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Sample records for ace inhibitors angiotensin

  1. Risk-benefit ratio of angiotensin antagonists versus ACE inhibitors in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, D A; Gehr, T W; Fernandez, A

    2000-05-01

    The effective treatment of hypertension is an extremely important consideration in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Virtually any drug class--with the possible exception of diuretics--can be used to treat hypertension in the patient with ESRD. Despite there being such a wide range of treatment options, drugs which interrupt the renin-angiotensin axis are generally suggested as agents of choice in this population, even though the evidence in support of their preferential use is quite scanty. ACE inhibitors, and more recently angiotensin antagonists, are the 2 drug classes most commonly employed to alter renin-angiotensin axis activity and therefore produce blood pressure control. ACE inhibitor use in patients with ESRD can sometimes prove an exacting proposition. ACE inhibitors are variably dialysed, with compounds such as catopril, enalapril, lisinopril and perindopril undergoing substantial cross-dialyser clearance during a standard dialysis session. This phenomenon makes the selection of a dose and the timing of administration for an ACE inhibitor a complex issue in patients with ESRD. Furthermore, ACE inhibitors are recognised as having a range of nonpressor effects that are pertinent to patients with ESRD. Such effects include their ability to decrease thirst drive and to decrease erythropoiesis. In addition, ACE inhibitors have a unique adverse effect profile. As is the case with their use in patients without renal failure, use of ACE inhibitors in patients with ESRD can be accompanied by cough and less frequently by angioneurotic oedema. In the ESRD population, ACE inhibitor use is also accompanied by so-called anaphylactoid dialyser reactions. Angiotensin antagonists are similar to ACE inhibitors in their mechanism of blood pressure lowering. Angiotensin antagonists are not dialysable and therefore can be distinguished from a number of the ACE inhibitors. In addition, the adverse effect profile for angiotensin antagonists is remarkably bland

  2. Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors from Marine Resources: Prospects in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekara, Isuru; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1; ACE) plays an important physiological role in regulation of blood pressure by converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor. Therefore, the inhibition of ACE activity is a major target in the prevention of hypertension. Recently, the search for natural ACE inhibitors as alternatives to synthetic drugs is of great interest to prevent several side effects and a number of novel compounds such as bioactive peptides, chitooligosaccharide derivatives (COS) and phlorotannins have been derived from marine organisms as potential ACE inhibitors. These inhibitory derivatives can be developed as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals with potential to prevent hypertension. Hence, the aim of this review is to discuss the marine-derived ACE inhibitors and their future prospects as novel therapeutic drug candidates for treat hypertension. PMID:20479968

  3. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  4. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabdtitis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  5. Characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the testis and assessment of the in vivo effects of the ACE inhibitor perindopril

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Cubela, R.B.; Sakaguchi, K.; Johnston, C.I.

    1988-07-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was characterized by radioligand studies utilizing the potent ACE inhibitor 351A, a derivative of lisinopril. Ligand binding characteristics were similar for ACE derived from testis, lung, and kidney, despite known differences in structure between ACe from these sources. This observation suggests that the ACE active enzymatic site is similar in different tissues. The effect of the orally active ACE inhibitor perindopril was studied ex vivo in tissues of the rat after oral gavage. Radioligand bound to tissue ACE was reduced after perindopril treatment, in tissue homogenates of lung and kidney, but not testis. Autoradiographs of radioligand binding to tissue sections obtained ex vivo after oral perindopril showed inhibition of ACE in the aorta, lung, and kidney, but did not reveal any inhibition of ACE in the testis. ACE in small vessels of the testis was inhibited as in the aorta, while at the same time testicular ACE was unaffected. ACE in rat testis appears to have a similar enzymatic binding site to ACE from the lung and kidney. Perindopril inhibited ACE in the lung and kidney but did not affect ACE in the testis, suggesting the drug is limited in testicular penetration by the blood-testis barrier. This may explain the lack of any reports of adverse effects of ACE inhibitors on testicular function.

  6. Identification of a new angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor from Thai edible plants.

    PubMed

    Simaratanamongkol, Arunee; Umehara, Kaoru; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2014-12-15

    Eight Thai edible plants were tested for their inhibitory activity against an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) using an in vitro assay. The methanol extract of Apium graveolens exhibited significant ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.7 mg/ml, and was then subjected to an isolation procedure that resulted in identification of a pure active constituent, junipediol A 8-O-β-d-glucoside (1-β-d-glucosyloxy-2-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-propane-1,3-diol) (1), which had good ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 76 μg/ml. Another eight known compounds, isofraxidin-β-d-glucoside (2), roseoside (3), apigenin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (4), luteolin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (5), icariside D2 (6), apiin (7), chrysoeriol-7-O-β-d-apiosylglucoside (8), and 11,21-dioxo-3 β,15 α,24-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-24-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (9) were also identified. Although each of these five constituents (2-6) isolated from the same fraction as 1 showed no activity at concentrations of 500 μM, together, when each was present at 300 μg/ml, they enhanced the inhibitory activity of 500 μM of 1 from 64% to 81%. PMID:25038653

  7. Discovery of new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from medicinal plants to treat hypertension using an in vitro assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors plays a critical role in treating hypertension. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate ACE inhibition activity of 50 Iranian medicinal plants using an in vitro assay. Methods The ACE activity was evaluated by determining the hydrolysis rate of substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine (HHL), using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and DPPH radical scavenging assay respectively. Results Six extracts revealed > 50% ACE inhibition activity at 330 μg/ml concentration. They were Berberis integerrima Bunge. (Berberidaceae) (88.2 ± 1.7%), Crataegus microphylla C. Koch (Rosaceae) (80.9 ± 1.3%), Nymphaea alba L. (Nymphaeaceae) (66.3 ± 1.2%), Onopordon acanthium L. (Asteraceae) (80.2 ± 2.0%), Quercus infectoria G. Olivier. (Fagaceae) (93.9 ± 2.5%) and Rubus sp. (Rosaceae) (51.3 ± 1.0%). Q. infectoria possessed the highest total phenolic content with 7410 ± 101 mg gallic acid/100 g dry plant. Antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria (IC50 value 1.7 ± 0.03 μg/ml) was more than that of BHT (IC50 value of 10.3 ± 0.15 μg/ml) and Trolox (IC50 value of 3.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml) as the positive controls. Conclusions In this study, we introduced six medicinal plants with ACE inhibition activity. Despite the high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria, due to its tannin content (tannins interfere in ACE activity), another plant, O. acanthium, which also had high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity, but contained no tannin, could be utilized in further studies for isolation of active compounds. PMID:24359711

  8. The binding of metal ions and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor by 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Sakamoto, Yuko; Ishii, Tomoko; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1991-06-01

    Enalaprilat (MK-422, 1- [ N- [1 (S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-alanyl]- L-proline (1)) and Lisinopril (MK521, N- N- [ (s)-l-carboxy-3- phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline, (2)) exhibit the capacity to act as a chelate, unidentate or bridge towards metal ions in aqueous solution, as determined by 13C NMR. By adding metal ions, in the series of Zn 2+, Ni 2+, Pb 2+, Pd 2+ and Cd 2+, the active site of the ACE inhibitor was well defined. MK-521 was more influenced by nuclei that were distant from the active site than MK-422.

  9. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor-II Antagonist Prescribing and Hospital Admissions with Acute Kidney Injury: A Longitudinal Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Laurie A.; Abel, Gary A.; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tomson, Charles R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Roland, Martin O.; Payne, Rupert A.

    2013-01-01

    Background ACE Inhibitors (ACE-I) and Angiotensin-Receptor Antagonists (ARAs) are commonly prescribed but can cause acute kidney injury (AKI) during intercurrent illness. Rates of hospitalization with AKI are increasing. We aimed to determine whether hospital AKI admission rates are associated with increased ACE-I/ARA prescribing. Methods and Findings English NHS prescribing data for ACE-I/ARA prescriptions were matched at the level of the general practice to numbers of hospital admissions with a primary diagnosis of AKI. Numbers of prescriptions were weighted for the demographic characteristics of general practices by expressing prescribing as rates where the denominator is Age, Sex, and Temporary Resident Originated Prescribing Units (ASTRO-PUs). We performed a mixed-effect Poisson regression to model the number of admissions for AKI occurring in each practice for each of 4 years from 1/4/2007. From 2007/8-2010/11, crude AKI admission rates increased from 0.38 to 0.57 per 1000 patients (51.6% increase), and national annual ACE-I/ARA prescribing rates increased by 0.032 from 0.202 to 0.234 (15.8% increase). There was strong evidence (p<0.001) that increases in practice-level prescribing of ACE-I/ARA over the study period were associated with an increase in AKI admission rates. The increase in prescribing seen in a typical practice corresponded to an increase in admissions of approximately 5.1% (rate ratio = 1.051 for a 0.03 per ASTRO-PU increase in annual prescribing rate, 95%CI 1.047-1.055). Using the regression model we predict that 1,636 (95%CI 1,540-1,780) AKI admissions would have been avoided if prescribing rates were at the 2007/8 level, equivalent to 14.8% of the total increase in AKI admissions. Conclusion In this ecological analysis, up to 15% of the increase in AKI admissions in England over a 4-year time period is potentially attributable to increased prescribing of ACE-I and ARAs. However, these findings are limited by the lack of patient level

  10. Can ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers be detrimental in CKD patients?

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay A C

    2011-01-01

    Current epidemiological data from the USA, Europe, Asia and the Indian subcontinent, Africa, the Far East, South America, the Middle East and Eastern Europe all point to the increasing incidence of renal failure encompassing acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While the explanations for these worldwide epidemics remain speculative, it must be acknowledged that these increases in AKI, CKD and ESRD, happening worldwide, have occurred despite the universal application of strategies of renoprotection over the last 2 decades, more especially the widespread use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). We note that many of the published large renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade randomized controlled trials, upon which current evidence-based practice for the increasing use of ACEIs and ARBs for renoprotection derived from, have strong deficiencies that have been highlighted over the years. From reports in the literature, there is an increasing association of exacerbations of renal failure with ACEIs and ARBs, more so in the older hypertensive patient, >65 years old. The biological plausibility for ACEI and ARB to protect the kidneys against a background of potential multiple pathogenetic pathways to account for CKD progression appears to be not very defensible. We reviewed the literature along these lines and submit that ACEIs and ARBs often cause unrecognized significant worsening renal failure in CKD patients, sometimes irreversible, and that more caution is required regarding their use, especially in the older hypertensive patients, with likely ischemic hypertensive nephropathy. Given the increasing association of concomitant RAAS blockade with worsening renal failure following exposure to iodinated contrast, during acute illness, in the perioperative period and following lower bowel preparations prior to colonoscopy, we submit that, preferably

  11. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Use and Mortality in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Lott, Evan H; Lu, Jun Ling; Malakauskas, Sandra M; Ma, Jennie Z; Quarles, Darryl L; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between ACEI/ARB use and mortality in CKD patients. Background There is insufficient evidence about the association of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) with mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods A logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the propensity of ACEI/ARB initiation in 141,413 US veterans with non-dialysis CKD previously unexposed to ACEI/ARB treatment. We examined the association of ACEI/ARB administration with all-cause mortality in patients matched by propensity scores, using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox models in “intention-to-treat” analyses, and in generalized linear models with binary outcomes and inverse probability treatment weighing (IPTW) in “as-treated” analyses. Results The mean±SD age of the patients at baseline was 75±10 years, 8% of patients were black, and 22% were diabetic. ACEI/ARB administration was associated with significantly lower risk of mortality both in the intention-to-treat analysis (HR=0.81; 95%CI: 0.78-0.84, p<0.001) and in the as-treated analysis with IPTW (OR=0.37; 95%CI: 0.34-0.41, p<0.001). The association of ACEI/ARB treatment with lower risk of mortality was present in all examined subgroups. Conclusions In this large contemporary cohort of non-dialysis dependent CKD patients, ACEI/ARB administration was associated with greater survival. PMID:24269363

  12. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  13. RU28318, an Aldosterone Antagonist, in Combination with an ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Benter, Ibrahim F.; Babiker, Fawzi; Al-Rashdan, Ibrahim; Yousif, Mariam; Akhtar, Saghir

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We evaluated the effects of RU28318 (RU), a selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, Captopril (Capt), an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and Losartan (Los), an angiotensin receptor blocker, alone or in combination with ischemia/reperfusion- (I/R-) induced cardiac dysfunction in hearts obtained from normal and diabetic rats. Methods. Isolated hearts were perfused for 30 min and then subjected to 30 min of global ischemia (I) followed by a period of 30 min of reperfusion (R). Drugs were administered for 30 min either before or after ischemia. Drug regimens tested were RU, Capt, Los, RU + Capt, RU + Los, Capt + Los, and RU + Capt + Los (Triple). Recovery of cardiac hemodynamics was evaluated. Results. Recovery of cardiac function was up to 5-fold worse in hearts obtained from diabetic animals compared to controls. Treatment with RU was generally better in preventing or reversing ischemia-induced cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts compared to treatment with Capt or Los alone. In diabetic hearts, RU was generally similarly effective as Capt or Los treatment. Conclusions. RU treatment locally might be considered as an effective therapy or preventative measure in cardiac I/R injury. Importantly, RU was the most effective at improving −dP/dt (a measure of diastolic function) when administered to diabetic hearts after ischemia. PMID:24066305

  14. Transdermal delivery of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Helal, Fouad; Lane, Majella E

    2014-09-01

    The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitor class of drugs has been in clinical use since the 1970s for the management of all grades of heart failure, hypertension, diabetic nephropathy and prophylaxis of cardiovascular events. Because of the advantages associated with transdermal delivery compared with oral delivery many researchers have investigated the skin as a portal for administration of ACE inhibitors. This review summarises the various studies reported in the literature describing the development and evaluation of transdermal formulations of ACE inhibitors. Captopril, enalapril maleate, lisinopril dihydrate, perindopril erbumine and trandolapril are the most studied in connection with transdermal preparations. The methodologies reported are considered critically and the limitations of the various skin models used are also highlighted. Finally, opportunities for novel transdermal preparations of ACE inhibitor drugs are discussed with an emphasis on rational formulation design. PMID:24657822

  15. An angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism may mitigate the effects of angiotensin-pathway medications on posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nylocks, K M; Michopoulos, V; Rothbaum, A O; Almli, L; Gillespie, C F; Wingo, A; Schwartz, A C; Habib, L; Gamwell, K L; Marvar, P J; Bradley, B; Ressler, K J

    2015-06-01

    Angiotensin, which regulates blood pressure may also act within the brain to mediate stress and fear responses. Common antihypertensive medication classes of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been associated with lower PTSD symptoms. Here we examine the rs4311 SNP in the ACE gene, previously implicated in panic attacks, in the relationship between ACE-I/ARB medications and PTSD symptoms. Participants were recruited from outpatient wait rooms between 2006 and March 2014 (n=  803). We examined the interaction between rs4311 genotype and the presence of blood pressure medication on PTSD symptoms and diagnosis. PTSD symptoms were lower in individuals taking ACE-Is or ARBs (N = 776). The rs4311 was associated with PTSD symptoms and diagnosis (N = 3803), as the T-carriers at the rs4311 SNP had significantly greater likelihood of a PTSD diagnosis. Lastly, the rs4311 genotype modified the effect of ACE-Is or ARBs on PTSD symptoms (N = 443; F1,443 = 4.41, P < 0.05). Individuals with the CC rs4311 genotype showed lower PTSD symptoms in the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. In contrast, T- carriers showed the opposite, such that the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs was associated with higher PTSD symptoms. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be important in PTSD, as ACE-I/ARB usage associates with lower symptoms. Furthermore, we provide genetic evidence that some individuals are comparatively more benefitted by ACE-Is/ARBs in PTSD treatment. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which ACE-Is/ARBs affect PTSD symptoms such that pharmaco-genetically informed interventions may be used to treat PTSD. PMID:25921615

  16. Pharmacological interventions into the renin-angiotensin system with ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists: effects beyond blood pressure lowering.

    PubMed

    Düsing, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Lowering of blood pressure has been shown to minimize the risk of cardiovascular events, with the majority of antihypertensives demonstrating a similar ability to reduce coronary events and stroke for a given reduction in blood pressure. Agents that modify the activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) have been proposed to exhibit additional effects that might go beyond simple blood pressure lowering. The RAS is a crucial system that regulates extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. Proposed potential benefits of RAS blockade that go beyond blood pressure lowering include a reduction in platelet aggregation and thrombosis, blunting of cardiac and vascular remodeling, favorable metabolic effects and reno- and cerebro-protection. However, factors such as treatment adherence, duration of action of antihypertensive agents and differences in effects on central versus brachial blood pressure may also result in apparent differences in efficacy of different antihypertensives. The aim of this review article is to examine the available data from clinical studies of antihypertensive drugs for evidence of effects that might legitimately be claimed to go beyond simple blood pressure lowering. PMID:27122491

  17. ACE inhibition, ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) axis in kidney and cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Simões E Silva, Ana Cristina; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-05-01

    The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a pivotal physiological regulator of heart and kidney homeostasis, but also plays an important role in the pathophysiology of heart and kidney diseases. Recently, new components of the RAS have been discovered, including angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7), Mas receptor, Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine. These new components of RAS are formed by the hydrolysis of Ang I and Ang II and, in general, counteract the effects of Ang II. In experimental models of heart and renal diseases, Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine produced vasodilation, inhibition of cell growth, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. Recent pharmacological strategies have been proposed to potentiate the effects or to enhance the formation of Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9), including ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, cyclized form of Ang-(1-7) and nonpeptide synthetic Mas receptor agonists. Here, we review the role and effects of ACE2, ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) and synthetic Mas receptor agonists in the control of inflammation and fibrosis in cardiovascular and renal diseases and as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. We briefly comment on the therapeutic potential of the novel members of RAS, Ang-(1-9) and alamandine, and the interactions between classical RAS inhibitors and new players in heart and kidney diseases. PMID:26995300

  18. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  19. ACE inhibitor potentiation of bradykinin-induced venoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Markus; Blaukat, Andree; Bara, Agnieszka T; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Busse, Rudi

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors exert their cardiovascular effects not only by preventing the formation of angiotensin II (AII), but also by promoting the accumulation of bradykinin in or at the vessel wall. In addition, certain ACE inhibitors have been shown to augment the vasodilator response to bradykinin, presumably by an interaction at the level of the B2 receptor. We have investigated whether this is a specific effect of the ACE inhibitor class of compounds in isolated endothelium-denuded segments of the rabbit jugular vein where bradykinin elicits a constrictor response which is exclusively mediated by activation of the B2 receptor. Moexiprilat and ramiprilat (⩽ 3 nM) enhanced the constrictor response to bradykinin three to four fold. Captopril and enalaprilat were less active by approximately one and quinaprilat by two orders of magnitude. Moexiprilat and ramiprilat, on the other hand, had no effect on the constrictor response to AII or the dilator response to acetylcholine. The bradykinin-potentiating effect of the ACE inhibitors was not mimicked by inhibitors of amino-, carboxy-, metallo- or serine peptidases or the synthetic ACE substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine, at a concentration which almost abolished the residual ACE activity in the vessel wall. In contrast, angiotensin-(1–7) (10 μM), an angiotensin I metabolite, significantly enhanced the constrictor response to bradykinin. Ramiprilat did not alter the binding of [3H]-bradykinin to a membrane fraction prepared from endothelium-denuded rabbit jugular veins or to cultured fibroblasts, and there was no ACE inhibitor-sensitive, bradykinin-induced cleavage of the B2 receptor in cultured endothelial cells. These findings demonstrate that ACE inhibitors selectively potentiate the B2 receptor-mediated vascular effects of bradykinin. Their relative efficacy appears to be independent of their ACE-inhibiting properties and might be related to differences in molecule structure

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, H P; Brown, S A; Chetboul, V; King, J N; Pouchelon, J-L; Toutain, P L

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors represent one of the most commonly used categories of drugs in canine and feline medicine. ACE inhibitors currently approved for use in veterinary medicine are benazepril, enalapril, imidapril and ramipril. They are all pro-drugs administered by oral route. A physiologically based model taking into account the saturable binding to ACE has been developed for pharmacokinetic analysis. The bioavailability of the active compounds from their respective pro-drug is low. The active metabolites are eliminated by renal, hepatorenal or biliary excretion, according to the drug. The elimination half-life of the free fraction of the active compounds is very short (ranging from approximately 10 min to 2 h). ACE inhibitors are generally well tolerated. Benazepril, enalapril, imidapril and ramipril are approved for dogs with chronic heart failure (CHF). The efficacy of ACE inhibitors has been convincingly demonstrated in dogs with CHF, especially in those with chronic valvular disease. In such clinical settings, ACE inhibitors improve hemodynamics and clinical signs, and increase survival time. In cats with cardiovascular disease, little information is available except for reports of some benefit in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in two non-controlled investigations. ACE inhibitors have also a mild to moderate hypotensive effect. There is also evidence to recommend ACE inhibitors in dogs and cats with chronic renal failure (CRF). They decrease the glomerular capillary pressure, have antiproteinuric effects, tend to delay the progression of CRF and to limit the extent of renal lesions. PMID:17506720

  1. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors as oxygen free radical scavengers.

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queiroz, M J; Manso, C F

    1993-01-01

    The authors have compared the ability of two non-SH-containing angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (enalaprilat and lisinopril) with an -SH containing ACE inhibitor (captopril) to scavenge the hydroxyl radical (.OH). All three compounds were able to scavenge .OH radicals generated in free solution at approximately diffusion-controlled rates (10(10) M-1 s-1) as established by the deoxyribose assay in the presence of EDTA. The compounds also inhibited deoxyribose degradation in reaction mixtures which did not contain EDTA but not so effectively. This later findings also suggests that they have some degree of metal-binding capability. Chemiluminescence assays of oxidation of hypoxanthine by xanthine oxidase in the presence of luminol, confirm that the three ACE inhibitors are oxygen free radical scavengers. Our results indicate that the presence of a sulphydryl group in the chemical structure of ACE inhibitors is not relevant for their oxygen free radical scavenging ability. PMID:8244086

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril maleate) accelerates recovery of mouse skin from UVB-induced wrinkles

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura-Hachiya, Yuko; Arai, Koji Y.; Ozeki, Rieko; Kikuta, Ayako; Nishiyama, Toshio

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) increases in UVB-irradiated skin. •Administration of an ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced skin wrinkle. •ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced epidermal hypertrophy. •ACE inhibitor improved transepidermal water loss in the UVB-irradiated skin. -- Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and angiotensin II signaling regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue remodeling, as well as blood pressure, while in skin, angiotensin II signaling is involved in wound healing, inflammation, and pathological scar formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that angiotensin II is also involved in photoaging of skin. In this study, we examined the effect of enalapril maleate, an ACE inhibitor, on recovery of wrinkled skin of hairless mice exposed to long-term UVB irradiation. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that expression of ACE, angiotensin II, and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in the skin was increased after UVB irradiation (3 times/week at increasing intensities for 8 weeks). Administration of enalapril maleate (5 times/week for 6 weeks, starting 1 week after 10-week irradiation) accelerated recovery from UVB-induced wrinkles, epidermal hyperplasia and epidermal barrier dysfunction, as compared with the vehicle control. Our results indicate that ACE and angiotensin II activity are involved in skin photoaging, and suggest that ACE inhibitor such as enalapril maleate may have potential for improvement of photoaged skin.

  3. Angiotensin II regulates ACE and ACE2 in neurons through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liang; Haack, Karla K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Brain ANG II plays an important role in modulating sympathetic function and homeostasis. The generation and degradation of ANG II are carried out, to a large extent, through the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2, respectively. In disease states, such as hypertension and chronic heart failure, central expression of ACE is upregulated and ACE2 is decreased in central sympathoregulatory neurons. In this study, we determined the expression of ACE and ACE2 in response to ANG II in a neuronal cell culture and the subsequent signaling mechanism(s) involved. A mouse catecholaminergic neuronal cell line (CATH.a) was treated with ANG II (30, 100, and 300 nM) for 24 h, and protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. ANG II induced a significant dose-dependent increase in ACE and decrease in ACE2 mRNA and protein expression in CATH.a neurons. This effect was abolished by pretreatment of the cells with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (10 μM) 30 min before administration of ANG II or the ERK1/2 inhibitor U-0126 (10 μM). These data suggest that ANG II increases ACE and attenuates ACE2 expression in neurons via the ANG II type 1 receptor, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:23535237

  4. Strong suppression of the renin-angiotensin system has a renal-protective effect in hypertensive patients: high-dose ARB with ACE inhibitor (Hawaii) study.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Mitsuru; Takeya, Yasushi; Tatara, Yuji; Yamamoto, Koichi; Onishi, Miyuki; Maekawa, Yoshihiro; Kamide, Kei; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2010-11-01

    The principal means for reducing proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney disease are strong blockade of the renin-angiotensin system and strict regulation of blood pressure (BP). This study compared the efficacy of the maximum permissible doses of two common angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), namely valsartan (maximum dose=160 mg per day) and olmesartan (maximum dose=40 mg per day). We also investigated whether a high-dose ARB or the combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with a high-dose ARB would be more renal protective. We recruited 87 poorly controlled hypertensive patients. In the first study, 50 patients without proteinuria were switched from valsartan (160 mg per day) to olmesartan (40 mg per day) for 4 months. In the second study, 37 patients with proteinuria were randomized to either switch from valsartan 160 mg per day to 40 mg per day olmesartan (n=19; Olm-G) or addition of 2.5-10 mg per day imidapril (stepped up by 2.5 mg per month) to valsartan at 160 mg per day (n=18; Imi-G). After 4 months, the BP level decreased (first study) from 157/88 mm Hg to 145/82 mm Hg (P<0.001) and (second study) from 149/86 mm Hg to 135/77 mm Hg and 145/82 mm Hg for Olm-G and Imi-G, respectively. Furthermore, in the second study, urinary protein/creatinine excretion was reduced from 2.0±1.8 g g⁻¹ to 0.8±0.8 g g⁻¹ (P=0.0242) in Olm-G and from 1.4±1.3 g g⁻¹ to 0.9±1.0 g g⁻¹ (P=0.0398) in Imi-G. The significance persisted after adjustment for BP or other risk factors. Our results suggested that the maximum dose of olmesartan was more effective than that of valsartan and comparable with the combination of valsartan and imidapril for reducing BP and proteinuria in poorly controlled hypertensive patients. PMID:20703230

  5. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  6. Regulation of alveolar epithelial cell survival by the ACE-2/angiotensin 1-7/Mas axis.

    PubMed

    Uhal, Bruce D; Li, Xiaopeng; Xue, Anita; Gao, Xu; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2011-09-01

    Earlier work from this laboratory demonstrated that apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires autocrine generation of angiotensin (ANG) II. More recent studies showed that angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), which degrades ANGII to form ANG1-7, is protective but severely downregulated in human and experimental lung fibrosis. Here it was theorized that ACE-2 and its product ANG1-7 might therefore regulate AEC apoptosis. To evaluate this hypothesis, the AEC cell line MLE-12 and primary cultures of rat AECs were exposed to the profibrotic apoptosis inducers ANGII or bleomycin (Bleo). Markers of apoptosis (caspase-9 or -3 activation and nuclear fragmentation), steady-state ANGII and ANG1-7, and JNK phosphorylation were measured thereafter. In the absence of Bleo, inhibition of ACE-2 by small interfering RNA or by a competitive inhibitor (DX600 peptide) caused a reciprocal increase in autocrine ANGII and corresponding decrease in ANG1-7 in cell culture media (both P < 0.05) and, moreover, induced AEC apoptosis. At baseline (without inhibitor), ANG1-7 in culture media was 10-fold higher than ANGII (P < 0.01). Addition of purified ANGII or bleomycin-induced caspase activation, nuclear fragmentation, and JNK phosphorylation in cultured AECs. However, preincubation with ANG1-7 (0.1 μM) prevented JNK phosphorylation and apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment with A779, a specific blocker of the ANG1-7 receptor mas, prevented ANG1-7 blockade of JNK phosphorylation, caspase activation, and nuclear fragmentation. These data demonstrate that ACE-2 regulates AEC survival by balancing the proapoptotic ANGII and its antiapoptotic degradation product ANG1-7. They also suggest that ANG1-7 inhibits AEC apoptosis through the ANG1-7 receptor mas. PMID:21665960

  7. ACE2 Decreases Formation and Severity of Angiotensin II-induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Sean E.; Zhang, Xuan; Howatt, Deborah A.; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Gurley, Susan B.; Ennis, Terri; Curci, John A.; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) cleaves angiotensin II (AngII) to form angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), which generally opposes effects of AngII. AngII infusion into hypercholesterolemic male mice induces formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This study tests the hypothesis that deficiency of ACE2 promotes AngII-induced AAAs, while ACE2 activation suppresses aneurysm formation. Approach and Results ACE2 protein was detectable by immunostaining in mice and human AAAs. Whole body deficiency of ACE2 significantly increased aortic lumen diameters and external diameters of suprarenal aortas from AngII-infused mice. Conversely, ACE2 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had no effect on AngII-induced AAAs. In contrast to AngII-induced AAAs, ACE2 deficiency had no significant effect on external aortic diameters of elastase-induced AAAs. Since ACE2 deficiency promoted AAA formation in AngII-infused mice, we determined if ACE2 activation suppressed AAAs. ACE2 activation by administration of diminazine aceturate (DIZE, 30 mg/kg/day) to Ldlr−/− mice increased kidney ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and elevated plasma Ang-(1-7) concentrations. Unexpectedly, administration of DIZE significantly reduced total sera cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol concentrations. Notably, DIZE significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters and aortic external diameters of AngII-infused mice resulting in a marked reduction in AAA incidence (from 73 to 29%). None of these effects of DIZE were observed in the Ace2−/y mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that ACE2 exerts a modulatory role in AngII-induced AAA formation, and that therapeutic stimulation of ACE2 could be a benefit to reduce AAA expansion and rupture in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system. PMID:25301841

  8. Synthesis and biological studies of highly concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for CT tracking of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William E.; Aras, Omer; Fleiter, Thorsten; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    For patients with a history of heart attack or stroke, the prevention of another cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event is crucial. The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with overexpression of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown great potential as X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Since lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor, it has been used as coating on GNPs for targeted imaging of tissue ACE in prevention of fibrosis. Herein, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles (LIS-GNPs) were synthesized up to a concentration of 55 mgAu/mL. Their contrast was measured using CT and the results were compared to Omnipaque, a commonly used iodine-based contrast agent. The targeting ability of these LIS-GNPs was also assessed.

  9. Postanesthetic Severe Oral Angioedema in Patient's Taking Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Acílio; Retroz-Marques, Carla; Mota, Sara; Cabral, Raquel; Campos, Matos

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are the leading cause of a drug-induced angioedema. This occurrence is frequently underdiagnosed, but its relapse can be life-threatening. The authors' intention in reporting this clinical case is to sound a warning about reviewing attitudes and surveillance to try to improve patient perioperative safety. PMID:25431681

  10. [A Case of Life-Threatening Angioedema Occurred During Prolonged Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Treatment].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Rintaro; Nihei, Shun-Ichi; Arai, Hideaki; Nagata, Keiji; Isa, Yasuki; Harayama, Nobuya; Aibara, Keiji; Kamochi, Msayuki

    2016-03-01

    Although angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are widely used as the first choice drug for treating hypertension, we have only a superficial understanding of their relationship to angioedema. We report a case of life-threatening angioedema. The case was a 60-year-old man who had been taking an ACE inhibitor for hypertension for 11 years. He visited his home doctor for dyspnea, and tongue and neck swelling. He was transported to our hospital because of the possibility of airway obstruction. On admission, his tongue and neck swelling became more severe. We performed an intubation using an endoscope and started airway management. We also stopped his ACE inhibitor. The severe tongue and neck swelling improved gradually and he was extubated on day 3. On the fifth day he was discharged. We diagnosed angioedema caused by an ACE inhibitor. Although the risk of airway obstruction with ACE inhibitors is acknowledged, we have only a superficial understanding of how prolonged ACE inhibitor treatment induces angioedema. So we should consider angioedema in cases of taking ACE inhibitors, especially in cases of prolonged treatment. PMID:26972946

  11. Structural determinants for binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Daniel; Hanchapola, Iresha; Thomas, Walter G.; Widdop, Robert E.; Smith, Alexander I.; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a zinc carboxypeptidase involved in the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and inactivates the potent vasopressive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) by removing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue to yield Ang1–7. This conversion inactivates the vasoconstrictive action of Ang II and yields a peptide that acts as a vasodilatory molecule at the Mas receptor and potentially other receptors. Given the growing complexity of RAS and level of cross-talk between ligands and their corresponding enzymes and receptors, the design of molecules with selectivity for the major RAS binding partners to control cardiovascular tone is an on-going challenge. In previous studies we used single β-amino acid substitutions to modulate the structure of Ang II and its selectivity for ACE2, AT1R, and angiotensin type 2 (AT2R) receptor. We showed that modification at the C-terminus of Ang II generally resulted in more pronounced changes to secondary structure and ligand binding, and here, we further explore this region for the potential to modulate ligand specificity. In this study, (1) a library of 47 peptides derived from the C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence (-IHPF) of Ang II was synthesized and assessed for ACE2 binding, (2) the terminal group requirements for high affinity ACE2 binding were explored by and N- and C-terminal modification, (3) high affinity ACE2 binding chimeric AngII analogs were then synthesized and assessed, (4) the structure of the full-length Ang II analogs were assessed by circular dichroism, and (5) the Ang II analogs were assessed for AT1R/AT2R selectivity by cell-based assays. Studies on the C-terminus of Ang II demonstrated varied specificity at different residue positions for ACE2 binding and four Ang II chimeric peptides were identified as selective ligands for the AT2 receptor. Overall, these results provide insight into the residue and structural requirements for ACE2 binding and angiotensin receptor selectivity. PMID

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and activity in Alzheimer's disease: differences in brain and CSF ACE and association with ACE1 genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miners, Scott; Ashby, Emma; Baig, Shabnam; Harrison, Rachel; Tayler, Hannah; Speedy, Elizabeth; Prince, Jonathan A; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD): ACE1 variations influence plasma ACE and risk of AD, and ACE is increased in AD brain. We measured frontal ACE level and activity in 89 AD and 51 control brains, and post-mortem CSF from 101 cases and 19 controls. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) level and Braak stage were used to indicate neuronal preservation and disease progression. We genotyped the common ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism, rs4343, rs1800764 and rs4921. ACE activity was elevated in AD and correlated with Braak stage. Crude ACE levels were unchanged but adjustment for NSE suggested increased neuronal ACE production with Braak stage. Exposing SH-SY-5Y neurons to oligomeric Aβ1-42 increased ACE level and activity, suggesting Aβ may upregulate ACE in AD. In CSF, ACE level but not activity was reduced in AD. ACE1 genotype did not predict ACE level or activity in brain or CSF. ACE activity and neuronal production increase in AD brain, possibly in response to Aβ. Peripheral measurements do not reflect ACE activity in the brain. PMID:19956428

  13. Pollen Count and Presentation of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Associated Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Brittany; Nian, Hui; Sloan, Chantel; Byrd, James Brian; Woodard-Grice, Alencia; Yu, Chang; Stone, Elizabeth; Steven, Gary; Hartert, Tina; Teo, Koon K.; Pare, Guillaume; McCarty, Catherine A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-associated angioedema is increased in patients with seasonal allergies. OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema present during months when pollen counts are increased. METHODS Cohort analysis examined the month of presentation of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema and pollen counts in the ambulatory and hospital setting. Patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema were ascertained through (1) an observational study of patients presenting to Vanderbilt University Medical Center, (2) patients presenting to the Marshfield Clinic and participating in the Marshfield Clinic Personalized Medicine Research Project, and (3) patients enrolled in The Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET). Measurements include date of presentation of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema, population exposure to ACE inhibitor by date, and local pollen counts by date. RESULTS At Vanderbilt, the rate of angioedema was significantly associated with tree pollen months (P = .01 from χ2 test). When separate analyses were conducted in patients with a history of seasonal allergies and patients without, the rate of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema was increased during tree pollen months only in patients with a history of seasonal allergies (P = .002). In Marshfield, the rate of angioedema was significantly associated with ragweed pollen months (P = .025). In ONTARGET, a positive trend was observed between the ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema rate and grass season, although it was not statistically significant (P = .057). CONCLUSIONS Patients with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema are more likely to present with this adverse drug event during months when pollen counts are increased. PMID:24565618

  14. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  19. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A.

