influence most responses but in combination with perindopril it strengthened the effect of perindopril. PMID:10684730

  18. Non-disulfide-bridged peptides from Tityus serrulatus venom: Evidence for proline-free ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro-Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Peigneur, Steve; Vriens, Kim; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno Philippe Angelo; Júnior, Ronaldo Bragança Martins; Arruda, Eurico; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Tytgat, Jan; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2016-08-01

    The present study purifies two T. serrulatus non-disulfide-bridged peptides (NDBPs), named venom peptides 7.2 (RLRSKG) and 8 (KIWRS) and details their synthesis and biological activity, comparing to the synthetic venom peptide 7.1 (RLRSKGKK), previously identified. The synthetic replicate peptides were subjected to a range of biological assays: hemolytic, antifungal, antiviral, electrophysiological, immunological and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition activities. All venom peptides neither showed to be cytolytic nor demonstrated significant antifungal or antiviral activities. Interestingly, peptides were able to modulate macrophages' responses, increasing IL-6 production. The three venom peptides also demonstrated potential to inhibit ACE in the following order: 7.2>7.1>8. The ACE inhibition activity was unexpected, since peptides that display this function are usually proline-rich peptides. In attempt to understand the origin of such small peptides, we discovered that the isolated peptides 7.2 and 8 are fragments of the same molecule, named Pape peptide precursor. Furthermore, the study discusses that Pape fragments could be originated from a post-splitting mechanism resulting from metalloserrulases and other proteinases cleavage, which can be seen as a clever mechanism used by the scorpion to enlarge its repertoire of venom components. Scorpion venom remains as an interesting source of bioactive proteins and this study advances our knowledge about three NDBPs and their biological activities. PMID:27221550

  19. TNF inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    MA, XIXI; XU, SHENGQIAN

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy has markedly improved treatment outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonists, such as infliximab (IFX), etanercept (ETN), adalimumab (ADA), golimumab (GOLI) and certolizumab pegol (CZP) have been widely used for the treatment of RA. IFX provides significant, clinically relevant improvement in physical function and the quality of life, inhibits progressive joint damage and sustains improvement in the signs and symptoms of patients with RA. ETN is effective and safe for patients with RA. Combination therapy with ETN plus methotrexate (MTX) reduces disease activity, decreases total joint score progression, slows the pace of joint destruction and improves function more effectively compared to any of the monotherapies. ADA with or without MTX also relieves the signs and symptoms of RA. CZP and GOLI expand the therapeutic schedule for patients with RA. The TNF-α inhibitors have similar efficacy, but distinct clinical pharmacokinetic and -dynamic properties. The common adverse events of these TNF-α antagonists include adverse reactions, infections and injection-site reaction. Additionally, these adverse events are mostly mild or moderate and their incidence is low. Certain patients exhibit a lack of response to anti-TNF-α therapies. Some patients may discontinue the initial drug and switch to a second anti-TNF-α agent. The shortage of clinical response to one agent may not predict deficiency of response to another. This review mainly addresses the latest developments of these biological agents in the treatment of RA. PMID:24648915

  20. HIV Entry Inhibitors and Their Potential in HIV Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses recent progress in the development of anti-HIV agents targeting the viral entry process. The three main classes (attachment inhibitors, co-receptor binding inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors) are further broken down by specific mechanism of action and structure. Many of these inhibitors are in advanced clinical trials, including the HIV maturation inhibitor bevirimat, from the authors’ laboratories. In addition, the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has recently been FDA-approved. Possible roles for these agents in anti-HIV therapy, including treatment of virus resistant to current drugs, are also discussed. PMID:18720513

  1. RU28318, an Aldosterone Antagonist, in Combination with an ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Benter, Ibrahim F.; Babiker, Fawzi; Al-Rashdan, Ibrahim; Yousif, Mariam; Akhtar, Saghir

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We evaluated the effects of RU28318 (RU), a selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, Captopril (Capt), an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and Losartan (Los), an angiotensin receptor blocker, alone or in combination with ischemia/reperfusion- (I/R-) induced cardiac dysfunction in hearts obtained from normal and diabetic rats. Methods. Isolated hearts were perfused for 30 min and then subjected to 30 min of global ischemia (I) followed by a period of 30 min of reperfusion (R). Drugs were administered for 30 min either before or after ischemia. Drug regimens tested were RU, Capt, Los, RU + Capt, RU + Los, Capt + Los, and RU + Capt + Los (Triple). Recovery of cardiac hemodynamics was evaluated. Results. Recovery of cardiac function was up to 5-fold worse in hearts obtained from diabetic animals compared to controls. Treatment with RU was generally better in preventing or reversing ischemia-induced cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts compared to treatment with Capt or Los alone. In diabetic hearts, RU was generally similarly effective as Capt or Los treatment. Conclusions. RU treatment locally might be considered as an effective therapy or preventative measure in cardiac I/R injury. Importantly, RU was the most effective at improving −dP/dt (a measure of diastolic function) when administered to diabetic hearts after ischemia. PMID:24066305

  2. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;1) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  3. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;(1)) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  4. ACE inhibition reduces infarction in normotensive but not hypertensive rats: correlation with cortical ACE activity

    PubMed Central

    Porritt, Michelle J; Chen, Michelle; Rewell, Sarah S J; Dean, Rachael G; Burrell, Louise M; Howells, David W

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition can reduce stroke risk by up to 43% in humans and reduce the associated disability, and hence understanding the mechanism of improvement is important. In animals and humans, these effects may be independent of the blood pressure-lowering effects of ACE inhibition. Normotensive (Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)) and hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)) animals were treated with the ACE inhibitors ramipril or lisinopril for 7 or 42 days before 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Blood pressure, serum ACE, and blood glucose levels were measured and stroke infarct volume was recorded 24 hours after stroke. Despite greater reductions in blood pressure, infarct size was not improved by ACE inhibition in hypertensive animals. Short-term ACE inhibition produced only a modest reduction in blood pressure, but WKY rats showed marked reductions in infarct volume. Long-term ACE inhibition had additional reductions in blood pressure; however, infarct volumes in WKY rats did not improve further but worsened. WKY rats differed from SHR in having marked cortical ACE activity that was highly sensitive to ACE inhibition. The beneficial effects of ACE inhibition on infarct volume in normotensive rats do not correlate with changes in blood pressure. However, WKY rats have ACE inhibitor-sensitive cortical ACE activity that is lacking in the SHR. PMID:20407464

  5. Angiotensin I–Converting Enzyme Type 2 (ACE2) Gene Therapy Improves Glycemic Control in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bindom, Sharell M.; Hans, Chetan P.; Xia, Huijing; Boulares, A. Hamid; Lazartigues, Eric

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Several clinical studies have shown the benefits of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade in the development of diabetes, and a local RAS has been identified in pancreatic islets. Angiotensin I–converting enzyme (ACE)2, a new component of the RAS, has been identified in the pancreas, but its role in β-cell function remains unknown. Using 8- and 16-week-old obese db/db mice, we examined the ability of ACE2 to alter pancreatic β-cell function and thereby modulate hyperglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Both db/db and nondiabetic lean control (db/m) mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2-eGFP) or the control virus (Ad-eGFP) via injection into the pancreas. Glycemia and β-cell function were assessed 1 week later at the peak of viral expression. RESULTS In 8-week-old db/db mice, Ad-hACE2-eGFP significantly improved fasting glycemia, enhanced intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, increased islet insulin content and β-cell proliferation, and reduced β-cell apoptosis compared with Ad-eGFP. ACE2 overexpression had no effect on insulin sensitivity in comparison with Ad-eGFP treatment in diabetic mice. Angiotensin-(1–7) receptor blockade by d-Ala7–Ang-(1-7) prevented the ACE2-mediated improvements in intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, glycemia, and islet function and also impaired insulin sensitivity in both Ad-hACE2-eGFP– and Ad-eGFP–treated db/db mice. d-Ala7–Ang-(1-7) had no effect on db/m mice. In 16-week-old diabetic mice, Ad-hACE2-eGFP treatment improved fasting blood glucose but had no effect on any of the other parameters. CONCLUSIONS These findings identify ACE2 as a novel target for the prevention of β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis occurring in type 2 diabetes. PMID:20660625

  6. Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of Different ACE Inhibitors in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: A PRISMA-Compliant Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, WeiPing; Zhang, HaiBin; Guo, JinCheng; Zhang, XueKun; Zhang, LiXin; Li, ChunLei; Zhang, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Heart failure is a public health problem and a great economic burden for patients and healthcare systems. Suppression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors remains the mainstay of treatment for heart failure. However, the abundance of ACE inhibitors makes it difficult for doctors to choose.We performed this network meta-analysis of ACEIs in patients with heart failure in order to address this area of uncertainty.We searched PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, and Medline.Any randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, ramipril, or trandolapril or combined interventions of 2 or more of these drugs.Two reviewers extracted the data and made the quality assessment. At first, we used Stata software (version 12.0, StataCorp, College Station, TX) to make traditional pairwise meta-analyses for studies that directly compared different interventions. Then, network meta-analysis was performed using WinBUGS (version 1.4.3, MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK).A total of 29 studies were included. Lisinopril was associated with a higher rate of all-cause mortality compared with placebo (odds ratio 65.9, 95% credible interval 1.91 to 239.6) or ramipril (14.65, 1.23 to 49.5). Enalapril significantly reduced systolic blood pressure when compared with placebo (standardized mean differences -0.6, 95% credible interval -1.03 to -0.18). Both captopril (odds ratio 76.2, 95% credible interval 1.56 to 149.3) and enalapril (274.4, 2.4 to 512.9) were associated with a higher incidence of cough compared to placebo.Some important outcomes such as rehospitalization and cardiac death were not included. The sample size and the number of studies were limited, especially for ramipril.Our results suggest that enalapril might be the best option when considering factors such as increased ejection fraction, stroke volume, and decreased mean arterial pressure. However, enalapril was associated with the

  7. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help diagnose and monitor a disorder called sarcoidosis . People with sarcoidosis may have their ACE level tested regularly to ... normal ACE level may be a sign of sarcoidosis. ACE levels may rise or fall as sarcoidosis ...

  8. [Comparative evaluation of the influence of sulfhydryl and phosphate ACE inhibitors on thrombocyte aggregation in patients suffering from atrerial hypertension with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; Medvedev, I N; Tolmachev, V V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the influence of two ACE inhibitors--captopril, a sulfhydryl one, and fozinopril, a phosphate one--on the aggregation activity of thrombocytes in patients suffering from arterial hypertension (AH) with metabolic syndrome (MS). Sixty-nine patients suffering from AH with MS were examined; 36 patients were administered captopril during 16 weeks, while 33 patients were treated with fozinopril during the same period of time. Changes in anthropometric parameters, blood lipid spectrum, lipid peroxidation in blood plasma and thrombocytes, and the antioxidative protection of liquid part of blood and platelets, as well as the aggregation activity of thrombocytes were assessed. The data received were processed using Student criterion and system multifactor analysis. The study shows that the use of fozinopril in patients with AH and metabolic syndrome attenuates peroxidation syndrome and optimizes thrombocyte aggregation. Prolonged fozinopril application will stabilize the achieved effect. Captopril did not have a positive effect on the parameters under study. In conclusion, fozinopril should be applied in combination with non-drug means to lower body weight in patients suffering from AH with MS. PMID:17564032

  9. An International, Web-Based, Prospective Cohort Study to Determine Whether the Use of ACE Inhibitors prior to the Onset of Scleroderma Renal Crisis Is Associated with Worse Outcomes—Methodology and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Marie; Baron, Murray; Lo, Ernest; Weinfeld, Joanna; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh

    2010-01-01

    Background. To describe the methodology of a study designed to determine whether systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with incident scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors prior to the onset of SRC have worse outcomes. Methods. Prospective, international cohort study of SRC subjects identified through an ongoing web-based survey. Every second Friday afternoon, an e-mail was sent to 589 participating physicians to identify new cases of SRC. Death or dialysis at one year after the onset of SRC will be compared in patients exposed or not to ACE inhibitors prior to the onset of SRC. Results. Fifteen months after the start of the survey, we had identified 76 incident cases of SRC. Of these, 66 (87%) had a hypertensive SRC and 10 (13%) a normotensive SRC. Twenty-two percent (22%) of the patients were on an ACE inhibitor immediately prior to the onset of the SRC. To date, we have collected one-year follow-up data on approximately 1/3 of the cohort. Of these, over 50% have died or remain on dialysis at one year. Conclusion. An international, web-based cohort study design is a feasible method of recruiting a substantial number of patients to study an infrequent vascular manifestation of SSc. PMID:20936135

  10. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called “ubiquitin-proteasome system” (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  11. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called "ubiquitin-proteasome system" (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  12. CYP17 inhibitors for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vasaitis, Tadas S; Bruno, Robert D; Njar, Vincent C O

    2011-05-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is now the second most prevalent cause of death in men in the USA and Europe. At present, the major treatment options include surgical or medical castration. These strategies cause ablation of the production of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and related androgens by the testes. However, because these procedures do not affect adrenal, prostate and other tissues' androgen production, they are often combined with androgen receptor antagonists to block their action. Indeed, recent studies have unequivocally established that in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) many androgen-regulated genes become re-expressed and tissue androgen levels increase despite low serum levels. Clearly, inhibition of the key enzyme which catalyzes the biosynthesis of androgens from pregnane precursors, 17α-hydroxy/17,20-lyase (hereafter referred to as CYP17) could prevent androgen production from all sources. Thus, total ablation of androgen production by potent CYP17 inhibitors may provide effective treatment of prostate cancer patients. This review highlights the role of androgen biosynthesis in the progression of prostate cancer and the impact of CYP17 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, abiraterone acetate, VN/124-1 (TOK-001) and TAK-700 in the clinic and in clinical development. Article from the special issue on Targeted Inhibitors. PMID:21092758

  13. CYP17 inhibitors for prostate cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vasaitis, Tadas S.; Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is now the second most prevalent cause of death in men in the USA and Europe. At present, the major treatment options include surgical or medical castration. These strategies cause ablation of the production of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and related androgens by the testes. However, because these procedures do not affect adrenal, prostate and other tissues androgen production, they are often combined with androgen receptor antagonists to block their action. Indeed, recent studies have unequivocally established that in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) many androgen-regulated genes become re-expressed and tissue androgen levels increase despite low serum levels. Clearly, inhibition of the key enzyme which catalyzes the biosynthesis of androgens from pregnane precursors, 17α-hydroxy/17,20-lyase (hereafter referred to as CYP17) could prevent androgen production from all sources. Thus, total ablation of androgen production by potent CYP17 inhibitors may provide effective treatment of prostate cancer patients. This review highlights the role of androgen biosynthesis in the progression of prostate cancer and the impact of CYP17 inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, abiraterone acetate, VN/124-1 (TOK-001) and TAK-700 in the clinic and in clinical development. PMID:21092758

  14. Anti-platelet therapy: phosphodiesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gresele, Paolo; Momi, Stefania; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of platelet aggregation can be achieved either by the blockade of membrane receptors or by interaction with intracellular signalling pathways. Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) are two critical intracellular second messengers provided with strong inhibitory activity on fundamental platelet functions. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs), by catalysing the hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, limit the intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotides, thus regulating platelet function. The inhibition of PDEs may therefore exert a strong platelet inhibitory effect. Platelets possess three PDE isoforms (PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5), with different selectivity for cAMP and cGMP. Several nonselective or isoenzyme-selective PDE inhibitors have been developed, and some of them have entered clinical use as antiplatelet agents. This review focuses on the effect of PDE2, PDE3 and PDE5 inhibitors on platelet function and on the evidence for an antithrombotic action of some of them, and in particular of dipyridamole and cilostazol. PMID:21649691

  15. [Thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor in asthma therapy].

    PubMed

    Machida, K; Takagi, K; Horiba, M

    1996-11-01

    Thromboxane A2(TXA2), a platelet aggregator and vasoconstricter, has been implicated as a potential mediator of bronchial asthma. TXA2 induces potent contraction of airway smooth muscles and airway hyperresponsiveness. OKY-046 (ozagrel hydrochloride) is a specific inhibitor of TXA2 synthetase and a new antiasthmatic agent. In a phase III study ozagrel has shown significantly higher effect in ameliorating the asthma symptoms and reduced the dose of concomitant steroid therapy compared to azelastine hydrochloride. Both basical and clinical studies showed that TXA2 synthetase inhibitor is effective on airway hyperresponsiveness. In this review the role of TXA2 synthetase inhibitor in current asthma therapy, which is based on the Japanese guideline of allergic disorders, was discussed. PMID:8950950

  16. A genome-wide association study identifies variants in KCNIP4 associated with ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Mosley, J D; Shaffer, C M; Van Driest, S L; Weeke, P E; Wells, Q S; Karnes, J H; Velez Edwards, D R; Wei, W-Q; Teixeira, P L; Bastarache, L; Crawford, D C; Li, R; Manolio, T A; Bottinger, E P; McCarty, C A; Linneman, J G; Brilliant, M H; Pacheco, J A; Thompson, W; Chisholm, R L; Jarvik, G P; Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Baldwin, E; Ralston, J; Larson, E B; Grafton, J; Scrol, A; Jouni, H; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Borthwick, K M; Kuivaniemi, H; Carey, D J; Ritchie, M D; Bradford, Y; Verma, S S; Chute, C G; Veluchamy, A; Siddiqui, M K; Palmer, C N A; Doney, A; MahmoudPour, S H; Maitland-van der Zee, A H; Morris, A D; Denny, J C; Roden, D M

    2016-06-01

    The most common side effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) drugs is cough. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ACEi-induced cough among 7080 subjects of diverse ancestries in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network. Cases were subjects diagnosed with ACEi-induced cough. Controls were subjects with at least 6 months of ACEi use and no cough. A GWAS (1595 cases and 5485 controls) identified associations on chromosome 4 in an intron of KCNIP4. The strongest association was at rs145489027 (minor allele frequency=0.33, odds ratio (OR)=1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-1.4), P=1.0 × 10(-8)). Replication for six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KCNIP4 was tested in a second eMERGE population (n=926) and in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside, Scotland (GoDARTS) cohort (n=4309). Replication was observed at rs7675300 (OR=1.32 (1.01-1.70), P=0.04) in eMERGE and at rs16870989 and rs1495509 (OR=1.15 (1.01-1.30), P=0.03 for both) in GoDARTS. The combined association at rs1495509 was significant (OR=1.23 (1.15-1.32), P=1.9 × 10(-9)). These results indicate that SNPs in KCNIP4 may modulate ACEi-induced cough risk. PMID:26169577

  17. The Aurora kinase inhibitors in cancer research and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cicenas, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    Compounds that affect enzymatic function of kinases are valuable for the understanding of the complex biochemical processes in cells. Aurora kinases (AURKs) play a key role in the control of the mitosis. These kinases are frequently deregulated in different human cancers: overexpression, amplifications, translocations and deletions were reported in many cancer cell lines as well as patient tissues. These findings steered a rigorous hunt for small-molecule AURK inhibitors not only for research purposes as well as for therapeutic uses. In this review, we describe a number of AURK inhibitors and their use in cancer research and/or therapy. We hope to assist researchers and clinicians in deciding which inhibitor is most appropriate for their specific purpose. The review will also provide a broad overview of the clinical studies performed with some of these inhibitors (if such studies have been performed). PMID:26932147

  18. Diabetes therapies in hemodialysis patients: Dipeptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuya; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Tsuji, Mayumi; Udaka, Yuko; Mihara, Masatomo; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Inoue, Michiyasu; Goto, Yoshikazu; Gotoh, Hiromichi; Inagaki, Masahiro; Oguchi, Katsuji

    2015-06-25

    Although several previous studies have been published on the effects of dipeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients, the findings have yet to be reviewed comprehensively. Eyesight failure caused by diabetic retinopathy and aging-related dementia make multiple daily insulin injections difficult for HD patients. Therefore, we reviewed the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors with a focus on oral antidiabetic drugs as a new treatment strategy in HD patients with diabetes. The following 7 DPP-4 inhibitors are available worldwide: sitagliptin, vildagliptin, alogliptin, linagliptin, teneligliptin, anagliptin, and saxagliptin. All of these are administered once daily with dose adjustments in HD patients. Four types of oral antidiabetic drugs can be administered for combination oral therapy with DPP-4 inhibitors, including sulfonylureas, meglitinide, thiazolidinediones, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. Nine studies examined the antidiabetic effects in HD patients. Treatments decreased hemoglobin A1c and glycated albumin levels by 0.3% to 1.3% and 1.7% to 4.9%, respectively. The efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitor treatment is high among HD patients, and no patients exhibited significant severe adverse effects such as hypoglycemia and liver dysfunction. DPP-4 inhibitors are key drugs in new treatment strategies for HD patients with diabetes and with limited choices for diabetes treatment. PMID:26131325

  19. Different effects of thiol and nonthiol ace inhibitors on copper-induced lipid and protein oxidative modification.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A C; Filipe, P M; Freitas, J P; Manso, C F

    1996-01-01

    Differences among angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) in scavenging reactive oxygen species were described and mainly attributed to the presence or absence of a thiol group. Plasma constituents and red cells are known targets for oxidative damage. Transition metals, like copper, are well known catalizers of free radical generation. In the present study we compared the abilities of captopril (a thiol ACEI), enalaprilat, and lisinopril (two nonthiol ACEI) for inhibiting copper-induced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation and fluorescence generation in whole human plasma and low-density lipoprotein. The effects of those ACEI on copper/hydrogen peroxide-induced fluorescence development and electrophoretic mobility modification in albumin and on copper-induced TBARS formation and hemolysis in human red cells were also compared. Captopril was more effective than the two nonthiol ACEI in inhibiting plasma and LDL lipid peroxidation, but it was ineffective in inhibiting the albumin oxidative modification that was moderately inhibited by enalaprilat and lisinopril. On the contrary, the inhibitory effects of the three ACEI on copper-induced lipid peroxidation and hemolysis in red cell suspensions were more uniform. This as yet unreported red cell protective effect may deserve pharmacological evaluation. Our results show that captopril is a more effective antioxidant than the nonthiol ACEI in some systems. However, the nonthiol ACEI also have the ability to partially protect some targets against oxidative damage. These observations suggest that the presence of a thiol group in the ACEI structure is not the only determinant for the antioxidant properties. PMID:8904291

  20. A genome-wide association study identifies variants in KCNIP4 associated with ACE inhibitor-induced cough

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, J D; Shaffer, C M; Van Driest, S L; Weeke, P E; Wells, Q S; Karnes, J H; Velez Edwards, D R; Wei, W-Q; Teixeira, P L; Bastarache, L; Crawford, D C; Li, R; Manolio, T A; Bottinger, E P; McCarty, C A; Linneman, J G; Brilliant, M H; Pacheco, J A; Thompson, W; Chisholm, R L; Jarvik, G P; Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Baldwin, E; Ralston, J; Larson, E B; Grafton, J; Scrol, A; Jouni, H; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Borthwick, K M; Kuivaniemi, H; Carey, D J; Ritchie, M D; Bradford, Y; Verma, S S; Chute, C G; Veluchamy, A; Siddiqui, M K; Palmer, C N A; Doney, A; MahmoudPour, S H; Maitland-van der Zee, A H; Morris, A D; Denny, J C; Roden, D M

    2016-01-01

    The most common side effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) drugs is cough. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ACEi-induced cough among 7080 subjects of diverse ancestries in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network. Cases were subjects diagnosed with ACEi-induced cough. Controls were subjects with at least 6 months of ACEi use and no cough. A GWAS (1595 cases and 5485 controls) identified associations on chromosome 4 in an intron of KCNIP4. The strongest association was at rs145489027 (minor allele frequency=0.33, odds ratio (OR)=1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–1.4), P=1.0 × 10−8). Replication for six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KCNIP4 was tested in a second eMERGE population (n=926) and in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside, Scotland (GoDARTS) cohort (n=4309). Replication was observed at rs7675300 (OR=1.32 (1.01–1.70), P=0.04) in eMERGE and at rs16870989 and rs1495509 (OR=1.15 (1.01–1.30), P=0.03 for both) in GoDARTS. The combined association at rs1495509 was significant (OR=1.23 (1.15–1.32), P=1.9 × 10−9). These results indicate that SNPs in KCNIP4 may modulate ACEi-induced cough risk. PMID:26169577

  1. Trial watch: IDO inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Aranda, Fernando; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Kennedy, Eugene P; Platten, Michael; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxigenase 1 (IDO1) is the main enzyme that catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step of the so-called “kynurenine pathway”, i.e., the metabolic cascade that converts the essential amino acid L-tryptophan (Trp) into L-kynurenine (Kyn). IDO1, which is expressed constitutively by some tissues and in an inducible manner by specific subsets of antigen-presenting cells, has been shown to play a role in the establishment and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. At least in part, this reflects the capacity of IDO1 to restrict the microenvironmental availability of Trp and to favor the accumulation of Kyn and some of its derivatives. Also, several neoplastic lesions express IDO1, providing them with a means to evade anticancer immunosurveillance. This consideration has driven the development of several IDO1 inhibitors, some of which (including 1-methyltryptophan) have nowadays entered clinical evaluation. In animal tumor models, the inhibition of IDO1 by chemical or genetic interventions is indeed associated with the (re)activation of therapeutically relevant anticancer immune responses. This said, several immunotherapeutic regimens exert robust clinical activity in spite of their ability to promote the expression of IDO1. Moreover, 1-methyltryptophan has recently been shown to exert IDO1-independent immunostimulatory effects. Here, we summarize the preclinical and clinical studies testing the antineoplastic activity of IDO1-targeting interventions. PMID:25941578

  2. Long-term maintenance therapy with calcineurin inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Campistol, J M

    2010-11-01

    Combination therapy with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-inhibitors and calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) provides significant immunosuppressive efficacy. If the combination of these agents is not properly optimized, however, important risks for synergistic toxicity and long-term complications may result. The combination of a CNI and an mTOR-inhibitor is a potent immunosuppressive therapy that effectively prevents the incidence of acute rejection, although the potential nephrotoxic impact must be considered in the longer term. The trend has therefore been to use a low-dose CNI in combination with the mTOR-inhibitor sirolimus in order to reduce the risk of nephrotoxicity. Recent studies show that an mTOR-inhibitor/low-dose CNI combination is effective in the short term following transplantation, and over time, consideration should be given to the elimination of the CNI in order to preserve renal function. In the medium to long term, it is also possible to consider the elimination of steroids from such a protocol. Considering CNI dose minimization or elimination is an essential component of this approach, as is the optimal dose and level of both drugs when used in combination. PMID:21095445

  3. Pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity from target therapy and angiogenesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maurea, Nicola; Coppola, Carmela; Piscopo, Giovanna; Galletta, Francesca; Riccio, Gennaro; Esposito, Emanuela; De Lorenzo, Claudia; De Laurentiis, Michelino; Spallarossa, Paolo; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    The progress in cancer therapy and the increase in number of long-term survivors reveal the issue of cardiovascular side-effects of anticancer drugs. Cardiotoxicity has become a significant problem, and the risks of adverse cardiac events induced by systemic drugs need to be seriously considered. Potential cardiovascular toxicities linked to anticancer agents include arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia and infarction, hypertension, thromboembolism, left ventricular dysfunction, and heart failure. It has been shown that several anticancer drugs seriously affect the cardiovascular system, such as ErbB2 inhibitors, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, multitargeted kinase inhibitors, Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog inhibitors, and others. Each of these agents has a different mechanism through which it affects the cardiovascular system. ErbB2 inhibitors block the ErbB4/ErbB2 heterodimerization pathway triggered by Neuregulin-1, which is essential for cardiomyocyte survival. VEGF signaling is crucial for vascular growth, but it also has a major impact on myocardial function, and the VEGF pathway is also essential for maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. Drugs that inhibit the VEGF signaling pathway lead to a net reduction in capillary density and loss of contractile function. Here, we review the mechanisms and pathophysiology of the most significant cardiotoxic effects of ErbB2 inhibitors and antiangiogenic drugs. Moreover, we highlight the role of cardioncology in recognizing these toxicities, developing strategies to prevent or minimize cardiovascular toxicity, and reducing long-term cardiotoxic effects. PMID:27183521

  4. The effectiveness of aerobic training, cognitive behavioural therapy, and energy conservation management in treating MS-related fatigue: the design of the TREFAMS-ACE programme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background TREFAMS is an acronym for TReating FAtigue in Multiple Sclerosis, while ACE refers to the rehabilitation treatment methods under study, that is, Aerobic training, Cognitive behavioural therapy, and Energy conservation management. The TREFAMS-ACE research programme consists of four studies and has two main objectives: (1) to assess the effectiveness of three different rehabilitation treatment strategies in reducing fatigue and improving societal participation in patients with MS; and (2) to study the neurobiological mechanisms of action that underlie treatment effects and MS-related fatigue in general. Methods/Design Ambulatory patients (n = 270) suffering from MS-related fatigue will be recruited to three single-blinded randomised clinical trials (RCTs). In each RCT, 90 patients will be randomly allocated to the trial-specific intervention or to a low-intensity intervention that is the same for all RCTs. This low-intensity intervention consists of three individual consultations with a specialised MS-nurse. The trial-specific interventions are Aerobic Training, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, and Energy Conservation Management. These interventions consist of 12 individual therapist-supervised sessions with additional intervention-specific home exercises. The therapy period lasts 16 weeks. All RCTs have the same design and the same primary outcome measures: fatigue - measured with the Checklist Individual Strength, and participation - measured with the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire. Outcomes will be assessed 1 week prior to, and at 0, 8, 16, 26 and 52 weeks after randomisation. The assessors will be blinded to allocation. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in serum, salivary cortisol, physical fitness, physical activity, coping, self-efficacy, illness cognitions and other determinants will be longitudinally measured in order to study the neurobiological mechanisms of action. Discussion The TREFAMS-ACE programme is unique in its aim to

  5. Triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy in children.

    PubMed

    Handforth, Jennifer; Sharland, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Much of the success attributed to HIV therapy in the last few years has resulted from improved ways of using existing drugs in combination therapy regimens. The availability of new, more potent drugs such as protease inhibitors and more accurate viral load tests to aid decisions to start or change treatment has also contributed to the success. Published recommendations for pediatric HIV therapy, generated by a panel of experts and specialists, are readily available and regularly updated. Preferred regimens of 'potent' therapy (referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy, or HAART) currently consist of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) combined with either a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or a protease inhibitor. More intense four-drug regimens using an NNRTI or a second protease inhibitor as a fourth drug are being evaluated. Problems with HAART include: unpalatable drug formulations and adverse effects, coupled with lack of data on the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of various drug combinations. Adherence is a major factor influencing the efficacy and outcome of antiretroviral therapy. Many children cannot adhere to complex multidrug regimens, which cause virologic failure, despite excellent CD4+ cell count responses. This means a rapid progression through the limited number of treatment regimens available. Simpler regimens such as those containing three NRTIs have been proposed as a method of treatment that will allow suppression of the virus, yet circumvent many of the problems previously mentioned. An additional benefit would be the preservation of antiretroviral drugs from other classes for future treatment options if required. The major advantages of triple NRTI regimens are the simplicity of the regimen, good tolerability, few drug-drug interactions, and infrequent adverse effects coupled with a low pill burden. However, abacavir hypersensitivity remains a major problem. Up to 3% of patients may

  6. Influence of ACE I/D Polymorphism on Circulating Levels of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, D-Dimer, Ultrasensitive C-Reactive Protein and Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Sara Santos; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Sabino, Adriano de Paula; Evangelista, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo; Gomes, Karina Braga; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases are associated with coagulation disorders, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and fibrosis. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion polymorphism (ACE I/D polymorphism) has also be linked to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to compare plasma levels of ultrassensible C-reactive protein (usCRP), PAI-1, D-dimer and TGF-β1 in patients undergoing HD with different ACE I/D polymorphisms. Methods The study was performed in 138 patients at ESRD under hemodialysis therapy for more than six months. The patients were divided into three groups according to the genotype. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood cells (leukocytes). ACE I/D polymorphism was investigated by single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of D-dimer, PAI-1 and TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the determination of plasma levels of usCRP was performed by immunonephelometry. Data were analyzed by the software SigmaStat 2.03. Results Clinical characteristics were similar in patients with these three ACE I/D polymorphisms, except for interdialytic weight gain. I allele could be associated with higher interdialytic weight gain (P = 0.017). Patients genotyped as DD and as ID had significantly higher levels of PAI-1 than those with II genotype. Other laboratory parameters did not significantly differ among the three subgroups (P = 0.033). Despite not reaching statistical significance, plasma levels of usCRP were higher in patients carrying the D allele. Conclusion ACE I/D polymorphisms could be associated with changes in the regulation of sodium, fibrinolytic system, and possibly, inflammation. Our data showed that high levels of PAI-1 are detected when D allele is present, whereas greater interdialytic gain is associated with the presence of I allele. However, further studies with different experimental designs are necessary to elucidate the

  7. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Use and Major Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treated With the Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Inhibitor Alogliptin.

    PubMed

    White, William B; Wilson, Craig A; Bakris, George L; Bergenstal, Richard M; Cannon, Christopher P; Cushman, William C; Heller, Simon K; Mehta, Cyrus R; Nissen, Steven E; Zannad, Faiez; Kupfer, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system when there is dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibition in the presence of high-dose angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition has led to concerns of potential increases in cardiovascular events when the 2 classes of drugs are coadministered. We evaluated cardiovascular outcomes from the EXAMINE (Examination of Cardiovascular Outcomes With Alogliptin versus Standard of Care) trial according to ACE inhibitor use. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and a recent acute coronary syndrome were randomly assigned to receive the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor alogliptin or placebo added to existing antihyperglycemic and cardiovascular prophylactic therapies. Risks of adjudicated cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, and hospitalized heart failure were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model in patients according to ACE inhibitor use and dose. There were 3323 (62%) EXAMINE patients treated with an ACE inhibitor (1681 on alogliptin and 1642 on placebo). The composite rates of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke were comparable for alogliptin and placebo with ACE inhibitor (11.4% versus 11.8%; hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.79-1.19; P=0.76) and without ACE inhibitor use (11.2% versus 11.9%; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-1.21; P=0.62). Composite rates for cardiovascular death and heart failure in patients on ACE inhibitor occurred in 6.8% of patients on alogliptin versus 7.2% on placebo (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-1.2; P=0.57). There were no differences for these end points nor for blood pressure or heart rate in patients on higher doses of ACE inhibitor. Cardiovascular outcomes were similar for alogliptin and placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary disease treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:27480840

  8. Rho-associated kinase inhibitors: a novel glaucoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshihiro; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2013-11-01

    The rho-associated kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is activated via secreted bioactive molecules or via integrin activation after extracellular matrix binding. These lead to polymerization of actin stress fibers and formation of focal adhesions. Accumulating evidence suggests that actin cytoskeleton-modulating signals are involved in aqueous outflow regulation. Aqueous humor contains various biologically active factors, some of which are elevated in glaucomatous eyes. These factors affect aqueous outflow, in part, through ROCK signaling modulation. Various drugs acting on the cytoskeleton have also been shown to increase aqueous outflow by acting directly on outflow tissue. In vivo animal studies have shown that the trabecular meshwork (TM) actin cytoskeleton in glaucomatous eyes is more disorganized and more randomly oriented than in non-glaucomatous control eyes. In a previous study, we introduced ROCK inhibitors as a potential glaucoma therapy by showing that a selective ROCK inhibitor significantly lowered rabbit IOP. Rho-associated kinase inhibitors directly affect the TM and Schlemm's canal (SC), differing from the target sight of other glaucoma drugs. The TM is affected earlier and more strongly than ciliary muscle cells by ROCK inhibitors, largely because of pharmacological affinity differences stemming from regulatory mechanisms. Additionally, ROCK inhibitors disrupt tight junctions, result in F-actin depolymerization, and modulate intracellular calcium level, effectively increasing SC-cell monolayer permeability. Perfusion of an enucleated eye with a ROCK inhibitor resulted in wider empty spaces in the juxtacanalicular (JCT) area and more giant vacuoles in the endothelial cells of SC, while the endothelial lining of SC was intact. Interestingly, ROCK inhibitors also increase retinal blood flow by relaxing vascular smooth muscle cells, directly protecting neurons against various stresses, while promoting wound healing. These additional effects may help

  9. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins: new targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohammad; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Perveen, Nadia; Ahmad, Bashir; Saleem, Uzma; Irshad, Tehseen; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) can play an important role in inhibiting apoptosis by exerting their negative action on caspases (apoptotic proteins). There are eight proteins in this family: NAIP/BIRC1/NLRB, cellular IAP1 (cIAP1)/human IAP2/BIRC2, cellular IAP2 (cIAP2)/human IAP1/BIRC3, X-linked IAP (XIAP)/BIRC4, survivin/BIRC5, baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme/apollon/BIRC6, livin/melanoma-IAP (ML-IAP)/BIRC7/KIAP, and testis-specific IAP (Ts-IAP)/hILP-2/BIRC8. Deregulation of these inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may push cell toward cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may provide new target for anticancer therapy. Drugs may be developed that are inhibiting these IAPs to induce apoptosis in cancerous cells. PMID:23790005

  10. Marine-Derived Angiogenesis Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs. PMID:23502698

  11. Marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2013-03-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs. PMID:23502698

  12. A novel proteasome inhibitor NPI-0052 as an anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, D; Hideshima, T; Anderson, K C

    2006-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib/Velcade has emerged as an effective anticancer therapy for the treatment of relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma (MM), but prolonged treatment can be associated with toxicity and development of drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the recent discovery of a novel proteasome inhibitor, NPI-0052, that is distinct from Bortezomib in its chemical structure, mechanisms of action, and effects on proteasomal activities; most importantly, it overcomes resistance to conventional and Bortezomib therapies. In vivo studies using human MM xenografts shows that NPI-0052 is well tolerated, prolongs survival, and reduces tumour recurrence. These preclinical studies provided the basis for Phase-I clinical trial of NPI-0052 in relapsed/refractory MM patients. PMID:17047643

  13. Mini-review: bmx kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarboe, John S; Dutta, Shilpa; Velu, Sadanandan E; Willey, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    Kinase inhibitors are among the fastest growing class of anti-cancer therapies. One family of kinases that has recently gained attention as a target for treating malignant disorders is the Tec kinase family. Evidence has been published that one member of this family; the Bmx kinase, may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma, prostate, breast and lung cancer. Bmx has also shown potential as an anti-vascular therapy in combination with radiation or as a sensitizer to chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, several companies such as Pharmacyclics, Avila Therapeutics, Merck and Co., Metaproteomics, IRM, and Moerae Matrix have developed compounds or peptides that function as Bmx kinase inhibitors. These companies have subsequently been issued patents for these inhibitors. Additionally, it has been shown that current clinical stage EGFR inhibitors can irreversibly inhibit Bmx, suggesting these compounds might be rapidly moved to clinical trials for other malignancies. This review will discuss current patents issued since 2009 that contain data specifically on inhibition of the Bmx kinase, and will also discuss the scientific literature that suggests their potential application as therapeutics in the treatment of the aforementioned malignancies. PMID:23198769

  14. Therapeutic Applications of PARP Inhibitors: Anticancer Therapy and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Nicola; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the current and potential clinical translation of pharmacological inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) for the therapy of various diseases. The first section of the present review summarizes the available preclinical and clinical data with PARP inhibitors in various forms of cancer. In this context, the role of PARP in single-strand DNA break repair is relevant, leading to replication-associated lesions that cannot be repaired if homologous recombination (HRR) repair is defective, and the synthetic lethality of PARP inhibitors in HRR-defective cancer. HRR defects are classically associated with BRCA1 and 2 mutations associated with familial breast and ovarian cancer, but there may be many other causes of HRR defects. Thus, PARP inhibitors may be the drugs of choice for BRCA mutant breast and ovarian cancers, and extend beyond these tumors if appropriate biomarkers can be developed to identify HRR defects. Multiple lines of preclinical data demonstrate that PARP inhibition increases cytotoxicity and tumor growth delay in combination with temozolomide, topoisomerase inhibitors and ionizing radiation. Both single agent and combination clinical trials are underway. The final part of the first section of the present review summarizes the current status of the various PARP inhibitors that are in various stages of clinical development. The second section of the present review summarizes the role of PARP in selected non-oncologic indications. In a number of severe, acute diseases (such as stroke, neurotrauma, circulatory shock and acute myocardial infarction) the clinical translatability of PARP inhibition is supported by multiple lines of preclinical data, as well as observational data demonstrating PARP activation in human tissue samples. In these disease indications, PARP overactivation due to oxidative and nitrative stress drives cell necrosis and pro-inflammatory gene expression, which contributes to disease pathology

  15. Angioedema in the emergency department: the impact of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pigman, E C; Scott, J L

    1993-07-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been reported to cause angioedema. The purpose of this study was to establish what proportion of patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with angioedema were concomitantly taking any of the ACE inhibitors and to show how this group differed in presentation and response to treatment from the larger population of patients with non-ACE inhibitor-related angioedema. An 8-year retrospective chart review of all patients with the diagnosis of angioedema observed from January 1, 1984 to December 31, 1991 was undertaken in the ED of an urban teaching hospital. Forty-nine patients ranging from 12 to 88 years of age with symptoms and physical examination that was consistent with the diagnosis of angioedema were entered onto the study. Twelve cases of ACE inhibitor-related angioedema were identified, all occurring in the last 4 years of the review, and when compared with the non-ACE inhibitor-related group were older (mean age, 63.3 vs 43.0 years), had less of an allergic history (0% vs 49%; P = .013), but demonstrated the same severity of symptoms and response to medical therapy. No case required an artificial or surgical airway. ACE inhibitor related angioedema is becoming a common type of angioedema observed in this ED. These patients are older and free of other allergic disease and respond well to traditional therapy. PMID:8216515

  16. Development of efflux pump inhibitors in antituberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-06-01

    Resistance and tolerance to antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs, especially the first-line drugs, has become a serious problem in anti-TB therapy. Efflux of antimicrobial agents via bacterial efflux pumps is one of the main reasons for drug resistance. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) bind to efflux pumps to inhibit drug efflux and thus enhance the drug effect and reduce drug resistance. Studies on EPIs targeting the efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) help to understand Mtb resistance and to identify the potential drug target and are of significance in guiding the development of new anti-TB drugs and optimal combinations. Currently, there are many potential EPIs under study, but none of them has been used clinically for anti-TB therapy. In this article, we will provide an overview on the current development of EPIs targeting the efflux pumps of Mtb and discuss their potential clinical applications. PMID:27211826

  17. Ocular toxicities of MEK inhibitors and other targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Stjepanovic, N; Velazquez-Martin, J P; Bedard, P L

    2016-06-01

    Many classes of anticancer therapy, including chemotherapeutic agents, hormonal and molecular targeted treatments, can produce ocular toxicity. Novel agents that target different cellular pathways have been related to a wide spectrum of ophthalmologic toxicities that can range from mild to severe, and include conjunctivitis, blurred vision, keratitis and optic neuritis, among others. Special attention has been drawn to the inhibitors of the MEK signaling pathway, due to their sine qua non ocular toxicity, defined as MEK retinopathy and described as symmetrical bilateral disease that develops in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. In this review, we discuss ophthalmologic toxicities associated with molecular targeted therapies, with particular focus on MEK retinopathy, including its nomenclature, incidence, symptoms and management. PMID:26951625

  18. Evolving Therapies and FAK Inhibitors for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelli Bullard; Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in medical and surgical therapy, cancer kills more than half a million people in the United States annually, and the majority of these patients succumb to metastatic disease. The traditional approach to treating systemic disease has been the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy is rarely curative and toxicity is often dose limiting. In addition, the effects of chemotherapy are nonspecific, targeting both malignant and normal tissues. As a result, recent efforts increasingly have focused on developing agents that target specific molecules in tumor cells in order to both improve efficacy and limit toxicity. This review summarizes the history and current use of targeted molecular therapy for cancer, with a special emphasis on recently developed inhibitors of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK). PMID:21291406

  19. Inhibition of ACE Retards Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Signs of Neuronal Degeneration in Aged Rats Subjected to Chronic Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    AbdAlla, Said; el Hakim, Ahmed; Abdelbaset, Ahmed; Elfaramawy, Yasser; Quitterer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of age-associated dementia are on the rise worldwide. Treatment approaches for dementia are insufficient and novel therapies are not readily available. In this context repurposing of established drugs appears attractive. A well-established class of cardiovascular drugs, which targets the angiotensin II system, is such a candidate, which currently undergoes a paradigm shift with regard to the potential benefit for treatment of neurodegenerative symptoms. In search for additional evidence, we subjected aged rats to chronic unpredictable mild stress, which is known to enhance the development of AD-related neuropathological features. We report here that four weeks of chronic mild stress induced a strong upregulation of the hippocampal angiotensin-converting enzyme (Ace) at gene expression and protein level. Concomitantly, tau protein hyperphosphorylation developed. Signs of neurodegeneration were detected by the significant downregulation of neuronal structure proteins such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and synuclein-gamma (Sncg). Ace was involved in neurodegenerative symptoms because treatment with the brain-penetrating ACE inhibitor, captopril, retarded tau hyperphosphorylation and signs of neurodegeneration. Moreover, ACE inhibitor treatment could counteract glutamate neurotoxicity by preventing the downregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2). Taken together, ACE inhibition targets neurodegeneration triggered by environmental stress. PMID:26697495

  20. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation. PMID:24124344

  1. Evolution of Primary Protease Inhibitor Resistance Mutations during Protease Inhibitor Salvage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Rami; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Israelski, Dennis; Shulman, Nancy; Montoya, Jose G.; Harbour, Michael; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to track the evolution of primary protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates, baseline and follow-up protease sequences were obtained from patients undergoing salvage PI therapy who presented initially with isolates containing a single primary PI resistance mutation. Among 78 patients meeting study selection criteria, baseline primary PI resistance mutations included L90M (42% of patients), V82A/F/T (27%), D30N (21%), G48V (6%), and I84V (4%). Despite the switching of treatment to a new PI, primary PI resistance mutations present at the baseline persisted in 66 of 78 (85%) patients. D30N persisted less frequently than L90M (50% versus 100%, respectively; P < 0.001) and V82A/F/T (50% versus 81%, respectively; P = 0.05). HIV-1 isolates from 38 (49%) patients failing PI salvage therapy developed new primary PI resistance mutations including L90M, I84V, V82A, and G48V. Common combinations of primary and secondary PI resistance mutations after salvage therapy included mutations at amino acid positions 10, 82, and 46 and/or 54 in 16 patients; 10, 90, and 71 and/or 73 in 14 patients; 10, 73, 84, 90, and 46 and/or 54 in 5 patients; 10, 48, and 82 in 5 patients; and 30, 88 and 90 in 5 patients. In summary, during salvage PI therapy, most HIV-1 isolates with a single primary PI resistance mutation maintained their original mutations, and 49% developed additional primary PI resistance mutations. The persistence of L90M, V82A/F/T, G48V, and I84V during salvage therapy suggests that these mutations play a role in clinical resistance to multiple PIs. PMID:11897594

  2. NAAG peptidase inhibitors and their potential for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Neale, Joseph H; Pomper, Martin G; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2005-12-01

    Modulation of N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate peptidase activity with small-molecule inhibitors holds promise for a wide variety of diseases that involve glutamatergic transmission, and has implications for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. This new class of compounds, of which at least one has entered clinical trials and proven to be well tolerated, has demonstrated efficacy in experimental models of pain, schizophrenia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and, when appropriately functionalized, can image prostate cancer. Further investigation of these promising drug candidates will be needed to bring them to the marketplace. The recent publication of the X-ray crystal structure for the enzymatic target of these compounds should facilitate the development of other new agents with enhanced activity that could improve both the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:16341066

  3. 5-Alpha-Reductase Inhibitors and Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Füllhase, Claudius; Schneider, Marc P

    2016-08-01

    By inhibiting the conversion from testosterone to dihydrotestosterone 5-Alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) are able to hinder prostatic growth, shrink prostate volumes, and improve BPH-related LUTS. 5ARIs are particularly beneficial for patients with larger prostates (>30-40ml). Generally the side effects of 5ARI treatment are mild, and according to the FORTA classification 5ARIs are suitable for frail elderly. 5ARI / alpha-blocker (AB) combination therapy showed the best symptomatic outcome and risk reduction for clinical progression. Combining Phosphodieseterase type 5 inhbibitors (PDE5Is) with 5ARIs counteracts the negative androgenic sexual side effects of 5ARIs, and simultaneously combines their synergistic effects on LUTS. PMID:27476125

  4. Weight loss for reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy: Comparison with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patil, M. R.; Mishra, A.; Jain, N.; Gutch, M.; Tewari, R.

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of weight in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) individuals is emerging as a significant strategy in the reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy along with control of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The objective was to evaluate the reduction in 24-h proteinuria in T2DM patients with nephropathy by weight loss, with conventional therapy (angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors) as the control arm. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted between June 2010 and May 2011. T2DM patients with confirmed nephropathy by 24-h urinary protein estimation with a body mass index (BMI) of >25 kg/m2 were studied. Patients who had nondiabetic nephropathy, uncontrolled hypertension (>125/75 mmHg) irrespective of antihypertensive drugs, excess weight due to edema or obesity due to other specific diseases, alcoholics, smokers, and patients who were on hemodialysis were excluded from the study. The patients were divided into three groups, namely, group A, patients on ACE inhibitor therapy; group B, patients on lifestyle modifications for weight loss; and group C, patients on an antiobesity drug (orlistat) and lifestyle modifications. At the end of 6 months, all the three groups were compared. Data were analyzed using software SPSS version 15.0. This study encompassed a total of 88 patients; 12 patients were dropped during the study period and 76 (group A: 22, group B: 23, and group C: 31) patients remained. The mean age of the patients was 58.36 ± 10.87 years (range: 30-70 years). At baseline, age, gender, mean BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and 24-h proteinuria did not vary significantly among the three groups. At 6 months, the mean BMI significantly decreased in group C (P < 0.001) compared to that in the other two groups. Among the parameters BMI and WHR, the proportional form of BMI correlated well with the degree of reduction in proteinuria (r = 0.397, P = 0.01). Reduction in weight using lifestyle modifications and

  5. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  6. Management of arthralgias associated with aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, C.

    2007-01-01

    For the upfront adjuvant therapy of postmenopausal estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, the third-generation aromatase inhibitors (ais) have shown a more favourable overall risk–benefit profile than has tamoxifen. Benefits of the ais include less frequent gynecologic, cerebrovascular, and thromboembolic adverse events; greater disease-free survival; and lower tumour recurrence. Although approximately 25% of postmenopausal women with early breast cancer report experiencing symptoms of arthralgia with ai therapy, 68-month data from the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination trial showed that, compared with tamoxifen, anastrozole treatment was associated with only a modest increase in the incidence of joint symptoms. The events, which were mostly mild-to-moderate in intensity, led to treatment withdrawal in 2% of patients on anastrozole as compared with 1% in the tamoxifen arm. The symptoms and changes correlate with clinical, biochemical, and radiologic findings in symptomatic women. To determine appropriate intervention, it is therefore essential to perform a comprehensive evaluation of musculoskeletal complaints to distinguish natural menopause-related degenerative disease from ai-related effects. The present review explores the advantages of differential diagnosis with an emphasis on history and physical and musculoskeletal examination; laboratory investigations are used to corroborate or rule out clinical impressions. The transient symptoms associated with the ais are manageable with an appropriate combination of lifestyle changes, including exercise and joint protection in conjunction with pharmacologic approaches. PMID:18087604

  7. Investigation of the energy barrier to the rotation of amide CN bonds in ACE inhibitors by NMR, dynamic HPLC and DFT.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallah, S; Ben Dhia, M T; Driss, M R; Touil, S

    2016-09-01

    The isomerizations of Enalapril, Perindopril, Enalaprilat and Lisinopril have been investigated using NMR spectroscopic, dynamic chromatographic, unified equation and DFT theoretical calculations. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were determined by varying the temperature in the NMR experiments. At the coalescence temperature, we can evaluate the isomerization barrier to the rotation (ΔG(≠)) around the amide bond. Using dynamics chromatography and an unified equation introduced by Trap, we can determine isomerization rate constants and Gibbs activation energies. Molecular mechanics calculations also provided evidence for the presence of low energy conformers for the ACE due to restricted amide rotation. With the value of barriers (ΔE) between them of the order of (20kJmol(-1)), which is in agreement with the dynamic NMR results and DFT calculations. PMID:27344631

  8. Decreased Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis With Incidental Concurrent Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kharofa, Jordan; Cohen, Eric P.; Tomic, Rade; Xiang Qun; Gore, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been shown to mitigate radiation-induced lung injury in preclinical models. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ACE inhibitors decrease the risk of radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage I through III small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer treated definitively with radiation from 2004-2009 at the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Acute pulmonary toxicity was quantified within 6 months of completion of treatment according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. The use of ACE inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, inhaled glucocorticosteroids, statins, and angiotensin receptor blockers; dose-volume histogram parameters; and patient factors were assessed for association with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Results: A total of 162 patients met the criteria for inclusion. The majority of patients had Stage III disease (64%) and received concurrent chemotherapy (61%). Sixty-two patients were identified as ACE inhibitor users (38%). All patients had acceptable radiation plans based on dose-volume histogram constraints (V20 [volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy] {<=}37% and mean lung dose {<=}20 Gy) with the exception of 2 patients who did not meet both criteria. Grade 2 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (7.4%). The rate of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis was lower in ACE inhibitor users vs. nonusers (2% vs. 11%, p = 0.032). Rates of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis were significantly increased in patients aged greater than 70 years (16% vs. 2%, p = 0.005) or in whom V5 (volume of lung receiving at least 5 Gy) was 50% or greater (13% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). V10 (volume of lung receiving at least 10 Gy), V20, V30 (volume of lung receiving at least 30 Gy), and mean lung dose were not independently associated with Grade 2 or

  9. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:138-139.

  10. MEK inhibitors and their potential in the treatment of advanced melanoma: the advantages of combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Khiem A; Cheng, Michelle Y; Mitra, Anupam; Ogawa, Hiromi; Shi, Vivian Y; Olney, Laura P; Kloxin, April M; Maverakis, Emanual

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of melanoma has improved markedly over the last several years with the advent of more targeted therapies. Unfortunately, complex compensation mechanisms, such as those of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, have limited the clinical benefit of these treatments. Recently, a better understanding of melanoma resistance mechanisms has given way to intelligently designed multidrug regimes. Herein, we review the extensive pathways of BRAF inhibitor (vemurafenib and dabrafenib) resistance. We also review the advantages of dual therapy, including the addition of an MEK inhibitor (cobimetinib or trametinib), which has proven to increase progression-free survival when compared to BRAF inhibitor monotherapy. Finally, this review touches on future treatment strategies that are being developed for advanced melanoma, including the possibility of triple therapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors and the work on optimizing sequential therapy. PMID:26730180

  11. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a beta blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by approximately 80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their long-chain metabolites: gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), dihomo-GLA (DGLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1), prostacyclin (PGI2), PGI3, lipoxins (LXs), resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-gamma ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the

  12. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Spindelboeck, Walter; Horvath, Angela; Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. PMID:26938078

  13. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E.; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545400 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545335 PMID:26938078

  14. BRAF inhibitors in colorectal cancer: Toward a differentiation therapy?

    PubMed

    Herr, Ricarda; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    BRAF inhibitor monotherapy appears to be ineffective in BRAF (V600E)-positive colorectal cancer (CRC) as a result of inherent EGFR-mediated resistance mechanisms. This concept initiated combinatorial treatment approaches. Nevertheless, BRAF inhibition in isogenic CRC cell lines induced enhanced cell-cell adhesion and differentiation, underlining a potential benefit of BRAF inhibitors in CRC. PMID:27308494

  15. Angiotensin II regulates ACE and ACE2 in neurons through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liang; Haack, Karla K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Brain ANG II plays an important role in modulating sympathetic function and homeostasis. The generation and degradation of ANG II are carried out, to a large extent, through the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2, respectively. In disease states, such as hypertension and chronic heart failure, central expression of ACE is upregulated and ACE2 is decreased in central sympathoregulatory neurons. In this study, we determined the expression of ACE and ACE2 in response to ANG II in a neuronal cell culture and the subsequent signaling mechanism(s) involved. A mouse catecholaminergic neuronal cell line (CATH.a) was treated with ANG II (30, 100, and 300 nM) for 24 h, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. ANG II induced a significant dose-dependent increase in ACE and decrease in ACE2 mRNA and protein expression in CATH.a neurons. This effect was abolished by pretreatment of the cells with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (10 μM) 30 min before administration of ANG II or the ERK1/2 inhibitor U-0126 (10 μM). These data suggest that ANG II increases ACE and attenuates ACE2 expression in neurons via the ANG II type 1 receptor, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:23535237

  16. How I use bypassing therapy for prophylaxis in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, Cindy A; Singleton, Tammuella; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitor development poses a significant challenge in the management of hemophilia because once an inhibitor is present, bleeding episodes can no longer be treated with standard clotting factor replacement therapy. Consequently, patients with inhibitors are at increased risk for difficult-to-control bleeding and complications, particularly arthropathy and physical disability. Three clinical trials in patients with inhibitors have demonstrated that prophylaxis with a bypassing agent reduces joint and other types of bleeding and improves health-related quality of life compared with on-demand bypassing therapy. In hemophilia patients without inhibitors, the initiation of prophylaxis with factor (F) VIII or FIX prior to the onset of recurrent hemarthroses can prevent the development of joint disease. Whether this is also true for bypassing agent prophylaxis remains to be determined. PMID:25827834

  17. A possible usage of a CDK4 inhibitor for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Ga-Young; Chun, Sung Hak; Han, Jeong Yun; Kim, Sung Dae; Lee, Janet; Lee, Chang-Woo; Yang, Kwangmo; Lee, Chang Geun

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► A CDK4 inhibitor may be used for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy. ► The CDK4 inhibitor differentiated the cancer stem cell population (CD24{sup −}/CD44{sup +}) of MDA-MB-231. ► The differentiation of the cancer stem cells by the CDK4 inhibitor radiosensitized MDA-MB-231. -- Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are one of the main reasons behind cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies. Thus, many efforts are being devoted to developing CSC-targeted therapies to overcome the resistance of CSCs to conventional anti-cancer therapies and decrease cancer recurrence. Differentiation therapy is one potential approach to achieve CSC-targeted therapies. This method involves inducing immature cancer cells with stem cell characteristics into more mature or differentiated cancer cells. In this study, we found that a CDK4 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells but not MCF7 cells to irradiation. This difference appeared to be associated with the relative percentage of CSC-population between the two breast cancer cells. The CDK4 inhibitor induced differentiation and reduced the cancer stem cell activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, which are shown by multiple marker or phenotypes of CSCs. Thus, these results suggest that radiosensitization effects may be caused by reducing the CSC-population of MDA-MB-231 through the use of the CDK4 inhibitor. Thus, further investigations into the possible application of the CDK4 inhibitor for CSC-targeted therapy should be performed to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy for breast cancer.