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Carry a Risk?

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Martin; Pourcelet, Aline; van Nuffelen, Marc; Racapé, Judith; Leeman, Marc; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), mainly excreted by the liver, the dosage of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, cleared by the kidney, must be adapted to account for renal clearance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to avoid acute kidney injury (AKI). Community-acquired AKI and the use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the emergency department were retrospectively assessed in 324 patients with baseline stage 3 or higher CKD. After stepwise regression analysis, the use of ACE inhibitors (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-3.1; P=.02) and the presence of dehydration (OR, 30.8; 95% CI, 3.9-239.1) were associated with AKI. A total of 45% of patients using ACE inhibitors experienced overdosing, which causes most of the excess risk of AKI. These results suggest that dosage adjustment of ACE inhibitors to renal function or substitution of ACE inhibitors with ARBs could reduce the incidence of AKI. Moreover, ACE inhibitors and ARBs should be stopped in cases of dehydration. PMID:27080620

  1. Angioedema in the emergency department: the impact of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pigman, E C; Scott, J L

    1993-07-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been reported to cause angioedema. The purpose of this study was to establish what proportion of patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with angioedema were concomitantly taking any of the ACE inhibitors and to show how this group differed in presentation and response to treatment from the larger population of patients with non-ACE inhibitor-related angioedema. An 8-year retrospective chart review of all patients with the diagnosis of angioedema observed from January 1, 1984 to December 31, 1991 was undertaken in the ED of an urban teaching hospital. Forty-nine patients ranging from 12 to 88 years of age with symptoms and physical examination that was consistent with the diagnosis of angioedema were entered onto the study. Twelve cases of ACE inhibitor-related angioedema were identified, all occurring in the last 4 years of the review, and when compared with the non-ACE inhibitor-related group were older (mean age, 63.3 vs 43.0 years), had less of an allergic history (0% vs 49%; P = .013), but demonstrated the same severity of symptoms and response to medical therapy. No case required an artificial or surgical airway. ACE inhibitor related angioedema is becoming a common type of angioedema observed in this ED. These patients are older and free of other allergic disease and respond well to traditional therapy. PMID:8216515

  2. DNA Methylation Analysis of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Gene in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Peter; Baghai, Thomas C.; Schüle, Cornelius; Born, Christoph; Früstück, Clemens; Büttner, Andreas; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang; Varallo-Bedarida, Gabriella; Rupprecht, Rainer; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Bondy, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    Background The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) has been repeatedly discussed as susceptibility factor for major depression (MD) and the bi-directional relation between MD and cardiovascular disorders (CVD). In this context, functional polymorphisms of the ACE gene have been linked to depression, to antidepressant treatment response, to ACE serum concentrations, as well as to hypertension, myocardial infarction and CVD risk markers. The mostly investigated ACE Ins/Del polymorphism accounts for ∼40%–50% of the ACE serum concentration variance, the remaining half is probably determined by other genetic, environmental or epigenetic factors, but these are poorly understood. Materials and Methods The main aim of the present study was the analysis of the DNA methylation pattern in the regulatory region of the ACE gene in peripheral leukocytes of 81 MD patients and 81 healthy controls. Results We detected intensive DNA methylation within a recently described, functional important region of the ACE gene promoter including hypermethylation in depressed patients (p = 0.008) and a significant inverse correlation between the ACE serum concentration and ACE promoter methylation frequency in the total sample (p = 0.02). Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between the concentrations of the inflammatory CVD risk markers ICAM-1, E-selectin and P-selectin and the degree of ACE promoter methylation in MD patients could be demonstrated (p = 0.01 - 0.04). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that aberrations in ACE promoter DNA methylation may be an underlying cause of MD and probably a common pathogenic factor for the bi-directional relationship between MD and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22808171

  3. Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hypertension Treated With the Renin Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Azilsartan Medoxomil vs Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: The Prospective EARLY Registry.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Bramlage, Peter; Baumgart, Peter; Mahfoud, Felix; Buhck, Hartmut; Ouarrak, Taoufik; Ehmen, Martina; Senges, Jochen; Gitt, Anselm K

    2015-12-01

    For patients with newly diagnosed hypertension, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are usually the first-line therapies. There is, however, no real-life data regarding the relative clinical effectiveness and tolerability of either drug class. The prospective registry, Treatment With Azilsartan Compared to ACE Inhibitors in Antihypertensive Therapy (EARLY), was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the ARB azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) vs ACE inhibitors in real-world patients. Of the 1153 patients with newly diagnosed hypertension who were included in the registry, 789 were prescribed AZL-M and 364 were prescribed an ACE inhibitor. After multivariate adjustment, AZL-M was found to provide superior blood pressure reduction and better target blood pressure (<140/90 mm Hg) achievement. The proportion of patients with adverse events was not statistically different between groups. The authors conclude that in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients, AZL-M provides superior blood pressure control with a similar safety profile compared with ACE inhibitors. PMID:26105590

  4. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) polymorphism frequency in Brazilian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel Barbosa; Pimenta, Eduardo; Rosse, Izinara Cruz; Veneroso, Christiano; Pussieldi, Guilherme; Becker, Lenice Kapes; Carvalho, Maria-Raquel; Silami-Garcia, Emerson

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) allelic and genotypic frequencies in Brazilian soccer players of different ages. The study group comprised 353 players from first-division clubs in the under (U)-14, U-15, U-17, U-20, and professional categories. The allelic and genotypic frequencies did not differ significantly in any of the categories between the group of players and the control group. This was the first study of ACE-I/D polymorphism in Brazilian soccer players. PMID:27232187

  5. Ace inhibitor therapy for heart failure in patients with impaired renal function: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Valika, Ali A; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure syndromes are often associated with multi-organ dysfunction, and concomitant liver, renal, and neurologic involvement is very common. Neuro-hormonal antagonism plays a key role in the management of this syndrome, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are one of the cornerstones of therapy. Cardiorenal physiology is becoming more recognized in these patients with advanced heart failure, and the role of neuro-hormonal blockade in this setting is vaguely defined in the literature. Often, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are decreased or even withheld in these circumstances. The purpose of this article is to review the role and pathophysiology of ace inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade in patients with acute and chronic heart failure syndromes and concomitant cardiorenal physiology. PMID:22213014

  6. Acute abdomen due to intestinal angioedema induced by ACE inhibitors: not so rare?

    PubMed

    Dobbels, P; Van Overbeke, L; Vanbeckevoort, D; Hiele, M

    2009-01-01

    During the last 5 years we identified 7 patients with a history of episodic acute abdominal pain and subobstruction due to intestinal angioedema secondary to the use of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. These cases were all diagnosed in one gastroenterology department. This is thereby the largest single centre case series of ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema that has been published until now. Our findings suggest that this syndrome is far more frequent than international literature would let us believe. We also describe one of the first male cases diagnosed with this entity for which there is a significant female predominance. In the presence of an appropriate history and suggestive findings on CT scan, this diagnosis can relatively easily be made if one is sufficiently intent on it. An appropriate diagnosis can save these patients a lot of unnecessary diagnostic procedures and discomfort. PMID:20163043

  7. ACE inhibitors can induce circulating antibodies directed to antigens of the superficial epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Rosa, Gian Marco; Drosera, Massimo; Intra, Chiara; Barsotti, Antonio; Parodi, Aurora

    2011-07-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus has been reported in patients receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The aim of this work was to study a group of hypertensive patients without skin diseases treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors (I), to verify the presence of serum circulating anti-antibodies. The indirect immunofluorescence showed that 33 sera (52.38%) presented autoantibodies directed to an antigen of the cytoplasm of the superficial epidermal keratinocytes. Two of the 33 positive sera had antibodies to Dsg1 and/or 3 in ELISA. Immunoblot analyses were negative. All the 48 control sera were found to have no circulating antibodies using the three assays. Our results would confirm that ACEI drugs may trigger the production of circulating autoantibodies also in patients without clinical manifestations of pemphigus. PMID:20563876

  8. Cardiovascular risk reduction by reversing endothelial dysfunction:ARBs, ACE inhibitors, or both? Expectations from The ONTARGET Trial Programme

    PubMed Central

    Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Redón, Josep; Schmieder, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is the initial pathophysiological step in a progression of vascular damage that leads to overt cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Angiotensin II, the primary agent of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS), has a central role in endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, RAS blockade with an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) and/or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor provides a rational approach to reverse endothelial dysfunction, reduce microalbuminuria, and, thus, improves cardiovascular and renal prognosis. ARBs and ACE inhibitors act at different points in the RAS pathway and recent evidence suggests that there are differences regarding their effects on endothelial dysfunction. In addition to blood pressure lowering, studies have shown that ARBs reduce target-organ damage, including improvements in endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, the progression of renal dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes, proteinuria, and left ventricular hypertrophy. The ONgoing Telmisartan Alone in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) Programme is expected to provide the ultimate evidence of whether improved endothelial function translates into reduced cardiovascular and renal events in high-risk patients, and to assess possible differential outcomes with telmisartan, the ACE inhibitor ramipril, or a combination of both (dual RAS blockade). Completion of ONTARGET is expected in 2008. PMID:17583170

  9. Adipocyte-derived lipids increase angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and modulate macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Trouvain, Caroline; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Fleming, Ingrid

    2011-03-01

    Human monocytes/macrophages express the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) but nothing is known about its role under physiological conditions. As adipose tissue contains resident macrophages that have been implicated in the generation of insulin resistance in expanding fat mass, we determined whether adipocytes release factors that affect ACE expression and function in monocytes. Incubation of human monocyte-derived macrophages with conditioned medium from freshly isolated human adipocytes (BMI = 25.4 ± 0.96) resulted in a 4-fold increase in ACE expression. The effect was insensitive to denaturation and different proteases but abolished after lipid extraction. mRNA levels of the major histocompatibility complex class II protein increased in parallel with ACE, whereas the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 decreased. As a consequence of the reduction in MCP-1, monocyte recruitment was also attenuated. Moreover, adipocyte-conditioned medium prevented the interferon (IFN)-γ induced formation of TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, all markers of classically-activated (M1 type) macrophages. The decrease in cytokine expression in adipocyte-conditioned medium-treated macrophages was sensitive to ACE silencing by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Accordingly, ACE overexpression in THP-1 cells mimicked the effect of adipocyte-conditioned medium. In both cell types, ACE inhibition failed to affect the changes induced by adipocyte conditioned-medium treatment and ACE overexpression. Thus, the modulation of macrophage polarization by ACE appears to be mediated independently of enzyme activity, probably via intracellular signaling. Interestingly, human macrophage ACE expression was also upregulated by IL-4 and IL-13, which promote the "alternative" activation of macrophages and decreased by LPS and IFN-γ. Mechanistically, adipocyte-conditioned medium stimulated the phosphorylation of

  10. Preoperative angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor usage in patients with chronic subdural hematoma: Associations with initial presentation and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Neidert, Marian C; Schmidt, Tobias; Mitova, Tatyana; Fierstra, Jorn; Bellut, David; Regli, Luca; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Bozinov, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the association of preoperative usage of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with the initial presentation and clinical outcome of patients with chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Patients treated for cSDH between 2009 and 2013 at our institution were included in this retrospective case-control study. Medical charts were reviewed retrospectively and data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Out of 203 patients (58 females, mean age 73.2years), 53 (26%) patients were on ACE inhibitors before their presentation with cSDH. Median initial hematoma volume in individuals with ACE inhibitors (179.2±standard error of the mean [SEM] 13.0ml) was significantly higher compared to patients without ACE inhibitors (140.4±SEM 6.2ml; p=0.007). There was an increased probability of surgical reintervention in the ACE inhibitor group (12/53, 23% versus 19/153, 12%; p=0.079), especially in patients older than 80years (6/23, 26% versus 3/45, 7%; p=0.026). ACE inhibitors are associated with higher hematoma volume in patients with cSDH and with a higher frequency of recurrences requiring surgery (especially in the very old). We hypothesize that these effects are due to ACE inhibitor induced bradykinin elevation causing increased vascular permeability of the highly vascularized neomembranes in cSDH. PMID:26898577

  11. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  12. Choice of ACE inhibitor combinations in hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes: update after recent clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Gentile, Giorgio; Angeli, Fabio; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The diabetes epidemic continues to grow unabated, with a staggering toll in micro- and macrovascular complications, disability, and death. Diabetes causes a two- to fourfold increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease, and represents the first cause of dialysis treatment both in the UK and the US. Concomitant hypertension doubles total mortality and stroke risk, triples the risk of coronary heart disease and significantly hastens the progression of microvascular complications, including diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, blood pressure reduction is of particular importance in preventing cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Successful antihypertensive treatment will often require a combination therapy, either with separate drugs or with fixed-dose combinations. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor plus diuretic combination therapy improves blood pressure control, counterbalances renin-angiotensin system activation due to diuretic therapy and reduces the risk of electrolyte alterations, obtaining at the same time synergistic antiproteinuric effects. ACE inhibitor plus calcium channel blocker provides a significant additive effect on blood pressure reduction, may have favorable metabolic effects and synergistically reduce proteinuria and the rate of decline in glomerular filtration rate, as evidenced by the GUARD trial. Finally, the recently published ACCOMPLISH trial showed that an ACE inhibitor/calcium channel blocker combination may be particularly useful in reducing cardiovascular outcomes in high-risk patients. The present review will focus on different ACE inhibitor combinations in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, in the light of recent clinical trials, including GUARD and ACCOMPLISH. PMID:19475778

  13. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Use and Major Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treated With the Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 Inhibitor Alogliptin.

    PubMed

    White, William B; Wilson, Craig A; Bakris, George L; Bergenstal, Richard M; Cannon, Christopher P; Cushman, William C; Heller, Simon K; Mehta, Cyrus R; Nissen, Steven E; Zannad, Faiez; Kupfer, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system when there is dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibition in the presence of high-dose angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition has led to concerns of potential increases in cardiovascular events when the 2 classes of drugs are coadministered. We evaluated cardiovascular outcomes from the EXAMINE (Examination of Cardiovascular Outcomes With Alogliptin versus Standard of Care) trial according to ACE inhibitor use. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and a recent acute coronary syndrome were randomly assigned to receive the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor alogliptin or placebo added to existing antihyperglycemic and cardiovascular prophylactic therapies. Risks of adjudicated cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, and hospitalized heart failure were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model in patients according to ACE inhibitor use and dose. There were 3323 (62%) EXAMINE patients treated with an ACE inhibitor (1681 on alogliptin and 1642 on placebo). The composite rates of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and nonfatal stroke were comparable for alogliptin and placebo with ACE inhibitor (11.4% versus 11.8%; hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.79-1.19; P=0.76) and without ACE inhibitor use (11.2% versus 11.9%; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-1.21; P=0.62). Composite rates for cardiovascular death and heart failure in patients on ACE inhibitor occurred in 6.8% of patients on alogliptin versus 7.2% on placebo (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-1.2; P=0.57). There were no differences for these end points nor for blood pressure or heart rate in patients on higher doses of ACE inhibitor. Cardiovascular outcomes were similar for alogliptin and placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary disease treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:27480840

  14. ACE2, angiotensin-(1-7) and Mas receptor axis in inflammation and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, AC; Silveira, KD; Ferreira, AJ; Teixeira, MM

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have improved our understanding of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). These have included the recognition that angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) is a biologically active product of the RAS cascade. The identification of the ACE homologue ACE2, which forms Ang-(1-7) from Ang II, and the GPCR Mas as an Ang-(1-7) receptor have provided the necessary biochemical and molecular background and tools to study the biological significance of Ang-(1-7). Most available evidence supports a counter-regulatory role for Ang-(1-7) by opposing many actions of Ang II on AT1 receptors, especially vasoconstriction and proliferation. Many studies have now shown that Ang-(1-7) by acting via Mas receptor exerts inhibitory effects on inflammation and on vascular and cellular growth mechanisms. Ang-(1-7) has also been shown to reduce key signalling pathways and molecules thought to be relevant for fibrogenesis. Here, we review recent findings related to the function of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis and focus on the role of this axis in modifying processes associated with acute and chronic inflammation, including leukocyte influx, fibrogenesis and proliferation of certain cell types. More attention will be given to the involvement of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the context of renal disease because of the known relevance of the RAS for the function of this organ and for the regulation of kidney inflammation and fibrosis. Taken together, this knowledge may help in paving the way for the development of novel treatments for chronic inflammatory and renal diseases. PMID:23488800

  15. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G M; Prieto, Minolfa C; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9-12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1) for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 +/- 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 +/- 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 +/- 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05). AT(1)R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 +/- 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 +/- 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 +/- 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 +/- 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT(1)R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT(1)R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  16. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C.; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G. M.; Prieto, Minolfa C.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9–12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng·kg−1·min−1 for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 ± 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 ± 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 ± 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 ± 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 ± 0.07, P < 0.05). AT1R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 ± 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 ± 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 ± 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 ± 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT1R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT1R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  17. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury: an overview.

    PubMed

    Zughaib, M E; Sun, J Z; Bolli, R

    1993-01-01

    There are multiple mechanisms whereby ACE inhibitors could be beneficial during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, including: i) reduced formation of angiotensin II, ii) decreased metabolism of bradykinin, iii) antioxidant activity, and iv) possibly other unknown mechanisms. Reduced formation of angiotensin II should be beneficial because this peptide exerts several actions that are potentially detrimental to the ischemic/reperfused myocardium, including vasoconstriction, increased release of norepinephrine, stimulation of phospholipase C and/or A2, and increased afterload with an attendant increase in oxygen demands. Reduced metabolism of bradykinin could be beneficial by increasing myocardial glucose uptake, by causing vasodilation, and by stimulating production of endothelium-derived relaxing factor and prostacyclin. Although earlier studies suggested that sulfhydryl-containing ACE inhibitors scavenge superoxide anions, recent data have shown that these drugs scavenge hydroxyl radical and hypochlorous acid with no effect on superoxide anion. Studies in isolated hearts have demonstrated that ACE inhibitors attenuate the metabolic, arrhythmic, and contractile dearrangements associated with ischemia and reperfusion, and have suggested that such beneficial effects are mediated by potentiation of bradykinin and/or increased synthesis of prostacyclin. Studies in models of myocardial stunning after brief (15-min) ischemia in vivo (anesthetized dogs) suggest that ACE inhibitors enhance the recovery of contractile function after a single brief ischemic episode. No data are available regarding the effect of these drugs on myocardial stunning after a prolonged, partly reversible episode, after multiple consecutive brief ischemic episodes, and after global ischemia. The mechanism for the salutary effects of ACE inhibitors on stunning remains a mystery. It may involve an antioxidant action (in the case of thiol-containing molecules) or potentiation of prostaglandins (in

  18. [Trials with ACE-inhibitors in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Dalla Volta, S

    1994-12-01

    In acute myocardial infarction, the results of the trials with ACE-inhibitors have not been always good, in contrast with what has been observed in chronic heart failure. The comparison of these compounds with the placebo has demonstrated lack of reduction of mortality in the study CONSENSUS II, favorable results on the survival as first endpoint and on the secondary endpoints, as reinfarction, heart failure and stroke in the studies SOLVD, AIRE, GISSI 3, ISIS 4, and uncertain (interim report) results in the Chinese study. Nevertheless, the analysis of the recruitment of the patients with acute infarction and the way these patients have been treated seem to be the most important cause of the conflicting results. ACE-inhibitors have proved no efficacy in acute myocardial infarction without signs of left ventricular failure (CONSENSUS II), have worsened the clinical picture and the mortality in patients in shock or with severe heart failure in the acute phase. On the reverse, in presence of mild to moderate left ventricular dysfunction and failure, the use of ACE-inhibitors has been followed by reduction of mortality in the early (AIRE, GISSI 3, ISIS 4), medium term (GISSI 3) and long-term follow-up (up to 4 years in the AIRE study). In parallel with the reduction of the primary endpoint, also secondary endpoints have been favorably influenced by the different ACE-inhibitors. No differences have been observed among the different class of compounds. ACE-inhibitors seem, therefore, to have a clear indication in acute myocardial infarction with mild or moderate signs and symptoms of heart failure. PMID:7634258

  19. Inhibition Mechanism and Model of an Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE)-Inhibitory Hexapeptide from Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    PubMed Central

    Ni, He; Li, Lin; Liu, Guang; Hu, Song-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) has an important function in blood pressure regulation. ACE-inhibitory peptides can lower blood pressure by inhibiting ACE activity. Based on the sequence of an ACE-inhibitory hexapeptide (TPTQQS) purified from yeast, enzyme kinetics experiments, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and a docking simulation were performed. The hexapeptide was found to inhibit ACE in a non-competitive manner, as supported by the structural model. The hexapeptide bound to ACE via interactions of the N-terminal Thr1, Thr3, and Gln4 residues with the residues on the lid structure of ACE, and the C-terminal Ser6 attracted the zinc ion, which is vital for ACE catalysis. The displacement of the zinc ion from the active site resulted in the inhibition of ACE activity. The structural model based on the docking simulation was supported by experiments in which the peptide was modified. This study provides a new inhibitory mechanism of ACE by a peptide which broads our knowledge for drug designing against enzyme targets. PMID:22606330

  20. Impact of disease states on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Jaclyn M; Dasta, Joseph F; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Schentag, Jerome J

    2006-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE) in elderly patients and patients with renal and hepatic impairment were examined, and a role for an AUC/EC50 ratio to guide dosing was evaluated. A Medline and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts search was used to identify human studies and abstracts. Relevant data were evaluated and summarized. Dosing regimens were compared using an AUC/EC50 ratio. Most studies evaluating ACE inhibitors in renal impairment report a strong linear correlation between creatine clearance and drug elimination. AUC and EC50 values for these drugs in elderly subjects appear similar to younger and hypertensive patients. There is increased AUC in some patients with hepatic impairment. Pharmacodynamic data are conflicting. Prolonged ACE inhibition is evident in renal impairment but not necessarily other disease states. ACE inhibitor dosing for hypertension is reasonable based on pharmacokinetics and EC50 values. Further individualization of therapy may improve outcomes, and using the threshold AUC/EC50 ratio may help guide appropriate dosing. PMID:16920891

  1. Automated multi-step purification protocol for Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzyme (ACE).

    PubMed

    Eisele, Thomas; Stressler, Timo; Kranz, Bertolt; Fischer, Lutz

    2012-12-12

    Highly purified proteins are essential for the investigation of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. The purification of a protein requires several steps, which are often time-consuming. In our study, the Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.15.1) was solubilised from pig lung without additional detergents, which are commonly used, under mild alkaline conditions in a Tris-HCl buffer (50mM, pH 9.0) for 48h. An automation of the ACE purification was performed using a multi-step protocol in less than 8h, resulting in a purified protein with a specific activity of 37Umg(-1) (purification factor 308) and a yield of 23.6%. The automated ACE purification used an ordinary fast-protein-liquid-chromatography (FPLC) system equipped with two additional switching valves. These switching valves were needed for the buffer stream inversion and for the connection of the Superloop™ used for the protein parking. Automated ACE purification was performed using four combined chromatography steps, including two desalting procedures. The purification methods contained two hydrophobic interaction chromatography steps, a Cibacron 3FG-A chromatography step and a strong anion exchange chromatography step. The purified ACE was characterised by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native-PAGE. The estimated monomer size of the purified glycosylated ACE was determined to be ∼175kDa by SDS-PAGE, with the dimeric form at ∼330kDa as characterised by a native PAGE using a novel activity staining protocol. For the activity staining, the tripeptide l-Phe-Gly-Gly was used as the substrate. The ACE cleaved the dipeptide Gly-Gly, releasing the l-Phe to be oxidised with l-amino acid oxidase. Combined with peroxidase and o-dianisidine, the generated H(2)O(2) stained a brown coloured band. This automated purification protocol can be easily adapted to be used with other protein purification tasks. PMID:23217308

  2. Fine-Mapping Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene: Separate QTLs Identified for Hypertension and for ACE Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chia-Min; Wang, Ruey-Yun; Fann, Cathy S. J.; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Kang, Chih-Sen; Chen, Chien-Chung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been implicated in multiple biological system, particularly cardiovascular diseases. However, findings associating ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism with hypertension or other related traits are inconsistent. Therefore, in a two-stage approach, we aimed to fine-map ACE in order to narrow-down the function-specific locations. We genotyped 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ACE from 1168 individuals from 305 young-onset (age ≤40) hypertension pedigrees, and found four linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks. A tag-SNP, rs1800764 on LD block 2, upstream of and near the ACE promoter, was significantly associated with young-onset hypertension (p = 0.04). Tag-SNPs on all LD blocks were significantly associated with ACE activity (p-value: 10–16 to <10–33). The two regions most associated with ACE activity were found between exon13 and intron18 and between intron 20 and 3′UTR, as revealed by measured haplotype analysis. These two major QTLs of ACE activity and the moderate effect variant upstream of ACE promoter for young-onset hypertension were replicated by another independent association study with 842 subjects. PMID:23469169

  3. Occurrence and fate of ACE-inhibitor peptides in cheeses and in their digestates following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, Milda; Cattaneo, Stefano; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of the casein-derived angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACE-I) peptides VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP and HLPLP were investigated in 12 different cheese samples by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The total amount of ACE-I peptides was in the range 0.87-331mgkg(-1). VPP and IPP largely prevailed in almost all cheeses. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion of Cheddar, Gorgonzola, Maasdam and Grana Padano cheeses, type and amount of ACE-I peptides changed, and only VPP, IPP, HLPLP and LHLPLP were detected in the intestinal digestates. The results evidenced that the degree of proteolysis itself cannot be regarded as a promoting or hindering factor for ACE-I peptide release during cheese digestion. Moreover, the data indicated that the ACE-I potential of cheeses cannot be inferred based on the type and amount of ACE-I peptides present in undigested samples. PMID:25172679

  4. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  5. A role for the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan in kidney dysfunction during ACE-inhibitor fetopathy.

    PubMed

    Hansell, P; Palm, F

    2015-04-01

    Despite data showing that inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system increase the risks of fetal morbidity and dysfunctionality later in life, their use during pregnancy has increased. The fetopathy induced by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is characterized by anuria, hypotension and growth restriction, but can also be associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. In the kidney, this fetopathy includes atrophy of the medulla, reduced number of glomeruli, developmental lesions of tubules and vessels, tubulointerstitial inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. Although angiotensin II (Ang II) inhibition during nephrogenesis interferes with normal growth and development, this review will focus on effects of the heavily accumulated matrix component hyaluronan (HA). An important mechanism of HA accumulation during nephrogenesis is disruption of its normal reduction as a consequence of lack of Ang II activation of hyaluronidase. Hyaluronan has very large water-attracting properties and is pro-inflammatory when fragmented. The ensuing inflammation and interstitial oedema affect kidney function. Hyaluronan is colocalized with CD44 overexpression and infiltrating immune cells. These properties make HA a plausible contributor to the observed structural and functional kidney defects associated with the fetopathy. Available data support an involvement of HA in kidney dysfunction of the foetus and during adulthood due to the physico-chemical characteristics of HA. No clinical treatment for HA accumulation exists. Treatment with the HA-degrading enzyme hyaluronidase and an HA synthesis inhibitor has been tested successfully in experimental models in the kidney, heart and pancreas. Reduced HA accumulation to reduce interstitial oedema and inflammation may improve organ function, but this concept needs to be tested in a controlled study before causal relationships can be established. PMID:25600777

  6. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar) Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E.; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes. PMID:25123137

  7. Fixed-Dose Combinations of Renin-Angiotensin System Inhibitors and Calcium Channel Blockers in the Treatment of Hypertension: A Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Fu-Chih; Tung, Ying-Chang; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wang, Chun-Li; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of different regimens are recommended in guidelines for the treatment of hypertension. However, clinical studies comparing FDCs of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB)/calcium channel blocker (CCB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitor)/CCB in hypertensive patients are lacking.Using a propensity score matching of 4:1 ratio, this retrospective claims database study compared 2 FDC regimens, ARB/CCB and ACE inhibitor/CCB, in treating hypertensive patients with no known atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. All patients were followed for at least 3 years or until the development of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) during the study period. In addition, the effect of medication adherence on clinical outcomes was evaluated in subgroup analysis based on different portions of days covered.There was no significant difference in MACE-free survival (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98-1.50; P = 0.08) and survival free from hospitalization for heart failure (HR: 1.15; 95% CI: 082-1.61; P = 0.431), new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 071-1.36; P = 0.906), and initiation of dialysis (HR: 0.99; 95% CI: 050-1.92; P = 0.965) between the 2 study groups. The results remained the same within each subgroup of patients with different adherence statuses.ARBs in FDC regimens with CCBs in the present study were shown to be as effective as ACE inhibitors at reducing the risks of MACEs, hospitalization for heart failure, new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease, and new initiation of dialysis in hypertensive patients, regardless of the medication adherence status. PMID:26705234

  8. [The new drug is much more effective than ACE inhibitors in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Sr, Jiří Widimský

    2015-02-01

    PARADIGM-HF study observed clinical outcomes after treatment by new drug LCZ696 or enalapril in patients with systolic chronic heart failure. It was randomized double-blind trial with LCZ696 (200 mg twice a day) and enalapril (10 mg twice a day). 8442 patients were enrolled with NYHA class II or III and left ventricular ejection fiction of 40% or less. Study drugs were added to other recommended medication. The trial was prematurely terminated after median follow-up of 27 months. The primary endpoint of the study was a combination of cardiovascular mortality and the first hospitalization for heart failure. LCZ696 drug, an inhibitor of angiotensin receptor and neprilysin (Arnie), has led to a reduction in the primary composite target by 20% (p <0.001). The treatment has decreased cardiovascular mortality by 20%, p <0.001 and hospitalization for worsening heart failure by 21%, p <0.001. LCZ696 has also decreased total mortality by 16%, p <0.001. The use of LCZ696 has been accompanied by frequent symptomatic hypotension and hypotension with a decrease in systolic blood pressure below 90 mm Hg, however, LCZ696 was less often associated with an increase in serum creatinine and serum potassium than enalapril. In addition, cough has occurred less frequently after LCZ696 than after enalapril. Discontinuation of therapy occurred in 746 patients (17.8%) treated with LCZ696 and in 833 patients (19.8%) treated with enalapril (19.8%) (p = 0.02). PARADIGM-HF study has also shown superiority of LCZ696 compared to ACE inhibitors in stable outpatients with chronic systolic heart failure NYHA stages II and III. Therefore, LCZ696 is more effective than ACE inhibitors (and angiotensin receptor blockers). Moreover, it is well tolerated. LCZ696 seems to replace the ACE inhibitors in mentioned patients. The authors also discuss the results of the first randomized study PARAMOUNT investigating LCZ696 efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure and good left ventricular ejection

  9. No association of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene (ACE2) polymorphisms with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Benjafield, Adam V; Wang, William Y S; Morris, Brian J

    2004-07-01

    Recent intriguing findings from genetic linkage, knockout, and physiologic studies in mice and rats led us to conduct the first investigation of the novel angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene (ACE2) in human hypertension (HT). We genotyped four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) (A-->G at nucleotide 1075 in intron 1, G-->A at nucleotide 8790 in intron 3, C-->G at nucleotide 28330 in intron 11, and G-->C at nucleotide 36787 in intron 16) in HT (n = 152) and normotensive (NT, n = 193) groups having inherently high biological power (>80%) due to our inclusion only of subjects whose parents had the same BP status as themselves. The SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium (D' = 54% to 100%, P =.05 to 0.0001). Because ACE2 is on the X chromosome, data for each sex were analyzed separately. Minor allele frequencies in HT versus NT were as follows: for the intron 1 variant 0.21 versus 0.17 in female subjects (P =.31) and 0.25 versus 0.29 in male subjects (P =.60); intron 3 variant 0.22 versus 0.18 in female subjects (P =.35) and 0.15 versus 0.20 in male subjects (P =.47); intron 11 variant 0.39 versus 0.46 in male subjects (P = 0.17) and 0.31 versus 0.30 in male subjects (P =.96); intron 16 variant 0.20 versus 0.19 in female subjects (P =.72) and 0.17 versus 0.17 in male subjects (P =.95). Haplotype analysis was also negative. These data provide little support for ACE2 in genetic predisposition to HT. PMID:15233982

  10. Angiotensin I–Converting Enzyme Type 2 (ACE2) Gene Therapy Improves Glycemic Control in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bindom, Sharell M.; Hans, Chetan P.; Xia, Huijing; Boulares, A. Hamid; Lazartigues, Eric

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Several clinical studies have shown the benefits of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade in the development of diabetes, and a local RAS has been identified in pancreatic islets. Angiotensin I–converting enzyme (ACE)2, a new component of the RAS, has been identified in the pancreas, but its role in β-cell function remains unknown. Using 8- and 16-week-old obese db/db mice, we examined the ability of ACE2 to alter pancreatic β-cell function and thereby modulate hyperglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Both db/db and nondiabetic lean control (db/m) mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2-eGFP) or the control virus (Ad-eGFP) via injection into the pancreas. Glycemia and β-cell function were assessed 1 week later at the peak of viral expression. RESULTS In 8-week-old db/db mice, Ad-hACE2-eGFP significantly improved fasting glycemia, enhanced intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, increased islet insulin content and β-cell proliferation, and reduced β-cell apoptosis compared with Ad-eGFP. ACE2 overexpression had no effect on insulin sensitivity in comparison with Ad-eGFP treatment in diabetic mice. Angiotensin-(1–7) receptor blockade by d-Ala7–Ang-(1-7) prevented the ACE2-mediated improvements in intraperitoneal glucose tolerance, glycemia, and islet function and also impaired insulin sensitivity in both Ad-hACE2-eGFP– and Ad-eGFP–treated db/db mice. d-Ala7–Ang-(1-7) had no effect on db/m mice. In 16-week-old diabetic mice, Ad-hACE2-eGFP treatment improved fasting blood glucose but had no effect on any of the other parameters. CONCLUSIONS These findings identify ACE2 as a novel target for the prevention of β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis occurring in type 2 diabetes. PMID:20660625

  11. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Activity on Egg Albumen Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Nahariah, N.; Legowo, A. M.; Abustam, E.; Hintono, A.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is used for fermentation of fish products, meat and milk. However, the utilization of these bacteria in egg processing has not been done. This study was designed to evaluate the potential of fermented egg albumen as a functional food that is rich in angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors activity (ACE-inhibitor activity) and is antihypertensive. A completely randomized design was used in this study with six durations of fermentation (6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 h) as treatments. Six hundred eggs obtained from the same chicken farm were used in the experiment as sources of egg albumen. Bacteria L. plantarum FNCC 0027 used in the fermentation was isolated from cow’s milk. The parameters measured were the total bacteria, dissolved protein, pH, total acid and the activity of ACE-inhibitors. The results showed that there were significant effects of fermentation time on the parameters tested. Total bacteria increased significantly during fermentation for 6, 12, 18, and 24 h and then decreased with the increasing time of fermentation to 30 and 36 h. Soluble protein increased significantly during fermentation to 18 h and then subsequently decreased during of fermentation to 24, 30, and 36 h. The pH value decreased markedly during fermentation. The activities of ACE-inhibitor in fermented egg albumen increased during fermentation to 18 h and then decreased with the increasing of the duration of fermentation to 24, 30, and 36 h. The egg albumen which was fermented for 18 h resulted in a functional food that was rich in ACE-inhibitor activity. PMID:25715689

  12. Use of β-Blockers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers, and Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Danish Nationwide Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Gitte Vrelits; Ganz, Patricia A.; Cole, Steven W.; Pedersen, Lars A.; Toft Sørensen, Henrik; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P.; Peter Garne, Jens; Christiansen, Peer M.; Lash, Timothy L.; Ahern, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To estimate associations between use of β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and breast cancer recurrence in a large Danish cohort. Patients and Methods We enrolled 18,733 women diagnosed with nonmetastatic breast cancer between 1996 and 2003. Patient, treatment, and 10-year recurrence data were ascertained from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group registry. Prescription and medical histories were ascertained by linkage to the National Prescription Registry and Registry of Patients, respectively. β-Blocker exposure was defined in aggregate and according to solubility, receptor selectivity, and individual drugs. ACE inhibitor and ARB exposures were defined in aggregate. Recurrence associations were estimated with multivariable Cox regression models in which time-varying drug exposures were lagged by 1 year. Results Compared with never users, users of any β-blocker had a lower recurrence hazard in unadjusted models (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.0) and a slightly higher recurrence hazard in adjusted models (adjusted HR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.5). Associations were similar for exposures defined by receptor selectivity and solubility. Although most individual β-blockers showed no association with recurrence, metoprolol and sotalol were associated with increased recurrence rates (adjusted metoprolol HR = 1.5, 95% CI, 1.2 to 1.8; adjusted sotalol HR = 2.0, 95% CI, 0.99 to 4.0). ACE inhibitors were associated with a slightly increased recurrence hazard, whereas ARBs were not associated with recurrence (adjusted ACE inhibitor HR = 1.2, 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.4; adjusted ARBs HR = 1.1, 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.3). Conclusion Our data do not support the hypothesis that β-blockers attenuate breast cancer recurrence risk. PMID:23650417

  13. Long-range safety and protective benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors for hypertension. Do we need more clinical trials?