  18. ACES--Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Presents text of Presidential Address delivered March 24, 1991, at the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) luncheon, part of the American Association for Counseling and Development Convention held in Reno, Nevada. Comments on past, present, and future of ACES, particularly on future challenges and role of ACES. (ABL)

  19. ACE inhibition in the treatment of children after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arbeiter, Klaus; Pichler, Andrea; Stemberger, Regina; Mueller, Thomas; Ruffingshofer, Dagmar; Vargha, Regina; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2004-02-01

    Currently, there are no data available on long-term effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) on graft function in children after renal transplantation. We therefore analyzed all children who were transplanted at our institution between 1989 and 1998 and followed for at least 2 years. Those treated with ACE-I, mainly because of failure of other antihypertensive medications, were compared to those without ACE-I. The ACE-I-treated children ( n=19) showed significantly better blood pressure control during the 1st year of follow-up ( p<0.05). In children with chronic allograft dysfunction ( n=8), treatment with ACE-I stabilized graft function, with improvement in creatinine clearance in 50% ( p<0.01). Serum potassium and hemoglobin levels remained stable. One patient discontinued ACE-I because of renal artery stenosis. Taken together, ACE-I were effective and safe in the treatment of hypertension in children following renal transplantation. Children with chronic allograft dysfunction experienced a stabilizing effect on graft function. PMID:14673630

  20. Association of Acute Interstitial Nephritis With Programmed Cell Death 1 Inhibitor Therapy in Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Shirali, Anushree C; Perazella, Mark A; Gettinger, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors that target the programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling pathway have recently been approved for use in advanced pretreated non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma. Clinical trial data suggest that these drugs may have adverse effects on the kidney, but these effects have not been well described. We present 6 cases of acute kidney injury in patients with lung cancer who received anti-PD-1 antibodies, with each case displaying evidence of acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) on kidney biopsy. All patients were also treated with other drugs (proton pump inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) linked to AIN, but in most cases, use of these drugs long preceded PD-1 inhibitor therapy. The association of AIN with these drugs in our patients raises the possibility that PD-1 inhibitor therapy may release suppression of T-cell immunity that normally permits renal tolerance of drugs known to be associated with AIN. PMID:27113507

  1. Overview of proteasome inhibitor-based anti-cancer therapies: perspective on bortezomib and second generation proteasome inhibitors versus future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Dou, Q Ping; Zonder, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, proteasome inhibition has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma (MM) and some lymphomas. In 2003, Bortezomib (BTZ) became the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). BTZ-based therapies have become a staple for the treatment of MM at all stages of the disease. The survival rate of MM patients has improved significantly since clinical introduction of BTZ and other immunomodulatory drugs. However, BTZ has several limitations. Not all patients respond to BTZ based therapies and relapse occurs in many patients who initially responded. Solid tumors, in particular, are often resistant to BTZ. Furthermore, BTZ can induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy (PN). The second generation proteasome inhibitor Carfizomib (CFZ; U.S. FDA approved in August 2012) induces responses in a minority of MM patients relapsed from or refractory to BTZ. There is less PN compared to BTZ. Four other second-generation proteasome inhibitors (Ixazomib, Delanzomib, Oprozomib and Marizomib) with different pharmacologic properties and broader anticancer activities, have also shown some clinical activity in bortezomib-resistant cancers. While the mechanism of resistance to bortezomib in human cancers still remains to be fully understood, targeting the immunoproteasome, ubiquitin E3 ligases, the 19S proteasome and deubiquitinases in pre-clinical studies represents possible directions for future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the treatment of MM and other cancers. PMID:25092212

  2. Overview of Proteasome Inhibitor-Based Anti-cancer Therapies: Perspective on Bortezomib and Second Generation Proteasome Inhibitors versus Future Generation Inhibitors of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Q. Ping; Zonder, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, proteasome inhibition has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma (MM) and some lymphomas. In 2003, Bortezomib (BTZ) became the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). BTZ-based therapies have become a staple for the treatment of MM at all stages of the disease. The survival rate of MM patients has improved significantly since clinical introduction of BTZ and other immunomodulatory drugs. However, BTZ has several limitations. Not all patients respond to BTZ-based therapies and relapse occurs in many patients who initially responded. Solid tumors, in particular, are often resistant to BTZ. Furthermore, BTZ can induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy (PN). The second generation proteasome inhibitor Carfizomib (CFZ; U.S. FDA approved in August 2012) induces responses in a minority of MM patients relapsed from or refractory to BTZ. There is less PN compared to BTZ. Four other second-generation proteasome inhibitors (Ixazomib, Delanzomib, Oprozomib and Marizomib) with different pharmacologic properties and broader anticancer activities, have also shown some clinical activity in bortezomib-resistant cancers. While the mechanism of resistance to bortezomib in human cancers still remains to be fully understood, targeting the immunoproteasome, ubiquitin E3 ligases, the 19S proteasome and deubiquitinases in pre-clinical studies represents possible directions for future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the treatment of MM and other cancers. PMID:25092212

  3. Effects of a novel ACE inhibitor, 3-(3-thienyl)-l-alanyl-ornithyl-proline, on endothelial vasodilation and hepatotoxicity in l-NAME-induced hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Mahesh Kumar; Hussain, M Ejaz; Pasha, Santosh; Fahim, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a widespread biological mediator involved in many physiological and pathological processes, eg, in the regulation of vascular tone and hypertension. Chronic inhibition of NO synthase by NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) hydrochloride results in the development of hypertension accompanied by an increase in vascular responsiveness to adrenergic stimuli. Recently, we developed a novel sulfur-containing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor: 3-(3-thienyl)-l-alanyl-ornithyl-proline (TOP). Our previous studies indicated a superior nature of the molecule as an antihypertensive agent in spontaneously hypertensive rats (showing the involvement of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system) in comparison to captopril. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of TOP on NO pathway in l-NAME-induced hypertensive rats, and captopril was included as the standard treatment group. Treatment with both TOP (20 mg/kg) and captopril (40 mg/kg) prevented the development of hypertension in l-NAME model, but TOP showed better restoration of NO and normal levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme. In addition, in vitro vasorelaxation assay showed an improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in both the cases. Further, the biochemical (malondialdehyde, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase) and the histopathological effects of TOP on rat liver tissues revealed a protective nature of TOP in comparison to captopril in the l-NAME model. In conclusion, TOP at 50% lesser dose than captopril was found to be better in the l-NAME model. PMID:27143859

  4. An ACE diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nasher, Omar; Gupta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher's disease is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients with hepatosplenomegaly and increased serum ACE. A 19-year-old girl presented with recurrent epigastric and left hypochondrial pain over a period of 9 years, associated with episodes of nausea and diarrhoea. She was extensively investigated and found to have splenomegaly and raised serum ACE. A screen for haematological disorders was negative. She reported an insect bite during an overseas holiday preceding her symptoms. She was therefore also screened for infectious causes of hepatosplenomegaly but without success. Later on in life, she reported joint pain and discomfort. Sarcoidosis was thought to be the putative cause on more than one occasion. However, the presence of splenomegaly and her relatively young age, led the rheumatologist to the correct diagnosis. PMID:23417380

  5. An ACE diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nasher, Omar; Gupta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher's disease is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients with hepatosplenomegaly and increased serum ACE. A 19-year-old girl presented with recurrent epigastric and left hypochondrial pain over a period of 9 years, associated with episodes of nausea and diarrhoea. She was extensively investigated and found to have splenomegaly and raised serum ACE. A screen for haematological disorders was negative. She reported an insect bite during an overseas holiday preceding her symptoms. She was therefore also screened for infectious causes of hepatosplenomegaly but without success. Later on in life, she reported joint pain and discomfort. Sarcoidosis was thought to be the putative cause on more than one occasion. However, the presence of splenomegaly and her relatively young age, led the rheumatologist to the correct diagnosis. PMID:23417380

  6. Search for Inhibitors of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System from Natural Sources for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Since the approval of the proteasome inhibitor, Velcade(®), by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma, inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system have been attracting increasing attention as promising drug leads for cancer therapy. While the development of drugs for diseases related to this proteolytic system has mainly been achieved by searching libraries of synthetic small molecules or chemical modifications to drug leads, limited searches have been conducted on natural sources. We have been searching natural sources for inhibitors that target this proteolytic system through in-house screening. Our recent studies on the search for natural inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, particularly, inhibitors against the proteasome, E1 enzyme (Uba1), E2 enzyme (Ubc13-Uev1A heterodimer), and E3 enzyme (Hdm2), and also those against deubiquitinating enzyme (USP7), are reviewed here. PMID:26833439

  7. Enhancing tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies therapy by PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yélamos, José; Galindo, Miguel; Navarro, Judith; Albanell, Joan; Rovira, Ana; Rojo, Federico; Oliver, Javier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a successful therapeutic approach in cancer. However, some patients do not achieve long-term clinical benefit and most mAbs only exert modest effects as monotherapies. Therefore, combinations with chemotherapy are currently being investigated. Emerging studies have shown a synergistic therapeutic effect of PARP inhibitors and mAbs in cancer. PARP enzymes catalytically cleave β-NAD+ and transfer the ADP-ribose moiety to acceptor proteins, modifying their function. In here, we update recent data about the therapeutic effect of the combination of PARP inhibitors with mAbs in cancer treatment and discuss the molecular mechanisms involved in this synergy. PMID:26942084

  8. Strong suppression of the renin-angiotensin system has a renal-protective effect in hypertensive patients: high-dose ARB with ACE inhibitor (Hawaii) study.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Mitsuru; Takeya, Yasushi; Tatara, Yuji; Yamamoto, Koichi; Onishi, Miyuki; Maekawa, Yoshihiro; Kamide, Kei; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2010-11-01

    The principal means for reducing proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney disease are strong blockade of the renin-angiotensin system and strict regulation of blood pressure (BP). This study compared the efficacy of the maximum permissible doses of two common angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), namely valsartan (maximum dose=160 mg per day) and olmesartan (maximum dose=40 mg per day). We also investigated whether a high-dose ARB or the combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with a high-dose ARB would be more renal protective. We recruited 87 poorly controlled hypertensive patients. In the first study, 50 patients without proteinuria were switched from valsartan (160 mg per day) to olmesartan (40 mg per day) for 4 months. In the second study, 37 patients with proteinuria were randomized to either switch from valsartan 160 mg per day to 40 mg per day olmesartan (n=19; Olm-G) or addition of 2.5-10 mg per day imidapril (stepped up by 2.5 mg per month) to valsartan at 160 mg per day (n=18; Imi-G). After 4 months, the BP level decreased (first study) from 157/88 mm Hg to 145/82 mm Hg (P<0.001) and (second study) from 149/86 mm Hg to 135/77 mm Hg and 145/82 mm Hg for Olm-G and Imi-G, respectively. Furthermore, in the second study, urinary protein/creatinine excretion was reduced from 2.0±1.8 g g⁻¹ to 0.8±0.8 g g⁻¹ (P=0.0242) in Olm-G and from 1.4±1.3 g g⁻¹ to 0.9±1.0 g g⁻¹ (P=0.0398) in Imi-G. The significance persisted after adjustment for BP or other risk factors. Our results suggested that the maximum dose of olmesartan was more effective than that of valsartan and comparable with the combination of valsartan and imidapril for reducing BP and proteinuria in poorly controlled hypertensive patients. PMID:20703230

  9. LRRK2 and ubiquitination: implications for kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations and risk variants in LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) represent the most common genetic cause of familial and sporadic PD (Parkinson's disease). LRRK2 protein is widely expressed throughout the brain and the periphery. Structurally, LRRK2 contains several functional domains, including a dual enzymatic core consisting of a kinase and GTPase domain. Disease-linked variants are found in both these enzymatic domains as well as in the COR [C-terminal of ROC (Ras of complex proteins)] and WD40 protein–protein binding domain. The kinase domain is widely believed to be linked to toxicity, and thus the thrust of pharmaceutical effort has focused on developing LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. However, recent data have suggested that inhibition of LRRK2 activity results in reduced LRRK2 levels and peripheral side effects, which are similar to those observed in homozygous LRRK2-knockout and LRRK2 kinase-dead rodent models. In a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal, a study led by Nichols reveals that dephosphorylation of LRRK2 cellular phosphorylation sites (Ser910/Ser935/Ser955/Ser973) triggers its ubiquitination and subsequent degradation and thus may account for the loss of function phenotypes observed in peripheral tissues in LRRK2-knockout/kinase-dead or inhibitor-treated rodents and primates. Albeit negative from a kinase inhibitor standpoint, the data open new avenues for LRRK2 biology and therapeutic approaches to counteract LRRK2 toxicity. PMID:26341487

  10. Therapy with JAK2 inhibitors for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fabio P. S.; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    The development of JAK2 inhibitors followed the discovery of activating mutation of JAK2 (JAK2V617F) in patients with classic Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs). It is now known that mutations activating the JAK-STAT pathway are ubiquitous in Ph-negative MPNs, and that deregulated JAK-STAT pathway plays a central role in the pathogenesis of these disorders. JAK2 inhibitors thus are effective in both patients with and without the JAK2V617F mutation. Clinical trials conducted in patients with myelofibrosis have demonstrated that these drugs lead to substantial improvements in systemic symptoms, splenomegaly, leukocytosis and thrombocytosis. Results of one randomized clinical trial suggest that JAK2 inhibition may also lead to improved survival. There are still significant challenges to be overcome, as these drugs do not improve bone marrow fibrosis and do not lead to significant reduction in the allele burden of JAK2V617F. In this manuscript we review the rationale for using JAK2 inhibitors in Ph-negative MPNs and results of more recent clinical trials with these drugs. PMID:23009939

  11. Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hypertension Treated With the Renin Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Azilsartan Medoxomil vs Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: The Prospective EARLY Registry.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Bramlage, Peter; Baumgart, Peter; Mahfoud, Felix; Buhck, Hartmut; Ouarrak, Taoufik; Ehmen, Martina; Senges, Jochen; Gitt, Anselm K

    2015-12-01

    For patients with newly diagnosed hypertension, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are usually the first-line therapies. There is, however, no real-life data regarding the relative clinical effectiveness and tolerability of either drug class. The prospective registry, Treatment With Azilsartan Compared to ACE Inhibitors in Antihypertensive Therapy (EARLY), was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the ARB azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) vs ACE inhibitors in real-world patients. Of the 1153 patients with newly diagnosed hypertension who were included in the registry, 789 were prescribed AZL-M and 364 were prescribed an ACE inhibitor. After multivariate adjustment, AZL-M was found to provide superior blood pressure reduction and better target blood pressure (<140/90 mm Hg) achievement. The proportion of patients with adverse events was not statistically different between groups. The authors conclude that in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients, AZL-M provides superior blood pressure control with a similar safety profile compared with ACE inhibitors. PMID:26105590

  12. An additive effect of eplerenone to ACE inhibitor on slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy in the db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangyu; Johansson, Ulrika; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Bamberg, Krister; Huang, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Although blockade of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) has become standard therapy for diabetic nephropathy (DN), decline in kidney function towards end-stage renal disease is seen in many patients. Elevated plasma aldosterone often accompanies RAS blockade by a phenomenon known as “aldosterone escape” and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). We therefore examined whether addition of the MR antagonist eplerenone to an ACEI would enhance the efficacy in slowing the progression of DN. Untreated uninephrectomized diabetic db/db mice developed progressive albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis between weeks 18 and 22, associated with decreased number of podocytes and increased renal expression of fibrotic markers. The therapeutic effect of eplerenone at 100 mg/kg BW/d on albuminuria, podocyte injury and renal fibrosis was similar to that of enalapril given alone at maximally effective doses. Adding eplerenone to enalapril resulted in further reduction in these measurements. Renal expressions of TNF-α, MCP-1, Nox2 and p47phox and renal TBARS levels, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, were increased during disease progression in diabetic mice, which were reduced by eplerenone or enalapril given alone and further reduced by the two drugs given in combination. However, there were no treatment related effects on plasma K+. Our results suggest that eplerenone is effective in slowing the progression of DN in db/db mice and that the effect is additive to an ACEI. The addition of an MR antagonist void of effects on plasma K+ to an ACEI may offer additional renoprotection in progressive DN via blocking the effects of aldosterone due to escape or diabetes-induction. PMID:27186263

  13. Why do hypertensive patients of African ancestry respond better to calcium blockers and diuretics than to ACE inhibitors and β-adrenergic blockers? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinicians are encouraged to take an individualized approach when treating hypertension in patients of African ancestry, but little is known about why the individual patient may respond well to calcium blockers and diuretics, but generally has an attenuated response to drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system and to β-adrenergic blockers. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the factors associated with the differential drug response of patients of African ancestry to antihypertensive drug therapy. Methods Using the methodology of the systematic reviews narrative synthesis approach, we sought for published or unpublished studies that could explain the differential clinical efficacy of antihypertensive drugs in patients of African ancestry. PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, African Index Medicus and the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency databases were searched without language restriction from their inception through June 2012. Results We retrieved 3,763 papers, and included 72 reports that mainly considered the 4 major classes of antihypertensive drugs, calcium blockers, diuretics, drugs that interfere with the renin-angiotensin system and β-adrenergic blockers. Pharmacokinetics, plasma renin and genetic polymorphisms did not well predict the response of patients of African ancestry to antihypertensive drugs. An emerging view that low nitric oxide and high creatine kinase may explain individual responses to antihypertensive drugs unites previous observations, but currently clinical data are very limited. Conclusion Available data are inconclusive regarding why patients of African ancestry display the typical response to antihypertensive drugs. In lieu of biochemical or pharmacogenomic parameters, self-defined African ancestry seems the best available predictor of individual responses to antihypertensive drugs. PMID:23721258

  14. Does the addition of losartan improve the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors in patients with anterior myocardial infarction? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Di, P; Bucca, V; Scalzo, S; Cannizzaro, S; Giubilato, A; Paterna, S

    1999-01-01

    (141) pg/ml; AII 12.77 (4.79) v 12.65 (4.71) pg/ml) or 10 days after admission (NA 283 (93) v 277 (98) pg/ml; AII 5.31 (2.25) v 6.09 (3.31) pg/ml). However, patients in group C had higher plasma concentrations of AII (14.79 (5.7) pg/ml on the third day and 7.98 (4.92) pg/ml on the 10th day) than patients in either group A or B (p = 0.006). After 90 days following treatment, group B (captopril plus losartan) patients had a smaller ESV than patients in group A (captopril) and group C (losartan).
CONCLUSION—The data suggest that the combination of captopril plus losartan is feasible in the early treatment of acute myocardial infarction patients, and it appears that this combination has more effect on ESV than captopril alone in the short term.


Keywords: acute myocardial infarction; angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; captopril; losartan PMID:10336919

  15. Development of Novel Arginase Inhibitors for Therapy of Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and resulting vascular pathology have been identified as an early hallmark of multiple diseases, including diabetes mellitus. One of the major contributors to endothelial dysfunction is a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, impaired NO signaling, and an increase in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the endothelium NO is produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), for which l-arginine is a substrate. Arginase, an enzyme critical in the urea cycle also metabolizes l-arginine, thereby directly competing with eNOS for their common substrate and constraining its bioavailability for eNOS, thereby compromising NO production. Arginase expression and activity is upregulated in many cardiovascular diseases including ischemia reperfusion injury, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. More importantly, since the 1990s, specific arginase inhibitors such as N-hydroxy-guanidinium or N-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine, and boronic acid derivatives, such as, 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid, and S-(2-boronoethyl)-l-cysteine, that can bridge the binuclear manganese cluster of arginase have been developed. These highly potent and specific inhibitors can now be used to probe arginase function and thereby modulate the redox milieu of the cell by changing the balance between NO and ROS. Inspired by this success, drug discovery programs have recently led to the identification of α–α-disubstituted amino acid based arginase inhibitors [such as (R)-2-amino-6-borono-2-(2-(piperidin-1-yl)ethyl)hexanoic acid], that are currently under early investigation as therapeutics. Finally, some investigators concentrate on identification of plant derived compounds with arginase inhibitory capability, such as piceatannol-3′-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (PG). All of these synthesized or naturally derived small molecules may represent novel therapeutics for vascular disease particularly that associated with diabetes. PMID:24062745

  16. Angiogenesis inhibitors in cancer therapy: mechanistic perspective on classification and treatment rationales

    PubMed Central

    El-Kenawi, Asmaa E; El-Remessy, Azza B

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis, a process of new blood vessel formation, is a prerequisite for tumour growth to supply the proliferating tumour with oxygen and nutrients. The angiogenic process may contribute to tumour progression, invasion and metastasis, and is generally accepted as an indicator of tumour prognosis. Therefore, targeting tumour angiogenesis has become of high clinical relevance. The current review aimed to highlight mechanistic details of anti-angiogenic therapies and how they relate to classification and treatment rationales. Angiogenesis inhibitors are classified into either direct inhibitors that target endothelial cells in the growing vasculature or indirect inhibitors that prevent the expression or block the activity of angiogenesis inducers. The latter class extends to include targeted therapy against oncogenes, conventional chemotherapeutic agents and drugs targeting other cells of the tumour micro-environment. Angiogenesis inhibitors may be used as either monotherapy or in combination with other anticancer drugs. In this context, many preclinical and clinical studies revealed higher therapeutic effectiveness of the combined treatments compared with individual treatments. The proper understanding of synergistic treatment modalities of angiogenesis inhibitors as well as their wide range of cellular targets could provide effective tools for future therapies of many types of cancer. PMID:23962094

  17. ROS1 Kinase Inhibitors for Molecular-Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Al-Sanea, M M; Abdelazem, A Z; Park, B S; Yoo, K H; Sim, T; Kwon, Y J; Lee, S H

    2016-01-01

    ROS1 is a pivotal transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase which regulates several cellular processes like apoptosis, survival, differentiation, proliferation, cell migration, and transformation. There is increasing evidence supporting that ROS1 plays an important role in different malignancies including glioblastoma, colorectal cancer, gastric adenocarcinoma, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, ovarian cancer, angiosarcoma, and non small cell lung cancer; thus, ROS1 has become a potential drug discovery target. ROS1 shares about 49% sequence homology with ALK primary structure; therefore, wide range of ALK kinase inhibitors have shown in vitro inhibitory activity against ROS1 kinase. After Crizotinib approval by FDA for the management of ALK-rearranged lung cancer, ROS1-positive tumors have been focused. Although significant advancements have been achieved in understanding ROS1 function and its signaling pathways plus recent discovery of small molecules modulating ROS1 protein, a vital need of medicinal chemistry efforts is still required to produce selective and potent ROS1 inhibitors as an important therapeutic strategy for different human malignancies. This review focuses on the current knowledge about different scaffolds targeting ROS1 rearrangements, methods to synthesis, and some biological data about the most potent compounds that have delivered various scaffold structures. PMID:26438251

  18. Targeted cancer therapy with ribosome biogenesis inhibitors: a real possibility?

    PubMed Central

    Brighenti, Elisa; Treré, Davide; Derenzini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The effects of many chemotherapeutic drugs on ribosome biogenesis have been underestimated for a long time. Indeed, many drugs currently used for cancer treatment – and which are known to either damage DNA or hinder DNA synthesis – have been shown to exert their toxic action mainly by inhibiting rRNA synthesis or maturation. Moreover, there are new drugs that have been proposed recently for cancer chemotherapy, which only hinder ribosome biogenesis without any genotoxic activity. Even though ribosome biogenesis occurs in both normal and cancer cells, whether resting or proliferating, there is evidence that the selective inhibition of ribosome biogenesis may, in some instances, result in a selective damage to neoplastic cells. The higher sensitivity of cancer cells to inhibitors of rRNA synthesis appears to be the consequence of either the loss of the mechanisms controlling the cell cycle progression or the acquisition of activating oncogene and inactivating tumor suppressor gene mutations that up-regulate the ribosome biogenesis rate. This article reviews those cancer cell characteristics on which the selective cancer cell cytotoxicity induced by the inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis is based. PMID:26415219

  19. Evaluation of rucaparib and companion diagnostics in the PARP inhibitor landscape for recurrent ovarian cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Zachary B; Sood, Anil K; Coleman, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Rucaparib camsylate (CO-338; 8-fluoro-2-{4-[(methylamino)methyl]phenyl}-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-6H-azepino[5,4,3-cd]indol-6-one ((1S,4R)-7,7-dimethyl-2-oxobicyclo[2.2.1]hept-1-yl)methanesulfonic acid salt) is a PARP1, 2 and 3 inhibitor. Phase I studies identified a recommended Phase II dose of 600 mg orally twice daily. ARIEL2 Part 1 established a tumor genomic profiling test for homologous recombination loss of heterozygosity quantification using a next-generation sequencing companion diagnostic (CDx). Rucaparib received US FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation for treatment of platinum-sensitive BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer patients who received greater than two lines of platinum-based therapy. Comparable to rucaparib development, other PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, niraparib, veliparib and talazoparib, are developing CDx tests for targeted therapy. PARP inhibitor clinical trials and CDx assays are discussed in this review, as are potential PARP inhibitor combination therapies and likely resistance mechanisms. PMID:27087632

  20. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  1. Alternative Agents in Type 1 Diabetes in Addition to Insulin Therapy: Metformin, Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitors, Pioglitazone, GLP-1 Agonists, DPP-IV Inhibitors, and SGLT-2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeGeeter, Michelle; Williamson, Bobbie

    2016-04-01

    Insulin is the mainstay of current treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Due to increasing insulin resistance, insulin doses are often continually increased, which may result in weight gain for patients. Medications currently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes offer varying mechanisms of action that can help to reduce insulin resistance and prevent or deter weight gain. A MEDLINE search was conducted to review literature evaluating the use of metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, pioglitazone, glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase, and sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, in patients with T1DM. Varying results were found with some benefits including reductions in hemoglobin A1c, decreased insulin doses, and favorable effects on weight. Of significance, a common fear of utilizing multiple therapies for diabetes treatment is the risk of hypoglycemia, and this review displayed limited evidence of hypoglycemia with multiple agents. PMID:25312263

  2. Possible involvement of ATP-dependent K-channel related mechanisms in the antihypertensive and cough suppressant effects of the novel ACE inhibitor (2S, 3aS, 7aS)-1-(N2-nicotinoyl-L-lysyl-gamma-D-glutamyl)octahydro-1H- indole-2-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Takeyama, K; Hosoki, K; Karasawa, T

    1997-06-01

    The antihypertensive and cough suppressant mechanisms of DU-1777 ((2S,3aS,7aS)-1-(N2-nicotinoyl-L-lsyl-gamma-D-glutamyl )octahydro-1H-indole-2 -carboxylic acid, CAS 116662-73-8), a new long-acting angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The antihypertensive effects of DU-1777 at 10 mg/kg p.o. and cromakalim at 0.3 mg/kg p.o. were partially (about 60%) or fully antagonized by glibenclamide at 10 mg/kg i.v. in 2-kidney, 1-clip renal hypertensive rats (2K-1C RHR). The antihypertensive effects of a Ca blocker (nifedipine) and other ACE inhibitors (captopril, alacepril, enalapril, lisinopril, imidapril and quanapril) were not antagonized by glibenclamide. In deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats (DOCA-HR), the antihypertensive effects of DU-1777 at 3-30 mg/kg p.o. were fully antagonized by glibenclamide. However, in vitro, DU-1777 (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) did not affect aortic ring contractions induced by high K (30 mmol/l). In guinea pig, citric acid induced cough was increased by ACE inhibitors, captopril, alacepril, enalapril and lisinopril (10 and 30 mg/kg p.o.). DU-1777 had a tendency to decrease citric acid induced cough and the effect was antagonized by glibenclamide. These results suggest that while DU-1777 itself does not open ATP-dependent K channel, it indirectly produces these effects through unknown mechanisms in vivo. Moreover, these effects contributed to the antihypertensive effect in DOCA-HR and cough suppressant effect in guinea pigs. PMID:9239450

  3. Role of homocysteinylation of ACE in endothelial dysfunction of arteries

    PubMed Central

    Huang, An; Pinto, John T.; Froogh, Ghezal; Kandhi, Sharath; Qin, Jun; Wolin, Michael S.; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The direct impact of de novo synthesis of homocysteine (Hcy) and its reactive metabolites, Hcy-S-S-Hcy and Hcy thiolactone (HCTL), on vascular function has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that Hcy synthesized within endothelial cells affects activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by direct homocysteinylation of its amino- and/or sulfhydryl moieties. This covalent modification enhances ACE reactivity toward angiotensin II (ANG II)-NADPH oxidase-superoxide-dependent endothelial dysfunction. Mesenteric and coronary arteries isolated from normal rats were incubated for 3 days with or without exogenous methionine (Met, 0.1–0.3 mM), a precursor to Hcy. Incubation of arteries in Met-free media resulted in time-dependent decreases in vascular Hcy formation. By contrast, vessels incubated with Met produced Hcy in a dose-dependent manner. There was a notably greater de novo synthesis of Hcy from endothelial than from smooth muscle cells. Enhanced levels of Hcy production significantly impaired shear stress-induced dilation and release of nitric oxide, events that are associated with elevated production of vascular superoxide. Each of these processes was attenuated by ANG II type I receptor blocker or ACE and NADPH oxidase inhibitors. In addition, in vitro exposure of purified ACE to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL resulted in formation of homocysteinylated ACE and an enhanced ACE activity. The enhanced ACE activity was confirmed in isolated coronary and mesenteric arteries that had been exposed directly to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL or after Met incubation. In conclusion, vasculature-derived Hcy initiates endothelial dysfunction that, in part, may be mediated by ANG II-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase in association with homocysteinylation of ACE. PMID:25416191

  4. National Survey of ACE Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, Ernesto A.

    In 1987-88, a national survey was conducted to determine the adult/continuing education (ACE) policies and practices of large, urban community colleges. Questionnaires were mailed to ACE deans at 74 colleges, requesting information about program characteristics, funding sources, personnel, curriculum review, and marketing and publicity. Study…

  5. Immune tolerance therapy in paediatric haemophiliacs with factor VIII inhibitors: 14 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, W; Ehrenforth, S; Funk, M; Auerswald, G; Mentzer, D; Joseph-Steiner, J; Beeg, T; Klarman, D; Scharrer, I; Kornhuber, B

    1995-01-01

    We report our clinical experience in the immune tolerance (IT) therapy of 21 paediatric haemophiliacs with FVIII inhibitor: high responders (16HR) received initially FVIII twice daily at a dosage of 50-300 U/kg/day, 11/16 received a concomitant treatment with activated prothrombin complex concentrate (100-200 U/kg/day). Low responders (five LR) received 20-100 FVIII U/kg every second or third day. Inhibitor elimination was achieved in 19/21 patients in a median time of 4 months in HR and 1.5 months in LR. The outcome and length of time needed to induce IT was significantly correlated with FVIII exposure between the first inhibitor detection and onset of IT therapy and to interruption of IT therapy. For a rapid elimination of FVIII inhibitors it is important to start continuous administration of high-dose FVIII (≥ 100 FVIII U/kg/day) before repeated exposure to FVIII, in order to prevent rebooster effects, prolongation of elimination time, and to reduce expense. PMID:27214218

  6. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Promising Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In spite of the improvements in the life quality of patients, their effectiveness is compromised by several disadvantages. This represents a demand for developing new effective strategies with focusing on tumor cells and minimum side effects. Targeted cancer therapies and personalized medicine have been defined as a new type of emerging treatments. Small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) are among the most effective drugs for targeted cancer therapy. The growing number of approved SMIs of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the clinical oncology imply the increasing attention and application of these therapeutic tools. Most of the current approved RTK–TKIs in preclinical and clinical settings are multi-targeted inhibitors with several side effects. Only a few specific/selective RTK–TKIs have been developed for the treatment of cancer patients. Specific/selective RTK–TKIs have shown less deleterious effects compared to multi-targeted inhibitors. This review intends to highlight the importance of specific/selective TKIs for future development with less side effects and more manageable agents. This article provides an overview of: (1) the characteristics and function of RTKs and TKIs; (2) the recent advances in the improvement of specific/selective RTK–TKIs in preclinical or clinical settings; and (3) emerging RTKs for targeted cancer therapies by TKIs. PMID:25110867

  7. Cutaneous adverse effects of targeted therapies: Part II: Inhibitors of intracellular molecular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, James B; Macdonald, Brooke; Golitz, Loren E; LoRusso, Patricia; Sekulic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-01

    The last decade has spawned an exciting new era of oncotherapy in dermatology, including the development of targeted therapies for metastatic melanoma and basal cell carcinoma. Along with skin cancer, deregulation of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR and RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK intracellular signaling pathways contributes to tumorigenesis of a multitude of other cancers, and inhibitors of these pathways are being actively studied. Similar to other classes of targeted therapies, cutaneous adverse effects are among the most frequent toxicities observed with mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors, PI3K-AKT-mTOR inhibitors, hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitors, and immunotherapies. Given the rapid expansion of these families of targeted treatments, dermatologists will be essential in offering dermatologic supportive care measures to cancer patients being treated with these agents. Part II of this continuing medical education article reviews skin-related adverse sequelae, including the frequency of occurrence and the implications associated with on- and off-target cutaneous toxicities of inhibitors of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK pathway, PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, hedgehog signaling pathway, and immunotherapies. PMID:25592339

  8. Combination therapy of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and metformin in type 2 diabetes: rationale and evidence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Hong, T

    2014-02-01

    The main pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) includes insulin resistance and pancreatic islet dysfunction. Metformin, which attenuates insulin resistance, has been recommended as the first-line antidiabetic medication. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are novel oral hypoglycaemic agents that protect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from degradation, maintain the bioactivity of endogenous GLP-1, and thus improve islet dysfunction. Results from clinical trials have shown that the combination therapy of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin [as an add-on, an initial combination or a fixed-dose combination (FDC)] provides excellent efficacy and safety in patients with T2DM. Moreover, recent studies have suggested that metformin enhances the biological effect of GLP-1 by increasing GLP-1 secretion, suppressing activity of DPP-4 and upregulating the expression of GLP-1 receptor in pancreatic β-cells. Conversely, DPP-4 inhibitors have a favourable effect on insulin sensitivity in patients with T2DM. Therefore, the combination of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin provides an additive or even synergistic effect on metabolic control in patients with T2DM. This article provides an overview of clinical evidence and discusses the rationale for the combination therapy of DPP-4 inhibitors and metformin. PMID:23668534

  9. HDAC inhibitors as cognitive enhancers in fear, anxiety and trauma therapy: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Whittle, Nigel; Singewald, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    A novel strategy to treat anxiety and fear-related disorders such as phobias, panic and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) is combining CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), including extinction-based exposure therapy, with cognitive enhancers. By targeting and boosting mechanisms underlying learning, drug development in this field aims at designing CBT-augmenting compounds that help to overcome extinction learning deficits, promote long-term fear inhibition and thus support relapse prevention. Progress in revealing the role of epigenetic regulation of specific genes associated with extinction memory generation has opened new avenues in this direction. The present review examines recent evidence from pre-clinical studies showing that increasing histone acetylation, either via genetic or pharmacological inhibition of HDACs (histone deacetylases) by e.g. vorinostat/SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), entinostat/MS-275, sodium butyrate, TSA (trichostatin A) or VPA (valproic acid), or by targeting HATs (histone acetyltransferases), augments fear extinction and, importantly, generates a long-term extinction memory that can protect from return of fear phenomena. The molecular mechanisms and pathways involved including BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor signalling are just beginning to be revealed. First studies in healthy humans are in support of extinction-facilitating effects of HDAC inhibitors. Very recent evidence that HDAC inhibitors can rescue deficits in extinction-memory-impaired rodents indicates a potential clinical utility of this approach also for exposure therapy-resistant patients. Important future work includes investigation of the long-term safety aspects of HDAC inhibitor treatment, as well as design of isotype(s)-specific inhibitors. Taken together, HDAC inhibitors display promising potential as pharmacological adjuncts to augment the efficacy of exposure-based approaches in anxiety and trauma therapy

  10. PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors: next-generation targeted cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-hua

    2015-01-01

    The pivotal roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in human cancers have inspired active development of small molecules to inhibit these lipid kinases. However, the first-generation pan-PI3K and dual-PI3K/mTOR inhibitors have encountered problems in clinical trials, with limited efficacies as a monotherapeutic agent as well as a relatively high rate of side effects. It is increasingly recognized that different PI3K isoforms play non-redundant roles in particular tumor types, which has prompted the development of isoform-selective inhibitors for pre-selected patients with the aim for improving efficacy while decreasing undesirable side effects. The success of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors is represented by CAL101 (Idelalisib), a first-in-class PI3Kδ-selective small-molecule inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma. Inhibitors targeting other PI3K isoforms are also being extensively developed. This review focuses on the recent progress in development of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the action modes of novel PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors will provide valuable information to further validate the concept of targeting specific PI3K isoforms, while the identification of biomarkers to stratify patients who are likely to benefit from the therapy will be essential for the success of these agents. PMID:26364801

  11. PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors: next-generation targeted cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Ding, Jian; Meng, Ling-hua

    2015-10-01

    The pivotal roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in human cancers have inspired active development of small molecules to inhibit these lipid kinases. However, the first-generation pan-PI3K and dual-PI3K/mTOR inhibitors have encountered problems in clinical trials, with limited efficacies as a monotherapeutic agent as well as a relatively high rate of side effects. It is increasingly recognized that different PI3K isoforms play non-redundant roles in particular tumor types, which has prompted the development of isoform-selective inhibitors for pre-selected patients with the aim for improving efficacy while decreasing undesirable side effects. The success of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors is represented by CAL101 (Idelalisib), a first-in-class PI3Kδ-selective small-molecule inhibitor that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma. Inhibitors targeting other PI3K isoforms are also being extensively developed. This review focuses on the recent progress in development of PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the action modes of novel PI3K isoform-selective inhibitors will provide valuable information to further validate the concept of targeting specific PI3K isoforms, while the identification of biomarkers to stratify patients who are likely to benefit from the therapy will be essential for the success of these agents. PMID:26364801

  12. Vaginal estrogen products in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sulaica, Elisabeth; Han, Tiffany; Wang, Weiqun; Bhat, Raksha; Trivedi, Meghana V; Niravath, Polly

    2016-06-01

    Atrophic vaginitis represents a major barrier to compliance with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in breast cancer (BC) survivors. While local estrogen therapy is effective for postmenopausal vaginal dryness, the efficacy of such therapies has not been evaluated systematically in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) BC patients on AI therapy. Furthermore, the potential risk of breast cancer recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy represents a long-term safety concern for the patients with HR + BC. Unfortunately, there is no standardized assay to measure very low concentrations of estradiol (E2) in these women being treated with AI therapy. This makes it difficult to evaluate even indirectly the potential risk of BC recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In this review, we describe available assays to measure very low concentrations of E2, discuss the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen products on the market, and summarize published and ongoing clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of vaginal estrogen in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In the absence of any randomized controlled clinical trials, this review serves as a summary of available clinical data and ongoing studies to aid clinicians in selecting the best available option for their patients. PMID:27178335

  13. Proton pump inhibitor step-down therapy for GERD: A multi-center study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Takao; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Takenaka, Ryuta; Nasu, Junichiro; Ishioka, Hidehiko; Fujiwara, Akiko; Yoshinaga, Fumiya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the predictors of success in step-down of proton pump inhibitor and to assess the quality of life (QOL). METHODS: Patients who had heartburn twice a week or more were treated with 20 mg omeprazole (OPZ) once daily for 8 wk as an initial therapy (study 1). Patients whose heartburn decreased to once a week or less at the end of the initial therapy were enrolled in study 2 and treated with 10 mg OPZ as maintenance therapy for an additional 6 mo (study 2). QOL was investigated using the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale (GSRS) before initial therapy, after both 4 and 8 wk of initial therapy, and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 mo after starting maintenance therapy. RESULTS: In study 1, 108 patients were analyzed. Their characteristics were as follows; median age: 63 (range: 20-88) years, sex: 46 women and 62 men. The success rate of the initial therapy was 76%. In the patients with successful initial therapy, abdominal pain, indigestion and reflux GSRS scores were improved. In study 2, 83 patients were analyzed. Seventy of 83 patients completed the study 2 protocol. In the per-protocol analysis, 80% of 70 patients were successful for step-down. On multivariate analysis of baseline demographic data and clinical information, no previous treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) [odds ratio (OR) 0.255, 95% CI: 0.06-0.98] and a lower indigestion score in GSRS at the beginning of step-down therapy (OR 0.214, 95% CI: 0.06-0.73) were found to be the predictors of successful step-down therapy. The improved GSRS scores by initial therapy were maintained through the step-down therapy. CONCLUSION: OPZ was effective for most GERD patients. However, those who have had previous treatment for GERD and experience dyspepsia before step-down require particular monitoring for relapse. PMID:21472108

  14. [Successful direct thrombin inhibitor treatment of a left atrial appendage thrombus developed under rivaroxaban therapy].

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Nándor; Gellér, László; Tahin, Tamás; Merkely, Béla; Széplaki, Gábor

    2016-01-24

    The authors present the history of a 62-year-old man on continuous rivaroxaban therapy who was scheduled for pulmonary vein isolation due to persistent atrial fibrillation. Preoperative transesophageal echocardiography detected the presence of left atrial appendage thrombus. Thrombophilia tests showed that the patient was heterozygous carrier of the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation. The authors hypothesized that a direct thrombin inhibitor might exert a more appropriate effect against thrombosis in this case and, therefore, a switch to dabigatran was performed. After two months of anticoagulation with the direct thrombin inhibitor and folic acid supplementation the thrombus resolved. The authors underline that thrombus formation may develop in atrial fibrillation even if the patient is adequately treated with rivaroxaban. This case suggests, that methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase gene mutation may modulate the efficacy of direct Xa factor inhibitors. According to this case history, dabigatran may be an effective therapeutic option in resolving established thrombus. PMID:26772828

  15. Patient adherence to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias J; Kantarjian, Hagop; Eliasson, Lina; Cornelison, A Megan; Marin, David

    2012-07-01

    Dramatically improved survival associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has transformed the disease model for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) to one of long-term management, but treatment success is challenged with poor medication adherence. Many risk factors associated with poor adherence can be ameliorated by close monitoring, dose modification, and supportive care. Controlling risk factors for poor adherence in combination with patient education that includes direct communication between the health care team and the patient are essential components for maximizing the benefits of TKI therapy. PMID:22473898

  16. Combination therapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors for melanoma: latest evidence and place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Zeynep; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib or dabrafenib in patients with advanced BRAFV600 mutated melanoma has shown objective tumor responses in approximately half of the patients. However, the duration of responses is limited in a majority of these patients, with progression-free survival rates around 6 months due to tumor progression from development of acquired resistance. Preclinical studies have suggested that concurrent inhibition of the BRAF kinases and MEK of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway could decrease MAPK-driven acquired resistance, resulting in longer duration of responses, higher rate of tumor responses, and a decrease in the cutaneous toxicities observed from paradoxical MAPK pathway activation with BRAF inhibitor monotherapy. This review provides an overview of the currently available clinical trial data on BRAF and MEK inhibitors together and in combinations with other therapeutic agents. PMID:26753005

  17. Tailoring hemostatic therapies to lower inhibitor development in previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, P M; Mancuso, M E; Franchini, M

    2016-07-01

    After technological progress provided safer therapeutic products for patients with hemophilia A, the development of alloantibodies (inhibitors) neutralizing the coagulant activity of infused factor VIII (FVIII) remains the most serious complication of replacement therapy, predisposing patients to greater morbidity and causing higher treatment costs. The pathogenesis of inhibitors, which develop at a high rate in previously untreated children with severe hemophilia A, is multifactorial, resulting from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Among non-genetic determinants, a key role is played by treatment-related factors, including the source of FVIII product (i.e., plasma derived or recombinant) and the mode of replacement therapy delivery (i.e., intensity, prophylaxis vs. on demand). We review the potential interventions on these modifiable factors that may help to lower the rate of inhibitor development. In addition, interest is currently directed toward the potential for lesser immunogenicity of novel hemostatic agents designed to decrease the dosing frequency or avoid/delay the need of FVIII replacement therapy. PMID:27155314

  18. [PARP1 inhibitors: contemporary attempts at their use in anticancer therapy and future perspective].

    PubMed

    Wiśnik, Ewelina; Ryksa, Marcin; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Current cancer therapies are based mainly on the use of compounds that cause DNA damage. Unfortunately, even the combination therapies do not give rewarding effects, due to the high efficiency of DNA damage repair mechanisms in tumor cells. Therefore, the present studies should be focused on proteins that are involved in DNA repair systems. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 is an example of a protein commonly known as an enzyme that plays a role in the detection of DNA damage and repair. Activation of PARP1 in response to DNA damage leads to poly-ADP-ribosylation of proteins contributing to DNA repair systems, therefore facilitating the maintenance of genome stability. On the other hand, inhibition of PARP1 enzyme results in the accumulation of DNA damage, which in turn contributes to cell death. Studies on inhibitors of PARP1 are still ongoing, and some of them are currently in the third phase of clinical trials. To date, only one representative of the PARP1 inhibitors, called olaparib, has been approved for anti-cancer therapy in the EU and the USA. Moreover, a growing body of evidence indicates a role of this protein in various intracellular processes such as bioenergetics, proliferation, regulation of gene expression, cell death as well as immunoregulation. A number of different intracellular processes regulated by PARP1 give rise to potential wider use of PARP1 inhibitors in treatment of other diseases, including immune or autoimmune disorders. PMID:27117104

  19. Targeting the TGF-β receptor with kinase inhibitors for scleroderma therapy.

    PubMed

    Cong, Lin; Xia, Zhi-Kuan; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2014-09-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a connective tissue disease that affects various organ systems; the treatment of scleroderma is still difficult and remains a challenge to the clinician. Recently, kinase inhibitors have shown great potential against fibrotic diseases and, specifically, the transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGF-βR) was found as a new and promising target for scleroderma therapy. In the current study, we propose that the large pool of existing kinase inhibitors could be exploited for inhibiting the TGF-βR to suppress scleroderma. In this respect, we developed a modeling protocol to systematically profile the inhibitory activities of 169 commercially available kinase inhibitors against the TGF-βR, from which five promising candidates were selected and tested using a standard kinase assay protocol. Consequently, two molecular entities, namely the PKB inhibitor MK-2206 and the mTOR C1/C2 inhibitor AZD8055, showed high potency when bound to the TGF-βR, with IC50 values of 97 and 86 nM, respectively, which are close to those of the recently developed TGF-βR selective inhibitors SB525334 and LY2157299 (IC50 = 14.3 and 56 nM, respectively). We also performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and post-molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area analyses to dissect the structural basis and energetic properties of intermolecular interactions between the TGF-βR kinase domain and these potent compounds, highlighting intensive nonbonded networks across the tightly packed interface of non-cognate TGF-βR-inhibitor complexes. PMID:24917246

  20. Rho kinase inhibitor enables cell-based therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Naoki; Sakamoto, Yuji; Fujii, Keita; Kitano, Junji; Nakano, Shinichiro; Tsujimoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Shin-ichiro; Ueno, Morio; Hagiya, Michio; Hamuro, Junji; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Shiina, Takashi; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency; consequently, its dysfunction causes severe vision loss. Tissue engineering-based therapy, as an alternative to conventional donor corneal transplantation, is anticipated to provide a less invasive and more effective therapeutic modality. We conducted a preclinical study for cell-based therapy in a primate model and demonstrated regeneration of the corneal endothelium following injection of cultured monkey corneal endothelial cells (MCECs) or human CECs (HCECs), in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, into the anterior chamber. We also evaluated the safety and efficacy of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-grade HCECs, similar to those planned for use as transplant material for human patients in a clinical trial, and we showed that the corneal endothelium was regenerated without adverse effect. We also showed that CEC engraftment is impaired by limited substrate adhesion, which is due to actomyosin contraction induced by dissociation-induced activation of ROCK/MLC signaling. Inclusion of a ROCK inhibitor improves efficiency of engraftment of CECs and enables cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction as a clinically relevant therapy. PMID:27189516

  1. Rho kinase inhibitor enables cell-based therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naoki; Sakamoto, Yuji; Fujii, Keita; Kitano, Junji; Nakano, Shinichiro; Tsujimoto, Yuki; Nakamura, Shin-Ichiro; Ueno, Morio; Hagiya, Michio; Hamuro, Junji; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Suzuki, Shingo; Shiina, Takashi; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains corneal transparency; consequently, its dysfunction causes severe vision loss. Tissue engineering-based therapy, as an alternative to conventional donor corneal transplantation, is anticipated to provide a less invasive and more effective therapeutic modality. We conducted a preclinical study for cell-based therapy in a primate model and demonstrated regeneration of the corneal endothelium following injection of cultured monkey corneal endothelial cells (MCECs) or human CECs (HCECs), in combination with a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, into the anterior chamber. We also evaluated the safety and efficacy of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-grade HCECs, similar to those planned for use as transplant material for human patients in a clinical trial, and we showed that the corneal endothelium was regenerated without adverse effect. We also showed that CEC engraftment is impaired by limited substrate adhesion, which is due to actomyosin contraction induced by dissociation-induced activation of ROCK/MLC signaling. Inclusion of a ROCK inhibitor improves efficiency of engraftment of CECs and enables cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction as a clinically relevant therapy. PMID:27189516

  2. HSP90 Inhibitor Encapsulated Photo-Theranostic Nanoparticles for Synergistic Combination Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-yin; Guo, Wenchang; Long, Qilai; Ma, Aihong; Liu, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Hongyong; Huang, Yee; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Pan, Chongxian; Lam, Kit S.; Li, Yuanpei

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising non-invasive therapeutic modality that has been proposed for treating prostate cancer, but the procedure is associated with limited efficacy, tumor recurrence and photo-toxicity. In the present study, we proposed to develop a novel multifunctional nano-platform for targeted delivery of heat, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor simultaneously for combination therapy against prostate cancer. This new nano-platform combines two newly developed entities: 1) a unique organic and biocompatible nanoporphyrin-based drug delivery system that can generate efficient heat and ROS simultaneously with light activation at the tumor sites for dual-modal photothermal- and photodynamic- therapy (PTT/PDT), and 2) new nano-formulations of Hsp90 inhibitors that can decrease the levels of pro-survival and angiogenic signaling molecules induced by phototherapy, therefore, further sensitizing cancer cells to phototherapy. Furthermore, the nanoparticles have activatable near infrared (NIR) fluorescence for optical imaging to conveniently monitor the real-time drug delivery in both subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models bearing prostate cancer xenograft. This novel multifunctional nano-platform has great potential to improve the care of prostate cancer patients through targeted combination therapy. PMID:27375782

  3. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  4. The role of proton pump inhibitor therapy in the management of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Prados-Manzano, Raul; Gonzalez-Cordero, Pedro Luis

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic esophageal disease characterized by a Th2 inflammatory response triggered by food/environmental allergens. Solid data confirm that up to half of patients with suspected EoE achieve complete remission on proton pump inhibitors (PPI) therapy. This disease phenotype is currently labelled as PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). Albeit initially believed to represent gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), evolving evidence has underscored that PPI-REE and EoE show a significant overlap regarding clinic, endoscopic, histologic, Th2 immune-mediated inflammation and gene expression features. Moreover, PPI therapy can effectively reverse Th2 inflammation and the EoE transcriptome expression in PPI-REE patients. Therefore, EoE and PPI-REE likely represent a common allergic disorder, where PPI therapy should be considered a short- and long-term therapeutic asset, along with diet and topical steroids. PMID:27097787

  5. Reducing the Burden of Difficult-to-Treat Major Depressive Disorder: Revisiting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Difficult-to-treat depression (eg, depression with atypical or anxious symptoms, treatment-resistant depression, or depression with frequent recurrence) is a challenging real-world health issue. This critical review of the literature focuses on monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) therapy and difficult-to-treat forms of depression. Data Sources: A PubMed literature search was performed in November 2012 and refreshed through January 2013 with no date restrictions using key search terms including MAO inhibitor therapy or MAOI and depression and anxiety, atypical, treatment-resistant, recurrent, relapse, or refractory. Study Selection: Articles were selected to summarize the current needs in difficult-to-treat depression as well as the use of MAOI therapies in this area. Results: Two strategies have fallen out of favor in the care of patients with major depressive disorder. The first is the use of MAOI therapy and the second is the proactive recognition of difficult-to-treat depression that may not respond as well to more frequently used antidepressants. The infrequent use of MAOIs stems from the perception that other oral therapies for depression are safer and easier to use than oral MAOIs; however, transdermal delivery is one potential strategy to improve the safety of this class of agents. Although food-related interactions with transdermal delivery of MAOI therapy can be lessened, clinicians still need to be vigilant for drug-drug interactions and serotonin syndrome. Conclusions: Clinicians should consider MAOIs for patients who have had several unsuccessful trials of antidepressants. Guidelines generally reserve MAOIs as third- and fourth-line treatments due to concerns over safety and tolerability; however, transdermal delivery of an MAOI may allay some of the safety and tolerability concerns. Patients should be provided education about MAOIs and their risks. PMID:24511450

  6. ACE inhibition, ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) axis in kidney and cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Simões E Silva, Ana Cristina; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-05-01

    The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a pivotal physiological regulator of heart and kidney homeostasis, but also plays an important role in the pathophysiology of heart and kidney diseases. Recently, new components of the RAS have been discovered, including angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7), Mas receptor, Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine. These new components of RAS are formed by the hydrolysis of Ang I and Ang II and, in general, counteract the effects of Ang II. In experimental models of heart and renal diseases, Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine produced vasodilation, inhibition of cell growth, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. Recent pharmacological strategies have been proposed to potentiate the effects or to enhance the formation of Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9), including ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, cyclized form of Ang-(1-7) and nonpeptide synthetic Mas receptor agonists. Here, we review the role and effects of ACE2, ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) and synthetic Mas receptor agonists in the control of inflammation and fibrosis in cardiovascular and renal diseases and as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. We briefly comment on the therapeutic potential of the novel members of RAS, Ang-(1-9) and alamandine, and the interactions between classical RAS inhibitors and new players in heart and kidney diseases. PMID:26995300

  7. Drug withdrawal in women with progressive metastatic breast cancer while on aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chavarri-Guerra, Y; Higgins, M J; Szymonifka, J; Cigler, T; Liedke, P; Partridge, A; Ligibel, J; Come, S E; Finkelstein, D; Ryan, P D; Goss, P E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acquiring resistance to endocrine therapy is common in metastatic hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer (MBC). These patients most often transition either to next-line endocrine therapy or to systemic chemotherapy. However, withdrawal of endocrine therapy and observation as is selectively practiced in prostate cancer is another potential strategy for breast cancer patients. Methods: A prospective, single-arm phase II trial of aromatase inhibitor (AI) withdrawal was performed in women with MBC, who had disease progression on AI therapy. The primary objective was to estimate the clinical benefit rate (defined as complete or partial response, or stable disease for at least 24 weeks, by RECIST criteria). Participants were monitored clinically and radiographically off all therapy at 8, 16 and 24 weeks after treatment and every 12 weeks thereafter until disease progression. Results: Twenty-four patients (of 40 intended) were enrolled when the study was closed due to slow accrual. Clinical benefit rate overall was 46% (95% CI 26% to 67%). Median progression-free survival from time of AI withdrawal was 4 months. Two patients have remained progression free, off all treatment, for over 60 months. Conclusions: Despite suboptimal patient accrual, our results suggest that selected patients with metastatic breast cancer progressing on AI therapy can experience disease stabilisation and a period of observation after AI withdrawal. A randomised phase II trial is planned. PMID:25233398

  8. Topical therapy for psoriasis: a promising future. Focus on JAK and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Adilia; Torres, Tiago

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic and disabling skin disorder affecting approximately 2% of the population, associated with significant negative impact on the patient's quality of life. Approximately 80% of those affected with psoriasis have mild-to-moderate forms and are usually treated with topical therapy, whereas phototherapy and systemic therapies are used for those with severe disease. In the past three decades, the major advances in psoriasis therapy have been in systemic agents for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis, particularly new immunomodulatory and biological molecules, while topical therapies have remained relatively unchanged over the past decades. Indeed, topical corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogs are still the gold standard of therapy for mild-to-moderate psoriasis. Thus, there is a need to develop new and more effective topical agents in the short and long term, with a better efficacy and safety profile than corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogs. Over the past five years, investigation into topical therapy has expanded, with exciting new drugs being developed. Preliminary results of these emerging agents that selectively target disease-defining pathogenic pathways seem to be promising, although long-term and large-scale studies assessing safety and efficacy are still lacking. The aim of this article was to review the clinical and research data of some emerging topical agents, focusing on Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription and phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, which are currently being investigated. PMID:26552963

  9. Persistent change in cardiac fibroblast physiology after transient ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, K M; Biwer, L A; Madhavpeddi, L; Ramaiah, P; Shahid, W; Hale, T M

    2015-10-01

    Transient angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition induces persistent changes that protect against future nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor-induced cardiac fibrosis and inflammation. Given the role of fibroblasts in mediating these effects, the present study investigates whether prior ACE inhibition produced persistent changes in cardiac fibroblast physiology. Adult male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with vehicle (C+L) or the ACE inhibitor, enalapril (E+L) for 2 wk followed by a 2-wk washout period and a subsequent 7-day challenge with the NOS inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. A third set of untreated SHRs served as controls. At the end of the study period, cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from control, C+L, and E+L left ventricles to assess proliferation rate, collagen expression, and chemokine release in vitro. After 7 days of NOS inhibition, there were areas of myocardial injury but no significant change in collagen deposition in E+L and C+L hearts in vivo. In vitro, cardiac fibroblasts isolated from C+L but not E+L hearts were hyperproliferative, demonstrated increased collagen type I gene expression, and an elevated secretion of the macrophage-recruiting chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor. These findings demonstrate that in vivo N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester treatment produces phenotypic changes in fibroblasts that persist in vitro. Moreover, this is the first demonstration that transient ACE inhibition can produce a persistent modification of the cardiac fibroblast phenotype to one that is less inflammatory and fibrogenic. It may be that the cardioprotective effects of ACE inhibition are related in part to beneficial changes in cardiac fibroblast physiology. PMID:26371174

  10. Use of Nanotechnology to Develop Multi-Drug Inhibitors For Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Raghavendra; Jones, Nathan R.; Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic agents that inhibit a single target often cannot combat a multifactorial disease such as cancer. Thus, multi-target inhibitors (MTIs) are needed to circumvent complications such as the development of resistance. There are two predominant types of MTIs, (a) single drug inhibitor (SDIs) that affect multiple pathways simultaneously, and (b) combinatorial agents or multi-drug inhibitors (MDIs) that inhibit multiple pathways. Single agent multi-target kinase inhibitors are amongst the most prominent class of compounds belonging to the former, whereas the latter includes many different classes of combinatorial agents that have been used to achieve synergistic efficacy against cancer. Safe delivery and accumulation at the tumor site is of paramount importance for MTIs because inhibition of multiple key signaling pathways has the potential to lead to systemic toxicity. For this reason, the development of drug delivery mechanisms using nanotechnology is preferable in order to ensure that the MDIs accumulate in the tumor vasculature, thereby increasing efficacy and minimizing off-target and systemic side effects. This review will discuss how nanotechnology can be used for the development of MTIs for cancer therapy and also it concludes with a discussion of the future of nanoparticle-based MTIs as well as the continuing obstacles being faced during the development of these unique agents.’ PMID:25013742

  11. Combined HSP90 and kinase inhibitor therapy: Insights from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Harvey; Scroggins, Brad; Zuehlke, Abbey; Kijima, Toshiki; Beebe, Kristin; Mishra, Alok; Neckers, Len; Prince, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    The merging of knowledge from genomics, cellular signal transduction and molecular evolution is producing new paradigms of cancer analysis. Protein kinases have long been understood to initiate and promote malignant cell growth and targeting kinases to fight cancer has been a major strategy within the pharmaceutical industry for over two decades. Despite the initial success of kinase inhibitors (KIs), the ability of cancer to evolve resistance and reprogram oncogenic signaling networks has reduced the efficacy of kinase targeting. The molecular chaperone HSP90 physically supports global kinase function while also acting as an evolutionary capacitor. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has compiled a trove of data indicating that a large percentage of tumors overexpress or possess mutant kinases that depend on the HSP90 molecular chaperone complex. Moreover, the overexpression or mutation of parallel activators of kinase activity (PAKA) increases the number of components that promote malignancy and indirectly associate with HSP90. Therefore, targeting HSP90 is predicted to complement kinase inhibitors by inhibiting oncogenic reprogramming and cancer evolution. Based on this hypothesis, consideration should be given by both the research and clinical communities towards combining kinase inhibitors and HSP90 inhibitors (H90Ins) in combating cancer. The purpose of this perspective is to reflect on the current understanding of HSP90 and kinase biology as well as promote the exploration of potential synergistic molecular therapy combinations through the utilization of The Cancer Genome Atlas. PMID:26070366

  12. Efflux pump inhibitors: targeting mycobacterial efflux systems to enhance TB therapy.

    PubMed

    Pule, Caroline M; Sampson, Samantha L; Warren, Robin M; Black, Philippa A; van Helden, Paul D; Victor, Tommie C; Louw, Gail E

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continues to plague TB control, with a global increase in the prevalence of MDR-TB. This acts as a gateway to XDR-TB and thus emphasizes the urgency for drug development and optimal treatment options. Bedaquiline is the first new anti-TB drug approved by the FDA in 40 years and has been shown to be an effective treatment option for MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Bedaquiline has also recently been included in clinical trials for new regimens with the aim of improving and shortening treatment periods. Alarmingly, efflux-mediated bedaquiline resistance, as well as efflux-mediated cross-resistance to clofazimine, has been identified in treatment failures. This mechanism of resistance results in efflux of a variety of anti-TB drugs from the bacterial cell, thereby decreasing the intracellular drug concentration. In doing so, the bacillus is able to render the antibiotic treatment ineffective. Recent studies have explored strategies to reverse the resistance phenotype conferred by efflux pump activation. It was observed that the addition of efflux pump inhibitors partially restored drug susceptibility in vitro and in vivo. This has significant clinical implications, especially in MDR-TB management where treatment options are extremely limited. This review aims to highlight the current efflux pump inhibitors effective against M. tuberculosis, the effect of efflux pump inhibitors on mycobacterial growth and the clinical promise of treatment with efflux pump inhibitors and standard anti-TB therapy. PMID:26472768

  13. Use of Nanotechnology to Develop Multi-Drug Inhibitors For Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Raghavendra; Jones, Nathan R; Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Robertson, Gavin P

    2013-12-01

    Therapeutic agents that inhibit a single target often cannot combat a multifactorial disease such as cancer. Thus, multi-target inhibitors (MTIs) are needed to circumvent complications such as the development of resistance. There are two predominant types of MTIs, (a) single drug inhibitor (SDIs) that affect multiple pathways simultaneously, and (b) combinatorial agents or multi-drug inhibitors (MDIs) that inhibit multiple pathways. Single agent multi-target kinase inhibitors are amongst the most prominent class of compounds belonging to the former, whereas the latter includes many different classes of combinatorial agents that have been used to achieve synergistic efficacy against cancer. Safe delivery and accumulation at the tumor site is of paramount importance for MTIs because inhibition of multiple key signaling pathways has the potential to lead to systemic toxicity. For this reason, the development of drug delivery mechanisms using nanotechnology is preferable in order to ensure that the MDIs accumulate in the tumor vasculature, thereby increasing efficacy and minimizing off-target and systemic side effects. This review will discuss how nanotechnology can be used for the development of MTIs for cancer therapy and also it concludes with a discussion of the future of nanoparticle-based MTIs as well as the continuing obstacles being faced during the development of these unique agents.' PMID:25013742

  14. Salvage therapy trial for erectile dysfunction using phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and vitamin E: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Nobuyuki; Higuchi, Yoshihide; Maruyama, Takuo; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo; Shima, Hiroki

    2008-12-01

    We report our initial experience with salvage therapy for low responders to PDE-5 inhibitors by adding vitamin E. Of 89 patients with ED who visited our clinic between January 2004 to August 2006, 9 were unable to obtain a full response to a PDE-5 inhibitor and included in the present study. After providing informed consent, each was given 300 mg per day of alpha-tocophenol at least 1 month and completed IIEF-5 questionnaires to assess its efficacy while also taking a PDE-5 inhibitor. With alpha-tocophenol administration, the average IIEF-5 score increased from 13.8 +/- 3.2 to 17.1 +/- 3.6. Four of seven patients who completed the questionnaire each time showed improved IIEF-5 scores, with a maximum elevation of 9 points. Further, eight of the nine patients experienced favourable subjective changes, the majority being increased penile rigidity. The present clinical trial results are, to our knowledge, the first known to show the effects of vitamin E for enhancing the efficacy of a PDE-5 inhibitor. PMID:19172547

  15. Positioning SGLT2 Inhibitors/Incretin-Based Therapies in the Treatment Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wilding, John P H; Rajeev, Surya Panicker; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2016-08-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) are the most recent addition to the therapeutic options available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and became available after the introduction of incretin-based therapies, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs). These agents have potential advantages with regard to their weight loss-promoting effect, low risk of hypoglycemia, reduction in blood pressure, and reduction in cardiovascular events in high-risk patients (with empagliflozin). Apart from these clinically important outcomes, they may also correct core defects present in type 2 diabetes (i.e., improvement in β-cell function and insulin sensitivity). They do, however, have some adverse effects, notably, nausea with GLP-1 RAs and genital tract infections and potential for volume depletion with SGLT2i. Whether incretin-based therapies are associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis is unclear. Most recently, diabetic ketoacidosis has been reported with SGLT2i. Therefore, a key clinical question in relation to guidelines is whether these clinical advantages, in the context of the adverse effect profile, outweigh the additional cost compared with older, more established therapies. This article reviews the therapeutic rationale for the use of these newer drugs for diabetes treatment, considers their place in current guidelines, and discusses how this may change as new data emerge about their long-term efficacy and safety from ongoing outcome trials. PMID:27440828

  16. Cancer cell resistance to aurora kinase inhibitors: identification of novel targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hrabakova, Rita; Kollareddy, Madhu; Tyleckova, Jirina; Halada, Petr; Hajduch, Marian; Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Kovarova, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance is the major obstacle to successful cancer therapy. Our study focuses on resistance to Aurora kinase inhibitors tested as anti-cancer drugs in clinical trials. We have used 2D electrophoresis in the pH ranges of 4-7 and 6-11 followed by protein identification using MALDI-TOF/TOF to compare the protein composition of HCT116 colon cancer cells either sensitive to CYC116 and ZM447439 inhibitors or resistant toward these drugs. The analysis also included p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) phenotypes of HCT116 cells. Our findings demonstrate that platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran contribute to the development of resistance to ZM447439 only where resistance is related to p53. On the other hand, serine hydroxymethyltransferase was found to promote the tumor growth in cells resistant to CYC116 without the influence of p53. Computer modeling of interaction networks highlighted a direct link of the p53-independent mechanism of resistance to CYC116 with autophagy. Importantly, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, serpin B5, and calretinin represent the target proteins that may help overcome resistance in combination therapies. In addition, serpin B5 and calretinin appear to be candidate biomarkers that may be accessible in patients for monitoring of cancer therapy with ease. PMID:23151231

  17. Synthesis and Metabolic Studies of Host-Directed Inhibitors for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Targeting host cell factors required for virus replication provides an alternative to targeting pathogen components and represents a promising approach to develop broad-spectrum antiviral therapeutics. High-throughput screening (HTS) identified two classes of inhibitors (2 and 3) with broad-spectrum antiviral activity against ortho- and paramyxoviruses including influenza A virus (IAV), measles virus (MeV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3). Hit-to-lead optimization delivered inhibitor 28a, with EC50 values of 0.88 and 0.81 μM against IAV strain WSN and MeV strain Edmonston, respectively. It was also found that compound 28a delivers good stability in human liver S9 fractions with a half-life of 165 min. These data establish 28a as a promising lead for antiviral therapy through a host-directed mechanism. PMID:23956816

  18. Inhibitors of emerging epigenetic targets for cancer therapy: a patent review (2010-2014).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Minoru; Roberts, Justin M; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James E

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory pathways comprise an emerging and active area of chemical probe discovery and investigational drug development. Emerging insights from cancer genome sequencing and chromatin biology have identified leveraged opportunities for development of chromatin-directed small molecules as cancer therapies. At present, only six agents in two epigenetic target classes have been approved by the US FDA, limited to treatment of hematological malignancies. Recently, new classes of epigenetic inhibitors have appeared in literatures. First-in-class compounds have successfully transitioned to clinical investigation, importantly also in solid tumors and pediatric malignancies. This review considers patent applications for small-molecule inhibitors of selected epigenetic targets from 2010 to 2014. Included are exemplary classes of chromatin-associated epigenomic writers (DOT1L and EZH2), erasers (LSD1) and readers (BRD4). PMID:26174566

  19. Cellular HIV-1 DNA quantitation in patients during simplification therapy with protease inhibitor-sparing regimens.

    PubMed

    Sarmati, Loredana; Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe; Nicastri, Emanuele; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Andreoni, Carolina; Dori, Luca; Gatti, Francesca; Montano, Marco; Buonomini, Anna Rita; Boldrin, Caterina; Palù, Giorgio; Vullo, Vincenzo; Andreoni, Massimo

    2007-07-01

    Simplified regimens containing protease-inhibitors (PI)-sparing combinations were used in patients with virological suppression after prolonged highly active antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated the total HIV-1 DNA quantitation as a predictor of long-term success for PI-sparing simplified therapy. Sixty-two patients were enrolled in a prospective non-randomized cohort. All patients have been receiving a triple-therapy regimen, two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus one PI, for at least 9 months and were characterized by undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (<50 cp/ml) for at least 6 months. Patients were changed to a simplified PI-sparing regimen to overcome PI-associated adverse effects. HIV-DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were evaluated at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Patients with proviral DNA levels below the median value (226 copies/10(6) PBMCs) had a significant higher CD4 cell count at nadir (P = 0.003) and at enrolment (P = 0.001) with respect to patients with HIV-DNA levels above the median value. At month 18, 53 out of 62 (85%) patients on simplified regimen showed virological success, 4 (6.4%) patients experienced virological failure and 5 (8%) patients showed viral blip. At logistic regression analysis, HIV-DNA levels below 226 copies/10(6) PBMCs at baseline were associated independently to a reduced risk of virological failure or viral blip during simplified therapy (OR 0.002, 95% CI 0.001-0.46, P = 0.025). The substitution of PI with NRTI or non-NRTIs may represent an effective treatment option. Indeed, treatment failure or viral blip were experienced by 6% and 8% of the patients on simplified therapy, respectively. In addition, sustained suppression of the plasma viral load was significantly correlated with low levels of proviral DNA before treatment simplification. PMID:17516532

  20. Recognizing Endocrinopathies Associated With Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Children With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Samis, Jill; Lee, Paul; Zimmerman, Donald; Arceci, Robert J; Suttorp, Meinolf; Hijiya, Nobuko

    2016-08-01

    Side effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment vary in children and adults with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). As children have a much longer life expectancy than adults, TKI therapy may continue for decades and with long-term consequences that differ from adults. Children may develop endocrinopathies related to "off-target" effects of TKIs, such as delayed growth, changes in bone metabolism, thyroid abnormalities, and effects on puberty and fertility. These endocrinopathies present additional challenges for pediatric patients with CML. This review critically evaluates the literature on long-term endocrine side effects of TKIs in the pediatric CML population and provides suggested recommendations. PMID:27100618

  1. Escalating therapy of cutaneous side effects of EGFR inhibitors: experience of German reference centers.

    PubMed

    Homey, Bernhard; Gerber, Peter Arne; Wollenberg, Andreas; Dirschka, Thomas; Hassel, Jessica C; Bölke, Edwin; Hauschild, Axel; Gutzmer, Ralf

    2012-08-01

    Recommendations for the management of cutaneous adverse effects of inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are urgently needed. In this context an expert panel of German dermatologists recently proposed a 3-step management concept based on personal experience and a current literature consensus. While steps 1 and 2 addressed general and preventive measures, as well as the therapy that can be performed by the primary treating physician, here we address the management of challenging cases (step 3) that do not respond well to basic measures and should be referred to an experienced dermatologist. PMID:22672156

  2. New design of nucleotide excision repair (NER) inhibitors for combination cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Tuszynski, Jack A; Barakat, Khaled H

    2016-04-01

    Many cancer chemotherapy agents act by targeting the DNA of cancer cells, causing substantial damage within their genome and causing them to undergo apoptosis. An effective DNA repair pathway in cancer cells can act in a reverse way by removing these drug-induced DNA lesions, allowing cancer cells to survive, grow and proliferate. In this context, DNA repair inhibitors opened a new avenue in cancer treatment, by blocking the DNA repair mechanisms from removing the chemotherapy-mediated DNA damage. In particular, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) involves more than thirty protein-protein interactions and removes DNA adducts caused by platinum-based chemotherapy. The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1)-xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA) protein (XPA-ERCC1) complex seems to be one of the most promising targets in this pathway. ERCC1 is over expressed in cancer cells and the only known cellular function so far for XPA is to recruit ERCC1 to the damaged point. Here, we build upon our recent advances in identifying inhibitors for this interaction and continue our efforts to rationally design more effective and potent regulators for the NER pathway. We employed in silico drug design techniques to: (1) identify compounds similar to the recently discovered inhibitors, but more effective at inhibiting the XPA-ERCC1 interactions, and (2) identify different scaffolds to develop novel lead compounds. Two known inhibitor structures have been used as starting points for two ligand/structure-hybrid virtual screening approaches. The findings described here form a milestone in discovering novel inhibitors for the NER pathway aiming at improving the efficacy of current platinum-based therapy, by modulating the XPA-ERCC1 interaction. PMID:26939044

  3. ACE to Ulysses Coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2006-12-01

    The EPAM charged particle instrument on ACE is the backup for the HISCALE instrument on Ulysses making the two ideally suited for spatial coherence studies over large heliosphere distances. Fluxes of low-energy ( ~50 - 200 keV) electrons are detected in eight spatial sectors on both spacecraft. A spherical harmonic description of the particle flux as a function of time using only the l=0 and l=1 degree coefficients describes most of the observed flux. Here we concentrate on the three l=1 coefficients for the 60--100 kev electrons.Between the two spacecraft these result in nine coherence estimates that are all typically moderately coherent, but the fact that the different coefficients at each spacecraft are also coherent with each other makes interpretation difficult. To avoid this difficulty we estimated the canonical coherences between the two groups of three series. This, in effect, chooses an optimum coordinate system at each spacecraft and for each frequency and estimates the coherence in this frame. Using one--minute data, we find that the canonical coherences are generally larger at high frequencies (3 mHz and above) than they are at low frequencies. This appears to be generally true and does not depend particularly on time, range, etc. However, if the data segment is chosen too long, say > 30 days with 1--minute sampling, the coherence at high frequencies drops. This may be because the spatial and temporal features of the mode are confounded, or possibly because the solar modes p--modes are known to change frequency with solar activity, so do not appear coherent on long blocks.The coherences are not smooth functions of frequency, but have a bimodal distribution particularly in the 100 μHz to 5 mHz range. Classifying the data at frequencies where the canonical coherences are high in terms of apparent polarization and orientation, we note two major families of modes that appear to be organized by the Parker spiral. The magnetic field data on the two

  4. [Mode of action, clinical profile and relevance of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in glaucoma therapy].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M

    2013-02-01

    Since their introduction the local carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAH) dorzolamide and brinzolamide have become well established in the drug therapy of glaucoma. They lower intraocular pressure (IOP) by blocking specifically carbonic anhydrase in the ciliary epithelium and thereby the secretion of aqueous humor. The IOP lowering effect is comparable with that of beta-blockers, but less than that of prostaglandin agonists. Because of their specific mode of action they produce an additive pressure lowering effect with any other glaucoma drug. Therefore they are ideal for being combined with other drugs. In addition, CAH may improve perfusion of the posterior eye. Preliminary results in glaucoma patients under dorzolamide therapy suggesting a reduction in the risk of progression due to enhanced blood flow need further confirmation. PMID:23430679

  5. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Derzko, C.; Elliott, S.; Lam, W.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cystitis and vaginitis. Not surprisingly, painful intercourse (dyspareunia) and loss of sexual interest (decreased libido) frequently occur as well. Various interventions, both non-hormonal and hormonal, are currently available to manage these problems. The purpose of the present review is to provide the practitioner with a wide array of management options to assist in treating the sexual consequences of aromatase inhibitors. The suggestions in this review are based on recent literature and on the recommendations set forth both by the North American Menopause Association and in the clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Canada. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction necessitates a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management alike, with interventions ranging from education and lifestyle changes to sexual counselling, pelvic floor therapies, sexual aids, medications, and dietary supplements—all of which have been reported to have a variable, but often successful, effect on symptom amelioration. Although the use of specific hormone replacement—most commonly local estrogen, and less commonly, systemic estrogen with or without an androgen, progesterone, or the additional of an androgen in an estrogenized woman (or a combination)—may be highly effective, the concern remains that in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, including those receiving anti-estrogenic adjuvant therapies, the use of these hormones may be

  6. Molecular basis for the actions of Hsp90 inhibitors and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Motowo; Shimotohno, Kumiko W; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2011-09-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor downregulates c-Myc expression and upregulates the expression of tumor repressor proteins such as p53 and pRB, inhibiting the G1/S transition and causing G2/M arrest during cell cycle progression. The cycle progression is extensively controlled by the pRB/E2F signaling pathway. E2F is released from the pRB/E2F complex with the phosphorylation of pRB by cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes. The released E2F promotes the transcription of target genes involved in cell cycle progression. The pRB/E2F signaling pathway is controlled by DNA methyltransferase-1 (Dnmt-1). The elevated expression of Dnmt-1 has been reported in carcinomas of the colon, lung and prostate. A defect of pRB expression in Rb -/- cancer cells is caused by the aberrant methylation of CpG in the Rb promoter. The Hsp90 inhibitor disrupts the Dnmt-1/Hsp90 association and upregulates pRB expression. In this review, the Hsp90 inhibitors that show promise for cancer therapy are summarized. PMID:21811259

  7. Cutaneous adverse effects of targeted therapies: Part I: Inhibitors of the cellular membrane.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, James B; Macdonald, Brooke; Golitz, Loren E; LoRusso, Patricia; Sekulic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-01

    There has been a rapid emergence of numerous targeted agents in the oncology community in the last decade. This exciting paradigm shift in drug development lends promise for the future of individualized medicine. Given the pace of development and clinical deployment of targeted agents with novel mechanisms of action, dermatology providers may not be familiar with the full spectrum of associated skin-related toxicities. Cutaneous adverse effects are among the most frequently observed toxicities with many targeted agents, and their intensity can be dose-limiting or lead to therapy discontinuation. In light of the often life-saving nature of emerging oncotherapeutics, it is critical that dermatologists both understand the mechanisms and recognize clinical signs and symptoms of such toxicities in order to provide effective clinical management. Part I of this continuing medical education article will review in detail the potential skin-related adverse sequelae, the frequency of occurrence, and the implications associated with on- and off-target cutaneous toxicities of inhibitors acting at the cell membrane level, chiefly inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor, KIT, and BCR-ABL, angiogenesis, and multikinase inhibitors. PMID:25592338

  8. Antiinfective therapy with a small molecule inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus sortase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hongchuan; Zhu, Kongkai; Gong, Shouzhe; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Wang, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiafei; Chen, Feifei; Zhang, Ruihan; Zhou, Lu; Lan, Lefu; Jiang, Hualiang; Schneewind, Olaf; Luo, Cheng; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2014-09-16

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most frequent cause of hospital-acquired infection, which manifests as surgical site infections, bacteremia, and sepsis. Due to drug-resistance, prophylaxis of MRSA infection with antibiotics frequently fails or incites nosocomial diseases such as Clostridium difficile infection. Sortase A is a transpeptidase that anchors surface proteins in the envelope of S. aureus, and sortase mutants are unable to cause bacteremia or sepsis in mice. Here we used virtual screening and optimization of inhibitor structure to identify 3-(4-pyridinyl)-6-(2-sodiumsulfonatephenyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazole and related compounds, which block sortase activity in vitro and in vivo. Sortase inhibitors do not affect in vitro staphylococcal growth yet protect mice against lethal S. aureus bacteremia. Thus, sortase inhibitors may be useful as antiinfective therapy to prevent hospital-acquired S. aureus infection in high-risk patients without the side effects of antibiotics. PMID:25197057

  9. Discovery and development of the Polo-like kinase inhibitor volasertib in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gjertsen, B T; Schöffski, P

    2015-01-01

    Owing to their integral involvement in cell cycle regulation, the Polo-like kinase (Plk) family, particularly Plk1, has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target in oncology. In recent years, several Plk1 inhibitors have been developed, with some agents showing encouraging results in early-phase clinical trials. This review focuses on volasertib (BI 6727; an investigational agent), a potent and selective Plk inhibitor. Volasertib has shown promising activity in various cancer cell lines and xenograft models of human cancer. Trials performed to date suggest that volasertib has clinical efficacy in a range of malignancies, with the most promising results seen in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Encouragingly, recent phase II data have demonstrated that volasertib combined with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) was associated with higher response rates and improved event-free survival than LDAC alone in patients with previously untreated AML. Based on these observations, and its presumably manageable safety profile, volasertib is currently in phase III development as a potential treatment for patients with AML who are ineligible for intensive remission induction therapy. Given that many patients with AML are of an older age and frail, this constitutes an area of major unmet need. In this review, we discuss the biologic rationale for Plk1 inhibitors in cancer, the clinical development of volasertib to date in solid tumors and AML, and the future identification of biomarkers that might predict response to volasertib and help determine the role of this agent in the clinic. PMID:25027517

  10. In Silico Discovery of Potential VEGFR-2 Inhibitors from Natural Derivatives for Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Nan; Luo, Kun; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xinru; Wu, Chuanfang; Bao, Jinku

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the growth of new capillaries from existing blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients and provide gateways for immune surveillance. Abnormal vessel growth in term of excessive angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer, inflammatory and eye diseases. VEGFR-2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) dominating the process of angiogenesis has led to approval of therapeutic inhibitors and is becoming a promising target for anti-angiogenic drugs. Notwithstanding these successes, the clinical use of current VEGFR-2 blockers is more challenging than anticipated. Taking axitinib as a reference drug, in our study we found three potent VEGFR-2 inhibitors (ZINC08254217, ZINC08254138, and ZINC03838680) from natural derivatives. Each of the three inhibitors acquired a better grid score than axitinib (−62.11) when docked to VEGFR-2. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that ZINC08254217– and ZINC08254138–VEGFR-2 complexes were more stable than axitinib. Similar to bind free energy for axitinib (−54.68 kcal/mol), such for ZINC03838680, ZINC08254217, and ZINC08254138 was −49.37, −43.32, and −32.73 kcal/mol respectively. These results suggested these three compounds could be candidate drugs against angiogenesis, with comparable VEGFR-2 binding affinity of axitinib. Hence findings in our study are able to provide valuable information on discovery of effective anti-angiogenesis therapy. PMID:25216334

  11. Invention of a novel photodynamic therapy for tumors using a photosensitizing PI3K inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Yushi; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Koichi; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Kato, Takuma; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Araki, Nobukazu

    2016-08-01

    XL147 (SAR245408, pilaralisib), an ATP-competitive pan-class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, is a promising new anticancer drug. We examined the effect of the PI3K inhibitor on PC3 prostate cancer cells under a fluorescence microscope and found that XL147-treated cancer cells are rapidly injured by blue wavelength (430 nm) light irradiation. During the irradiation, the cancer cells treated with 0.2-2 μM XL147 showed cell surface blebbing and cytoplasmic vacuolation and died within 15 min. The extent of cell injury/death was dependent on the dose of XL147 and the light power of the irradiation. These findings suggest that XL147 might act as a photosensitizing reagent in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer. Moreover, the cytotoxic effect of photosensitized XL147 was reduced by pretreatment with other ATP-competitive PI3K inhibitors such as LY294002, suggesting that the cytotoxic effect of photosensitized XL147 is facilitated by binding to PI3K in cells. In a single-cell illumination analysis using a fluorescent probe to identify reactive oxygen species (ROS), significantly increased ROS production was observed in the XL147-treated cells when the cell was illuminated with blue light. Taken together, it is conceivable that XL147, which is preferentially accumulated in cancer cells, could be photosensitized by blue light to produce ROS to kill cancer cells. This study will open up new possibilities for PDT using anticancer drugs. PMID:26989815

  12. A stonemason with accelerated silicosis in the setting of tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Baird, Timothy; Putt, Michael; Dettrick, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    We present the case of a 26-year-old stonemason with accelerated silicosis in the setting of treatment for psoriasis with the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitor adalimumab. Accelerated silicosis is an important occupational lung disease with a poor prognosis and limited treatment options [1]. Although the exact pathogenesis remains unknown, it is suggested that secretion of cytokines, including TNF-alpha, plays a central role in disease progression [1,2]. Importantly, however, TNF-alpha inhibitors, in addition to resulting in an increased risk of infection, are also now being seen to cause interstitial lung disease [3,4]. To our knowledge, this is the first documented patient to develop silicosis whilst on TNF-alpha inhibitor therapy. This case challenges the theory behind TNF-alpha's exact role in the pathogenesis of silicosis and lung fibrosis, highlights the importance of monitoring individuals with both occupational and drug exposures, and illustrates the increasing difficulties physicians face in investigating patients with pulmonary infiltrates and multiple possible aetiologies. PMID:27516887

  13. Anti-TNF-refractory colitis after checkpoint inhibitor therapy: Possible role of CMV-mediated immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lankes, Katharina; Hundorfean, Gheorghe; Harrer, Thomas; Pommer, Ansgar J; Agaimy, Abbas; Angelovska, Irena; Tajmir-Riahi, Azadeh; Göhl, Jonas; Schuler, Gerold; Neurath, Markus F; Hohenberger, Werner; Heinzerling, Lucie

    2016-06-01

    Immune-related adverse events (irAEs) induced by checkpoint inhibitors are well known. Since fatal outcomes have been reported early detection and adequate management are crucial. In particular, colitis is frequently observed and can result in intestinal perforation. This is the first report of an autoimmune colitis that was treated according to algorithms but became resistant due to a CMV reactivation. The 32-y-old male patient with metastatic melanoma treated within an anti-PD-1/ipilimumab combination study developed severe immune-mediated colitis (CTCAE grade 3) with up to 18 watery stools per day starting 2 weeks after treatment initiation. After improving upon therapy with immunosuppressive treatment (high dose steroids and infliximab) combined with parenteral nutrition diarrhea again exacerbated. Additionally, the patient had asymptomatic grade 3 CTCAE amylase and lipase elevation. Colitis was monitored by weekly endoscopies and colon biopsies were analyzed histologically with CMV staining, multi-epitope ligand cartography (MELC) and qRT-PCR for inflammatory genes. In the course, CMV reactivation was detected in the colon and treated with antiviral medication in parallel to a reduction of corticosteroids. Subsequently, symptoms improved. The patient showed a complete response for 2 y now including regression of bone metastases. CMV reactivation under checkpoint inhibitor therapy in combination with immunosuppressive treatment for autoimmune side effects has to be considered in these patients and if present treated. Potentially, CMV reactivation is underdiagnosed. Treatment algorithms should include CMV diagnostics. PMID:27471608

  14. Proton-pump inhibitors in patients requiring antiplatelet therapy: new FDA labeling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David A; Chilton, Robert; Liker, Harley R

    2014-05-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are recommended for patients who require antiplatelet therapy and have a history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Proton-pump inhibitors should also be considered for patients receiving antiplatelet therapy who have other risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding, including use of aspirin. Thus, evidence of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between PPIs and consequent impaired effectiveness of the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel has caused concern. Here, we discuss comparative studies suggesting that the extent to which a PPI reduces exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel and attenuates its antithrombotic effect differs among PPIs. Although a clinically meaningful effect of the interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel on cardiovascular outcomes has not been established, these studies provided the basis for recent changes in US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeling for several PPIs and clopidogrel. New labeling suggests that PPI use among patients taking clopidogrel be limited to pantoprazole, rabeprazole, lansoprazole, or dexlansoprazole. Because comparative studies indicate that omeprazole and esomeprazole have a greater effect on the CYP2C19-mediated conversion of clopidogrel to its active metabolite and, consequently, clopidogrel's effect on platelet reactivity, FDA labeling recommends avoiding omeprazole and esomeprazole in patients taking clopidogrel. Even a 12-hour separation of dosing does not appear to prevent drug interactions between omeprazole and clopidogrel. PMID:24918808

  15. Targeting DDX3 with a small molecule inhibitor for lung cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bol, Guus M; Vesuna, Farhad; Xie, Min; Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Gandhi, Nishant; Levine, Anne; Irving, Ashley; Korz, Dorian; Tantravedi, Saritha; Heerma van Voss, Marise R; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Bordt, Evan A; Polster, Brian M; Cope, Leslie; van der Groep, Petra; Kondaskar, Atul; Rudek, Michelle A; Hosmane, Ramachandra S; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Tran, Phuoc T; Raman, Venu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and is a focus for developing targeted therapies due to its refractory nature to current treatment. We identified a RNA helicase, DDX3, which is overexpressed in many cancer types including lung cancer and is associated with lower survival in lung cancer patients. We designed a first-in-class small molecule inhibitor, RK-33, which binds to DDX3 and abrogates its activity. Inhibition of DDX3 by RK-33 caused G1 cell cycle arrest, induced apoptosis, and promoted radiation sensitization in DDX3-overexpressing cells. Importantly, RK-33 in combination with radiation induced tumor regression in multiple mouse models of lung cancer. Mechanistically, loss of DDX3 function either by shRNA or by RK-33 impaired Wnt signaling through disruption of the DDX3–β-catenin axis and inhibited non-homologous end joining—the major DNA repair pathway in mammalian somatic cells. Overall, inhibition of DDX3 by RK-33 promotes tumor regression, thus providing a compelling argument to develop DDX3 inhibitors for lung cancer therapy. PMID:25820276

  16. The calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus as a new therapy in severe cherubism.

    PubMed

    Kadlub, Natacha; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Galmiche, Louise; L'Herminé, Aurore Coulomb; Dainese, Linda; Ulinski, Tim; Fauroux, Brigitte; Pavlov, Ioana; Badoual, Cécile; Marlin, Sandrine; Deckert, Marcel; Leboulanger, Nicolas; Berdal, Ariane; Descroix, Vianney; Picard, Arnaud; Coudert, Amélie E

    2015-05-01

    Cherubism is a rare genetic disorder characterized by extensive growth of a bilateral granuloma of the jaws, resulting in facial disfigurement. Cherubism is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the SH3BP2 gene, leading to overactivation of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1)-dependent osteoclastogenesis. Recent findings in human and mouse cherubism have suggested that calcineurin inhibitors might be drug candidates in cherubism medical treatment. A 4-year-old boy with aggressive cherubism was treated with the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus for 1 year, and clinical, radiological, and molecular data were obtained. Immunohistologic analysis was performed to compare preoperative and postoperative NFATc1 staining and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Real-time PCR was performed to analyze the relative expression levels of OPG and RANKL. After tacrolimus therapy, the patient showed significant clinical improvement, including stabilization of jaw size and intraosseous osteogenesis. Immunohistologic analyses on granuloma showed that tacrolimus caused a significant reduction in the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and NFATc1 nuclear staining in multinucleated giant cells. Molecular analysis showed that tacrolimus treatment also resulted in increased OPG expression. We present the first case of effective medical therapy in cherubism. Tacrolimus enhanced bone formation by stimulating osteogenesis and inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25491283

  17. Personalized antiplatelet therapy with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors: benefits and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Max-Paul; Koziński, Marek; Kubica, Jacek; Aradi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors has become the cornerstone of medical treatment in patients with acute coronary syndrome, after percutaneous coronary intervention and in secondary prevention of atherothrombotic events. Clopidogrel used to be the most broadly prescribed P2Y12 receptor inhibitor with undisputable benefits especially in combination with aspirin, but a considerable number of clopidogrel-treated patients experience adverse thrombotic events in whom insufficient P2Y12-inhibition and a consequential high on-treatment platelet reactivity is a common finding. This clinically relevant limitation of clopidogrel has driven the increased use of new antiplatelet agents. Prasugrel (a third generation thienopyridine) and ticagrelor (a cyclopentyl-triazolo-pyrimidine) feature more potent and predictable P2Y12-inhibition compared to clopidogrel, which translates into improved ischemic outcomes. However, excessive platelet inhibition and consequential low on-treatment platelet reactivity comes at the price of increased risk of major bleeding. The majority of randomized clinical trials failed to demonstrate improved clinical outcomes with platelet function testing and tailored antiplatelet therapy, but results of all recent trials of potent antiplatelets and prolonged antiplatelet durations point towards a need for individualized antiplatelet approach in order to decrease thrombotic events without increasing bleeding. This review focuses on potential strategies for personalizing antiplatelet treatment. PMID:26677375

  18. Impact of disease states on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Jaclyn M; Dasta, Joseph F; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Schentag, Jerome J

    2006-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE) in elderly patients and patients with renal and hepatic impairment were examined, and a role for an AUC/EC50 ratio to guide dosing was evaluated. A Medline and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts search was used to identify human studies and abstracts. Relevant data were evaluated and summarized. Dosing regimens were compared using an AUC/EC50 ratio. Most studies evaluating ACE inhibitors in renal impairment report a strong linear correlation between creatine clearance and drug elimination. AUC and EC50 values for these drugs in elderly subjects appear similar to younger and hypertensive patients. There is increased AUC in some patients with hepatic impairment. Pharmacodynamic data are conflicting. Prolonged ACE inhibition is evident in renal impairment but not necessarily other disease states. ACE inhibitor dosing for hypertension is reasonable based on pharmacokinetics and EC50 values. Further individualization of therapy may improve outcomes, and using the threshold AUC/EC50 ratio may help guide appropriate dosing. PMID:16920891

  19. Photodynamic therapy for inactivating endodontic bacterial biofilms and effect of tissue inhibitors on antibacterial efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Annie; Kishen, Anil

    Complex nature of bacterial cell membrane and structure of biofilm has challenged the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) to achieve effective disinfection of infected root canals. In addition, tissue-inhibitors present inside the root canals are known to affect APDT activity. This study was aimed to assess the effect of APDT on bacterial biofilms and evaluate the effect of tissue-inhibitors on the APDT. Rose-bengal (RB) and methylene-blue (MB) were tested on Enterococcus faecalis (gram-positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (gram-negative) biofilms. In vitro 7- day old biofilms were sensitized with RB and MB, and photodynamically activated with 20-60 J/cm2. Photosensitizers were pre-treated with different tissue-inhibitors (dentin, dentin-matrix, pulp tissue, bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and tested for antibacterial effect of APDT. Microbiological culture based analysis was used to analyze the cell viability, while Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) was used to examine the structure of biofilm. Photoactivation resulted in significant reduction of bacterial biofilms with RB and MB. The structure of biofilm under LSCM was found to be disrupted with reduced biofilm thickness. Complete biofilm elimination could not be achieved with both tested photosensitizers. APDT effect using MB and RB was inhibited in a decreasing order by dentin-matrix, BSA, pulp, dentin and LPS (P< 0.05). Both strains of bacterial biofilms resisted complete elimination after APDT and the tissue inhibitors existing within the root canal reduced the antibacterial activity at varying degrees. Further research is required to enhance the antibacterial efficacy of APDT in an endodontic environment.

  20. Akt inhibitors as an HIV-1 infected macrophage-specific anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Pauline; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Monteiro-Filho, Carlos MR; Planelles, Vicente; Maggirwar, Sanjay B; Dewhurst, Stephen; Kim, Baek

    2008-01-01

    Background Unlike CD4+ T cells, HIV-1 infected macrophages exhibit extended life span even upon stress, consistent with their in vivo role as long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs. Results Here, we demonstrate that PI3K/Akt inhibitors, including clinically available Miltefosine, dramatically reduced HIV-1 production from long-living virus-infected macrophages. These PI3K/Akt inhibitors hyper-sensitize infected macrophages to extracellular stresses that they are normally exposed to, and eventually lead to cell death of infected macrophages without harming uninfected cells. Based on the data from these Akt inhibitors, we were able to further investigate how HIV-1 infection utilizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to establish the cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 infection, which extends the lifespan of infected macrophages, a key viral reservoir. First, we found that HIV-1 infection activates the well characterized pro-survival PI3K/Akt pathway in primary human macrophages, as reflected by decreased PTEN protein expression and increased Akt kinase activity. Interestingly, the expression of HIV-1 or SIV Tat is sufficient to mediate this cytoprotective effect, which is dependent on the basic domain of Tat – a region that has previously been shown to bind p53. Next, we observed that this interaction appears to contribute to the downregulation of PTEN expression, since HIV-1 Tat was found to compete with PTEN for p53 binding; this is known to result in p53 destabilization, with a consequent reduction in PTEN protein production. Conclusion Since HIV-1 infected macrophages display highly elevated Akt activity, our results collectively show that PI3K/Akt inhibitors may be a novel therapy for interfering with the establishment of long-living HIV-1 infected reservoirs. PMID:18237430

  1. Interaction of acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521 with tumor response to photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Zhang, Wei; Saw, Kyi Min; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Bielawska, Alicja; Separovic, Duska

    2016-09-15

    Acid ceramidase has been identified as a promising target for cancer therapy. One of its most effective inhibitors, LCL521, was examined as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy (PDT) using mouse squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII model of head and neck cancer. Lethal effects of PDT, assessed by colony forming ability of in vitro treated SCCVII cells, were greatly enhanced when combined with 10 µM LCL521 treatment particularly when preceding PDT. When PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used to vaccinate SCCVII tumor-bearing mice (PDT vaccine protocol), adjuvant LCL521 treatment (75 mg/kg) resulted in a marked retardation of tumor growth. This effect can be attributed to the capacity of LCL521 to effectively restrict the activity of two main immunoregulatory cell populations (Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, MDSCs) that are known to hinder the efficacy of PDT vaccines. The therapeutic benefit with adjuvant LCL521 was also achieved with SCCVII tumors treated with standard PDT when using immunocompetent mice but not with immunodeficient hosts. The interaction of LCL521 with PDT-based antitumor mechanisms is dominated by immune system contribution that includes overriding the effects of immunoregulatory cells, but could also include a tacit contribution from boosting direct tumor cell kill. PMID:27136745

  2. Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (Tki) as Salvage Therapy for Resistant or Intolerant Patients to Prior TKIs.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of target therapies, imatinib became the mainstay for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, despite the brilliant results obtained with this drug, more than 30% of patients discontinue therapy in long-term due to several reasons, including failure and/or intolerance. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are more potent drugs and have expanded inhibition against a broad spectrum of mutations resistant to imatinib. Both nilotinib and dasatinib have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo clinical activity against different types of mutations and various forms of resistance. However, patients with T315I mutation do not obtain an advantage from these drugs and a third generation inhibitor ponatinib, a pan-BCR drug, was tested with significant results. In this review, we report the results of second-and third-generation TKIs tested as second or third line therapy in patients resistant and/or intolerant to previous inhibitors. PMID:24455112

  3. Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (Tki) as Salvage Therapy for Resistant or Intolerant Patients to Prior TKIs

    PubMed Central

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of target therapies, imatinib became the mainstay for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. However, despite the brilliant results obtained with this drug, more than 30% of patients discontinue therapy in long-term due to several reasons, including failure and/or intolerance. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are more potent drugs and have expanded inhibition against a broad spectrum of mutations resistant to imatinib. Both nilotinib and dasatinib have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo clinical activity against different types of mutations and various forms of resistance. However, patients with T315I mutation do not obtain an advantage from these drugs and a third generation inhibitor ponatinib, a pan-BCR drug, was tested with significant results. In this review, we report the results of second-and third-generation TKIs tested as second or third line therapy in patients resistant and/or intolerant to previous inhibitors. PMID:24455112

  4. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitor pracinostat in doublet therapy: a unique strategy to improve therapeutic efficacy and to tackle herculean cancer chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Context Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising results in neurodegeneration and cancer. Hydroxamate HDACi, including vorinostat, have shown encouraging results in haematological malignancies, but the poor pharmacokinetic of these inhibitors leads to insufficient tumour concentration limiting their application against solid malignancies. Objective This article deals with novel HDAC inhibitor pracinostat (SB939) and delineates its therapeutic role in solid and haematological malignancies. The article provides rigorous details about the underlying molecular mechanisms modulated by pracinostat to exert cytotoxic effect. The article further highlights the doublet therapy that may be used to tackle monotonous cancer chemoresistance. Methods Both old and the latest literature on pracinostat was retrieved from diverse sources, such as PubMed, Science Direct, Springer Link, general Google search using both pracinostat and SB939 keywords in various ways: after thorough evaluation the topic which can fulfil the current gap was chosen. Results Pracinostat shows potent anticancer activity against both solid and haematological malignancies compared to the FDA-approved drug vorinostat. This marvellous inhibitor has better physicochemical, pharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic properties than the defined inhibitor vorinostat. Pracinostat has  >100-fold more affinity towards HDACs compared to other zinc-dependent metalloenzymes and shows maximum efficacy when used in doublet therapy. Conclusion Pracinostat shows potent anticancer activity even against therapeutically challenging cancers when used in doublet therapy. However, the triplet combination studies of the defined inhibitor that may prove even more beneficial are still undone, emphasizing the desperate need of further research in the defined gap. PMID:26853619

  6. Aromatase inhibitor plus ovarian suppression as adjuvant therapy in premenopausal women with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Figg, William D; Cook, Katherine; Clarke, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The goal of adjuvant hormonal therapy for breast cancer is to prevent recurrence by eradicating micrometastatic disease. Recent studies have shown that the use of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) as adjuvant therapy improves outcomes for postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer compared to adjuvant endocrine therapy with tamoxifen alone. The research question has been raised whether AIs would have similar improvements in disease-free survival (DFS) in premenopausal women with ER-positive breast cancer. Combining 2 phase 3 clinical trials (n = 4,690), Pagani and colleagues randomized premenopausal women with ER-positive early breast cancer to exemestane plus ovarian suppression or tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression for a period of 5 y. After a median follow-up of 68 months, DFS was 91.1% in the AI group and 87.3% in the tamoxifen group. In premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, adjuvant treatment with exemestane plus ovarian suppression, as compared with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, significantly reduced recurrence. PMID:25535893

  7. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer in the era of aromatase inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Mokbel, Ramia; Karat, Isabella; Mokbel, Kefah

    2006-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that optimal adjuvant endocrine therapy for hormone sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women should include a third generation aromatase inhibitor (AI). On current evidence, adjuvant anstrozole or letrozole should be used upfront in such patients especially in those with high risk disease (node positive and/or tumours > 2 cm). The sequential approach of tamoxifen for 2-3 years followed by exemestane or anastrozole for 2-3 years is a reasonable alternative to 5 years of AI monotherapy in patients with low risk disease (node negative and tumour smaller than 2 cm) especially if the tumour is positive for estrogen and progesterone receptors.Node-positive patients completing 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen should be offered letrozole for up 48 months. Further research is required to establish the long-term cardiovascular safety of AIs especially that of letrozole and exmestane, the optimal AI to use, duration of AI therapy and whether monotherapy with an AI for 5 years is superior to sequencing an AI after 2-3 years of tamoxifen. The bone mineral density (BMD) should be measured at baseline and monitored during therapy in women being treated with AIs. Anti-osteoporosis agents should such as bisphosphonates should be considered in patients at high risk of bone fractures. PMID:16981992

  8. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S.; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R.; Martin, Ina V.; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  9. Combination of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and laser therapy for diabetic macular oedema: a review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hemal; Gillies, Mark C; Fraser-Bell, Samantha

    2016-05-01

    This review provides a perspective on published and ongoing clinical trials of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (anti-VEGF agents) combined with laser therapy for diabetic macular oedema (DMO). Although there was little short-term benefit in combining prompt macular laser with anti-VEGF therapy for centre-involving DMO in the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCRnet) Protocol I study, deferred macular laser was still required in over 40% of study eyes in DRCRnet Protocol T. Macular laser was applied in more than 30% of eyes with centre-involving DMO receiving ranibizumab in the RISE and RIDE studies. For non centre-involving DMO the evidence-base still supports use of focal macular laser alone, although clinicians should be cautious about applying laser too close to the foveal avascular zone with the availability of pharmacotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing whether selectively targeting areas of peripheral retinal ischaemia with laser reduces the number of anti-VEGF injections to stabilise DMO and whether combining macular micropulse laser with anti-VEGF therapy is beneficial in DMO. PMID:27061760

  10. A Mathematical Model of Prostate Tumor Growth Under Hormone Therapy with Mutation Inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-04-01

    This paper extends Jackson’s model describing the growth of a prostate tumor with hormone therapy to a new one with hypothetical mutation inhibitors. The new model not only considers the mutation by which androgen-dependent (AD) tumor cells mutate into androgen-independent (AI) ones but also introduces inhibition which is assumed to change the mutation rate. The tumor consists of two types of cells (AD and AI) whose proliferation and apoptosis rates are functions of androgen concentration. The mathematical model represents a free-boundary problem for a nonlinear system of parabolic equations, which describe the evolution of the populations of the above two types of tumor cells. The tumor surface is a free boundary, whose velocity is equal to the cell’s velocity there. Global existence and uniqueness of solutions of this model is proved. Furthermore, explicit formulae of tumor volume at any time t are found in androgen-deprived environment under the assumption of radial symmetry, and therefore the dynamics of tumor growth under androgen-deprived therapy could be predicted by these formulae. Qualitative analysis and numerical simulation show that controlling the mutation may improve the effect of hormone therapy or delay a tumor relapse.

  11. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R; Martin, Ina V; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  12. Effect of chronic treatment with the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE 7688 and ramipril on endothelial function in atherogenic diet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Weckler, Nadine; Leitzbach, Daniela; Kalinowski, Leszek; Malinski, Tadeusz; Busch, Andreas E; Linz, Wolfgang; Kalinowski, Ludmila

    2003-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in Western nations, although improved possibilities regarding diagnosis and therapy now exist. Endothelial dysfunction is triggered by cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, adiposity and smoking, contributing to the common endpoint of atherosclerosis. This study examined the pharmacological effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and combined ACE-neutral endopeptidase (NEP) (vasopeptidase) inhibitors on endothelial dysfunction in the model of hyperlipidaemic rabbits. The focus of the study was to assess endothelial function after treatment with the ACE-NEP inhibitor AVE 7688 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison to the ACE inhibitor (ACE-I) ramipril (1 mg/kg/day). Different parameters, such as endothelial function, blood pressure (BP), expansion of plaques, endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2-) release and plasma levels of various lipidaemic parameters were analysed. Control groups consisted of one group fed only with normal diet, one group fed only with atherogenic diet and the direct control group fed with varied diets (six weeks atherogenic diet followed by 12 weeks normal diet). Since for the treatment of atherosclerosis, a change in feeding is absolutely necessary, in the present study, at the start of the treatments with AVE 7688 and ramipril, the rabbits food was changed to a normal diet. At the end of the study, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was measured in the anaesthetised animals. The values in standard, atherogenic and varied diet-fed rabbits were around 73 2 mmHg. Angiotensin I (Ang I) given intravenous (i.v.) induced a strong increase in MAP of about 20%. In both the treated groups Ang I-induced BP increase was inhibited. In contrast, i.v. bradykinin led to a strong reduction in MAP in both the treated groups of around 50%. Six weeks feeding with an atherogenic diet in the rabbits induced an enduring endothelial dysfunction despite the food

  13. Severe acute interstitial nephritis after combination immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoka; Borges, Thiago J; Yamashita, Michifumi; Riella, Leonardo V

    2016-06-01

    Immune-checkpoint inhibitors are emerging as revolutionary drugs for certain malignancies. However, blocking the co-inhibitory signals may lead to immune-related adverse events, mainly in the spectrum of autoimmune diseases including colitis, endocrinopathies and nephritis. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old man with metastatic malignant melanoma treated with a combination of nivolumab (anti-PD1-antibody) and ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody) who developed systemic rash along with severe acute tubulointerstitial nephritis after two doses of combination therapy. Kidney biopsy and peripheral blood immune profile revealed highly proliferative and cytotoxic T cell features. Herein, we discuss the pathophysiology and management of immune checkpoint blockade-related adverse events. PMID:27274826

  14. Angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor LCZ696: a novel targeted therapy for arterial hypertension?