    PubMed Central

    Sambhi, M P; Gavras, H; Robertson, J I; Smith, W M

    1993-01-01

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is being applied with considerable success to the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are the only currently available agents that can achieve this objective. In general, the major therapeutic effects of these agents in the treatment of mild to moderate hypertension or of heart failure are exerted on the vascular tissue through inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system and, secondarily, of the sympathetic nervous system. When cardiovascular functional reserve is diminished and autoregulation of regional and systemic blood flow is strained, however, ACE inhibitors may affect other organ functions (heart, kidneys, and possibly brain), hormones other than the renin system, and local tissue humoral systems. The interrelations between the renin-angiotensin system and several other vasoactive systems--including circulating and locally generated tissue hormones and centrally acting neurohormonal factors--are complex and unclear. A better understanding of these mechanisms and interrelations would allow for a more rational therapeutic use of these agents. Unknown also are the clinical effects of prolonged ACE inhibition. Whether the use of ACE inhibitors can provide primary cardiorenal protection requires proof through definitive clinical trials. Images PMID:8460511

  14. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with type 2 diabetes and retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Hung-Ta; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Pi-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy, but randomized trials and meta-analyses comparing their effects on macrovascular complications have yielded conflicting results. We compared the effectiveness of these drugs in patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy in a large population-based cohort. Methods: We conducted a propensity score–matched cohort study using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. We included adult patients prescribed an ACE inhibitor or ARB within 90 days after diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy between 2000 and 2010. Primary outcomes were all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or cardiovascular death). Secondary outcomes were hospital admissions with acute kidney injury or hyperkalemia. Results: We identified 11 246 patients receiving ACE inhibitors and 15 173 receiving ARBs, of whom 9769 patients in each group were matched successfully by propensity scores. In the intention-to-treat analyses, ARBs were similar to ACE inhibitors in risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR] 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87–1.01) and major adverse cardiovascular events (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.87–1.04), including myocardial infarction (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88–1.20), ischemic stroke (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.85–1.04) and cardiovascular death (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.88–1.16). They also did not differ from ACE inhibitors in risk of hospital admission with acute kidney injury (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.91–1.13) and hospital admission with hyperkalemia (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.86–1.18). Results were similar in as-treated analyses. Interpretation: Our study showed that ACE inhibitors were similar to ARBs in risk of all-cause death, major adverse cardiovascular events and adverse effects among patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27001739

  15. In silico analysis and molecular docking studies of potential angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor using quercetin glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Fatima, Nighat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the inhibitory action of quercetin glycosides by computational docking studies. For this, natural metabolite quercetin glycosides isolated from buckwheat and onions were used as ligand for molecular interaction. The crystallographic structure of molecular target angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) (peptidyl-dipeptidase A) was obtained from PDB database (PDB ID: 1O86). Enalapril, a well-known brand of ACE inhibitor was taken as the standard for comparative analysis. Computational docking analysis was performed using PyRx, AutoDock Vina option based on scoring functions. The quercetin showed optimum binding affinity with a molecular target (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) with the binding energy of −8.5 kcal/mol as compared to the standard (−7.0 kcal/mol). These results indicated that quercetin glycosides could be one of the potential ligands to treat hypertension, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. PMID:26109757

  16. [Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as neutralizers of hydroxyl radical].

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queirós, M J; Manso, C

    1992-05-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are utilized in the treatment of essential hypertension and of chronic cardiac failure. They are also employed in the treatment of the myocardial lesion of ischemia-reperfusion, which involves oxygen free radicals. In the present study we investigated the possibility of three angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril, lisinopril) to act as hydroxyl radical scavengers. The rate constants for reactions of those compounds with .OH were determined using the deoxyribose method. All there compounds proved to be good scavengers of .OH with rate constants of about 10(10)M-1s-1 and are iron chelators specially enalapril. The fact that captopril possesses a thiol group does not confer an higher antioxidative capacity. These results suggest that scavenging of oxygen free radicals may be a possible mechanism contributing to the therapeutic effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:1325814

  17. Activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) attenuates allergic airway inflammation in rat asthma model.

    PubMed

    Dhawale, Vaibhav Shrirang; Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Malek, Vajir; Patel, Deep; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) is positively correlated to asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is highly expressed in lungs. ACE2, the counteracting enzyme of ACE, was proven to be protective in pulmonary, cardiovascular diseases. In the present study we checked the effect of ACE2 activation in animal model of asthma. Asthma was induced in male wistar rats by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin and then treated with ACE2 activator, diminazene aceturate (DIZE) for 2weeks. 48h after last allergen challenge, animals were anesthetized, blood, BALF, femoral bone marrow lavage were collected for leucocyte count; trachea for measuring airway responsiveness to carbachol; lungs and heart were isolated for histological studies and western blotting. In our animal model, the characteristic features of asthma such as altered airway responsiveness to carbachol, eosinophilia and neutrophilia were observed. Western blotting revealed the increased pulmonary expression of ACE1, IL-1β, IL-4, NF-κB, BCL2, p-AKT, p-p38 and decreased expression of ACE2 and IκB. DIZE treatment prevented these alterations. Intraalveolar interstitial thickening, inflammatory cell infiltration, interstitial fibrosis, oxidative stress and right ventricular hypertrophy in asthma control animals were also reversed by DIZE treatment. Activation of ACE2 by DIZE conferred protection against asthma as evident from biochemical, functional, histological and molecular parameters. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time that activation of ACE2 by DIZE prevents asthma progression by altering AKT, p38, NF-κB and other inflammatory markers. PMID:27343405

  18. Recovery of casein-derived peptides with in vitro inhibitory activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) using aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Evaldo Cardozo; Coimbra, Jane Sélia Dos Reis; de Oliveira, Eduardo Basílio; Bonomo, Renata Cristina Ferreira

    2014-10-22

    Peptides inhibiting the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) were obtained by trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of bovine milk casein, performed at 37°C, during 1, 2, 5, 8 and 24h. Results of in vitro inhibitory activity ranged between 13.4% and 78.5%. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was evidenced for hydrolysates obtained after 2h of reaction. Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) formed by polyethylene glycol of 1500gmol(-1) (PEG 1500)+sodium phosphate or potassium phosphates were produced and evaluated, in terms of partition coefficients (K) and extraction yields (y), to recovery the casein hydrolysates at room temperature. In ATPS containing sodium phosphate, the peptides showed a slightly greater affinity toward the bottom salt-rich phase (0.1≤K≤0.9; 5.7%≤y≤47%). In the case of ATPS containing potassium phosphates, these molecules showed substantially greater affinity toward the top polymer-rich phase (137≤K≤266; y≥99%). These results point out extraction using PEG 1500/potassium phosphate ATPS is an efficient technique to recover casein hydrolysates containing ACE inhibitors peptides. Outlined data will be helpful in integrating such unit operation to larger scale processes. PMID:25464099

  19. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  20. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  1. Role of angiotensin converting enzyme in the vascular effects of an endopeptidase 24.15 inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Telford, S E; Smith, A I; Lew, R A; Perich, R B; Madden, A C; Evans, R G

    1995-01-01

    1. We investigated the role of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the cardiovascular effects of N-[1-(R,S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Tyr-p-aminobenzoate (cFP), a peptidase inhibitor selective for metalloendopeptidase (EP) E.C. 3.4.24.15. 2. In conscious rabbits, cFP (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) markedly slowed the degradation of [3H]-bradykinin, potentiated the depressor response to right atrial administration of bradykinin (10-1000 ng kg-1), and inhibited the pressor response to right atrial angiotensin I (10-100 ng kg-1). In each of these respects, the effects of cFP were indistinguishable from those of the ACE inhibitor, captopril (0.5 mg plus 10 mg kg-1h-1 i.v.). Furthermore, the effects of combined administration of cFP and captopril were indistinguishable from those of captopril alone. 3. In experimentally naive anaesthetized rats, cFP administration (9.3 mg kg-1, i.v.) was followed by a moderate but sustained fall in arterial pressure of 13 mmHg. However, in rats pretreated with bradykinin (50 micrograms kg-1) a more pronounced fall of 30 mmHg was observed. Captopril (5 mg kg-1) had similar hypotensive effects to those of cFP, and cFP had no effect when it was administered after captopril. 4. CFP displaced the binding of [125I]-351A (the p-hydroxybenzamidine derivative of lisinopril) from preparations of rat plasma ACE and solubilized lung membrane ACE (KD = 1.2 and 0.14 microM respectively), and inhibited rat plasma ACE activity (KI = 2.4 microM). Addition of phosphoramidon (10 microM), an inhibitor of a range of metalloendopeptidases, including neutral endopeptidase (E.C.3.4.24.11), markedly reduced the potency of cFP in these systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620708

  2. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy. PMID:26648693

  3. Early genes induction in spontaneously hypertensive rats left ventricle with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but not hydralazine

    SciTech Connect

    Susic, D.; Aristizabal, D.J.; Prakash, O.; Nunez, E.; Frohlich, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats were given an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril or quinapril) or hydralazine and were left for up to 6 hr. To examine whether administration of antihypertensive agents affects expression of immediate early genes in left ventricular myocardium, groups of rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, and 6 hr after dosing; total RNA was extracted from left ventricular tissue and analyzed by blot hybridization technique using labeled probes for c-myc, c-fos, and GAPDH mRNA. All three antihypertensive agents reduced pressure similarly, and treatment with the two ACE inhibitors increased c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression in left ventriculum. By contrast, hydralazine did not increase steady-state mRNA expression of either proto-oncogene. Thus, in parallel with the pressure fall, acute administration of the ACE inhibitors induced expression of c-fos and c-myc mRNAs in the left ventricle. Since the equidepressor dose of hyralazine did not affect expression of these proto-oncogenes, this effect of ACE inhibitors is independent of their hemodynamic action. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Angiotensin II inhibitor facilitates epidermal wound regeneration in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamber, Maria; Papalazarou, Vasileios; Rouni, Georgia; Papageorgopoulou, Evagelia; Papalois, Apostolos; Kostourou, Vassiliki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue regeneration and wound healing are severely impaired in diabetes and are associated with poor circulation and dysfunctional blood vessels. Angiotensin II inhibitors are anti-hypertensive drugs used in clinical practice to regulate blood pressure and could affect tissue remodeling. We hypothesize that blocking angiotensin II, using Losartan, could facilitate tissue regeneration in diabetic mice. To this end, we established an experimental model of wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Our data demonstrated that Losartan accelerates wound repair and normalizes wound stromal responses, having a beneficial role in wounds of diabetic individuals. Our findings highlight a potential therapeutic use of Losartan in improving wound repair in diabetic conditions. PMID:26106332

  5. Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of Different ACE Inhibitors in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, WeiPing; Zhang, HaiBin; Guo, JinCheng; Zhang, XueKun; Zhang, LiXin; Li, ChunLei; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure is a public health problem and a great economic burden for patients and healthcare systems. Suppression of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors remains the mainstay of treatment for heart failure. However, the abundance of ACE inhibitors makes it difficult for doctors to choose. We performed this network meta-analysis of ACEIs in patients with heart failure in order to address this area of uncertainty. We searched PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, and Medline. Any randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, ramipril, or trandolapril or combined interventions of 2 or more of these drugs. Two reviewers extracted the data and made the quality assessment. At first, we used Stata software (version 12.0, StataCorp, College Station, TX) to make traditional pairwise meta-analyses for studies that directly compared different interventions. Then, network meta-analysis was performed using WinBUGS (version 1.4.3, MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK). A total of 29 studies were included. Lisinopril was associated with a higher rate of all-cause mortality compared with placebo (odds ratio 65.9, 95% credible interval 1.91 to 239.6) or ramipril (14.65, 1.23 to 49.5). Enalapril significantly reduced systolic blood pressure when compared with placebo (standardized mean differences −0.6, 95% credible interval −1.03 to −0.18). Both captopril (odds ratio 76.2, 95% credible interval 1.56 to 149.3) and enalapril (274.4, 2.4 to 512.9) were associated with a higher incidence of cough compared to placebo. Some important outcomes such as rehospitalization and cardiac death were not included. The sample size and the number of studies were limited, especially for ramipril. Our results suggest that enalapril might be the best option when considering factors such as increased ejection fraction, stroke volume, and decreased mean arterial pressure. However, enalapril was

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) from raccoon dog can serve as an efficient receptor for the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Zhang, Yanfang; Liu, Yun; Chen, Zhiwei; Deng, Hongkui; Ma, Zhongbin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong; Deng, Fei

    2009-11-01

    Raccoon dog is one of the suspected intermediate hosts of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In this study, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene of raccoon dog (rdACE2) was cloned and sequenced. The amino acid sequence of rdACE2 has identities of 99.3, 89.2, 83.9 and 80.4 % to ACE2 proteins from dog, masked palm civet (pcACE2), human (huACE2) and bat, respectively. There are six amino acid changes in rdACE2 compared with huACE2, and four changes compared with pcACE2, within the 18 residues of ACE2 known to make direct contact with the SARS-CoV S protein. A HeLa cell line stably expressing rdACE2 was established; Western blot analyses and an enzyme-activity assay indicated that the cell line expressed ACE2 at a similar level to two previously established cell lines that express ACE2 from human and masked palm civet, respectively. Human immunodeficiency virus-backboned pseudoviruses expressing spike proteins derived from human SARS-CoV or SARS-CoV-like viruses of masked palm civets and raccoon dogs were tested for their entry efficiency into these cell lines. The results showed that rdACE2 is a more efficient receptor for human SARS-CoV, but not for SARS-CoV-like viruses of masked palm civets and raccoon dogs, than huACE2 or pcACE2. This study provides useful data to elucidate the role of raccoon dog in SARS outbreaks. PMID:19625462

  7. Decreased Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis With Incidental Concurrent Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kharofa, Jordan; Cohen, Eric P.; Tomic, Rade; Xiang Qun; Gore, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been shown to mitigate radiation-induced lung injury in preclinical models. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ACE inhibitors decrease the risk of radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage I through III small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer treated definitively with radiation from 2004-2009 at the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Acute pulmonary toxicity was quantified within 6 months of completion of treatment according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. The use of ACE inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, inhaled glucocorticosteroids, statins, and angiotensin receptor blockers; dose-volume histogram parameters; and patient factors were assessed for association with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Results: A total of 162 patients met the criteria for inclusion. The majority of patients had Stage III disease (64%) and received concurrent chemotherapy (61%). Sixty-two patients were identified as ACE inhibitor users (38%). All patients had acceptable radiation plans based on dose-volume histogram constraints (V20 [volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy] {<=}37% and mean lung dose {<=}20 Gy) with the exception of 2 patients who did not meet both criteria. Grade 2 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (7.4%). The rate of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis was lower in ACE inhibitor users vs. nonusers (2% vs. 11%, p = 0.032). Rates of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis were significantly increased in patients aged greater than 70 years (16% vs. 2%, p = 0.005) or in whom V5 (volume of lung receiving at least 5 Gy) was 50% or greater (13% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). V10 (volume of lung receiving at least 10 Gy), V20, V30 (volume of lung receiving at least 30 Gy), and mean lung dose were not independently associated with Grade 2 or

  8. Assessing the teratogenic potential of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Burrows, R F; Burrows, E A

    1998-08-01

    To assess the teratogenic potential of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, we report on 20 prospective pregnancies and 85 identified from articles in the literature. The anomaly rate was 20.6% in small series <10 entrants (95% CI 8.7-37.9%) and 1.4% in larger series > or =10 entrants (95% CI 0.03-7.3%) p=0.0016. The most consistent anomaly seen, skull hypoplasia, along with renal dysfunction appear to be more related to prolonged or late pregnancy exposure than to first trimester exposure. There is little supportive evidence that ACE inhibitors (captopril or enalapril) are teratogenic. There seems to be no absolute reason to discontinue these 2 medications prior to pregnancy, nor to create anxiety when a patient is identified with the combination of early pregnancy and treatment with these medications. There appears to be reason to discontinue the medication in pregnancy but the adverse event rate cannot be assessed because of inadequate prospective information. PMID:9761159

  9. Treatment of Hypertension in Black Patients With Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Neil B.

    1988-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension and the incidence of complications from uncontrolled elevated blood pressure in blacks is much greater than in the white population. In general, blacks have underlying differences in the factors relating to blood pressure level, including low plasma renin, and, in certain instances, a decreased ability to excrete sodium. The stepped-care approach in the management of the black hypertensive patient is similar to that taken with white patients, but racial differences in response to antihypertensive drugs exist that require careful consideration when choosing a treatment regimen. Thiazide diuretics are effective in blacks and are often used as initial therapy. Blacks tend to respond less well to β-blockers, but when combined with a diuretic, they are also effective. Encouraging data are available on the use of calcium channel blockers in blacks. When combined with a diuretic, the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors also provide an alternative to therapy for black patients. The use of low doses of ACE inhibitors has reduced the high incidence of adverse effects associated with this group of drugs in earlier studies. PMID:3280812

  10. [INTERACTION OF BETA-BLOCKER PROPRANOLOL WITH RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM INHIBITORS IN RAT KIDNEY].

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, O B; Buchneva, N V; Landar, L N

    2016-01-01

    Propranolol injection (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.) in anesthetized rats increases diuresis 1.60 times (p < 0.05) with simultaneous 1.54- and 1.62-fold increase (p < 0.05) in sodium and potassium excretion, respectively. Preliminary inhibition of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity using ACE inhibitor enalapril (1 mg/kg, orally, 7 days) increases the sensitivity of rat kidney to drug, increasing its diuretic effect 2.33 times, natriuresis 2.49 times, and urine potassium excretion 1.80 times (p < 0.05). After the preliminary insertion of AT1 angiotensin receptor antagonist losartan (1 mg/kg, orally, 7 days), propranolol causes 1.8-fold increase in diuresis, 2.48-fold decrease in urine sodium, and 1.71-fold decrease in kaliuresis (p < 0.05). Preliminary administration of direct renin inhibitor aliskiren (4 mg/kg, orally, 7 days) is accompanied by 2.30-fold increase in the diuretic effect of propranolol, 2.56-fold increase in natriuresis, and 2.27-fold increase in urine potassium excretion (p < 0.05). It is concluded that the renal tissue RAS is involved in the mechanism of propranolol action in the kidney, acting as modulator preventing excessive loss of water and electrolytes with urine. PMID:27455575

  11. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-related Angioedema: A Case of an Unexpected Death.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Eray; Özdemir, Mehmet Tamer; Çiğsar, Gülşen; Omurca, Ferhat; Aslan, Nurullah; Yildiz, Mehmet; Gey, Zehra Bahar

    2015-11-01

    Angioedema is an asymmetric non-pitting oedema on face, lips, tongue and mucous membranes; any delay in diagnosis and treatment can be fatal. Treatment with lisinopril as an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, can be a reason of angioedema. Here we report a case who developed oral-facial edema four years after using lisinopril/hydrochlorothiazide. Laryngeal oedema is a main cause of death in angioedema. The treatment of choice in angioedema including fresh frozen plasma, C1 inhibitor concentrations and BRK-2 antagonists (bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists) were used. In this case; a 77 years old female patient suffering from hypertension was considered. This patient was suffering two days from swelling on her face and neck. Non- allergic angioedema was distinguished in five major forms; acquired (AAO), hereditary (HAE), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blocker-dependent, pseudoallergic angioedema (PAS) and an idiopathic angioedema (IAO). She was admitted to our clinic with the diagnosis of hereditary angioedema. Patient had skin edema and life threatening laryngeal edema. In emergency department treatment was started using intravenous methylprednisolone, diphenydramine as well as inhaled and subcutaneous epinephrine simultaneously. Despite the initial treatment, the patient died due to the insufficient respiration and cardiac arrest. The patient has no history of kidney disease. PMID:26725563

  12. ACE Inhibitor Delapril Prevents Ca(2+)-Dependent Blunting of IK1 and Ventricular Arrhythmia in Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Thireau, J; Zalvidea, S; Meschin, P; Pasquie, J-L; Aimond, F; Richard, S

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) improve clinical outcome in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and chronic heart failure. We investigated potential anti-arrhythmic (AA) benefits in a mouse model of ischemic HF. We hypothesized that normalization of diastolic calcium (Ca(2+)) by ACE-I may prevent Ca(2+)-dependent reduction of inward rectifying K(+) current (IK1) and occurrence of arrhythmias after MI. Mice were randomly assigned to three groups: Sham, MI, and MI-D (6 weeks of treatment with ACE-I delapril started 24h after MI). Electrophysiological analyses showed that delapril attenuates MI-induced prolongations of electrocardiogram parameters (QRS complex, QT, QTc intervals) and conduction time from His bundle to ventricular activation. Delapril improved the sympatho-vagal balance (LF/HF) and reduced atrio-ventricular blocks and ventricular arrhythmia. Investigations in cardiomyocytes showed that delapril prevented the decrease of IK1 measured by patch-clamp technique. IK1 reduction was related to intracellular Ca(2+) overload. This reduction was not observed when intracellular free-Ca(2+) was maintained low. Conversely, increasing intracellular free-Ca(2+) in Sham following application of SERCA2a inhibitor thapsigargin reduced IK1. Thapsigargin had no effect in MI animals and abolished the benefits of delapril on IK1 in MI-D mice. Delapril prevented both the prolongation of action potential late repolarization and the depolarization of resting membrane potential, two phenomena known to trigger abnormal electrical activities, promoted by MI. In conclusion, early chronic therapy with delapril after MI prevented Ca(2+)-dependent reduction of IK1. This mechanism may significantly contribute to the antiarrhythmic benefits of ACE-I in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. PMID:26321755

  13. Refill Adherence in Relation to Substitution and the Use of Multiple Medications: A Nationwide Population Based Study on New ACE-Inhibitor Users

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Anna K.; Lesén, Eva; Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte; Sundell, Karolina Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Objective Generic substitution has contributed to economic savings but switching products may affect patient adherence, particularly among those using multiple medications. The aim was to analyse if use of multiple medications influenced the association between switching products and refill adherence to angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in Sweden. Study Design and Setting New users of ACE-inhibitors, starting between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007, were identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Refill adherence was assessed using the continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA) and analysed with linear regression and analysis of covariance. Results The study population included 42735 individuals whereof 51.2% were exposed to switching ACE-inhibitor and 39.6% used multiple medications. Refill adherence was higher among those exposed to switching products than those not, but did not vary depending on the use of multiple medications or among those not. Refill adherence varied with age, educational level, household income, country of birth, previous hospitalisation and previous cardiovascular diagnosis. Conclusion The results indicate a positive association between refill adherence and switching products, mainly due to generic substitution, among new users of ACE-inhibitors in Sweden. This association was independent of use of multiple medications. PMID:27192203

  14. Increase of migration of cultured endothelial cells by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor derived from tuna muscle.

    PubMed

    Kohama, Y; Oka, H; Murayama, N; Iida, K; Itoh, M; Itoh, M; Ying, X; Mimura, T

    1992-05-01

    The influence of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory octapeptide derived from tuna muscle (tuna AI) on the bovine aorta endothelial cell (BAEC) migration was investigated, as compared with captopril. BAEC migration was quantitated 6 d after release from contact inhibition by a teflon fence assay. The culture grown in the presence of tuna AI (1 and 10 microM) clearly exhibited an increase in migration, compared with the control. The media collected from tuna AI (1 and 10 microM)-stimulated BAECs significantly exhibited the interleukin (IL) -1 activity that was detected by the thymocyte costimulation assay with phytohemagglutinin. Although tuna AI was a weaker ACE inhibitor than captopril, the increasing effect of tuna AI on the migration and the IL-1 generation in BAECs was slightly greater than that of captopril. In quiescent BAECs, tuna AI (1 microM) apparently induced c-myc and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) A-chain messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expressions within 30 min, which persisted for 6 h. In contrast, captopril induced a very low expression of c-myc mRNA, and had no relation to PDGF A-chain mRNA expression. These results suggest that the increase of BAEC migration by tuna AI, unlike captopril, is likely related to the induction or activation of IL-1, and c-myc and PDGF mRNAs, in addition to the inhibition of the conversion of endogenous angiotensin I to angiotensin II. PMID:1527698

  15. Functional and molecular evidence for expression of the renin angiotensin system and ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding in COS7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Kashkari, Nada; Chodavarapu, Harshita; Somineni, Hari K.; Singh, Richa

    2015-01-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) plays a vital role in the regulation of the cardiovascular and renal functions. COS7 is a robust and easily transfectable cell line derived from the kidney of the African green monkey, Cercopithecus aethiops. The aims of this study were to 1) demonstrate the presence of an endogenous and functional RAS in COS7, and 2) investigate the role of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17 (ADAM17) in the ectodomain shedding of angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). Reverse transcription coupled to gene-specific polymerase chain reaction demonstrated expression of ACE, ACE2, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), and renin at the transcript levels in total RNA cell extracts. Western blot and immunohistochemistry identified ACE (60 kDa), ACE2 (75 kDa), AT1R (43 kDa), renin (41 kDa), and ADAM17 (130 kDa) in COS7. At the functional level, a sensitive and selective mass spectrometric approach detected endogenous renin, ACE, and ACE2 activities. ANG-(1–7) formation (m/z 899) from the natural substrate ANG II (m/z 1,046) was detected in lysates and media. COS7 cells stably expressing shRNA constructs directed against endogenous ADAM17 showed reduced ACE2 shedding into the media. This is the first study demonstrating endogenous expression of the RAS and ADAM17 in the widely used COS7 cell line and its utility to study ectodomain shedding of ACE2 mediated by ADAM17 in vitro. The transfectable nature of this cell line makes it an attractive cell model for studying the molecular, functional, and pharmacological properties of the renal RAS. PMID:25740155

  16. The influence of a polymorphism in the gene encoding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) on treatment outcomes in late-onset Pompe patients receiving alglucosidase alfa.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rena C; Palmer, Rachel; Pomponio, Robert J; Lu, Yuefeng; Ma, Xiwen; McVie-Wylie, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype (I/I, I/D, D/D), disease severity at baseline and response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) were assessed in the Pompe disease Late-Onset Treatment Study (LOTS). No correlations were observed between ACE genotype and disease severity at baseline. However, D/D patients appeared to have a reduced response to alglucosidase alfa treatment than I/I or I/D patients, suggesting that ACE polymorphisms may influence the response to alglucosidase alfa treatment and warrants further investigation. PMID:27489778

  17. Fixed-Dose Combinations of Renin–Angiotensin System Inhibitors and Calcium Channel Blockers in the Treatment of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Fu-Chih; Tung, Ying-Chang; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wang, Chun-Li; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of different regimens are recommended in guidelines for the treatment of hypertension. However, clinical studies comparing FDCs of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB)/calcium channel blocker (CCB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitor)/CCB in hypertensive patients are lacking. Using a propensity score matching of 4:1 ratio, this retrospective claims database study compared 2 FDC regimens, ARB/CCB and ACE inhibitor/CCB, in treating hypertensive patients with no known atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. All patients were followed for at least 3 years or until the development of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) during the study period. In addition, the effect of medication adherence on clinical outcomes was evaluated in subgroup analysis based on different portions of days covered. There was no significant difference in MACE-free survival (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98–1.50; P = 0.08) and survival free from hospitalization for heart failure (HR: 1.15; 95% CI: 082–1.61; P = 0.431), new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 071–1.36; P = 0.906), and initiation of dialysis (HR: 0.99; 95% CI: 050–1.92; P = 0.965) between the 2 study groups. The results remained the same within each subgroup of patients with different adherence statuses. ARBs in FDC regimens with CCBs in the present study were shown to be as effective as ACE inhibitors at reducing the risks of MACEs, hospitalization for heart failure, new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease, and new initiation of dialysis in hypertensive patients, regardless of the medication adherence status. PMID:26705234

  18. The ACE inhibitor ( sup 3 H)SQ29,852 identifies a high affinity recognition site located in the human temporal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Egli, P.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 identified a single high affinity recognition site (defined by 10.0 microM captopril) in the human temporal cortex (pKD 8.62 +/- 0.03; Bmax 248 +/- 24 fmol mg-1 protein, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). ACE inhibitors and thiorphan competed to a similar level for the ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 binding site in the human temporal cortex with a rank order of affinity (pKi values mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), lisinopril (9.49 +/- 0.02), captopril (9.16 +/- 0.08), SQ29,852 (8.58 +/- 0.04), epicaptopril (7.09 +/- 0.08), fosinopril (7.08 +/- 0.05) and thiorphan (6.40 +/- 0.04). Since this rank order of affinity is similar to the affinity of these compounds to inhibit brain ACE activity it is concluded that ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 selectively labels the inhibitor recognition site of ACE in the human temporal cortex.