    PubMed

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Skalis, Georgios; Pavlidis, Antonis N; Makris, Thomas; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2015-10-01

    The need for novel antihypertensive therapies represents a continuous challenge. LCZ696 is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor that has been shown to enhance endogenous natriuretic peptide (NP) actions on neurohormonal activation. This effect seems to be additive to that of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) suppression, as impressively suggested in the PARADIGM HF study. LCZ696 has been shown to be effective in reducing blood pressure in several small studies; however, its effectiveness and safety remain to be proved in larger studies. This review summarizes the role of RAAS and NP system in the pathophysiology of hypertension and reviews the current data on the antihypertensive effects of LCZ696. PMID:27532450

  15. Severe acute interstitial nephritis after combination immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Naoka; Borges, Thiago J.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Riella, Leonardo V.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-checkpoint inhibitors are emerging as revolutionary drugs for certain malignancies. However, blocking the co-inhibitory signals may lead to immune-related adverse events, mainly in the spectrum of autoimmune diseases including colitis, endocrinopathies and nephritis. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old man with metastatic malignant melanoma treated with a combination of nivolumab (anti-PD1-antibody) and ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody) who developed systemic rash along with severe acute tubulointerstitial nephritis after two doses of combination therapy. Kidney biopsy and peripheral blood immune profile revealed highly proliferative and cytotoxic T cell features. Herein, we discuss the pathophysiology and management of immune checkpoint blockade-related adverse events. PMID:27274826

  16. Glycolytic inhibitors 2-deoxyglucose and 3-bromopyruvate synergize with photodynamic therapy respectively to inhibit cell migration.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolan; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong; Zhang, Ting; Mai, Bingjie; Wang, Xiaobing

    2015-06-01

    Most cancer cells have the specially increased glycolytic phenotype, which makes this pathway become an attractive therapeutic target. Although glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) has been demonstrated to potentiate the cytotoxicity of photodynamic therapy (PDT), the impacts on cell migration after the combined treatment has never been reported yet. The present study aimed to analyze the influence of glycolytic inhibitors 2-DG and 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) combined with Ce6-PDT on cell motility of Triple Negative Breast Cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. As determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium-bromide-Tetraz-olium (MTT) assay, more decreased cell viability was observed in 2-DG + PDT and 3-BP + PDT groups when compared with either monotherapy. Under optimal conditions, synergistic potentiation on cell membrane destruction and the decline of cell adhesion and cells migratory ability were observed in both 2-DG + PDT and 3-BP + PDT by electron microscope observation (SEM), wound healing and trans-well assays. Besides, serious microfilament network collapses as well as impairment of matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were notably improved after the combined treatments by immunofluorescent staining. These results suggest that 2-DG and 3-BP can both significantly potentiated Ce6-PDT efficacy of cell migration inhibition. PMID:25631472

  17. Targeting histone methylation for cancer therapy: enzymes, inhibitors, biological activity and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongcheng; Wu, Fangrui; Wu, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational methylation of histone lysine or arginine residues plays important roles in gene regulation and other physiological processes. Aberrant histone methylation caused by a gene mutation, translocation, or overexpression can often lead to initiation of a disease such as cancer. Small molecule inhibitors of such histone modifying enzymes that correct the abnormal methylation could be used as novel therapeutics for these diseases, or as chemical probes for investigation of epigenetics. Discovery and development of histone methylation modulators are in an early stage and undergo a rapid expansion in the past few years. A number of highly potent and selective compounds have been reported, together with extensive preclinical studies of their biological activity. Several compounds have been in clinical trials for safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy, targeting several types of cancer. This review summarizes the biochemistry, structures, and biology of cancer-relevant histone methylation modifying enzymes, small molecule inhibitors and their preclinical and clinical antitumor activities. Perspectives for targeting histone methylation for cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:27316347

  18. Myeloproliferative neoplasms: From JAK2 mutations discovery to JAK2 inhibitor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Passamonti, Francesco; Maffioli, Margherita; Caramazza, Domenica; Cazzola, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Most BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) carry an activating JAK2 mutation. Approximately 96% of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) harbors the V617F mutation in JAK2 exon 14, whereas the minority of JAK2 (V617F)-negative subjects shows several mutations in exon 12. Other mutation events as MPL, TET2, LNK, EZH2 have been described in chronic phase, while NF1, IDH1, IDH2, ASX1, CBL and Ikaros in blast phase of MPN. The specific pathogenic implication of these mutations is under investigation, but they may have a role in refinement of diagnostic criteria and in development of new prognostic models. Several trials with targeted therapy (JAK inhibitors) are ongoing mostly involving patients with PMF, post-PV MF and post-essential thrombocythemia (ET) MF. Treatment with ruxolitinib and TG101348 has shown clinically significant benefits, particularly in improvement of splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms in MF patients. On the other hand, JAK inhibitors have not thus far shown disease-modifying activity therefore any other deduction on these new drugs seems premature. PMID:21646683

  19. Switching from Nitrate Therapy to Ranolazine in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Receiving Phosphodiesterase Type-5 Inhibitors for Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Udeoji, Dioma U; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and erectile dysfunction (ED) frequently coexist. The introduction of phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors has revolutionized medical management of organic ED; however, in patients with angina pectoris, a common symptom of CAD, coadministration of PDE-5 inhibitors and nitrates has been implicated in CAD-related deaths following sexual activity. The mechanism of action of PDE-5 inhibitors results in a potential cumulative drop in blood pressure (BP); thus, these agents are contraindicated in patients receiving nitrates. Beta-blockers and calcium channel antagonists are considered the mainstays of antianginal therapy, but may not be tolerated by all patients. Ranolazine is an antianginal agent that produces minimal reductions in heart rate and BP. Here we report three cases of men with CAD, chronic angina, and concomitant ED. We describe our treatment approach in these patients, using ranolazine as a potential substitute to nitrate therapy. PMID:25452706

  20. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  1. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Ph+ Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Therapy: a Review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Parikh, Sonia; Rawal, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative hematopoietic stem cell disorder. Deregulated BCRABL fusion tyrosine kinase activity is the main cause of CML disease pathogenesis, making BCRABL an ideal target for inhibition. Current tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) designed to inhibit BCRABL oncoprotein activity, have completely transformed the prognosis of CML. Interruption of TKI treatment leads to minimal residual disease reside (MRD), thought to reside in TKIinsensitive leukaemia stem cells which remain a potential reservoir for disease relapse. This highlights the need to develop new therapeutic strategies for CML either as small molecule master TKIs or phytopharmaceuticals derived from nature to achieve chronic molecular remission. This review outlines the past, present and future therapeutic approaches for CML including coverage of relevant mechanisms, whether ABL dependent or independent, and epigenetic factors responsible for developing resistance against TKIs. Appearance of mutant clones along the course of therapy either preexisting or induced due to therapy is still a challenge for the clinician. A proposed invitro model of generating colony forming units from CML stem cells derived from diagnostic samples seems to be achievable in the era of high throughput technology which can take care of single cell genomic profiling. PMID:27509925

  2. An update on integrase inhibitors: new opportunities for a personalized therapy? The NEXTaim Project.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, Massimo; Marcotullio, Simone; Puro, Vincenzo; De Carli, Gabriella; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Nozza, Silvia; Gori, Andrea; Rusconi, Stefano; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Clementi, Massimo; Perno, Carlo Federico; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Castagna, Antonella; De Luca, Andrea; Galli, Massimo; Giacomelli, Andrea; Borderi, Marco; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Calcagno, Andrea; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano; Mussini, Cristina; Di Biagio, Antonio; Puoti, Massimo; Bruno, Raffaele; Zuccaro, Valentina; Antinori, Andrea; Cinque, Paola; Croce, Davide; Restelli, Umberto; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the development of antiretroviral agents to control HIV replication, HIV infection has turned from a fatal disease into a treatable chronic infection. The present work collects the opinions of several experts on the efficacy and safety of recently approved second generation of integrase inhibitors and, in particular, on the role of this new class of drugs in antiretroviral therapy. The availability of new therapeutic options represents an opportunity to ameliorate the efficacy of cART in controlling HIV replication also within viral reservoirs. The personalization of the treatment driven mainly by the management of comorbidities, HIV-HCV co-infections and aging, will be easier with antiretroviral drugs without drug-drug interactions and with a better toxicity and tolerability profile. Future assessment of economic impact for the introduction of new innovative drugs in the field of antiretroviral therapy will likely need some degree of adjustment of the evaluation criteria of costs and benefit which are currently based almost exclusively on morbidity and mortality. PMID:26571377

  3. Development of inhibitor-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (IDEPT) for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stacy E; Ganguly, Tanushree; Munske, Gerhard R; Fulton, Melody D; Hopkins, Mark R; Berkman, Clifford E; Black, Margaret E

    2014-10-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common cause of cancer death among American men after lung cancer. Unfortunately, current therapies do not provide effective treatments for patients with advanced, metastatic, or hormone refractory disease. Therefore, we seek to generate therapeutic agents for a novel PCa treatment strategy by delivering a suicide enzyme (yCDtriple) to a cell membrane bound biomarker found on PCa cells (prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)). This approach has resulted in a new PCa treatment strategy reported here as inhibitor-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (IDEPT). The therapeutic agents described were generated using a click chemistry reaction between the unnatural amino acid (p-azidophenylalanine (pAzF)) incorporated into yCDtriple and the dibenzylcyclooctyne moiety of our PSMA targeting agent (DBCO-PEG4-AH2-TG97). After characterization of the therapeutic agents, we demonstrate significant PCa cell killing of PSMA-positive cells. Importantly, we demonstrate that this click chemistry approach can be used to efficiently couple a therapeutic protein to a targeting agent and may be applicable to the ablation of other types of cancers and/or malignancies. PMID:25157916

  4. CNS-accessible Inhibitor of Glucosylceramide Synthase for Substrate Reduction Therapy of Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, John; Sun, Ying; Bangari, Dinesh S; Budman, Eva; Park, Hyejung; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Allaire, Amy; Cromwell, Mary A; Wang, Bing; Grabowski, Gregory A; Leonard, John P; Cheng, Seng H

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase and the consequent lysosomal accumulation of unmetabolized glycolipid substrates. Enzyme-replacement therapy adequately manages the visceral manifestations of nonneuronopathic type-1 Gaucher patients, but not the brain disease in neuronopathic types 2 and 3 GD. Substrate reduction therapy through inhibition of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) has also been shown to effectively treat the visceral disease. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel small molecule inhibitor of GCS with central nervous system (CNS) access (Genz-682452) to treat the brain disease. Treatment of the conduritol β epoxide-induced mouse model of neuronopathic GD with Genz-682452 reduced the accumulation of liver and brain glycolipids (>70% and >20% respectively), extent of gliosis, and severity of ataxia. In the genetic 4L;C* mouse model, Genz-682452 reduced the levels of substrate in the brain by >40%, the extent of gliosis, and paresis. Importantly, Genz-682452-treated 4L;C* mice also exhibited an ~30% increase in lifespan. Together, these data indicate that an orally available antagonist of GCS that has CNS access is effective at attenuating several of the neuropathologic and behavioral manifestations associated with mouse models of neuronopathic GD. Therefore, Genz-682452 holds promise as a potential therapeutic approach for patients with type-3 GD. PMID:26948439

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy and fetal risk: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Marchioni, Renée M; Lichtenstein, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (anti-TNFs) are effective in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) recalcitrant to conventional medical therapy. As the peak incidence of IBD overlaps with the prime reproductive years, it is crucial to establish pharmacologic regimens for women of childbearing age that achieve effective disease control without posing significant fetal harm. A systematic literature review was performed to identify all human studies with birth outcomes data after maternal exposure to infliximab, adalimumab, or certolizumab pegol within 3 mo of conception or during any trimester of pregnancy. Live births, spontaneous abortions or stillbirths, preterm or premature births, low birth weight or small for gestational age infants, and congenital abnormalities were recorded. Fifty selected references identified 472 pregnancy exposures. The subsequent review includes general information regarding anti-TNF therapy in pregnancy followed by a summary of our findings. The benefits of biologic modalities in optimizing disease control during pregnancy must be weighed against the potential toxicity of drug exposure on the developing fetus. Although promising overall, there is insufficient evidence to prove absolute safety for use of anti-TNFs during pregnancy given the limitations of available data and lack of controlled trials. PMID:23674866

  6. HIF inhibitors for ischemic retinopathies and cancers: options beyond anti-VEGF therapies.

    PubMed

    Subhani, Saima; Vavilala, Divya Teja; Mukherji, Mridul

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway causing overexpression of angiogenic genes, like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is one of the underlying causes of ocular neovascularization (NV) and metastatic cancer. Consistently, along with surgical interventions, a number of anti-VEGF agents have been approved by FDA for the treatment of ocular neovascular diseases. These anti-VEGF agents, like ranibizumab/lucentis, have revolutionized the treatment in the past decade. However, substantial vision improvement is observed only in a subset of age-related macular degeneration patients receiving ranibizumab. Further, all current therapies are associated with limitations and side effects. For example, surgeries cause tissue destruction and inflammation while anti-VEGF therapies are expensive, require repeated administration, and offer temporary relief from vascular leakage. These factors impose significant cost and treatment burdens to both the patient and society. With an aging population in most western countries with a continually increasing number of patients on lifelong treatment for these retinal diseases, the focus of ocular drug development for neovascular diseases will be to improve efficacy while reducing treatment costs. Blocking the HIF pathway, a major regulator of ocular NV and cancer, offers an appealing therapeutic strategy. Therefore, this review summarizes HIF inhibitors that have been recently evaluated for the treatment of different cancers and ischemic retinopathies. PMID:27146677

  7. Microtubule inhibitor-based antibody–drug conjugates for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klute, Kelsey; Nackos, Eleni; Tasaki, Shinsuke; Nguyen, Daniel P; Bander, Neil H; Tagawa, Scott T

    2014-01-01

    The specificity of monoclonal antibodies represents a potential therapeutic advantage, but their use as single agents in oncology has proven limited to date. The development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) takes advantage of the specificity of the monoclonal antibody and potent cytotoxic effect of chemotherapy, leading to enhanced cytotoxicity in target cells and limiting toxicity to normal tissue. Microtubules represent a validated oncologic target in a range of tumor types, with a number of anti-microtubule targeting cytotoxic drugs approved for cancer use. The systemic use of potent microtubule-binding agents is limited by their effects in normal cells, which leads to toxicity including myelosuppression and peripheral neuropathy. Linking these agents to monoclonal antibodies may limit toxicity to normal tissues and increase drug concentration in target tissues, also allowing the use of more potent agents which would be too toxic to administer in their unbound form. Two such ADCs have been approved for clinical use and many others are in development. Here we review the characteristics of each of the ADC components that have led to efficacious therapies and discuss some of the tubulin inhibitor-based ADCs in development for cancer therapy. PMID:25506226

  8. Development of Antioxidant COX-2 Inhibitors as Radioprotective Agents for Radiation Therapy-A Hypothesis-Driven Review.

    PubMed

    Laube, Markus; Kniess, Torsten; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) evolved to be a primary treatment modality for cancer patients. Unfortunately, the cure or relief of symptoms is still accompanied by radiation-induced side effects with severe acute and late pathophysiological consequences. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are potentially useful in this regard because radioprotection of normal tissue and/or radiosensitizing effects on tumor tissue have been described for several compounds of this structurally diverse class. This review aims to substantiate the hypothesis that antioxidant COX-2 inhibitors are promising radioprotectants because of intercepting radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in normal tissue, especially the vascular system. For this, literature reporting on COX inhibitors exerting radioprotective and/or radiosensitizing action as well as on antioxidant COX inhibitors will be reviewed comprehensively with the aim to find cross-points of both and, by that, stimulate further research in the field of radioprotective agents. PMID:27104573

  9. The Economic Impact of Delaying 5-Alpha Reductase Inhibitor Therapy in Men Receiving Treatment for Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Naslund, Michael; Eaddy, Michael T.; Hogue, Susan L.; Kruep, Eric J.; Shah, Manan B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pharmacologic treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia often includes alpha-blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. Many clinicians use alpha-blockers for rapid symptom control, later adding 5-alpha reductase inhibitors to modify long-term disease progression. Delaying the addition of these medications has been shown to result in reduced clinical outcomes. The economic impact of this practice has not been widely studied or reported to date. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the economic impact of delaying initiation of concomitant 5-alpha reductase inhibitor therapy (≥30 days) in patients receiving alpha-blockers for lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods Using 2 nationally representative databases (Integrated Health Care Information Solutions and PharMetrics), 2 retrospective analyses were conducted involving 2636 and 4260 men, respectively, aged ≥50 years treated for benign prostatic hyperplasia between 2000 and 2007. Economic outcomes (ie, the cost of therapy and the use of healthcare resources) were compared for adding 5-alpha reductase inhibitor therapy early (within <30 days of initiating an alpha-blocker) versus delaying these medications (≥30 days after initiating an alpha-blocker). Results In the Integrated Health Care Information Solutions analysis, patients in the early add-on therapy group (n = 1572) had lower benign prostatic hyperplasia–related medical costs in the posttreatment period than those in the delayed-therapy group (n = 1064), $349 versus $618 (P <.0001). Similar trends were seen in the PharMetrics analysis—the medical costs in the early add-on therapy group (n = 2604) and delayed group (n = 1656) were $344 versus $449, respectively (P <.001). Pharmacy costs were $1068 for the early-treatment cohort and $989 for the delayed-treatment cohort for the Integrated Health Care Information Solutions database, yielding total costs of $1417 and $1606, respectively

  10. Adjunctive Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibitor Therapy Improves Antibiotic Response to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; O'Brien, Paul; Dartois, Véronique; Khetani, Vikram; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adjunctive host-directed therapy is emerging as a new potential approach to improve the outcome of conventional antimicrobial treatment for tuberculosis (TB). We tested the ability of a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (PDE4i) CC-11050, co-administered with the first-line anti-TB drug isoniazid (INH), to accelerate bacillary killing and reduce chronic inflammation in the lungs of rabbits with experimental Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Methods A rabbit model of pulmonary TB that recapitulates the pathologic manifestations seen in humans was used. Rabbits were infected with virulent Mtb by aerosol exposure and treated for eight weeks with INH with or without CC-11050, starting at four weeks post infection. The effect of CC-11050 treatment on disease severity, pathology, bacillary load, T cell proliferation and global lung transcriptome profiles were analyzed. Results Significant improvement in bacillary clearance and reduced lung pathology and fibrosis were noted in the rabbits treated for eight weeks with INH + CC-11050, compared to those treated with INH or CC-11050 only. In addition, expression of host genes associated with tissue remodeling, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) regulation, macrophage activation and lung inflammation networks was dampened in CC-11050-treated, compared to the untreated rabbits. Conclusions Adjunctive CC-11050 therapy significantly improves the response of rabbits with experimental pulmonary TB to INH treatment. We propose that CC-11050 may be a promising candidate for host directed therapy of patients with pulmonary TB, reducing the duration and improving clinical outcome of antibiotic treatment. PMID:26981575

  11. Combination therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: Additive preclinical efficacy of the HDAC inhibitor panobinostat with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Lachenmayer, Anja; Toffanin, Sara; Cabellos, Laia; Alsinet, Clara; Hoshida, Yujin; Villanueva, Augusto; Minguez, Beatriz; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Ward, Stephen C.; Thung, Swan; Friedman, Scott L.; Llovet, Josep M.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous cancer in which sorafenib is the only approved systemic therapy. Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are commonly dysregulated in cancer and therefore represent promising targets for therapies, however their role in HCC pathogenesis is still unknown. We analyzed the expression of 11 HDACs in human HCCs and assessed the efficacy of the pan-HDAC inhibitor panobinostat alone and in combination with sorafenib in preclinical models of liver cancer. Methods Gene expression and copy number changes were analyzed in a cohort of 334 human HCCs, while the effects of panobinostat and sorafenib were evaluated in 3 liver cancer cell lines and a murine xenograft model. Results Aberrant HDAC expression was identified and validated in 91 and 243 HCCs, respectively. Upregulation of HDAC3 and 5 mRNAs were significantly correlated with DNA copy number gains. Inhibiting HDACs with panobinostat led to strong anti-tumoral effects in vitro and vivo, enhanced by the addition of sorafenib. Cell viability and proliferation declined, while apoptosis and autophagy increased. Panobinostat increased Histone H3 and HSP90 acetylation, downregulated BIRC5 (survivin) and upregulated CDH1. Combination therapy with panobinostat and sorafenib significantly decreased vessel density, and most significantly decreased tumor volume and increased survival in HCC xenografts. Conclusions Aberrant expression of several HDACs and copy number gains of HDAC3 and HDAC5 occur in HCC. Treatment with panobinostat combined with sorafenib demonstrated the highest preclinical efficacy in HCC models, providing the rationale for clinical studies with this novel combination. PMID:22322234

  12. Benefit/risk for adjuvant breast cancer therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use by age, and race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T; Haque, R; Hedlin, H; Col, N; Paskett, E; Manson, J E; Kubo, J T; Johnson, K C; Wactawski-Wende, J; Pan, K; Anderson, G

    2015-12-01

    In early adjuvant breast cancer trial reports, aromatase inhibitors more effectively reduced breast recurrence with lower risk of thromboembolic events and endometrial cancer than tamoxifen, while aromatase inhibitors had higher fracture and cardiovascular disease risk. We used data from updated patient-level meta-analyses of adjuvant trials in analyses to summarize the benefits and risks of these agents in various clinical circumstances. Baseline incidence rates for health outcomes by age and race/ethnicity, absent aromatase inhibitor, or tamoxifen use were estimated from the Women's Health Initiative. Aromatase inhibitor and tamoxifen effects on distant recurrence were obtained from a meta-analysis of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) and Breast International Group (Big-1-98) clinical trials. Impact on other health outcomes were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials comparing aromatase inhibitor to tamoxifen use and from placebo-controlled chemoprevention trials. All health outcomes were given equal weight when modeling net benefit/risk for aromatase inhibitor compared to tamoxifen use by breast cancer recurrence risk, age (decade), race/ethnicity, hysterectomy (yes/no), and by prior myocardial infarction. Over a 10-year period, the benefit/risk index was more favorable for aromatase inhibitor than for tamoxifen as adjuvant breast cancer therapy in almost all circumstances regardless of patient age, race/ethnicity, breast cancer recurrence risk, or presence or absence of a uterus. Only in older women with prior myocardial infarction and low recurrence risk was an advantage for tamoxifen seen. Using a benefit/risk index for endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy in postmenopausal women, benefit was higher for aromatase inhibitor use in almost all circumstances. PMID:26602222

  13. Targeted in-vivo computed tomography (CT) imaging of tissue ACE using concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Marie-Christine; Aras, Omer; Smith, Mark F.; Nan, Anjan; Fleiter, Thorsten

    2010-04-01

    The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis have been associated with overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Moreover, ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril, have shown a benificial effect for patients diagnosed with heart failure or systemic hypertension. Thus targeted imaging of the ACE is of crucial importance for monitoring of the tissue ACE activity as well as the treatment efficacy in heart failure. In this respect, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles were prepared to provide a new type of probe for targeted molecular imaging of ACE by tuned K-edge computed tomography (CT) imaging. Concentrated solutions of these modified gold nanoparticles, with a diameter around 16 nm, showed high contrast in CT imaging. These new targeted imaging agents were thus used for in vivo imaging on rat models.

  14. Adverse impact of fibrin clot inhibitors on intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for superficial bladder tumors.

    PubMed

    Hudson, M A; Yuan, J J; Catalona, W J; Ratliff, T L

    1990-12-01

    Although intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy has proved to be efficacious in the treatment and prophylaxis against tumor recurrence of superficial bladder tumors, its mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. Previous work has suggested that bacillus Calmette-Guerin organisms attach to the matrix protein, fibronectin, during fibrin clot formation at sites of urothelial disruption and that this attachment was required for the antitumor effect of bacillus Calmette-Guerin to be expressed. Furthermore, drugs inhibiting clot formation were found to abrogate the antitumor effect of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy in a murine bladder tumor model. To examine the effect of inhibitors of fibrin clot formation on the results of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy, a retrospective analysis of 149 evaluable patients receiving intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin for superficial bladder tumors was performed. The over-all response rate free of tumor for 29 patients who concomitantly received inhibitors of fibrin clot formation with bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy was 48%, as compared with 67% for 120 patients who were not receiving these medications (p = 0.0655, chi-square). The most striking difference was noted for patients who failed with recurrent superficial disease. Of the patients who received fibrin clot inhibitors during intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy 35% had recurrent superficial tumors compared to only 8% of those who did not receive these drugs during a mean followup of 29.8 plus or minus 11 months (p = 0.005, chi-square). Our study suggests that inhibitors of fibrin clot formation may have an adverse influence on the results of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy for superficial bladder tumors. PMID:2231927

  15. Hsp90 Inhibitors and Drug Resistance in Cancer: The Potential Benefits of Combination Therapies of Hsp90 Inhibitors and Other Anti-Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiangyi; Xiao, Li; Wang, Luan; Ruden, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    Hsp90 is a chaperone protein that interacts with client proteins that are known to be in the cell cycle, signaling and chromatin-remodeling pathways. Hsp90 inhibitors act additively or synergistically with many other drugs in the treatment of both solid tumors and leukemias in murine tumor models and humans. Hsp90 inhibitors potentiate the actions of anti-cancer drugs that target Hsp90 client proteins, including trastuzumab (Herceptin™) which targets Her2/Erb2B, as Hsp90 inhibition elicits the drug effects in cancer cell lines that are otherwise resistant to the drug. A Phase II study of the Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG and trastuzumab showed that this combination therapy has anticancer activity in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer progressing on trastuzumab. In this review, we discuss the results of Hsp90 inhibitors in combination with trastuzumab and other cancer drugs. We also discuss recent results from yeast focused on the genetics of drug resistance when Hsp90 is inhibited and the implications that this might have in understanding the effects of genetic variation in treating cancer in humans. PMID:22120678

  16. ACE VET Linkages: Provider, Student and Industry Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, John

    In recent years, Australia's system of adult and community education (ACE) has broadened to include vocational learning as well as the hobby, enrichment, and personal development traditionally provided by ACE in the past. A study examined the views of ACE providers, ACE students, and industry organizations regarding ACE vocational education and…

  17. Potentiation of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy by the PARP Inhibitor Olaparib

    PubMed Central

    Nonnekens, Julie; van Kranenburg, Melissa; Beerens, Cecile E.M.T.; Suker, Mustafa; Doukas, Michael; van Eijck, Casper H.J.; de Jong, Marion; van Gent, Dik C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues, resulting in strongly increased progression-free survival and quality of life. There is nevertheless still room for improvement, as very few patients can be cured at this stage of disease. We aimed to specifically sensitize replicating tumor cells without further damage to healthy tissues. Thereto we investigated the DNA damaging effects of PRRT with the purpose to enhance these effects through modulation of the DNA damage response. Although PRRT induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), a larger fraction of the induced lesions are single strand breaks (expected to be similar to those induced by external beam radiotherapy) that require poly-[ADP-ribose]-polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activity for repair. If these breaks cannot be repaired, they will cause replication fork arrest and DSB formation during replication. Therefore, we used the PARP-1 inhibitor Olaparib to increase the number of cytotoxic DSBs. Here we show that this new combination strategy synergistically sensitized somatostatin receptor expressing cells to PRRT. We observed increased cell death and reduced cellular proliferation compared to the PRRT alone. The enhanced cell death was caused by increased numbers of DSBs that are repaired with remarkably slow kinetics, leading to genome instability. Furthermore, we validated the increased DSB induction after PARP inhibitor addition in the clinically relevant model of living human NET slices. We expect that this combined regimen can thus augment current PRRT outcomes. PMID:27570553

  18. Potentiation of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy by the PARP Inhibitor Olaparib.

    PubMed

    Nonnekens, Julie; van Kranenburg, Melissa; Beerens, Cecile E M T; Suker, Mustafa; Doukas, Michael; van Eijck, Casper H J; de Jong, Marion; van Gent, Dik C

    2016-01-01

    Metastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues, resulting in strongly increased progression-free survival and quality of life. There is nevertheless still room for improvement, as very few patients can be cured at this stage of disease. We aimed to specifically sensitize replicating tumor cells without further damage to healthy tissues. Thereto we investigated the DNA damaging effects of PRRT with the purpose to enhance these effects through modulation of the DNA damage response. Although PRRT induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), a larger fraction of the induced lesions are single strand breaks (expected to be similar to those induced by external beam radiotherapy) that require poly-[ADP-ribose]-polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activity for repair. If these breaks cannot be repaired, they will cause replication fork arrest and DSB formation during replication. Therefore, we used the PARP-1 inhibitor Olaparib to increase the number of cytotoxic DSBs. Here we show that this new combination strategy synergistically sensitized somatostatin receptor expressing cells to PRRT. We observed increased cell death and reduced cellular proliferation compared to the PRRT alone. The enhanced cell death was caused by increased numbers of DSBs that are repaired with remarkably slow kinetics, leading to genome instability. Furthermore, we validated the increased DSB induction after PARP inhibitor addition in the clinically relevant model of living human NET slices. We expect that this combined regimen can thus augment current PRRT outcomes. PMID:27570553

  19. Enzymatic pathways in the pathogenesis of hereditary angioedema: the role of C1 inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Allen P

    2010-11-01

    A functional abnormality of C1 inhibitor (C1INH) is present in types I and II hereditary angioedema (HAE), and normal C1INH may be rendered ineffective in the newly described type III HAE. C1INH inhibits factor XIIa, factor XII fragment (XIIf), kallikrein, and plasmin. Thus, in its absence, there is marked activation of the bradykinin-forming cascade resulting in severe angioedema. Factor XII may autoactivate on binding to endothelial cell surface gC1qR (receptor for the globular heads of C1q) thus initiating the cascade. Alternatively, stimuli that activate endothelial cells may liberate (or express at the cell surface) heat shock protein 90 or the enzyme prolylcarboxypeptidase, either of which can interact with the prekallikrein-high-molecular-weight kininogen complex to convert prekallikrein to kallikrein stoichiometrically. The kallikrein produced can cleave high-molecular-weight kininogen to produce bradykinin and also recruit factor XII by enzymatically activating it. Patients with type I or II HAE have mutant C1INH so that control of C1 activation is lost. Autoactivation of C1r in the absence of C1INH leads to C1s activation followed by C4 cleavage and depletion. An attack of swelling is accompanied by conversion of factor XIIa to factor XIIf and further enzymatic activation of C1r so that C4 levels drop further and C2 is depleted. New therapies for HAE focus on the bradykinin-forming cascade and include a kallikrein inhibitor and a bradykinin B-2 receptor antagonist in addition to administration of purified C1INH. PMID:20889195

  20. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors or sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors as an add-on to insulin therapy: A comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    The gradual decline in β-cell function is inevitable in type 2 diabetes mellitus and therefore, substantial proportions of patients require insulin subsequently, in order to achieve optimal glucose control. While weight gain, hypoglycemia, and fluid retention especially during dose intensification is a known limitation to insulin therapy, these adverse effects also reduce patient satisfaction and treatment adherence. It is also possible that the benefits of intensive control achieved by insulin therapy, perhaps get nullified by the weight gain and hypoglycemia. In addition, improvement in plasma glucose or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) itself is associated with weight gain. Notably, studies have already suggested that reduction in body weight by ~3–5%, may allow a significantly better glycemic control. Thus, a class of drugs, which can reduce HbA1c effectively, yet are weight neutral or preferably reduce body weight, could be the most sought out strategy as an add-on therapy to insulin. While sulfonylureas (SUs) are associated with weight gain and hypoglycemia, pioglitazone increases body weight and fluid retention. Moreover, SUs are not recommended once premix or prandial insulin is commenced. The addition of newer agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist to insulin certainly appears to be an effective tool in reducing both HbA1c and body weight as is evident across the studies; however, this approach incurs an additional injection as well as cost. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are other exciting options, as an add-on to insulin therapy primarily because these are oral drugs and do not possess any intrinsic potential of hypoglycemia. Furthermore, these are either weight neutral or induce significant weight loss. This review article aims to comparatively analyze the safety and efficacy of DPP-4I and SGLT-2I, as an add-on therapy to insulin. PMID:26904466

  1. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors or sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors as an add-on to insulin therapy: A comparative review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    The gradual decline in β-cell function is inevitable in type 2 diabetes mellitus and therefore, substantial proportions of patients require insulin subsequently, in order to achieve optimal glucose control. While weight gain, hypoglycemia, and fluid retention especially during dose intensification is a known limitation to insulin therapy, these adverse effects also reduce patient satisfaction and treatment adherence. It is also possible that the benefits of intensive control achieved by insulin therapy, perhaps get nullified by the weight gain and hypoglycemia. In addition, improvement in plasma glucose or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) itself is associated with weight gain. Notably, studies have already suggested that reduction in body weight by ~3-5%, may allow a significantly better glycemic control. Thus, a class of drugs, which can reduce HbA1c effectively, yet are weight neutral or preferably reduce body weight, could be the most sought out strategy as an add-on therapy to insulin. While sulfonylureas (SUs) are associated with weight gain and hypoglycemia, pioglitazone increases body weight and fluid retention. Moreover, SUs are not recommended once premix or prandial insulin is commenced. The addition of newer agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist to insulin certainly appears to be an effective tool in reducing both HbA1c and body weight as is evident across the studies; however, this approach incurs an additional injection as well as cost. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are other exciting options, as an add-on to insulin therapy primarily because these are oral drugs and do not possess any intrinsic potential of hypoglycemia. Furthermore, these are either weight neutral or induce significant weight loss. This review article aims to comparatively analyze the safety and efficacy of DPP-4I and SGLT-2I, as an add-on therapy to insulin. PMID:26904466

  2. Multiple Roles of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Patrick J.; Bisi, John E.; Strum, Jay C.; Combest, Austin J.; Darr, David B.; Usary, Jerry E.; Zamboni, William C.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Perou, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    carboplatin plus PD0332991 decreased antitumor activity compared with carboplatin alone in Rb-competent mice (mean percent change in tumor volume at day 21 = −52.6% vs 3.7% for carboplatin and carboplatin plus PD0332991, respectively, difference = 56.3%, 95% CI = −109.0% to −3.6%, P = .04). In contrast, Rb-deficient tumors in C3-Tag mice were resistant to PD0332991, and coadministration of PD0332991 plus carboplatin had no effect on in vivo tumor growth (mean percent change in tumor volume at day 21 = 118.8% and 109.1% for carboplatin and carboplatin plus PD0332991, respectively, difference = 9.7%, 95% CI = −183.5% to 202.9%, P = .92). Finally, in tumor-bearing mice, coadministration of PD0332991 with carboplatin provided statistically significant protection of platelets (P = .04). Conclusion We believe that the present data support a possible role for CDK4/6 inhibitors in a majority of patients with advanced cancer: to either inhibit tumor growth in CDK4/6-dependent tumors or ameliorate the dose-limiting toxicities of chemotherapy in CDK4/6-indepdendent tumors. Our data also suggest CDK4/6 inhibitors should not be combined with DNA-damaging therapies, such as carboplatin, to treat tumors that require CDK4/6 activity for proliferation. PMID:22302033

  3. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes therapy – focus on alogliptin

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Annalisa; Sportiello, Liberata; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Rossi, Francesco; Giugliano, Dario; Esposito, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex and progressive disease that is showing an apparently unstoppable increase worldwide. Although there is general agreement on the first-line use of metformin in most patients with type 2 diabetes, the ideal drug sequence after metformin failure is an area of increasing uncertainty. New treatment strategies target pancreatic islet dysfunction, in particular gut-derived incretin hormones. Inhibition of the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) slows degradation of endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and thereby enhances and prolongs the action of the endogenous incretin hormones. The five available DPP-4 inhibitors, also known as ‘gliptins’ (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, alogliptin), are small molecules used orally with similar overall clinical efficacy and safety profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes. The main differences between the five gliptins on the market include: potency, target selectivity, oral bioavailability, long or short half-life, high or low binding to plasma proteins, metabolism, presence of active or inactive metabolites, excretion routes, dosage adjustment for renal and liver insufficiency, and potential drug–drug interactions. On average, treatment with gliptins is expected to produce a mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) decrease of 0.5%–0.8%, with about 40% of diabetic subjects at target for the HbA1c goal <7%. There are very few studies comparing DPP-4 inhibitors. Alogliptin as monotherapy or added to metformin, pioglitazone, glibenclamide, voglibose, or insulin therapy significantly improves glycemic control compared with placebo in adult or elderly patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes. In the EXAMINE trial, alogliptin is being compared with placebo on cardiovascular outcomes in approximately 5,400 patients with type 2 diabetes. In clinical studies, DPP-4 inhibitors were generally safe and well tolerated. However, there are limited data on their

  4. Clinical activity and safety of the dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib for higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes following DNA methyltransferase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis R; Greenberg, Peter; Raza, Azra; Olnes, Matthew J; Holland, James F; Reddy, Premkumar; Maniar, Manoj; Wilhelm, Francois

    2015-06-01

    Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na) is an inhibitor of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and polo-like kinase pathways that induces mitotic arrest and apoptosis in neoplastic cells, while sparing normal cells. Our purpose is to summarize the clinical activity and safety of intravenous (IV) rigosertib delivered by an external ambulatory infusion pump in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts-1, -2, or, -t myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) following prior treatment with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors. A total of 39 patients with MDS who fulfilled these criteria were enrolled in four phase 1-2 clinical trials of IV rigosertib. Thirty five (88%) had higher risk disease according to the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System. Median overall survival for this group of 39 patients was 35 weeks. Of 30 evaluable patients with follow-up bone marrow biopsies, 12 (40%) achieved complete (n = 5) or partial (n = 7) bone marrow blast responses. In addition, 15 patients achieved stabilization of bone marrow blasts. One patient with a complete bone marrow response also achieved a complete cytogenetic response. A second patient with stable bone marrow blasts achieved a partial cytogenetic response. Two of the responding patients and three patients with stable disease had hematological improvements. Rigosertib-induced bone marrow blast decreases and stability appeared to be predictive of prolonged survival. IV rigosertib had a favorable safety profile without significant myelosuppression. Most common drug-related toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, dysuria, and hematuria. In summary, IV rigosertib is well tolerated and has clinical activity in patients with higher risk MDS following DNMT inhibitor treatment. A multinational pivotal phase 3 randomized clinical trial of rigosertib versus best supportive care for patients with MDS with excess blasts following prior treatment with DNMT inhibitors (ONTIME: ON 01910.Na Trial In Myelodysplastic SyndromE) has recently

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, H P; Brown, S A; Chetboul, V; King, J N; Pouchelon, J-L; Toutain, P L

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors represent one of the most commonly used categories of drugs in canine and feline medicine. ACE inhibitors currently approved for use in veterinary medicine are benazepril, enalapril, imidapril and ramipril. They are all pro-drugs administered by oral route. A physiologically based model taking into account the saturable binding to ACE has been developed for pharmacokinetic analysis. The bioavailability of the active compounds from their respective pro-drug is low. The active metabolites are eliminated by renal, hepatorenal or biliary excretion, according to the drug. The elimination half-life of the free fraction of the active compounds is very short (ranging from approximately 10 min to 2 h). ACE inhibitors are generally well tolerated. Benazepril, enalapril, imidapril and ramipril are approved for dogs with chronic heart failure (CHF). The efficacy of ACE inhibitors has been convincingly demonstrated in dogs with CHF, especially in those with chronic valvular disease. In such clinical settings, ACE inhibitors improve hemodynamics and clinical signs, and increase survival time. In cats with cardiovascular disease, little information is available except for reports of some benefit in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in two non-controlled investigations. ACE inhibitors have also a mild to moderate hypotensive effect. There is also evidence to recommend ACE inhibitors in dogs and cats with chronic renal failure (CRF). They decrease the glomerular capillary pressure, have antiproteinuric effects, tend to delay the progression of CRF and to limit the extent of renal lesions. PMID:17506720

  6. Enhancement of the efficiency of photodynamic therapy by combination with the microtubule inhibitor vincristine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li Wei; Berg, Kristian; Danielsen, Havard E.; Iani, Vladimir; Moan, Johan

    1996-01-01

    Combination effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with meso-tetra (di-adjacent- sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS2a) and the microtubule (MT) inhibitor, vincristine (VCR), were studied in the CaD2 mouse tumor model in mice. A synergistic effect was found when VCR, at an almost nontoxic dose (1 mg/kg), was injected i.p. into the mice 6 hr before PDT. The data on mitotic index show a 4 - 5 fold accumulation of the cells in mitosis 6 hr after injection of VCR into the mice. Cell cycle and ploidy distributions in tumor tissues were determined by means of image analysis with measurement of integrated optical density after Feulgen reaction on monolayers. Ploidy distribution of the tumors was not significantly changed 6 and 12 hr after administration of VCR only, while an increasing aneuploidy was observed 24 and 48 hr after VCR treatment. No prominent changes of the cell cycle and ploidy distributions were found in the tumor tissues after PDT or PDT combined with VCR.

  7. Risk of liver injury after α-glucosidase inhibitor therapy in advanced chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chih-Chin; Wu, Pei-Chen; Wu, Che-Hsiung; Chen, Li-kwang; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Wu, Mai-Szu; Wu, Vin-Cent

    2016-01-01

    Although α-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are commonly used for controlling postprandial blood glucose, AGIs-induced liver injuries have been reported. However, the relationship between AGIs and liver injuries in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients remains unexplored. In this nationwide case-control study, we recruited 1765 advanced diabetic CKD patients, who received AGIs therapy from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010 as the study sample and 5295 matched controls. Recent and former AGIs users were defined as patients who received the AGIs prescription for 30–60 d and 30–210 d before the event of liver injury. The risk of AGIs-induced liver injury was examined using time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model. Liver injury occurred in 3.9% of patients in the study group and 3.3% of patients in the control group. AGIs use did not increase the risk of liver injury in advanced CKD patients (P = 0.19). The stratified analysis indicated no increased risk of liver injury in all AGIs-using subgroups (all P > 0.05). The available evidence supports extending the use of AGIs without increasing the risk of liver injury in patients with advanced CKD. Additional randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm our results. PMID:26751038

  8. Nutritional status changes in HIV-infected children receiving combined antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fiore, P; Donelli, E; Boni, S; Pontali, E; Tramalloni, R; Bassetti, D

    2000-11-01

    Maintaining linear growth and weight gain in HIV-infected children is often difficult. Nutritional evaluation and support are recognised as important factors to improve their quality of life. Combination antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors (HAART) reduces HIV-viral load and improves survival, quality of life and nutritional status. Our study aimed to determine changes in nutrional status based on body weight, height and nutritional habits, of HIV-infected children receiving HAART. Possible side effects of lipid metabolism were also studied. Twenty five children, 13 treated with HAART (group B) were followed up for 12 months. We did not observe statistically significant differences in nutritional status over that time or between groups A and B. Inadequate energy intake was more common in patients with advanced HIV-disease. Hyperlipidemia was found in 70% of children receiving ritonavir and in approximately 50% of children receiving nelfinavir. We observed an important although not statistically significative modification in the height of those in group B. PMID:11091066

  9. Gold nanoparticles enhance the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrushev, Bobe; Boca, Sanda; Simon, Timea; Berce, Cristian; Frinc, Ioana; Dima, Delia; Selicean, Sonia; Gafencu, Grigore-Aristide; Tanase, Alina; Zdrenghea, Mihnea; Florea, Adrian; Suarasan, Sorina; Dima, Liana; Stanciu, Raluca; Jurj, Ancuta; Buzoianu, Anca; Cucuianu, Andrei; Astilean, Simion; Irimie, Alexandru; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Every year, in Europe, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is diagnosed in thousands of adults. For most subtypes of AML, the backbone of treatment was introduced nearly 40 years ago as a combination of cytosine arabinoside with an anthracycline. This therapy is still the worldwide standard of care. Two-thirds of patients achieve complete remission, although most of them ultimately relapse. Since the FLT3 mutation is the most frequent, it serves as a key molecular target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit FLT3 kinase. In this study, we report the conjugation of TKIs onto spherical gold nanoparticles. Materials and methods The internalization of TKI-nanocarriers was proved by the strongly scattered light from gold nanoparticles and was correlated with the results obtained by transmission electron microscopy and dark-field microscopy. The therapeutic effect of the newly designed drugs was investigated by several methods including cell counting assay as well as the MTT assay. Results We report the newly described bioconjugates to be superior when compared with the drug alone, with data confirmed by state-of-the-art analyses of internalization, cell biology, gene analysis for FLT3-IDT gene, and Western blotting to assess degradation of the FLT3 protein. Conclusion The effective transmembrane delivery and increased efficacy validate its use as a potential therapeutic. PMID:26929621

  10. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors combination therapy in type 2 diabetes: A systematic review of current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    As type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic and progressive disease with multiple pathophysiologic defects, no single anti-diabetic agent can tackle all these multi-factorial pathways. Consequently, multiple agents working through the different mechanisms will be required for the optimal glycemic control. Moreover, the combination therapies of different anti-diabetic agents may complement their actions and possibly act synergistic. Furthermore, these combinations could possess the additional properties to counter their undesired physiological compensatory response. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are newly emerging class of drugs, with a great potential to reduce glucose effectively with an additional quality of lowering cardiovascular events as demonstrated very recently by one of the agents of this class. However, increase in endogenous glucose production (EGP) from the liver, either due to the increase in glucagon or compensatory response to glucosuria can offset the glucose-lowering potential of SGLT-2I. Interestingly, another class of drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) effectively decrease glucagon and reduce EGP. In light of these findings, combination therapies with SGLT-2I and DPP-4I are particularly appealing and are expected to produce a synergistic effect. Preclinical studies of combination therapies with DPP-4I and SGLT-2I have already demonstrated a significant lowering of hemoglobin A1c potential and human studies also find no drug-drug interaction between these agents. This article aims to systematically review the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of SGLT-2I and DPP-4I in T2DM. PMID:27042423

  11. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors combination therapy in type 2 diabetes: A systematic review of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    As type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic and progressive disease with multiple pathophysiologic defects, no single anti-diabetic agent can tackle all these multi-factorial pathways. Consequently, multiple agents working through the different mechanisms will be required for the optimal glycemic control. Moreover, the combination therapies of different anti-diabetic agents may complement their actions and possibly act synergistic. Furthermore, these combinations could possess the additional properties to counter their undesired physiological compensatory response. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are newly emerging class of drugs, with a great potential to reduce glucose effectively with an additional quality of lowering cardiovascular events as demonstrated very recently by one of the agents of this class. However, increase in endogenous glucose production (EGP) from the liver, either due to the increase in glucagon or compensatory response to glucosuria can offset the glucose-lowering potential of SGLT-2I. Interestingly, another class of drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) effectively decrease glucagon and reduce EGP. In light of these findings, combination therapies with SGLT-2I and DPP-4I are particularly appealing and are expected to produce a synergistic effect. Preclinical studies of combination therapies with DPP-4I and SGLT-2I have already demonstrated a significant lowering of hemoglobin A1c potential and human studies also find no drug-drug interaction between these agents. This article aims to systematically review the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of SGLT-2I and DPP-4I in T2DM. PMID:27042423

  12. Current Diagnosis and Management of Suspected Reflux Symptoms Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Suspected reflux symptoms that are refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are rapidly becoming the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients seen in gastroenterology clinics. These patients are a heterogeneous group, differing in symptom frequency and severity, PPI dosing regimens, and responses to therapy (from partial to absent). Before testing, the physician needs to question the patient carefully about PPI compliance and the timing of drug intake in relation to meals. Switching PPIs or doubling the dose is the next step, but only 20% to 25% of the group refractory to PPIs will respond. The first diagnostic test should be upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In more than 90% of cases, the results will be normal, but persistent esophagitis may suggest pill esophagitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, or rarer diseases, such as lichen planus, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, or genotype variants of PPI metabolism. If the endoscopy results are normal, esophageal manometry and especially reflux testing should follow. Whether patients should be tested on or off PPI therapy is controversial. Most physicians prefer to test patients off PPIs to identify whether abnormal acid reflux is even present; if it is not, PPIs can be stopped and other diagnoses sought. Testing patients on PPI therapy allows nonacid reflux to be identified, but more than 50% of patients have a normal test result, leaving the clinician with a conundrum—whether to stop PPIs or continue them because the GERD is being treated adequately. Alternative diagnoses in patients with refractory GERD and normal reflux testing include achalasia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroparesis, rumination, and aerophagia. However, more than 50% will be given the diagnosis of functional heartburn, a visceral hypersensitivity syndrome. Treating patients with PPI-refractory GERD–like symptoms can be difficult and frustrating. Any of the following may help: a histamine-2 receptor antagonist

  13. Transdermal delivery of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Helal, Fouad; Lane, Majella E

    2014-09-01

    The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitor class of drugs has been in clinical use since the 1970s for the management of all grades of heart failure, hypertension, diabetic nephropathy and prophylaxis of cardiovascular events. Because of the advantages associated with transdermal delivery compared with oral delivery many researchers have investigated the skin as a portal for administration of ACE inhibitors. This review summarises the various studies reported in the literature describing the development and evaluation of transdermal formulations of ACE inhibitors. Captopril, enalapril maleate, lisinopril dihydrate, perindopril erbumine and trandolapril are the most studied in connection with transdermal preparations. The methodologies reported are considered critically and the limitations of the various skin models used are also highlighted. Finally, opportunities for novel transdermal preparations of ACE inhibitor drugs are discussed with an emphasis on rational formulation design. PMID:24657822

  14. Pericardial effusions with tamponade and visceral constriction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis on tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Soh, May Ching; Hart, Hamish H; Corkill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-inhibitor (TNF-inhibitor) therapy is increasingly used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. While it is effective for the articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis we have reason to believe that it is less effective for extra-articular disease. We present two cases of life-threatening cardiac tamponade in two patients with well-controlled rheumatoid arthritis on adalimumab. An extensive literature search was carried out and three other patients were found. We believe that these cases highlight the need for rheumatologists to be vigilant for extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis even in the presence of quiescent joint disease while on TNF-inhibitors. PMID:20374322

  15. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers on clinical outcomes in patients with and without coronary artery obstructions at angiography (from a Register-Based Cohort Study on Acute Coronary Syndromes).

    PubMed

    Manfrini, Olivia; Morrell, Christine; Das, Rajiv; Barth, Julian H; Hall, Alistair S; Gale, Christopher P; Cenko, Edina; Bugiardini, Raffaele

    2014-05-15

    We sought to determine the effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and β-blocker treatment as a function of the degree of coronary artery disease (CAD) obstruction at angiography. The Evaluation of Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events registry enrolled patients who had been hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome. There were 1,602 patients who had cardiac catheterization that were used for this analysis. The main outcome measures were evidence-based therapies prescribed at discharge and 6-month incidence of all-cause mortality. The cohort consisted of 1,252 patients with obstructive CAD (>50% luminal diameter obstructed) and 350 patients with nonobstructive CAD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for further medications and other clinical factors was performed. Patients with nonobstructive CAD had significantly (p <0.001) higher rates of β-blocker (77.8% vs 63.3%) and lower rates of ACE-inhibitor (57.7% vs 66.4%) prescriptions. In patients with nonobstructive CAD, ACE-inhibitor therapy was clearly associated with a lower 6-month mortality (odds ratio [OR] 0.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.03 to 0.78, p = 0.004). No significant association between β-blocker use and death was found. In patients with obstructive CAD, both β blockers (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.67, p <0.001) and ACE inhibitors (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.87, p = 0.01) were significantly associated with a reduced risk of 6-month mortality. In conclusion, ACE-inhibitor therapy seems to be an effective first-line treatment for preventing the occurrence of mortality in patients with nonobstructive CAD. PMID:24698468

  16. ACE program/UNIX user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Feng-Berman, S.K.

    1993-01-12

    This report the following: How to use the ace program ; Introduction to the ace program; Online command; Define a macro file; Macro commands; Counters and MCA; Counters usage; Counters database; Feedback Counter Database; MCA functions and macro command; X window Interclient Communication; and How to get around in UNIX

  17. ACE program/UNIX user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Feng-Berman, S.K.

    1993-01-12

    This report the following: How to use the ace program?; Introduction to the ace program; Online command; Define a macro file; Macro commands; Counters and MCA; Counters usage; Counters database; Feedback Counter Database; MCA functions and macro command; X window Interclient Communication; and How to get around in UNIX?

  18. Targeted therapies and immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of metastatic melanoma patients: a guide and update for pathologists.

    PubMed

    Kakavand, Hojabr; Wilmott, James S; Long, Georgina V; Scolyer, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    The previously dismal prospects for patients with advanced stage metastatic melanoma have greatly improved in recent years. Enhanced understanding of both the pathogenesis of melanoma and its molecular drivers, as well as the importance and regulation of anti-tumour immune responses, have provided new therapeutic opportunities for melanoma patients. There are two major distinct categories of systemic treatments with activity for patients with metastatic melanoma: (1) targeted therapies, which act to inhibit the oncogenes that drive the aberrant growth and dissemination of the tumour; and (2) immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies, which act to enhance anti-tumour immune responses by blocking negative regulators of immunity. Pathologists play a critical and expanding role in the selection of the most appropriate treatment for individual metastatic melanoma patients in the modern era of personalised/precision medicine. The molecular pathology testing of melanoma tumour tissue for the presence of targetable oncogenic mutations is already part of routine practice in many institutions. In addition, other potential oncogenic therapeutic targets continue to be identified and pathology testing techniques must readily adapt to this rapidly changing field. Recent research findings suggest that pathological assessment of tumour associated immune cells and immunosuppressive ligand expression of the tumour are likely to be important in identifying patients most likely to benefit from immune checkpoint inhibitors. Similarly, pathological and molecular observations of on-treatment tumour tissue biopsies taken from patients on targeted therapies have provided new insights into the mechanisms of action of targeted molecular therapies, have contributed to the identification of resistance mechanisms to these novel therapies and may be of higher value for selecting patients most likely to benefit from therapies. These data have already provided a rational biological basis for the

  19. Combination of angiogenesis inhibitors increases the anti-tumor efficacy of photodynamic therapy in a human bladder tumor xenograft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Gan, Yik Yuen; Thong, Patricia S. P.; Chin, William Wei L.; Soo, Khee Chee; Olivo, Malini

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a standard treatment for various malignant and non-malignant conditions. Though therapeutic responses are encouraging, recurrences have been noted, as one of the limitations of PDT is treatment-induced hypoxia that triggers angiogenesis. The present study evaluates the use of angiogenic inhibitors Avastin, that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Erbitux that targets epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with PDT in an in vivo bladder carcinoma xenograft. Tumor bearing mice were assigned to 6 different categories: control, PDT only, Avastin + Erbitux, PDT + Avastin, PDT + Erbitux and PDT + Avastin and Erbitux. Treated and control tumors were monitored for recurrence for up to 90 days. VEGF and EGFR expression was detected in the tumor tissue. Migratory assay was performed to establish the inhibitory effect of the angiogenesis agents. Using confocal laser endomicroscopy, the tumor microvasculature was assessed. Tumors treated with the combination therapy of PDT + inhibitors showed significantly greater response compared to control and PDT only treated group. Combination therapy treated tumors also showed the most post-treatment damage with reduced tumor vasculature. These results demonstrate that the combination of PDT with inhibitors that target different angiogenesis pathways can improve tumor control.

  20. Combined therapy with COX-2 inhibitor and 20-HETE inhibitor reduces colon tumor growth and the adverse effects of ischemic stroke associated with COX-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hoda, Md Nasrul; Zheng, Xuan; Li, Weiguo; Luo, Pengcheng; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Seki, Tsugio; Ergul, Adviye; Wang, Mong-Heng

    2014-09-15

    20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), Cyp4a-derived eicosanoid, is a lipid mediator that promotes tumor growth, as well as causing detrimental effects in cerebral circulation. We determined whether concurrent inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 20-HETE affects colon tumor growth and ischemic stroke outcomes. The expression of Cyp4a and COXs and production of 20-HETE and PGE2 were determined in murine colon carcinoma (MC38) cells. We then examined the effects of combined treatment with rofecoxib, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, and HET0016, a potent Cyp4a inhibitor, on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells. Subsequently, we tested the effects of HET0016 plus rofecoxib in MC38 tumor and ischemic stroke models. Cyp4a and COXs are highly expressed in MC38 cells. Respectively, HET0016 and rofecoxib inhibited 20-HETE and PGE2 formation in MC38 cells. Moreover, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 had greater inhibitory effects on the growth and proliferation of MC38 cells than did rofecoxib alone. Importantly, rofecoxib combined with HET0016 provided greater inhibition on tumor growth than did rofecoxib alone in MC38 tumor-bearing mice. Prolonged treatment with rofecoxib selectively induced circulating 20-HETE levels and caused cerebrovascular damage after ischemic stroke, whereas therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 attenuated 20-HETE levels and reduced rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes during anti-tumor therapy. Thus these results demonstrate that combination therapy with rofecoxib and HET0016 provides a new treatment of colon tumor, which can not only enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of rofecoxib, but also reduce rofecoxib-induced cerebrovascular damage and stroke outcomes. PMID:24990856

  1. Treatment-limiting toxicities associated withnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy: A prospective, observational study**

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Rosario; Santos, Jesús; Camino, Xavier; Arazo, Piedad; Torres Perea, Rafael; Echevarrfa, Santiago; Ribera, Esteban; Sánchez de la Rosa, Rainel; Moreno Guillen, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Recover Study is an ongoing, prospective study designed 10 to assess toxicity associated with the use of nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (stavudine, zidovudine, lamivudine, didanosine, abacavir) in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in routine clinical practice. This project is being conducted at 120 HIV units at teaching hospitals across Spain. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the most common treatment-limiting 10 moderate to severe clinical and laboratory adverse effects (AEs), and the individual NRTIs involved in the development of these effects, in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART who discontinued use of an NRTI in the Recover Study. Methods: Patients eligible for participation in the Recover Study are aged10 ≥18 years; have virologically documented HIV-1 infection; have sustained viral suppression (viral load <200 cells/mL or stable, heavily experienced [ie, have received ≥3 antiretroviral regimens] patients with viral load <5000 cells/mL) for ≥6 months; are receiving HAART; are undergoing active follow-up; and have developed 2:1 NRTI-associated AE that, in the opinion of a study investigator and under the conditions of routine clinical practice, justified discontinuation of treatment with the offending drug (principal AE/offending NRTI). The present study included patients recruited for the Recover Study between September 2002 and May 2003. Results: A total of 1391 patients were enrolled (966 men, 425 women; mean 1 age, 42 years [range, 18–67 years]). Five hundred six patients (36.4%) had been diagnosed with AIDS. The mean duration of treatment with the offending NRTI was 74 months (range, 6–156 months). Seven hundred nine patients (51.0%) were receiving fourth-line (or more) therapy. Eight hundred twenty-one patients (59.0%) were receiving nonnucleoside analogues, and 552 patients (39.7%), protease inhibitors, as components of their HAART

  2. An angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism may mitigate the effects of angiotensin-pathway medications on posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nylocks, K M; Michopoulos, V; Rothbaum, A O; Almli, L; Gillespie, C F; Wingo, A; Schwartz, A C; Habib, L; Gamwell, K L; Marvar, P J; Bradley, B; Ressler, K J

    2015-06-01

    Angiotensin, which regulates blood pressure may also act within the brain to mediate stress and fear responses. Common antihypertensive medication classes of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been associated with lower PTSD symptoms. Here we examine the rs4311 SNP in the ACE gene, previously implicated in panic attacks, in the relationship between ACE-I/ARB medications and PTSD symptoms. Participants were recruited from outpatient wait rooms between 2006 and March 2014 (n=  803). We examined the interaction between rs4311 genotype and the presence of blood pressure medication on PTSD symptoms and diagnosis. PTSD symptoms were lower in individuals taking ACE-Is or ARBs (N = 776). The rs4311 was associated with PTSD symptoms and diagnosis (N = 3803), as the T-carriers at the rs4311 SNP had significantly greater likelihood of a PTSD diagnosis. Lastly, the rs4311 genotype modified the effect of ACE-Is or ARBs on PTSD symptoms (N = 443; F1,443 = 4.41, P < 0.05). Individuals with the CC rs4311 genotype showed lower PTSD symptoms in the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. In contrast, T- carriers showed the opposite, such that the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs was associated with higher PTSD symptoms. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be important in PTSD, as ACE-I/ARB usage associates with lower symptoms. Furthermore, we provide genetic evidence that some individuals are comparatively more benefitted by ACE-Is/ARBs in PTSD treatment. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which ACE-Is/ARBs affect PTSD symptoms such that pharmaco-genetically informed interventions may be used to treat PTSD. PMID:25921615

  3. Triple Combination Therapy for Global Cardiovascular Risk: Atorvastatin, Perindopril, and Amlodipine.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Michel E; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Mourad, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have markedly changed the clinical progression of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The goal of this paper is to review the rationale and evidence for combining these three drug classes in hypertensive patients with hypercholesterolemia or CAD. Data sources include a literature search for publications on the use of a statin combined with various antihypertensive drugs in patients with hypertension and hypercholesterolemia or stable CAD. Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension constitute major physiological risk factors of ischemic heart disease. Current guidelines recommend a global approach to risk management, using agents that address as many risk factors as possible. Dual combination therapies are an important component of guideline-recommended therapy in hypertension. Our review of the literature indicates that triple therapy with a statin, ACE inhibitor, and CCB is associated with a significant reduction in major cardiovascular events. For example, a post hoc analysis in 1056 patients with stable CAD participating in the EUROPA trial indicated that the addition of perindopril to a CCB and a lipid-lowering agent was associated with a 46 % reduction in the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and resuscitated cardiac arrest (p = 0.023). In addition, single pill formulations are known to result in better adherence to the treatment. Single-pill formulations that combine a statin, an ACE inhibitor, and a CCB appear to offer an effective approach to the management of global cardiovascular risk. PMID:27256435

  4. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  5. ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism and diabetic nephropathy: clinical implications of genetic information.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sung-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 20-40% of diabetic patients develop nephropathy which is the leading cause of ESRD in developed countries. The ACE I/D polymorphism is thought to be a marker for functional polymorphism which regulates circulating and tissue ACE activity. While the initial study found a protective effect of the II genotype on the development of nephropathy in IDDM patients, subsequent studies have addressed the role of ACE I/D polymorphism in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. RAAS blockers are the first line drugs for the treatment hypertension associated with diabetes and have been widely used in everyday clinical practice for the purpose of reducing proteinuria in patients with various renal diseases. However, the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockers is variable and the percentage of reducing proteinuria is in the range of 20-80%. The antiproteinuric effect of RAAS blockers may be related to a number of factors: the type or the dose of RAAS blockers, the duration of therapy, the level of sodium intake, and the type of patient's ACE I/D genotype. Besides the nongenetic factors, drug responses, can be influenced by ACE gene polymorphism. In this review, we discuss the relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and diabetic nephropathy and therapeutic response of RAAS blockers. PMID:25587546

  6. HDAC Inhibitors as Epigenetic Regulators of the Immune System: Impacts on Cancer Therapy and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, McKale R.; Leyva, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are powerful epigenetic regulators that have enormous therapeutic potential and have pleiotropic effects at the cellular and systemic levels. To date, HDAC inhibitors are used clinically for a wide variety of disorders ranging from hematopoietic malignancies to psychiatric disorders, are known to have anti-inflammatory properties, and are in clinical trials for several other diseases. In addition to influencing gene expression, HDAC enzymes also function as part of large, multisubunit complexes which have many nonhistone targets, alter signaling at the cellular and systemic levels, and result in divergent and cell-type specific effects. Thus, the effects of HDAC inhibitor treatment are too intricate to completely understand with current knowledge but the ability of HDAC inhibitors to modulate the immune system presents intriguing therapeutic possibilities. This review will explore the complexity of HDAC inhibitor treatment at the cellular and systemic levels and suggest strategies for effective use of HDAC inhibitors in biomedical research, focusing on the ability of HDAC inhibitors to modulate the immune system. The possibility of combining the documented anticancer effects and newly emerging immunomodulatory effects of HDAC inhibitors represents a promising new combinatorial therapeutic approach for HDAC inhibitor treatments. PMID:27556043

  7. Fueling the engine and releasing the break: combinational therapy of cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kleponis, Jennifer; Skelton, Richard; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are increasingly drawing much attention in the therapeutic development for cancer treatment. However, many cancer patients do not respond to treatments with immune checkpoint inhibitors, partly because of the lack of tumor-infiltrating effector T cells. Cancer vaccines may prime patients for treatments with immune checkpoint inhibitors by inducing effector T-cell infiltration into the tumors and immune checkpoint signals. The combination of cancer vaccine and an immune checkpoint inhibitor may function synergistically to induce more effective antitumor immune responses, and clinical trials to test the combination are currently ongoing. PMID:26487965

  8. Current concepts in combination therapy for the treatment of hypertension: combined calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Castro-Serna, David; Barrera, Cesar I Elizalde; Ramos-Brizuela, Luz M

    2009-01-01

    Recent guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend target blood pressures <140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients, or <130/80 mmHg in subjects with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or coronary artery disease. Despite the availability and efficacy of antihypertensive drugs, most hypertensive patients do not reach the recommended treatment targets with monotherapy, making combination therapy necessary to achieve the therapeutic goal. Combination therapy with 2 or more agents is the most effective method for achieving strict blood pressure goals. Fixed-dose combination simplifies treatment, reduces costs, and improves adherence. There are many drug choices for combination therapy, but few data are available about the efficacy and safety of some specific combinations. Combination therapy of calcium antagonists and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are efficacious and safe, and have been considered rational by both the JNC 7 and the 2007 European Society of Hypertension – European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension. The aim of this review is to discuss some relevant issues about the use of combinations with calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:21949615

  9. Aliskiren – an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in the therapy of arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Karolina; Bryl, Wiesław; Minczykowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There has been enormous progress in antihypertensive therapy over the last few decades. However, the management of arterial hypertension is still insufficient and more efforts are needed to improve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of this widely prevalent disease. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition is crucial both for blood pressure (BP) control and for prevention of organ damage or its development in patients with hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or sartans block RAAS incompletely. Aliskiren is one of the novel drugs that has been introduced to antihypertensive therapy recently. Up to now no trial has confirmed that aliskiren is efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events. Double RAAS blockade with aliskiren was not always safe. This review article presents the current view on the place of aliskiren in the therapy of arterial hypertension. PMID:25276171

  10. Aliskiren - an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in the therapy of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Hoffmann, Karolina; Bryl, Wiesław; Minczykowski, Andrzej

    2014-08-29

    There has been enormous progress in antihypertensive therapy over the last few decades. However, the management of arterial hypertension is still insufficient and more efforts are needed to improve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of this widely prevalent disease. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition is crucial both for blood pressure (BP) control and for prevention of organ damage or its development in patients with hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or sartans block RAAS incompletely. Aliskiren is one of the novel drugs that has been introduced to antihypertensive therapy recently. Up to now no trial has confirmed that aliskiren is efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events. Double RAAS blockade with aliskiren was not always safe. This review article presents the current view on the place of aliskiren in the therapy of arterial hypertension. PMID:25276171

  11. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  12. Adjuvant therapy for highly malignant canine mammary tumours: Cox-2 inhibitor versus chemotherapy: a case-control prospective study.