  19. Hypotensive, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Diuretic Activities of the Aqueous-methanol Extract of Ipomoea reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Qaiser; Aslam, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Ipomoea reniformis Roxb. (Convolvulaceae) is a small, weedy herb used for the management of cardiac problems in traditional systems of medicine in India and Pakistan. Objective of the present study was to investigate the hypotensive, diuretic and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of the aqueous-methanol (30:70) crude extract of the dried aerial parts of I. reniformis (Ir.Cr.) in rats. To record blood pressure lowering effects of the Ir.Cr, different doses of the extract were administered through jugular vein to the ketamine-diazepam anesthetized normotensive rats and blood pressure was recorded via carotid artery. ACE inhibitory activity of the extract was studied in-vitro; using hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine as substrate, the product hippurate was quantified spectrophotometrically after reacting with cyanuric chloride/dioxane reagent. Effects of intraperitoneal administration of the extract on urine and urinary electrolyte excretion were also investigated in rats. The extract (Ir.Cr.) produced 21.51 ± 3.41, 28.99 ± 2.30, 53.34 ± 0.88 and 61.71 ± 3.37% fall in mean arterial blood pressure of the anesthetized rats at the doses of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/Kg, respectively. Ir.Cr. was found to have serum ACE inhibitory activity, with IC50 value of 422 ± 21.16 μg/mL. The extract also increased urine volume and urinary Na+ excretion significantly at the doses of 30 and 50 mg/Kg in rats. The study concludes that the crude extract of Ipomoea reniformis (Ir.Cr.) has hypotensive, ACE inhibitory and diuretic activities, which provide the scientific justification for the traditional uses of the plant as cardioprotective, antihypertensive and diuretic remedy. PMID:24523757

  20. Isolation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting triterpenes from Schinus molle.

    PubMed

    Olafsson, K; Jaroszewski, J W; Smitt, U W; Nyman, U

    1997-08-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of extracts of Schinus molle leaves, using an in vitro assay, led to the isolation of ACE-inhibitory steroidal triterpenes of the euphane type, identified by means of NMR spectroscopic methods. One of the triterpenes was isolated as an equilibrium mixture of epimeric aldehydes. The triterpenes showed moderate ACE-inhibitory activity (IC(50) about 250 microM). PMID:17252394

  1. A systematic review on randomized control trials on rennin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitors role in managing hypertension among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Raja Ahsan; Khan, Amer Hayat; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Jannah, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    Randomized control trials (RCTs) are considered as most rigors way of determining the cause-effect relationship of a treatment and outcome. Activation of rennin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) is an important contributor to hypertension in hemodialysis patients. The prevalence of hypertension in hemodialysis patients varies from 60% to 80% and hypertension management alone with conventional hemodialysis is insufficient. Hence, the current review was aimed to investigate the effect of RAAS inhibitors in managing hypertension among hemodialysis patients in a randomized control trial. Using PUBMED and EMBASE databases, randomized control trial with primary or secondary outcomes related to the effect of RAAS inhibitors on blood pressure among hemodialysis patients were included for analysis. The current review also assessed the quality of reporting of RCT. A total of eight RCT met inclusion criteria for current review. According to modified jaded scale, one (12.5%) study scored four points for quality reporting, whereas two (25%) studies scored one point that was the least score. The mean score for all included studies was 2.25. Six (75%) of the eight RCT included, involved ARB in hypertension management among hemodialysis patients, whereas two (25%) studies involved angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Of the siz RCT involving ARB, two (33.3%) RCT also included ACE inhibitors comparison group. Altogether six (75%) studies report a reduction in blood pressure with the use of RAAS inhibitors compared to control group; however, of the six studies, two (33.3%) reported that the reduction in blood pressure was not significant. Whereas, two (25%) studies reported no reduction in blood pressure compared to the control group. The findings from current review do not indicate a clear pattern for a role of RAAS inhibitors for hypertension control among hemodialysis patients. PMID:26853680

  2. Lymphocyte-suppressing action of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in coronary artery disease patients with normal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2011-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders partially results from its anti-inflammatory action. No previous study has investigated the effect of any ACE inhibitor on lymphocyte cytokine release. In this study, we compared the effects of serum- and tissue-type angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on systemic inflammation and lymphocyte secretory function in normotensive patients with stable coronary artery disease. The study included 134 patients with coronary artery disease who were randomized into one of three groups and treated with enalapril (20 mg/d, n = 47), perindopril (4 mg/d, n = 45) or placebo (n = 42), respectively. The control group included 40 age-, sex- and weight-matched healthy subjects. The plasma lipid profile, glucose metabolism markers, hsCRP and lymphocyte cytokine release were examined at the beginning of the study and after 30 and 90 days of treatment. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T cells released significantly more interleukin-2, interferon-γ and TNFα than the lymphocytes of control subjects. Neither enalapril nor perindopril treatment was associated with any significant changes in blood pressure. Perindopril treatment inhibited lymphocyte cytokine release and systemic inflammation, while the effect of enalapril was insignificant. Perindopril, and, to a lesser extent, enalapril, strongly reduced lymphocyte cytokine release in insulin-resistant but not insulin-sensitive subjects. Our results indicate that perindopril is superior to enalapril in producing lymphocyte-suppressing and systemic anti-inflammatory effects in normotensive coronary artery disease patients. These effects may contribute to a reduction in the vascular risk of this group of patients, particularly in those subjects who are resistant to insulin, when these patients are treated with tissue-type angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:22180357

  3. Fragment-based design for the development of N-domain-selective angiotensin-1-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Ross G; Sharma, Rajni K; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Lubbe, Lizelle; Zamora, Ismael; Acharya, K Ravi; Chibale, Kelly; Sturrock, Edward D

    2014-02-01

    ACE (angiotensin-1-converting enzyme) is a zinc metallopeptidase that plays a prominent role in blood pressure regulation and electrolyte homeostasis. ACE consists of two homologous domains that despite similarities of sequence and topology display differences in substrate processing and inhibitor binding. The design of inhibitors that selectively inhibit the N-domain (N-selective) could be useful in treating conditions of tissue injury and fibrosis due to build-up of N-domain-specific substrate Ac-SDKP (N-acetyl-Ser-Asp-Lys-Pro). Using a receptor-based SHOP (scaffold hopping) approach with N-selective inhibitor RXP407, a shortlist of scaffolds that consisted of modified RXP407 backbones with novel chemotypes was generated. These scaffolds were selected on the basis of enhanced predicted interaction energies with N-domain residues that differed from their C-domain counterparts. One scaffold was synthesized and inhibitory binding tested using a fluorogenic ACE assay. A molecule incorporating a tetrazole moiety in the P2 position (compound 33RE) displayed potent inhibition (K(i)=11.21±0.74 nM) and was 927-fold more selective for the N-domain than the C-domain. A crystal structure of compound 33RE in complex with the N-domain revealed its mode of binding through aromatic stacking with His388 and a direct hydrogen bond with the hydroxy group of the N-domain specific Tyr369. This work further elucidates the molecular basis for N-domain-selective inhibition and assists in the design of novel N-selective ACE inhibitors that could be employed in treatment of fibrosis disorders. PMID:24015848

  4. Angiotensin type 1a receptor-deficient mice develop diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction, which is prevented by renin-angiotensin system inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes-induced organ damage is significantly associated with the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Recently, several studies have demonstrated a change in the RAS from an extracellular to an intracellular system, in several cell types, in response to high ambient glucose levels. In cardiac myocytes, intracellular angiotensin (ANG) II synthesis and actions are ACE and AT1 independent, respectively. However, a role of this system in diabetes-induced organ damage is not clear. Methods To determine a role of the intracellular ANG II in diabetic cardiomyopathy, we induced diabetes using streptozotocin in AT1a receptor deficient (AT1a-KO) mice to exclude any effects of extracellular ANG II. Further, diabetic animals were treated with a renin inhibitor aliskiren, an ACE inhibitor benazeprilat, and an AT1 receptor blocker valsartan. Results AT1a-KO mice developed significant diastolic and systolic dysfunction following 10 wks of diabetes, as determined by echocardiography. All three drugs prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction in these animals, without affecting blood pressure or glucose levels. A significant down regulation of components of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) was observed in diabetic animals, which was largely prevented by benazeprilat and valsartan, while aliskiren normalized kininogen expression. Conclusions These data indicated that the AT1a receptor, thus extracellular ANG II, are not required for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The KKS might contribute to the beneficial effects of benazeprilat and valsartan in diabetic cardiomyopathy. A role of intracellular ANG II is suggested by the inhibitory effects of aliskiren, which needs confirmation in future studies. PMID:24215514

  5. Inflammatory markers in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and the protective role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    ROŞIANU, ŞTEFAN HORIA; ROŞIANU, ADELA-NICOLETA; ALDICA, MIHAI; CĂPÂLNEANU, RADU; BUZOIANU, ANCA DANA

    2013-01-01

    Background Experimental and clinical studies have shown the importance of inflammation in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF). The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AF in correlation with the inflammatory process. RAAS inhibition may have important therapeutic value in limiting AF. The aim of this study was the correlation between inflammatory markers and recurrent episodes of AF in patients with known paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, with and without treatment with RAAS inhibitors. Methods and results We studied 82 patients with paroxysmal AF recorded at “Niculae Stancioiu” Heart Institute Cluj-Napoca, divided into two groups: group A treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and group B without this medication. All patients underwent clinical examination, ECG, echocardiography and determination of plasma levels of inflammatory markers represented by high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). In the group treated with ACE inhibitors/ARBs, AF burden was significantly lower than in patients without treatment. We obtained a strong positive correlation between blood levels of high-sensitivity CRP and those of IL-6 (r=0.64, p<0.001), the number of yearly AF episodes (r=0.570, p<0.001), LA diameter (r=0.5, p<0.001) and LA volume (r=0.5, p<0.001). We found moderate positive correlations between blood levels of IL-6 and LA diameter (r=0.305, p=0.01), LA volume (r=0.314, p=0.01), the number of yearly AF episodes (r=0.489, p<0.001), the total number of AF episodes (r=0.304, p<0.001), BMI (r=0.473, p<0.001), LA area (r=0.458, p<0.001), LA area index (r=0.334, p=0.007) and LA volume index (r=0.304, p=0.01). The number of yearly AF episodes and BMI values influenced IL-6 blood levels (t=3.46, p=0.001, respectively t=2.17, p=0.03). Conclusions Inflammation is present in patients with AF, with or without treatment with

  6. Inequity of access to ACE inhibitors in Swedish heart failure patients: a register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Bertil; Hanning, Marianne; Westerling, Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    Background Several international studies suggest inequity in access to evidence-based heart failure (HF) care. Specifically, studies of ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) point to reduced ACEI access related to female sex, old age and socioeconomic position. Thus far, most studies have either been rather small, lacking diagnostic data, or lacking the possibility to account for several individual-based sociodemographic factors. Our aim was to investigate differences, which could reflect inequity in access to ACEIs based on sex, age, socioeconomic status or immigration status in Swedish patients with HF. Methods Individually linked register data for all Swedish adults hospitalised for HF in 2005–2010 (n=93 258) were analysed by multivariate regression models to assess the independent risk of female sex, high age, low employment status, low income level, low educational level or foreign country of birth, associated with lack of an ACEI dispensation within 1 year of hospitalisation. Adjustment for possible confounding was made for age, comorbidity, Angiotensin receptor blocker therapy, period and follow-up time. Results Analysis revealed an adjusted OR for no ACEI dispensation for women of 1.31 (95% CI 1.27 to 1.35); for the oldest patients of 2.71 (95% CI 2.53 to 2.91); and for unemployed patients of 1.59 (95% CI 1.46 to 1.73). Conclusions Access to ACEI treatment was reduced in women, older patients and unemployed patients. We conclude that access to ACEIs is inequitable among Swedish patients with HF. Future studies should include clinical data, as well as mortality outcomes in different groups. PMID:26261264

  7. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:138-139.

  8. Is angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers therapy protective against prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yeqing; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xiao; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may act as a molecular and therapeutic target for treating site-specific cancers, including prostate cancer. However, previous observational studies regarding the association between RAS inhibitors and prostate cancer risk have reported inconsistent results. We examined this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 20,267 patients from nine cohort studies were enrolled. Compared with non-users of RAS inhibitors, individuals using RAS inhibitors had a reduced risk of prostate cancer (RR 0.92, 95 % CI 0.87-0.98), without statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (P = 0.118 for heterogeneity, I2 = 37.6 %). In addition, when subgroup analyses by study quality and number of cases, more statistically significant associations were observed in studies of high quality (RR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.88-0.97) and large sample size (RR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.91-0.98). There was no evidence of significant publication bias with Begg's test (P = 0.602) or with Egger's test (P = 0.350). Overall, this study indicates that use of RAS inhibitors may be associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer. Large-scale well designed studies are needed to further explore this association. PMID:26760503

  9. ACE inhibition reduces infarction in normotensive but not hypertensive rats: correlation with cortical ACE activity

    PubMed Central

    Porritt, Michelle J; Chen, Michelle; Rewell, Sarah S J; Dean, Rachael G; Burrell, Louise M; Howells, David W

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition can reduce stroke risk by up to 43% in humans and reduce the associated disability, and hence understanding the mechanism of improvement is important. In animals and humans, these effects may be independent of the blood pressure-lowering effects of ACE inhibition. Normotensive (Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)) and hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)) animals were treated with the ACE inhibitors ramipril or lisinopril for 7 or 42 days before 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Blood pressure, serum ACE, and blood glucose levels were measured and stroke infarct volume was recorded 24 hours after stroke. Despite greater reductions in blood pressure, infarct size was not improved by ACE inhibition in hypertensive animals. Short-term ACE inhibition produced only a modest reduction in blood pressure, but WKY rats showed marked reductions in infarct volume. Long-term ACE inhibition had additional reductions in blood pressure; however, infarct volumes in WKY rats did not improve further but worsened. WKY rats differed from SHR in having marked cortical ACE activity that was highly sensitive to ACE inhibition. The beneficial effects of ACE inhibition on infarct volume in normotensive rats do not correlate with changes in blood pressure. However, WKY rats have ACE inhibitor-sensitive cortical ACE activity that is lacking in the SHR. PMID:20407464

  10. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and angiotensin converting enzyme polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Shakarami, Fatemeh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Zare Karizi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) defined by two or more failed pregnancies before 20 weeks of gestation. Several factors play a role in RPL including thrombophilic conditions which can be influenced by gene polymorphisms. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genes are closely related to fibrinolytic process, embryonic development and pregnancy success. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between RPL and common polymorphisms in ACE and PAI-1 genes. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 100 women with recurrent abortions (at least two) were selected as cases and 100 healthy women with two or more normal term deliveries without a history of abortion as controls. Total genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The status of the PAI-1 4G/5G and ACE (D/I) polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP. Results: Homozygosity for PAI-1 4G polymorphism was seen in 17 cases (17%), and 5 controls (5%) (p=0.006) so patients with homozygote 4G mutation were significantly more prone to RPL in contrast to control group (OR: 4.63, % 95 CI: 1.55-13.84). In addition, 7 patients (7 %), and no one from the control group, were homozygote (I/I) for ACE polymorphism (p=0.034), suggesting no significant associations between ACE D allele or DD genotype and RPL. Conclusion: Considering these results, because 4G/4G polymorphism for PAI-1 gene could be a thrombophilic variant leading to abortion, analysis of this mutation and other susceptibility factors are recommended in patients with RPL. PMID:26644791

  11. The path to an angiotensin receptor antagonist-neprilysin inhibitor in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2015-03-17

    The PARADIGM-HF (Prospective comparison of ARNi with ACEi to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure) trial demonstrated that a new angiotensin receptor antagonist-neprilysin inhibitor was superior to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in reducing mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. This paper traces the research path that culminated in the development of this drug. The first phase, elucidation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, began with Tigerstedt's discovery of renin, followed by isolation of angiotensin, isolation of angiotensin-converting enzyme, and synthesis of its inhibitors and of angiotensin receptor blockers. Phase 2 began with de Bold's discovery of atrial natriuretic peptide, followed by isolation of the enzyme that degrades it (neprilysin) and its inhibitors. Phase 3 consists of blocking both the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide-degrading systems simultaneously. A molecular complex, LCZ696, developed by scientists at Novartis, combines an angiotensin receptor blocker with a neprilysin inhibitor, is well tolerated, and represents an important step in the management of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. PMID:25766951

  12. Pharmacology of a phosphorus-containing novel angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, SQ 29 852 in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohara, N; Yokota, S; Konishi, C; Shukunobe, K; Ono, H

    1991-12-01

    The effects of (S)-1[6-amino-2[[hydrozy(4- phenylbutyl)phosphinyl]oxy]-1-oxohexyl]-L-proline (SQ 29 852), a phosphorus-containing novel angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), which is synthesized aiming an ACEI with long-lasting activity and with few side effects, were studied using anesthetized dogs. SQ 29 852 was equipotent with captopril to modify blood pressure response of the animals to angiotensin I (Ang I) and bradykinin (Bdk). An intravenous infusion of SQ 29 852 at 0.1 mg/kg/min for 30 min caused a remarkable hypotension without reflex tachycardia in open-chest dogs. In these animals cardiac contractility (dP/dtmax of left ventricular pressure) appeared to be reduced by SQ 29 852 without any changes in right atrial pressure (RAP), left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and aortic blood flow (AoF, cardiac output). In sodium-restricted dogs, the hypotension and renal vasodilation by SQ 29 852 (at 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/kg, i.v.) were slightly pronounced compared with animals fed with normal diet. It is demonstrated from these results that SQ 29 852 has comparable potency with captopril to inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity and as common a pharmacological profile as ACEI. SQ 29 852 may be a favorable antihypertensive agent, if its long-lasting activity and few side effects are confirmed. PMID:1812274

  13. Exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias in congestive heart failure and role of ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hasija, P K; Karloopia, S D; Shahi, B N; Chauhan, S S

    1998-02-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are considered to be related to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. ACE inhibitors though improve LV function their beneficial role on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias is not established. To study the effects of ACE inhibitors on exercise capacity vis-a-vis their role on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias, 25 patients of congestive heart failure (CHF) of various etiologies in NYHA Class II and III were subjected to a prospective randomised controlled trial. The control group comprising of 12 patients received conventional treatment (digitalis and diuretics) and the test group was given enalapril/captopril in addition as tolerated. They were followed up for 3 months. Exercise testing on treadmill and monitoring of clinical and biochemical parameters were done at the beginning and end of study in all cases. Ventricular arrhythmias observed during exercise and post-exercise for 10 minutes was analysed using Lown's grading for frequency and severity of ventricular arrhythmia. The mean exercise duration showed significant improvement on ACE inhibitor as compared to the control group (p < 0.05) however there was no significant change in the grades of arrhythmia. Serum electrolytes and other bio-chemical parameter were within normal range. It is concluded that effect of ACE inhibitor on improving functional capacity in CHF is independent of it's any effect on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:11273109

  14. Angiotensin-Receptor Blocker, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, and Risks of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have protective effects against atrial fibrillation (AF). The differences between ARB and ACEI in their effects on the primary prevention of AF remain unclear. This study compared ARB and ACEI in combined antihypertensive medications for reducing the risk of AF in patients with hypertension, and determined which was better for AF prevention in a nationwide cohort study. Patients aged ≥55 years and with a history of hypertension were identified from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Medical records of 25,075 patients were obtained, and included 6205 who used ARB, 8034 who used ACEI, and 10,836 nonusers (no ARB or ACEI) in their antihypertensive regimen. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for new-onset AF. During an average of 7.7 years’ follow-up, 1619 patients developed new-onset AF. Both ARB (adjusted HR: 0.51, 95% CI 0.44–0.58, P < 0.001) and ACEI (adjusted HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.47–0.59, P < 0.001) reduced the risk of AF compared to nonusers. Subgroup analysis showed that ARB and ACEI were equally effective in preventing new-onset AF regardless of age, gender, the presence of heart failure, diabetes, and vascular disease, except for those with prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). ARB prevents new-onset AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of stroke or TIA (log-rank P = 0.012). Both ARB and ACEI reduce new-onset AF in patients with hypertension. ARB prevents AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of prior stroke or TIA. PMID:27196491

  15. Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor and Statin Medication Use and Incident Mobility Limitation in Community Older Adults. The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Shelly L.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Newman, Anne B.; Studenski, Stephanie A.; Shorr, Ronald I; Bauer, Douglas C.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Hanlon, Joseph T

    2012-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and statin medications have been proposed as potential agents to prevent or delay physical disability; yet limited research has evaluated whether such use in older community dwelling adults is associated with a lower risk of incident mobility limitation. Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Participants 3055 participants who were well functioning at baseline (e.g., no mobility limitations). Measurements Summated standardized daily doses (low, medium and high) and duration of ACE inhibitor and statin use was computed. Mobility limitation (two consecutive self-reports of having any difficulty walking 1/4 mile or climbing 10 steps without resting) was assessed every 6 months after baseline. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses were conducted adjusting for demographics, health status, and health behaviors. Results At baseline, ACE inhibitors and statins were used by 15.2% and 12.9%, respectively and both increased to over 25% by year 6. Over 6.5 years of follow-up, 49.8% had developed mobility limitation. In separate multivariable models, neither ACE inhibitor (multivariate hazard ratio [HR] 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82–1.09) nor statin use (multivariate HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.87–1.17) was associated with a lower risk for mobility limitation. Similar findings were seen in analyses examining dose- and duration-response relationships and sensitivity analyses restricted to those with hypertension. Conclusions These findings indicate that ACE inhibitors and statins widely prescribed to treat hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, respectively do not lower risk of mobility limitation, an important life quality indicator. PMID:22092102

  16. Reduction of microalbuminuria in type-2 diabetes mellitus with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor alone and with cilnidipine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, V. K.; Mishra, A.; Gupta, K. K.; Misra, R.; Patel, M. L.; Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the antiproteinuric effect of enalapril angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor) alone or in combination with cilnidipine in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. The study was conducted on 71 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus patients with hypertension and microalbuminuria. They were divided into two groups randomly as follows: Group I (enalaprilalone, n = 36) and Group II (enalapril with cilnidipine, n = 35). In both the groups, baseline 24 h urinary albumin was estimated and was repeated every 3 months upto 1-year. After 1-year follow-up, reduction in microalbuminuria was found to be greater in Group II. In Group I microalbuminuria came down by 25.68 ± 21.40 while in Group II it reduced by 54.88 ± 13.84 (P < 0.001). We conclude that in diabetic population, cilnidipine has an additive effect in microalbuminuria reduction over and above the well-proven effect of ACE inhibitors. PMID:26664207

  17. Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) by flavonoids isolated from Ailanthus excelsa (Roxb) (Simaroubaceae).

    PubMed

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Said, Ataa; Tundis, Rosa; Rashed, Khaled; Statti, Giancarlo Antonio; Hufner, Antje; Menichini, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    In our screening program for antihypertensive properties of plants, the leaves of Ailanthus excelsa (Roxb), a plant used in Egyptian traditional medicine, were analysed. Chromatographic separation of A. excelsa MeOH extract yielded six flavonoids for the first time from this species, namely apigenin, luteolin, kaempferol-3-O-alpha-arabinopyranoside, kaempferol-3-O-beta-galactopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-alpha-arabinopyranoside and luteolin-7-O-beta-glucopyranoside. The in vitro hypotensive activities of the MeOH extract and the isolated compounds were elucidated. All the flavonoids tested exhibited ACE inhibitory activity, in particular the most active compound was kaempferol-3-O-beta-galactopyranoside with an IC(50) value of 260 microm. PMID:17072829

  18. Inhibition of tissue angiotensin converting enzyme. Quantitation by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, K.; Chai, S.Y.; Jackson, B.; Johnston, C.I.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1988-03-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in serum and tissues of rats was studied after administration of lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor. Tissue ACE was assessed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography using the ACE inhibitor (/sup 125/I)351A, as a ligand, and serum ACE was measured by a fluorimetric method. Following oral administration of lisinopril (10 mg/kg), serum ACE activity was acutely reduced but recovered gradually over 24 hours. Four hours after lisinopril administration, ACE activity was markedly inhibited in kidney (11% of control level), adrenal (8%), duodenum (8%), and lung (33%; p less than 0.05). In contrast, ACE in testis was little altered by lisinopril (96%). In brain, ACE activity was markedly reduced 4 hours after lisinopril administration in the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ (16-22%) and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (7%; p less than 0.05). In other areas of the brain, including the choroid plexus and caudate putamen, ACE activity was unchanged. Twenty-four hours after administration, ACE activity in peripheral tissues and the circumventricular organs of the brain had only partially recovered toward control levels, as it was still below 50% of control activity levels. These results establish that lisinopril has differential effects on inhibiting ACE in different tissues and suggest that the prolonged tissue ACE inhibition after a single oral dose of lisinopril may reflect targets involved in the hypotensive action of ACE inhibitors.

  19. Sperm-specific expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is mediated by a 91-base-pair promoter containing a CRE-like element.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, T; Balogh, R; Overbeek, P; Bernstein, K E

    1993-01-01

    The gene encoding the testis isozyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme (testis ACE) is one example of the many genes expressed uniquely during spermatogenesis. This protein is expressed by developing germ cells late in their development and results from the activation of a sperm-specific promoter that is located within intron 12 of the gene encoding the somatic isozyme of ACE. In vitro transcription, DNase footprinting, gel shift assays, and transgenic mouse studies have been used to define the minimal testes ACE promoter and to characterize DNA-protein interactions mediating germ cell-specific expression. These studies show that proper cell- and stage-specific expression of testis ACE requires only a small portion of the immediate upstream sequence extending to -91. A critical motif within this core promoter is a cyclic AMP-responsive element sequence that interacts with a testis-specific transactivating factor. Since this putative cyclic AMP-responsive element has been conserved within the testis ACE promoters of different species and is found at the same site in other genes that are expressed specifically in the testis, it may provide a common mechanism for the recognition of sperm-specific promoters. Images PMID:8380220

  20. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;1) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  1. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;(1)) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  2. A Modern Understanding of the Traditional and Nontraditional Biological Functions of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Giani, Jorge F.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent peptidase responsible for converting angiotensin I into the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. However, ACE is a relatively nonspecific peptidase that is capable of cleaving a wide range of substrates. Because of this, ACE and its peptide substrates and products affect many physiologic processes, including blood pressure control, hematopoiesis, reproduction, renal development, renal function, and the immune response. The defining feature of ACE is that it is composed of two homologous and independently catalytic domains, the result of an ancient gene duplication, and ACE-like genes are widely distributed in nature. The two ACE catalytic domains contribute to the wide substrate diversity of ACE and, by extension, the physiologic impact of the enzyme. Several studies suggest that the two catalytic domains have different biologic functions. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure of ACE has elucidated some of the structural differences between the two ACE domains. This is important now that ACE domain-specific inhibitors have been synthesized and characterized. Once widely available, these reagents will undoubtedly be powerful tools for probing the physiologic actions of each ACE domain. In turn, this knowledge should allow clinicians to envision new therapies for diseases not currently treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:23257181

  3. Investigation of interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors in various buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Arayne, Muhammad Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Abbas, Hira Fatima

    2015-02-01

    This work describes a RP-HPLC method for the determination and interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors (captopril, enalapril and lisinopril) in various buffers. The separation and interaction of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors was achieved on a Purospher Star, C18 (5 μm, 250 × 4.6 mm) column. Mobile phase consisted of methanol: water (80:20, v/v, pH 3.3); however, for the separation of lisinopril, it was modified to methanol-water (40:60, v/v, pH 3.3) and pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. In all cases, UV detection was performed at 225 nm. Interactions were carried out in physiological pH i.e., pH 1 (simulated gastric juice), 4 (simulated full stomach), 7.4 (blood pH) and 9 (simulated GI), drug contents were analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Method was found linear in the concentration range of 1.0-50.0 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999. Precision (RSD%) was less than 2.0%, indicating good precision of the method and accuracy was 98.0-100.0%. Furthermore, cefpirome-ACE-inhibitors' complexes were also synthesized and results were elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, and 1H NMR. The interaction results show that these interactions are pH dependent and for the co-administration of cefpirome and ACE-inhibitors, a proper interval should be given.

  4. Application of quantitative NMR for purity determination of standard ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi; Yang, Xing; Shi, Yaqin

    2015-10-10

    This study investigated the accuracy of the quantitative NMR method for purity determination of ACE inhibitors reference standards and the discovery of two pairs of new diastereoisomers. Six types of ACE inhibitors, imidapril hydrochloride, benazepril hydrochloride, lisinopril, enalapril maleate, quinapril hydrochloride, and captopril were quantificated and validated for the qNMR method by discussing factors that affect parameters of the qNMR experiment, internal standards, integration, pH-effect, and uncertainty. The results were compared with data obtained by the mass balance method. The study found that maleic acid influenced the quantification of captopril in deuteroxide because of a chemical reaction. The mixtures of the reaction products were isolated by HPLC and structurally elucidated by NMR as two pairs of new diastereoisomers, 1-[(2S,4R)-thio-2-methylpropionyl-5-d-ethanedicarboxylicacid]-L-proline and 1-[(2S,4S)-thio-2-methylpropionyl-5-d-ethanedicarboxylicacid]-L-proline. The results showed that the accuracy and precision of quantitative (1)H NMR spectroscopy satisfied the requirements for quantitative analysis of chemical reference standards and provided a simple, rapid, and reliable method for purity determination of ACE inhibitors systematically. PMID:26070161

  5. Observation of high and low molecular weight inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Brecher, A S; Thevananther, S; Wilson, S

    1996-01-01

    Fractionation of the rat lung yielded a 54,000 g supernate, and DOC-solubilized 775 g, 3100 g and 54,000 g sediments, each of these preparations displaying an increasing angiotensin-converting enzyme activity with increasing dilution, suggesting the presence of freely reversible angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The solubilized 775 g sediment was applied to an immobilized captopril column, eluted successively with 20 mM Pi(K+), pH 7.8 buffer, buffer/0.5 M NaCl, and buffer/0.01M cysteine to obtain four major protein bands, two of which appeared with the cysteine eluant. The first two protein peaks were each pooled and subjected to ultrafiltration with 10,000 molecular weight cutoff filters. The pooled peaks, retentates and ultrafiltrates each inhibited the angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, suggesting the presence of large and small molecular weight reversible angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in association with the solubilized (membranous) particulate angiotensin-converting enzyme fraction. These results expand upon earlier observations on the existence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in mammalian serum by observing an increasing angiotensin-converting enzyme activity with increasing dilution. This activity was eluted in multiple peaks, including elution with the cysteine eluate, suggesting that the angiotensin-converting enzyme, as well as other proteins, may react covalently with the sulfhydryl functional group of the immobilized captopril in a transsulfhydration reaction cleaving the disulfide bonds in proteins. Subsequent elution with cysteine affects an additional transsulfhydration reaction, releasing the proteins from the column. It is further postulated that air oxidation of the proteins permits reformation of disulfide bonds, yielding some active angiotensin-converting enzyme. Having in mind the possibility of lipophilic angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors crossing the blood-brain barrier as a means of treatment of

  6. First-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Vardeny, O; Tacheny, T; Solomon, S D

    2013-10-01

    Neprilysin inhibitors augment the natriuretic peptide system by preventing the breakdown of atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide. LCZ696, an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor composed of a neprilysin inhibitor prodrug and the angiotensin receptor antagonist valsartan, has proven effective in hypertension, has shown promise in a pilot trial of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and is being tested in a large outcomes trial of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. A preserved ejection fraction outcomes trial is beginning. PMID:23872864

  7. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of sardinelle (Sardinella aurita) by-products protein hydrolysates obtained by treatment with microbial and visceral fish serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Bougatef, Ali; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima; Ravallec-Plé, Rozenn; Leroy, Yves; Guillochon, Didier; Barkia, Ahmed; Nasri, Moncef

    2008-11-15

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of protein hydrolysates prepared from heads and viscera of sardinelle (Sardinella aurita) by treatment with various proteases were investigated. Protein hydrolysates were obtained by treatment with Alcalase(®), chymotrypsin, crude enzyme preparations from Bacillus licheniformis NH1 and Aspergillus clavatus ES1, and crude enzyme extract from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) viscera. All hydrolysates exhibited inhibitory activity towards ACE. The alkaline protease extract from the viscera of sardine produced hydrolysate with the highest ACE inhibitory activity (63.2±1.5% at 2mg/ml). Further, the degrees of hydrolysis and the inhibitory activities of ACE increased with increasing proteolysis time. The protein hydrolysate generated with alkaline proteases from the viscera of sardine was then fractionated by size exclusion chromatography on a Sephadex G-25 into eight major fractions (P1-P8). Biological functions of all fractions were assayed, and P4 was found to display a high ACE inhibitory activity. The IC50 values for ACE inhibitory activities of sardinelle by-products protein hydrolysates and fraction P4 were 1.2±0.09 and 0.81±0.013mg/ml, respectively. Further, P4 showed resistance to in vitro digestion by gastrointestinal proteases. The amino acid analysis by GC/MS showed that P4 was rich in phenylalanine, arginine, glycine, leucine, methionine, histidine and tyrosine. The added-value of sardinelle by-products may be improved by enzymatic treatment with visceral serine proteases from sardine. PMID:26047434

  8. Purification and characterisation of a novel angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide derived from the enzymatic hydrolysate of Enteromorpha clathrata protein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Saikun; Wang, Shujun; Jing, Lingling; Yao, Dongrui

    2016-11-15

    Hydrolysates containing angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide were prepared from Enteromorpha clathrata protein using alcalase. The hydrolysates were fractionated into two molecular-weight ranges (below and above 10kDa) by ultrafiltration. The below-10kDa fraction showed higher ACE-inhibitory activity and was subsequently purified by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration chromatography. The structure of active peptide was identified as Pro-Ala-Phe-Gly by HPLC-Q-TOF-MS and its IC50 value was 35.9μM. The yield of this peptide from E. clathrata protein was 0.82%. Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the inhibitory kinetic mechanism of this peptide was non-competitive. Stability study revealed that the purified peptide showed resistance against gastrointestinal proteases. Thus, E. clathrata protein hydrolysate treated with alcalase is a beneficial ingredient of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals against hypertension and related diseases. PMID:27283651

  9. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven- and freeze-dried protein hydrolysate from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Elavarasan, K; Shamasundar, B A; Badii, Faraha; Howell, Nazlin

    2016-09-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven-dried (OD-FPH) and freeze-dried (FD-FPH) protein hydrolysates derived from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala) muscle, using papain, were investigated. Amino acid profiles indicated a higher proportion of hydrophobic residues in OD-FPH and hydrophilic residues in FD-FPH samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed random coil structure in OD-FPH and β-sheet in FD-FPH samples. The approximate molecular weight of peptides in OD-FPH and FD-FPH was in the range of 7030-339Da. The IC50 values for ACE inhibition by OD-FPH and FD-FPH samples were found to be 1.15 and 1.53mg of proteinml(-1), respectively. The ACE-inhibitory activity of OD-FPH was more stable (during sequential digestion, using pepsin and pancreatin) than that of FD-FPH sample. The study suggested that the ACE inhibitory activity of protein hydrolysate was not affected by oven-drying. PMID:27041318

  10. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  11. The effect of treatment with low dose ACE inhibitor and/or diuretic on coronary microvasculature in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Maurin, A; Guez, D; Schiavi, P

    2000-03-01

    Angiotensin II is considered to have angiogenic properties. Nevertheless, several authors reported an increase in coronary capillary density after treatment with ACE inhibitors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of treatment with low doses of ACE inhibitor perindopril, low doses of the diuretic indapamide, or a combination of the two on microvascular structure in hearts from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-sp). Young adult male SHR treated with indapamide (0.24 mg/kg/day), perindopril (0.76 mg/kg/day), or both were compared with untreated animals after 8 or 14 weeks of treatment. Survival of SHR-sp was significantly increased after treatment. Only perindopril alone or in combination with indapamide significantly decreased blood pressure and cardiac mass. Treatment also significantly increased capillary and myocyte densities but arteriolar density tended to decrease. External and internal diameters significantly increased in treated animals while arteriolar thickness remained the same. Thus, thickness in vessels of the same size was the greatest in untreated animals, followed by indapamide- and perindopril-treated rats with the thinnest walls in rats with combined treatment, and the treatment resulted in a significant increase in the lumen to wall ratio. Capillary and arteriolar growth responses in treated animals seem to indicate that the two are independently regulated processes. Treatment with indapamide alone at this dosage did not significantly influence most responses but in combination with perindopril it strengthened the effect of perindopril. PMID:10684730

  12. The Evaluation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase (DPP)-IV, α-Glucosidase and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activities of Whey Proteins Hydrolyzed with Serine Protease Isolated from Asian Pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia).