    PubMed

    Arenas, C; Peña, L; Granados-Soler, J L; Pérez-Alenza, M D

    2016-07-30

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) enzyme participates in different steps of the carcinogenetic process and in canine mammary tumours (CMTs), a high expression of Cox-2 is associated with malignancy and tumour angiogenesis. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of a Cox-2 inhibitor as adjuvant therapy in dogs with highly malignant (HM)-CMTs and compare it with that of dogs treated with chemotherapy and with control dogs. Twenty-eight dogs were prospectively included. After surgery, dogs were alternatively allocated into two treatment groups (chemotherapy with mitoxantrone n=8; Cox-2 inhibitor, firocoxib n=7). Control group (n=13) included dogs whose owners rejected adjuvant therapy. All dogs were followed up for two years or until death. The DFS was significantly higher in dogs that received adjuvant treatment (mitoxantrone or firocoxib) (P=0.030) than in control dogs. Dogs on firocoxib treatment had significantly higher DFS (P=0.015) and OS (P=0.048) than control dogs. The DFS and OS of dogs on mitoxantrone treatment were not statistically different from controls. In conclusion, this study supports the use of firocoxib for the treatment of HM-CMTs. Further studies are needed to compare the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs versus Cox-2 inhibitors as adjuvant treatment in these cases. PMID:27377395

  13. Should NS5A inhibitors serve as the scaffold for all-oral anti-HCV combination therapies?

    PubMed Central

    Janardhan, Sujit V; Reau, Nancy S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents a global health problem that affects up to 130–150 million people worldwide. The HCV treatment landscape has been transformed recently by the introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents that target viral proteins, including the NS3 protease, the NS5B polymerase, and the NS5A protein. Treatment with multiple DAAs in combination has been shown to result in high rates of sustained virologic response, without the need for pegylated interferon, and a shorter duration of therapy compared with interferon-based regimens; however, the optimal combination of DAAs has yet to be determined. The class of NS5A inhibitors has picomolar potency with pangenotypic activity, and recent clinical studies have shown these inhibitors to be an important component of DAA combination regimens. This review discusses the rational design of an optimal anti-HCV DAA cocktail, with a focus on the role of NS5A in the HCV life cycle, the attributes of the NS5A class of inhibitors, and the potential for NS5A inhibitors to act as a scaffold for DAA-only treatment regimens. PMID:25926761

  14. Generation of a selective small molecule inhibitor of the CBP/p300 bromodomain for leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Katherine; Meier, Julia; Olzscha, Heidi; Monteiro, Octovia; Martin, Sarah; Philpott, Martin; Tumber, Anthony; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Yapp, Clarence; Wells, Christopher; Che, Ka Hing; Bannister, Andrew; Robson, Samuel; Kumar, Umesh; Parr, Nigel; Lee, Kevin; Lugo, Dave; Jeffrey, Philip; Taylor, Simon; Vecellio, Matteo L.; Bountra, Chas; Brennan, Paul E.; O’Mahony, Alison; Velichko, Sharlene; Müller, Susanne; Hay, Duncan; Daniels, Danette L.; Urh, Marjeta; La Thangue, Nicholas B.; Kouzarides, Tony; Prinjha, Rab; Schwaller, Jürg; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The histone acetyltransferases CBP/p300 are involved in recurrent leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations and are key regulators of cell growth. Therefore, efforts to generate inhibitors of CBP/p300 are of clinical value. We developed a specific and potent acetyl-lysine competitive protein-protein interaction inhibitor, I-CBP112, that targets the CBP/p300 bromodomains. Exposure of human and mouse leukemic cell lines to I-CBP112 resulted in substantially impaired colony formation and induced cellular differentiation without significant cytotoxicity. I-CBP112 significantly reduced the leukemia-initiating potential of MLL-AF9+ AML cells in a dose-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, I-CBP112 increased the cytotoxic activity of BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 as well as doxorubicin. Collectively we report the development and preclinical evaluation of a novel, potent inhibitor targeting CBP/p300 bromodomains that impairs aberrant self-renewal of leukemic cells. The synergistic effects of I-CBP112 and current standard therapy (doxorubicin) as well as emerging treatment strategies (BET inhibition) provide new opportunities for combinatorial treatment of leukemia and potentially other cancers. PMID:26552700

  15. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors promote pro-caspase-8 dimerization that sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damaging therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Tian; Qian, Xiao-Jun; Yu, Yan; Li, Zhen-Hua; Wu, Rui-Yan; Ji, Jiao; Jiao, Lin; Li, Xuan; Kong, Peng-Fei; Chen, Wen-Dan; Feng, Gong-Kan; Deng, Rong; Zhu, Xiao-Feng

    2015-07-10

    The combination of time and order-dependent chemotherapeutic strategies has demonstrated enhanced efficacy in killing cancer cells while minimizing adverse effects. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive. Our results showed that pre-treatment of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib or lapatinib significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of DNA-damaging agents compared to coadministration of the EGFR inhibitor and DNA-damaging agent. Sequential application of erlotinib and doxorubicin increased activated caspase-8 by promoting pro-caspase-8 homodimerization and autocatalytical cleavage, whereas coadministration did not. We found that EGFR inhibitors promoted pro-caspase-8 homodimerization by inhibiting ERK pathway signaling, while doxorubicin promoted it. Our data highlight that ERK has the potential to inhibit the formation of pro-caspase-8 homodimers by phosphorylating pro-caspase-8 at S387. In conclusion, the pretreatment of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors promote pro-caspase-8 dimerization that sensitizes cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents. Our findings provide rationale for novel strategies for the implementation of combined targeted and cytotoxic chemotherapy within a new framework of time and order-dependent therapy. PMID:26036637

  16. FIRE_ACE_ER2_MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) NASA ER-2 Moderate Resolution Imaging ... SSFR Location:  Northern Alaska Arctic Ocean Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  17. Association Between Ischemic Stroke and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Audrey S. L.; Lunt, Mark; Mercer, Louise K.; Watson, Kath D.; Dixon, William G.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) may influence risk and mortality after ischemic stroke by reducing inflammation. This study was undertaken to examine the association of TNFi with the risk of incident ischemic stroke and with 30‐day and 1‐year mortality after ischemic stroke. Methods Patients with RA starting therapy with TNFi and a biologics‐naive comparator group treated with synthetic disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) only were recruited to the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for Rheumatoid Arthritis from 2001 to 2009. Patients were followed up via clinical and patient questionnaires as well as the national death register. Incident strokes were classified as ischemic if brain imaging reports suggested ischemia or if ischemic stroke was reported as the underlying cause of death on a death certificate. Patients with a previous stroke were excluded. Risk of ischemic stroke was compared between patients receiving synthetic DMARDs only and those ever‐exposed to TNFi using a Cox proportional hazards regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Mortality after ischemic stroke was compared between synthetic DMARD–treated patients and TNFi‐treated patients using logistic regression, adjusted for age and sex. Results To April 2010, 127 verified incident ischemic strokes (21 in 3,271 synthetic DMARD–treated patients and 106 in 11,642 TNFi‐treated patients) occurred during 11,973 and 61,226 person‐years of observation, respectively (incidence rate 175 versus 173 per 100,000 person‐years). After adjustment for confounders, there was no association between ever‐exposure to TNFi and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.99 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.54–1.81]). Mortality 30 days or 1 year after ischemic stroke was not associated with concurrent TNFi exposure (odds ratio 0.18 [95% CI 0.03–1.21] and 0.60 [95

  18. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy vs Risperidone for Augmenting Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Helen Blair; Foa, Edna B.; Liebowitz, Michael R.; Huppert, Jonathan D.; Cahill, Shawn; Maher, Michael J.; McLean, Carmen P.; Bender, James; Marcus, Sue M.; Williams, Monnica T.; Weaver, Jamie; Vermes, Donna; Van Meter, Page E.; Rodriguez, Carolyn I.; Powers, Mark; Pinto, Anthony; Imms, Patricia; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Campeas, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the world’s most disabling illnesses according to the World Health Organization. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are the only medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat OCD, but few patients achieve minimal symptoms from an SRI alone. In such cases, practice guidelines recommend adding antipsychotics or cognitive-behavioral therapy consisting of exposure and ritual prevention (EX/RP). OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of these 2 SRI augmentation strategies vs pill placebo for the first time, to our knowledge, in adults with OCD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized clinical trial (conducted January 2007–August 2012) at 2 academic outpatient research clinics that specialize in OCD and anxiety disorders. Patients (aged 18–70 years) were eligible if they had OCD of at least moderate severity despite a therapeutic SRI dose for at least 12 weeks prior to entry. Of 163 who were eligible, 100 were randomized (risperidone, n = 40; EX/RP, n = 40; and placebo, n = 20), and 86 completed the trial. INTERVENTIONS While continuing their SRI at the same dose, patients were randomized to the addition of 8 weeks of risperidone (up to 4 mg/d), EX/RP (17 sessions delivered twice weekly), or pill placebo. Independent assessments were conducted every 4 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) to measure OCD severity. RESULTS Patients randomized to EX/RP had significantly greater reduction in week 8 Y-BOCS scores based on mixed-effects models (vs risperidone: mean [SE], −9.72 [1.38]; P<.001 vs placebo: mean [SE], −10.10 [1.68]; P < .001). Patients receiving risperidone did not significantly differ from those receiving placebo (mean [SE], −0.38 [1.72]; P=.83). More patients receiving EX/RP responded (Y-BOCS score decrease ≥25%: 80% for EX/RP, 23% for risperidone, and 15% for placebo; P < .001). More patients receiving EX/RP achieved minimal

  19. Discovery of potent and selective spiroindolinone MDM2 inhibitor, RO8994, for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuming; Ding, Qingjie; Liu, Jin-Jun; Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Nan; Chu, Xin-Jie; Bartkovitz, David; Luk, Kin-Chun; Janson, Cheryl; Tovar, Christian; Filipovic, Zoran M; Higgins, Brian; Glenn, Kelli; Packman, Kathryn; Vassilev, Lyubomir T; Graves, Bradford

    2014-08-01

    The field of small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions is rapidly advancing and the specific area of inhibitors of the p53/MDM2 interaction is a prime example. Several groups have published on this topic and multiple compounds are in various stages of clinical development. Building on the strength of the discovery of RG7112, a Nutlin imidazoline-based compound, and RG7388, a pyrrolidine-based compound, we have developed additional scaffolds that provide opportunities for future development. Here, we report the discovery and optimization of a highly potent and selective series of spiroindolinone small-molecule MDM2 inhibitors, culminating in RO8994. PMID:24997575

  20. Novel aspects of therapy with the dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor bosutinib in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Keller-V Amsberg, Gunhild; Brümmendorf, Tim H

    2012-09-01

    The dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor bosutinib (SKI-606) targets the tyrosine kinase brc-abl, the key enzyme in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In clinical trials, bosutinib yielded promising results with regard to efficacy, tolerability and toxicity in first-, second- and third-line therapy of CML patients. Remarkably, bosutinib is able to overcome most imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL1-1 mutations except V299L and T315I. Mostly, low-to-moderate grade gastrointestinal toxicitis are the most common treatment-emergent adverse events observed under bosutinib. Unlike other tyrosine kinase inhibitors approved for CML treatment to date, bosutinib shows only minimal inhibitory activity against c-KIT and the PDGF receptor. This may be causative for its favorable hematologic toxicity profile. In this review, the authors give an overview on the mechanism of action and currently available preclinical and clinical data for bosutinib in CML. PMID:23098112

  1. Cell cycle dependence of ACE-2 explains downregulation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Uhal, Bruce D; Dang, MyTrang; Dang, Vinh; Llatos, Roger; Cano, Esteban; Abdul-Hafez, Amal; Markey, Jonathan; Piasecki, Christopher C; Molina-Molina, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II cells, a major source of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2 in the adult lung, are normally quiescent but actively proliferate in lung fibrosis and downregulate this protective enzyme. It was, therefore, hypothesised that ACE-2 expression might be related to cell cycle progression. To test this hypothesis, ACE-2 mRNA levels, protein levels and enzymatic activity were examined in fibrotic human lungs and in the alveolar epithelial cell lines A549 and MLE-12 studied at postconfluent (quiescent) versus subconfluent (proliferating) densities. ACE-2 mRNA, immunoreactive protein and enzymatic activity were all high in quiescent cells, but were severely downregulated or absent in actively proliferating cells. Upregulation of the enzyme in cells that were progressing to quiescence was completely inhibited by the transcription blocker actinomycin D or by SP600125, an inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In lung biopsy specimens obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, immunoreactive enzyme was absent in alveolar epithelia that were positive for proliferation markers, but was robustly expressed in alveolar epithelia devoid of proliferation markers. These data explain the loss of ACE-2 in lung fibrosis and demonstrate cell cycle-dependent regulation of this protective enzyme by a JNK-mediated transcriptional mechanism. PMID:23100504

  2. Combination Therapy with Cholinesterase Inhibitors and Memantine for Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Taro; Iwata, Nakao

    2015-01-01

    Background: We performed an updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of combination therapy with cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: We reviewed cognitive function, activities of daily living, behavioral disturbance, global assessment, discontinuation rate, and individual side effects. Results: Seven studies (total n=2182) were identified. Combination therapy significantly affected behavioral disturbance scores (standardized mean difference=−0.13), activity of daily living scores (standardized mean difference=−0.10), and global assessment scores (standardized mean difference=−0.15). In addition, cognitive function scores (standardized mean difference=−0.13, P=.06) exhibited favorable trends with combination therapy. The effects of combination therapy were more significant in the moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease subgroup in terms of all efficacy outcome scores. The discontinuation rate was similar in both groups, and there were no significant differences in individual side effects. Conclusions: Combination therapy was beneficial for the treatment of moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease in terms of cognition, behavioral disturbances, activities of daily living, and global assessment was well tolerated. PMID:25548104

  3. General relativistic observables for the ACES experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Yu, Nan; Toth, Viktor T.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a high-precision model for relativistic observables of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). We develop all relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of ACES in Earth orbit and to compute observable quantities. We analyze the accuracy of the required model as it applies to the proper-to-coordinate time transformations, light-time equation, and spacecraft equations of motion. We consider various sources of nongravitational noise and their effects on ACES. We estimate the accuracy of orbit reconstruction that is needed to satisfy the ACES science objectives. Based on our analysis, we derive models for the relativistic observables of ACES, which also account for the contribution of atmospheric drag on the clock rate. We include the Earth's oblateness coefficient J2 and the effects of major nongravitational forces on the orbit of the ISS. We demonstrate that the ACES reference frame is pseudoinertial at the level of accuracy required by the experiment. We construct a Doppler-canceled science observable representing the gravitational redshift. We derive accuracy requirements for ISS navigation. The improved model is accurate up to <1 ps and ˜4 ×1 0-17 for time and frequency transfers, correspondingly. These limits are determined by the higher-order harmonics in Earth's gravitational potential.

  4. The Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The goals and measurement strategy of the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE) are described. ACE will help to answer fundamental science questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and global ocean ecosystems. Specifically, the goals of ACE are: 1) to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions and to assess the impact of aerosols on the hydrological cycle and 2) determine Ocean Carbon Cycling and other ocean biological processes. It is expected that ACE will: narrow the uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction and quantify the role of aerosols in climate change; measure the ocean ecosystem changes and precisely quantify ocean carbon uptake; and, improve air quality forecasting by determining the height and type of aerosols being transported long distances. Overviews are provided of the aerosol-cloud community measurement strategy, aerosol and cloud observations over South Asia, and ocean biology research goals. Instruments used in the measurement strategy of the ACE mission are also highlighted, including: multi-beam lidar, multiwavelength high spectra resolution lidar, the ocean color instrument (ORCA)--a spectroradiometer for ocean remote sensing, dual frequency cloud radar and high- and low-frequency micron-wave radiometer. Future steps for the ACE mission include refining measurement requirements and carrying out additional instrument and payload studies.

  5. TCPs: privileged scaffolds for identifying potent LSD1 inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi-Chao; Yu, Bin; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Liu, Ying; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-05-01

    Since the first lysine-specific demethylase (KDM), lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), was characterized in 2004, several families of KDMs have been identified. LSD1 can specifically demethylate H3K4me1/2, H3K9me1/2 as well as some nonhistone substrates. It has been demonstrated to be an oncogene as well as a drug target. Hence, tens of small-molecule LSD1 inhibitors have been designed, synthesized and applied for cancer treatment. However, the two LSD1 inhibitors that have been advanced into early phase clinical trials are trans-2-phenylcyclopropylamine (TCP) derivatives, which indicate that TCP is a druggable scaffold for LSD1 inhibitor. Here, we review the design, synthesis and properties of reported TCP-based LSD1 inhibitors as well as their biological roles. PMID:27102879

  6. Perceptions of erectile dysfunction and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy in a qualitative study of men and women in affected relationships.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Sarah A; Rosen, Raymond C; Althof, Stanley E; Dunn, Marian; Cameron, Ann; Wong, David

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction negatively affects men and women in relationships; however, the subjective experience of erectile dysfunction and phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitor therapy remains poorly understood. The authors therefore characterized participants' subjective understanding of erectile dysfunction and phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitor therapy using individual interviews with affected heterosexual men (n = 58) and women (n = 65). Responses were characterized by 6 psychosocial domains: explanation of the experience, emotional responses, socially expected responses, value of sex, communication with the partner, and treatment expectations. The findings may aid clinicians in relating to men with erectile dysfunction and thus potentially improve effectiveness of therapy. PMID:24274107

  7. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases Modulate DNA Damage Response - A Contributing Factor to Using MEK Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, F; Yan, J; Tang, D

    2011-01-01

    The Raf-MEK-ERK pathway is commonly activated in human cancers, largely attributable to the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) being a common downstream target of growth factor receptors, Ras, and Raf. Elevation of these up-stream signals occurs frequently in a variety of malignancies and ERK kinases play critical roles in promoting cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of MEK-mediated ERK activation is very appealing in cancer therapy. Consequently, numerous MEK inhibitors have been developed over the years. However, clinical trials have yet to produce overwhelming support for using MEK inhibitors in cancer therapy. Although complex reasons may have contributed to this outcome, an alternative possibility is that the MEK-ERK pathway may not solely provide proliferation signals to malignancies, the central scientific rationale in developing MEK inhibitors for cancer therapy. Recent developments may support this alternative possibility. Accumulating evidence now demonstrated that the MEK-ERK pathway contributes to the proper execution of cellular DNA damage response (DDR), a major pathway of tumor suppression. During DDR, the MEK-ERK pathway is commonly activated, which facilitates the proper activation of DDR checkpoints to prevent cell division. Inhibition of MEK-mediated ERK activation, therefore, compromises checkpoint activation. As a result, cells may continue to proliferate in the presence of DNA lesions, leading to the accumulation of mutations and thereby promoting tumorigenesis. Alternatively, reduction in checkpoint activation may prevent efficient repair of DNA damages, which may cause apoptosis or cell catastrophe, thereby enhancing chemotherapy’s efficacy. This review summarizes our current understanding of the participation of the ERK kinases in DDR. PMID:22087839

  8. The mixed lineage kinase-3 inhibitor URMC-099 improves therapeutic outcomes for long-acting antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Guo, Dongwei; Dash, Prasanta K; Araínga, Mariluz; Wiederin, Jayme L; Haverland, Nicole A; Knibbe-Hollinger, Jaclyn; Martinez-Skinner, Andrea; Ciborowski, Pawel; Goodfellow, Val S; Wysocki, Tadeusz A; Wysocki, Beata J; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Liu, Xin-Ming; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Gorantla, Santhi; Gelbard, Harris A; Gendelman, Howard E

    2016-01-01

    During studies to extend the half-life of crystalline nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) the mixed lineage kinase-3 inhibitor URMC-099, developed as an adjunctive neuroprotective agent was shown to facilitate antiviral responses. Long-acting ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (nanoATV/r) nanoformulations co-administered with URMC-099 reduced viral load and the numbers of HIV-1 infected CD4+ T-cells in lymphoid tissues more than either drug alone in infected humanized NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-/- mice. The drug effects were associated with sustained ART depots. Proteomics analyses demonstrated that the antiretroviral responses were linked to affected phagolysosomal storage pathways leading to sequestration of nanoATV/r in Rab-associated recycling and late endosomes; sites associated with viral maturation. URMC-099 administered with nanoATV induced a dose-dependent reduction in HIV-1p24 and reverse transcriptase activity. This drug combination offers a unique chemical marriage for cell-based viral clearance. From the Clinical Editor: Although successful in combating HIV-1 infection, the next improvement in antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) would be to devise long acting therapy, such as intra-cellular depots. In this report, the authors described the use of nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy given together with the mixed lineage kinase-3 inhibitor URMC-099, and showed that this combination not only prolonged drug half-life, but also had better efficacy. The findings are hoped to be translated into the clinical setting in the future. PMID:26472049

  9. Regional Aerosol Optical Depth Characteristics from Satellite Observations: ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K. E.; Smith, P. J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Holben, B. N.; Tomasi, C.; Vitale, V.; Collins, D.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the aerosol properties during 3 recent international field campaigns ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 are described using satellite retrievals from NOAA AVHRR data. Validation of the satellite retrieval procedure is performed with airborne, shipboard, and land-based sunphotometry during ACE-2. The intercomparison between satellite and surface optical depths has a correlation coefficient of 0.93 for 630 nm wavelength and 0.92 for 860 nm wavelength, The standard error of estimate is 0.025 for 630 nm wavelength and 0.023 for 860 nm wavelength. Regional aerosol properties are examined in composite analysis of aerosol optical properties from the ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 regions. ACE-1 and ACE-2 regions have strong modes in the distribution of optical depth around 0.1, but the ACE-2 tails toward higher values yielding an average of 0.16 consistent with pollution and dust aerosol intrusions. The TARFOX region has a noticeable mode of 0.2, but has significant spread of aerosol optical depth values consistent with the varied continental aerosol constituents off the eastern North American Coast.

  10. PI3K inhibitors for cancer therapy: what has been achieved so far?

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Liu, Tao; Hu, Yongzhou

    2009-01-01

    PI3K is a large duel lipid and protein kinase that catalyzes phosphorylation of the 3-hydroxyl position of phosphatidylinositides (PIs) and plays a crucial role in the cellular signaling network. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway is a newly identified strategy for the discovery and development of certain therapeutic agents. Among the various subtypes of PI3K, class IA PI3Kalpha has gained increasing attention as a promising drug target for the treatment of cancer due to its frequent mutations and amplifications in various human cancers. Here, we discuss the insights gained so far relevant to the development of PI3K inhibitors for the treatment of human cancers. Emphasis is on the structure-activity relationship of PI3K inhibitors which bear the most significant PI3Kalpha inhibitory activities. We also highlight PI3K inhibitors that are currently under clinical trials for cancers. PMID:19275602

  11. Recent findings and future directions for interpolar mitotic kinesin inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Stephanie M.; Collins, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The kinesin class of microtubule-associated motor proteins present attractive anti-cancer targets owing to their roles in key functions in dividing cells. Two interpolar mitotic kinesins Eg5 and HSET have opposing motor functions in mitotic spindle assembly with respect to microtubule movement, but both offer opportunities to develop cancer selective therapeutic agents. Here, we summarize the progress to date in developing inhibitors of Eg5 and HSET, with an emphasis on structural biology insights into the binding modes of allosteric inhibitors, compound selectivity and mechanisms of action of different chemical scaffolds. We discuss translation of preclinical studies to clinical experience with Eg5 inhibitors, recent findings on potential resistance mechanisms, and explore the implications for future anticancer drug development against these targets. PMID:26976726

  12. Recent findings and future directions for interpolar mitotic kinesin inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Myers, Stephanie M; Collins, Ian

    2016-03-01

    The kinesin class of microtubule-associated motor proteins present attractive anticancer targets owing to their roles in key functions in dividing cells. Two interpolar mitotic kinesins Eg5 and HSET have opposing motor functions in mitotic spindle assembly with respect to microtubule movement, but both offer opportunities to develop cancer selective therapeutic agents. Here, we summarize the progress to date in developing inhibitors of Eg5 and HSET, with an emphasis on structural biology insights into the binding modes of allosteric inhibitors, compound selectivity and mechanisms of action of different chemical scaffolds. We discuss translation of preclinical studies to clinical experience with Eg5 inhibitors, recent findings on potential resistance mechanisms and explore the implications for future anticancer drug development against these targets. PMID:26976726

  13. Early switch in tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: An emerging clinical question.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Kendra; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2016-07-01

    Response to frontline BCR-ABL1-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy is associated with an improved prognosis for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Accordingly, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and European LeukemiaNet (ELN) recommend the use of specific response milestones (eg, BCR-ABL1≤10% on the International Scale at 3 months) to assess treatment success and inform follow-up care, including potentially switching to another TKI therapy. However, prior to any treatment change, the potential benefits and risks of each TKI and the goals of the patient must be considered. Here we review current NCCN and ELN response recommendations for patients with CML, highlight the impact of early responses on long-term prognosis, and discuss several reasons patients may consider a switch in TKI therapy. We also review completed and ongoing clinical studies involving a switch in frontline therapy for patients with CML, including those with a treatment-free remission phase. PMID:27262540

  14. Three dimensional pharmacophore modeling of human CYP17 inhibitors. Potential agents for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Clement, Omoshile O; Freeman, Clive M; Hartmann, Rolf W; Handratta, Venkatesh D; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Brodie, Angela M H; Njar, Vincent C O

    2003-06-01

    We report here a molecular modeling investigation of steroidal and nonsteroidal inhibitors of human cytochrome P450 17alpha-hydroxylase-17,20-lyase (CYP17). Using the pharmacophore perception technique, we have generated common-feature pharmacophore model(s) to explain the putative binding requirements for two classes of human CYP17 inhibitors. Common chemical features in the steroid and nonsteroid human CYP17 enzyme inhibitors, as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program, are one to two hydrogen bond acceptors (HBAs) and three hydrophobic groups. For azole-steroidal ligands, the 3beta-OH group of ring A and the N-3 of the azole ring attached to ring D at C-17 act as hydrogen bond acceptors. A model that permits hydrogen bond interaction between the azole functionality on ring D and the enzyme is consistent with experimental deductions for type II CYP17 inhibitors where a sixth ligating atom interacts with Fe(II) of heme. In general, pharmacophore models derived for steroid and nonsteroidal compounds bear striking similarities to all azole sites mapping the HBA functionality and to three hydrophobic features describing the hydrophobic interactions between the ligands and the enzyme. Using the pharmacophore model derived for azole-steroidal inhibitors as a 3D search query against several 3D multiconformational Catalyst formatted databases, we identified several steroidal compounds with potential inhibition of this enzyme. Biological testing of some of these compounds show low to high inhibitory potency against the human CYP17 enzyme. This shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying new and potent CYP17 inhibitors. Further refinement of the model is in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads. PMID:12773039

  15. Combinatorial protein engineering of proteolytically resistant mesotrypsin inhibitors as candidates for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Itay; Kayode, Olumide; Hockla, Alexandra; Sankaran, Banumathi; Radisky, Derek C; Radisky, Evette S; Papo, Niv

    2016-05-15

    Engineered protein therapeutics offer advantages, including strong target affinity, selectivity and low toxicity, but like natural proteins can be susceptible to proteolytic degradation, thereby limiting their effectiveness. A compelling therapeutic target is mesotrypsin, a protease up-regulated with tumour progression, associated with poor prognosis, and implicated in tumour growth and progression of many cancers. However, with its unique capability for cleavage and inactivation of proteinaceous inhibitors, mesotrypsin presents a formidable challenge to the development of biological inhibitors. We used a powerful yeast display platform for directed evolution, employing a novel multi-modal library screening strategy, to engineer the human amyloid precursor protein Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (APPI) simultaneously for increased proteolytic stability, stronger binding affinity and improved selectivity for mesotrypsin inhibition. We identified a triple mutant APPIM17G/I18F/F34V, with a mesotrypsin inhibition constant (Ki) of 89 pM, as the strongest mesotrypsin inhibitor yet reported; this variant displays 1459-fold improved affinity, up to 350 000-fold greater specificity and 83-fold improved proteolytic stability compared with wild-type APPI. We demonstrated that APPIM17G/I18F/F34V acts as a functional inhibitor in cell-based models of mesotrypsin-dependent prostate cancer cellular invasiveness. Additionally, by solving the crystal structure of the APPIM17G/I18F/F34V-mesotrypsin complex, we obtained new insights into the structural and mechanistic basis for improved binding and proteolytic resistance. Our study identifies a promising mesotrypsin inhibitor as a starting point for development of anticancer protein therapeutics and establishes proof-of-principle for a novel library screening approach that will be widely applicable for simultaneously evolving proteolytic stability in tandem with desired functionality for diverse protein scaffolds. PMID:26957636

  16. A recommended practical approach to the management of target therapy and angiogenesis inhibitors cardiotoxicity: an opinion paper of the working group on drug cardiotoxicity and cardioprotection, Italian Society of Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Maurea, Nicola; Spallarossa, Paolo; Cadeddu, Christian; Madonna, Rosalinda; Mele, Donato; Monte, Ines; Novo, Giuseppina; Pagliaro, Pasquale; Pepe, Alessia; Tocchetti, Carlo G.; Zito, Concetta; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The US National Cancer Institute estimates that cardiotoxicity (CTX) from target therapy refers mostly to four groups of drugs: epidermal growth factor receptor 2 inhibitors, angiogenic inhibitors, directed Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog inhibitors, and proteasome inhibitors. The main cardiotoxic side-effects related to antiepidermal growth factor receptor 2 therapy are left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart failure. Angiogenesis inhibitors are associated with hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction/heart failure, myocardial ischemia, QT prolongation, and thrombosis. Moreover, other agents may be related to CTX induced by treatment. In this study, we review the guidelines for a practical approach for the management of CTX in patients under anticancer target therapy. PMID:27183530

  17. A recommended practical approach to the management of target therapy and angiogenesis inhibitors cardiotoxicity: an opinion paper of the working group on drug cardiotoxicity and cardioprotection, Italian Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Maurea, Nicola; Spallarossa, Paolo; Cadeddu, Christian; Madonna, Rosalinda; Mele, Donato; Monte, Ines; Novo, Giuseppina; Pagliaro, Pasquale; Pepe, Alessia; Tocchetti, Carlo G; Zito, Concetta; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    The US National Cancer Institute estimates that cardiotoxicity (CTX) from target therapy refers mostly to four groups of drugs: epidermal growth factor receptor 2 inhibitors, angiogenic inhibitors, directed Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog inhibitors, and proteasome inhibitors. The main cardiotoxic side-effects related to antiepidermal growth factor receptor 2 therapy are left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart failure. Angiogenesis inhibitors are associated with hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction/heart failure, myocardial ischemia, QT prolongation, and thrombosis. Moreover, other agents may be related to CTX induced by treatment. In this study, we review the guidelines for a practical approach for the management of CTX in patients under anticancer target therapy. PMID:27183530

  18. Current and future prospects for anticoagulant therapy: inhibitors of factor Xa and factor IIa.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Job; Wehling, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Indirect systemic and direct oral factor Xa and direct oral factor IIa inhibitors with improved pharmacologic profiles compared with heparins and vitamin K antagonists are currently in clinical development. This overview focuses on the indirect antithrombin dependent pentasaccharide derivatives of idraparinux and on the most advanced oral direct inhibitors to factor Xa (rivaroxaban and apixaban) and IIa (dabigatran). Specifically, the results of dose-finding studies for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after elective orthopedic surgery, the results of dose-finding studies for treatment of acute venous thromboembolism including prolonged prophylaxis of recurrent events, and the designs of ongoing clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:18393142

  19. Small molecule inhibitors of the Dishevelled-CXXC5 interaction are new drug candidates for bone anabolic osteoporosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Yi; Choi, Sehee; Yoon, Ji-Hye; Lim, Hwan Jung; Lee, Hyuk; Choi, Jiwon; Ro, Eun Ji; Heo, Jung-Nyoung; Lee, Weontae; No, Kyoung Tai; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2016-01-01

    Bone anabolic agents promoting bone formation and rebuilding damaged bones would ideally overcome the limitations of anti-resorptive therapy, the current standard prescription for osteoporosis. However, the currently prescribed parathyroid hormone (PTH)-based anabolic drugs present limitations and adverse effects including osteosarcoma during long-term use. Also, the antibody-based anabolic drugs that are currently being developed present the potential limits in clinical application typical of macromolecule drugs. We previously identified that CXXC5 is a negative feedback regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway via its interaction with Dishevelled (Dvl) and suggested the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction as a potential target for anabolic therapy of osteoporosis. Here, we screened small-molecule inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction via a newly established in vitro assay system. The screened compounds were found to activate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and enhance osteoblast differentiation in primary osteoblasts. The bone anabolic effects of the compounds were shown using ex vivo-cultured calvaria. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titration analysis confirmed interaction between Dvl PDZ domain and KY-02061, a representative of the screened compounds. Oral administration of KY-02327, one of 55 newly synthesized KY-02061 analogs, successfully rescued bone loss in the ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model. In conclusion, small-molecule inhibitors of the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction that block negative feedback regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling are potential candidates for the development of bone anabolic anti-osteoporosis drugs. PMID:26941261

  20. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy. PMID:26648693

  1. [Comparison of salvage chemotherapy regimen ACES with ESHAP for refractory or relapsed malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Imataki, Osamu; Tamai, Yotaro; Kawakami, Kimihiro

    2007-10-01

    Standard salvage chemotherapy for refractory or relapsed malignant lymphoma has not been defined. The efficacy and feasibility of the ACES regimen, consisting of carboplatin at 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 to 4, etoposide at 80 mg/m(2) on day 1 to 4, high-dose Ara-C at 2 g/m(2) on day 5 and methylprednisolone at 500 mg/day for 5 days, for refractory or relapsed lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed in comparison with the ESHAP regimen. The subjects were 29 patients, including 7 aggressive follicular lymphomas, 16 large B cell lymphomas and 6 Hodgkin lymphomas. Characteristics of patients with ESHAP (19 cases) and the ACES (10 cases) group were as follows: male/female ratio, 10/9 and 3/7; median age, 49 (range, 31-72) and 54 (22-65); and initial clinical stage (I and II / III / IV), 5/8/6 and 1/1/8, respectively. Among the 29 patients, complete response was achieved in 68% (13/19) in ESHAP and 40% (4/10) in ACES.Progression-free survival and overall survival were 31.3% and 34.3%, respectively. Hematological toxicity was not significantly different between the two groups, and renal toxicity was significantly higher in ESHAP (52%) than ACES (0%). We concluded that the ACES regimen had a possibility of effective consolidation therapy for the elderly aiming to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. PMID:17940378

  2. Is angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers therapy protective against prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yeqing; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xiao; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may act as a molecular and therapeutic target for treating site-specific cancers, including prostate cancer. However, previous observational studies regarding the association between RAS inhibitors and prostate cancer risk have reported inconsistent results. We examined this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 20,267 patients from nine cohort studies were enrolled. Compared with non-users of RAS inhibitors, individuals using RAS inhibitors had a reduced risk of prostate cancer (RR 0.92, 95 % CI 0.87-0.98), without statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (P = 0.118 for heterogeneity, I2 = 37.6 %). In addition, when subgroup analyses by study quality and number of cases, more statistically significant associations were observed in studies of high quality (RR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.88-0.97) and large sample size (RR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.91-0.98). There was no evidence of significant publication bias with Begg's test (P = 0.602) or with Egger's test (P = 0.350). Overall, this study indicates that use of RAS inhibitors may be associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer. Large-scale well designed studies are needed to further explore this association. PMID:26760503

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors: investigational therapies for the treatment of psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, Anja K; Crawshaw, Ania A; Byrne, Emily; Young, Helen S

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory autoimmune condition in which environmental factors and genetic predisposition contribute to the development of disease in susceptible individuals. Angiogenesis is known to be a key pathogenic feature of psoriasis. Local and systemic elevation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A has been demonstrated in the skin and plasma of patients with psoriasis and is known to correlate with improvement following some traditional psoriasis treatments. A number of VEGF inhibitors are licensed for the treatment of malignancies and eye disease and isolated case reports suggest that some individuals with psoriasis may improve when exposed to these agents. The small number of cases and lack of unified reporting measures makes it difficult to draw generalizations and underline the heterogeneity of psoriasis as a disease entity. Though not yet licensed for the treatment of psoriasis in humans, experimental data supports the potential of VEGF inhibitors to influence relevant aspects of human cell biology (such as endothelial cell differentiation) and to improve animal models of skin disease. Given the multi-factorial nature of psoriasis it is unlikely that VEGF inhibitors will be effective in all patients, however they have the potential to be a valuable addition to the therapeutic arsenal in selected cases. Current VEGF inhibitors in clinical use are associated with a number of potentially serious side effects including hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, and gastrointestinal perforation. Such risks require careful consideration in psoriasis populations particularly in light of growing concerns linking psoriasis to increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:24101875

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors: investigational therapies for the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Anja K; Crawshaw, Ania A; Byrne, Emily; Young, Helen S

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory autoimmune condition in which environmental factors and genetic predisposition contribute to the development of disease in susceptible individuals. Angiogenesis is known to be a key pathogenic feature of psoriasis. Local and systemic elevation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A has been demonstrated in the skin and plasma of patients with psoriasis and is known to correlate with improvement following some traditional psoriasis treatments. A number of VEGF inhibitors are licensed for the treatment of malignancies and eye disease and isolated case reports suggest that some individuals with psoriasis may improve when exposed to these agents. The small number of cases and lack of unified reporting measures makes it difficult to draw generalizations and underline the heterogeneity of psoriasis as a disease entity. Though not yet licensed for the treatment of psoriasis in humans, experimental data supports the potential of VEGF inhibitors to influence relevant aspects of human cell biology (such as endothelial cell differentiation) and to improve animal models of skin disease. Given the multi-factorial nature of psoriasis it is unlikely that VEGF inhibitors will be effective in all patients, however they have the potential to be a valuable addition to the therapeutic arsenal in selected cases. Current VEGF inhibitors in clinical use are associated with a number of potentially serious side effects including hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, and gastrointestinal perforation. Such risks require careful consideration in psoriasis populations particularly in light of growing concerns linking psoriasis to increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:24101875

  5. In Vitro Targeted Photodynamic Therapy with a Pyropheophorbide-a Conjugated Inhibitor of Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiancheng; Wu, Lisa Y.; Choi, Joseph K.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKROUND The lack of specific delivery of photosensitizers (PSs), represents a significant limitation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The biomarker prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has attracted considerable attention as a target for imaging and therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. Although recent efforts have been made to conjugate inhibitors of PSMA with imaging agents, there have been no reports on photosensitizer-conjugated PSMA inhibitors for targeted PDT of prostate cancer. The present study focuses on the use of a PSMA inhibitor-conjugate of pyropheophorbide-a (Ppa-conjugate 2) for targeted PDT to achieve apoptosis in PSMA+ LNCaP cells. METHODS Confocal laser scanning microscopy with a combination of nuclear staining and immunofluorescence methods were employed to monitor the specific imaging and PDT-mediated apoptotic effects on PSMA-positive LNCaP and PSMA-negative (PC-3) cells. RESULTS Our results demonstrated that PDT-mediated effects by Ppa-conjugate 2 were specific to LNCaP cells, but not PC-3 cells. Cell permeability was detected as early as 2 h by HOE33342/PI double-staining, becoming more intense by 4 h. Evidence for the apoptotic caspase cascade being activated was based on the appearance of PARP p85 fragment. TUNEL assay detected DNA fragmentation 16 h post-PDT, confirming apoptotic events. CONCLUSIONS Cell permeability by HOE33342/PI double-staining as well as PARP p85 fragment and TUNEL assays confirm cellular apoptosis in PSMA+ cells when treated with PS-inhibitor conjugate 2 and subsequently irradiated. It is expected that the PSMA targeting small-molecule of this conjugate can serve as a delivery vehicle for PDT and other therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. PMID:19142895

  6. Nanoformulation of Geranylgeranyltransferase-I Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy: Liposomal Encapsulation and pH-Dependent Delivery to Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jie; Yoshimura, Kohei; Goto, Koichi; Lee, Craig; Hamura, Ken; Kwon, Ohyun; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors against protein geranylgeranyltransferase-I such as P61A6 have been shown to inhibit proliferation of a variety of human cancer cells and exhibit antitumor activity in mouse models. Development of these inhibitors could be dramatically accelerated by conferring tumor targeting and controlled release capability. As a first step towards this goal, we have encapsulated P61A6 into a new type of liposomes that open and release cargos only under low pH condition. These low pH-release type liposomes were prepared by adjusting the ratio of two types of phospholipid derivatives. Loading of geranylgeranyltransferase-I inhibitor (GGTI) generated liposomes with average diameter of 50–100 nm. GGTI release in solution was sharply dependent on pH values, only showing release at pH lower than 6. Release of cargos in a pH-dependent manner inside the cell was demonstrated by the use of a proton pump inhibitor Bafilomycin A1 that Increased lysosomal pH and inhibited the release of a dye carried in the pH-liposome. Delivery of GGTI to human pancreatic cancer cells was demonstrated by the inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation inside the cell and this effect was blocked by Bafilomycin A1. In addition, GGTI delivered by pH-liposomes induced proliferation inhibition, G1 cell cycle arrest that is associated with the expression of cell cycle regulator p21CIP1/WAF1. Proliferation inhibition was also observed with various lung cancer cell lines. Availability of nanoformulated GGTI opens up the possibility to combine with other types of inhibitors. To demonstrate this point, we combined the liposomal-GGTI with farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI) to inhibit K-Ras signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. Our results show that the activated K-Ras signaling in these cells can be effectively inhibited and that synergistic effect of the two drugs is observed. Our results suggest a new direction in the use of GGTI for cancer therapy. PMID:26352258

  7. Gene Therapy with Endogenous Inhibitors of Angiogenesis for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Beyond Anti-VEGF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prea, Selwyn M.; Chan, Elsa C.; Dusting, Gregory J.; Vingrys, Algis J.; Bui, Bang V.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of substantial and irreversible vision loss amongst elderly populations in industrialized countries. The advanced neovascular (or “wet”) form of the disease is responsible for severe and aggressive loss of central vision. Current treatments aim to seal off leaky blood vessels via laser therapy or to suppress vessel leakage and neovascular growth through intraocular injections of antibodies that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, the long-term success of anti-VEGF therapy can be hampered by limitations such as low or variable efficacy, high frequency of administration (usually monthly), potentially serious side effects, and, most importantly, loss of efficacy with prolonged treatment. Gene transfer of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins is an alternative approach that has the potential to provide long-term suppression of neovascularization and/or excessive vascular leakage in the eye. Preclinical studies of gene transfer in a large animal model have provided impressive preliminary results with a number of transgenes. In addition, a clinical trial in patients suffering from advanced neovascular AMD has provided proof-of-concept for successful gene transfer. In this mini review, we summarize current theories pertaining to the application of gene therapy for neovascular AMD and the potential benefits when used in conjunction with endogenous antiangiogenic proteins. PMID:25821585

  8. Pharmacophore development and screening for discovery of potential inhibitors of ADAMTS-4 for osteoarthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Dalal, Krishna; Chopra, Madhu

    2016-08-01

    In the development of osteoarthritis, aggrecan degrades prior to cartilage destruction. Aggrecanase-1 (ADAMTS-4) is considered to be the major enzyme responsible for cleaving the Glu373-Ala374 bond in the interglobular domain of aggrecan in humans. Therefore, inhibitors of ADAMTS-4 have therapeutic potential in the treatment of osteoarthritis. In the present work, we developed a chemical feature based pharmacophore model of ADAMTS-4 inhibitors using the HipHop module within the Catalyst program package in order to elucidate the structure-activity relationship and to carry out in-silico screening. The Maybridge database was screened using Hypo1 as a 3D query, and the best-fit hits that followed Lipinski's rule of five were subsequently screened to select the compounds. The hit compounds were then docked into the active site of ADAMTS-4, and interactions were visualized to determine the potential lead molecules. After subjecting all of the hits to various screening and filtering processes, 13 compounds were finally evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activities. This study resulted in the identification of two lead compounds with potent inhibitory effects on ADAMTS-4 activity, with IC50 values of 0.042 μM and 0.028 μM, respectively. These results provide insight into the pharmacophoric requirements for the development of more potent ADAMTS-4 inhibitors. Graphical Abstract The aggrecan-degrading metalloprotease ADAMTS-4 has been identified as a novel therapeutic target for osteoarthritis. In this work, we used HipHop-based pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening of the Maybridge database to identify novel ADAMTS-4 inhibitors. These novel lead compounds act as potent and specific inhibitors for the ADAMTS-4 enzyme and could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of OA. PMID:27401455

  9. Molecularly targeted therapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer: a review of the ErbB family inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Assuntina G; Worden, Francis P

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) present with locally advanced disease, which requires site-specific combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite aggressive therapy, survival outcomes remain poor, and treatment-related morbidity is not negligible. For patients with recurrent or metastatic disease, therapeutic options are further limited and prognosis is dismal. With this in mind, molecularly targeted therapy provides a promising approach to optimizing treatment efficacy while minimizing associated toxicity. The ErbB family of receptors (ie, epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR], ErbB2/human epidermal growth factor receptor [HER]-2, ErbB3/HER3, and ErbB4/HER4) is known to contribute to oncogenic processes, such as cellular proliferation and survival. EGFR, specifically, is upregulated in more than 90% of HNSCC, has been implicated in radiation resistance, and correlates with poorer clinical outcomes. The central role of EGFR in the pathogenesis of HNSCC suggests that inhibition of this pathway represents an attractive treatment strategy. As a result, EGFR inhibition has been extensively studied, with the emergence of two classes of drug therapy: monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. While the monoclonal antibody cetuximab is currently the only US Food and Drug Administration–approved EGFR inhibitor for the treatment of HNSCC, numerous investigational drugs are being evaluated in clinical trials. This paper will review the role of the ErbB family in the pathogenesis of HNSCC, as well as the evidence-based data for the use of ErbB family inhibition in clinical practice. PMID:27110122

  10. Low level HIV viremia is more frequent under protease-inhibitor containing firstline therapy than under NNRTI-regimens

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmann, Frank; Braun, Patrick; Knickmann, Mechthild; Knechten, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An association of persistent low level viremia (LLV) below 500 copies/mL and a higher risk of therapy failure is still point of controversial discussion. Furthermore, it seems that LLV occurs more frequently in patients with protease-inhibitor regimens than in NNRTI- / or integrase-inhibitor containing therapies. The focus of this work was to assess the prevalence of LLV (50–200 copies/mL) and weak viremia (201–500 copies/mL) in firstline-treated patients according to their therapy regimen. Methods A total of 832 and 944 patients from 23 German centres were under firstline therapy in 2012 and 2013, respectively. All patients received their therapy for more than 24 weeks. VL data was related to clinical data retrospectively including ART-composition, subdivided into NNRTIs (Efavirenz, Nevirapine), PIs (Atazanavir, Darunavir, Lopinavir) and INIs (Raltegravir). Low viremic patients were classified into two arms of 50–200 copies/mL (group A) and 201–500 copies/mL (group B). Results Success of therapy was defined as <50 copies/mL and was observed in 90.0% and 91.1% (2012/2013), respectively. An additional 2.0% and 2.3% had LLV. The amount of viremic patients with VLs <500 copies/mL differed significantly between NNRTI-based firstline regimens 1.7% and 2.5% and PI-based regimens 4.8% and 5.7% (2012/2013), respectively. LLV was clearly less often observed in EFV-based- (1.6% and 1.1% [group A] / 0.4% and 0.4% [group B]) or NVP-based firstline therapies (1.0% and 3.6% [group A] + 0% and 0% [group B]) than in ATV-based- (7.5% and 3.8% [group A] + 1.5% and 2.5% [group B]), DRV-based- (2.9% and 3.0% [group A] + 2.2% and 0% [group B]) or LPV-based firstline therapies (1.6% and 3.3% [group A] + 0.8% and 2.5% [group B]) and also in parts for RAL-based regimens (0% and 3.7% [group A] + 0% and 1.9% [group B]). Conclusions LLV is more often observed under PI-based firstline than under NNRTI-regimens. Only one NNRTI-patient of group B remained on therapy. A

  11. Activation of HER3 Interferes with Antitumor Effects of Axl Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: Suggestion of Combination Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Torka, Robert; Pénzes, Kinga; Gusenbauer, Simone; Baumann, Christine; Szabadkai, István; Őrfi, Lászlȯ; Kéri, György; Ullrich, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has been established as a strong candidate for targeted therapy of cancer. However, the benefits of targeted therapies are limited due to acquired resistance and activation of alternative RTKs. Therefore, we asked if cancer cells are able to overcome targeted Axl therapies. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of Axl by short interfering RNA or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) BMS777607 induces the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) and the neuregulin 1(NRG1)–dependent phosphorylation of HER3 in MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Moreover, analysis of 20 Axl-expressing cancer cell lines of different tissue origin indicates a low basal phosphorylation of RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT) as a general requirement for HER3 activation on Axl inhibition. Consequently, phosphorylation of AKT arises as an independent biomarker for Axl treatment. Additionally, we introduce phosphorylation of HER3 as an independent pharmacodynamic biomarker for monitoring of anti-Axl therapy response. Inhibition of cell viability by BMS777607 could be rescued by NRG1-dependent activation of HER3, suggesting an escape mechanism by tumor microenvironment. The Axl-TKI MPCD84111 simultaneously blocked Axl and HER2/3 signaling and thereby prohibited HER3 feedback activation. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 using BMS777607 and lapatinib led to a significant inhibition of cell viability in Axl-expressing MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Therefore, we conclude that, in patient cohorts with expression of Axl and low basal activity of AKT, a combined inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 kinase would be beneficial to overcome acquired resistance to Axl-targeted therapies. PMID:24862757

  12. Risk of bleeding associated with combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and antiplatelet therapy following acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Labos, Christopher; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Nedjar, Hacene; Turecki, Gustavo; Rahme, Elham

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients prescribed antiplatelet treatment to prevent recurrent acute myocardial infarction are often also given a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) to treat coexisting depression. Use of either treatment may increase the risk of bleeding. We assessed the risk of bleeding among patients taking both medications following acute myocardial infarction. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using hospital discharge abstracts, physician billing information, medication reimbursement claims and demographic data from provincial health services administrative databases. We included patients 50 years of age or older who were discharged from hospital with antiplatelet therapy following acute myocardial infarction between January 1998 and March 2007. Patients were followed until admission to hospital due to a bleeding episode, admission to hospital due to recurrent acute myocardial infarction, death or the end of the study period. Results: The 27 058 patients in the cohort received the following medications at discharge: acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) (n = 14 426); clopidogrel (n = 2467), ASA and clopidogrel (n = 9475); ASA and an SSRI (n = 406); ASA, clopidogrel and an SSRI (n = 239); or clopidogrel and an SSRI (n = 45). Compared with ASA use alone, the combined use of an SSRI with antiplatelet therapy was associated with an increased risk of bleeding (ASA and SSRI: hazard ratio [HR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–1.87; ASA, clopidogrel and SSRI: HR 2.35, 95% CI 1.61–3.42). Compared with dual antiplatelet therapy alone (ASA and clopidogrel), combined use of an SSRI and dual antiplatelet therapy was associated with an increased risk of bleeding (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.07–2.32). Interpretation: Patients taking an SSRI together with ASA or dual antiplatelet therapy following acute myocardial infarction were at increased risk of bleeding. PMID:21948719

  13. Comparison of efavirenz and protease inhibitor based combination antiretroviral therapy regimens in treatment-naïve people living with HIV with baseline resistance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Charlotte; McFaul, Katie; Kabagambe, Samuel; Sonecha, Sonali; Jones, Rachael; Asboe, David; Pozniak, Anton; Nwokolo, Nneka; Boffito, Marta

    2016-07-17

    A retrospective cohort analysis comparing the efficacy of boosted protease inhibitor-based and efavirenz-based combination antiretroviral therapy in treatment-naïve people living with HIV with baseline resistance found that efavirenz-based treatment led to a shorter mean time to undetectable viral load. A higher proportion of patients with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor related baseline resistance mutations in the efavirenz-treatment group achieved an undetectable viral load at both 6 and 12 months post-treatment initiation, compared with the boosted protease-inhibitor-treatment group.Supplementary content: http://links.lww.com/QAD/A930. PMID:27139315

  14. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors as oxygen free radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queiroz, M J; Manso, C F

    1993-01-01

    The authors have compared the ability of two non-SH-containing angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (enalaprilat and lisinopril) with an -SH containing ACE inhibitor (captopril) to scavenge the hydroxyl radical (.OH). All three compounds were able to scavenge .OH radicals generated in free solution at approximately diffusion-controlled rates (10(10) M-1 s-1) as established by the deoxyribose assay in the presence of EDTA. The compounds also inhibited deoxyribose degradation in reaction mixtures which did not contain EDTA but not so effectively. This later findings also suggests that they have some degree of metal-binding capability. Chemiluminescence assays of oxidation of hypoxanthine by xanthine oxidase in the presence of luminol, confirm that the three ACE inhibitors are oxygen free radical scavengers. Our results indicate that the presence of a sulphydryl group in the chemical structure of ACE inhibitors is not relevant for their oxygen free radical scavenging ability. PMID:8244086

  15. Natural AChE Inhibitors from Plants and their Contribution to Alzheimer’s Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ana Paula; Faraoni, María Belén; Castro, María Julia; Alza, Natalia Paola; Cavallaro, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    As acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are an important therapeutic strategy in Alzheimer’s disease, efforts are being made in search of new molecules with anti-AChE activity. The fact that naturally-occurring compounds from plants are considered to be a potential source of new inhibitors has led to the discovery of an important number of secondary metabolites and plant extracts with the ability of inhibiting the enzyme AChE, which, according to the cholinergic hypothesis, increases the levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain, thus improving cholinergic functions in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and alleviating the symptoms of this neurological disorder. This review summarizes a total of 128 studies which correspond to the most relevant research work published during 2006-2012 (1st semester) on plant-derived compounds, plant extracts and essential oils found to elicit AChE inhibition. PMID:24381530

  16. Remarks on KERMA Factors in ACE files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, C.; Ochiai, K.; Takakura, K.; Sato, S.

    2014-04-01

    Some neutron KERMA factors in ACE files are negative and extremely large if nuclear data libraries do not keep energy-balance. The status of neutron KERMA factors in the official ACE file of ENDF/B-VII.1 is examined. As a result, it is found out that neutron KERMA factors of nuclei more than 200 in ENDF/B-VII.1 have some problems. Effects of the inadequate KERMA factor are also investigated, which are large for neutron heat while those are small for total (neutron + gamma) heat. Users who use only neutron KERMA factors should check if the factors are adequate or not before they use the factors.

  17. Combination therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors and other antidepressants or stimulants: strategies for the management of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Samantha J; Shin, Mirae; McInnis, Melvin G; Bostwick, Jolene R

    2015-04-01

    combination treatment certainly exist with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, or clomipramine, the current literature supports cautious use of combining MAOIs with other antidepressants in patients with TRD who have failed multiple treatment modalities. In addition, the data from the 29 patients receiving combination therapy with an MAOI and another antidepressant or stimulant medication revealed that 21% improved significantly, with no complications. This case series and literature review suggest that when used under close supervision and under the care of an experienced clinician in psychiatry, combination therapy may be a consideration for the management of TRD in patients not responding to monotherapy or other combinations of antidepressants. PMID:25884531

  18. Kinase Domain Point Mutations in Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Emerge Following Therapy with BCR-ABL Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dan; Thomas, Deborah; Yin, C. Cameron; O'Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge E.; Jabbour, Elias; Breeden, Megan; Giles, Francis J.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2008-01-01

    Background BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations are detected in approximately 45% of imatinib-resistant CML. Patterns of KD mutations in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are less well-studied. Methods We assessed KD mutations in relapsed Ph+ ALL following treatments that included one or more kinase inhibitors (n = 24) or no prior KI therapy (n = 12). Results ABL KD mutations were detected by direct sequencing in 15 of 17 (88%) relapsed Ph+ ALL with prior imatinib (n = 16) or dasatinib (n = 1) treatment, and in 6 of 7 (86%) resistant/relapsed tumors treated with 2 or more KIs, compared with 0 of 12 relapsed Ph+ ALL never treated with KI. A restricted set of mutations was seen, mostly Y253H and T315I, detected on average 13 months following KI initiation, and mutations were not detected in the initial tumor samples prior to KI therapy in 12 patients assessed. Using a more sensitive pyrosequencing method, we did not detect mutations at codons 315 and 253 in the diagnostic samples from these 12 patients or in 30 Ph+ ALL patients who never relapsed. Conclusions ABL KD mutations, especially at codons 315 and 253, emerge upon relapse in the vast majority of patients with Ph+ ALL receiving maintenance KI therapy. Ongoing KI exposure may thus alter the patterns of relapse and favor outgrowth of clones with KI-resistant mutations. PMID:18615627

  19. Dual mode of cancer cell destruction for pancreatic cancer therapy using Hsp90 inhibitor loaded polymeric nano magnetic formulation.