    PubMed

    Konrad, Babij; Anna, Dąbrowska; Marek, Szołtysik; Marta, Pokora; Aleksandra, Zambrowicz; Józefa, Chrzanowska

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, whey protein concentrate (WPC-80) and β-lactoglobulin were hydrolyzed with a noncommercial serine protease isolated from Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia). Hydrolysates were further fractionated by ultrafiltration using membranes with cut-offs equal 3 and 10 kDa. Peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 and 3-10 kDa were further subjected to the RP-HPLC. Separated preparations were investigated for their potential as the natural inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-IV), α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). WPC-80 hydrolysate showed higher inhibitory activities against the three tested enzymes than β-lactoglobulin hydrolysate. Especially high biological activities were exhibited by peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 kDa, with ACE IC50 <0.64 mg/mL and DPP-IV IC50 <0.55 mg/mL. This study suggests that peptides generated from whey proteins may support postprandial glycemia regulation and blood pressure maintenance, and could be used as functional food ingredients in the diet of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25364320

  13. Aliskiren – an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in the therapy of arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Karolina; Bryl, Wiesław; Minczykowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There has been enormous progress in antihypertensive therapy over the last few decades. However, the management of arterial hypertension is still insufficient and more efforts are needed to improve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of this widely prevalent disease. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition is crucial both for blood pressure (BP) control and for prevention of organ damage or its development in patients with hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or sartans block RAAS incompletely. Aliskiren is one of the novel drugs that has been introduced to antihypertensive therapy recently. Up to now no trial has confirmed that aliskiren is efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events. Double RAAS blockade with aliskiren was not always safe. This review article presents the current view on the place of aliskiren in the therapy of arterial hypertension. PMID:25276171

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in women of childbearing age: risks versus benefits.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Mark; Sarween, Nadia; Knox, Ellen; Lipkin, Graham; Martin, Una

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are effective and widely used antihypertensive drugs. Exposure to these agents is known to be harmful to the fetus in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Concerns have also been raised about the risk of congenital malformations if ACEIs or ARBs are taken during the first trimester of pregnancy. The evidence to date, however, is conflicting and observed malformations may be due to confounders such as undiagnosed diabetes or maternal obesity, other antihypertensive medications or the hypertension itself. Nonetheless, in women who become pregnant while taking an ACEI or ARB, the drug should be stopped as soon as possible. In women with chronic kidney disease and proteinuria, it may be appropriate to continue taking an ACEI or ARB until the pregnancy is confirmed because of the significant benefit to their kidney function and the lower fertility rate in these patients. PMID:25612630

  15. Aliskiren - an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in the therapy of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Hoffmann, Karolina; Bryl, Wiesław; Minczykowski, Andrzej

    2014-08-29

    There has been enormous progress in antihypertensive therapy over the last few decades. However, the management of arterial hypertension is still insufficient and more efforts are needed to improve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of this widely prevalent disease. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition is crucial both for blood pressure (BP) control and for prevention of organ damage or its development in patients with hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or sartans block RAAS incompletely. Aliskiren is one of the novel drugs that has been introduced to antihypertensive therapy recently. Up to now no trial has confirmed that aliskiren is efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events. Double RAAS blockade with aliskiren was not always safe. This review article presents the current view on the place of aliskiren in the therapy of arterial hypertension. PMID:25276171

  16. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question. PMID:27246933

  17. Endopeptidase 3.4.24.11 converts N-1-(R,S)carboxy-3-phenylpropyl-Ala-Ala-Phe-p-carboxyanilide into a potent inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C H; Yamamoto, T; Walsh, D M; Allsop, D

    1993-01-01

    It was reported recently that N-1-(R,S)carboxy-3-phenylpropyl-Ala-Ala-Phe-p-carboxyanilide (CPP-A-A-F-pAB), an inhibitor of endopeptidase 3.4.24.15 (E-24.15), also inhibits angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) from rabbit lung. We have found that this compound is without effect on ACE purified from pig kidney, at a concentration some 1000-fold greater than the Ki reported for inhibition of the enzyme from lung. However, preincubation of CPP-A-A-F-pAB with neutral endopeptidase 3.4.24.11 (E-24.11) does result in potent inhibitory effects on ACE. We have shown this to be due to formation of a fragment, CPP-A-A, the structure of which is closely related to ACE inhibitors such as enalaprilat. CPP-A-A was found to be a potent inhibitor of pig ACE. Under the conditions used it had an IC50 value of 1.6 x 10(-8) M, compared with the value obtained for captopril of 7.5 x 10(-10) M. These results have important implications for studies of E-24.15 when using CPP-A-A-F-pAB in vivo or in crude tissue extracts where E-24.11 might also be present. PMID:8379924

  18. Icatibant in the Treatment of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Neil H.; Patel, Jaimin; Diwakar, Lavanya; Smith, Fang Gao

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who presented with massive tongue and lip swelling secondary to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema. An awake fibre-optic intubation was performed because of impending airway obstruction. As there was no improvement in symptoms after 72 hours, the selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant (Firazyr) was administered and the patient's trachea was successfully extubated 36 hours later. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of icatibant being used for the treatment of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema in the United Kingdom and represents a novel therapeutic option in its management. PMID:25328718

  19. Characterization of angiotensin I-converting enzyme from anterior gills of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus.

    PubMed

    Bersanetti, Patrícia A; Nogueira, Regina F; Marcondes, Marcelo F; Paiva, Paulo B; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Carmona, Adriana K; Zanotto, Flavia P

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is a well-known metallopeptidase that is found in vertebrates, invertebrates and bacteria. We isolated from the anterior gill of the crab Ucides cordatus an isoform of ACE, here named crab-ACE, which presented catalytic properties closely resembling to those of mammalian ACE. The enzyme was purified on Sepharose-lisinopril affinity chromatography to apparent homogeneity and a band of about 72 kDa could be visualized after silver staining and Western blotting. Assays performed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) selective ACE substrates Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH, Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH and Abz-LFK(Dnp)-OH, allowed us to verify that crab-ACE has hydrolytic profile very similar to that of the ACE C-domain. In addition, we observed that crab-ACE can hydrolyze the ACE substrates, angiotensin I and bradykinin. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by the specific ACE inhibitor lisinopril (Ki of 1.26 nM). However, in contrast to other ACE isoforms, crab-ACE presented a very particular optimum pH, being the substrate Abz-FRK(Dnp)-P-OH hydrolyzed efficiently at pH 9.5. Other interesting characteristic of crab-ACE was that the maximum hydrolytic activity was reached at around 45°C. The description of an ACE isoform in Ucides cordatus is challenging and may contribute to a better understanding of the biochemical function of this enzyme in invertebrates. PMID:25544039

  20. Diagnostic use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in radioisotope evaluation of unilateral renal artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer Hovinga, T.K.; de Jong, P.E.; Piers, D.A.; Beekhuis, H.; van der Hem, G.K.; de Zeeuw, D.

    1989-05-01

    Iodine-123 hippurate renography, (/sup 99m/Tc)diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) renography, and (/sup 99m/Tc)dimercapto succinic acid (DMSA) renal scintigraphy were performed before and during angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition in a group of 15 hypertensive patients with angiographically ''significant'' unilateral renal artery stenosis. Visual and quantitative evaluation of the three radioisotope methods before ACE inhibition already disclosed abnormalities suggestive of renal artery stenosis in a high percentage (87%, 60%, and 60%, respectively) in this group of patients, but ACE inhibition further improved the diagnostic yield in all three methods (93%, 86%, and 80%). Iodine-123 hippurate renography was at least as useful as (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA renography in this respect, while (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA scintigraphy can be used particularly in segmental stenosis. Despite a large drop in blood pressure after ACE inhibition little adverse reactions were seen and overall renal function was fairly well maintained, the exceptions noted in patients with initially a more impaired renal function.

  1. Cognitive enhancing effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Nade, V. S.; Kawale, L. A.; Valte, K. D.; Shendye, N. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate cognitive enhancing property of angiotensin-converting enzymes inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in rats. Materials and Methods: The elevated plus maze (EPM), passive avoidance test (PAT), and water maze test (WMT) were used to assess cognitive enhancing activity in young and aged rats. Ramipril (10 mg/kg, p.o.), perindopril (10 mg/kg, i.p), losartan (20 mg/kg, i.p), and valsartan (20 mg/kg, p.o) were administered to assess their effect on learning and memory. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p) was used to impair cognitive function. Piracetam (200 mg/kg, i.p) was used as reference drug. Results: All the treatments significantly attenuated amnesia induced by aging and scopolamine. In EPM, aged and scopolamine-treated rats showed an increase in transfer latency (TL) whereas, ACEI and ARBs showed a significant decrease in TL. Treatment with ACEI and ARBs significantly increased step down latencies and decreased latency to reach the platform in target quadrant in young, aged and scopolamine-treated animals in PAT and WMT, respectively. The treatments inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme in the brain. Similarly, all the treatments attenuated scopolamine-induced lipid peroxidation and normalize antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion: The results suggest that the cognitive enhancing effect of ACEI and ARBs may be due to inhibition of AChE or by regulation of antioxidant system or increase in formation of angiotensin IV. PMID:26069362

  2. T-lymphocyte induction of human monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is not dependent upon T-lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk-Pavlovic, Z.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in serum free media for seven days show a basal activity of the ectoenzyme ACE which is augmented 2-3 times by the presence of autologous peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Since these two cell types are also involved in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction if serum is present, the authors compared the ability of T-cells to stimulate ACE activity in the presence or absence of proliferation (measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). By the seventh day, cultures with 5% AB/sup +/ serum showed significant increase in proliferation but no increase in ACE activity compared to the serum free cultures. Even higher proliferation rate achieved by co-culturing T-lymphocytes with allogeneic monocytes did not increase ACE production; on the contrary, ACE activity remained at the basal level. Monocyte-T-cell co-cultures stimulated with increasing concentrations of ConA or PHA showed dose dependent increases in proliferation but parallel decreases in ACE activity. Addition of soluble antigen (Candida albicans) also enhanced proliferation but not ACE synthesis. They conclude that T-lymphocyte induction of monocyte ACE is a result of cooperation between autologous cells which is not dependent upon T-cell proliferation.

  3. Diagnostic use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibited renal scintigraphy in the identification of selective renal artery stenosis in the presence of multiple renal arteries: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, K.A.; Rose, S.C.; Haakenstad, A.O.; Handy, J.E.; Scuderi, A.J.; Datz, F.L. )

    1990-11-01

    In patients with renovascular hypertension, it is unknown whether the angiotensin converting enzyme-(ACE) inhibited renal scan will identify stenosis of a segmental branch of a single renal artery or of an accessory artery where multiple renal arteries are present. Since multiple renal arteries may be present in approximately 25% of all individuals, it will be important to establish whether the ACE-inhibited renal scan is useful in this population. We report a case of stenosis involving a renal artery in a patient with multiple renal arteries, successfully identified by ACE-inhibited renal scintigraphy.

  4. ACE inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Cardiology; American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the science: promoting self-care in persons with heart failure: ...

  5. ACE inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... your dose helps. But sometimes your doctor will switch you to a different medication. Do not lower ... American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Circulation . 2013 Oct 15; ...

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Assessment of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Milk by Lactobacillus casei Strains.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhijie; Chi, Yujie

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of fermented soybean milk (FSM) by Lactobacillus casei strains in vitro was investigated in this study. Effects of fermented soybean milk administration by gavage on systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure was also evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) rats and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Results showed that, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM showed high ACE inhibitory activity in vitro test and ACE inhibitory activity of CICC 23184 FSM was higher than CICC 20280 FSM. The bioactive substances of FSM were peptide and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Their contents in CICC 20280 FSM and CICC 23184 FSM were 3.97 ± 0.67 mg/ml (peptide), 1.71 ± 0.36 mg/ml (GABA) and 5.17 ± 0.22 mg/ml (peptide), 1.57 ± 0.21 mg/ml (GABA), respectively. Moreover, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM administration by gavage could effectively lower the blood pressure of SHR to a normal level, while there was no effect on blood pressure of WKY rats. This result indicated that the bioactive substances could play an antihypertensive role when the blood pressure was not within the normal levels (high levels). PMID:27139252

  7. A novel angiotensin-І converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide from gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate of silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein: Biochemical characterization and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiongying; Jia, Junqiang; Yan, Hui; Du, Jinjuan; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2015-06-01

    Silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein was hydrolyzed using gastrointestinal endopeptidases (pepsin, trypsin and α-chymotrypsin). Then, the hydrolysate was purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. A novel ACE inhibitory peptide, Ala-Ser-Leu, with the IC50 value of 102.15μM, was identified by IT-MS/MS. This is the first report of Ala-Ser-Leu from natural protein. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that the peptide is a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The molecular docking studies revealed that the ACE inhibition of Ala-Ser-Leu is mainly attributed to forming very strong hydrogen bonds with the S1 pocket (Ala354) and the S2 pocket (Gln281 and His353). The results indicate that silkworm pupa (B. mori) protein or its gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate could be used as a functional ingredient in auxiliary therapeutic foods against hypertension. PMID:25111373

  8. An International, Web-Based, Prospective Cohort Study to Determine Whether the Use of ACE Inhibitors prior to the Onset of Scleroderma Renal Crisis Is Associated with Worse Outcomes—Methodology and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Marie; Baron, Murray; Lo, Ernest; Weinfeld, Joanna; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh

    2010-01-01

    Background. To describe the methodology of a study designed to determine whether systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with incident scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors prior to the onset of SRC have worse outcomes. Methods. Prospective, international cohort study of SRC subjects identified through an ongoing web-based survey. Every second Friday afternoon, an e-mail was sent to 589 participating physicians to identify new cases of SRC. Death or dialysis at one year after the onset of SRC will be compared in patients exposed or not to ACE inhibitors prior to the onset of SRC. Results. Fifteen months after the start of the survey, we had identified 76 incident cases of SRC. Of these, 66 (87%) had a hypertensive SRC and 10 (13%) a normotensive SRC. Twenty-two percent (22%) of the patients were on an ACE inhibitor immediately prior to the onset of the SRC. To date, we have collected one-year follow-up data on approximately 1/3 of the cohort. Of these, over 50% have died or remain on dialysis at one year. Conclusion. An international, web-based cohort study design is a feasible method of recruiting a substantial number of patients to study an infrequent vascular manifestation of SSc. PMID:20936135

  9. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor derived from cross-linked oyster protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, Cheng-Liang; Kim, Jin-Soo; Ha, Jong-Myung; Choung, Se-Young; Choi, Yeung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Following cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase, modified oyster proteins were hydrolyzed to improve inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity with the use of a single protease, or a combination of six proteases. The oyster hydrolysate with the lowest 50% ACE inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.40 mg/mL was obtained by two-step hydrolysis of the cross-linked oyster protein using Protamex and Neutrase. Five ACE inhibitory peptides were purified from the oyster hydrolysate using a multistep chromatographic procedure comprised of ion-exchange, size exclusion, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Their sequences were identified as TAY, VK, KY, FYN, and YA, using automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. These peptides were synthesized, and their IC50 values were measured to be 16.7, 29.0, 51.5, 68.2, and 93.9 μM, respectively. Toxicity of the peptides on the HepG2 cell line was not detected. The oyster hydrolysate also significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The antihypertensive effect of the oyster hydrolysate on SHR was rapid and long-lasting, compared to commercially obtained sardine hydrolysate. These results suggest that the oyster hydrolysate could be a source of effective nutraceuticals against hypertension. PMID:25140307

  10. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Derived from Cross-Linked Oyster Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cheng-Liang; Kim, Jin-Soo; Ha, Jong-Myung; Choung, Se-Young

    2014-01-01

    Following cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase, modified oyster proteins were hydrolyzed to improve inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity with the use of a single protease, or a combination of six proteases. The oyster hydrolysate with the lowest 50% ACE inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.40 mg/mL was obtained by two-step hydrolysis of the cross-linked oyster protein using Protamex and Neutrase. Five ACE inhibitory peptides were purified from the oyster hydrolysate using a multistep chromatographic procedure comprised of ion-exchange, size exclusion, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Their sequences were identified as TAY, VK, KY, FYN, and YA, using automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. These peptides were synthesized, and their IC50 values were measured to be 16.7, 29.0, 51.5, 68.2, and 93.9 μM, respectively. Toxicity of the peptides on the HepG2 cell line was not detected. The oyster hydrolysate also significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The antihypertensive effect of the oyster hydrolysate on SHR was rapid and long-lasting, compared to commercially obtained sardine hydrolysate. These results suggest that the oyster hydrolysate could be a source of effective nutraceuticals against hypertension. PMID:25140307

  11. Cardiovascular risk reduction in hypertension: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers. Where are we up to?

    PubMed

    Sindone, A; Erlich, J; Lee, C; Newman, H; Suranyi, M; Roger, S D

    2016-03-01

    Previously, management of hypertension has concentrated on lowering elevated blood pressure. However, the target has shifted to reducing absolute cardiovascular (CV) risk. It is estimated that two in three Australian adults have three or more CV risk factors at the same time. Moderate reductions in several risk factors can, therefore, be more effective than major reductions in one. When managing hypertension, therapy should be focused on medications with the strongest evidence for CV event reduction, substituting alternatives only when a primary choice is not appropriate. Hypertension management guidelines categorise angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) interchangeably as first-line treatments in uncomplicated hypertension. These medications have different mechanisms of action and quite different evidence bases. They are not interchangeable and their prescription should be based on clinical evidence. Despite this, currently ARB prescriptions are increasing at a higher rate than those for ACEI and other antihypertensive classes. Evidence that ACEI therapy prevents CV events and death, in patients with coronary artery disease or multiple CV risk factors, emerged from the European trial on reduction of cardiac events with perindopril in stable coronary artery disease (EUROPA) and Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) trials respectively. The consistent benefit has been demonstrated in meta-analyses. The clinical trial data for ARB are less consistent, particularly regarding CV outcomes and mortality benefit. The evidence supports the use of ACEI (Class 1a) compared with ARB despite current prescribing trends. PMID:26968600

  12. The Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Inflammatory Processes in Atherosclerosis: Evidence from Basic Research and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Pende, Aldo; Mach, François

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the renin-angiotensin system is a crucial player in atherosclerotic processes. The regulation of arterial blood pressure was considered from its first description of the main mechanism involved. Vasoconstriction (mediated by angiotensin II) and salt and water retention (mainly due to aldosterone) were classically considered as pivotal proatherosclerotic activities. However, basic research and animal studies strongly support angiotensin II as a proinflammatory mediator, which directly induces atherosclerotic plaque development and heart remodeling. Furthermore, angiotensin II induces proatherosclerotic cytokine and chemokine secretion and increases endothelial dysfunction. Accordingly, the pharmacological inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system improves prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease even in settings of normal baseline blood pressure. In the present review, we focused on angiotensin-convertingenzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), and renin inhibitors to update the direct activities of the renin-angiotensin system in inflammatory processes governing atherosclerosis. PMID:19390623

  13. Angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T, AGT T174M and Angiotensin-1-Converting Enzyme (ACE) I/D Gene Polymorphisms in Essential Hypertension: Effects on Ramipril Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Vana; Lagou, Evangelia; Mihas, Constantinos; Vasiliki, Giannakopoulou; Katsiki, Niki; Kollia, Aikaterini; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Degiannis, Dimitris; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension, one of the most important risk factors for premature cardiovascular disease, is a major worldwide public health problem. Angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensinogen (AGT) gene polymorphisms are thought to be associated with primary hypertension. In the present study, we examined the frequency of these gene polymorphisms in an adult population with and without essential hypertension. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE and AGT gene polymorphisms on ramipril treatment efficacy in the hypertensive patients. Methods: A total of 166 adults (83 hypertensives and 83 normotensives) were involved in the study and genotyped for AGTM235T (rs699), AGTT174M (rs4762) and ACEI/D (rs1799752) gene polymorphisms. Results: The genotype and allele distribution of the AGTM235T variant significantly differed between hypertensives and normotensives [odds ratio (OR) = 1.57% (T vs M allele), 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.01 - 2.44; p=0.045 for hypertensives]. However, none of the 3 studied Simple Nucleotide Polymorphisms were associated with the blood pressure-lowering response to ramipril. Conclusion: These results suggest that AGTM235T gene polymorphism is associated with essential hypertension. However, none of the AGTM235T, AGTT174M and ACEI/D gene polymorphisms influenced ramipril effectiveness. PMID:27006715

  14. Human gut endogenous proteins as a potential source of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides.

    PubMed

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Hayes, Maria; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that endogenous bioactive proteins and peptides play a substantial role in the body's first line of immunological defence, immune-regulation and normal body functioning. Further, the peptides derived from the luminal digestion of proteins are also important for body function. For example, within the peptide database BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/en/biopep) 12 endogenous antimicrobial and 64 angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory peptides derived from human milk and plasma proteins are listed. The antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) lists over 111 human host-defence peptides. Several endogenous proteins are secreted in the gut and are subject to the same gastrointestinal digestion processes as food proteins derived from the diet. The human gut endogenous proteins (GEP) include mucins, serum albumin, digestive enzymes, hormones, and proteins from sloughed off epithelial cells and gut microbiota, and numerous other secreted proteins. To date, much work has been carried out regarding the health altering effects of food-derived bioactive peptides but little attention has been paid to the possibility that GEP may also be a source of bioactive peptides. In this review, we discuss the potential of GEP to constitute a gut cryptome from which bioactive peptides such as ACE-I inhibitory, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides may be derived. PMID:26617077

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1–7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2−/y) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2−/y mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1–7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what’s more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1–7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1-7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2(-/y) mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1-7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what's more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1-7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  17. New approaches to hyperkalemia in patients with indications for renin angiotensin aldosterone inhibitors: Considerations for trial design and regulatory approval.

    PubMed

    Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Epstein, Murray; Alonso Garcia, Maria de Los Angeles; Bakris, George L; Butler, Javed; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Berman, Lance; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Rasmussen, Henrik S; Ruilope, Luis M; Stockbridge, Norman; Thompson, Aliza; Wittes, Janet; Pitt, Bertram

    2016-08-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical problem, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, or heart failure. Treatment with renin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitors exacerbates the risk of hyperkalemia in these patients. Concern about hyperkalemia can result in the failure to initiate, suboptimal dosing, or discontinuation of renin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitor therapy in patients; effective treatments for hyperkalemia might mitigate such undertreatment. New treatments for hyperkalemia in development may offer better efficacy, tolerability and safety profiles than do existing approved treatments. These compounds might enable more eligible patients to receive renin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitor therapy or to receive renin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitors at target doses. The evidence needed to support a treatment claim (reduction in serum potassium) differs from that needed to support a prevention claim (preventing hyperkalemia to allow renin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitor treatment). Thus, several issues related to clinical trial design and drug development need to be considered. This paper summarizes and expands upon a discussion at the Global Cardiovascular Clinical Trialists 2014 Forum and examines methodologic considerations for trials of new potassium binders for the prevention and management of hyperkalemia in patients with renin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitor indications. PMID:27140336

  18. Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of Different ACE Inhibitors in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: A PRISMA-Compliant Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, WeiPing; Zhang, HaiBin; Guo, JinCheng; Zhang, XueKun; Zhang, LiXin; Li, ChunLei; Zhang, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Heart failure is a public health problem and a great economic burden for patients and healthcare systems. Suppression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors remains the mainstay of treatment for heart failure. However, the abundance of ACE inhibitors makes it difficult for doctors to choose.We performed this network meta-analysis of ACEIs in patients with heart failure in order to address this area of uncertainty.We searched PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, and Medline.Any randomized controlled trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, ramipril, or trandolapril or combined interventions of 2 or more of these drugs.Two reviewers extracted the data and made the quality assessment. At first, we used Stata software (version 12.0, StataCorp, College Station, TX) to make traditional pairwise meta-analyses for studies that directly compared different interventions. Then, network meta-analysis was performed using WinBUGS (version 1.4.3, MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK).A total of 29 studies were included. Lisinopril was associated with a higher rate of all-cause mortality compared with placebo (odds ratio 65.9, 95% credible interval 1.91 to 239.6) or ramipril (14.65, 1.23 to 49.5). Enalapril significantly reduced systolic blood pressure when compared with placebo (standardized mean differences -0.6, 95% credible interval -1.03 to -0.18). Both captopril (odds ratio 76.2, 95% credible interval 1.56 to 149.3) and enalapril (274.4, 2.4 to 512.9) were associated with a higher incidence of cough compared to placebo.Some important outcomes such as rehospitalization and cardiac death were not included. The sample size and the number of studies were limited, especially for ramipril.Our results suggest that enalapril might be the best option when considering factors such as increased ejection fraction, stroke volume, and decreased mean arterial pressure. However, enalapril was associated with the

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion, not bradykinin B2 receptor -58T/C gene polymorphism, associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-related cough in Chinese female patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y J; Tsai, J C

    2001-11-01

    To investigate the genetic susceptibility associated with cough related to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, 189 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with proteinuria or hypertension treated with perindopril were studied. Cough was considered to be present if the patients had been bothered by a cough during treatment and if they had had related symptoms for at least 2 weeks without an identifiable cause. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was used to detect polymorphisms of ACE and bradykinin B2-receptor genes. After 8 weeks of treatment, 49.2% (93 of 189) of our NIDDM patients were found to be suffering from ACEI-related cough. ACEI-related cough was mainly associated with female patients, with 71.7% (76 of 106) of female and only 20.5% (17 of 83) of male patients experiencing cough after ACEI treatment. There was a significant association of ACE II genotype with ACEI-related cough. The genotype frequencies were 58.2% for II, 47.8% for ID, and 16.7% for DD in patients with ACEI-associated cough and 41.8% for II, 52.2% for ID, and 83.3% for DD in subjects without ACEI-associated cough (chi(2) = 10.268; df = 2, P =.006). As female patients made up the majority of the subjects suffering from ACEI-related cough, we further analyzed the association of ACE I/D genotype with ACEI-related cough separately by sex. Male patients with ACEI-related cough were not associated with ACE I/D genotype distribution, while female patients were strongly associated with ACE I/D genotype polymorphism (chi(2) = 16.12; df = 2; P <.001). There was no association between the bradykinin B2 receptor gene -58T/C polymorphism with ACEI-related cough. In conclusion, our results indicate that Chinese diabetic female subjects are susceptible to ACEI-related cough, and this susceptibility may be genetically predetermined. PMID:11699055

  20. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers on clinical outcomes in patients with and without coronary artery obstructions at angiography (from a Register-Based Cohort Study on Acute Coronary Syndromes).

    PubMed

    Manfrini, Olivia; Morrell, Christine; Das, Rajiv; Barth, Julian H; Hall, Alistair S; Gale, Christopher P; Cenko, Edina; Bugiardini, Raffaele

    2014-05-15

    We sought to determine the effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and β-blocker treatment as a function of the degree of coronary artery disease (CAD) obstruction at angiography. The Evaluation of Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events registry enrolled patients who had been hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome. There were 1,602 patients who had cardiac catheterization that were used for this analysis. The main outcome measures were evidence-based therapies prescribed at discharge and 6-month incidence of all-cause mortality. The cohort consisted of 1,252 patients with obstructive CAD (>50% luminal diameter obstructed) and 350 patients with nonobstructive CAD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for further medications and other clinical factors was performed. Patients with nonobstructive CAD had significantly (p <0.001) higher rates of β-blocker (77.8% vs 63.3%) and lower rates of ACE-inhibitor (57.7% vs 66.4%) prescriptions. In patients with nonobstructive CAD, ACE-inhibitor therapy was clearly associated with a lower 6-month mortality (odds ratio [OR] 0.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.03 to 0.78, p = 0.004). No significant association between β-blocker use and death was found. In patients with obstructive CAD, both β blockers (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.67, p <0.001) and ACE inhibitors (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.87, p = 0.01) were significantly associated with a reduced risk of 6-month mortality. In conclusion, ACE-inhibitor therapy seems to be an effective first-line treatment for preventing the occurrence of mortality in patients with nonobstructive CAD. PMID:24698468

  1. Ventricular dilatation in the absence of ACE inhibitors: influence of haemodynamic and neurohormonal variables following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J; Batin, P; Hawkins, M; McEntegart, D; Cowley, A

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To examine the relation between patterns of ventricular remodelling and haemodynamic and neurohormonal variables, at rest and during symptom limited exercise, in the year following acute myocardial infarction in patients not receiving angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.
Design—A prospective observational study.
Patients—65 patients recruited following hospital admission with a transmural anterior myocardial infarction.
Methods—Central haemodynamics and neurohormonal activation at rest and during symptom limited treadmill exercise were measured at baseline before hospital discharge, one month later, and at three monthly intervals thereafter. Patients were classified according to individual patterns of change in left ventricular end diastolic volumes at rest, assessed at each visit using transthoracic echocardiography.
Results—In most patients (n = 43, 66%) ventricular volumes were unchanged or reduced. Mean (SEM) treadmill exercise capacity and peak exercise cardiac index increased at month 12 by 200 (24) seconds (p < 0.001 v baseline) and by 0.8 (0.4) l/min/m2 (p<0.05 v baseline), respectively, in this group. In patients with limited ventricular dilatation (n = 11, 17%) exercise capacity increased by 259 (52) seconds (p < 0.001 v baseline) and peak exercise cardiac index improved by 0.8 (0.7) l/min/m2 (NS). In the remaining 11 patients with progressive left ventricular dilatation, exercise capacity increased by 308 (53) seconds (p< 0.001 v baseline) and peak exercise cardiac index similarly improved by 1.3 (0.7) l/min/m2 (NS). There were trends towards increased atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) secretion at rest and at peak exercise in this group.
Conclusions—Ventricular dilatation after acute myocardial infarction is a heterogeneous process that is progressive in only a minority of patients. Compensatory mechanisms, including ANF release, appear capable of maintaining and improving exercise capacity in

  2. In vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in sarcoid lymph nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.K.; Chai, S.Y.; Dunbar, M.S.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-09-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was localized in sarcoid lymph nodes by an in vitro autoradiographic technique using a synthetic ACE inhibitor of high affinity, /sup 125/I-labelled 351A. The lymph nodes were from seven patients with active sarcoidosis who underwent mediastinoscopy and from six control subjects who had nodes resected at either mediastinoscopy or laparotomy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme was localized in the epithelioid cells of sarcoid granulomata in markedly increased amounts compared with control nodes, where it was restricted to vessels and some histiocytes. In sarcoid lymph nodes, there was little ACE present in lymphocytes or fibrous tissue. Sarcoid nodes with considerable fibrosis had much less intense ACE activity than the nonfibrotic nodes. The specific activity of ACE measured by an enzymatic assay in both the control and sarcoid lymph nodes closely reflected the ACE activity demonstrated by autoradiography. Sarcoid lymph nodes with fibrosis had an ACE specific activity of half that of nonfibrotic nodes (p less than 0.05). There was a 15-fold increase in specific ACE activity in sarcoid nodes (p less than 0.05) compared to normal. Serum ACE was significantly higher in those sarcoid patients whose lymph nodes were not fibrosed compared with those with fibrosis (p less than 0.01). This technique offers many advantages over the use of polyclonal antibodies. The 351A is a highly specific ACE inhibitor, chemically defined and in limitless supply. This method enables the quantitation of results, and autoradiographs may be stored indefinitely for later comparison.

  3. Non-disulfide-bridged peptides from Tityus serrulatus venom: Evidence for proline-free ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro-Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Peigneur, Steve; Vriens, Kim; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno Philippe Angelo; Júnior, Ronaldo Bragança Martins; Arruda, Eurico; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Tytgat, Jan; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2016-08-01

    The present study purifies two T. serrulatus non-disulfide-bridged peptides (NDBPs), named venom peptides 7.2 (RLRSKG) and 8 (KIWRS) and details their synthesis and biological activity, comparing to the synthetic venom peptide 7.1 (RLRSKGKK), previously identified. The synthetic replicate peptides were subjected to a range of biological assays: hemolytic, antifungal, antiviral, electrophysiological, immunological and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition activities. All venom peptides neither showed to be cytolytic nor demonstrated significant antifungal or antiviral activities. Interestingly, peptides were able to modulate macrophages' responses, increasing IL-6 production. The three venom peptides also demonstrated potential to inhibit ACE in the following order: 7.2>7.1>8. The ACE inhibition activity was unexpected, since peptides that display this function are usually proline-rich peptides. In attempt to understand the origin of such small peptides, we discovered that the isolated peptides 7.2 and 8 are fragments of the same molecule, named Pape peptide precursor. Furthermore, the study discusses that Pape fragments could be originated from a post-splitting mechanism resulting from metalloserrulases and other proteinases cleavage, which can be seen as a clever mechanism used by the scorpion to enlarge its repertoire of venom components. Scorpion venom remains as an interesting source of bioactive proteins and this study advances our knowledge about three NDBPs and their biological activities. PMID:27221550

  4. Angiotensin-Receptor Blocker, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, and Risks of Atrial Fibrillation: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2016-05-01

    Both angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have protective effects against atrial fibrillation (AF). The differences between ARB and ACEI in their effects on the primary prevention of AF remain unclear. This study compared ARB and ACEI in combined antihypertensive medications for reducing the risk of AF in patients with hypertension, and determined which was better for AF prevention in a nationwide cohort study.Patients aged ≥55 years and with a history of hypertension were identified from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Medical records of 25,075 patients were obtained, and included 6205 who used ARB, 8034 who used ACEI, and 10,836 nonusers (no ARB or ACEI) in their antihypertensive regimen. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for new-onset AF.During an average of 7.7 years' follow-up, 1619 patients developed new-onset AF. Both ARB (adjusted HR: 0.51, 95% CI 0.44-0.58, P < 0.001) and ACEI (adjusted HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.47-0.59, P < 0.001) reduced the risk of AF compared to nonusers. Subgroup analysis showed that ARB and ACEI were equally effective in preventing new-onset AF regardless of age, gender, the presence of heart failure, diabetes, and vascular disease, except for those with prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). ARB prevents new-onset AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of stroke or TIA (log-rank P = 0.012).Both ARB and ACEI reduce new-onset AF in patients with hypertension. ARB prevents AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of prior stroke or TIA. PMID:27196491

  5. Impact of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor versus Angiotensin Receptor Blocker on Incidence of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Choi, Byoung Geol; Choi, Se Yeon; Choi, Jae Woong; Ryu, Sung Kee; Lee, Se Jin; Kim, Seunghwan; Noh, Yung-Kyun; Akkala, Raghavender Goud; Li, Hu; Ali, Jabar; Kim, Ji Bak; Lee, Sunki; Na, Jin Oh; Choi, Cheol Ung; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) are associated with a decreased incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM). The aim of this study was to compare the protective effect of ACEI versus ARBs on NODM in an Asian population. Materials and Methods We investigated a total of 2817 patients who did not have diabetes mellitus from January 2004 to September 2009. To adjust for potential confounders, a propensity score matched (PSM) analysis was performed using a logistic regression model. The primary end-point was the cumulative incidence of NODM, which was defined as having a fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dL or HbA1c ≥6.5%. Multivariable cox-regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of ACEI versus ARB on the incidence of NODM. Results Mean follow-up duration was 1839±1019 days in all groups before baseline adjustment and 1864±1034 days in the PSM group. After PSM (C-statistics=0.731), a total 1024 patients (ACEI group, n=512 and ARB group, n=512) were enrolled for analysis and baseline characteristics were well balanced. After PSM, the cumulative incidence of NODM at 3 years was lower in the ACEI group than the ARB group (2.1% vs. 5.0%, p=0.012). In multivariate analysis, ACEI vs. ARB was an independent predictor of the lower incidence for NODM (odd ratio 0.37, confidence interval 0.17-0.79, p=0.010). Conclusion In the present study, compared with ARB, chronic ACEI administration appeared to be associated with a lower incidence of NODM in a series of Asian cardiovascular patients. PMID:26632399

  6. Antihypertensive efficacy of the angiotensin receptor blocker azilsartan medoxomil compared with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril

    PubMed Central

    Bönner, G; Bakris, G L; Sica, D; Weber, M A; White, W B; Perez, A; Cao, C; Handley, A; Kupfer, S

    2013-01-01

    Drug therapy often fails to control hypertension. Azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) is a newly developed angiotensin II receptor blocker with high efficacy and good tolerability. This double-blind, controlled, randomised trial compared its antihypertensive efficacy and safety vs the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril (RAM) in patients with clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP) 150–180 mm Hg. Patients were randomised (n=884) to 20 mg AZL-M or 2.5 mg RAM once daily for 2 weeks, then force-titrated to 40 or 80 mg AZL-M or 10 mg RAM for 22 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in trough, seated, clinic SBP. Mean patient age was 57±11 years, 52.4% were male, 99.5% were Caucasian. Mean baseline BP was 161.1±7.9/94.9±9.0 mm Hg. Clinic SBP decreased by 20.6±0.95 and 21.2±0.95 mm Hg with AZL-M 40 and 80 mg vs12.2±0.95 mm Hg with RAM (P<0.001 for both AZL-M doses). Adverse events leading to discontinuation were less frequent with AZL-M 40 and 80 mg (2.4% and 3.1%, respectively) than with RAM (4.8%). These data demonstrated that treatment of stage 1–2 hypertension with AZL-M was more effective than RAM and better tolerated. PMID:23514842

  7. Preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blocker use and acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Steven G.; Garg, Amit X.; Swaminathan, Madhav; Garwood, Susan; Hong, Kwangik; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Passik, Cary; Koyner, Jay L.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Jai, Raman; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Akhter, Shahab; Devarajan, Prasad; Bennett, Michael; Edelsteinm, Charles; Patel, Uptal; Chu, Michael; Goldbach, Martin; Guo, Lin Ruo; McKenzie, Neil; Myers, Mary Lee; Novick, Richard; Quantz, Mac; Zappitelli, Michael; Dewar, Michael; Darr, Umer; Hashim, Sabet; Elefteriades, John; Geirsson, Arnar

    2013-01-01

    Background Using either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) the morning of surgery may lead to ‘functional’ postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI), measured by an abrupt increase in serum creatinine. Whether the same is true for ‘structural’ AKI, measured with new urinary biomarkers, is unknown. Methods The TRIBE-AKI study was a prospective cohort study of 1594 adults undergoing cardiac surgery at six hospitals between July 2007 and December 2010. We classified the degree of exposure to ACEi/ARB into three categories: ‘none’ (no exposure prior to surgery), ‘held’ (on chronic ACEi/ARB but held on the morning of surgery) or ‘continued’ (on chronic ACEi/ARB and taken the morning of surgery). The co-primary outcomes were ‘functional’ AKI based upon changes in pre- to postoperative serum creatinine, and ‘structural AKI’, based upon peak postoperative levels of four urinary biomarkers of kidney injury. Results Across the three levels (none, held and continued) of ACEi/ARB exposure there was a graded increase in functional AKI, as defined by AKI stage 1 or worse; (31, 34 and 42%, P for trend 0.03) and by percentage change in serum creatinine from pre- to postoperative (25, 26 and 30%, P for trend 0.03). In contrast, there were no differences in structural AKI across the strata of ACEi/ARB exposure, as assessed by four structural AKI biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule-1, interleukin-18 or liver-fatty acid-binding protein). Conclusions Preoperative ACEi/ARB usage was associated with functional but not structural acute kidney injury. As AKI from ACEi/ARB in this setting is unclear, interventional studies testing different strategies of perioperative ACEi/ARB use are warranted. PMID:24081864

  8. Intrarenal alterations of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7 complex of the renin-angiotensin system do not alter the course of malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Husková, Zuzana; Kopkan, Libor; Červenková, Lenka; Doleželová, Šárka; Vaňourková, Zdeňka; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Kramer, Herbert J; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    The role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of malignant hypertension is not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the recently discovered vasodilator axis of the RAS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7), constitutes an endogenous system counterbalancing the hypertensiogenic axis, ACE/angiotensin II (ANG II)/AT1 receptor. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the intrarenal vasodilator RAS axis in the pathophysiology of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension was induced by 13 days' dietary administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates the mouse renin gene in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. It was hypothesized that pharmacologically-induced inhibition of the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex should aggravate, and activation of this axis should attenuate, the course of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) was monitored by radiotelemetry. ACE2 inhibitor (DX 600, 0.2 μg/day) and ACE2 activator (DIZE, 1 mg/day) were administrated via osmotic minipumps. Even though ACE2 inhibitor significantly decreased and ACE2 activator increased intrarenal ANG 1-7 concentrations, the course of BP, as well as of albuminuria, cardiac hypertrophy and renal glomerular damage, were not altered. It was shown that intrarenal alterations in the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex did not significantly modify the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Thus, in our experimental setting alterations of this intrarenal vasodilator complex of the RAS do not significantly modify the form of malignant hypertension that clearly depends on the inappropriately increased activity of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis. PMID:26833491

  9. Weight loss for reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy: Comparison with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patil, M. R.; Mishra, A.; Jain, N.; Gutch, M.; Tewari, R.

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of weight in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) individuals is emerging as a significant strategy in the reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy along with control of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The objective was to evaluate the reduction in 24-h proteinuria in T2DM patients with nephropathy by weight loss, with conventional therapy (angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors) as the control arm. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted between June 2010 and May 2011. T2DM patients with confirmed nephropathy by 24-h urinary protein estimation with a body mass index (BMI) of >25 kg/m2 were studied. Patients who had nondiabetic nephropathy, uncontrolled hypertension (>125/75 mmHg) irrespective of antihypertensive drugs, excess weight due to edema or obesity due to other specific diseases, alcoholics, smokers, and patients who were on hemodialysis were excluded from the study. The patients were divided into three groups, namely, group A, patients on ACE inhibitor therapy; group B, patients on lifestyle modifications for weight loss; and group C, patients on an antiobesity drug (orlistat) and lifestyle modifications. At the end of 6 months, all the three groups were compared. Data were analyzed using software SPSS version 15.0. This study encompassed a total of 88 patients; 12 patients were dropped during the study period and 76 (group A: 22, group B: 23, and group C: 31) patients remained. The mean age of the patients was 58.36 ± 10.87 years (range: 30-70 years). At baseline, age, gender, mean BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and 24-h proteinuria did not vary significantly among the three groups. At 6 months, the mean BMI significantly decreased in group C (P < 0.001) compared to that in the other two groups. Among the parameters BMI and WHR, the proportional form of BMI correlated well with the degree of reduction in proteinuria (r = 0.397, P = 0.01). Reduction in weight using lifestyle modifications and

  10. Angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors: clinical potential in heart failure and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagdeep SS; Lang, Chim C

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major concern across the globe as life expectancies and delivery of health care continue to improve. There has been a dearth of new developments in heart failure therapies in the last decade until last year, with the release of the results from the PARADIGM-HF Trial heralding the arrival of a promising new class of drug, ie, the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. In this review, we discuss the evolution of our incremental understanding of the neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure, which has led to our success in modulating its various pathways. We start by examining the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, followed by the challenges of modulating the natriuretic peptide system. We then delve deeper into the pharmacology and mechanisms by which angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors achieve their significant cardiovascular benefits. Finally, we also consider the potential application of this new class of drug in other areas, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, patients with renal impairment, and following myocardial infarction. PMID:26082640

  11. Angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors: clinical potential in heart failure and beyond.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep S S; Lang, Chim C

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major concern across the globe as life expectancies and delivery of health care continue to improve. There has been a dearth of new developments in heart failure therapies in the last decade until last year, with the release of the results from the PARADIGM-HF Trial heralding the arrival of a promising new class of drug, ie, the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. In this review, we discuss the evolution of our incremental understanding of the neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure, which has led to our success in modulating its various pathways. We start by examining the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, followed by the challenges of modulating the natriuretic peptide system. We then delve deeper into the pharmacology and mechanisms by which angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors achieve their significant cardiovascular benefits. Finally, we also consider the potential application of this new class of drug in other areas, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, patients with renal impairment, and following myocardial infarction. PMID:26082640

  12. Angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor LCZ696: a novel targeted therapy for arterial hypertension?

    PubMed

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Skalis, Georgios; Pavlidis, Antonis N; Makris, Thomas; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2015-10-01

    The need for novel antihypertensive therapies represents a continuous challenge. LCZ696 is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor that has been shown to enhance endogenous natriuretic peptide (NP) actions on neurohormonal activation. This effect seems to be additive to that of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) suppression, as impressively suggested in the PARADIGM HF study. LCZ696 has been shown to be effective in reducing blood pressure in several small studies; however, its effectiveness and safety remain to be proved in larger studies. This review summarizes the role of RAAS and NP system in the pathophysiology of hypertension and reviews the current data on the antihypertensive effects of LCZ696. PMID:27532450

  13. Development and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Rule for Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor-induced Cough

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Takeshi; Gandhi, Tejal K; Fiskio, Julie M; Seger, Andrew C; So, Joseph W; Cook, E Francis; Fukui, Tsuguya; Bates, David W

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are effective for many cardiovascular diseases and are widely prescribed, but cough sometimes necessitates their withdrawal. OBJECTIVE To develop and validate a model that predicts, by using information available at first prescription, whether a patient will develop cough within 6 months. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study with derivation and validation sets. SETTING Outpatient clinics affiliated with an urban tertiary care hospital. PATIENTS Clinical data were collected from electronic charts. The derivation set included 1,125 patients and the validation set included 567 patients. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitorinduced cough assessed by predetermined criteria. RESULTS In the total cohort, 12% of patients developed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced cough. Independent multivariate predictors of cough were older age, female gender, non-African American (with East Asian having highest risk), no history of previous angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use, and history of cough due to another angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. Patients with a history of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced cough were 29 times more likely to develop a cough than those without this history. These factors were used to develop a model stratifying patients into 4 risk groups. In the derivation set, low-risk, average-risk, intermediate-risk, and highrisk groups had a 6%, 9%, 22%, and 55% probability of cough, respectively. In the validation set, 4%, 14%, 20%, and 60% of patients in these 4 groups developed cough, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This model may help clinicians predict the likelihood of a particular patient developing cough from an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor at the time of prescribing, and may also assist with subsequent clinical decisions. PMID:15209608

  14. Preclinical development and characterization of an intravenous dosage form for the ACE inhibitor RS-10029.

    PubMed

    Visor, G C; Lin, L H; Henry, P; Singer, L

    1989-01-01

    Preclinical development of an intravenous dosage form for the ACE inhibitor RS-10029 involved the formulation and characterization of the drug's chemical/physical stability in two prototype formulations (injectable solution and lyophilized powder). Included in these studies were quantitative evaluations of various processing and administration parameters (membrane qualification, terminal sterilization, compatibility/delivery of the drug with typical infusion fluids and administration sets) on finished product integrity and quality. Analytical methodology used in these studies consisted primarily of a stability specific HPLC assay and a light obscuration based sensor (HIAC) for particulate matter analysis. Results of these studies indicate that the drug is relatively stable at ambient temperature and under accelerated storage conditions (predicted T90 at 25 degrees C greater than 2 yr, and T90 at 50 degrees C greater than 2 mo). However, the ability of the product to withstand a full terminal sterilization cycle is limited, and therefore other approaches toward sterile processing were examined. With regard to the stability and compatibility of the drug in a variety of fluids and devices there appears to be no overt limitations in its use for either bolus or infusion delivery. PMID:2600732

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-induced angioedema treated by C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate (Berinert®): about one case and review of the therapeutic arsenal

    PubMed Central

    Lipski, Samuel Michael; Casimir, Georges; Vanlommel, Martine; Jeanmaire, Mathieu; Dolhen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert®) is generally used to treat severe attack of hereditary angioedema. We describe here the case of a patient who presented with a severe angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) endangering her life. It could be successfully treated with that medicine. PMID:25767713

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-induced angioedema treated by C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate (Berinert®): about one case and review of the therapeutic arsenal.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Samuel Michael; Casimir, Georges; Vanlommel, Martine; Jeanmaire, Mathieu; Dolhen, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert®) is generally used to treat severe attack of hereditary angioedema. We describe here the case of a patient who presented with a severe angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) endangering her life. It could be successfully treated with that medicine. PMID:25767713

  17. Contributions of Leukocytic Angiotensin-converting Enzyme to Development of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Lu, Hong; Zhao, Mingming; Tashiro, Katsuya; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study determined the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) on the development of angiotensin I (AngI)-induced atherosclerosis and the contribution of leukocyte-specific expression of this enzyme. Approach and Results To define the contribution of ACE-dependent activity to AngII synthesis in atherosclerotic development, male LDL receptor -/- mice were fed a fat-enriched diet and infused with either AngI or AngII. The same infusion rate of these peptides had equivalent effects on atherosclerotic development. Co-infusion of an ACE inhibitor, enalapril, ablated AngI augmented atherosclerosis, but had no effect on AngII-induced lesion development. ACE protein was detected in several cell types in atherosclerotic lesions, with a predominance in macrophages. This cell type secreted AngII, which was ablated by ACE inhibition. To study whether leukocyte ACE contributed to atherosclerosis, irradiated male LDL receptor -/- mice were repopulated with bone marrow-derived cells from either ACE +/+ or -/- mice and fed the fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks. Chimeric mice with ACE deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had modestly reduced atherosclerotic lesions in aortic arches, but had no effects in aortic roots. Conclusions ACE mediates AngI-induced atherosclerosis, and ACE expression in leukocytes modestly contributes to atherosclerotic development in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:23846498

  18. Impact of drug price adjustments on utilization of and expenditures on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A previous study has suggested that drug price adjustments allow physicians in Taiwan to gain greater profit by prescribing generic drugs. To better understand the effect of price adjustments on physician choice, this study used renin-angiotensin drugs (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] and angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) to examine the impact of price adjustments on utilization of and expenditures on patented and off-patent drugs with the same therapeutic indication. Methods Using the Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (2005), we identified 147,157 patients received ACEIs and/or ARBs between 1997 and 2008. The annual incident and prevalent users of ACEIs, ARBs and overall renin-angiotensin drugs were examined. Box-Tiao intervention analysis was applied to assess the impact of price adjustments on monthly utilization of and expenditures on these drugs. ACEIs were divided into patented and off-patent drugs, off-patent ACEIs were further divided into original brands and generics, and subgroup analyses were performed. Results The number of incident renin-angiotensin drug users decreased over the study period. The number of prevalent ARB users increased and exceeded the cumulative number of first-time renin-angiotensin drug users starting on ARBs, implying that some patients switched from ACEIs to ARBs. After price adjustments, long term trend increases in utilization were observed for patented ACEIs and ARBs; a long-term trend decrease was observed for off-patent ACEIs; long-term trend change was not significant for overall renin-angiotensin drugs. Significant long-term trend increases in expenditures were observed for patented ACEIs after price adjustment in 2007 (200.9%, p = 0.0088) and in ARBs after price adjustments in 2001 (173.4%, p < 0.0001) and 2007 (146.3%, p < 0.0001). A significant long-term trend decrease in expenditures was observed for off-patent ACEIs after 2004 price adjustment (

  19. Angiotensin processing activities in the venom of Thalassophryne nattereri.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Humberto de Araújo; Marques, Maria Elizabeth da Costa; Machado, Sonia Salgueiro; Pereira, Hugo Juarez Vieira

    2015-05-01

    The venom of marine animals is a rich source of compounds with remarkable functional specificity and diversity. Thalassophryne nattereri is a small venomous fish inhabiting the northern and northeastern coast of Brazil, and represents a relatively frequent cause of injuries. Its venom causes severe inflammatory response followed frequently by the necrosis of the affected area. This venom presents characterized components such as proteases (Natterins 1-4) and a lectin (Nattectin) with complex effects on the human organism. A specific inhibitor of tissue kallikrein (TKI) reduces the nociception and the edema caused by the venom in mice. Our study sought to investigate the proteolytic activities against vasopeptides Angiotensin I, Angiotensin II, Angiotensin 1-9 and Bradykinin. The venom indicated angiotensin conversion against angiotensin I, as well as kininase against bradykinin. Captopril conducted the total inhibition of the converting activity, featuring the first report of ACE activity in fish venoms. PMID:25702959

  20. Effects of age and sex on the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696, an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Langenickel, Thomas; Petruck, Jesika; Kode, Kiran; Rajman, Iris; Chandra, Priya; Zhou, Wei; Rebello, Sam; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    LCZ696, a novel angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, is in development for the treatment of heart failure. Administration of LCZ696 results in systemic exposure to sacubitril (inactive prodrug of LBQ657), LBQ657 (neprilysin inhibitor), and valsartan (angiotensin II receptor blocker). We investigated the potential effects of age and sex on the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 analytes (LBQ657 and valsartan) in an open-label, single oral dose (400 mg), parallel-group study in healthy subjects. Among 36 enrolled subjects, there were 19 male and 17 female subjects; 18 subjects were 18-45 years old (young), and 18 subjects were 65 years of age or older (elderly). Compared with young subjects, the AUCinf and T1/2 for LBQ657 were 42% and 30% greater, respectively, in elderly subjects. The Cmax for LBQ657 was similar between age groups. The AUCinf, Cmax, and T1/2 for valsartan were 30%, 24% greater, and 3.35 hours longer, respectively, in the elderly when compared with young subjects. All pharmacokinetic parameters of LCZ696 analytes (LBQ657 and valsartan) were similar between male and female subjects, indicating no effect on the pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 analytes based on sex. Considering the magnitude of change and its clinical significance, dose adjustment based on age or sex is not considered necessary. PMID:26073563

  1. Multifactorial Model and Treatment Approaches of Refractory Hypotension in a Patient Who Took an ACE Inhibitor the Day of Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Karan; Sacher, Vikas Y.; Nelson, Craig T.; Lew, John I.

    2013-01-01

    In the field of anesthesiology, there is wide debate on discontinuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy the day of noncardiac surgery. Although there have been many studies attributing perioperative hypotension to same-day ACEI and ARB use, there are many additional variables that play a role in perioperative hypotension. Additionally, restoring blood pressure in these patients presents a unique challenge to anesthesiologists. A case report is presented in which a patient took her ACEI the day of surgery and developed refractory hypotension during surgery. The evidence of ACEI use on the day of surgery and development of hypotension is reviewed, and additional variables that contributed to this hypotensive episode are discussed. Lastly, current challenges in restoring blood pressure are presented, and a basic model on treatment approaches for refractory hypotension in the setting of perioperative ACEI use is proposed. PMID:23662213

  2. Inhibitors of endopeptidase and angiotensin-converting enzyme lead to an amplification of the morphological changes and an upregulation of the substance P system in a muscle overuse model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously observed, in studies on an experimental overuse model, that the tachykinin system may be involved in the processes of muscle inflammation (myositis) and other muscle tissue alterations. To further evaluate the significance of tachykinins in these processes, we have used inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), substances which are known to terminate the activity of various endogenously produced substances, including tachykinins. Methods Injections of inhibitors of NEP and ACE, as well as the tachykinin substance P (SP), were given locally outside the tendon of the triceps surae muscle of rabbits subjected to marked overuse of this muscle. A control group was given NaCl injections. Evaluations were made at 1 week, a timepoint of overuse when only mild inflammation and limited changes in the muscle structure are noted in animals not treated with inhibitors. Both the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles were examined morphologically and with immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Results A pronounced inflammation (myositis) and changes in the muscle fiber morphology, including muscle fiber necrosis, occurred in the overused muscles of animals given NEP and ACE inhibitors. The morphological changes were clearly more prominent than for animals subjected to overuse and NaCl injections (NaCl group). A marked SP-like expression, as well as a marked expression of the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) was found in the affected muscle tissue in response to injections of NEP and ACE inhibitors. The concentration of SP in the muscles was also higher than that for the NaCl group. Conclusions The observations show that the local injections of NEP and ACE inhibitors led to marked SP-like and NK-1R immunoreactions, increased SP concentrations, and an amplification of the morphological changes in the tissue. The injections of the inhibitors thus led to a more marked myositis process and an upregulation of

  3. QM/MM investigation of the catalytic mechanism of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xia; Zhang, Chunchun; Xu, Dingguo

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II and degrades bradykinin and other vasoactive peptides. ACE inhibitors are used to treat diseases such as hypertension and heart failure. It is thus highly desirable to understand the catalytic mechanism of ACE, as this should facilitate the design of more powerful and selective ACE inhibitors. ACE exhibits two different active domains, the C-domain and the N-domain. In this work, we systematically investigated the inhibitor- and substrate-binding patterns in the N-domain of human ACE using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical approach. The hydrolysis of hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL) as catalyzed by the N-domain of human somatic ACE was explored, and the effects of chloride ion on the overall reaction were also investigated. Two models, one with and one without a chloride ion at the first binding position, were then designed to examine the chloride dependence of inhibitor-substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Our calculations indicate that the hydrolysis reaction follows a stepwise general base/general acid catalysis path. The estimated mean free energy barrier height in the two models is about 15.6 kcal/mol, which agrees very well with the experimentally estimated value of 15.8 kcal/mol. Our simulations thus suggest that the N-domain is in a mixed form during ACE-catalyzed hydrolysis, with the single-chloride-ion and the double-chloride-ion forms existing simultaneously. Graphical Abstract Superposition of ACE C- and N- domains. PMID:27184002

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the renin-angiotensin system: Implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Paschalis; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest liver disease in Western countries. Treatment of NAFLD is currently based on lifestyle measures and no effective pharmacologic treatment is available so far. Emerging evidence, mainly from animal studies, suggests that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system may be of major importance in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) as a potentially useful therapeutic approach. However, data from human studies are limited and contradictory. In addition, there are few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of ACE-I or ARB in patients with NAFLD and most data are from retrospective studies, pilot prospective studies and post hoc analyses of clinical trials. Accordingly, more and larger RCTs are needed to directly assess the effectiveness of ACE-I and ARBs in NAFLD. PMID:23355909

  5. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  6. Novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus (J.E. Lange) Imbach identified by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Lau, Ching Ching; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-04-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors derived from foods are valuable auxiliaries to agents such as captopril. Eight highly functional ACE inhibitory peptides from the mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, were identified by LC-MS/MS. Among these peptides, the most potent ACE inhibitory activity was exhibited by AHEPVK, RIGLF and PSSNK with IC₅₀ values of 63, 116 and 129 μM, respectively. These peptides exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity after gastrointestinal digestion. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggested that AHEPVK and RIGLF act as competitive inhibitors against ACE, whereas PSSNK acts as a non-competitive inhibitor. Mushrooms can be a good component of dietary supplement due to their readily available source and, in addition, they rarely cause food allergy. Compared to ACE inhibitory peptides isolated from other edible mushrooms, AHEPVK, RIGLF and PSSNK have lower IC₅₀ values. Therefore, these peptides may serve as an ideal ingredient in the production of antihypertensive supplements. PMID:24262574

  7. Angiotensin II-inhibition: effect on Alzheimer’s pathology in the aged triple transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ferrington, Linda; Palmer, Laura E.; Love, Seth; Horsburgh, Karen J; Kelly, Paul AT; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2012-01-01

    Reducing excessive accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a key objective of most AD therapies, and inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) may delay onset or progression of AD. The effects of an ACE-inhibitor (ACE-I) and an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) on Aβ and tau pathology in a triple transgenic (3xTGAD) mouse model of AD were investigated. 9-10month 3xTGAD mice were treated with ARB, ACE-I or vehicle for 6 months. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was measured periodically and mice were assessed behaviourally. Aβ, phospho-tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and ACE activity were analysed. MABP was significantly reduced at 2 weeks and 3 months in the ACE-I group and at 3 months in the ARB group, compared to vehicle. Neither drug altered performance of 3xTGAD mice in Morris Water Maze or T-maze, nor were Aβ, tau immunolabelling or APP levels altered. ACE-I significantly reduced ACE activity in kidney. Prolonged treatment with ACE-I or ARB does not affect Aβ or phospho-tau accumulation in brains of aged 3xTGAD mice. PMID:22611468

  8. Pharmacological, immunological, and gene targeting of the renin-angiotensin system for treatment of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Igic, Rajko; Behnia, Rahim

    2007-01-01

    Effective blood pressure control with a large arsenal of conventional antihypertensive drugs, such as diuretics, beta-adrenergic blockers, and calcium channel blockers, significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. However, blood pressure control with these drugs does not reduce cardiovascular disease risks to the levels in normotensive persons. Only two drug classes that inhibit or antagonize portions of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor type-1 (AT(1) receptor) blockers, have protective and beneficial effects unrelated to the degree of blood pressure reduction. These drugs may prevent the blood pressure related functional and structural abnormalities of the cardiovascular system and reduce the end organ-damage. The first part of this review presents the components of the RAS, biological actions of angiotensin peptides, and the functions of the enzymes that generate and metabolize angiotensins, including the likely effect of manipulating them. Special attention is devoted to renin, ACE, ACE2, chymase, and neprilysin. The second part of this review presents the rationale for targeting the RAS, based on clinical studies of the ACE inhibitors and AT(1) receptor blockers. Finally, we present the investigational agents acting on the RAS that have a potential for clinical usage, and give the perspective of pharmacological, immunological and gene targeting of the RAS for treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:17504230

  9. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study.

    PubMed

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them-and perhaps also the other dipeptides-as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  10. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M.; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them—and perhaps also the other dipeptides—as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  11. Role of homocysteinylation of ACE in endothelial dysfunction of arteries

    PubMed Central

    Huang, An; Pinto, John T.; Froogh, Ghezal; Kandhi, Sharath; Qin, Jun; Wolin, Michael S.; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The direct impact of de novo synthesis of homocysteine (Hcy) and its reactive metabolites, Hcy-S-S-Hcy and Hcy thiolactone (HCTL), on vascular function has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that Hcy synthesized within endothelial cells affects activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by direct homocysteinylation of its amino- and/or sulfhydryl moieties. This covalent modification enhances ACE reactivity toward angiotensin II (ANG II)-NADPH oxidase-superoxide-dependent endothelial dysfunction. Mesenteric and coronary arteries isolated from normal rats were incubated for 3 days with or without exogenous methionine (Met, 0.1–0.3 mM), a precursor to Hcy. Incubation of arteries in Met-free media resulted in time-dependent decreases in vascular Hcy formation. By contrast, vessels incubated with Met produced Hcy in a dose-dependent manner. There was a notably greater de novo synthesis of Hcy from endothelial than from smooth muscle cells. Enhanced levels of Hcy production significantly impaired shear stress-induced dilation and release of nitric oxide, events that are associated with elevated production of vascular superoxide. Each of these processes was attenuated by ANG II type I receptor blocker or ACE and NADPH oxidase inhibitors. In addition, in vitro exposure of purified ACE to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL resulted in formation of homocysteinylated ACE and an enhanced ACE activity. The enhanced ACE activity was confirmed in isolated coronary and mesenteric arteries that had been exposed directly to Hcy-S-S-Hcy/HCTL or after Met incubation. In conclusion, vasculature-derived Hcy initiates endothelial dysfunction that, in part, may be mediated by ANG II-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase in association with homocysteinylation of ACE. PMID:25416191

  12. Angiotensin II and gene expression in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S; Morrissey, J

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, has a key role in renal injury and in the progression of chronic renal disease of diverse causes. In vascular smooth muscle cells, angiotensin II modulates growth, which may lead to hypertrophy and also may inhibit mitogen-stimulated DNA synthesis. The effects of angiotensin II on responsive cells are mediated by two classes of receptors, AT-1 and AT-2. Information obtained in the last decade indicates that angiotensin II increases the production of several autocrine factors, including transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and platelet-derived growth factor A chain (PDGF). Angiotensin also increases the release of other growth factors such as endothelin, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and interleukin 6. In addition, it increases the "activity" of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and the synthesis of angiotensinogen. The emerging picture indicates that the actions of angiotensin II may be related to factors that are released or upregulated by angiotensin II, possibly through NF-kappaB activation. It appears likely that many of the effects of angiotensin II on renal disease may be mediated by TGF-beta1, TNF-alpha, and changes in the activity of NF-kappaB. The use of ACE inhibitors or antagonists of AT-1 or AT-2 receptors in experimental animals decreases the levels of angiotensin II or limits its action, thereby interfering with the production and effects of the factors described. PMID:9428470

  13. ACE inhibition in the treatment of children after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arbeiter, Klaus; Pichler, Andrea; Stemberger, Regina; Mueller, Thomas; Ruffingshofer, Dagmar; Vargha, Regina; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2004-02-01

    Currently, there are no data available on long-term effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) on graft function in children after renal transplantation. We therefore analyzed all children who were transplanted at our institution between 1989 and 1998 and followed for at least 2 years. Those treated with ACE-I, mainly because of failure of other antihypertensive medications, were compared to those without ACE-I. The ACE-I-treated children ( n=19) showed significantly better blood pressure control during the 1st year of follow-up ( p<0.05). In children with chronic allograft dysfunction ( n=8), treatment with ACE-I stabilized graft function, with improvement in creatinine clearance in 50% ( p<0.01). Serum potassium and hemoglobin levels remained stable. One patient discontinued ACE-I because of renal artery stenosis. Taken together, ACE-I were effective and safe in the treatment of hypertension in children following renal transplantation. Children with chronic allograft dysfunction experienced a stabilizing effect on graft function. PMID:14673630

  14. Effect of the Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, MK-421, on Experimentally Induced Drinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregley, Melvin J.; Fater, Dennis C.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1982-01-01

    MK-421, the ethyl ester maleate salt of N-(S)-1-(ethoxycarbonyl)-3-phenyl-propyl- Ala-L-Pro, is an angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor. An initial objective was to determine whether MK-421, administered at 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/kg, ip to 96 female rats 15 min prior to administration of the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (25 microgram/kg, ip), would inhibit the drinking induced by isoproterenol during 2 h after its administration. The water intake induced by isoproterenol was inhibited significantly by 2.5 mg MK-421/kg. When a similar experiment was performed using Angiotensin I (AI) (200 microgram/kg, ip) as the dipsogenic agent, MK-421 (5 mg/kg, ip), administered 15 min prior to AI, inhibited significantly both the dipsogenic and the diuretic effect of AI. However, administration of angiotensin II (AII, 200 microgram/kg, ip) 15 min after MK-421 (5mg/kg) was accompanied by a water intake that did not differ from AII alone. The drink induced by ip administration of 1.0 m NaCl solution (1% of body wt, ip) was not inhibited by administration of MK-421 (5 mg/kg) 15 min prior to allowing access to water while the drink induced by a 24 h dehydration was partially inhibited. Thus, the drinks induced by administraition of either isoproterenol or AI are dependent on formation of AII. That induced by dehydration is partially dependent, while that induced by hypertonic siilinc is independent of the formation of AII.