    PubMed

    Rochani, Ankit K; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Raveendran, Sreejith; Borah, Ankita; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2016-09-10

    Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) has been extensively explored as a potential drug target for cancer therapies. 17- N-allylamino- 17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG) was the first Hsp90 inhibitor to enter clinical trials for cancer therapy. However, native drug is being shown to have considerable anticancer efficacy against pancreatic cancer when used in combination therapy regime. Further, magnetic hyperthermia has shown to have promising effects against pancreatic cancer in combination with known cyto-toxic drugs under both target and non-targeted scenarios. Hence, in order to enhance the efficacy of 17AAG against pancreatic cancer, we developed poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coated, 17AAG and Fe3O4 loaded magnetic nanoparticle formulations by varying the relative concentration of polymer. We found that polymer concentration affects the magnetic strength and physicochemical properties of formulation. We were also able to see that our aqueous dispensable formulations were able to provide anti-pancreatic cancer activity for MIA PaCa-2 cell line in dose and time dependent manner in comparison to mice fibroblast cell lines (L929). Moreover, the in-vitro magnetic hyperthermia against MIA PaCa-2 provided proof principle that our 2-in-1 particles may work against cancer cell lines effectively. PMID:27469073

  20. Synthetic lethal screening with small molecule inhibitors provides a pathway to rational combination therapies for melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Roller, Devin; Axelrod, Mark; Capaldo, Brian; Jensen, Karin; Mackey, Aaron; Weber, Michael J; Gioeli, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Recent data demonstrate that extracellular signals are transmitted through a network of proteins rather than hierarchical signaling pathways suggesting why inhibition of a single component of a canonical pathway is insufficient for the treatment of cancer. The biological outcome of signaling through a network is inherently more robust and resistant to inhibition of a single network component. In this study, we performed a functional chemical genetic screen to identify novel interactions between signaling inhibitors that would not be predicted based on our current understanding of signaling networks. We screened over 300 drug combinations in nine melanoma cell lines and have identified pairs of compounds that show synergistic cytotoxicity. The synergistic cytotoxicities identified did not correlate with the known RAS and BRAF mutational status of the melanoma cell lines. Among the most robust results was synergy between sorafenib, a multi-kinase inhibitor with activity against RAF, and diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Drug substitution experiments using the NSAIDs celecoxib and ibuprofen or the MEK inhibitor PD325901 and the RAF inhibitor RAF265 suggest that inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) and MAP kinase signaling are targets for the synergistic cytotoxicity of sorafenib and diclofenac. Co-treatment with sorafenib and diclofenac interrupts a positive feedback signaling loop involving ERK, cPLA2, and COX. Genome-wide expression profiling demonstrates synergy-specific down-regulation of survival-related genes. This study has uncovered novel functional drug combinations and suggests that the underlying signaling networks that control responses to targeted agents can vary substantially depending on unexplored components of the cell genotype. PMID:22962324

  1. Retreatment with aromatase inhibitor therapy in the management of granulosa cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Melissa; Huang, Gloria S

    2016-01-01

    •Over 90% of granulosa cell tumors have a FOXL2 mutation that contributes to aromatase upregulation.•Chemotherapy has demonstrated limited efficacy in the treatment of granulosa cell tumors.•A patient with recurrent granulosa cell tumor responded briefly to anastrazole treatment.•Retreatment with another aromatase inhibitor letrozole led to a durable response of 24 months. PMID:26937482

  2. Validation of the 2nd Generation Proteasome Inhibitor Oprozomib for Local Therapy of Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Semren, Nora; Habel-Ungewitter, Nunja C; Fernandez, Isis E; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Stöger, Tobias; Meiners, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition has been shown to prevent development of fibrosis in several organs including the lung. However, effects of proteasome inhibitors on lung fibrosis are controversial and cytotoxic side effects of the overall inhibition of proteasomal protein degradation cannot be excluded. Therefore, we hypothesized that local lung-specific application of a novel, selective proteasome inhibitor, oprozomib (OZ), provides antifibrotic effects without systemic toxicity in a mouse model of lung fibrosis. Oprozomib was first tested on the human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line A549 and in primary mouse alveolar epithelial type II cells regarding its cytotoxic effects on alveolar epithelial cells and compared to the FDA approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ). OZ was less toxic than BZ and provided high selectivity for the chymotrypsin-like active site of the proteasome. In primary mouse lung fibroblasts, OZ showed significant anti-fibrotic effects, i.e. reduction of collagen I and α smooth muscle actin expression, in the absence of cytotoxicity. When applied locally into the lungs of healthy mice via instillation, OZ was well tolerated and effectively reduced proteasome activity in the lungs. In bleomycin challenged mice, however, locally applied OZ resulted in accelerated weight loss and increased mortality of treated mice. Further, OZ failed to reduce fibrosis in these mice. While upon systemic application OZ was well tolerated in healthy mice, it rather augmented instead of attenuated fibrotic remodelling of the lung in bleomycin challenged mice. To conclude, low toxicity and antifibrotic effects of OZ in pulmonary fibroblasts could not be confirmed for pulmonary fibrosis of bleomycin-treated mice. In light of these data, the use of proteasome inhibitors as therapeutic agents for the treatment of fibrotic lung diseases should thus be considered with caution. PMID:26340365

  3. Validation of the 2nd Generation Proteasome Inhibitor Oprozomib for Local Therapy of Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Semren, Nora; Habel-Ungewitter, Nunja C.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Stöger, Tobias; Meiners, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition has been shown to prevent development of fibrosis in several organs including the lung. However, effects of proteasome inhibitors on lung fibrosis are controversial and cytotoxic side effects of the overall inhibition of proteasomal protein degradation cannot be excluded. Therefore, we hypothesized that local lung-specific application of a novel, selective proteasome inhibitor, oprozomib (OZ), provides antifibrotic effects without systemic toxicity in a mouse model of lung fibrosis. Oprozomib was first tested on the human alveolar epithelial cancer cell line A549 and in primary mouse alveolar epithelial type II cells regarding its cytotoxic effects on alveolar epithelial cells and compared to the FDA approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ). OZ was less toxic than BZ and provided high selectivity for the chymotrypsin-like active site of the proteasome. In primary mouse lung fibroblasts, OZ showed significant anti-fibrotic effects, i.e. reduction of collagen I and α smooth muscle actin expression, in the absence of cytotoxicity. When applied locally into the lungs of healthy mice via instillation, OZ was well tolerated and effectively reduced proteasome activity in the lungs. In bleomycin challenged mice, however, locally applied OZ resulted in accelerated weight loss and increased mortality of treated mice. Further, OZ failed to reduce fibrosis in these mice. While upon systemic application OZ was well tolerated in healthy mice, it rather augmented instead of attenuated fibrotic remodelling of the lung in bleomycin challenged mice. To conclude, low toxicity and antifibrotic effects of OZ in pulmonary fibroblasts could not be confirmed for pulmonary fibrosis of bleomycin-treated mice. In light of these data, the use of proteasome inhibitors as therapeutic agents for the treatment of fibrotic lung diseases should thus be considered with caution. PMID:26340365

  4. Acquired resistance and clonal evolution in melanoma during BRAF inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangju; Hong, Aayoung; Koya, Richard C.; Moriceau, Gatien; Chodon, Thinle; Guo, Rongqing; Johnson, Douglas B.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Kelley, Mark C.; Kefford, Richard F.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Glaspy, John A.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; van Baren, Nicolas; Long, Georgina V.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors elicit rapid anti-tumor responses in the majority of patients with V600BRAF mutant melanoma, but acquired drug resistance is almost universal. We sought to identify the core resistance pathways and the extent of tumor heterogeneity during disease progression. We show that MAPK reactivation mechanisms were detected among 70% of disease-progressive tissues, with RAS mutations, mutant BRAF amplification and alternative splicing being most common. We also detected PI3K-PTEN-AKT-upregulating genetic alterations among 22% of progressive melanomas. Distinct molecular lesions, in both core drug escape pathways, were commonly detected concurrently in the same tumor or among multiple tumors from the same patient. Beyond harboring extensively heterogeneous resistance mechanisms, melanoma re-growth emerging from BRAF inhibitor selection displayed branched evolution marked by altered mutational spectra/signatures and increased fitness. Thus, melanoma genomic heterogeneity contributes significantly to BRAF inhibitor treatment failure, implying upfront, co-targeting of two core pathways as an essential strategy for durable responses. PMID:24265155

  5. Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Human Reticulocyte 12/15-Lipoxygenase as Anti-Stroke Therapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge facing drug discovery today is variability of the drug target between species, such as with 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX), which contributes to ischemic brain injury, but its human and rodent isozymes have different inhibitor specificities. In the current work, we have utilized a quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) screen to identify compound 1 (ML351), a novel chemotype for 12/15-LOX inhibition that has nanomolar potency (IC50 = 200 nM) against human 12/15-LOX and is protective against oxidative glutamate toxicity in mouse neuronal HT22 cells. In addition, it exhibited greater than 250-fold selectivity versus related LOX isozymes, was a mixed inhibitor, and did not reduce the active-site ferric ion. Lastly, 1 significantly reduced infarct size following permanent focal ischemia in a mouse model of ischemic stroke. As such, this represents the first report of a selective inhibitor of human 12/15-LOX with demonstrated in vivo activity in proof-of-concept mouse models of stroke. PMID:24684213

  6. CD8+ T Cells Specific to Apoptosis-Associated Antigens Predict the Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Citro, Alessandra; Scrivo, Rossana; Martini, Helene; Martire, Carmela; De Marzio, Paolo; Vestri, Anna Rita; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Valesini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells (apoptotic epitopes) represent a principal player in chronic immune activation, which is known to amplify immunopathology in various inflammatory diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship involving these autoreactive T cells, the rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology, and the response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy. The frequency of autoreactive CD8+ T cells specific to various apoptotic epitopes, as detected by both enzyme-linked immunospot assay and dextramers of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules complexed with relevant apoptotic epitopes, was longitudinally analyzed in the peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients who were submitted to etanercept treatment (or other tumor necrosis factor inhibitors as a control). The percentage of apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells was significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients than in healthy donors, and correlated with the disease activity. More important, it was significantly more elevated in responders to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy than in non-responders before the start of therapy; it significantly dropped only in the former following therapy. These data indicate that apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells may be involved in rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology through the production of inflammatory cytokines and that they may potentially represent a predictive biomarker of response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy to validate in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26061065

  7. Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kurzencwyg, David; Filion, Kristian B; Pilote, Louise; Nault, Patrice; Platt, Robert W; Rahme, Elham; Steinmetz, Oren; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2006-09-01

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a common surgical procedure associated with high mortality rates. Our objective was to describe the use of in-hospital cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing open AAA repair and to examine the effect of perioperative cardiac medical therapy on in-hospital mortality. We examined clinical data and in-hospital medication use among 223 patients who underwent open AAA repair at three North American hospitals, all of which used the Transition resource and cost accounting system. Medication use was described [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, aspirin, ss-blockers, and statins] within the cohort at five specific periods of time: presurgery, day of surgery, 1 day after surgery, postsurgery, and discharge. We then performed a matched case-control study where cases were defined as patients who died in-hospital. We compared medication use between cases and controls to assess its impact on in-hospital mortality. Most patients were elderly (mean age 72.5 +/- 9.8 years), 70.4% were male, and in-hospital mortality within the cohort was 10.8%. Medication use in all periods of administration was low. ss-Blocker use was highest among all classes on the day of surgery, with 20.6% of patients undergoing AAA repair receiving the medication. Less than 50% of patients received any of the medications at discharge. After adjusting for baseline differences, perioperative ACE inhibitor use showed a trend toward a protective effect [odds ratio (OR) = 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-1.31, p = 0.08], and perioperative ss-blocker use was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (OR = 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.87, p = 0.04). Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing AAA repair is low throughout all periods of hospitalization. ACE inhibitor and ss-blocker use may be associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. PMID:16794911

  8. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Combination Therapy with Cholinesterase Inhibitors and Memantine in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Muayqil, Taim; Camicioli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Background N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonists (memantine) and cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are the only two approved classes of drugs to treat dementia; this paper explores the evidence for using these two treatments in combination. Objective To determine the efficacy and safety of using combination therapy with memantine and a ChEI to treat dementia in comparison to monotherapy with either memantine or a ChEI. Methods In March 2012, we systematically searched MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, and grey literature databases. All study types were included, except for case series or reports, which looked at combination therapy versus monotherapy in various dementing disorders. Data was pooled for blinded randomized controlled trials (RCTs) only; mean differences and standardized mean differences were used to determine effect sizes. Results Thirteen studies were included in this review; 3 were blinded RCTs, with a total of 971 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, which were included into the meta-analysis. No papers were found that primarily addressed combination therapy in other dementias. In the meta-analysis, small but statistically significant effect sizes were seen in favor of combination therapy among patients with moderate to severe AD on the scales of cognition (0.45–0.52; p < 0.0001), scales of functional outcomes (0.23–0.3; p < 0.01), and the neuropsychiatric inventory (3.7–4.4; p < 0.0001). Among the open-label studies, 3 out of 6 suggested benefits, as did the 4 included cohort studies. However, the high risk of bias encountered in the latter two study designs limits deducing any conclusions about benefit. Conclusion Although there were statistically significant changes in favor of combination therapy in moderate to severe AD, heterogeneity in scales and patient characteristics exists. However, it is unclear if clinically significant outcomes can be achieved using the combination therapy. More studies are required before a recommendation

  9. Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Outpatient Proton-Pump Inhibitor Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Allison A.; Lam, Jennifer O.; Paik, Julie J.; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Drummond, M. Bradley; Crowell, Trevor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most frequently prescribed medications. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity, mortality and healthcare spending. Some studies suggest an increased risk of CAP among PPI users. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the association between outpatient PPI therapy and risk of CAP in adults. Methods We conducted systematic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus and Web of Science on February 3, 2014. Case-control studies, case-crossover, cohort studies and randomized controlled trials reporting outpatient PPI exposure and CAP diagnosis for patients ≥18 years old were eligible. Our primary outcome was the association between CAP and PPI therapy. A secondary outcome examined the risk of hospitalization for CAP and subgroup analyses evaluated the association between PPI use and CAP among patients of different age groups, by different PPI doses, and by different durations of PPI therapy. Results Systematic review of 33 studies was performed, of which 26 studies were included in the meta-analysis. These 26 studies included 226,769 cases of CAP among 6,351,656 participants. We observed a pooled risk of CAP with ambulatory PPI therapy of 1.49 (95% CI 1.16, 1.92; I2 99.2%). This risk was increased during the first month of therapy (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.39, 3.16), regardless of PPI dose or patient age. PPI therapy also increased risk for hospitalization for CAP (OR 1.61; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.31). Discussion Outpatient PPI use is associated with a 1.5-fold increased risk of CAP, with the highest risk within the first 30 days after initiation of therapy. Providers should be aware of this risk when considering PPI use, especially in cases where alternative regimens may be available or the benefits of PPI use are uncertain. PMID:26042842

  10. Second-line protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based regimens in Asian HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Fahey, Paul; Kariminia, Azar; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin Nik; Khanh, Truong Huu; Sohn, Annette H.; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Razali, Kamarul; Kurniati, Nia; Huy, Bui Vu; Sudjaritruk, Tavitiya; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Fong, Siew Moy; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    Background The WHO recommends boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) after failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) treatment. We examined outcomes of this regimen in Asian HIV-infected children. Methods Children from five Asian countries in the TREAT Asia Pediatric HIV Observational Database (TApHOD) with ≥24 weeks of NNRTI-based HAART followed by ≥24 weeks of bPI-based HAART were eligible. Primary outcomes were the proportions with virologic suppression (HIV-RNA <400 copies/ml) and immune recovery (CD4% ≥25% if age <5 years and CD4 count ≥500 cells/mm3 if age ≥5 years) at 48 and 96 weeks. Results Of 3422 children, 153 were eligible; 52% were female. At switch, median age was 10 years, 26% were in WHO stage 4. Median weight-for-age z-score (WAZ) was −1.9 (n=121), CD4% was 12.5% (n=106), CD4 count was 237 (n=112) cells/mm3, and HIV-RNA was 4.6 log10copies/ml (n=61). The most common PI was lopinavir/ritonavir (83%). At 48 weeks, 61% (79/129) had immune recovery, 60% (26/43) had undetectable HIV-RNA and 73% (58/79) had fasting triglycerides ≥130mg/dl. By 96 weeks, 70% (57/82) achieved immune recovery, 65% (17/26) virologic suppression, and hypertriglyceridemia occurred in 66% (33/50). Predictors for virologic suppression at week 48 were longer duration of NNRTI-based HAART (p=0.006), younger age (p=0.007), higher WAZ (p=0.020), and HIV-RNA at switch <10,000 copies/ml (p=0.049). Conclusion In this regional cohort of Asian children on bPI-based second-line HAART, 60% of children tested had immune recovery by one year, and two-thirds had hyperlipidemia, highlighting difficulties in optimizing second-line HAART with limited drug options. PMID:23296119

  11. Switching among Equivalents in Chronic Cardiovascular Therapies: 'Real World' Data from Italy.

    PubMed

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Veronese, Giacomo; Piccinni, Carlo; Raschi, Emanuel; Koci, Ariola; Pagano, Paola; Godman, Brian; Marchesini, Giulio; Boriani, Giuseppe; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Since August 2012, Italian general practitioners are required to prescribe the generic name of medicines, except for refill of chronic therapy. We evaluated the extent of switching among equivalents in chronic cardiovascular therapies, the influence of the 2012 regulatory intervention and of patient-related or drug-related factors. Prescriptions of off-patent anti-arrhythmics, oral antidiabetics and ACE inhibitors dispensed from August 2011 to August 2013 within the Bologna Local Health Authority (870,000 inhabitants) was collected. The rate of actual switching among equivalents was evaluated monthly. The effect of the regulatory intervention was estimated by interrupted-time-series analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of switching were calculated for the following: age, gender, number of different equivalents available for each drug and change in dispensing pharmacy between subsequent refills. The average monthly rates of switches were 9.6%, 16.3% and 16.3% for anti-arrhythmics, antidiabetics and ACE inhibitors, respectively. Values significantly increased soon after the regulatory intervention for ACE inhibitors (+1.81%, p < 0.01), anti-arrhythmics (+1.46%, p = 0.01) and antidiabetics (+1.09%, p = 0.01), and no significant decreasing trends were observed in the following 12 months. For all drug classes, odd of switching was higher in case of change in dispensing pharmacy (up to aOR = 4.31, 95 CI = 4.26-4.35 for ACE inhibitors) and availability of ≥5 different equivalents (up to aOR = 7.82, 95 CI = 7.39-8.28 for antidiabetics). Switching was lower for age ≥65 for antidiabetics and ACE inhibitors (aOR = 0.92, 95 CI = 0.90-0.93; 0.87, 0.86-0.88, respectively). The Italian regulatory intervention generated an immediate increase, not sustained in time, in switching among equivalents of cardiovascular therapies. Young age, high number of available equivalents and changes in dispensing pharmacy between subsequent refills were associated with

  12. [REVIEW OF CLINICAL STUDIES ON COMBINATION THERAPY OF 5α-REDUCTASE INHIBITORS AND α1-BLOCKERS IN PATIENTS WITH BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA].

    PubMed

    Spivak, L G; Lokshin, K L; Vinarov, A Z

    2015-01-01

    The review presents the results of studies on combination therapy of 5α-reductase inhibitors and α-blockers in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). These data demonstrate a significant advantage of the combination therapy versus monotherapy in terms of quality of life and subjective symptoms as well as the safety, better results in the prevention of BPH progression and acute urinary retention, and reduced need for surgery. PMID:26665780

  13. Targeted molecular therapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Daisuke; Fooshee, David R.; Zhao, Mei; Andrews, Genevieve A.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Galer, Chad; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Morrow, Phuong Khanh H.; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    Background We investigated the effects of vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), alone and in combination with paclitaxel in an orthotopic mouse model of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods The in vitro effects of vandetanib (ZACTIMA™) were assessed in two HNSCC cell lines on cell growth, apoptosis, and receptor and downstream signaling morecule expression and phosphorylation levels. We assessed in vivo effects of vandetanib and/or paclitaxel by measuring tumor cell apoptosis, endothelial cell apoptosis, microvessel density, tumor size, and animal survival. Results In vitro, vandetanib inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream targets in HNSCC cells and inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of HNSCC cells and extended survival and inhibited tumor growth in nude mice orthotopically injected with human HNSCC. Conclusion Vandetanib has the potential to be a novel molecular targeted therapy for HNSCC. PMID:20629091

  14. Renal ACE immunohistochemical localization in NIDDM patients with nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Yoshikawa, H; Tanegashima, M; Miyagi, M; Kobayashi, M; Sakai, K; Hayashi, I; Aikawa, A; Ohara, T; Hasegawa, A

    1998-02-01

    A role of renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in diabetic nephropathy has been suggested. Immunohistochemical localization of ACE was studied in 20 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic nephropathy and 17 healthy kidney transplant donors, with ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism also examined in the latter. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that ACE staining was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced in glomeruli and slightly decreased in proximal tubules in diabetic patients. Glomeruli positive for ACE immunostaining were observed in 23.5% of the healthy subjects and in 80% of the diabetic patients. All patients with nodular lesions had ACE-positive glomeruli and showed significantly (P < 0.01) more intense glomerular ACE immunostaining than patients without nodular lesions. Among healthy controls, subjects with the DD genotype had ACE-positive glomeruli more frequently and tended to show slightly increased intensity on proximal tubule ACE immunostaining compared with subjects with other genotypes. These observations suggest that increased ACE localization in glomeruli is likely to be one of the factors in the increased renin-angiotensin system activity in glomeruli in patients with diabetic nephropathy. There is a possibility that ACE gene I/D polymorphism may be related to renal ACE immunohistochemical localization. PMID:9469501

  15. Increased Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor (VEGFI) After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Laack, Nadia N.; Miller, Robert C.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Macdonald, O. Kenneth; Bauer, Heather J.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Gastrointestinal injury occurs rarely with agents that affect the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and with abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). We explored the incidence of serious bowel injury (SBI) in patients treated with SBRT with or without vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor (VEGFI) therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six patients with 84 primary or metastatic intra-abdominal lesions underwent SBRT (median dose, 50 Gy in 5 fractions). Of the patients, 20 (26%) received VEGFI within 2 years after SBRT (bevacizumab, n=14; sorafenib, n=4; pazopanib, n=1; sunitinib, n=1). The incidence of SBI (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, grade 3-5 ulceration or perforation) after SBRT was obtained, and the relationship between SBI and VEGFI was examined. Results: In the combined population, 7 patients (9%) had SBI at a median of 4.6 months (range, 3-17 months) from SBRT. All 7 had received VEGFI before SBI and within 13 months of completing SBRT, and 5 received VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT. The 6-month estimate of SBI in the 26 patients receiving VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT was 38%. No SBIs were noted in the 63 patients not receiving VEGFI. The log–rank test showed a significant correlation between SBI and VEGFI within 3 months of SBRT (P=.0006) but not between SBI and radiation therapy bowel dose (P=.20). Conclusions: The combination of SBRT and VEGFI results in a higher risk of SBI than would be expected with either treatment independently. Local therapies other than SBRT may be considered if a patient is likely to receive a VEGFI in the near future.

  16. Evaluating the Role of Cellular Immune Responses in the Emergence of HCV NS3 Resistance Mutations During Protease Inhibitor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hameed, Enass A; Rouster, Susan D; Ji, Hong; Ulm, Ashley; Hetta, Helal F; Anwar, Nadeem; Sherman, Kenneth E; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of protease inhibitor drugs in hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment is limited by the selection and expansion of drug-resistant mutations. HCV replication is error-prone and genetic variability within the dominant epitopes ensures its persistence. The aims of this study are to evaluate the role of cellular immune response in the emergence of HCV protease resistance mutations and its effects on treatment outcome. Ten chronically HCV-infected subjects were treated with boceprevir (BOC)-based triple therapy. HCV-RNA was tested for BOC resistance-associated viral variants. HCV protease resistance mutations were investigated pretreatment and 24 weeks post-treatment. Synthetic peptides representing the wild-type and the potential nonstructural (NS)3 variants were used to evaluate T cell responses and human leukocyte antigen binding. Sustained viral response was achieved in 70% of patients, two patients were treatment nonresponders (NRs) and one was classified as a relapse. Pretreatment, the proportion of drug-resistant variants within individuals was higher in sustained viral responders (SVRs) than in NR patients. However, resistance-associated variants increased in NRs after BOC combined triple therapy. In contrast to NR patients, significant stronger cell-mediated immune responses were observed at the baseline among those who achieved sustained viral response for all T cell epitopes tested. Despite the increase in cell-mediated immune responses at week 24 in NRs, they failed to control the virus replication, leading to development of overt drug-resistant variants. Our data suggest that strong NS3-specific T cell immune responses at the baseline may predict a positive outcome of directly acting antiviral-based therapy, and the presence of pre-existent resistance mutations does not play a significant role in the outcome of anti-HCV combined therapy. PMID:26885675

  17. YM155, a small molecule inhibitor of survivin expression, sensitizes cancer cells to hypericin-mediated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gyurászová, Katarína; Mikeš, Jaromír; Halaburková, Andrea; Jendželovský, Rastislav; Fedoročko, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) represents a rapidly developing alternative treatment for various types of cancers. Although considered highly effective, cancer cells can exploit various mechanisms, including the upregulation of apoptosis inhibitors, to overcome the cytotoxic effect of PDT. Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, is known to play a critical role in cancer progression and therapeutic resistance and therefore represents a potential therapeutic target. The aim of this study was to investigate whether YM155, a small molecule inhibitor of survivin expression, can potentiate the cytotoxic effect of hypericin-mediated PDT (HY-PDT). Accordingly, two cell lines resistant to HY-PDT, HT-29 (colorectal adenocarcinoma) and A549 (lung adenocarcinoma), were treated either with HY-PDT alone or in combination with YM155. The efficacy of different treatment regimens was assessed by MTT assay, flow cytometry analysis of metabolic activity, viability, phosphatidylserine externalisation, mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activity and immunoblotting for the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Here we show for the first time that the repression of survivin expression by YM155 is effective in sensitizing HT-29 and A549 cells to HY-PDT, as measured by the decrease in cell viability and induction of apoptosis. Combined treatment with hypericin and YM155 led to a more severe dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and caused an increase in caspase-3 activation and subsequent PARP cleavage. Our results demonstrate that the repression of survivin expression by YM155 potentially represents a novel alternative strategy to increase the efficacy of HY-PDT in cancer cells that are otherwise weakly responsive or non-responsive to treatment. PMID:27241169

  18. [CLINICAL AND PHARMACOECONOMIC RESULTS OF THE USAGE OF VARIOUS HIV REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE INHIBITORS IN THE SCHEMES OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY OF PATIENT RECEIVING THERAPY FOR THE CHRONIC HEPATITIS C VIRUS].

    PubMed

    Moshkovich, G F; Minaeva, S V; Varlova, L W; Goryaeva, M P; Gulyaeva, S S; Tichonova, E V

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy, safety, and economical aspects of treatment with abacavir, zidovudine, stavudine, and phosphazide in the schemes of antiretroviral therapy of the HIV-infected patients receiving therapy for hepatitis C virus were tested. Clinical, immunological, and virologic efficacy of treatment and dynamics of hemoglobin, thrombocytes, and alanine aminotransferase as markers of common adverse events recorded at the start of the antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C and after 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 weeks of the treatment were evaluated. The usage of these drugs in the schemes of antiretroviral therapy exhibited efficacy, high tolerability and safety for all HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors. PMID:27145599

  19. Treating Trichotillomania: A Meta-Analysis of Treatment Effects and Moderators for Behavior Therapy and Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Joseph F.; Ung, Danielle; Selles, Robert R.; Rahman, Omar; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) exist examining the efficacy of behavior therapy (BT) or serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) for the treatment of trichotillomania (TTM), with no examination of treatment moderators. The present meta-analysis synthesized the treatment effect sizes (ES) of BT and SRI relative to comparison conditions, and examined moderators of treatment. A comprehensive literature search identified 11 RCTs that met inclusion criteria. Clinical characteristics (e.g., age, comorbidity, therapeutic contact hours), outcome measures, treatment subtypes (e.g., SRI subtype, BT subtype), and ES data were extracted. The standardized mean difference of change in hair pulling severity was the outcome measure. A random effects meta-analysis found a large pooled ES for BT (ES= 1.41, p< 0.001). BT trials with greater therapeutic contact hours exhibited larger ES (p= 0.009). Additionally, BT trials that used mood enhanced therapeutic techniques exhibited greater ES relative to trials including only traditional BT components (p= 0.004). For SRI trials, a random effects meta-analysis identified a moderate pooled ES (ES= 0.41, p= 0.02). Although clomipramine exhibited larger ES relative to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the difference was not statistically significant. Publication bias was not identified for either treatment. BT yields large treatment effects for TTM, with further examination needed to disentangle confounded treatment moderators. SRI trials exhibited a moderate pooled ES, with no treatment moderators identified. Sensitivity analyses highlighted the need for further RCTs of SRIs, especially among youth with TTM. PMID:25108618

  20. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098–4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  1. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  2. Acute renal allograft rejection after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spain, L; Higgins, R; Gopalakrishnan, K; Turajlic, S; Gore, M; Larkin, J

    2016-06-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as ipilimumab and nivolumab improve survival in patients with advanced melanoma and are increasingly available to clinicians for use in the clinic. Their safety in organ transplant recipients is not well defined but published case reports describing treatment with ipilimumab have not been complicated by graft rejection. No cases of anti-programmed cell death protein 1 administration are reported in this group. We describe a case of acute graft rejection in a kidney transplant recipient after treatment with nivolumab, after progression on ipilimumab. Potential factors increasing the risk of graft rejection in this case are discussed, in particular the contribution of nivolumab. PMID:26951628

  3. Reactivation of p53 by Novel MDM2 Inhibitors: Implications for Pancreatic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, A.S.; Philip, P.A.; Wang, Z.; Banerjee, S.; Zafar, S.F.; Goustin, A.-S.; Almhanna, K.; Yang, D.; Wang, S.; Sarkar, F.H.; Mohammad, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study is the first to show in pancreatic cancer (PC) the growth inhibition and apoptosis by novel MDM2 inhibitors (MI-319 & 219) through reactivation of p53 pathway. Our results highlight two new secondary targets of MDM2 inhibitor ‘SIRT1’ and Ku70. SIRT1 has a role in ageing and cancer and is known to regulate p53 signaling through acetylation. Ku70 is a key component of non-homologous end joining machinery in the DNA damage pathway and is known to regulate apoptosis by blocking Bax entry into mitochondria. Given the growth inhibition and apoptosis by MI-219, MI-319 was accompanied by increase in levels of p53 along with p21WAF1 and the proapoptotic Puma. SiRNA against p21WAF1 abrogated the growth inhibition of PC cells confirming p21WAF1 as a key player downstream of activated p53. Immunoprecipitation-western blot analysis revealed reduced association of MDM2-p53 interaction in drug exposed PC cells. In combination studies, the inhibitors synergistically augmented anti-tumor effects of therapeutic drug gemcitabine both in terms of cell growth inhibition as well as apoptosis. Surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed strong binding between MI-319 and Ku70 (KD 170 nM). Western blot revealed suppression of SIRT1 and Ku70 with simultaneous upregulation of acetyl-p53 (Lys379) and Bax. Co-Immunoprecipitation studies confirmed that MI-319 could disrupt Ku70-Bax and SIRT1-Bax interaction. Further, using wt-p53 xenograft of Capan-2, we found that oral administration of MI-319 at 300 mg/kg for 14 days resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition without any observed toxicity to the animals. No tumor inhibition was found in mut-p53 BxPC-3 xenografts. In light of our results, the inhibitors of MDM2 warrant clinical investigation as new agents for PC treatment. PMID:20370686

  4. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  5. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  6. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  7. Ace the Verbal on the SAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meierding, Loren

    2005-01-01

    Many students are not accepted in to certain colleges and universities because of low SAT scores. Loren Meierding has written Ace the Verbal on the SAT to help students with minimal preparation do well by improving their vocabulary and use better techniques for finding the answers to the questions. This book provides strategies needed to score…

  8. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Delivery using Nanoparticles with Intrinsic Passive Tumor Targeting Properties for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    el Bahhaj, Fatima; Denis, Iza; Pichavant, Loic; Delatouche, Régis; Collette, Floraine; Linot, Camille; Pouliquen, Daniel; Grégoire, Marc; Héroguez, Valérie; Blanquart, Christophe; Bertrand, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Fast clearance, metabolism and systemic toxicity are major limits for the clinical use of anti-cancer drugs. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) present these defects despite displaying promising anti-tumor properties on tumor cells in vitro and in in vivo model of cancers. Specific delivery of anti-cancer drugs into the tumor should improve their clinical benefit by limiting systemic toxicity and by increasing the anti-tumor effect. In this work, we describe a simple and flexible polymeric nanoparticle platform highly targeting the tumor in vivo and triggering impressive tumor weight reduction when functionalized with HDACi. Our nanoparticles were produced by Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization of azido-polyethylene oxide-norbornene macromonomers and functionalized using click chemistry. Using an orthotopic model of peritoneal invasive cancer, a highly selective accumulation of the particles in the tumor was obtained. A combination of epigenetic drugs involving a pH-responsive histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) polymer conjugated to these particles gave 80% reduction of tumor weight without toxicity whereas the free HDACi has no effect. Our work demonstrates that the use of a nanovector with theranostic properties leads to an optimized delivery of potent HDACi in tumor and then, to an improvement of their anti-tumor properties in vivo. PMID:27162550

  9. Potentiation of tumor responses to DNA damaging therapy by the selective ATR inhibitor VX-970.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amy B; Newsome, Dave; Wang, Yuxin; Boucher, Diane M; Eustace, Brenda; Gu, Yong; Hare, Brian; Johnson, Mac A; Milton, Sean; Murphy, Cheryl E; Takemoto, Darin; Tolman, Crystal; Wood, Mark; Charlton, Peter; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Furey, Brinley; Golec, Julian; Reaper, Philip M; Pollard, John R

    2014-07-30

    Platinum-based DNA-damaging chemotherapy is standard-of-care for most patients with lung cancer but outcomes remain poor. This has been attributed, in part, to the highly effective repair network known as the DNA-damage response (DDR). ATR kinase is a critical regulator of this pathway, and its inhibition has been shown to sensitize some cancer, but not normal, cells in vitro to DNA damaging agents. However, there are limited in vivo proof-of-concept data for ATR inhibition. To address this we profiled VX-970, the first clinical ATR inhibitor, in a series of in vitro and in vivo lung cancer models and compared it with an inhibitor of the downstream kinase Chk1. VX-970 markedly sensitized a large proportion of a lung cancer cell line and primary tumor panel in vitro to multiple DNA damaging drugs with clear differences to Chk1 inhibition observed. In vivo VX-970 blocked ATR activity in tumors and dramatically enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin across a panel of patient derived primary lung xenografts. The combination led to complete tumor growth inhibition in three cisplatin-insensitive models and durable tumor regression in a cisplatin-sensitive model. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of VX-970 in lung cancer patients. PMID:25010037

  10. Potentiation of tumor responses to DNA damaging therapy by the selective ATR inhibitor VX-970

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Diane M.; Eustace, Brenda; Gu, Yong; Hare, Brian; Johnson, Mac A.; Milton, Sean; Murphy, Cheryl E.; Takemoto, Darin; Tolman, Crystal; Wood, Mark; Charlton, Peter; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Furey, Brinley; Golec, Julian; Reaper, Philip M.; Pollard, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based DNA-damaging chemotherapy is standard-of-care for most patients with lung cancer but outcomes remain poor. This has been attributed, in part, to the highly effective repair network known as the DNA-damage response (DDR). ATR kinase is a critical regulator of this pathway, and its inhibition has been shown to sensitize some cancer, but not normal, cells in vitro to DNA damaging agents. However, there are limited in vivo proof-of-concept data for ATR inhibition. To address this we profiled VX-970, the first clinical ATR inhibitor, in a series of in vitro and in vivo lung cancer models and compared it with an inhibitor of the downstream kinase Chk1. VX-970 markedly sensitized a large proportion of a lung cancer cell line and primary tumor panel in vitro to multiple DNA damaging drugs with clear differences to Chk1 inhibition observed. In vivo VX-970 blocked ATR activity in tumors and dramatically enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin across a panel of patient derived primary lung xenografts. The combination led to complete tumor growth inhibition in three cisplatin-insensitive models and durable tumor regression in a cisplatin-sensitive model. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of VX-970 in lung cancer patients. PMID:25010037

  11. Development of antibody-based c-Met inhibitors for targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongheon; Sung, Eun-Sil; Ahn, Jin-Hyung; An, Sungwon; Huh, Jiwon; You, Weon-Kyoo

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways mediated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and their ligands play important roles in the development and progression of human cancers, which makes RTK-mediated signaling pathways promising therapeutic targets in the treatment of cancer. Compared with small-molecule compounds, antibody-based therapeutics can more specifically recognize and bind to ligands and RTKs. Several antibody inhibitors of RTK-mediated signaling pathways, such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, have been developed and are widely used to treat cancer patients. However, since the therapeutic options are still limited in terms of therapeutic efficacy and types of cancers that can be treated, efforts are being made to identify and evaluate novel RTK-mediated signaling pathways as targets for more efficacious cancer treatment. The hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway has come into the spotlight as a promising target for development of potent cancer therapeutic agents. Multiple antibody-based therapeutics targeting hepatocyte growth factor or c-Met are currently in preclinical or clinical development. This review focuses on the development of inhibitors of the hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway for cancer treatment, including critical issues in clinical development and future perspectives for antibody-based therapeutics.

  12. AZD7762, a novel checkpoint kinase inhibitor, drives checkpoint abrogation and potentiates DNA-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Zabludoff, Sonya D; Deng, Chun; Grondine, Michael R; Sheehy, Adam M; Ashwell, Susan; Caleb, Benjamin L; Green, Stephen; Haye, Heather R; Horn, Candice L; Janetka, James W; Liu, Dongfang; Mouchet, Elizabeth; Ready, Shannon; Rosenthal, Judith L; Queva, Christophe; Schwartz, Gary K; Taylor, Karen J; Tse, Archie N; Walker, Graeme E; White, Anne M

    2008-09-01

    Insights from cell cycle research have led to the hypothesis that tumors may be selectively sensitized to DNA-damaging agents resulting in improved antitumor activity and a wider therapeutic margin. The theory relies on the observation that the majority of tumors are deficient in the G1-DNA damage checkpoint pathway resulting in reliance on S and G2 checkpoints for DNA repair and cell survival. The S and G2 checkpoints are regulated by checkpoint kinase 1, a serine/threonine kinase that is activated in response to DNA damage; thus, inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 signaling impairs DNA repair and increases tumor cell death. Normal tissues, however, have a functioning G1 checkpoint signaling pathway allowing for DNA repair and cell survival. Here, we describe the preclinical profile of AZD7762, a potent ATP-competitive checkpoint kinase inhibitor in clinical trials. AZD7762 has been profiled extensively in vitro and in vivo in combination with DNA-damaging agents and has been shown to potentiate response in several different settings where inhibition of checkpoint kinase results in the abrogation of DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest. Dose-dependent potentiation of antitumor activity, when AZD7762 is administered in combination with DNA-damaging agents, has been observed in multiple xenograft models with several DNA-damaging agents, further supporting the potential of checkpoint kinase inhibitors to enhance the efficacy of both conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy and increase patient response rates in a variety of settings. PMID:18790776

  13. Development of antibody-based c-Met inhibitors for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongheon; Sung, Eun-Sil; Ahn, Jin-Hyung; An, Sungwon; Huh, Jiwon; You, Weon-Kyoo

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways mediated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and their ligands play important roles in the development and progression of human cancers, which makes RTK-mediated signaling pathways promising therapeutic targets in the treatment of cancer. Compared with small-molecule compounds, antibody-based therapeutics can more specifically recognize and bind to ligands and RTKs. Several antibody inhibitors of RTK-mediated signaling pathways, such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, have been developed and are widely used to treat cancer patients. However, since the therapeutic options are still limited in terms of therapeutic efficacy and types of cancers that can be treated, efforts are being made to identify and evaluate novel RTK-mediated signaling pathways as targets for more efficacious cancer treatment. The hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway has come into the spotlight as a promising target for development of potent cancer therapeutic agents. Multiple antibody-based therapeutics targeting hepatocyte growth factor or c-Met are currently in preclinical or clinical development. This review focuses on the development of inhibitors of the hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met signaling pathway for cancer treatment, including critical issues in clinical development and future perspectives for antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:27471710

  14. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  15. Essential hypertension of Caribbean Hispanics: sodium, renin, and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Laffer, Cheryl L; Elijovich, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about essential hypertension in Hispanic Americans, despite the fact that they are the fastest-growing minority in the United States and have a disproportionate degree of hypertensive target organ damage. The authors studied 89 Caribbean Hispanic hypertensive patients who participated in six double-blind, randomized trials of antihypertensive agents. Demographics, laboratory data, sodium excretion, plasma renin activity, and atrial natriuretic peptide were obtained after 3-4 weeks on placebo. Blood pressure responses to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), and fixed combinations of ACE inhibitors and HCTZ, were compared to the placebo values after 8-12 weeks of treatment. Patients had a multiple risk factor profile (obesity and diabetes) and a wide spectrum of blood pressure elevation, left ventricular hypertrophy, and hypertensive renal damage. Urine sodium excretion rates indicated inability to comply with salt restriction in 65% of patients. Plasma renin activity was lower than that of Hispanic normotensive controls, and 62% of patients had low-renin essential hypertension by renin profiling to sodium excretion. On analysis of variance, blood pressure reductions by calcium channel blockers, HCTZ, and ACE inhibitor/HCTZ combinations were significantly greater than that with placebo, while those of ACE inhibitors and beta blockers as monotherapy were not. The authors conclude that essential hypertension of Caribbean Hispanics is associated with multiple risk factors and is largely of the low-renin type. Responses to therapy are consistent with those observed in other populations with the low-renin phenotype and suggest salt-sensitivity of blood pressure in this population. Confirmation of the latter has implications for prevention and treatment of essential hypertension in Hispanics. PMID:12147929

  16. Hemophilia A Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with High Responding Inhibitors Complicating Total Knee Arthroplasty: Embolization: A Cost-Reducing Alternative to Medical Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kickuth, Ralph Anderson, Suzanne; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Laemmle, Bernhard; Eggli, Stefan; Triller, Juergen

    2006-12-15

    Joint hemorrhages are very common in patients with severe hemophilia. Inhibitors in patients with hemophilia are allo-antibodies that neutralize the activity of the clotting factor. After total knee replacement, rare intra-articular bleeding complications might occur that do not respond to clotting factor replacement. We report a 40-year-old male with severe hemophilia A and high responding inhibitors presenting with recurrent knee joint hemorrhage after bilateral knee prosthetic surgery despite adequate clotting factor treatment. There were two episodes of marked postoperative hemarthrosis requiring extensive use of subsititution therapy. Eleven days postoperatively, there was further hemorrhage into the right knee. Digital subtraction angiography diagnosed a complicating pseudoaneurysm of the inferior lateral geniculate artery and embolization was successfully performed. Because clotting factor replacement therapy has proved to be excessively expensive and prolonged, especially in patients with inhibitors, we recommend the use of cost-effective early angiographic embolization.

  17. Durable complete responses off all treatment in patients with metastatic malignant melanoma after sequential immunotherapy followed by a finite course of BRAF inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wyluda, Edward J; Cheng, Jihua; Schell, Todd D; Haley, Jeremy S; Mallon, Carol; Neves, Rogerio I; Robertson, Gavin; Sivik, Jeffrey; Mackley, Heath; Talamo, Giampaolo; Drabick, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    We report 3 cases of durable complete response (CR) in patients with BRAF-mutated metastatic melanoma who were initially treated unsuccessfully with sequential immunotherapies (high dose interleukin 2 followed by ipilimumab with or without concurrent radiation therapy). After progression during or post immunotherapy, these patients were given BRAF inhibitor therapy and developed rapid CRs. Based on the concomitant presence of autoimmune manifestations (including vitiligo and hypophysitis), we postulated that there was a synergistic effect between the prior immune therapy and the BRAF targeting agents. Accordingly, the inhibitors were gradually weaned off beginning at 3 months and were stopped completely at 9–12 months. The three patients remain well and in CR off of all therapy at up to 15 months radiographic follow-up. The institution of the BRAF therapy was associated with development of severe rheumatoid-like arthritis in 2 patients which persisted for months after discontinuation of therapy, suggesting it was not merely a known toxicity of BRAF inhibitors (arthralgias). On immunologic analysis, these patients had high levels of non-T-regulatory, CD4 positive effector phenotype T-cells, which persisted after completion of therapy. Of note, we had previously reported a similar phenomenon in patients with metastatic melanoma who failed high dose interleukin-2 and were then placed on a finite course of temozolomide with rapid complete responses that have remained durable for many years after discontinuation of temozolomide. We postulate that a finite course of cytotoxic or targeted therapy specific for melanoma given after apparent failure of prior immunotherapy can result in complete and durable remissions that may persist long after the specific cytotoxic or targeted agents have been discontinued suggesting the existence of sequence specific synergism between immunotherapy and these agents. Here, we discuss these cases in the context of the literature on

  18. Enhancement of human sodium iodide symporter gene therapy for breast cancer by HDAC inhibitor mediated transcriptional modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, Madhura G.; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Jadhav, Smita; Gupta, Sudeep; Ahn, Beyong-Cheol; De, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant expression of human sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in breast cancer (BC) has raised the possibility of using targeted radioiodide therapy. Here we investigate modulation of endogenous, functional NIS expression by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) in vitro and in vivo. Luciferase reporter based initial screening of six different HDACi shows 2–10 fold enhancement of NIS promoter activity in majority of the cell types tested. As a result of drug treatment, endogenous NIS transcript and protein shows profound induction in BC cells. To get an insight on the mechanism of such transcriptional activation, role of Stat4, CREB and other transcription factors are revealed by transcription factor profiling array. Further, NIS-mediated intracellular iodide uptake also enhances substantially (p < 0.05) signifying functional relevance of the transcriptional modulation strategy. Gamma camera imaging confirms 30% higher uptake in VPA or NaB treated BC tumor xenograft. Corroborating with such functional impact of NIS, significant reduction in cell survival (p < 0.005) is observed in VPA, NaB or CI994 drug and 131I combination treatment in vivo indicating effective radioablation. Thus, for the first time this study reveals the mechanistic basis and demonstrates functional relevance of HDACi pre-treatment strategy in elevating NIS gene therapy approach for BC management in clinic. PMID:26777440

  19. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors as add-on therapy to insulin: rationale and evidences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are recently approved class of anti-hyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). SGLT-2I inhibits renal glucose reabsorption, thereby ensuing urinary glucose excretion in a dose-dependent manner. This caloric loss and osmotic diuresis, secondary to increased urinary glucose excretion, has a unique potential to counter insulin induced weight gain and fluid retention, with little potential of hypoglycemic exacerbation. Also, as these agents act independently of insulin secretion or action, they are effective even in long-standing diabetes with depleted β-cell reserve. Improvement in insulin sensitivity, as observed with SGLT-2I can also facilitate insulin action. Furthermore, significant reduction in total daily insulin dosage and reduction of body weight as observed during combination therapy renders SGLT-2I, a near-ideal partner to insulin. This review aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of currently used SGLT-2I as an add-on to insulin therapy in the treatment of T2DM. PMID:26732230

  20. CYP19A1 Genetic Polymorphisms rs4646 and Osteoporosis in Patients Treated with Aromatase Inhibitor-Based Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, Federica; Botticelli, Andrea; Mazzotti, Eva; La Torre, Marco; Borro, Marina; Marchetti, Luca; Maddalena, Chiara; Gentile, Giovanna; Simmaco, Maurizio; Marchetti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AI) are potent suppressors of aromatase activity. The aim of this study was to measure the incidence of adverse effects in breast cancer patients treated with AI-based adjuvant therapy and the relationship with the CYP19A1 genotypes. Materials and Methods: Forty-five postmenopausal breast cancer patients (46–85 yrs) in AI adjuvant treatment were genotyped for the rs4646 polymorphisms of CYP19A1 gene and three variations were identified. Toxicities were registered at each follow-up medical examination, and classified in accord with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: Twenty-four (53.3%) patients presented the GG genotype; 19 (42.2%) the GT, and 2 (4.4%) the TT. The AI treatment was Anastrazole for 35 patients (77.8%) and Letrozole for the others (n=10; 22.2%). Osteoporosis was significantly associated with the GG genotype (p=0.001). Treatment discontinuation (TD) was observed in 6 cases (13.3%). The only parameter able to predict TD was the appearance of severe arthralgia/myalgia (Odds Ratio, OR=23.75; p=0.009), when adjusted for age and AI treatment. Conclusion: Our results suggest that CYP19A1 polymorphic variants may influence susceptibility to develop AI-related side effects. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm the role of the aromatase gene (CYP19A1) polymorphisms in predicting adverse effects to AI-based therapy. PMID:27026757

  1. HS-133, a novel fluorescent phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor as a potential imaging and anticancer agent for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Son, Mi Kwon; Yun, Sun-Mi; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Donghee; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    As PI3K/Akt signaling is frequently deregulated in a wide variety of human tumors, PI3K inhibitors are an emerging class of drugs for cancer treatment. The monitoring of the drug behavior and distribution in the biological system can play an important role for targeted therapy and provide information regarding the response or resistance to available therapies. In this study, therefore, we have developed a family of xanthine derivatives, serving as a dual function exhibiting fluorescence, as well as inhibiting PI3K. Among them, HS-133 showed anti-proliferative effects and was monitored for its subcellular localization by a fluorescence microscopy. HS-133 suppressed the PI3K/Akt pathway and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis by HS-133 was confirmed by the increases of the cleaved PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-8. Furthermore, HS-133 decreased the protein expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, as well inhibited the tube formation and migration of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In vivo imaging also showed that tumors were visualized fluorescent with HS-133, and its oral administration significantly inhibited the growth of tumor in SkBr3 mouse xenograft models. Thus, we suggest that HS-133 may be used as a fluorescent anticancer agent against human breast cancer. PMID:25338206

  2. Unusual location of tuberculosis in the course of tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brzezicki, Jan; Rymko, Marcin; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mycobacteria. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis usually develops more than two years after infection or many years later. Factors favoring onset of the disease are malnutrition, older age, renal failure, diabetes, cancer, immunosuppression and biological treatment, e.g. tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitors. The paper presents a case of a 56-year-old patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with infliximab, diagnosed with tuberculosis of the spleen. The unusual location and uncharacteristic symptoms created a lot of diagnostic difficulties, particularly as during qualification for biological treatment tests are performed to exclude infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Pharmacological treatment of tuberculosis is typical, but in the case of tuberculosis of the spleen, splenectomy also is a method of treatment. The decision was made to implement pharmacological treatment, which proved to be effective, so the patient avoided surgery.

  3. Covalent inhibitors in drug discovery: from accidental discoveries to avoided liabilities and designed therapies.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Renato A

    2015-09-01

    Drugs that covalently bond to their biological targets have a long history in drug discovery. A look at drug approvals in recent years suggests that covalent drugs will continue to make impacts on human health for years to come. Although fraught with concerns about toxicity, the high potencies and prolonged effects achievable with covalent drugs may result in less-frequent drug dosing and in wide therapeutic margins for patients. Covalent inhibition can also dissociate drug pharmacodynamics (PD) from pharmacokinetics (PK), which can result in desired drug efficacy for inhibitors that have short systemic exposure. Evidence suggests that there is a reduced risk for the development of resistance against covalent drugs, which is a major challenge in areas such as oncology and infectious disease. PMID:26002380

  4. Targeted cancer therapy: giving histone deacetylase inhibitors all they need to succeed

    PubMed Central

    Gryder, Berkley E; Sodji, Quaovi H; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) have now emerged as a powerful new class of small-molecule therapeutics acting through the regulation of the acetylation states of histone proteins (a form of epigenetic modulation) and other non-histone protein targets. Over 490 clinical trials have been initiated in the last 10 years, culminating in the approval of two structurally distinct HDACis – SAHA (vorinostat, Zolinza™) and FK228 (romidepsin, Istodax™). However, the current HDACis have serious limitations, including ineffectively low concentrations in solid tumors and cardiac toxicity, which is hindering their progress in the clinic. Herein, we review the primary paradigms being pursued to overcome these hindrances, including HDAC isoform selectivity, localized administration, and targeting cap groups to achieve selective tissue and cell type distribution. PMID:22416777

  5. Monitoring B-type natriuretic peptide in patients undergoing therapy with neprilysin inhibitors. An emerging challenge?

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian

    2016-09-15

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is primarily synthesized by the ventricles of the heart as a 108-amino acid polypeptide precursor (i.e., proBNP), which is then cleaved into a 76-amino acid biologically inert N-terminal fragment (NT-proBNP) and a biologically active 32-amino acid peptide (BNP). The generation of BNP is considerably enhanced in response to high ventricular filling pressures, so that the measurement of either the active hormone or NT-proBNP has become a mainstay in patients with congestive heart failure. Recent evidence was brought that the enzyme neprilysin efficiently degrades circulating BNP in vivo, whereas proBNP and NT-proBNP are virtually resistant to enzymatic cleavage. Increasing emphasis is currently placed on the fact that that measuring BNP in patients taking the novel and promising neprilysin inhibitors such as LCZ696 may not reliably reflect cardiac dysfunction. Since laboratory monitoring in patients with heart failure should be aimed to define the role of BNP in modulating fluid hemostasis and cardiac remodeling, but natriuretic peptides should also serve as reliable biomarkers of cardiac function and treatment response in these patients, the assessment of neither BNP nor NT-proBNP alone provides a comprehensive biological and clinical picture. Therefore, it seems reasonable to suggest both BNP and the neprilysin-resistant peptide NT-proBNP should be concomitantly assessed in patients with heart failure who take neprilysin inhibitors, so allowing to concomitantly monitor the progression of heart failure and to assess the actual cardiorenal potency of circulating BNP. PMID:27317994

  6. The JNC 7 approach compared to conventional treatment in diabetic patients with hypertension: a double-blind trial of initial monotherapy vs. combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jonathan C; Leight, Kellie; Sutradhar, Santosh C; Demopoulos, Laura A; Gleim, Gilbert W; Lewin, Andrew J; Bakris, George L

    2004-08-01

    The JNC 7 states that persons with blood pressure (BP) more than 20/10 mm Hg above goal should be started on combination drug therapy. This criterion includes patients with BP >160/100 mm Hg and diabetics with hypertension. The goal BP for persons with diabetes mellitus is <130/80 mm Hg. A randomized, double-blind trial force titrated initial combination therapy utilizing an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) combination (losartan/hydrochlorothiazide [LOS/HCTZ]) compared with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (ramipril), for 8 weeks, and tested the hypothesis that combination therapy is more likely to achieve goal BP vs. monotherapy. At 4 weeks, 30.5% of LOS/HCTZ and 14.4% of ramipril recipients achieved goal diastolic BP (p<0.001). More participants achieved goal systolic BP in the ARB/HCTZ group at 4 weeks (29.8% vs. 14.4%; p<0.001). At 4 weeks, mean diastolic BP had decreased 10.2+/-7.4 mm Hg in the LOS/HCTZ group compared with 6.4+/-6.8 mm Hg in the ramipril group (p<0.001), and systolic BP had fallen 15.4+/-13.1 mm Hg in the ARB/HCTZ compared with 9.2+/-10.2 mm Hg in the ACE-inhibitor group (p<0.001). Significant differences favoring the combination were also noted at 8 weeks. Drug-related adverse experiences were 10.3% for the combination compared with 12.7% for the monotherapy group. Initial combination therapy with an ARB/HCTZ was more effective than ACE-inhibitor monotherapy in achieving BP goals in participants with diabetes with no significant differences in the incidence of adverse experiences. These observations confirm other studies of combination therapies, such as b blocker/diuretic, ACE inhibitor/diuretic, or ACE inhibitor/calcium channel blocker. The use of two medications will achieve goal BP in more patients than monotherapy. This observation is important in treatment of high-risk patients with diabetes. PMID:15308882

  7. KE108-conjugated unimolecular micelles loaded with a novel HDAC inhibitor thailandepsin-A for targeted neuroendocrine cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guojun; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata; Harrison, April; Dammalapati, Ajitha; Xu, Wenjin; Cheng, Yiqiang; Chen, Herbert; Gong, Shaoqin

    2016-08-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) cancers can cause significant patient morbidity. Besides surgery, there are no curative treatments for NE cancers and their metastases, emphasizing the need for the development of other forms of therapy. In this study, multifunctional unimolecular micelles were developed for targeted NE cancer therapy. The unimolecular micelles were formed by multi-arm star amphiphilic block copolymer poly(amidoamine)-poly(valerolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) conjugated with KE108 peptide and Cy5 dye (abbreviated as PAMAM-PVL-PEG-KE108/Cy5). The unimolecular micelles with a spherical core-shell structure exhibited a uniform size distribution and excellent stability. The hydrophobic drug thailandepsin-A (TDP-A), a recently discovered HDAC inhibitor, was physically encapsulated into the hydrophobic core of the micelles. KE108 peptide, a somatostatin analog possessing high affinity for all five subtypes of somatostatin receptors (SSTR 1-5), commonly overexpressed in NE cancer cells, was used for the first time as an NE cancer targeting ligand. KE108 exhibited superior targeting abilities compared to other common somatostatin analogs, such as octreotide, in NE cancer cell lines. The in vitro assays demonstrated that the TDP-A-loaded, KE108-targeted micelles exhibited the best capabilities in suppressing NE cancer cell growth. Moreover, the in vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging on NE-tumor-bearing nude mice showed that KE108-conjugated micelles exhibited the greatest tumor accumulation due to their passive targeting and active targeting capabilities. Finally, TDP-A-loaded and KE108-conjugated micelles possessed the best anticancer efficacy without detectable systemic toxicity. Thus, these novel TDP-A-loaded and KE108-conjugated unimolecular micelles offer a promising approach for targeted NE cancer therapy. PMID:27156249

  8. The influence of a polymorphism in the gene encoding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) on treatment outcomes in late-onset Pompe patients receiving alglucosidase alfa.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rena C; Palmer, Rachel; Pomponio, Robert J; Lu, Yuefeng; Ma, Xiwen; McVie-Wylie, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype (I/I, I/D, D/D), disease severity at baseline and response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) were assessed in the Pompe disease Late-Onset Treatment Study (LOTS). No correlations were observed between ACE genotype and disease severity at baseline. However, D/D patients appeared to have a reduced response to alglucosidase alfa treatment than I/I or I/D patients, suggesting that ACE polymorphisms may influence the response to alglucosidase alfa treatment and warrants further investigation. PMID:27489778

  9. Antiproteinuric therapy and Fabry nephropathy: factors associated with preserved kidney function during agalsidase-beta therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G; Thomas, Christie P; Vujkovac, Bojan; Campbell, Ruth C; Charrow, Joel; Laney, Dawn A; Jackson, Leslie L; Wilcox, William R; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Nephropathy is an important feature of classical Fabry disease, which results in alpha-galactosidase A deficiency and cellular globotriaosylceramide accumulation. We report the safety and efficacy of antiproteinuric therapy with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in a study of classical Fabry patients receiving recombinant agalsidase-beta therapy. Methods and design The goal was maintenance of urine protein to creatinine ratio (UPCR) <0.5 g/g or a 50% reduction in baseline UPCR for 24 patients at eight study sites. The change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 21 months of treatment. Results 18 out of 24 patients achieved the UPCR goal with eGFR slopes that were significantly better than six patients who did not achieve the UPCR goal (−3.6 (−4.8 to −1.1) versus −7.0 (−9.0 to −5.6) mL/min/1.73 m2/year, respectively, p=0.018). Despite achieving the UPCR goal, 67% (12/18 patients) still progressed with an eGFR slope <−2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year. Regression analysis showed that increased age at initiation of agalsidase-beta therapy was significantly associated with worsened kidney outcome. Hypotension and hyperkalaemia occurred in seven and eight patients, respectively, which required modification of antiproteinuric therapy but was not associated with serious adverse events. Conclusions This study documents the effectiveness of agalsidase-beta (1 mg/kg/2 weeks) and antiproteinuric therapy with ACE inhibitors and/or ARB in patients with severe Fabry nephropathy. Patients had preservation of kidney function if agalsidase-beta treatment was initiated at a younger age, and UPCR maintained at or below 0.5 g/g with antiproteinuric therapy. Trial registration number NCT00446862. PMID:26490103

  10. [A Case of Life-Threatening Angioedema Occurred During Prolonged Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Treatment].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Rintaro; Nihei, Shun-Ichi; Arai, Hideaki; Nagata, Keiji; Isa, Yasuki; Harayama, Nobuya; Aibara, Keiji; Kamochi, Msayuki

    2016-03-01

    Although angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are widely used as the first choice drug for treating hypertension, we have only a superficial understanding of their relationship to angioedema. We report a case of life-threatening angioedema. The case was a 60-year-old man who had been taking an ACE inhibitor for hypertension for 11 years. He visited his home doctor for dyspnea, and tongue and neck swelling. He was transported to our hospital because of the possibility of airway obstruction. On admission, his tongue and neck swelling became more severe. We performed an intubation using an endoscope and started airway management. We also stopped his ACE inhibitor. The severe tongue and neck swelling improved gradually and he was extubated on day 3. On the fifth day he was discharged. We diagnosed angioedema caused by an ACE inhibitor. Although the risk of airway obstruction with ACE inhibitors is acknowledged, we have only a superficial understanding of how prolonged ACE inhibitor treatment induces angioedema. So we should consider angioedema in cases of taking ACE inhibitors, especially in cases of prolonged treatment. PMID:26972946

  11. Synthesis and biological studies of highly concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for CT tracking of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William E.; Aras, Omer; Fleiter, Thorsten; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    For patients with a history of heart attack or stroke, the prevention of another cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event is crucial. The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with overexpression of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown great potential as X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Since lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor, it has been used as coating on GNPs for targeted imaging of tissue ACE in prevention of fibrosis. Herein, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles (LIS-GNPs) were synthesized up to a concentration of 55 mgAu/mL. Their contrast was measured using CT and the results were compared to Omnipaque, a commonly used iodine-based contrast agent. The targeting ability of these LIS-GNPs was also assessed.