  15. [Liver damage in a patient treated with a vitamin K antagonist, a statin and an ACE inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Bruggisser, M; Terraciano, L; Rätz Bravo, A; Haschke, M

    2010-10-20

    We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient who presented at the emergency room with episodes of epistaxis and jaundice. The patient was on therapy with phenprocoumon, atorvastatin and perindopril. Findings on admission included prominent elevation of transaminases and bilirubin and a high INR due to impaired liver function and oral anticoagulation. After exclusion of other causes like viral or autoimmune hepatitis and after having obtained a liver biopsy, a diagnosis of drug induced liver damage (DILI) was made. Epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical signs of DILI are discussed with a special focus on coumarines, statins and ACE-inhibitors. PMID:20960395

  16. EARLY Treatment with azilsartan compared to ACE-inhibitors in anti-hypertensive therapy – rationale and design of the EARLY hypertension registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arterial hypertension is highly prevalent but poorly controlled. Blood pressure (BP) reduction substantially reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent randomized, double-blind clinical trials demonstrated that azilsartan medoxomil (AZM) is more effective in reducing BP than the ubiquitary ACE inhibitor ramipril. Therefore, we aimed to test whether these can be verified under clinical practice conditions. Methods/Design The “Treatment with Azilsartan Compared to ACE-Inhibitors in Anti-Hypertensive Therapy” (EARLY) registry is a prospective, observational, national, multicenter registry with a follow-up of up to 12 months. It will include up to 5000 patients on AZM or ACE-inhibitor monotherapy in a ratio of 7 to 3. A subgroup of patients will undergo 24-hour BP monitoring. EARLY has two co-primary objectives: 1) Description of the safety profile of azilsartan and 2) achievement of BP targets based on recent national and international guidelines for patients treated with azilsartan in comparison to those treated with ACE-inhibitors. The most important secondary endpoints are the determination of persistence with treatment and the documentation of cardiovascular and renal events. Recruitment commenced in January 2012 and will be completed by February 2013. Conclusions The data obtained will supplement previous results from randomized controlled trials to document the potential value of utilizing azilsartan medoxomil in comparison to ACE-inhibitor treatment for target BP achievement in clinical practice. PMID:23819631

  17. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaolin; Li, Guangze; Chen, Shuzhen; Chen, Ji; Buck, Joshua; Zhu, Yulan; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Chen, Yanfang; Olson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD results from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of NADPH oxidases. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  18. Activation of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway reduces oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced tissue swelling, ROS production, and cell death in mouse brain with angiotensin II overproduction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Li, G; Chen, S; Bihl, J; Buck, J; Zhu, Y; Xia, H; Lazartigues, E; Chen, Y; Olson, J E

    2014-07-25

    We previously demonstrated that mice which overexpress human renin and angiotensinogen (R+A+) show enhanced cerebral damage in both in vivo and in vitro experimental ischemia models. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) counteracts the effects of angiotensin (Ang-II) by transforming it into Ang-(1-7), thus reducing the ligand for the AT1 receptor and increasing stimulation of the Mas receptor. Triple transgenic mice, SARA, which specifically overexpress ACE2 in neurons of R+A+ mice were used to study the role of ACE2 in ischemic stroke using oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of brain slices as an in vitro model. We examined tissue swelling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell death in the cerebral cortex (CX) and the hippocampal CA1 region during OGD. Expression levels of NADPH oxidase (Nox) isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4 were measured using western blots. Results show that SARA mice and R+A+ mice treated with the Mas receptor agonist Ang-(1-7) had less swelling, cell death, and ROS production in CX and CA1 areas compared to those in R+A+ animals. Treatment of slices from SARA mice with the Mas antagonist A779 eliminated this protection. Finally, western blots revealed less Nox2 and Nox4 expression in SARA mice compared with R+A+ mice both before and after OGD. We suggest that reduced brain swelling and cell death observed in SARA animals exposed to OGD result from diminished ROS production coupled with lower expression of Nox isoforms. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway plays a protective role in brain ischemic damage by counteracting the detrimental effects of Ang-II-induced ROS production. PMID:24814023

  19. Prophylactic treatment of migraine with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril): randomised, placebo controlled, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Harald; Stovner, Lars Jacob; Helde, Grethe; Sand, Trond; Bovim, Gunnar

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor in the prophylaxis of migraine. Design Double blind, placebo controlled, crossover study. Setting Neurological outpatient clinic. Participants Sixty patients aged 19-59 years with migraine with two to six episodes a month. Interventions Treatment period of 12 weeks with one 10 mg lisinopril tablet once daily for one week then two 10 mg lisinopril tablets once daily for 11 weeks, followed by a two week wash out period. Second treatment period of one placebo tablet once daily for one week and then two placebo tablets for 11 weeks. Thirty participants followed this schedule, and 30 received placebo followed by lisinopril. Main outcome measures Primary end points: number of hours with headache, number of days with headache, number of days with migraine. Secondary end points: headache severity index, use of drugs for symptomatic relief, quality of life and number of days taken as sick leave, acceptability of treatment. Results In the 47 participants with complete data, hours with headache, days with headache, days with migraine, and headache severity index were significantly reduced by 20% (95% confidence interval 5% to 36%), 17% (5% to 30%), 21% (9% to 34%), and 20% (3% to 37%), respectively, with lisinopril compared with placebo. Days with migraine were reduced by at least 50% in 14 participants for active treatment versus placebo and 17 patients for active treatment versus run-in period. Days with migraine were fewer by at least 50% in 14 participants for active treatment versus placebo. Intention to treat analysis of data from 55 patients supported the differences in favour of lisinopril for the primary end points. Conclusion The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril, has a clinically important prophylactic effect in migraine. PMID:11141144

  20. Cardiac oxidative stress and dysfunction by fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) are mediated by angiotensin-II.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Wellenius, Gregory A; Lawrence, Joy; Millet, Emil; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation exposure to fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) increases cardiac oxidants by mechanisms involving modulation of the sympathovagal tone on the heart. Angiotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor and a sympatho-excitatory peptide involved in the regulation of blood pressure. We hypothesized that increases in angiotensin-II after fine particulate matter (PM) exposure could be involved in the development of cardiac oxidative stress. Adult rats were treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril), or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB; valsartan) before exposure to fine PM aerosols or filtered air. Exposures were carried out for 5 hours in the chamber of the Harvard fine particle concentrator (fine PM mass concentration: 440 +/- 80 microg/m(3)). At the end of the exposure the animals were tested for in situ chemiluminescence (CL) of the heart, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and for plasma levels of angiotensin-II. Also, continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements were collected on a subgroup of exposed animals. PM exposure was associated with statistically significant increases in plasma angiotensin concentrations. Pre-treatment with the ACE inhibitor effectively lowered angiotensin concentration, whereas ARB treatment led to increases in angiotensin above the PM-only level. PM exposure also led to significant increases in heart oxidative stress (CL, TBARS), and a shortening of the T-end to T-peak interval on the ECG that were prevented by treatment with both the ACE inhibitor and ARB. These results show that ambient fine particles can increase plasma levels of angiotensin-II and suggest a role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of particle-related acute cardiac events. PMID:20718632

  1. Cardiac Oxidative Stress and Dysfunction by Fine Concentrated Ambient Particles (CAPs) are Mediated by Angiotensin-II

    PubMed Central

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Lawrence, Joy; Millet, Emil; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation exposure to fine Concentrated Ambient Particles (CAPs) increases cardiac oxidants by mechanisms involving modulation of the sympathovagal tone on the heart. Angiotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor and a sympatho-excitatory peptide involved in the regulation of blood pressure. We hypothesized that increases in angiotensin-II after fine PM exposure could be involved in the development of cardiac oxidative stress. Adult rats were treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (Benazepril ®), or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB, Valsartan ®) before exposure to fine PM aerosols or filtered air. Exposures were carried out for 5 hours in the chamber of the Harvard Fine Particle Concentrator (fine PM mass concentration: 440 ± 80 μg/m3). At the end of the exposure the animals were tested for in situ chemiluminescence (CL) of the heart, TBARS and for plasma levels of angiotensin-II. Also, continuous ECG measurements were collected on a subgroup of exposed animals. PM exposure was associated with statistically significant increases in plasma angiotensin concentrations. Pretreatment with the ACE inhibitor effectively lowered angiotensin concentration, whereas ARB treatment led to increases in angiotensin above the PM-only level. PM exposure also led to significant increases in heart oxidative stress (CL, TBARs), and a shortening of the T-end to T-peak interval on the ECG that were prevented by treatment with both the ACE inhibitor and ARB. These results show that ambient fine particles can increase plasma levels of angiotensin-II and suggest a role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of particle-related acute cardiac events. PMID:20718632

  2. A new high-resolution crystal structure of the Drosophila melanogaster angiotensin converting enzyme homologue, AnCE.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Charlotte; Acharya, K Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase with an essential role in blood pressure homeostasis in mammals. ACE has long been targeted in the treatment of hypertension through ACE inhibitors, however current inhibitors are known to cause severe side effects. Therefore, there is a requirement for a new generation of ACE inhibitors and structural information will be invaluable in their development. ACE is a challenging enzyme to work with due to its extensive glycosylation. As such, the Drosophila melanogaster ACE homologue, AnCE, which shares ∼60% sequence similarity with human ACE, can be used as a model for studying inhibitor binding. The presence of ligands originating from the crystallisation condition at the AnCE active site has proved an obstacle to studying the binding of new inhibitor precursors. Here we present the crystal structure of AnCE (in a new crystal form) at 1.85 Å resolution, using crystals grown under different conditions. This new structure may be more suitable for studying the binding of new compounds, with the potential of developing a new generation of improved ACE inhibitors. PMID:26380810

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme is a GPI-anchored protein releasing factor crucial for fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Gen; Tojo, Hiromasa; Nakatani, Yuka; Komazawa, Nobuyasu; Murata, Chie; Yamagata, Kazuo; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh; Okabe, Masaru; Taguchi, Ryo; Takeda, Junji

    2005-02-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key regulator of blood pressure. It is known to cleave small peptides, such as angiotensin I and bradykinin and changes their biological activities, leading to upregulation of blood pressure. Here we describe a new activity for ACE: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein releasing activity (GPIase activity). Unlike its peptidase activity, GPIase activity is weakly inhibited by the tightly binding ACE inhibitor and not inactivated by substitutions of core amino acid residues for the peptidase activity, suggesting that the active site elements for GPIase differ from those for peptidase activity. ACE shed various GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, and the process was accelerated by the lipid raft disruptor filipin. The released products carried portions of the GPI anchor, indicating cleavage within the GPI moiety. Further analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry predicted the cleavage site at the mannose-mannose linkage. GPI-anchored proteins such as TESP5 and PH-20 were released from the sperm membrane of wild-type mice but not in Ace knockout sperm in vivo. Moreover, peptidase-inactivated E414D mutant ACE and also PI-PLC rescued the egg-binding deficiency of Ace knockout sperms, implying that ACE plays a crucial role in fertilization through this activity. PMID:15665832

  4. Molecular evidence for the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme in hemocytes of Locusta migratoria: stimulation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Macours, N; Hens, K; Francis, C; De Loof, A; Huybrechts, R

    2003-08-01

    The presence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in insects has been reported many times, but numerous questions about the functional role of this enzyme in insects remain. Here we show by RT-PCR experiments that ACE has a wide tissue distribution in Locusta migratoria, suggesting diverse roles for this enzyme in the locust. Immune challenge through injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides resulted in a tenfold increase of ACE gene transcripts in the hemocytes and is suggestive for a role of ACE in the cellular defense of the locust. However, phenotypic knockout experiments with the ACE inhibitor captopril showed that ACE is not essential for the efficient clearance of injected E. coli bacteria. PMID:12880654

  5. Use of renin angiotensin system inhibitors in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Adam, W R; Wright, J R

    2016-05-01

    Current guidelines recommend renin angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) as key components of treatment of hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), because of their effect on reducing the future rate of loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A common risk of RASI in CKD is a haemodynamically mediated, and reversible, fall in GFR of varying severity and duration, any time after commencement of the Inhibitors. A benefit of the acute reduction in filtration rate with RASI may be a reduction in the future rate of loss in GFR: the greatest benefit likely to be in those patients with a greater rate of loss of GFR prior to, and a lesser acute loss of GFR after, introduction of RASI; and in those patients with significant proteinuria. An acute loss of GFR of >25% following the introduction of RASI is an indication to cease the RASI. An acute loss of GFR < 25% requires consideration of the likely risks of the lower GFR and benefits of any future reduced rate of loss of GFR. A fall in GFR in patients while on RASI is usually associated with a remediable cause. When the cause for the fall in GFR is not revealed, and the fall is less than 25%, hopeful expectancy is recommended. Hyperkalaemia in patients with CKD on RASI is more common with more severe disease, potassium retaining diuretics and hypoaldosteronism. Treatment should be modified to maintain a plasma potassium <6 mmol/L. PMID:27170242

  6. Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI): New Avenues in Cardiovascular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Tocci, G; Battistoni, A; Rubattu, S

    2015-09-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is continuously and progressively raising worldwide. Essential hypertension is a major driver of cardiovascular events, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and congestive heart failure. This latter may represent the final common pathway of different cardiovascular diseases, and it is often mediated by progressive uncontrolled hypertension. Despite solid advantages derived from effective and sustained blood pressure control, and the widespread availability of effective antihypertensive medications, the vast majority of the more than 1 billion hypertensive patients worldwide continue to have uncontrolled hypertension. Among various factors that may be involved, the abnormal activation of neurohormonal systems is one consistent feature throughout the continuum of cardiovascular diseases. These systems may initiate biologically meaningful "injury responses". However, their sustained chronic overactivity often may induce and maintain the progression from hypertension towards congestive heart failure. The renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system, the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelin system are major neurohormonal stressor systems that are not only able to elevate blood pressure levels by retaining water and sodium, but also to play a role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. More recently, the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) represents a favourable approach to inhibit neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and suppress the RAAS via blockade of the AT1 receptors, without the increased risk of angioedema. LCZ696, the first-in-class ARNI, has already demonstrated BP lowering efficacy in patients with hypertension, in particular with respect to systolic blood pressure levels, improved cardiac biomarkers, cardiac remodelling and prognosis in patients with heart failure. This manuscript will briefly overview the main pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of ARNI in

  7. Angiotensin converting enzyme in the brain, testis, epididymis, pituitary gland and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)Captopril binds to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in rat tissue homogenates. The pharmacology, regional distribution and copurification of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding with enzymatic activity demonstrate the selectivity of (/sup 3/H)captopril labeling of ACE. (/sup 3/H)Captopril binding to purified ACE reveals differences in cationic dependence and anionic regulation between substrate catalysis and inhibitor recognition. (/sup 3/H)Captopril association with ACE is entropically driven. The selectivity of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding permits autoradiographic localization of the ACE in the brain, male reproductive system, pituitary gland and adrenal gland. In the brain, ACE is visualized in a striatonigral neuronal pathway which develops between 1 and 7 d after birth. In the male reproductive system, (/sup 3/H)captopril associated silver grains are found over spermatid heads and in the lumen of seminiferous tubules in stages I-VIII and XII-XIV. In the pituitary gland, ACE is localized to the posterior lobe and patches of the anterior lobe. The adrenal medulla contains moderate ACE levels while low levels are found in the adrenal cortex. Adrenal medullary ACE is increased after hypophysectomy and after reserpine treatment. The general of ligand binding techniques for the study of enzymes is demonstrated by the specific labeling of another enzyme, enkephaline convertase, in crude tissue homogenates by the inhibitor (/sup 3/H)GEMSA.

  8. Targeted in-vivo computed tomography (CT) imaging of tissue ACE using concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Marie-Christine; Aras, Omer; Smith, Mark F.; Nan, Anjan; Fleiter, Thorsten

    2010-04-01

    The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis have been associated with overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Moreover, ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril, have shown a benificial effect for patients diagnosed with heart failure or systemic hypertension. Thus targeted imaging of the ACE is of crucial importance for monitoring of the tissue ACE activity as well as the treatment efficacy in heart failure. In this respect, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles were prepared to provide a new type of probe for targeted molecular imaging of ACE by tuned K-edge computed tomography (CT) imaging. Concentrated solutions of these modified gold nanoparticles, with a diameter around 16 nm, showed high contrast in CT imaging. These new targeted imaging agents were thus used for in vivo imaging on rat models.

  9. Preparation of lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for molecular imaging of angiotensin-converting enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Baeta, Cesar; Aras, Omer; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2009-05-01

    Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been associated with the pathophysiology of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, the prescription of ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril, has shown a favorable effect on patient outcome for patients with heart failure or systemic hypertension. Thus targeted imaging of the ACE would be of crucial importance for monitoring tissue ACE activity as well as the treatment efficacy in heart failure. In this respect, lisinopril-coated gold nanoparticles were prepared to provide a new type of probe for targeted molecular imaging of ACE by tuned K-edge computed tomography (CT) imaging. The preparation involved non-modified lisinopril, using its primary amine group as the anchoring function on the gold nanoparticles surface. The stable lisinopril-coated gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their zeta potential was also measured in order to assess the charge density on the modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs).

  10. The effects of drug market regulation on pharmaceutical prices in Europe: overview and evidence from the market of ACE inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study provides an overview of policy measures targeting pharmaceutical expenditure in Europe and analyses their impact on originator pharmaceutical prices. Panel data methods are used to examine the market of ACE Inhibitors in six European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, United Kingdom) over period 1991-2006. We find that although some measures are effective in reducing originator prices, others appear to have an insignificant effect. Results suggest that supply side measures such as mandatory generic substitution, regressive pharmacy mark-ups and claw-backs are effective in reducing pharmaceuticals prices. Results are not as strong for demand side measures. Profit controls and the use of cost-effectiveness analysis appear to have a negative effect on prices, while results on reference pricing are inconclusive. Findings also indicate that, although originator prices are not immediately affected by generic entry, they may be influenced by changes in generic prices post patent expiry. PMID:22828053

  11. Top-down Targeted Metabolomics Reveals a Sulfur-Containing Metabolite with Inhibitory Activity against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme in Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Nishizawa, Tomoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-05-22

    The discovery of bioactive natural compounds containing sulfur, which is crucial for inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is a challenging task in metabolomics. Herein, a new S-containing metabolite, asparaptine (1), was discovered in the spears of Asparagus officinalis by targeted metabolomics using mass spectrometry for S-containing metabolites. The contribution ratio (2.2%) to the IC50 value in the crude extract showed that asparaptine (1) is a new ACE inhibitor. PMID:25922884

  12. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  13. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a beta blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by approximately 80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their long-chain metabolites: gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), dihomo-GLA (DGLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1), prostacyclin (PGI2), PGI3, lipoxins (LXs), resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-gamma ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the

  14. CES1 genetic variation affects the activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wang, G; Shi, J; Aa, J; Comas, R; Liang, Y; Zhu, H-J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) genetic variation on the activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) prodrugs. In vitro incubation study of human liver, intestine and kidney s9 fractions demonstrated that the ACEI prodrugs enalapril, ramipril, perindopril, moexipril and fosinopril are selectively activated by CES1 in the liver. The impact of CES1/CES1VAR and CES1P1/CES1P1VAR genotypes and diplotypes on CES1 expression and activity on enalapril activation was investigated in 102 normal human liver samples. Neither the genotypes nor the diplotypes affected hepatic CES1 expression and activity. Moreover, among several CES1 nonsynonymous variants studied in transfected cell lines, the G143E (rs71647871) was a loss-of-function variant for the activation of all ACEIs tested. The CES1 activity on enalapril activation in human livers with the 143G/E genotype was approximately one-third of that carrying the 143G/G. Thus, some functional CES1 genetic variants (for example, G143E) may impair ACEI activation, and consequently affect therapeutic outcomes of ACEI prodrugs. PMID:26076923

  15. [Psychotropic effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: what are the arguments?].

    PubMed

    Mesure, G; Fallet, A; Chevalier, J F

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a case of acute mania induced by perindopril (Coversyl) in a 57 year old man with no prior history of mental illness. This Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (ACEI) had been introduced eight days prior to the first signs of excitation, in order to treat recently diagnosed arterial hypertension. Without proof of reintroduction, and on the basis of clinical observations, the attribution appears plausible. Similar observations have been made for other molecules in this class of medication, such as captopril (Lopril). A review of literature regroups recent data concerning psychotropic effects of ACEIs. Several reports claim that captopril clearly acts as an antidepressant. Studies on the mood or the quality of life of treated hypertensive patients show ACEIs to have an euphoric-type positive effect compared to other anti-hypertensive treatments. Captopril and perindopril also act like potential antidepressants in experimental models of antidepression. Furthermore, pharmacologic data confirm that the most lipophilic ACEIs penetrate the central nervous system and argue in favor of the role of these molecules in activating central opioides. As these data provide evidence of mood swing in some patients, but also of an overall benefit in hypertensive populations, the clinical importance of the antidepressant effect of ACEIs needs further investigations. PMID:8529571

  16. Use of beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers and breast cancer survival: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Sara; Botteri, Edoardo; Munzone, Elisabetta; Cipolla, Carlo; Rotmensz, Nicole; DeCensi, Andrea; Gandini, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in Western Countries. Beta-blocker (BB) drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) were suggested to have a favorable role in the development and progression of BC. We have performed a meta-analysis to clarify the potential benefits of these drugs on BC survival. A total number of 46 265 BC patients from eleven papers were included, ten independent studies on BB use and seven on ACEi/ARB use. The summary hazard ratio (SHR) was estimated by pooling the study-specific estimates with random effects models and maximum likelihood estimation. We assessed the homogeneity of the effects across studies and evaluated between-study heterogeneity by meta-regression and sensitivity analyses. We found a significant improvement in BC specific survival for patients treated with BB drugs at the time of BC diagnosis (SHR: 0.44; 95%CI: 0.26-0.73 with I(2)  = 78%). We also observed a borderline significant improvement in disease free survival for subjects treated with BB (SHR: 0.71, 95%CI: 0.19-1.03). No association of ACEi/ARB use with disease free and overall survival was found. In conclusion, we report epidemiological evidence that BB improve BC-specific survival. Clinical trials addressing this hypothesis are warranted. PMID:26916107

  17. Diabetes and CVD risk during angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment in hypertension: a study of 15 990 patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasvold, L P; Bodegård, J; Thuresson, M; Stålhammar, J; Hammar, N; Sundström, J; Russell, D; Kjeldsen, S E

    2014-01-01

    Differences in clinical effectiveness between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in the primary treatment of hypertension are unknown. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients treated with ARBs or ACEis. Patients initiated on enalapril or candesartan treatment in 71 Swedish primary care centers between 1999 and 2007 were included. Medical records data were extracted and linked with nationwide hospital discharge and cause of death registers. The 11 725 patients initiated on enalapril and 4265 on candesartan had similar baseline characteristics. During a mean follow-up of 1.84 years, 36 482 patient-years, the risk of new diabetes onset was lower in the candesartan group (hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69–0.96, P=0.01) compared with the enalapril group. No difference between the groups was observed in CVD risk (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.87–1.13, P=0.86). More patients discontinued treatment in the enalapril group (38.1%) vs the candesartan group (27.2%). In a clinical setting, patients initiated on candesartan treatment had a lower risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes and lower rates of drug discontinuation compared with patients initiated on enalapril. No differences in CVD risk were observed. PMID:25211055

  18. Angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory peptide extracted from freshwater zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Kwon; Lee, Min-Su; Park, Heum Gi; Kim, Se-Kwon; Byun, Hee-Guk

    2010-04-01

    In this study, hydrolysates obtained from the freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflonus were investigated for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides. Freshwater rotifer protein was hydrolyzed using six separate enzymes in a batch reactor. The peptic hydrolysate had the highest ACE inhibitory activity compared to the other hydrolysates. The highest ACE inhibitory peptide was separated using Sephadex G-25 column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 column. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of purified ACE inhibitory peptide was 40.01 microg/mL. ACE inhibitory peptide was identified as being seven amino acid residues of Ala-Gln-Gly-Glu-Arg-His-Arg by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The IC(50) value of purified ACE inhibitory peptide was 47.1 microM, and Lineweaver-Burk plots suggested that the peptide purified from rotifer protein acts as a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The results of this study suggest that peptides derived from freshwater rotifers may be beneficial as antihypertension compounds in functional foods or as pharmaceuticals. PMID:20170338

  19. CYP4A2-Induced Hypertension is 20-HETE and Angiotensin II-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Komal; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Cheng, Jennifer; Gotlinger, Katherine; Inoue, Kazuyoshi; Goli, Mohan; Falck, John R.; Abraham, Nader G.; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that increased vascular endothelial expression of CYP4A2 leads to 20-HETE-dependent hypertension. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key regulator of blood pressure. In this study, we examined possible interactions between 20-HETE and RAS. In normotensive (110±3 mmHg) Sprague Dawley rats transduced with a lentivirus expressing the CYP4A2 cDNA under the control of an endothelial-specific promoter (VECAD-4A2), systolic blood pressure increased rapidly, reaching 139±1, 145±3 and 150±2 mmHg at 3, 5 and 10 days after transduction; blood pressure remained elevated, thereafter, with maximum levels of 163±3 mmHg. Treatment with lisinopril, losartan or the 20-HETE antagonist 20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z), 15(Z)-dienoic acid (20-HEDE) decreased blood pressure to control values, but blood pressure returned to its high levels after cessation of treatment. Endothelial-specific overexpression of CYP4A2 resulted in increased expression of vascular angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and increased levels of plasma and tissue Angiotensin II; all were attenuated by treatment with HET0016, an inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis, or with 20-HEDE. In cultured endothelial cells, 20-HETE specifically and potently induced ACE expression without altering the expression of ACE2, angiotensinogen or angiotensin II receptors. This is the first study to demonstrate that 20-HETE, a key constrictor eicosanoid in the microcirculation, induces ACE and AT1R expression and increases Angiotensin II levels, suggesting that the mechanisms by which 20-HETE promotes hypertension include activation of RAS that is likely initiated at the level of ACE induction. PMID:20837888

  20. Nine novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) muscle protein hydrolysates and antihypertensive effect of the potent active peptide in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Balti, Rafik; Bougatef, Ali; Sila, Assaâd; Guillochon, Didier; Dhulster, Pascal; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to identify novel ACE inhibitory peptides from the muscle of cuttlefish. Proteins were hydrolyzed and the hydrolysates were then subjected to various types of chromatography to isolate the active peptides. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides were isolated and their molecular masses and amino acid sequences were determined using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS, respectively. The structures of the most potent peptides were identified as Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro, Ala-Phe-Val-Gly-Tyr-Val-Leu-Pro and Glu-Lys-Ser-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Pro. The first peptide displayed the highest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 5.22μM. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro acts as a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE. Furthermore, antihypertensive effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) also revealed that oral administration of Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro can decrease systolic blood pressure significantly (p<0.01). These results suggest that the Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro would be a beneficial ingredient for nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals acting against hypertension and its related diseases. PMID:25306378

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LCZ696, a novel dual-acting angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi).

    PubMed

    Gu, Jessie; Noe, Adele; Chandra, Priya; Al-Fayoumi, Suliman; Ligueros-Saylan, Monica; Sarangapani, Ramesh; Maahs, Suzanne; Ksander, Gary; Rigel, Dean F; Jeng, Arco Y; Lin, Tsu-Han; Zheng, Weiyi; Dole, William P

    2010-04-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockade and neprilysin (NEP) inhibition together offer potential benefits for the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. LCZ696 is a novel single molecule comprising molecular moieties of valsartan and NEP inhibitor prodrug AHU377 (1:1 ratio). Oral administration of LCZ696 caused dose-dependent increases in atrial natriuretic peptide immunoreactivity (due to NEP inhibition) in Sprague-Dawley rats and provided sustained, dose-dependent blood pressure reductions in hypertensive double-transgenic rats. In healthy participants, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (n = 80) of single-dose (200-1200 mg) and multiple-dose (50-900 mg once daily for 14 days) oral administration of LCZ696 showed that peak plasma concentrations were reached rapidly for valsartan (1.6-4.9 hours), AHU377 (0.5-1.1 hours), and its active moiety, LBQ657 (1.8-3.5 hours). LCZ696 treatment was associated with increases in plasma cGMP, renin concentration and activity, and angiotensin II, providing evidence for NEP inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade. In a randomized, open-label crossover study in healthy participants (n = 56), oral LCZ696 400 mg and valsartan 320 mg were shown to provide similar exposure to valsartan (geometric mean ratio [90% confidence interval]: AUC(0-infinity) 0.90 [0.82-0.99]). LCZ696 was safe and well tolerated. These data support further clinical development of LCZ696, a novel, orally bioavailable, dual-acting angiotensin receptor-NEP inhibitor (ARNi) for hypertension and heart failure. PMID:19934029

  2. The Use of Plasma-Derived Complement C1-Esterase Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) in the Treatment of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Related Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Hermanrud, Thorbjørn; Duus, Nicolaj; Bygum, Anette; Rasmussen, Eva Rye

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema of the upper airways is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence has been increasing in the past two decades, primarily due to pharmaceuticals influencing the generation or degradation of the vasoactive molecule bradykinin. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate is a well-established treatment option of hereditary and acquired complement C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency, which are also mediated by an increased level of bradykinin resulting in recurrent angioedema. We here present a case of severe angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor related angioedema (ACEi-AE) of the hypopharynx that completely resolved rapidly after the infusion of plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate adding to the sparse reports in the existing literature. PMID:27123347

  3. The Use of Plasma-Derived Complement C1-Esterase Inhibitor Concentrate (Berinert®) in the Treatment of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Related Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hermanrud, Thorbjørn; Duus, Nicolaj; Bygum, Anette; Rasmussen, Eva Rye

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema of the upper airways is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. The incidence has been increasing in the past two decades, primarily due to pharmaceuticals influencing the generation or degradation of the vasoactive molecule bradykinin. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitor concentrate is a well-established treatment option of hereditary and acquired complement C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency, which are also mediated by an increased level of bradykinin resulting in recurrent angioedema. We here present a case of severe angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor related angioedema (ACEi-AE) of the hypopharynx that completely resolved rapidly after the infusion of plasma-derived C1-inhibitor concentrate adding to the sparse reports in the existing literature. PMID:27123347

  4. Chebulin: Terminalia chebula Retz. fruit-derived peptide with angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Sornwatana, Thakorn; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Wetprasit, Nuanchawee; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Ratanapo, Sunanta

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in blood pressure regulation. In this study, an ACE-hexapeptide inhibitor (Asp-Glu-Asn-Ser-Lys-Phe) designated as chebulin was produced from the fruit protein of Terminalia chebula Retz. by pepsin digestion, ultrafiltrated through a 3 KDa cut-off membrane, a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Chebulin was found to inhibit ACE in a noncompetitive manner, as supported by the structural model. It bounds to ACE by the hydrogen bond, hydrophobic and ionic interactions via the interactions of C-terminal Phe (Phe-6), and N-terminal residues (Asp-1 and Glu-2) with the amino acid residues on noncatalytic sites of the ACE. The results showed that chebulin derived from fruits of T. chebula Retz. is a potential ACE-peptide inhibitor that could be used as a functional food additive for the prevention of hypertension and as an alternative to ACE inhibitor drug. PMID:25410725

  5. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB.We conducted a nested case-control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates.From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78-0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66-0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine.In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  6. Cardiorespiratory effects of continuous i.v. administration of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat in the critically ill.

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, J; Müller, M; Heesen, M; Härter, K; Hempelmann, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Cardiorespiratory effects of long-term, continuous i.v. administration of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat were studied. 2. Forty-five consecutive critically patients suffering from trauma or postoperative complications were randomly separated into three groups (15 patients in each group) receiving either 0.25 mg h-1 or 0.50 mg h-1 enalaprilat, respectively, or saline solution as placebo (= control group). The infusion was continued for 5 days. 3. Haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were intensively monitored on admission to the intensive care unit (= 'baseline' values) and daily during the next 5 days. 4. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased significantly only in the enalaprilat-treated patients, whereas heart rate (HR) remained unchanged in these patients. 5. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were decreased by enalaprilat (0.50 mg h-1: PAP (mean +/- s.d.) decreased from 28.0 +/- 4.1 to 24.0 +/- 3.0 mm Hg) and remained significantly lower than in the control group. In the untreated control group, cardiac index (CI), oxygen consumption (VO2I) and oxygen delivery (DO2I) significantly decreased, which was blunted by enalaprilat infusion. Oxygen extraction (O2-extr) increased in both enalaprilat groups (0.25 mg h-1: from 26.1 +/- 5.5 to 30.4 +/- 4.0%; 0.50 mg h-1: 25.2 +/- 5.6 to 30.9 +/- 4.4%) and decreased in the control patients. 6. Right ventricular haemodynamics improved by enalaprilat infusion (0.50 mg h-1: RVEF increased from 40.0 +/- 3.5 to 45.5 +/- 4.0%). Lactate plasma concentrations decreased in the group with 0.50 mg h-1 enalaprilat (from 1.9 +/- 1.0 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg dl-1) and increased in the control patients. 7. Continuous infusion of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat exerted beneficial cardiorespiratory effects in the critically ill. The widespread common risk of altered perfusion with decreased CI, DO2, VO2, O2-extr and increased lactate concentration was blunted by enalaprilat infusion. 8. Although

  7. Omapatrilat, an Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme and Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitor, Attenuates Early Atherosclerosis in Diabetic and in Nondiabetic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Zohar; Dvir, Ayana; Shaish, Aviv; Trestman, Svetlana; Cohen, Hofit; Levkovietz, Hana; Rhachmani, Rita; Harats, Dror

    2003-01-01

    Omapatrilat inhibits both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase (NEP). ACE inhibitors have been shown to inhibit atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice and in several other animal models but failed in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor– deficient mice despite effective inhibition of the reninangiotensin- aldosterone system. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of omapatrilat on atherogenesis in diabetic and nondiabetic LDL receptor–deficient mice. LDL receptor–deficient male mice were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 11 each). Diabetes was induced in 2 groups by low-dose STZ, the other 2 groups served as nondiabetic controls. Omapatrilat (70 mg/kg/day) was administered to one of the diabetic and to one of the nondiabetic groups. The diabetic and the nondiabetic mice were sacrificed after 3 and 5 weeks, respectively. The aortae were examined and the atherosclerotic plaque area was measured. The atherosclerotic plaque area was significantly smaller in the omapatrilat-treated mice, both diabetic and nondiabetic, as compared to nontreated controls. The mean plaque area of omapatrilattreated nondiabetic mice was 9357 ± 7293 μm2, versus 71977 ± 34610 μm2 in the nontreated mice (P = .002). In the diabetic animals, the plaque area was 8887 ± 5386 μm2 and 23220 ± 10400 μm2, respectively for treated and nontreated mice (P = .001). Plasma lipids were increased by omapatrilat: Meanplasma cholesterol in treated mice, diabetic and nondiabetic combined, was 39.31 ± 6.00 mmol/L, versus 33.12 ± 7.64 mmol/L in the nontreated animals (P = .008). The corresponding combined mean values of triglycerides were 4.83 ± 1.93 versus 3.00 ± 1.26 mmol/L (P = .02). Omapatrilat treatment did not affect weight or plasma glucose levels. Treatment with omapatrilat inhibits atherogenesis in diabetic as well as nondiabetic LDL receptor–deficient mice despite an increase in plasma lipids, suggesting a direct effect on the arterial

  8. Mechanisms of fetal and neonatal renal impairment by pharmacologic inhibition of angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is highly conserved through evolutionary history, and has multiple functions in addition to maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis: these include the regulation of renal cell survival and cell death, and development of the kidney. The importance of angiotensin (ANG) in normal kidney development was first recognized in infants with renal maldevelopment born to mothers treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or with ANG AT1 receptor blockers. The molecular role of ANG in renal development has been elucidated using gene targeting in mice, revealing major effects in branching morphogenesis, vasculogenesis, development of the papilla and renal concentrating mechanism. Although exposure of the fetus to ANG inhibitors is potentially harmful throughout pregnancy, effects are greater in late compared to early gestation. Significant differences between humans and rodents in placental transfer of ANG and timing of renal development contributed to initial delays in recognizing the teratogenic effects of ANG inhibitors. Although administration of ACE or AT1 receptor inhibitors can slow progression of renal disease in older children, ANG inhibition in the neonatal period can aggravate renal injury due to congenital urinary tract obstruction. Neonates are also far more sensitive than older children to the hypotensive actions these agents and doses must be markedly reduced to avoid precipitating oliguria. Understanding the complex interactions of the maturing renin-angiotensin system in the perinatal period is essential in the use of ANG or renin inhibitors in women during childbearing years or in neonates with cardiovascular or renal disease. PMID:22876894