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril maleate) accelerates recovery of mouse skin from UVB-induced wrinkles

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura-Hachiya, Yuko; Arai, Koji Y.; Ozeki, Rieko; Kikuta, Ayako; Nishiyama, Toshio

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) increases in UVB-irradiated skin. •Administration of an ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced skin wrinkle. •ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced epidermal hypertrophy. •ACE inhibitor improved transepidermal water loss in the UVB-irradiated skin. -- Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and angiotensin II signaling regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue remodeling, as well as blood pressure, while in skin, angiotensin II signaling is involved in wound healing, inflammation, and pathological scar formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that angiotensin II is also involved in photoaging of skin. In this study, we examined the effect of enalapril maleate, an ACE inhibitor, on recovery of wrinkled skin of hairless mice exposed to long-term UVB irradiation. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that expression of ACE, angiotensin II, and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in the skin was increased after UVB irradiation (3 times/week at increasing intensities for 8 weeks). Administration of enalapril maleate (5 times/week for 6 weeks, starting 1 week after 10-week irradiation) accelerated recovery from UVB-induced wrinkles, epidermal hyperplasia and epidermal barrier dysfunction, as compared with the vehicle control. Our results indicate that ACE and angiotensin II activity are involved in skin photoaging, and suggest that ACE inhibitor such as enalapril maleate may have potential for improvement of photoaged skin.

  13. Antiretroviral Therapy and Efficacy After Virologic Failure on First-line Boosted Protease Inhibitor Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu; Hughes, Michael D.; Lockman, Shahin; Benson, Constance A.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gulick, Roy M.; Daar, Eric S.; Sax, Paul E.; Riddler, Sharon A.; Haubrich, Richard; Salata, Robert A.; Currier, Judith S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Virologic failure (VF) on a first-line ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) regimen is associated with low rates of resistance, but optimal management after failure is unknown. Methods. The analysis included participants in randomized trials who experienced VF on a first-line regimen of PI/r plus 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and had at least 24 weeks of follow-up after VF. Antiretroviral management and virologic suppression (human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1] RNA <400 copies/mL) after VF were assessed. Results. Of 209 participants, only 1 participant had major PI-associated treatment-emergent mutations at first-line VF. The most common treatment approach after VF (66%) was to continue the same regimen. The virologic suppression rate 24 weeks after VF was 64% for these participants, compared with 72% for those who changed regimens (P = .19). Participants remaining on the same regimen had lower NRTI resistance rates (11% vs 30%; P = .003) and higher CD4+ cell counts (median, 275 vs 213 cells/µL; P = .005) at VF than those who changed. Among participants remaining on their first-line regimen, factors at or before VF significantly associated with subsequent virologic suppression were achieving HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/mL before VF (odds ratio [OR], 3.39 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.32–8.73]) and lower HIV-1 RNA at VF (OR for <10 000 vs ≥10 000 copies/mL, 3.35 [95% CI, 1.40–8.01]). Better adherence after VF was also associated with subsequent suppression (OR for <100% vs 100%, 0.38 [95% CI, .15–.97]). For participants who changed regimens, achieving HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/mL before VF also predicted subsequent suppression. Conclusions. For participants failing first-line PI/r with no or limited drug resistance, remaining on the same regimen is a reasonable approach. Improving adherence is important to subsequent treatment success. PMID:24842909

  14. A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor as a potential modulator of cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Teicher, B A; Liu, S D; Liu, J T; Holden, S A; Herman, T S

    1993-01-01

    Since several anticancer drugs are known to become more cytotoxic to cells in an acidic milieu, we have attempted to utilize the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, Acetazolamide, to acidify the blood and tumor of C3H mice bearing the FSaIIC fibrosarcoma in order to sensitize tumor cells in vivo to CDDP, Melphalan, BCNU, SR4233 or PtCl4 (Fast Black)2 +/- hyperthermia. The direct cytotoxic interactions between the anticancer drugs and Acetazolamide were tested in FSaIIC cells in vitro with the monacidifying diuretic Chlorothrozide as a control. When cells were exposed to CDDP both diuretics protected against cytotoxicity in a dose dependent fashion. In contrast, cells exposed to Melphalan were minimally sensitized and those exposed to BCNU, SR4233, or PtCl4 (Fast Black)2 were essentially unaffected by the presence of the diuretic agents. Both diuretics were essentially non-toxic to cells in vitro, and, interestingly, both drugs markedly protected cells against hyperthermia under low pH conditions. In vitro, however, Acetzolamide produced a tumor growth delay of 2.3 days alone when given at 10 mg/kg i.p. once (the most effective dose) and produced additive growth delays with CDDP and Melphalan, but probably greater than additive delays with SR4233 and PtCl4 (Fast Black)2. When Acetazolamide was given daily for 5 days starting on the day the anticancer drugs were given once (day 7) essentially no further increase in tumor growth delay of nearly 16 days was observed versus only 4,6 days for the drug alone. When hyperthermia (43 degrees C min.) was delivered locally to the tumor after i.p. injection of the drugs, further growth delays were produced for every drug combination which probably were additive in extent. Blood and urine pH determinations revealed that a pH drop of 1 units occurred in the blood and a pH elevation of 1 to 21 units occurred in the urine 1 hr. after i.p. injection of Acetazolamide. These results indicate that this carbonic anhydrase inhibitor can add to

  15. Pollen Count and Presentation of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Associated Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Brittany; Nian, Hui; Sloan, Chantel; Byrd, James Brian; Woodard-Grice, Alencia; Yu, Chang; Stone, Elizabeth; Steven, Gary; Hartert, Tina; Teo, Koon K.; Pare, Guillaume; McCarty, Catherine A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-associated angioedema is increased in patients with seasonal allergies. OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema present during months when pollen counts are increased. METHODS Cohort analysis examined the month of presentation of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema and pollen counts in the ambulatory and hospital setting. Patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema were ascertained through (1) an observational study of patients presenting to Vanderbilt University Medical Center, (2) patients presenting to the Marshfield Clinic and participating in the Marshfield Clinic Personalized Medicine Research Project, and (3) patients enrolled in The Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET). Measurements include date of presentation of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema, population exposure to ACE inhibitor by date, and local pollen counts by date. RESULTS At Vanderbilt, the rate of angioedema was significantly associated with tree pollen months (P = .01 from χ2 test). When separate analyses were conducted in patients with a history of seasonal allergies and patients without, the rate of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema was increased during tree pollen months only in patients with a history of seasonal allergies (P = .002). In Marshfield, the rate of angioedema was significantly associated with ragweed pollen months (P = .025). In ONTARGET, a positive trend was observed between the ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema rate and grass season, although it was not statistically significant (P = .057). CONCLUSIONS Patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema are more likely to present with this adverse drug event during months when pollen counts are increased. PMID:24565618

  16. LLL12, a novel small inhibitor targeting STAT3 for hepatocellular carcinoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Mingxin; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Javle, Milind

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in clinical incidences of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but not in normal human hepatocytes. STAT3 signaling plays pivotal roles in angiogenesis, survival, metastasis, and growth of HCC. Recent evidence suggests that the blockade of aberrant STAT3 pathways can be exploited as a therapeutic strategy for HCC. We have developed the novel small molecular STAT3 inhibitor LLL12 on the basis of curcumin structure using computer-aided rational design. LLL12 has shown antitumor activity in various solid tumors including breast, brain, pancreatic cancer, and glioblastoma in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we hypothesized LLL12 inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 (Y705) in HCC and show antitumor activity in HCC in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that LLL12 selectively inhibited HCC cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in SNU387, SNU398, SNU449, and Hep3B HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, LLL12 at 5 mg/kg/day significantly inhibited the growth of SNU398 xenografts in nude mice. Collectively, our results indicate that LLL12 could be used to target STAT3 for the effective prevention or treatment of HCC. PMID:25883212

  17. Evidence-based support for the use of proton pump inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Fais, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    'We can only cure what we can understand first', said Otto H. Warburg, the 1931 Nobel laureate for his discovery on tumor metabolism. Unfortunately, we still don't know too much the mechanisms underlying of cancer development and progression. One of the unsolved mystery includes the strategies that cancer cells adopt to cope with an adverse microenvironment. However, we knew, from the Warburg's discovery, that through their metabolism based on sugar fermentation, cancer cells acidify their microenvironment and this progressive acidification induces a selective pressure, leading to development of very malignant cells entirely armed to survive in the hostile microenvironment generated by their own metabolism. One of the most mechanism to survive to the acidic tumor microenvironment are proton exchangers not allowing intracellular acidification through a continuous elimination of H(+) either outside the cells or within the internal vacuoles. This article wants to comment a translational process through which from the preclinical demonstration that a class of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) exploited worldwide for peptic ulcer treatment and gastroprotection are indeed chemosensitizers as well, we have got to the clinical proof of concept that PPI may well be included in new anti-cancer strategies, and with a solid background and rationale. PMID:26597250

  18. [From poly(ADP-ribose) discovery to PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Valérie; Illuzzi, Giuditta; Héberlé, Eléa; Dantzer, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARP-1 is a molecular sensor of DNA breaks, playing a key role in the spatial and temporal organization of their repair, contributing to the maintenance of genome integrity and cell survival. The fact that PARP inhibition impairs efficacy of break repair has been exploited as anticancer strategies to potentiate the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs and radiotherapy. Numerous clinical trials based on this innovative approach are in progress. PARP inhibition has also proved to be exquisitely efficient to kill tumour cells deficient in double strand break repair by homologous recombination, such as cells mutated for the breast cancer early onset genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, by synthetic lethality. Several phase III clinical trials are in progress for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers with BRCA mutations and the PARP inhibitor olaparib has just been approved for advanced ovarian cancers with germline BRCA mutation. This review recapitulates the history from the discovery of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reaction to the promising therapeutic applications of its inhibition in innovating anticancer strategies. Benefits, hopes and obstacles are discussed. PMID:26384693

  19. Glucocorticoids as cytokine inhibitors: role in neuroendocrine control and therapy of inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fantuzzi, Giamila

    1993-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are potent inhibitors of inflammation and endotoxic shock. This probably occurs through an inhibition of the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as of many of their toxic activities. Therefore, endogenous glucocorticoids (GC) might represent a major mechanism in the control of cytokine mediated pathologies. GC inhibit the synthesis of cytokines in various experimental models. Adrenalectomy or GC antagonists potentiate TNF, IL-1 and IL-6 production in LPS treated mice. GC inhibit the formation of arachidonic acid metabolites and the induction of NO synthase. They also inhibit various activities of cytokines including toxicity, haemodynamic shock and fever. Adrenalectomy sensitizes to the toxic effects of LPS, TNF and IL-1. On the other hand, GC potentiate the synthesis of several cytokine induced APP by the liver. Since many of these proteins have anti-toxic activities (antioxidant, antiprotease etc.) or bind cytokines, this might well represent a GC mediated protective feedback mechanism involving the liver. Not only do GC inhibit cytokines, but in vivo LPS and various cytokines (TNF, IL-1, IL-6) increase blood GC levels through a central mechanism involving the activation of the HPA. Thus, this neuroendocrine response to cytokines constitutes an important immunoregulatory feedback involving the brain. PMID:18475532

  20. INHALED ALPHA1-PROTEINASE INHIBITOR THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Gaggar, Amit; Chen, Junliang; Chmiel, James F; Dorkin, Henry L; Flume, Patrick A; Griffin, Rhonda; Nichols, David; Donaldson, Scott H

    2016-01-01

    Background Inhaled alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (PI) is known to reduce neutrophil elastase burden in some patients with CF. This phase 2a study was designed to test inhaled Alpha-1 HC, a new aerosolized alpha1-PI formulation, in CF patients. Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and evaluated the safety of 100 or 200 mg of inhaled Alpha-1 HC once daily for 3 weeks in subjects with CF. Thirty adult subjects were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive Alpha-1 HC or placebo. Results Drug delivery was confirmed by a dose-dependent increase in the sputum alpha1-PI. Seven (20.0%) of the 35 adverse events in the 100-mg dose group, 3 (13.0%) of 23 in the 200-mg dose group, and 4 (14.3%) of 28 in the placebo group were drug-related in these subjects. One serious adverse event occurred in 1 subject within each group. Conclusions Alpha-1 HC inhalation was safe and well tolerated. PMID:26321218

  1. Histotripsy Focal Ablation of Implanted Prostate Tumor in an ACE-1 Canine Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Schade, George R.; Keller, Jill; Ives, Kim; Cheng, Xu; Rosol, Thomas J.; Keller, Evan; Roberts, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Histotripsy is a nonthermal ablative focused ultrasound technology with possible future applications for prostate cancer focal therapy. We used the ACE-1 prostate tumor model and evaluated the feasibility of treating prostate tumors with histotripsy. Materials and Methods A total of 10 immunosuppressed (cyclosporine treated) canine subjects received transrectal ultrasound guided percutaneous intraprostatic injection of ACE-1 canine prostate cancer cells. Prostates were serially imaged with transrectal ultrasound to monitor tumor growth. Subjects were sham treated (3) or underwent transabdominal histotripsy of the prostate, which targeted implanted tumor and adjacent parenchyma using a 750 kHz piezoelectric ultrasound therapy transducer. Prostates were examined histologically to confirm tumor and the histotripsy treatment effect. Results ACE-1 tumors were visualized on transrectal ultrasound in all 10 subjects within 2 weeks of tumor injection. Lesions demonstrated growth in the prostatic capsule, glandular lobules, fibrous septa and periurethral stroma with significant desmoplastic reaction and areas of central necrosis on histology. Lymph node and/or pulmonary metastases developed in 4 subjects. Ultrasound tumor localization and initiation of cavitation during histotripsy therapy were feasible in all treated subjects. Histologically there was evidence of homogenization of tumor and prostatic parenchyma in all 4 acute subjects with necrosis and hemorrhage in the 3 chronic subjects. Conclusions This study shows the feasibility of histotripsy destruction of prostate tumors in a canine ACE-1 model. It suggests a potential role for histotripsy based focal therapy for prostate cancer. Further studies are needed to better characterize the effects of histotripsy on malignant tissues. PMID:22999534

  2. ACES-PHARAO : Microwave link data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynadier, F.; Delva, P.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Laurent, P.; Wolf, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Atomic Clocks Ensemble in Space (PHARAO-ACES mission, te{Salomon2007}), which will be installed on board the International Space Station , uses a dedicated two-way microwave link in order to compare the timescale generated on board with those provided by many ground stations disseminated on the Earth. Phase accuracy and stability of this long range link will have a key role in the success of the PHARAO-ACES experiment. The SYRTE is heavily involved in the design and the development of the data processing software : from theoretical modelling and numerical simulations to the development of a software prototype. Our team is working on a wide range of problems that need to be solved in order to achieve high accuracy in (almost) real time. In this poster we present some key aspects of the measurement, as well as the current status of the software's development.

  3. Hypofibrinolytic state in HIV-1-infected patients treated with protease inhibitor-containing highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Kristina; Bratt, Göran; Schulman, Sam; Bylund, Håkan; Sandström, Eric

    2002-04-15

    Decreased insulin sensitivity, hyperlipidemia, and body fat changes are considered as risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). A clustering of such factors (metabolic syndrome [MSDR]) exponentially increases the risk. Impaired fibrinolysis and increased coagulation are additional independent risk factors for CHD. We studied the effects of protease inhibitor (PI)-containing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on metabolic and hemostatic parameters in 363 HIV-infected individuals, of whom 266 were receiving PI-containing HAART and 97 were treatment naive. The fasting plasma levels of insulin, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), and fibrinogen were evaluated together with the areas of visceral adipose tissue and the visceral adipose tissue/subcutaneous adipose tissue area ratio. The levels of insulin, triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; visceral adipose tissue area; low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio; and visceral adipose tissue/subcutaneous adipose tissue area ratio were significantly increased in patients receiving PI-containing HAART compared with treatment-naive patients. The levels of PAI-1 and fibrinogen were significantly higher in patients receiving PI-containing HAART. PAI-1 levels were higher in individuals with MSDR but also in patients without MSDR who were receiving PI-containing HAART. PAI-1 was independently correlated to use of PI-containing HAART, triglyceride level, insulin level, and body mass index (p <.001). These findings suggest that patients receiving PI-containing HAART have decreased fibrinolysis and increased coagulability, which may thus represent additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in this patient group. PMID:11981359

  4. C1 Inhibitor in Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Nonresponsive to Conventional Therapy in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Viglietti, D; Gosset, C; Loupy, A; Deville, L; Verine, J; Zeevi, A; Glotz, D; Lefaucheur, C

    2016-05-01

    Complement inhibitors have not been thoroughly evaluated in the treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). We performed a prospective, single-arm pilot study to investigate the potential effects and safety of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) Berinert added to high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the treatment of acute ABMR that is nonresponsive to conventional therapy. Kidney recipients with nonresponsive active ABMR and acute allograft dysfunction were enrolled between April 2013 and July 2014 and received C1-INH and IVIG for 6 months (six patients). The primary end point was the change in eGFR at 6 months after inclusion (M+6). Secondary end points included the changes in histology and DSA characteristics and adverse events as evaluated at M+6. All patients showed an improvement in eGFR between inclusion and M+6: from 38.7 ± 17.9 to 45.2 ± 21.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.0277). There was no change in histological features, except a decrease in the C4d deposition rate from 5/6 to 1/6 (p = 0.0455). There was a change in DSA C1q status from 6/6 to 1/6 positive (p = 0.0253). One deep venous thrombosis was observed. In a secondary analysis, C1-INH patients were compared with a similar historical control group (21 patients). C1-INH added to IVIG is safe and may improve allograft function in kidney recipients with nonresponsive acute ABMR. PMID:26693703

  5. Selective intracellular delivery of proteasome inhibitors through pH-sensitive polymeric micelles directed to efficient antitumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Quader, S; Cabral, H; Mochida, Y; Ishii, T; Liu, X; Toh, K; Kinoh, H; Miura, Y; Nishiyama, N; Kataoka, K

    2014-08-28

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is central in the regulation of cellular proteins controlling cell cycle progression and apoptosis, drawing much interest for developing effective targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we developed a novel pH-responsive polymeric-micelle-based carrier system to effectively deliver the proteasome inhibitor MG132 into cancer cells. MG132 is covalently bound to the block copolymer composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyaspartate through an acid-labile hydrazone bond. This bond is stable at physiological condition, but hydrolytically degradable in acidic compartments in the cell, such as late-endosomes and lysosomes, and thus, it was used for controlled release of MG132 after EPR-mediated preferential accumulation of the micelles into the tumor. MG132-loaded micelles have monodispersed size distribution with an average diameter of 45nm, and critical micelle concentration is well below 10(-7)M. In vitro studies against several cancer cell lines confirmed that MG132-loaded micelles retained the cytotoxic effect, and this activity was indeed due to the inhibition of proteasome by released MG132 from the micelles. Real-time in vitro confocal-microscopy experiments clearly indicated that MG132-conjugated micelles disintegrated only inside the target cells. By intravital confocal micro-videography, we also confirmed the prolonged circulation of MG132 loaded micelles in the bloodstream, which lead to tumor specific accumulation of micelles, as confirmed by in vivo imaging 24h after injection. These micelles showed significantly lower in vivo toxicity than free MG132, while achieving remarkable antitumor effect against a subcutaneous HeLa-luc tumor model. Our findings create a paradigm for future development of polymeric-micelle-based carrier system for other peptide aldehyde type proteasome inhibitors to make them effective cohort of the existing cancer therapeutic regiments. PMID:24892974

  6. Association between HIV in pregnancy and antiretroviral therapy, including protease inhibitors and low birth weight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, P J; Smit, R; Stevens, M; Sever, J L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of low birth weight infants born to HIV seropositive women and to demonstrate any effects of antiretroviral therapy on birth weight. METHODS: Retrospective review of all obstetrical medical records from January 1, 1995 through June 30, 1998 to identify HIV seropositive women. We evaluated their antiretroviral therapy, CD4 counts, and birth weights of their newborns. We conducted detailed review of the clinical and laboratory findings for the HIV-infected untreated patients, women who received ZDV antepartum alone, and those who received PIs as part of antiretroviral treatment. RESULTS: The frequency of low birth weight infants was significantly increased in HIV seropositive compared to HIV seronegative parturients. Low birth weight infants were more frequent among HIV infected women with lower CD4 counts but the association was not statistically significant. Women who received no antepartum treatment, antepartum only ZDV, and those treated with PIs had significantly more low birth weight infants than did comparison groups. HIV seropositive women also had high frequencies of several obstetrical risk factors for low birth weight infants. CONCLUSION: The present study showed a significantly increased frequency of low birth weight infants among HIV infected women and especially the subgroups of infected women who received no antepartum treatment, antepartum ZDV only, and those treated with PIs. This association, however, may be related to the presence of many other preterm obstetrical risk factors noted in this study. Increasing numbers of HIV seropositive women are being treated with PIs according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines. If PIs are a cause of low birth weight infants, women taking these drugs may have incremental risk of low birth weight. PMID:10805364

  7. A Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Radiation Therapy, Temozolomide, and the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid for Patients With Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauze, Andra V.; Chang, Michael G.; Holdford, Diane J.; Smith, Sharon; Shih, Joanna; Tofilon, Philip J.; Camphausen, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic agent with histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) activity shown to sensitize glioblastoma (GBM) cells to radiation in preclinical models. We evaluated the addition of VPA to standard radiation therapy (RT) plus temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed GBM. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled between July 2006 and April 2013. Patients received VPA, 25 mg/kg orally, divided into 2 daily doses concurrent with RT and TMZ. The first dose of VPA was given 1 week before the first day of RT at 10 to 15 mg/kg/day and subsequently increased up to 25 mg/kg/day over the week prior to radiation. VPA- and TMZ-related acute toxicities were evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 (National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program) and Cancer Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme for toxicity and adverse event reporting (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment). Results: A total of 81% of patients took VPA according to protocol. Median overall survival (OS) was 29.6 months (range: 21-63.8 months), and median progression-free survival (PFS) was 10.5 months (range: 6.8-51.2 months). OS at 6, 12, and 24 months was 97%, 86%, and 56%, respectively. PFS at 6, 12, and 24 months was 70%, 43%, and 38% respectively. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities of VPA in conjunction with RT/TMZ therapy were blood and bone marrow toxicity (32%), neurological toxicity (11%), and metabolic and laboratory toxicity (8%). Younger age and class V recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) results were significant for both OS and PFS. VPA levels were not correlated with grade 3 or 4 toxicity levels. Conclusions: Addition of VPA to concurrent RT/TMZ in patients with newly diagnosed GBM was well tolerated. Additionally, VPA may result in improved outcomes compared to historical data and merits further study.

  8. Treatment of Hypertension in Black Patients With Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Neil B.

    1988-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension and the incidence of complications from uncontrolled elevated blood pressure in blacks is much greater than in the white population. In general, blacks have underlying differences in the factors relating to blood pressure level, including low plasma renin, and, in certain instances, a decreased ability to excrete sodium. The stepped-care approach in the management of the black hypertensive patient is similar to that taken with white patients, but racial differences in response to antihypertensive drugs exist that require careful consideration when choosing a treatment regimen. Thiazide diuretics are effective in blacks and are often used as initial therapy. Blacks tend to respond less well to β-blockers, but when combined with a diuretic, they are also effective. Encouraging data are available on the use of calcium channel blockers in blacks. When combined with a diuretic, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors also provide an alternative to therapy for black patients. The use of low doses of ACE inhibitors has reduced the high incidence of adverse effects associated with this group of drugs in earlier studies. PMID:3280812

  9. Drug-Related Pneumonitis During Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor Therapy: Radiographic Pattern-Based Approach in Waldenström Macroglobulinemia as a Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Erica N.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study determined the frequency of drug-related pneumonitis during mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor therapy in Waldenström macroglobulinemia patients and investigated the imaging characteristics and radiographic patterns of pneumonitis. Materials and Methods. A total of 40 patients (23 men, 17 women; 43–84 years old) with Waldenström macroglobulinemia treated in 2 trials of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus were retrospectively studied. Chest computed tomography (CT) scans during therapy were reviewed for abnormalities suspicious for drug-related pneumonitis by the consensus of three radiologists, evaluating the extent, distributions, and specific findings. The radiographic patterns of pneumonitis were classified using the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification of interstitial pneumonia. Results. Drug-related pneumonitis was noted in 23 patients (58%). The median time from the initiation of therapy to the onset of pneumonitis was 5.7 months. Lower lungs were involved in all 23 patients, with a higher extent than in the other zones (p < .001). The distribution was peripheral and lower in 11 patients (48%) and mixed and multifocal in 10 (44%). The findings were bilateral in 20 patients (87%). Ground glass opacities (GGOs) and reticular opacities were present in all 23 patients, with consolidation in 12, traction bronchiectasis in 2, and centrilobular nodularity in 1. The pattern of pneumonitis was classified as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) in 16 (70%) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) in 7 (30%), with overlapping features of COP and NSIP in 7 patients. Conclusion. Drug-related pneumonitis was noted on CT in 58% of Waldenström macroglobulinemia patients treated with mTOR inhibitor therapy. Most common findings were bilateral GGOs and reticular opacities, with or without consolidation, in peripheral and lower lungs, demonstrating COP and NSIP patterns. Implications for Practice: The

  10. Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI): New Avenues in Cardiovascular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Tocci, G; Battistoni, A; Rubattu, S

    2015-09-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is continuously and progressively raising worldwide. Essential hypertension is a major driver of cardiovascular events, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and congestive heart failure. This latter may represent the final common pathway of different cardiovascular diseases, and it is often mediated by progressive uncontrolled hypertension. Despite solid advantages derived from effective and sustained blood pressure control, and the widespread availability of effective antihypertensive medications, the vast majority of the more than 1 billion hypertensive patients worldwide continue to have uncontrolled hypertension. Among various factors that may be involved, the abnormal activation of neurohormonal systems is one consistent feature throughout the continuum of cardiovascular diseases. These systems may initiate biologically meaningful "injury responses". However, their sustained chronic overactivity often may induce and maintain the progression from hypertension towards congestive heart failure. The renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system, the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelin system are major neurohormonal stressor systems that are not only able to elevate blood pressure levels by retaining water and sodium, but also to play a role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. More recently, the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) represents a favourable approach to inhibit neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and suppress the RAAS via blockade of the AT1 receptors, without the increased risk of angioedema. LCZ696, the first-in-class ARNI, has already demonstrated BP lowering efficacy in patients with hypertension, in particular with respect to systolic blood pressure levels, improved cardiac biomarkers, cardiac remodelling and prognosis in patients with heart failure. This manuscript will briefly overview the main pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of ARNI in

  11. Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia stem cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs), which constitute a minority of the tumor bulk, are functionally defined on the basis of their ability to transfer leukemia into an immunodeficient recipient animal. The presence of LSCs has been demonstrated in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), of which ALL with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+). The use of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), as part of front-line treatment and in combination with cytotoxic agents, has greatly improved the proportions of complete response and molecular remission and the overall outcome in adults with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. New challenges have emerged with respect to induction of resistance to imatinib via Abelson tyrosine kinase mutations. An important recent addition to the arsenal against Ph+ leukemias in general was the development of novel TKIs, such as nilotinib and dasatinib. However, in vitro experiments have suggested that TKIs have an antiproliferative but not an antiapoptotic or cytotoxic effect on the most primitive ALL stem cells. None of the TKIs in clinical use target the LSC. Second generation TKI dasatinib has been shown to have a more profound effect on the stem cell compartment but the drug was still unable to kill the most primitive LSCs. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) remains the only curative treatment available for these patients. Several mechanisms were proposed to explain the resistance of LSCs to TKIs in addition to mutations. Hence, TKIs may be used as a bridge to SCT rather than monotherapy or combination with standard chemotherapy. Better understanding the biology of Ph+ ALL will open new avenues for effective management. In this review, we highlight recent findings relating to the question of LSCs in Ph+ ALL. PMID:22993661

  12. Regulation of alveolar epithelial cell survival by the ACE-2/angiotensin 1-7/Mas axis.

    PubMed

    Uhal, Bruce D; Li, Xiaopeng; Xue, Anita; Gao, Xu; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2011-09-01

    Earlier work from this laboratory demonstrated that apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires autocrine generation of angiotensin (ANG) II. More recent studies showed that angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), which degrades ANGII to form ANG1-7, is protective but severely downregulated in human and experimental lung fibrosis. Here it was theorized that ACE-2 and its product ANG1-7 might therefore regulate AEC apoptosis. To evaluate this hypothesis, the AEC cell line MLE-12 and primary cultures of rat AECs were exposed to the profibrotic apoptosis inducers ANGII or bleomycin (Bleo). Markers of apoptosis (caspase-9 or -3 activation and nuclear fragmentation), steady-state ANGII and ANG1-7, and JNK phosphorylation were measured thereafter. In the absence of Bleo, inhibition of ACE-2 by small interfering RNA or by a competitive inhibitor (DX600 peptide) caused a reciprocal increase in autocrine ANGII and corresponding decrease in ANG1-7 in cell culture media (both P < 0.05) and, moreover, induced AEC apoptosis. At baseline (without inhibitor), ANG1-7 in culture media was 10-fold higher than ANGII (P < 0.01). Addition of purified ANGII or bleomycin-induced caspase activation, nuclear fragmentation, and JNK phosphorylation in cultured AECs. However, preincubation with ANG1-7 (0.1 μM) prevented JNK phosphorylation and apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment with A779, a specific blocker of the ANG1-7 receptor mas, prevented ANG1-7 blockade of JNK phosphorylation, caspase activation, and nuclear fragmentation. These data demonstrate that ACE-2 regulates AEC survival by balancing the proapoptotic ANGII and its antiapoptotic degradation product ANG1-7. They also suggest that ANG1-7 inhibits AEC apoptosis through the ANG1-7 receptor mas. PMID:21665960

  13. Human Recombinant ACE2 Reduces the Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oudit, Gavin Y.; Liu, George C.; Zhong, JiuChang; Basu, Ratnadeep; Chow, Fung L.; Zhou, Joyce; Loibner, Hans; Janzek, Evelyne; Schuster, Manfred; Penninger, Josef M.; Herzenberg, Andrew M.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Scholey, James W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most common causes of end-stage renal failure. Inhibition of ACE2 function accelerates diabetic kidney injury, whereas renal ACE2 is downregulated in diabetic nephropathy. We examined the ability of human recombinant ACE2 (hrACE2) to slow the progression of diabetic kidney injury. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male 12-week-old diabetic Akita mice (Ins2WT/C96Y) and control C57BL/6J mice (Ins2WT/WT) were injected daily with placebo or with rhACE2 (2 mg/kg, i.p.) for 4 weeks. Albumin excretion, gene expression, histomorphometry, NADPH oxidase activity, and peptide levels were examined. The effect of hrACE2 on high glucose and angiotensin II (ANG II)–induced changes was also examined in cultured mesangial cells. RESULTS Treatment with hrACE2 increased plasma ACE2 activity, normalized blood pressure, and reduced the urinary albumin excretion in Akita Ins2WT/C96Y mice in association with a decreased glomerular mesangial matrix expansion and normalization of increased α-smooth muscle actin and collagen III expression. Human recombinant ACE2 increased ANG 1–7 levels, lowered ANG II levels, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. mRNA levels for p47phox and NOX2 and protein levels for protein kinase Cα (PKCα) and PKCβ1 were also normalized by treatment with hrACE2. In vitro, hrACE2 attenuated both high glucose and ANG II–induced oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase activity. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with hrACE2 attenuates diabetic kidney injury in the Akita mouse in association with a reduction in blood pressure and a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity. In vitro studies show that the protective effect of hrACE2 is due to reduction in ANG II and an increase in ANG 1–7 signaling. PMID:19934006

  14. Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication Effective in Eliminating GERD Symptoms in Partial Responders to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy at 6 Months

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, William E.; Simoni, Gilbert; Shughoury, Ahmad B.; Mavrelis, Peter G.; Raza, Mamoon; Heise, Jeffrey A.; Turgeon, Daniel G.; Fox, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Incomplete control of troublesome regurgitation and extraesophageal manifestations of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a known limitation of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. This multicenter randomized study compared the efficacy of transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) against PPIs in controlling these symptoms in patients with small hiatal hernias. Methods. Between June and August 2012, 63 patients were randomized at 7 US community hospitals. Patients in the PPI group were placed on maximum standard dose (MSD). Patients in the TIF group underwent esophagogastric fundoplication using the EsophyX2 device. Primary outcome was elimination of daily troublesome regurgitation or extraesophageal symptoms. Secondary outcomes were normalization of esophageal acid exposure (EAE), PPI usage and healing of esophagitis. Results. Of 63 randomized patients (40 TIF and 23 PPI), 3 were lost to follow-up leaving 39 TIF and 21 PPI patients for analysis. At 6-month follow-up, troublesome regurgitation was eliminated in 97% of TIF patients versus 50% of PPI patients, relative risk (RR) = 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-3.11 (P = .006). Globally, 62% of TIF patients experienced elimination of regurgitation and extraesophageal symptoms versus 5% of PPI patients, RR = 12.9, 95% CI = 1.9-88.9 (P = .009). EAE was normalized in 54% of TIF patients (off PPIs) versus 52% of PPI patients (on MSD), RR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.6-1.7 (P = .914). Ninety percent of TIF patients were off PPIs. Conclusion. At 6-month follow-up, TIF was more effective than MSD PPI therapy in eliminating troublesome regurgitation and extraesophageal symptoms of GERD. PMID:24756976

  15. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the Era of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: An Evolving Paradigm of Molecularly Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohamed A M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm, characterized by the unrestrained expansion of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. CML was the first malignancy in which a unique chromosomal abnormality was identified and a pathophysiologic association was suggested. The hallmark of CML is a reciprocal chromosomal translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22, t(9; 22)(q34; q11), creating a derivative 9q+ and a shortened 22q-. The latter, known as the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, harbors the breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL) fusion gene, encoding the constitutively active BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase that is necessary and sufficient for initiating CML. The successful implementation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for the treatment of CML remains a flagship for molecularly targeted therapy in cancer. TKIs have changed the clinical course of CML; however, some patients nonetheless demonstrate primary or secondary resistance to such therapy and require an alternative therapeutic strategy. Therefore, the assessment of early response to treatment with TKIs has become an important tool in the clinical monitoring of CML patients. Although mutations in the BCR-ABL have proven to be the most prominent mechanism of resistance to TKIs, other mechanisms-either rendering the leukemic cells still dependent on BCR-ABL activity or supporting oncogenic properties of the leukemic cells independent of BCR-ABL signaling-have been identified. This article provides an overview of the current understanding of CML pathogenesis; recommendations for diagnostic tools, treatment strategies, and management guidelines; and highlights the BCR-ABL-dependent and -independent mechanisms that contribute to the development of resistance to TKIs. PMID:27220498

  16. Influence of phase I periodontal therapy on levels of matrix metalloproteinase 1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Ghodpage, Pallavi S.; Kolte, Rajashri A.; Kolte, Abhay P.; Gupta, Madhur

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) is a member of a family of enzymes that can degrade most extracellular matrix macromolecules. Extracellularly, MMPs are controlled by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and by mechanisms of pro-MMP activation. Levels of MMPs and TIMPs change during healing, inflammation, and normal tissue turnover. Herein we aimed to evaluate the levels of MMP-1 and TIMP-1 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) from periodontally healthy patients (control group) and chronic periodontitis patients before and after phase 1 therapy. Methods In this study we examined 30 patients who had chronic periodontitis with probing depth sites ⩾5 mm and a clinical attachment level (CAL) ⩾5 mm. We included 30 periodontally healthy patients as a control. Clinical measurements such as plaque (PI) and gingival (GI) indices, papillary bleeding index (PBI), probing depths (PD), and CAL were recorded both before treatment (BT) and after phase I periodontal treatment (AT). Assays for MMP-1 and TIMP-1 were performed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results All clinical parameters were significantly reduced at the post-therapy visit. MMP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients BT than the controls; however, the patients AT were not statistically different than the controls. TIMP-1 levels in patients BT were significantly lower than in the controls and significantly lower than patients AT. We observed a significant positive correlation between GCF volume and MMP-1 levels. Furthermore, TIMP-1 levels were significantly negatively correlated with both GCF volume and all clinical parameters. Conclusions We observed that as the extent of periodontal destruction increases, MMP-1 concentration increases and TIMP-1 concentration decreases in GCF. When chronic periodontitis patients were treated by scaling and root planing (SRP), the average MMP-1 concentrations decreased and TIMP-1 concentrations increased in GCF. PMID

  17. Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Is Associated With Reduction of Early Bleeding Risk After Prophylactic Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong Hee; Yim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Seung Young; Suh, Sang Jun; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) is an effective procedure to control and prevent variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis, but it can be complicated by bleeding from post-EVL ulcers. Several studies have reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) decrease the size of post-EVL ulcers. However, evidence are limited as to whether PPIs actually reduce the risk of bleeding after EVL. This study aimed to analyze the factors associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL and to assess the effect of PPI therapy. Five hundred and five cirrhotic patients with high risk esophageal varices who received primary prophylactic EVL were included for this retrospective cohort study. Post-EVL bleeding was defined as bleeding after prophylactic EVL within 8 weeks evidenced by the occurrence of melena or hematemesis, or by a decrease of hemoglobin by >2.0 g/dL. If evidence of bleeding from ulceration of the EVL sites was confirmed by endoscopy, we defined it as post-EVL ulcer bleeding. Fourteen patients developed bleeding after prophylactic EVL. Factors associated with post-EVL bleeding included alcohol as etiology, low albumin, high total bilirubin, high Child-Pugh score, high MELD score, coexistence of gastric varices, and not administrating PPI medication by univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic analysis, Co-existing gastric varix (odds ratio [OR] 5.680, P = 0.005] and not administrating PPIs (OR 8.217, P = 0.002) were associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL. In the subgroup analysis excluding patients whose gastric varices were treated, not administering PPI medication (OR 8.827, P = 0.008) was the sole factor associated with post-EVL bleeding. We suggest that PPI therapy needs to be considered in patients receiving prophylactic EVL to reduce the risk of bleeding after prophylactic EVL. PMID:26937932

  18. Prospects of medium specific activity (177) Lu in targeted therapy of prostate cancer using (177) Lu-labeled PSMA inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Chakravarty, Rubel; Shetty, Priyalata; Vimalnath, K V; Sen, Ishita B; Dash, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy using (177) Lu-labeled peptidomimetic inhibitor of prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) viz. PSMA-617 is emerging as one the most effective strategies for management of metastatic prostate cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer related death. The aim of the present study is to develop a robust and easily adaptable protocol for formulation of therapeutic dose of (177) Lu-PSMA-617 at hospital radiopharmacy using moderate specific activity (177) Lu available at an affordable cost. Extensive radiochemical studies were performed to optimize the required [PSMA-617] / [Lu] ratio and other parameters to formulate 7.4 GBq dose of (177) Lu-PSMA-617. Based on these, 7.4 GBq therapeutic dose of (177) Lu-PSMA-617 was formulated by incubating 160 µg of PSMA-617 with indigenously produced (177) LuCl3 (555 GBq/µg specific activity of (177) Lu) at 90 °C for 30 min. The radiochemical purity of the formulation was 98.3 ± 0.6% (n = 7) which was retained to the extent of >95% after 7 d in normal saline at room temperature and >96% after 2 d in human serum at 37 °C. Preliminary clinical studies showed specific targeting of the agent in the lesion sites and similar physiological distribution as in diagnostic (68) Ga-PSMA-11 PET scans performed earlier. The developed optimized protocol for formulating therapeutic dose of (177) Lu-PSMA-617 could be useful for large number of nuclear medicine therapy clinics across the world having access to moderate specific activity (177) Lu at an affordable cost. PMID:27264278

  19. Plasma tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1): an independent predictor of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tolosana, Jose María; Mont, Lluís; Sitges, Marta; Berruezo, Antonio; Delgado, Victoria; Vidal, Bàrbara; Tamborero, David; Morales, Manel; Batlle, Montserrat; Roig, Eulalia; Castel, M. Angeles; Pérez-Villa, Félix; Godoy, Miguel; Brugada, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Aims Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) play a role in left ventricular structural remodelling. The aim of our study was to analyse MMP-2 and TIMP-1 levels as predictors of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods and results A cohort of 42 CRT patients from our centre was prospectively evaluated at baseline and after 12-month follow-up. MMP-2 and TIMP-1 assays were performed prior to CRT implant. Cardiac resynchronization therapy responders were defined as patients who survived, were not transplanted, and increased their basal 6 min walking distance test (6MWDT) by ≥10% or improved their NYHA functional class. Overall, 25 patients (60%) were classed as responders. At 12-month follow-up, six patients (14.2%) had died and one (2.4%) patient had been transplanted. Compared with responders, non-responders had higher levels of TIMP-1 (277 ± 59 vs. 216 ± 46 ng/mL, P = 0.001), MMP-2 (325 ± 115 vs. 258 ± 56 ng/mL, P = 0.02), and creatinine (1.76 ± 0.8 vs. 1.25 ± 0.3 mg/dL, P = 0.01). In a multivariate analysis, TIMP-1 was the only independent predictor of non-response to CRT [OR 0.97, 95% (CI 0.96–0.99) P = 0.005]. TIMP-1≥248 ng/mL predicted non-response with 71% sensitivity and 72% specificity. Conclusion TIMP-1 is an independent predictor of non-response in patients treated with CRT. PMID:20360066

  20. Long-term effectiveness of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor- versus ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy: implications for first-line therapy choice in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D; Hull, Mark; McVea, David; Chau, William; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio SG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In many resource-limited settings, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) failure is diagnosed clinically or immunologically. As such, there is a high likelihood that patients may stay on a virologically failing regimen for a substantial period of time. Here, we compared the long-term impact of initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)- versus boosted protease inhibitor (bPI)-based cART in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We followed prospectively 3925 ART-naïve patients who started NNRTIs (N=1963, 50%) or bPIs (N=1962; 50%) from 1 January 2000 until 30 June 2013 in BC. At six months, we assessed whether patients virologically failed therapy (a plasma viral load (pVL) >50 copies/mL), and we stratified them based on the pVL at the time of failure ≤500 versus >500 copies/mL. We then followed these patients for another six months and calculated their probability of achieving subsequent viral suppression (pVL <50 copies/mL twice consecutively) and of developing drug resistance. These probabilities were adjusted for fixed and time-varying factors, including cART adherence. Results At six months, virologic failure rates were 9.5 and 14.3 cases per 100 person-months for NNRTI and bPI initiators, respectively. NNRTI initiators who failed with a pVL ≤500 copies/mL had a 16% higher probability of achieving subsequent suppression at 12 months than bPI initiators (0.81 (25th–75th percentile 0.75–0.83) vs. 0.72 (0.61–0.75)). However, if failing NNRTI initiators had a pVL >500 copies/mL, they had a 20% lower probability of suppressing at 12 months than pVL-matched bPI initiators (0.37 (0.29–0.45) vs. 0.46 (0.38–0.54)). In terms of evolving HIV drug resistance, those who failed on NNRTI performed worse than bPI in all scenarios, especially if they failed with a viral load >500 copies/mL. Conclusions Our results show that patients who virologically failed at six months on NNRTI and continued on the same regimen had a

  1. Optimal antagonism of the Renin-Angiotensin-aldosterone system: do we need dual or triple therapy?

    PubMed

    Werner, Christian; Pöss, Janine; Böhm, Michael

    2010-07-01

    HeFT and CHARM-ADDED have shown that combined RAAS inhibition with an ACE inhibitor and ARB significantly reduced the morbidity endpoint in certain patient subgroups compared with standard therapy. However, in clinical practice, dual RAAS blockade is rarely employed, as seen, for instance, in the CORONA trial. The RALES and EPHESUS trials, investigating the effects of aldosterone blockade on cardiovascular outcomes in CHF patients, revealed that the addition of an aldosterone antagonist to standard heart failure therapy conferred powerful relative risk reductions for both morbidity and mortality. Future studies will elucidate whether this also holds true for patients who are asymptomatic or who have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. In selected patients with renal disease, several studies have suggested that combined RAAS blockade brings about additional renoprotective antiproteinuric effects independent of blood pressure reduction, and large trials with robust endpoints are underway. In summary, combined therapy with several RAAS inhibitors is not recommended for all patients along the cardiorenovascular continuum. Patients with CHF with incomplete neuroendocrine blockade, as indicated, for example, by repetitive cardiac decompensation or refractory symptoms, might benefit from dual therapy as long as safety issues are well controlled. Finally, novel pharmacological agents such as the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren may provide additional therapeutic tools, but their role has yet to be established. PMID:20568830

  2. Risk stratification of chromosomal abnormalities in chronic myelogenous leukemia in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cortes, Jorge E; Tang, Guilin; Khoury, Joseph D; Wang, Sa; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; DiGiuseppe, Joseph A; Chen, Zi; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Hu, Shimin

    2016-06-01

    Clonal cytogenetic evolution with additional chromosomal abnormalities (ACAs) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is generally associated with decreased response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy and adverse survival. Although ACAs are considered as a sign of disease progression and have been used as one of the criteria for accelerated phase, the differential prognostic impact of individual ACAs in CML is unknown, and a classification system to reflect such prognostic impact is lacking. In this study, we aimed to address these questions using a large cohort of CML patients treated in the era of TKIs. We focused on cases with single chromosomal changes at the time of ACA emergence and stratified the 6 most common ACAs into 2 groups: group 1 with a relatively good prognosis including trisomy 8, -Y, and an extra copy of Philadelphia chromosome; and group 2 with a relatively poor prognosis including i(17)(q10), -7/del7q, and 3q26.2 rearrangements. Patients in group 1 showed much better treatment response and survival than patients in group 2. When compared with cases with no ACAs, ACAs in group 2 conferred a worse survival irrelevant to the emergence phase and time. In contrast, ACAs in group 1 had no adverse impact on survival when they emerged from chronic phase or at the time of CML diagnosis. The concurrent presence of 2 or more ACAs conferred an inferior survival and can be categorized into the poor prognostic group. PMID:27006386

  3. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  4. A Protease Inhibitor with Induction Therapy with Natural Interferon-β in Patients with HCV Genotype 1b Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Yutaka; Imaizumi, Naohiko; Tanimura, Hirohisa; Kashiwamura, Shinichiro; Kashiwagi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The restoration of innate immune responses has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We compared the efficacy and safety of induction therapy (IT) with natural interferon-β (n-IFN-β) followed by pegylated-IFN-α/ribavirin (PR) alone (group A, n = 30) and IT with a protease inhibitor (PI) (simeprevir or vaniprevir)/PR (group B, n = 13) in CHC patients with genotype 1b and high viral loads. During IT with nIFN-β, virologic response rates in group A and group B were 10% and 8% (p = 0.6792) at week 4, 30% and 16% (p = 0.6989) at week 12 and 47% and 20% (p = 0.0887) at week 24 respectively. During and after the treatment with PR alone or PI/PR, virologic response rates in groups A and B were 50% and 82% (p = 0.01535) at week 4, 53% and 91% (p = 0.006745) at week 8, 57% and 91% (p = 0.001126) at week 12, 57% and 100% (p < 0.001845) at the end of the treatment and 57% and 80% (p < 0.005166) after treatment cessation. IT with PI/PR linked to the restoration of innate immune response was tolerated well, overcame virological breakthrough, enhanced early virologic responses, and resulted in a sustained virologic response in difficult-to-treat CHC patients. IT with PI/PR is beneficial for treating difficult-to-treat CHC patients. PMID:27005617

  5. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  6. A Protease Inhibitor with Induction Therapy with Natural Interferon-β in Patients with HCV Genotype 1b Infection.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Yutaka; Imaizumi, Naohiko; Tanimura, Hirohisa; Kashiwamura, Shinichiro; Kashiwagi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The restoration of innate immune responses has potential as a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We compared the efficacy and safety of induction therapy (IT) with natural interferon-β (n-IFN-β) followed by pegylated-IFN-α/ribavirin (PR) alone (group A, n = 30) and IT with a protease inhibitor (PI) (simeprevir or vaniprevir)/PR (group B, n = 13) in CHC patients with genotype 1b and high viral loads. During IT with nIFN-β, virologic response rates in group A and group B were 10% and 8% (p = 0.6792) at week 4, 30% and 16% (p = 0.6989) at week 12 and 47% and 20% (p = 0.0887) at week 24 respectively. During and after the treatment with PR alone or PI/PR, virologic response rates in groups A and B were 50% and 82% (p = 0.01535) at week 4, 53% and 91% (p = 0.006745) at week 8, 57% and 91% (p = 0.001126) at week 12, 57% and 100% (p < 0.001845) at the end of the treatment and 57% and 80% (p < 0.005166) after treatment cessation. IT with PI/PR linked to the restoration of innate immune response was tolerated well, overcame virological breakthrough, enhanced early virologic responses, and resulted in a sustained virologic response in difficult-to-treat CHC patients. IT with PI/PR is beneficial for treating difficult-to-treat CHC patients. PMID:27005617

  7. A MEK/PI3K/HDAC inhibitor combination therapy for KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ischenko, Irene; Petrenko, Oleksi; Hayman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive, metastatic disease with limited treatment options. Factors contributing to the metastatic predisposition and therapy resistance in pancreatic cancer are not well understood. Here, we used a mouse model of KRAS-driven pancreatic carcinogenesis to define distinct subtypes of PDAC metastasis: epithelial, mesenchymal and quasi-mesenchymal. We examined pro-survival signals in these cells and the therapeutic response differences between them. Our data indicate that the initiation and maintenance of the transformed state are separable, and that KRAS dependency is not a fundamental constant of KRAS-initiated tumors. Moreover, some cancer cells can shuttle between the KRAS dependent (drug-sensitive) and independent (drug-tolerant) states and thus escape extinction. We further demonstrate that inhibition of KRAS signaling alone via co-targeting the MAPK and PI3K pathways fails to induce extensive tumor cell death and, therefore, has limited efficacy against PDAC. However, the addition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors greatly improves outcomes, reduces the self-renewal of cancer cells, and blocks cancer metastasis in vivo. Our results suggest that targeting HDACs in combination with KRAS or its effector pathways provides an effective strategy for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:26158412

  8. Trans-arterial chemoembolization as a therapy for liver tumours: New clinical developments and suggestions for combination with angiogenesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gadaleta, C Damiano; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2011-10-01

    The liver is the primary site of metastases for many malignancies. Gastrointestinal cancers are especially prone to spread to the liver and other tumours, as breast cancer and melanoma often spread to the liver. On the other hand, hepatocellular cancer (HCC) is the fifth most common malignancy in the world due to its common etiology from chronic liver damage caused by hepatitis or cirrhosis. Treatments of liver tumours vary according to histology and liver invasion and until now trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) has represented a main approach in the therapy of liver tumours. This review takes into consideration: (i) the background to utilizing TACE in liver tumours; (ii) TACE methods and the biological rationale for utilizing chemotherapeutic agents coated to a new micro-particle such as DC-Beads and HepaSphere; (iii) clinical experiences employing TACE in different liver tumours; (iv) the pivotal role of angiogenesis and hypoxia-induced angiogenesis following TACE with special references to HCC. Finally, the rationale for the combination of TACE with angiogenesis inhibitors is also discussed. PMID:21067940

  9. Fragment-based drug design and identification of HJC0123, a novel orally bioavailable STAT3 inhibitor for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Ding, Chunyong; Chu, Lili; Zhang, Yusong; Terry, Kristin; Liu, Huiling; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a promising approach for the generation of lead molecules with enhanced activity and especially drug-like properties against therapeutic targets. Herein, we report the fragment-based drug design, systematic chemical synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of novel scaffolds as potent anticancer agents by utilizing six privileged fragments from known STAT3 inhibitors. Several new molecules such as compounds 5, 12, and 19 that may act as advanced chemical leads have been identified. The most potent compound 5 (HJC0123) has demonstrated to inhibit STAT3 promoter activity, downregulate phosphorylation of STAT3, increase the expression of cleaved caspase-3, inhibit cell cycle progression and promote apoptosis in breast and pancreatic cancer cells with low micromolar to nanomolar IC50 values. Furthermore, compound 5 significantly suppressed estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumor growth in vivo (p.o.), indicating its great potential as an efficacious and orally bioavailable drug candidate for human cancer therapy. PMID:23416191

  10. Fragment-based drug design and identification of HJC0123, a novel orally bioavailable STAT3 inhibitor for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Ding, Chunyong; Chu, Lili; Zhang, Yusong; Terry, Kristin; Liu, Huiling; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-04-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is a promising approach for the generation of lead molecules with enhanced activity and especially drug-like properties against therapeutic targets. Herein, we report the fragment-based drug design, systematic chemical synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of novel scaffolds as potent anticancer agents by utilizing six privileged fragments from known STAT3 inhibitors. Several new molecules such as compounds 5, 12, and 19 that may act as advanced chemical leads have been identified. The most potent compound 5 (HJC0123) has demonstrated to inhibit STAT3 promoter activity, downregulate phosphorylation of STAT3, increase the expression of cleaved caspase-3, inhibit cell cycle progression and promote apoptosis in breast and pancreatic cancer cells with low micromolar to nanomolar IC50 values. Furthermore, compound 5 significantly suppressed estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumor growth in vivo (p.o.), indicating its great potential as an efficacious and orally bioavailable drug candidate for human cancer therapy. PMID:23416191

  11. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, -0.99; 95% CI, -1.61 to -0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, -0.58; 95% CI, -1.10 to -0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, -0.31; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, -0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with exercises and TNF inhibitors for

  12. Computer-Aided Identification of Trypanosoma brucei Uridine Diphosphate Galactose 4′-Epimerase Inhibitors: Toward the Development of Novel Therapies for African Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, affects tens of thousands of sub-Saharan Africans. As current therapeutics are inadequate due to toxic side effects, drug resistance, and limited effectiveness, novel therapies are urgently needed. UDP-galactose 4′-epimerase (TbGalE), an enzyme of the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism, is one promising T. brucei drug target. We here use the relaxed complex scheme, an advanced computer-docking methodology that accounts for full protein flexibility, to identify inhibitors of TbGalE. An initial hit rate of 62% was obtained at 100 μM, ultimately leading to the identification of 14 low-micromolar inhibitors. Thirteen of these inhibitors belong to a distinct series with a conserved binding motif that may prove useful in future drug design and optimization. PMID:20527952

  13. SGLT2 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists as second-line therapy in type 2 diabetes: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gurgle, Holly E; White, Karen; McAdam-Marx, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the selection of second-line therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are unable to achieve glycemic control with metformin therapy alone. Newer pharmacologic treatments for T2DM include glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. Both the classes of medication are efficacious, exhibit positive effects on weight, and are associated with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. The purpose of this review is to compare the clinical trial and real-world effectiveness data of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors related to A1c reduction, weight loss, cost-effectiveness, cardiovascular outcomes, and safety in patients with T2DM. This review summarizes comparative evidence for providers who are determining which of the two classes may be the most appropriate for a specific patient. PMID:27350752

  14. Safety of a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor and novel targeted therapy for the treatment of a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Katzel, Jed A; Lee-Ma, Annette; Vesole, David H

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of chronic myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma has increased in recent years partly because of an improved therapeutic armamentarium for both conditions. Likewise, understanding the complexity inherent in designing combination treatment strategies will become increasingly prescient in the coming years. We describe, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported patient to be treated with second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy while on novel therapy for myeloma. The combination was well tolerated and effective for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia and concurrent myeloma. PMID:26111050

  15. Response of protein C and protein C inhibitor to warfarin therapy in patient with combined deficiency of Factors V and VIII.

    PubMed

    Bern, M M; Suzuki, K; Mann, K; Tracy, P; Hoyer, L; Jensen, W; Gallivan, M; Arkin, C; Davis, G

    1984-12-15

    The role of Protein C in combined factor V/VIII deficiency was examined by reducing the Protein C concentration using warfarin therapy in a patient with the combined deficiency. The factor VIII deficiency was like Hemophilia-A, with deficiency of VIII:C and VIII:C(Ag), but normal VIIIR:Ag and VIIIR:cof. The factor V deficiency was due to loss of the V antigen. During warfarin therapy the Protein C level was reduced, but concentrations of factors V and VIII did not change. Protein C Inhibitor was normal throughout. Thus combined factor V/VIII deficiency is not related to Protein C levels. PMID:6098970

  16. Sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor combination therapy to optimize glycemic control and tolerability in patients with type 2 diabetes: focus on dapagliflozin–metformin

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Katz, Arie

    2016-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes (T2D), early combination therapy using agents that target a number of the underlying pathophysiologic defects contributing to hyperglycemia may improve patient outcomes. For many patients, the combination of metformin with a sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor may be a good option because these agents have complementary mechanisms of action, neutral-to-positive effects on body weight, and a low risk of hypoglycemia. This review focuses on the combination of metformin with dapagliflozin, a member of the SGLT-2 inhibitor class of antidiabetes agents. In clinical trials, the combination of dapagliflozin with metformin produced significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin and body weight in a broad range of adult patients with T2D, including those initiating pharmacotherapy and those with more advanced disease. These reductions were accompanied by modest decreases in blood pressure. Dapagliflozin as add-on therapy to metformin was well tolerated and associated with low rates of hypoglycemia. Genital infections and, in some studies, urinary tract infections were more frequent with dapagliflozin than with placebo. Early combination therapy with dapagliflozin and metformin may be a safe and appropriate treatment option that enables patients with T2D to achieve individualized glycemic goals as either initial combination therapy in treatment-naïve patients or as dapagliflozin add-on in patients inadequately controlled with metformin therapy. PMID:27042132

  17. Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor combination therapy to optimize glycemic control and tolerability in patients with type 2 diabetes: focus on dapagliflozin-metformin.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Katz, Arie

    2016-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes (T2D), early combination therapy using agents that target a number of the underlying pathophysiologic defects contributing to hyperglycemia may improve patient outcomes. For many patients, the combination of metformin with a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor may be a good option because these agents have complementary mechanisms of action, neutral-to-positive effects on body weight, and a low risk of hypoglycemia. This review focuses on the combination of metformin with dapagliflozin, a member of the SGLT-2 inhibitor class of antidiabetes agents. In clinical trials, the combination of dapagliflozin with metformin produced significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin and body weight in a broad range of adult patients with T2D, including those initiating pharmacotherapy and those with more advanced disease. These reductions were accompanied by modest decreases in blood pressure. Dapagliflozin as add-on therapy to metformin was well tolerated and associated with low rates of hypoglycemia. Genital infections and, in some studies, urinary tract infections were more frequent with dapagliflozin than with placebo. Early combination therapy with dapagliflozin and metformin may be a safe and appropriate treatment option that enables patients with T2D to achieve individualized glycemic goals as either initial combination therapy in treatment-naïve patients or as dapagliflozin add-on in patients inadequately controlled with metformin therapy. PMID:27042132

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Metabolic Predictors of Rapid Responders to Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor as an Add-on Therapy to Sulfonylurea and Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ye An; Yoo, Won Sang; Hong, Eun Shil; Ku, Eu Jeong; Park, Kyeong Seon; Lim, Soo; Cho, Young Min; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor add-on therapy is a new option for patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes who are taking combined metformin and sulfonylurea (SU). We evaluated the efficacy and safety of this triple therapy and the characteristics of rapid responders and hypoglycemia-prone patients. Methods We included 807 patients with type 2 diabetes who were prescribed a newly added DPP-4 inhibitor to ongoing metformin and SU in 2009 to 2011. Glycemia and other metabolic parameters at baseline, 12, 24, and 52 weeks, as well as episodes of hypoglycemia were analyzed. Rapid responders were defined as patients with ≥25% reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) within 12 weeks. Results At baseline, while on the submaximal metformin and SU combination, the mean HbA1c level was 8.4%. Twelve weeks after initiation of DPP-4 inhibitor add-on, 269 patients (34.4%) achieved an HbA1c level ≤7%. Sixty-six patients (8.2%, 47 men) were rapid responders. The duration of diabetes was shorter in rapid responders, and their baseline fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, C-peptide, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance were significantly higher. Patients who experienced hypoglycemia after taking DPP-4 inhibitor add-on were more likely to be female, to have a lower body weight and lower triglyceride and FPG levels, and to have higher homeostasis model assessment of β-cells. Conclusion An oral hypoglycemic triple agent combination including a DPP-4 inhibitor was effective in patients with uncontrolled diabetes. Proactive dose reduction of SU should be considered when a DPP-4 inhibitor is added for rapid responders and hypoglycemia-prone patients. PMID:26616595

  19. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University assist in leveling and orienting the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) as it is seated on a platform for solar array installation in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The ACE observatory has six high-resolution particle detection sensors and three monitoring instruments. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  20. Update on drug interactions with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors prescribed as first-line therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction or pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Kadowitz, Philip J; Gokce, Ahmet; Sikka, Suresh C; Lokman, Utku; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2013-02-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5i, sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil and avanafil) are a first-line medical therapy for erectile dysfunction (ED). In all likelihood, PDE5i usage will increase because sildenafil (Viagra® and Revatio®) and tadalafil (Cialis® and Adcirca®) have recently been recommended as first-line therapy for patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). PDE5i exhibit higher plasma concentrations when co-administered with cytochrome P (CYP) 3A inhibitors, which influences their side-effect profile. The higher PDE5i plasma concentrations, caused by CYP3A inhibitors, influence the severity and timing of PDE5i drug interactions and require dose adjustment. PDE5i are safe when used with most antihypertensive agents, but co-administration with nitrates or α-blockers can cause severe hypotension and syncope. Dose adjustment is also necessary when PDE5i are co-administered with CYP3A inducers. The combination of oral tadalafil and bosentan (endothelin receptor antagonist) reduces tadalafil levels and requires dose adjustment. Current literature reports a number of interactions between PDE5i and other agents and further studies are needed to expand our knowledge base of these interactions. This review discusses relevant PDE5i drug interactions, including those with CYP 450 inhibitors and inducers which are frequently used during the treatment of ED and PH. PMID:23140258

  1. Genetic events that limit the efficacy of MEK and RTK inhibitor therapies in a mouse model of KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Viale, Andrea; Shah, Parantu; Carugo, Alessandro; Ying, Haoqiang; Wang, Huamin; Genovese, Giannicola; Seth, Sahil; Minelli, Rosalba; Green, Tessa; Huang-Hobbs, Emmet; Corti, Denise; Sanchez, Nora; Nezi, Luigi; Marchesini, Matteo; Kapoor, Avnish; Yao, Wantong; Di Francesco, Maria Emilia; Petrocchi, Alessia; Deem, Angela K.; Scott, Kenneth; Colla, Simona; Mills, Gordon B.; Fleming, Jason B.; Heffernan, Timothy P.; Jones, Philip; Toniatti, Carlo; DePinho, Ronald A.; Draetta, Giulio F.

    2014-01-01

    Mutated KRAS (KRAS*) is a fundamental driver in the majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC). Using an inducible mouse model of KRAS*-driven PDAC, we compared KRAS* genetic extinction to pharmacological inhibition of MEK1 in tumor spheres and in vivo. KRAS* ablation blocked proliferation and induced apoptosis while MEK1 inhibition exerted cytostatic effects. Proteomic analysis evidenced that MEK1 inhibition was accompanied by a sustained activation of the PI3K-AKT-MTOR pathway and by the activation of AXL, PDGFRa, and HER1-2 receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) expressed in a large proportion of human PDAC samples analyzed. While single inhibition of each RTK alone or plus MEK1 inhibitors was ineffective, a combination of inhibitors targeting all three co-activated RTKs and MEK1 was needed to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in both mouse and human low-passage PDAC cultures. Importantly, constitutive AKT activation, which may mimic the fraction of AKT2-amplified PDAC, was able to bypass the induction of apoptosis caused by KRAS* ablation, highlighting a potential inherent resistance mechanism that may inform the clinical application of MEK inhibitor therapy. This study suggests that combinatorial targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer must be informed by the activation state of each putative driver in a given treatment context. Additionally, our work may offer explanative and predictive power in understanding why inhibitors of EGFR signaling fail in PDAC treatment and how drug resistance mechanisms may arise in strategies to directly target KRAS. PMID:25736685

  2. CFTR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Synder, David; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel whose major function is to facilitate epithelial fluid secretion. Loss-of-function mutations in CFTR cause the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is required for transepithelial fluid transport in certain secretory diarrheas, such as cholera, and for cyst expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. High-throughput screening has yielded CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone, glycine hydrazide and quinoxalinedione chemical classes. The glycine hydrazides target the extracellular CFTR pore, whereas the thiazolidinones and quinoxalinediones act at the cytoplasmic surface. These inhibitors have been widely used in cystic fibrosis research to study CFTR function at the cell and organ levels. The most potent CFTR inhibitor has IC50 of approximately 4 nM. Studies in animal models support the development of CFTR inhibitors for antisecretory therapy of enterotoxin-mediated diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23331030

  3. Randomized controlled clinical trial of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    SU, YONG; SU, YA-LI; LV, LI-FANG; WANG, LI-MIN; LI, QUAN-ZHONG; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Type II diabetic patients exhibiting poor glycemic control following α-glucosidase inhibitor treatment for at least two months were selected and randomly distributed into vildagliptin and placebo groups. The body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) and blood lipid levels and hepatorenal functions of the patients were determined before and 12 weeks after the trial. Following the trial, the FBG, PPG, HbA1c, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglyceride (TG) levels in the vildagliptin group were significantly decreased compared with the pretreatment levels (P<0.05), whereas only the PPG level in the placebo group decreased (P<0.05). The FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in the vildagliptin group were markedly lower than those in the placebo group 12 weeks after the trial. A comparison of the body weights and hepatorenal functions before and after the trial or between groups did not show statistically significant differences. The combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor effectively reduced the FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in patients without inducing weight gain or hepatorenal dysfunction. However, the therapy may have caused a reduction in the blood lipid levels. PMID:24926379

  4. Multiphysics Applications of ACE3P

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Lee, C. Ko, Z. Li, C.-K. Ng, L. Xiao, G. Cheng, H. Wang

    2012-07-01

    The TEM3P module of ACE3P, a parallel finite-element electromagnetic code suite from SLAC, focuses on the multiphysics simulation capabilities, including thermal and mechanical analysis for accelerator applications. In this pa- per, thermal analysis of coupler feedthroughs to supercon- ducting rf (SRF) cavities will be presented. For the realistic simulation, internal boundary condition is implemented to capture RF heating effects on the surface shared by a di- electric and a conductor. The multiphysics simulation with TEM3P matched the measurement within 0.4%.

  5. Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Carry a Risk?

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Martin; Pourcelet, Aline; van Nuffelen, Marc; Racapé, Judith; Leeman, Marc; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), mainly excreted by the liver, the dosage of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, cleared by the kidney, must be adapted to account for renal clearance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to avoid acute kidney injury (AKI). Community-acquired AKI and the use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the emergency department were retrospectively assessed in 324 patients with baseline stage 3 or higher CKD. After stepwise regression analysis, the use of ACE inhibitors (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-3.1; P=.02) and the presence of dehydration (OR, 30.8; 95% CI, 3.9-239.1) were associated with AKI. A total of 45% of patients using ACE inhibitors experienced overdosing, which causes most of the excess risk of AKI. These results suggest that dosage adjustment of ACE inhibitors to renal function or substitution of ACE inhibitors with ARBs could reduce the incidence of AKI. Moreover, ACE inhibitors and ARBs should be stopped in cases of dehydration. PMID:27080620

  6. Preoperative angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor usage in patients with chronic subdural hematoma: Associations with initial presentation and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neidert, Marian C; Schmidt, Tobias; Mitova, Tatyana; Fierstra, Jorn; Bellut, David; Regli, Luca; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bozinov, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the association of preoperative usage of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with the initial presentation and clinical outcome of patients with chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Patients treated for cSDH between 2009 and 2013 at our institution were included in this retrospective case-control study. Medical charts were reviewed retrospectively and data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Out of 203 patients (58 females, mean age 73.2years), 53 (26%) patients were on ACE inhibitors before their presentation with cSDH. Median initial hematoma volume in individuals with ACE inhibitors (179.2±standard error of the mean [SEM] 13.0ml) was significantly higher compared to patients without ACE inhibitors (140.4±SEM 6.2ml; p=0.007). There was an increased probability of surgical reintervention in the ACE inhibitor group (12/53, 23% versus 19/153, 12%; p=0.079), especially in patients older than 80years (6/23, 26% versus 3/45, 7%; p=0.026). ACE inhibitors are associated with higher hematoma volume in patients with cSDH and with a higher frequency of recurrences requiring surgery (especially in the very old). We hypothesize that these effects are due to ACE inhibitor induced bradykinin elevation causing increased vascular permeability of the highly vascularized neomembranes in cSDH. PMID:26898577

  7. A novel, potent dual inhibitor of Arg-gingipains and Lys-gingipain as a promising agent for periodontal disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Shinsuke; Baba, Atsuyo; Suda, Yoshimitsu; Takii, Ryosuke; Hashimoto, Munetaka; Kawakubo, Tomoyo; Asao, Tetsuji; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis produces a unique class of cysteine proteinases termed gingipains that comprises Arg-gingipain (Rgp) and Lys-gingipain (Kgp). Growing evidence indicates that these 2 types of gingipains synergistically contribute to the entire virulence of the organism and increase the risk of periodontal disease (PD) by disrupting the host immune system and degrading the host tissue and plasma proteins. Therefore, a dual inhibitor of both gingipains would have attractive clinical potential for PD therapy. In this study, a novel, potent, dual inhibitor of Rgp and Kgp was developed through structure-based drug design, and its biological potency was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This inhibitor had low nanomolar inhibitory potency (Ki=40 nM for Rgp, Ki=0.27 nM for Kgp) and good selectivity for host proteases and exhibited potent antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis by abrogating its manifold pathophysiological functions. The therapeutic potential of this inhibitor in vivo was also verified by suppressing the vascular permeability that was enhanced in guinea pigs by the organism and the gingival inflammation in beagle dog PD models. These findings suggest that a dual inhibitor of Rgp and Kgp would exhibit noteworthy anti-inflammatory activity in the treatment of PD. PMID:24776743

  8. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Haoran; Zhong, Wenzhao; Yang, Xuening

    2015-01-01

    The Lung Adjuvant Cisplatin Evaluation (LACE) meta-analysis and the meta-analysis of individual participant data reported by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) Meta-analysis Collaborative Group in neo-adjuvant setting validated respectively that adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy would significantly improve overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival for resectable NSCLC. However, chemotherapy has reached a therapeutic plateau. It has been confirmed that epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) targeting therapy provides a dramatic response to patients with advanced EGFR-mutation positive NSCLC. Researchers have paid more attention to exploring applications of TKIs to early resectable NSCLCs. Several studies on adjuvant TKI treatment concluded its safety and feasibility. But there existed certain limitations of these studies as inference factors to interpret data accurately: the BR19 study recruited patients among which almost 52% had stage IB and only 15 (3.0%, 15/503) had been confirmed with EGFR-mutant type; retrospective studies performed at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) selected EGFR mutant-type NSCLC patients but couldn’t avoid inherent defects inside retrospective researches; the RADIANT study revised endpoints from targeting at EGFR immunohistochemistry (IHC)+ and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)+ mutation to only EGFR IHC+ mutation, leading to selective bias; despite that the SELECT study validated efficacy of adjuvant TKI and second round of TKI after resistance occurred, a single-arm clinical trial is not that persuasive in the absence of comparison with chemotherapy. Taking all these limitations into account, CTONG1104 in China and IMPACT in Japan have been conducted and recruiting patients to offer higher level of evidences to explore efficacy of preoperative TKI therapy for early resectable EGFR mutation positive NSCLC patients (confirmed by pathological results of tumor tissue or

  9. Antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory of Class II hydrophobin from wild strain Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Khalesi, Mohammadreza; Jahanbani, Raheleh; Riveros-Galan, David; Sheikh-Hassani, Vahid; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud; Sahihi, Mehdi; Winterburn, James; Derdelinckx, Guy; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-01

    There are several possible uses of the Class II hydrophobin HFBII in clinical applications. To fully understand and exploit this potential however, the antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory potential of this protein need to be better understood and have not been previously reported. In this study, the Class II hydrophobin HFBII was produced by the cultivation of wild type Trichoderma reesei. The crude hydrophobin extract obtained from the fermentation process was purified using reversed-phase liquid chromatography and the identity of the purified HFBII verified by MALDI-TOF (molecular weight: 7.2kDa). Subsequently the antioxidant activities of different concentrations of HFBII (0.01-0.40mg/mL) were determined. The results show that for HFBII concentrations of 0.04mg/mL and upwards the protein significantly reduced the presence of ABTS(+) radicals in the medium, the IC50 value found to be 0.13mg/mL. Computational modeling highlighted the role of the amino acid residues located in the conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the surface of the HFBII molecule and the interactions with the aromatic rings of ABTS. The ACE-inhibitory effect of HFBII was found to occur from 0.5mg/mL and upwards, making the combination of HFBII with strong ACE-inhibitors attractive for use in the healthcare industry. PMID:27211298

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and activity in Alzheimer's disease: differences in brain and CSF ACE and association with ACE1 genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miners, Scott; Ashby, Emma; Baig, Shabnam; Harrison, Rachel; Tayler, Hannah; Speedy, Elizabeth; Prince, Jonathan A; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD): ACE1 variations influence plasma ACE and risk of AD, and ACE is increased in AD brain. We measured frontal ACE level and activity in 89 AD and 51 control brains, and post-mortem CSF from 101 cases and 19 controls. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level and Braak stage were used to indicate neuronal preservation and disease progression. We genotyped the common ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism, rs4343, rs1800764 and rs4921. ACE activity was elevated in AD and correlated with Braak stage. Crude ACE levels were unchanged but adjustment for NSE suggested increased neuronal ACE production with Braak stage. Exposing SH-SY-5Y neurons to oligomeric Aβ1-42 increased ACE level and activity, suggesting Aβ may upregulate ACE in AD. In CSF, ACE level but not activity was reduced in AD. ACE1 genotype did not predict ACE level or activity in brain or CSF. ACE activity and neuronal production increase in AD brain, possibly in response to Aβ. Peripheral measurements do not reflect ACE activity in the brain. PMID:19956428

  11. The Change From Brand-Name to Generic Aromatase Inhibitors and Hormone Therapy Adherence for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Jennifer; Meyer, Jay; Glied, Sherry; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Wright, Jason D.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to hormonal therapy is common and is associated with increased copayment amount. We investigated the change in adherence after the introduction of generic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in 2010. Methods Using deidentified pharmacy and claims data from OptumInsight, we identified women older than 50 years on brand-name AIs (BAIs) and/or generic AIs (GAIs) for early breast cancer between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Clinical, demographic, and financial variables were evaluated. Adherence was defined as a medication possession ratio (MPR) 80% or greater. Results We identified 5511 women, 2815 (51.1%) on BAI, 1411 (25.6%) on GAI, and 1285 (23.3%) who switched from BAI to GAI. The median 30-day copayment was higher for BAI ($33.3) than for GAI ($9.04). In a multivariable Cox-proportional hazard analysis, women who took GAI were less likely to discontinue therapy (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 0.84) compared with BAI. Discontinuation was positively associated with a higher monthly copayment of $15 to $30 (HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.44) and more than $30 (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.23 to 1.80) compared with less than $15. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, adherence (medication possession ratio ≥ 80%) was positively associated with GAI use (odds ratio = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.22 to 1.91) compared with BAI and inversely associated with increased monthly copayment. In addition, adherence was associated with a high annual income of more than $100k/year (odds ratio = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17 to 2.11). Conclusions Higher prescription copayment amount was associated with nonadherence and discontinuation of AIs. After controlling for copayment, discontinuation was higher and adherence was lower with Brand AIs. Because nonadherence is associated with worse survival, efforts should be directed towards reducing out-of-pocket costs for these life-saving medications. PMID:25349080

  12. Risk Factors for Incident Diabetes in a Cohort Taking First-Line Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Karamchand, Sumanth; Leisegang, Rory; Schomaker, Michael; Maartens, Gary; Walters, Lourens; Hislop, Michael; Dave, Joel A; Levitt, Naomi S; Cohen, Karen

    2016-03-01

    Efavirenz is the preferred nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in low- and middle-income countries, where the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Randomized control trials have shown mild increases in plasma glucose in participants in the efavirenz arms, but no association has been reported with overt diabetes. We explored the association between efavirenz exposure and incident diabetes in a large Southern African cohort commencing NNRTI-based first-line ART. Our cohort included HIV-infected adults starting NNRTI-based ART in a private sector HIV disease management program from January 2002 to December 2011. Incident diabetes was identified by the initiation of diabetes treatment. Patients with prevalent diabetes were excluded. We included 56,298 patients with 113,297 patient-years of follow-up (PYFU) on first-line ART. The crude incidence of diabetes was 13.24 per 1000 PYFU. Treatment with efavirenz rather than nevirapine was associated with increased risk of developing diabetes (hazard ratio 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.46)) in a multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, baseline CD4 count, viral load, NRTI backbone, and exposure to other diabetogenic medicines. Zidovudine and stavudine exposure were also associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. We found that treatment with efavirenz, as well as stavudine and zidovudine, increased the risk of incident diabetes. Interventions to detect and prevent diabetes should be implemented in ART programs, and use of antiretrovirals with lower risk of metabolic complications should be encouraged. PMID:26945366

  13. Time course of arthralgia among women initiating aromatase inhibitor therapy and a postmenopausal comparison group in a prospective cohort

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Liana D.; Hartmann, Katherine E.; Mayer, Ingrid A.; Saville, Benjamin R.; Alvarez, JoAnn; Boomershine, Chad S.; Abramson, Vandana G.; Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Friedman, Debra L.; Cella, David F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND More than 80,000 postmenopausal breast cancer patients in the US each year are estimated to begin a five-year course of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) to prevent recurrence. AI-related arthralgia (joint pain and/or stiffness) may contribute to nonadherence, but longitudinal data are needed on arthralgia risk factors, trajectories, and background in postmenopause. OBJECTIVES To describe one-year arthralgia trajectories and baseline covariates among AI patients and a postmenopausal comparison group. METHODS Patients initiating AIs (n=91) were surveyed at the time of AI initiation and at six repeated assessments over one year. A comparison group of postmenopausal women without breast cancer (n=177) completed concomitantly-timed surveys. Numeric rating scales (0–10) were used to measure pain in eight joint pair groups (bilateral fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, hips, knees, ankles, and toes). Poisson regression models were used to analyze arthralgia trajectories and risk factors. RESULTS By week six, the AI-initiating group had more severe arthralgia than did the comparison group (ratio of means=1.8, (95% CI 1.2–2.7, p=0.002), adjusting for baseline characteristics. Arthralgia then worsened further over a year in the AI group. Menopausal symptom severity and existing joint-related comorbidity at baseline among women initiating AI were associated with more severe longitudinal arthralgia. CONCLUSIONS Patients initiating AI should be told about the timing of arthralgia over the first year of therapy, and advised that it does not appear to resolve over the course of a year. Menopausal symptoms and joint-related comorbidity at AI initiation can help identify patients at risk for developing AI-related arthralgia. PMID:23575918

  14. Risk Factors for Incident Diabetes in a Cohort Taking First-Line Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Karamchand, Sumanth; Leisegang, Rory; Schomaker, Michael; Maartens, Gary; Walters, Lourens; Hislop, Michael; Dave, Joel A.; Levitt, Naomi S.; Cohen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efavirenz is the preferred nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in low- and middle-income countries, where the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Randomized control trials have shown mild increases in plasma glucose in participants in the efavirenz arms, but no association has been reported with overt diabetes. We explored the association between efavirenz exposure and incident diabetes in a large Southern African cohort commencing NNRTI-based first-line ART. Our cohort included HIV-infected adults starting NNRTI-based ART in a private sector HIV disease management program from January 2002 to December 2011. Incident diabetes was identified by the initiation of diabetes treatment. Patients with prevalent diabetes were excluded. We included 56,298 patients with 113,297 patient-years of follow-up (PYFU) on first-line ART. The crude incidence of diabetes was 13.24 per 1000 PYFU. Treatment with efavirenz rather than nevirapine was associated with increased risk of developing diabetes (hazard ratio 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10–1.46)) in a multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, baseline CD4 count, viral load, NRTI backbone, and exposure to other diabetogenic medicines. Zidovudine and stavudine exposure were also associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. We found that treatment with efavirenz, as well as stavudine and zidovudine, increased the risk of incident diabetes. Interventions to detect and prevent diabetes should be implemented in ART programs, and use of antiretrovirals with lower risk of metabolic complications should be encouraged. PMID:26945366

  15. The dark side of 5α-reductase inhibitors' therapy: sexual dysfunction, high Gleason grade prostate cancer and depression.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Mulgaonkar, Ashwini; Giordano, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    With aging, abnormal benign growth of the prostate results in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with concomitant lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Because the prostate is an androgen target tissue, and transforms testosterone into 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT), a potent androgen, via 5α-reductase (5α-R) activity, inhibiting this key metabolic reaction was identified as a target for drug development to treat symptoms of BPH. Two drugs, namely finasteride and dutasteride were developed as specific 5α-reductase inhibitors (5α-RIs) and were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of BPH symptoms. These agents have proven useful in the reducing urinary retention and minimizing surgical intervention in patients with BPH symptoms and considerable literature exists describing the benefits of these agents. In this review we highlight the adverse side effects of 5α-RIs on sexual function, high grade prostate cancer incidence, central nervous system function and on depression. 5α-Rs isoforms (types 1-3) are widely distributed in many tissues including the central nervous system and inhibition of these enzymes results in blockade of synthesis of several key hormones and neuro-active steroids leading to a host of adverse effects, including loss of or reduced libido, erectile dysfunction, orgasmic dysfunction, increased high Gleason grade prostate cancer, observed heart failure and cardiovascular events in clinical trials, and depression. Considerable evidence exists from preclinical and clinical studies, which point to significant and serious adverse effects of 5α-RIs, finasteride and dutasteride, on sexual health, vascular health, psychological health and the overall quality of life. Physicians need to be aware of such potential adverse effects and communicate such information to their patients prior to commencing 5α-RIs therapy. PMID:24955220

  16. ACE: A Collaborative School Consultation Program for Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Caroline; Massé, Line

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a description of ACE (Accompagnement collaboratif des enseignants (Collaborative teacher accompaniment)), a new program designed to guide secondary school teachers in integrating students with behavioral problems in their classrooms. ACE proposes collaborative accompaniment inspired by behavioral and mental health…

  17. An Inclusive ACE. Broadening Participation in Adult and Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Merilyn; Beatty, Dianne

    A project identified strategies to increase participation by community members who traditionally have not used adult and community education (ACE) in Australia. Methodology included a focus group, literature research, and interviews with 70 people. Government-supported ACE was seen as having a broad role in supporting lifelong learning. ACE…

  18. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion. PMID:23145508

  19. Review of US Comparative Economic Evidence for Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma after Failure of First-Line VEGF Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael K.; Wang, Xufang; Chulikavit, Maruit J.; Liu, Zhimei

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2006, the economic burden of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) was estimated to be up to $1.6 billion worldwide and has since grown annually. With the continuing increase of the economic burden of this disease in the United States, there is a growing need for economic analyses to guide treatment and policy decisions for this patient population. Objective To evaluate available comparative economic data on targeted therapies for patients with mRCC who have failed first-line targeted therapies. Method A broad and comprehensive literature review was conducted of US-based studies between January 1, 2005, and February 11, 2013, evaluating comparative economic evidence for targeted agents that are used as second-line therapy or beyond. Based on the specific search parameters that focused on cost-effectiveness and economic comparisons between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor (VEGFr) inhibitors and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, only 7 relevant, US-based economic evaluations were found appropriate for inclusion in the analysis. All authors, who are experts in the health economics and outcomes research field, reviewed the search results. Studies of interest were those with a targeted agent, VEGF/VEGFr or mTOR inhibitor, in at least 1 study arm. Discussion As a group, targeted therapies were found to be cost-effective options in treating patients with refractory mRCC in the United States. Oral therapies showed an economic advantage over intravenous agents, presumably because oral therapies have a lower impact on outpatient resources. Based on 3 studies, everolimus has been shown to have an economic advantage over temsirolimus and to be cost-effective compared with sorafenib. No economic comparison between everolimus and axitinib, the only 2 drugs with a National Comprehensive Cancer Network category 1 recommendation for use after the failure of VEGFr tyrosine kinase inhibitors, is available. Conclusion The limited

  20. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University install solar array panels on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. The panel on which they are working is identical to the panel (one of four) seen in the foreground on the ACE spacecraft. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low- energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles for a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  1. The relationship between tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer carrying EGFR mutations

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Hirashima, Tomonori; Okamoto, Norio; Yamadori, Tadahiro; Tamiya, Motohiro; Morishita, Naoko; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Otsuka, Tomoyuki; Kitai, Kanako; Kawase, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    For patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive lung cancer, the relationship between the dose or duration of treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and overall survival remains unclear. Here, we analyzed clinical data of 39 patients who were diagnosed with EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer and treated with TKI, but subsequently died. Several parameters were measured in this study: overall survival; first, second, and overall TKI therapy durations; first TKI intensity (actual dose/normal dose); and TKI rate (overall TKI therapy duration/overall survival). The response rate to TKI therapy was 50%, and the median survival was 553 days. After TKI therapy failed, 38.5% patients were re-challenged with TKI. We observed a moderate relationship [r = 0.534, 95% confidential interval (CI) = 0.263 to 0.727, P < 0.001] between overall TKI therapy duration and overall survival. However, we found no relationship between overall survival and first TKI intensity (r = 0.073, 95% CI = -0.380 to 0.247, P = 0.657) or TKI rate (r = 0.0345, 95% CI = -0.284 to 0.346, P = 0.835). Non-small cell lung cancer patients with mutation-positive tumors remained on TKI therapy for, on average, 33% of the overall survival time. These findings suggest that patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors should not stick to using TKIs. PMID:23237215

  2. Effectiveness and safety of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in cancer therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhengqiang; Cao, Chao; Geng, Xinwei; Tian, Baoping; Wu, Yanping; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-02-16

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are a class of small-molecule drugs suppressing PARP enzymes activity, inducing the death of cells deficient in homologous recombination repair (HRR). HRR deficiency is common in tumor cells with BRCA gene mutation. Since their first clinical trial in 2003, PARP inhibitors have shown benefit in the treatment of HRR-deficient tumors. Recently, several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to investigate the potential benefit of administration of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. However, the results remain controversial. To evaluate the efficiency and safety of PARP inhibitors in patients with cancer, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of RCTs. According to our study, PARP inhibitors could clearly improve progression-free survival (PFS), especially in patients with BRCA mutation. However, our study showed no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between the PARP inhibitors and controls, even in the BRCA mutation group. Little toxicity was reported in the rate of treatment correlated adverse events (AEs) in PARP inhibitor group compared with controls. In conclusion, PARP inhibitors do well in improving PFS with little toxicity, especially in patients with BRCA deficiency. PMID:26399274

  3. Effectiveness and safety of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in cancer therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xinwei; Tian, Baoping; Wu, Yanping; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are a class of small-molecule drugs suppressing PARP enzymes activity, inducing the death of cells deficient in homologous recombination repair (HRR). HRR deficiency is common in tumor cells with BRCA gene mutation. Since their first clinical trial in 2003, PARP inhibitors have shown benefit in the treatment of HRR-deficient tumors. Recently, several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been conducted to investigate the potential benefit of administration of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. However, the results remain controversial. To evaluate the efficiency and safety of PARP inhibitors in patients with cancer, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of RCTs. According to our study, PARP inhibitors could clearly improve progression-free survival (PFS), especially in patients with BRCA mutation. However, our study showed no significant difference in overall survival (OS) between the PARP inhibitors and controls, even in the BRCA mutation group. Little toxicity was reported in the rate of treatment correlated adverse events (AEs) in PARP inhibitor group compared with controls. In conclusion, PARP inhibitors do well in improving PFS with little toxicity, especially in patients with BRCA deficiency. PMID:26399274

  4. Structure-based design, discovery and development of checkpoint kinase inhibitors as potential anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas P; Jones, Alan M; Collins, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Checkpoint kinase inhibitors offer the promise of enhancing the effectiveness of widely prescribed cancer chemotherapies and radiotherapy by inhibiting the DNA damage response, as well as the potential for single agent efficacy. Areas covered This article surveys structural insights into the checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 that have been exploited to enhance the selectivity and potency of small molecule inhibitors. The use of mechanistic cellular assays to guide the optimisation of inhibitors is reviewed. The status of the current clinical candidates and emerging new clinical contexts for CHK1 and CHK2 inhibitors are discussed, including the prospects for single agent efficacy. Expert opinion Protein bound water molecules play key roles in structural features that can be targeted to gain high selectivity for either enzyme. The results of early phase clinical trials of checkpoint inhibitors have been mixed, but significant progress has been made in testing the combination of CHK1 inhibitors with genotoxic chemotherapy. Second generation CHK1 inhibitors are likely to benefit from increased selectivity and oral bioavailability. While the optimum therapeutic context for CHK2 inhibition remains unclear, the emergence of single agent preclinical efficacy for CHK1 inhibitors in specific tumour types exhibiting constitutive replication stress represents exciting progress in exploring the therapeutic potential of these agents. PMID:23594139

  5. Desert Dust Layers Over Polluted Marine Boundary Layers: ACE-2 Measurements and ACE-Asia Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosols in ACE-Asia are expected to have some commonalties with those in ACE-2, along with important differences. Among the commonalities are occurrences of desert dust layers over polluted marine boundary layers. Differences include the nature of the dust (yellowish in the East Asia desert outflow, vs. reddish-brown in the Sahara Outflow measured in ACE-2) and the composition of boundary-layer aerosols (e.g., more absorbing, soot and organic aerosol in-the Asian plume, caused by coal and biomass burning, with limited controls). In this paper we present ACE-2 measurements and analyses as a guide to our plans for ACE-2 Asia. The measurements include: (1) Vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth and extinction (380-1558 nm), and of water vapor column and concentration, from the surface through the elevated desert dust, measured by the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14); (2) Comparisons of airborne and shipborne sunphotometer optical depths to satellite-retrieved values, with and without desert dust; (3) Comparisons between airborne Sunphotometer optical depth and extinction spectra and those derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption; (4) Comparisons between size distributions measured in situ and retrieved from sunphotometer optical depth spectra; (5) Comparisons between aerosol single scattering albedo values obtained by several techniques, using various combinations of measurements of backscatter, extinction, size distribution, scattering, absorption, and radiative flux. We show how analyses of these data can be used to address questions important to ACE-Asia, such as: (1) How do dust and other absorbing aerosols affect the accuracy of satellite optical depth retrievals? How important are asphericity effects? (2) How important are supermicron dust and seasalt aerosols to overall aerosol optical depth and radiative forcing? How well are these aerosols sampled by aircraft

  6. Patient preference and satisfaction in erectile dysfunction therapy: a comparison of the three phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Amr Abdel; Kell, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a problem that may affect up to 52% of men between the ages of 40 and 70. It can be distressing because of its negative effect on self-esteem, quality of life, and interpersonal relationships. Oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5 inhibitors) are now the first choice of treatment in ED. The availability of three (sildenafil citrate, tadalafil, and vardenafil) well tolerated and effective oral PDE5 inhibitors gives treatment options for men with ED. Although the mechanism of action is the same for the three drugs, they differ in their pharmacokinetics. Several preference studies were conducted between the three PDE5 inhibitors but they were not free from bias. Because of the lack of overwhelming reliable data showing that one PDE5 inhibitor is superior to another, current opinion is that the individual patient should have the opportunity to test all three drugs and then select the one that best suits him and his partner. PMID:19936151

  7. New and emerging biologic therapies for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis: mechanistic rationales and recent clinical data for IL-17 and IL-23 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gaspari, Anthony A; Tyring, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The development of effective and well-tolerated biologic therapies has advanced the management of psoriasis by enabling clinicians to treat underlying disease mechanisms. Biologics approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis include three tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors and an interleukin-12/interleukin-23 inhibitor. The establishment of the immunological basis of psoriasis has led to the development of biologic agents targeting specific downstream mediators in the psoriatic cascade. These drugs inhibit cytokines and cytokine signaling/transcription mediators like interleukin-17, which plays an important role in immunopathogenesis. Several interleukin-17 inhibitors are undergoing phase 3 clinical studies. In addition, biologics that selectively inhibit interleukin-23 have been assessed in phase 2 studies. This review describes how the dissection of pathways in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis has led to the development of therapeutic agents and highlights the latest clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability data on new and emerging biologic therapies that selectively target interleukin-17 or interleukin-23. PMID:26201310

  8. Managing side effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy to optimize adherence in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: the role of the midlevel practitioner.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Megan; Jabbour, Elias J; Welch, Mary Alma

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the development of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has brought about unprecedented change in the way newly diagnosed, chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients are treated. Two next-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nilotinib and dasatinib, were initially indicated for imatinib-resistant or imatinib-intolerant chronic myeloid leukemia patients and recently received approval from the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of newly diagnosed, chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients. In comparison with the previous standards of care, benefits with these three tyrosine kinase inhibitors have included more rapid response rates, increased survival, and fewer side effects. The improved long-term outcomes have altered the approach to management of chronic myeloid leukemia from a progressive fatal disease with a poor prognosis to a chronic condition similar to diabetes or hypertension. Prolonged survival increases the need for patient education, support, monitoring, and assistance with adverse event management. Even low-grade side effects can adversely affect patients' quality of life and, therefore, require prompt attention to prevent long-term complications or suboptimal outcomes. New evidence has indicated that patient adherence to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy is essential to successful treatment. Midlevel practitioners can help to optimize outcomes by educating patients regarding the importance of adherence, performing regular monitoring, helping patients to understand their test results, and aggressively managing treatment-related side effects. PMID:22244674

  9. Sotagliflozin, a Dual SGLT1 and SGLT2 Inhibitor, as Adjunct Therapy to Insulin in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zambrowicz, Brian P.; Rosenstock, Julio; Lapuerta, Pablo; Bode, Bruce W.; Garg, Satish K.; Buse, John B.; Banks, Phillip; Heptulla, Rubina; Rendell, Marc; Cefalu, William T.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the safety and efficacy of dual sodium–glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 1 and SGLT2 inhibition with sotagliflozin as adjunct therapy to insulin in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We treated 33 patients with sotagliflozin, an oral dual SGLT1 and SGLT2 inhibitor, or placebo in a randomized, double-blind trial assessing safety, insulin dose, glycemic control, and other metabolic parameters over 29 days of treatment. RESULTS In the sotagliflozin-treated group, the percent reduction from baseline in the primary end point of bolus insulin dose was 32.1% (P = 0.007), accompanied by lower mean daily glucose measured by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) of 148.8 mg/dL (8.3 mmol/L) (P = 0.010) and a reduction of 0.55% (5.9 mmol/mol) (P = 0.002) in HbA1c compared with the placebo group that showed 6.4% reduction in bolus insulin dose, a mean daily glucose of 170.3 mg/dL (9.5 mmol/L), and a decrease of 0.06% (0.65 mmol/mol) in HbA1c. The percentage of time in target glucose range 70–180 mg/dL (3.9–10.0 mmol/L) increased from baseline with sotagliflozin compared with placebo, to 68.2% vs. 54.0% (P = 0.003), while the percentage of time in hyperglycemic range >180 mg/dL (10.0 mmol/L) decreased from baseline, to 25.0% vs. 40.2% (P = 0.002), for sotagliflozin and placebo, respectively. Body weight decreased (1.7 kg) with sotagliflozin compared with a 0.5 kg gain (P = 0.005) in the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS As adjunct to insulin, dual SGLT1 and SGLT2 inhibition with sotagliflozin improved glycemic control and the CGM profile with bolus insulin dose reduction, weight loss, and no increased hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26049551

  10. Progressive Resistance to a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor but Not to Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leykin, Yan; Amsterdam, Jay D.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research suggests that there may be a reduction in therapeutic response after multiple administrations of antidepressant drug (AD) therapy in patients with major depressive disorder. This study assessed the response to AD therapy and cognitive therapy (CT) of patients with a history of prior AD exposures. A sample of 240 patients with…

  11. AB081. Effects of combination therapy of Tamoxifen, L-carnitine and daily PDE5 inhibitors in the Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae Il; Park, Tae Yong; Jeong, Hyeong Guk; Park, Jong Jin; Chae, Ji Yun; Kim, Jong Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Hong Seok; Kim, Je Jong; Moon, Du Geon

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of combination therapy of Tamoxifen, L-carnitine and daily PDE5 inhibitors and to compare with Potassium para-aminobenzoate (Potaba) monotherapy in the medical treatment of Peyronie’s disease. Methods From January 2011 to December 2014, a total of 104 patients with Peyronie’s disease enrolled in this study. Sixty-eight patients were treated with Tamoxifen 20 mg and Acetyl L-carnitine 330 mg twice a daily in addition to daily PDE5 inhibitors (Tadalafil 5 mg once daily) combination therapy (Group 1), while thirty-four patients were treated with Potassium para-aminobenzoate 12 g daily (Group 2), Pain on erection, impossibility of intercourse, plaque size, penile curvature and IIEF-5 were assessed. Plaque volume was assessed by penile ultrasonography. Results Both groups showed resolution of pain and intercourse satisfaction after treatment. The pre-treatment plaque sizes of both groups were 17.1±7.2, 17.0±5.0 mm, respectively. After treatment, those parameters significantly reduced to 13.2±5.6, 16.2±5.3 mm. In group 1, combination therapy significantly improved the angle of penile curvature, plaque size, and IIEF (P value <0.05). In group 2, the size of the plaque, penile curvature and IIEF were improved after Potassium para-aminobenzoate monotherapy. However, no significant differences were observed. Conclusion Statistically significant improvement in intercourse satisfaction, plaque size, degree of curvature and IIEF-5 was observed in combination therapy. Combination therapy may be the more effective than Potassium para-aminobenzoate monotherapy in medical treatment of Peyronie’s disease.

  12. AB093. The efficacy of medical treatment of Peyronie’s disease: Potaba monotherapy vs. combination therapy with Tamoxifen, L-carnitine, and PDE5 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Jin; Kim, Jong Wook; Moon, Du Geon

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of combination therapy of Tamoxifen, L-carnitine and daily PDE5 inhibitors and to compare with Potassium para-aminobenzoate (Potaba) monotherapy in the medical treatment of Peyronie’s disease. Methods From January 2011 to December 2014, a total of 104 patients with Peyronie’s disease enrolled in this study. Sixty-eight patients were treated with Tamoxifen 20 mg and Acetyl L-carnitine 330 mg twice a daily in addition to daily PDE5 inhibitors (Tadalafil 5 mg once daily) combination therapy (Group 1), while thirty-four patients were treated with Potassium para-aminobenzoate 12 g daily (Group 2), Pain on erection, impossibility of intercourse, plaque size, penile curvature and IIEF-5 were assessed. Plaque volume was assessed by penile ultrasonography. Results Both groups showed resolution of pain and intercourse satisfaction after treatment. The pre-treatment plaque sizes of both groups were 17.1±7.2, 17.0±5.0 mm, respectively. After treatment, those parameters significantly reduced to 13.2±5.6, 16.2±5.3 mm. In group 1, combination therapy significantly improved the angle of penile curvature, plaque size, and IIEF (P<0.05). In group 2, the size of the plaque, penile curvature and IIEF were improved after Potassium para-aminobenzoate monotherapy. However, no significant differences were observed. Conclusions Statistically significant improvement in intercourse satisfaction, plaque size, degree of curvature and IIEF-5 was observed in combination therapy. Combination therapy may be the more effective than Potassium para-aminobenzoate monotherapy in medical treatment of Pyeronie’s disease.

  13. Inhibiting NFAT1 for breast cancer therapy: New insights into the mechanism of action of MDM2 inhibitor JapA

    PubMed Central

    Voruganti, Sukesh; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor NFAT1 has been recently identified as a new regulator of the MDM2 oncogene. Targeting the NFAT1-MDM2 pathway represents a novel approach to cancer therapy. We have recently identified a natural product MDM2 inhibitor, termed JapA. As a specific and potent MDM2 inhibitor, JapA inhibits MDM2 at transcriptional and post-translational levels. However, the molecular mechanism remains to be fully elucidated for its inhibitory effects on MDM2 transcription. Herein, we reported that JapA inhibited NFAT1 and NFAT1-mediated MDM2 transcription, which contributed to the anticancer activity of JapA. Its effects on the expression and activity of NFAT1 were examined in various breast cancer cell lines in vitro and in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors in vivo. The specificity of JapA in targeting NFAT1 and NFAT1-MDM2 pathway and the importance of NFAT1 inhibition in JapA's anticancer activity were demonstrated using NFAT1 overexpression and knockdown cell lines and the pharmacological activators and inhibitors of NFAT1 signaling. Our results indicated that JapA inhibited NFAT1 signaling in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which plays a pivotal role in its anticancer activity. JapA inhibited the nuclear localization of NFAT1, disrupted the NFAT1-MDM2 P2 promoter complex, and induced NFAT1 proteasomal degradation, resulting in the repression of MDM2 transcription. In conclusion, JapA is a novel NFAT1 inhibitor and the NFAT1 inhibition is responsible for the JapA-induced repression of MDM2 transcription, contributing to its anticancer activity. The results may pave an avenue for validating the NFAT1-MDM2 pathway as a novel molecular target for cancer therapy. PMID:26461225

  14. Effective Concentration of a Multikinase Inhibitor within Bone Marrow Correlates with In Vitro Cell Killing in Therapy-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mu, Chaofeng; Wu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Helen; Tao, Wenjing; Zhang, Guodong; Xia, Xiaojun; Shen, Jianliang; Mai, Junhua; Sun, Tong; Sun, Xiaoping; Arlinghaus, Ralph B; Shen, Haifa

    2016-05-01

    Leukemia cells escape BCR-ABL-targeted therapy by developing mutations, such as T315I, in the p210(BCR-ABL) fusion protein in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Although most effort has been focused on development of new tyrosine kinase inhibitors, enrichment of these small-molecule inhibitors in the tumor tissue can also have a profound impact on treatment outcomes. Here, we report that a 2-hour exposure of the T315I-mutant CML cells to 10 μmol/L of the multikinase inhibitor TG101209 suppressed BCR-ABL-independent signaling and caused cell-cycle arrest at G2-M. Further increase in drug concentration to 17.5 μmol/L blocked phosphorylation of the mutant BCR-ABL kinase and its downstream JAK2 and STAT5. The effective dosage to overcome therapy resistance identified in an in vitro setting serves as a guidance to develop the proper drug formulation for in vivo efficacy. A targeted formulation was developed to achieve sustained bone marrow TG101209 concentration at or above 17.5 μmol/L for effective killing of CML cells in vivo Potent inhibition of leukemia cell growth and extended survival were observed in two murine models of CML treated with 40 mg/kg intravenously administered targeted TG101209, but not with the untargeted drug at the same dosage. Our finding provides a unique approach to develop treatments for therapy-resistant CML. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 899-910. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26846820

  15. Durable response of glioblastoma to adjuvant therapy consisting of temozolomide and a weekly dose of AMD3100 (plerixafor), a CXCR4 inhibitor, together with lapatinib, metformin and niacinamide

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Adan; Hsu, Sigmund H.; Blanco, Angel; Buryanek, Jamie; Day, Arthur L.; McGuire, Mary F.; Brown, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a CNS (central nervous system) malignancy with a low cure rate. Median time to progression after standard treatment is 7 months and median overall survival is 15 months [1]. Post-treatment vasculogenesis promoted by recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs, CD11b+ myelomonocytes) is one of main mechanisms of GBM resistance to initial chemoradiotherapy treatment [2]. Local secretion of SDF-1, cognate ligand of BMDCs CXCR4 receptors attracts BMDCs to the post-radiation tumor site.[3]. This SDF-1 hypoxia-dependent effect can be blocked by AMD3100 (plerixafor) [4]. We report a GBM case treated after chemo- radiotherapy with plerixafor and a combination of an mTOR, a Sirt1 and an EGFRvIII inhibitor. After one year temozolomide and the EGFRvIII inhibitor were stopped. Plerixafor, and the MTOR and Sirt-1 inhibitors were continued. He is in clinical and radiologic remission 30 months from the initiation of his adjuvant treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient treated for over two years with a CXCR4 inhibitor (plerixafor), as part of his adjuvant treatment. We believe there is sufficient experimental evidence to consider AMD3100 (plerixafor) part of the adjuvant treatment of GBM. Significance The adjuvant inhibition of GBM vasculogenesis(a process different from local angiogenesis) by specifically blocking the migration of BMDCs to the primary tumor site with inhibitors of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis represents a potential novel therapeutic approach to GBM. There is significant pre-clinical evidence and validation for its use as demonstrated in a patient derived tumor xenograft model of GBM. Together with other specific anti-tumoral therapies, the active inhibition of vasculogenesis in the adjuvant treatment of GBM is deserving of further exploration. PMID:27489862

  16. The Evolving Role of Maintenance Therapy Using Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (EGFR TKIs) in the Management of Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao H.; Powers, Benjamin C.

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the development of many cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs) are a class of novel biologically-targeted agents widely used in the management of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. Erlotinib, one of the EGFR TKIs, is currently FDA approved in second and third line therapy. However, recent studies showed that erlotinib is also effective as maintenance therapy after initial chemotherapy, improving disease free survival and possibly overall survival. Our current understanding of erlotinib’s mechanism of action, with the discovery that EGFR mutation confers higher response rate, has propelled this agent into the first line setting. Advances in molecular testing and clinical research of this agent and other agents in this class will eventually change the way we utilize EGFR TKIs in the near future. PMID:22550402

  17. A novel angiotensin-І converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide from gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate of silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein: Biochemical characterization and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiongying; Jia, Junqiang; Yan, Hui; Du, Jinjuan; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2015-06-01

    Silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein was hydrolyzed using gastrointestinal endopeptidases (pepsin, trypsin and α-chymotrypsin). Then, the hydrolysate was purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. A novel ACE inhibitory peptide, Ala-Ser-Leu, with the IC50 value of 102.15μM, was identified by IT-MS/MS. This is the first report of Ala-Ser-Leu from natural protein. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that the peptide is a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The molecular docking studies revealed that the ACE inhibition of Ala-Ser-Leu is mainly attributed to forming very strong hydrogen bonds with the S1 pocket (Ala354) and the S2 pocket (Gln281 and His353). The results indicate that silkworm pupa (B. mori) protein or its gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate could be used as a functional ingredient in auxiliary therapeutic foods against hypertension. PMID:25111373

  18. Incretin therapies: highlighting common features and differences in the modes of action of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nauck, M

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, incretin-based therapies have emerged as important agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). These agents exert their effect via the incretin system, specifically targeting the receptor for the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which is partly responsible for augmenting glucose-dependent insulin secretion in response to nutrient intake (the 'incretin effect'). In patients with T2D, pharmacological doses/concentrations of GLP-1 can compensate for the inability of diabetic β cells to respond to the main incretin hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, and this is therefore a suitable parent compound for incretin-based glucose-lowering medications. Two classes of incretin-based therapies are available: GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. GLP-1RAs promote GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signalling by providing GLP-1R stimulation through 'incretin mimetics' circulating at pharmacological concentrations, whereas DPP-4 inhibitors prevent the degradation of endogenously released GLP-1. Both agents produce reductions in plasma glucose and, as a result of their glucose-dependent mode of action, this is associated with low rates of hypoglycaemia; however, there are distinct modes of action resulting in differing efficacy and tolerability profiles. Furthermore, as their actions are not restricted to stimulating insulin secretion, these agents have also been associated with additional non-glycaemic benefits such as weight loss, improvements in β-cell function and cardiovascular risk markers. These attributes have made incretin therapies attractive treatments for the management of T2D and have presented physicians with an opportunity to tailor treatment plans. This review endeavours to outline the commonalities and differences among incretin-based therapies and to provide guidance regarding agents most suitable for treating T2D in individual patients. PMID:26489970

  19. Risk of Hormone Escape in a Human Prostate Cancer Model Depends on Therapy Modalities and Can Be Reduced by Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Guyader, Charlotte; Céraline, Jocelyn; Gravier, Eléonore; Morin, Aurélie; Michel, Sandrine; Erdmann, Eva; de Pinieux, Gonzague; Cabon, Florence; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Poupon, Marie-France; Oudard, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Almost all prostate cancers respond to androgen deprivation treatment but many recur. We postulated that risk of hormone escape -frequency and delay- are influenced by hormone therapy modalities. More, hormone therapies induce crucial biological changes involving androgen receptors; some might be targets for escape prevention. We investigated the relationship between the androgen deprivation treatment and the risk of recurrence using nude mice bearing the high grade, hormone-dependent human prostate cancer xenograft PAC120. Tumor-bearing mice were treated by Luteinizing-Hormone Releasing Hormone (LHRH) antagonist alone, continuous or intermittent regimen, or combined with androgen receptor (AR) antagonists (bicalutamide or flutamide). Tumor growth was monitored. Biological changes were studied as for genomic alterations, AR mutations and protein expression in a large series of recurrent tumors according to hormone therapy modalities. Therapies targeting Her-2 or AKT were tested in combination with castration. All statistical tests were two-sided. Tumor growth was inhibited by continuous administration of the LH-RH antagonist degarelix (castration), but 40% of tumors recurred. Intermittent castration or complete blockade induced by degarelix and antiandrogens combination, inhibited tumor growth but increased the risk of recurrence (RR) as compared to continuous castration (RRintermittent: 14.5, RRcomplete blockade: 6.5 and 1.35). All recurrent tumors displayed new quantitative genetic alterations and AR mutations, whatever the treatment modalities. AR amplification was found after complete blockade. Increased expression of Her-2/neu with frequent ERK/AKT activation was detected in all variants. Combination of castration with a Her-2/neu inhibitor decreased recurrence risk (0.17) and combination with an mTOR inhibitor prevented it. Anti-hormone treatments influence risk of recurrence although tumor growth inhibition was initially similar. Recurrent tumors displayed

  20. Structural characterization of inhibitor complexes with checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), a drug target for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Jobson, Andrew G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Self, Christopher R.; Zhang, Guangtao; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-01-20

    Chk2 (checkpoint kinase 2) is a serine/threonine kinase that participates in a series of signaling networks responsible for maintaining genomic integrity and responding to DNA damage. The development of selective Chk2 inhibitors has recently attracted much interest as a means of sensitizing cancer cells to current DNA-damaging agents used in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, selective Chk2 inhibitors may reduce p53-mediated apoptosis in normal tissues, thereby helping to mitigate adverse side effects from chemotherapy and radiation. Thus far, relatively few selective inhibitors of Chk2 have been described and none have yet progressed into clinical trials. Here, we report crystal structures of the catalytic domain of Chk2 in complex with a novel series of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors. These compounds exhibit nanomolar potencies and are selective for Chk2 over Chk1. The structures reported here elucidate the binding modes of these inhibitors to Chk2 and provide information that can be exploited for the structure-assisted design of novel chemotherapeutics.

  1. Bromodomain Inhibitor Review: Bromodomain and Extra-terminal Family Protein Inhibitors as a Potential New Therapy in Central Nervous System Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Elizabeth; Nicolaides, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family proteins associate with transcriptional activation through interaction with acetylated chromatin, therefore playing a key role as epigenetic regulators. BET proteins serve to regulate the expression of importance oncogenes, including those involved in apoptosis as well as cell cycle progression. Due to this potential as an epigenetic target, small molecule inhibition of BET proteins have been investigated and demonstrate promising activity in both solid and hematologic malignancies, including brain tumors. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), subsets of medulloblastoma, and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are types of brain tumors with dismal prognoses, and as such have been the subjects of preclinical studies using BET inhibitors both in vivo and in vitro. While results from these preclinical investigations have shown