  9. Pharmacogenetic effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors over age-related urea and creatinine variations in patients with dementia due to Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Juliana Marília; Suchi Chen, Elizabeth; Cardoso Smith, Marilia; Ferreira Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal function declines according to age and vascular risk factors, whereas few data are available regarding genetically-mediated effects of anti-hypertensives over renal function. Objective: To estimate urea and creatinine variations in dementia due to Alzheimer disease (AD) by way of a pharmacogenetic analysis of the anti-hypertensive effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis). Methods: Consecutive outpatients older than 60 years-old with AD and no history of kidney transplant or dialytic therapy were recruited for prospective correlations regarding variations in fasting blood levels of urea and creatinine in one year, considering ACE genotypes of rs1800764 and rs4291 and their respective haplotypes, and treatment with ACEis along with blood pressure variations. Results: For 190 patients, 152 had arterial hypertension, and 122 used ACEis. Minor allele frequencies were 0.492 for rs1800764-C and 0.337 for rs4291-T, both in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There were no overall significant yearly variations in levels of urea and creatinine, but their concurrent variations were positively correlated (ρ <0.0001). Each A allele of rs4291 led to an yearly urea increase of 3,074 mg/dL, and an yearly creatinine increase of 0.044 mg/dL, while the use of ACEis was protective regarding creatinine variations. The use of ACEis was also protective for carriers of rs1800764-CT/rs4291-AA, while carriers of rs1800764-CT/rs4291-AT had steeper reductions in creatinine levels, particularly when they were treated with ACEis. Conclusions: Effects of ACEis over creatinine variations are genetically mediated and independent of blood pressure variations in older people with AD. PMID:27546928

  10. Protein Kinase C-δ Mediates Shedding of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 from Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fengxia; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Burger, Dylan; Kennedy, Christopher; Hébert, Richard L.; Burns, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7), and protects against diabetic renal injury. Soluble ACE2 fragments are shed from the proximal tubule, and appear at high levels in the urine with diabetes. High glucose-induced shedding of ACE2 from proximal tubular cells is mediated by the enzyme “a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17″ (ADAM17). Here, we investigated the mechanism for constitutive shedding of ACE2. Mouse proximal tubular cells were cultured and ACE2 shedding into the media was assessed by enzyme activity assay and immunoblot analysis. Cells were incubated with pharmacologic inhibitors, or transfected with silencing (si) RNA. Incubation of proximal tubular cells with increasing concentrations of D-glucose stimulated ACE2 shedding, which peaked at 16 mM, while L-glucose (osmotic control) had no effect on shedding. In cells maintained in 7.8 mM D-glucose, ACE2 shedding was significantly inhibited by the pan-protein kinase C (PKC) competitive inhibitor sotrastaurin, but not by an inhibitor of ADAM17. Incubation of cells with the PKC-α and -β1-specific inhibitor Go6976, the PKC β1 and β2-specific inhibitor ruboxistaurin, inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases-2,-8, and -9, or an inhibitor of ADAM10 (GI250423X) had no effect on basal ACE2 shedding. By contrast, the PKC-δ inhibitor rottlerin significantly inhibited both constitutive and high glucose-induced ACE2 shedding. Transfection of cells with siRNA directed against PKC-δ reduced ACE2 shedding by 20%, while knockdown of PKC-ε was without effect. These results indicate that constitutive shedding of ACE2 from proximal tubular cells is mediated by PKC-δ, which is also linked to high glucose-induced shedding. Targeting PKC-δ may preserve membrane-bound ACE2 in proximal tubule in disease states and diminish Ang II-stimulated adverse signaling. PMID:27313531

  11. Prevalence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in South Indian population with hypertension and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, R; Kumaresan, R; Giri, P

    2015-01-01

    Context: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is associated with a high risk of developing further severe complications such as, cardiovascular disease and eventually End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) leading to death. Hypertension plays a key role in the progression of renal failure and is also a chief risk factor for the occurrence of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Aim: This study investigates the possible association of insertion (I) and deletion (D) polymorphism of ACE gene in patients of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) with and without hypertension (HT). Settings and Design: Total 120 participants with 30 members in each group (Control, HT, CKD and CKD-HT) were chosen followed by informed consent. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected and subjected to biochemical analyses and nested PCR amplification was performed to genotype the DNA, for ACE I/D using specific primers. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS version 13. Allele and genotypic frequency was calculated by direct gene counting method. Comparison of the different genotypes was done by using Chi square test. Odd's ratios were calculated with a 95% confidence interval limit. Results: The ACE genotype were distributed as II, 27 (90%); DD, 2 (6.67%) and ID, 1 (3.33%) in control, II, 1 (3.33%); DD, 5 (16.67%) and ID, 24 (80%) in HT, II, 4 (13.33%); DD, 24 (80%) and ID, 2 (6.67%) in CKD and II, 0 (0%); DD, 2 (6.67%) and ID, 28 (93.33%) in CKD-HT group. Conclusions: D allele of ACE gene confers a greater role in genetic variations underlying CKD and hypertension. This result suggest that CKD patients should be offered analysis for defects in ACE I/D polymorphisms, especially if they are hypertensive. PMID:26440392

  12. Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers in Terms of Major Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chao, Pei-Wen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lee, Yi-Jung; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chu, Hsi; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renin and aldosterone activity levels are low in elderly patients, raising concerns about the benefits and risks of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) use. However, data from direct comparisons of the effects of ACEIs on ARBs in the elderly population remain inconclusive. In this nationwide study, all patients aged ≥ 70 years were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database for the period 2000 to 2009 and were followed up until the end of 2010. The ARB cohort (12,347 patients who continuously used ARBs for ≥ 90 days) was matched to ACEI cohort using high-dimensional propensity score (hdPS). Intention-to-treat (ITT) and as-treated (AT) analyses were conducted. In the ITT analysis, after considering death as a competing risk, the ACEI cohort had similar risks of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio [HR] 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–1.06), ischemic stroke (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.90–1.07), and heart failure (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.83–1.04) compared with the ARB cohort. No difference in adverse effects, such as acute kidney injury (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89–1.09) and hyperkalemia (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.87–1.20), was observed between cohorts. AT analysis produced similar results to those of ITT analysis. We were unable to demonstrate a survival difference between cohorts (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88–1.21) after considering drug discontinuation as a competing risk in AT analysis. Our study supports the notion that ACEI and ARB users have similar risks of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), even in elderly populations. PMID:26512568

  13. Effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor antagonist combination on nitric oxide bioavailability and atherosclerotic change in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Toshio; Kuroi, Akio; Ikejima, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Katsunobu; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Mochizuki, Seiichi; Goto, Masami; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Akasaka, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the effects of co-administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in genetically hyperlipidemic rabbits with our newly developed NO sensor. Plasma NO was measured using the new NO sensor in the abdominal aorta of anesthetized Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. Acetylcholine (ACh)-stimulated (20 microg in 5 min into the aortic arch) NO production was recorded after an 8 week per os pretreatment with 1) vehicle (control), 2) the ACEI enalapril (E: 3 mg/kg/day), 3) the ARB losartan (L: 30 mg/kg/day) and 4) enalapril (1.5 mg/kg/day)+losartan (15 mg/kg/day) (E+L). Intra-aortic infusion of ACh produced an increase in plasma NO concentration, which was significantly greater with all the drug treatments than with the control. E increased ACh-induced NO significantly more than L (by 6.9 nmol/L, and 4.7 nmol/L, respectively). E+L increased ACh-induced NO by 9.5 nmol/L, significantly more than either E or L. Plasma peroxynitrite concentration was 1.2 pmol/mg protein in the control group and significantly less than in the E- and L-group. The lowest peroxynitrite concentration was observed in the E+L group (0.5 pmol/mg protein), which was significantly lower than in the E-group and the L-group. Optical coherence tomography and histology of the thoracic aorta revealed that the plaque area decreased significantly more with the combination than with the monotherapy (p<0.01). In conclusion, the combined treatment with an ACEI and an ARB may have additive protective effects on endothelial function as well as atherosclerotic change. PMID:18497479

  14. Release of angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor peptides during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of Parmigiano Reggiano PDO cheese and their absorption through an in vitro model of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, L; Catalani, E; Morera, P; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Bernabucci, U; De Noni, I; Nardone, A

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of 8 bovine casein-derived peptides (VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP, and HLPLP) reported as angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors (ACE-I) was investigated in the 3-kDa ultrafiltered water-soluble extract (WSE) of Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) cheese samples by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry via an electrospray ionization source. Only VPP, IPP, LHLPLP, and HLPLP were revealed in the WSE, and their total amount was in the range of 8.46 to 21.55 mg/kg of cheese. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion, the same ACE-I peptides along with the newly formed AYFYPEL and AYFYPE were found in the 3 kDa WSE of PR digestates. Digestates presented high amounts (1,880-3,053 mg/kg) of LHLPLP, whereas the remaining peptides accounted for 69.24 to 82.82 mg/kg. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values decreased from 7.92 ± 2.08 in undigested cheese to 3.20 ± 1.69 after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The 3-kDa WSE of digested cheeses were used to study the transport of the 8 ACE-I peptides across the monolayers of the Caco-2 cell culture grown on a semipermeable membrane of the transwells. After 1h of incubation, 649.20 ± 148.85 mg/kg of LHLPLP remained in the apical compartment, whereas VPP, IPP, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, and HLPLP accounted in total for less than 36.78 mg/kg. On average, 0.6% of LHLPLP initially present in the digestates added to the apical compartment were transported intact to the basolateral chamber after the same incubation time. Higher transport rate (2.9%) was ascertained for the peptide HLPLP. No other intact ACE-I peptides were revealed in the basolateral compartment. For the first time, these results demonstrated that the ACE-I peptides HLPLP and LHLPLP present in the in vitro digestates of PR cheese are partially absorbed through an in vitro model of human intestinal epithelium. PMID:26364103

  15. Angioedema of the lips and tongue induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Helen A; Steele, John C; Field, E Anne; Darroch, Campbell J

    2004-01-01

    The following case reports describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of two patients who attended Liverpool University Dental Hospital with rapidly increasing swelling of the lips and tongue. Both patients were suffering from angioedema and were taking an angiotension-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (ACEI). A provisional diagnosis of ACEI-induced angioedema was made. An intramuscular injection of chlorpheniramine maleate was given to both patients and they were immediately transferred to the local accident and emergency department. These cases illustrate the potential role of the general dental practitioner in the early recognition and management of this potentially life-threatening condition. PMID:14768205

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor prevents oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis in carbon tetrachloride-treated rat liver.

    PubMed

    Reza, Hasan Mahmud; Tabassum, Nabila; Sagor, Md Abu Taher; Chowdhury, Mohammed Riaz Hasan; Rahman, Mahbubur; Jain, Preeti; Alam, Md Ashraful

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a common feature of chronic liver injury, and the involvement of angiotensin II in such process has been studied earlier. We hypothesized that anti-angiotensin II agents may be effective in preventing hepatic fibrosis. In this study, Long Evans female rats were used and divided into four groups such as Group-I, Control; Group-II, Control + ramipril; Group-III, CCl4; and Group-IV, CCl4 + ramipril. Group II and IV are treated with ramipril for 14 d. At the end of treatment, the livers were removed, and the level of hepatic marker enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase, Alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase), nitric oxide, advanced protein oxidation product , catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation were determined. The degree of fibrosis was evaluated through histopathological staining with Sirius red and trichrome milligan staining. Carbon-tetrachloride (CCl4) administration in rats developed hepatic dysfunction and raised the hepatic marker enzymes activities significantly. CCl4 administration in rats also produced oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis in liver. Furthermore, angiotensinogen-inhibitor ramipril normalized the hepatic enzymes activities and improved the antioxidant enzyme catalase activity. Moreover, ramipril treatment ameliorated lipid peroxidation and hepatic inflammation in CCl4-treated rats. Ramipril treatment also significantly reduced hepatic fibrosis in CCl4-administered rats. In conclusion, our investigation suggests that the antifibrotic effect of ramipril may be attributed to inhibition of angiotensin-II mediated oxidative stress and inflammation in liver CCl4-administered rats. PMID:26862777

  17. [Inhibition of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in heart failure, or from CONSENSUS to PARADIGM-HF].

    PubMed

    Vítovec, Jiří; Špinar, Jindřich; Špinarová, Lenka

    2015-05-01

    An historical survey is presented of mortality trials on angiotensin-aldosteron system inhibition in patients with chronic heart failure. From the CONSENSUS trial up to the PARADIGM-HF trial, ACE inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AT1-blockers, ARBs, sartans), along with mineralocorticoid receptor blockers, have been the gold standard of treatment. Both direct renin blocker aliskiren and dual blocker enalapril + neprilysin proved ineffective; on the other hand, the new dual inhibitor valsartan + neprilysin LCZ 696 is a new and promising therapeutic agent for future treatment of chronic heart failure. PMID:26075858

  18. Risk of Hospitalized Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Persons Randomized to Diuretic, ACE-Inhibitor, or Calcium-Channel Blocker in ALLHAT

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William; Piller, Linda B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Whittle, Jeffrey; Jafri, Syed Z.A.; Ford, Charles E.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Oparil, Suzanne; Furberg, Curt D.; Grimm, Richard H.; Alderman, Michael H.; Davis, Barry R.; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium channel-blockers (CCB) are an important class of medication useful in the treatment of hypertension. Several observational studies have suggested an association between CCB therapy and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Using administrative databases, we re-examined in a post-hoc analysis whether the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants randomized to the calcium-channel blocker amlodipine had a greater risk of hospitalized gastrointestinal bleeding (a pre-specified outcome) compared to those randomized to the diuretic chlorthalidone or the ACE-inhibitor lisinopril. Participants randomized to chlorthalidone did not have a reduced risk for gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations compared to participants randomized to amlodipine (HR, 1.09, 95% CI 0.92-1.28). Those randomized to lisinopril were at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding compared those randomized to chlorthalidone (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.00-1.36). In a post-hoc comparison, participants assigned lisinopril therapy had a higher risk of hospitalized gastrointestinal hemorrhage (HR,1.27, 95% CI 1.06-1.51) versus those assigned to amlodipine. In-study use of atenolol prior to first gastrointestinal hemorrhage was related to a lower incidence of GI bleeding (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.83). In conclusion, hypertensive patients on amlodipine do not have an increased risk of GI bleeding hospitalizations compared to those on either chlorthalidone or lisinopril. PMID:24283598

  19. Life-threatening angio-oedema after the first dose of an ACE inhibitor-not an anaphylactic reaction.

    PubMed

    Krogh Nielsen, Troels; Bygum, Anette; Rye Rasmussen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old Caucasian woman, with no prior history of swellings, who was admitted to a hospital due to life-threatening angio-oedema. She had, the previous day, been prescribed an ACE inhibitor for her essential hypertension. She had taken one tablet at night-time, and awoke in the morning with a swollen face progressing to involve the tongue and throat within a few hours. On arrival at her doctor's office, her voice had altered. Corticosteroids and antihistamine were administered while awaiting an ambulance. Arriving at the emergency department, she had dyspnoea due to increasingly severe angio-oedema of the upper airways. Neither adrenaline inhalations, intravenously administrated corticosteroids, atropine nor furosemide were effective and the patient soon become bradycardic. A tracheotomy was performed and the patient was placed on a ventilator. She eventually made a full recovery. It was concluded that she had suffered from life-threatening angio-oedema due to her new medication. PMID:27229746

  20. A genome-wide association study identifies variants in KCNIP4 associated with ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Mosley, J D; Shaffer, C M; Van Driest, S L; Weeke, P E; Wells, Q S; Karnes, J H; Velez Edwards, D R; Wei, W-Q; Teixeira, P L; Bastarache, L; Crawford, D C; Li, R; Manolio, T A; Bottinger, E P; McCarty, C A; Linneman, J G; Brilliant, M H; Pacheco, J A; Thompson, W; Chisholm, R L; Jarvik, G P; Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Baldwin, E; Ralston, J; Larson, E B; Grafton, J; Scrol, A; Jouni, H; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Borthwick, K M; Kuivaniemi, H; Carey, D J; Ritchie, M D; Bradford, Y; Verma, S S; Chute, C G; Veluchamy, A; Siddiqui, M K; Palmer, C N A; Doney, A; MahmoudPour, S H; Maitland-van der Zee, A H; Morris, A D; Denny, J C; Roden, D M

    2016-06-01

    The most common side effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) drugs is cough. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ACEi-induced cough among 7080 subjects of diverse ancestries in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network. Cases were subjects diagnosed with ACEi-induced cough. Controls were subjects with at least 6 months of ACEi use and no cough. A GWAS (1595 cases and 5485 controls) identified associations on chromosome 4 in an intron of KCNIP4. The strongest association was at rs145489027 (minor allele frequency=0.33, odds ratio (OR)=1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-1.4), P=1.0 × 10(-8)). Replication for six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KCNIP4 was tested in a second eMERGE population (n=926) and in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside, Scotland (GoDARTS) cohort (n=4309). Replication was observed at rs7675300 (OR=1.32 (1.01-1.70), P=0.04) in eMERGE and at rs16870989 and rs1495509 (OR=1.15 (1.01-1.30), P=0.03 for both) in GoDARTS. The combined association at rs1495509 was significant (OR=1.23 (1.15-1.32), P=1.9 × 10(-9)). These results indicate that SNPs in KCNIP4 may modulate ACEi-induced cough risk. PMID:26169577

  1. Renin angiotensin system: A novel target for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nandha, Ruchika; Singh, Harpal

    2012-03-01

    Migraine constitutes 16% of primary headaches affecting 10-20% of general population according to International Headache Society. Till now nonsteroidalanti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), opioids and triptans are the drugs being used for acute attack of migraine. Substances with proven efficacy for prevention include β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, antiepileptic drugs and antidepressants. All the already available drugs have certain limitations. Either they are unable to produce complete relief or 30-40% patients are no responders or drugs produce adverse effects. This necessitates the search for more efficacious and well-tolerated drugs. A new class of drugs like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin II receptor antagonists have recently been studied for their off label use in prophylaxis of migraine. Studies, done so far, have shown results in favour of their clinical use because of the ability to reduce number of days with headache, number of days with migraine, hours with migraine, headache severity index, level of disability, improved Quality of life and decrease in consumption of specific or nonspecific analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of these drugs in prophylaxis of migraine and can give physician a direction to use these drugs for chronic migraineurs. Searches of pubmed, Cochrane database, Medscape, Google and clinicaltrial.org were made using terms like ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists and migraine. Relevant journal articles were chosen to provide necessary information. PMID:22529467

  2. Inhibition of ACE Retards Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Signs of Neuronal Degeneration in Aged Rats Subjected to Chronic Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    AbdAlla, Said; el Hakim, Ahmed; Abdelbaset, Ahmed; Elfaramawy, Yasser; Quitterer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of age-associated dementia are on the rise worldwide. Treatment approaches for dementia are insufficient and novel therapies are not readily available. In this context repurposing of established drugs appears attractive. A well-established class of cardiovascular drugs, which targets the angiotensin II system, is such a candidate, which currently undergoes a paradigm shift with regard to the potential benefit for treatment of neurodegenerative symptoms. In search for additional evidence, we subjected aged rats to chronic unpredictable mild stress, which is known to enhance the development of AD-related neuropathological features. We report here that four weeks of chronic mild stress induced a strong upregulation of the hippocampal angiotensin-converting enzyme (Ace) at gene expression and protein level. Concomitantly, tau protein hyperphosphorylation developed. Signs of neurodegeneration were detected by the significant downregulation of neuronal structure proteins such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and synuclein-gamma (Sncg). Ace was involved in neurodegenerative symptoms because treatment with the brain-penetrating ACE inhibitor, captopril, retarded tau hyperphosphorylation and signs of neurodegeneration. Moreover, ACE inhibitor treatment could counteract glutamate neurotoxicity by preventing the downregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2). Taken together, ACE inhibition targets neurodegeneration triggered by environmental stress. PMID:26697495

  3. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  4. Direct positive chronotropic action by angiotensin II in the isolated mouse atrium.

    PubMed

    Mori, Toyoki; Hashimoto, Ayako

    2006-07-10

    We observed the direct positive chronotropic effect of angiotensin II in mouse atria and characterized its pharmacological property. C57BL/6J mice were anesthetized with pentobarbital and hearts were quickly excised. Atrial preparations including right and left atrium were isolated and suspended in the organ bath filled with Krebs-Henseleit solution gassed with 95% O2 and 5% CO2. Angiotensin II at concentrations of 10(-10) to 10(-6) M caused concentration-dependent increase in heart rate, and the maximal response was about 13% of that by isoproterenol. The effect was blocked by the selective AT1-receptor antagonist, losartan at concentrations of 10(-6) M, but not by the selective beta-blocker, nadolol at concentration of 10(-5) M. Furthermore, angiotensin I also caused concentration-dependent increase in heart rate, and the effect was blocked by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril at concentrations of 10(-6) M. These results suggested that angiotensin I is converted to angiotensin II via ACE system in mice atria, and regulate heart rate through AT1-receptor stimulation, not by beta-adrenergic receptor. PMID:16564555

  5. The association of angiotensin-converting enzyme with biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lower angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity could increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as ACE functions to degrade amyloid-β (Aβ). Therefore, we investigated whether ACE protein and activity levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were associated with CSF Aβ, total tau (tau) and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau). Methods We included 118 subjects from our memory clinic-based Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (mean age 66 ± 8 years) with subjective memory complaints (n = 40) or AD (n = 78), who did not use antihypertensive drugs. We measured ACE protein levels (ng/ml) and activity (RFU) in CSF and serum, and amyloid β1–42, tau and ptau (pg/ml) in CSF. Results Cross-sectional regression analyses showed that ACE protein level and activity in CSF and serum were lower in patients with AD compared to controls. Lower CSF ACE protein level, and to a lesser extent serum ACE protein level and CSF ACE activity, were associated with lower CSF Aβ, indicating more brain Aβ pathology; adjusted regression coefficients (B) (95% CI) per SD increase were 0.09 (0.04; 0.15), 0.06 (0.00; 0.12) and 0.05 (0.00; 0.11), respectively. Further, lower CSF ACE protein level was associated with lower CSF tau and ptau levels; adjusted B’s (95% CI) per SD increase were 0.15 (0.06; 0.25) and 0.17 (0.10; 0.25), respectively. Conclusions These results strengthen the hypothesis that ACE degrades Aβ. This could suggest that lowering ACE levels by for example ACE-inhibitors might have adverse consequences for patients with, or at risk for AD. PMID:24987467

  6. A focused parameter update: hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.

    PubMed

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lang, David M; Craig, Timothy; Dreyfus, David; Hsieh, Fred; Khan, David; Sheikh, Javed; Weldon, David; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Cox, Linda; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Randolph, Christopher R; Schuller, Diane E; Spector, Sheldon L; Tilles, Stephen A; Wallace, Dana

    2013-06-01

    These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters (JTFPP), representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The AAAAI and the ACAAI have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "A focused parameter update: Hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the JTFPP, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters understands that the cost of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents is an important concern that might appropriately influence the work-up and treatment chosen for a given patient. The JTFPP recognizes that the emphasis of our primary recommendations regarding a medication might vary, for example, depending on third-party payer issues and product patent expiration dates. However, because the cost of a given test or agent is so widely variable and there is a paucity of pharmacoeconomic data, the JTFPP generally does not consider cost when formulating practice parameter recommendations. In some instances the cost benefit of an intervention is considered relevant, and commentary might be provided. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion

  7. Possible involvement of ATP-dependent K-channel related mechanisms in the antihypertensive and cough suppressant effects of the novel ACE inhibitor (2S, 3aS, 7aS)-1-(N2-nicotinoyl-L-lysyl-gamma-D-glutamyl)octahydro-1H- indole-2-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Takeyama, K; Hosoki, K; Karasawa, T

    1997-06-01

    The antihypertensive and cough suppressant mechanisms of DU-1777 ((2S,3aS,7aS)-1-(N2-nicotinoyl-L-lsyl-gamma-D-glutamyl )octahydro-1H-indole-2 -carboxylic acid, CAS 116662-73-8), a new long-acting angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The antihypertensive effects of DU-1777 at 10 mg/kg p.o. and cromakalim at 0.3 mg/kg p.o. were partially (about 60%) or fully antagonized by glibenclamide at 10 mg/kg i.v. in 2-kidney, 1-clip renal hypertensive rats (2K-1C RHR). The antihypertensive effects of a Ca blocker (nifedipine) and other ACE inhibitors (captopril, alacepril, enalapril, lisinopril, imidapril and quanapril) were not antagonized by glibenclamide. In deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats (DOCA-HR), the antihypertensive effects of DU-1777 at 3-30 mg/kg p.o. were fully antagonized by glibenclamide. However, in vitro, DU-1777 (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) did not affect aortic ring contractions induced by high K (30 mmol/l). In guinea pig, citric acid induced cough was increased by ACE inhibitors, captopril, alacepril, enalapril and lisinopril (10 and 30 mg/kg p.o.). DU-1777 had a tendency to decrease citric acid induced cough and the effect was antagonized by glibenclamide. These results suggest that while DU-1777 itself does not open ATP-dependent K channel, it indirectly produces these effects through unknown mechanisms in vivo. Moreover, these effects contributed to the antihypertensive effect in DOCA-HR and cough suppressant effect in guinea pigs. PMID:9239450

  8. Smooth muscle cell conditioned medium elevates angiotensin-converting enzyme of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, F S; Lee, S L; Fanburg, B L

    1989-11-01

    Conditioned medium obtained from bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC) in culture was found to elevate angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (EC) by 2- to 3-fold upon incubation for 24 to 48 h. The elevation in ACE was time dependent and inhibited by 10(-6) M cycloheximide, making it likely that the elevation was related to new protein synthesis by EC. Conditioned medium from EC failed to produce the same effect. The stimulatory effect of SMC conditioned medium on EC ACE was uninfluenced by exposures to anoxia as compared with room air, either during conditioning of medium or while assaying the effect of conditioned medium on EC ACE. Inhibitors of prostaglandin metabolism and calcium transport failed to influence the stimulatory effect of SMC conditioned medium on EC ACE. The stimulatory effect on EC ACE by conditioned medium was additive to that produced by Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and, similar to baseline ACE, was inhibited by 3 x 10(-8) M ouabain. Thus, SMC produce a factor that regulates the level of EC ACE. PMID:2484059

  9. Disposition and metabolism of [(14)C] Sacubitril/Valsartan (formerly LCZ696) an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Flarakos, Jimmy; Du, Yancy; Bedman, Timothy; Al-Share, Qusai; Jordaan, Pierre; Chandra, Priya; Albrecht, Diego; Wang, Lai; Gu, Helen; Einolf, Heidi J; Huskey, Su-Er; Mangold, James B

    2016-11-01

    1. Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) is an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) providing simultaneous inhibition of neprilysin (neutral endopeptidase 24.11; NEP) and blockade of the angiotensin II type-1 (AT1) receptor. 2. Following oral administration, [(14)C]LCZ696 delivers systemic exposure to valsartan and AHU377 (sacubitril), which is rapidly metabolized to LBQ657 (M1), the biologically active neprilysin inhibitor. Peak sacubitril plasma concentrations were reached within 0.5-1 h. The mean terminal half-lives of sacubitril, LBQ657 and valsartan were ∼1.3, ∼12 and ∼21 h, respectively. 3. Renal excretion was the dominant route of elimination of radioactivity in human. Urine accounted for 51.7-67.8% and feces for 36.9 to 48.3 % of the total radioactivity. The majority of the drug was excreted as the active metabolite LBQ657 in urine and feces, total accounting for ∼85.5% of the total dose. 4. Based upon in vitro studies, the potential for LCZ696 to inhibit or induce cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and cause CYP-mediated drug interactions clinically was found to be low. PMID:26931777

  10. Localized accumulation of angiotensin II and production of angiotensin-(1-7) in rat luteal cells and effects on steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, John R; Nemeth, Gabor; Yamada, Yuji; Naftolin, Frederick; Merino, Maricruz

    2006-08-01

    These studies aim to investigate subcellular distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) in rat luteal cells, identify other bioactive angiotensin peptides, and investigate a role for angiotensin peptides in luteal steroidogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed ANG II distributed within the cytoplasm and nuclei of luteal cells. HPLC analysis showed peaks that eluted with the same retention times as ANG-(1-7), ANG II, and ANG III. Their relative concentrations were ANG II >or= ANG-(1-7) > ANG III, and accumulation was modulated by quinapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Z-proprolinal (ZPP), an inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), and parachloromercurylsulfonic acid (PCMS), an inhibitor of sulfhydryl protease. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, did not affect peptide accumulation. Quinapril, ZPP, PCMS, and PMSF, as well as losartan and PD-123319, the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonists, were used in progesterone production studies. ZPP significantly reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent progesterone production (P < 0.05). Quinapril plus ZPP had a greater inhibitory effect on LH-stimulated progesterone than either inhibitor alone, but this was not reversed by exogenous ANG II or ANG-(1-7). Both PCMS and PMSF acutely blocked LH-stimulated progesterone, and PCMS blocked LH-sensitive cAMP accumulation. Losartan inhibited progesterone production in permeabilized but not intact luteal cells and was reversed by ANG II. PD-123319 had no significant effect on luteal progesterone production in either intact or permeabilized cells. These data suggest that steroidogenesis may be modulated by angiotensin peptides that act in part through intracellular AT1 receptors. PMID:16478781

  11. Serum levels of renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II in patients treated by surgical excision, propranolol and captopril for problematic proliferating infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sulzberger, L; Baillie, R; Itinteang, T; de Jong, S; Marsh, R; Leadbitter, P; Tan, S T

    2016-03-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the biology of infantile haemangioma (IH) and its accelerated involution induced by β-blockers was first proposed in 2010. This led to the first clinical trial in 2012 using low-dose captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, demonstrating a similar response in these tumours. This study aimed to compare serial serum levels of the components of the RAS in patients before and after surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment for problematic proliferating IH. Patients with problematic proliferating IH underwent measurements of serum levels of plasma renin activity (PRA), ACE and angiotensin II (ATII) before, and 1-2 and 6 months following surgical excision, propranolol or captopril treatment. This study included 27 patients undergoing surgical excision (n = 8), propranolol (n = 11) and captopril (n = 8) treatment. Treatment with either surgical excision or propranolol resulted in significant decrease in the mean levels of PRA. Surgical excision or captopril treatment led to significant decline in the mean levels of ATII. All three treatment modalities had no significant effect on the mean levels of ACE. This study demonstrates the effect of surgical excision, propranolol and captopril treatment in lowering the levels of PRA and ATII, but not ACE, supporting a mechanistic role for the RAS in the biology of IH. PMID:26612192

  12. Persistent change in cardiac fibroblast physiology after transient ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, K M; Biwer, L A; Madhavpeddi, L; Ramaiah, P; Shahid, W; Hale, T M

    2015-10-01

    Transient angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition induces persistent changes that protect against future nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor-induced cardiac fibrosis and inflammation. Given the role of fibroblasts in mediating these effects, the present study investigates whether prior ACE inhibition produced persistent changes in cardiac fibroblast physiology. Adult male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with vehicle (C+L) or the ACE inhibitor, enalapril (E+L) for 2 wk followed by a 2-wk washout period and a subsequent 7-day challenge with the NOS inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. A third set of untreated SHRs served as controls. At the end of the study period, cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from control, C+L, and E+L left ventricles to assess proliferation rate, collagen expression, and chemokine release in vitro. After 7 days of NOS inhibition, there were areas of myocardial injury but no significant change in collagen deposition in E+L and C+L hearts in vivo. In vitro, cardiac fibroblasts isolated from C+L but not E+L hearts were hyperproliferative, demonstrated increased collagen type I gene expression, and an elevated secretion of the macrophage-recruiting chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor. These findings demonstrate that in vivo N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester treatment produces phenotypic changes in fibroblasts that persist in vitro. Moreover, this is the first demonstration that transient ACE inhibition can produce a persistent modification of the cardiac fibroblast phenotype to one that is less inflammatory and fibrogenic. It may be that the cardioprotective effects of ACE inhibition are related in part to beneficial changes in cardiac fibroblast physiology. PMID:26371174

  13. Renoprotective effects of combined SGLT2 and ACE inhibitor therapy in diabetic Dahl S rats

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Naoki; Williams, Jan M; Slaughter, Tiffani N; Kato, Sota; Takahashi, Teisuke; Miyata, Noriyuki; Roman, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether control of hyperglycemia with a new SGLT2 inhibitor, luseogliflozin, given alone or in combination with lisinopril could prevent the development of renal injury in diabetic Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl S) rats treated with streptozotocin (Dahl-STZ). Blood glucose levels increased from normoglycemic to hyperglycemic levels after treatment of STZ in Dahl S rats. Chronic treatment of Dahl-STZ rats with luseogliflozin (10 mg/kg/day) increased the fractional excretion of glucose and normalized blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Lisinopril (20 mg/kg/day) reduced blood pressure from 145 ± 9 to 120 ± 5 mmHg in Dahl-STZ rats, while luseogliflozin had no effect on blood pressure. Combination therapy reduced blood pressure more than that seen in the rats treated with luseogliflozin or lisinopril alone. Dahl-STZ rats exhibited hyperfiltration, mesangial matrix expansion, severe progressive proteinuria, focal glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. Control of hyperglycemia with luseogliflozin reduced the degree of hyperfiltration and renal injury but had no effect on blood pressure or the development of proteinuria. Treatment with lisinopril reduced hyperfiltration, proteinuria and renal injury in Dahl-STZ rats. Combination therapy afforded greater renoprotection than administration of either drug alone. These results suggest that long-term control of hyperglycemia with luseogliflozin, especially in combination with lisinopril to lower blood pressure, attenuates the development of renal injury in this rat model of advanced diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26169541

  14. The Effect of Renin-angiotensin System Inhibitors on Kidney Allograft Survival: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Mao, Michael A.; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Sathick, Insara J. J.; Erickson, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors in patients with chronic kidney disease, and especially in diabetic kidney disease, has been shown to provide renoprotective effects and slow progression to end-stage renal disease. However, this protective effect in kidney transplant patient populations is unclear. Aim: The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of RAS inhibitors on kidney allograft survival. Materials and Methods: A literature search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed from inception through February 2016. Studies that reported relative risks or hazard ratios comparing the risks of renal graft loss in renal transplant recipients who received RAS inhibitors vs. controls were included. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Results: Five studies (3 RCTs and 2 cohort studies) with 20024 kidney transplant patients were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled RR of allograft failure in recipients who received RAS inhibitors was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.45–1.21). When meta-analysis was limited only to RCTs, the pooled RR of allograft failure in patients using RAS inhibitors was 0.59 (95%: CI 0.20–1.69). The risk for mortality (RR: 1.13 [95% CI: 0.62–2.07]) in patients using RAS inhibitors compared to controls was not significantly reduced. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated insignificant reduced risks of renal graft loss among renal transplant recipients who received RAS inhibitors. Future studies assessing the potential benefits of RAS inhibitors on allograft survival in specific kidney transplant patient populations are needed. PMID:27583237

  15. Aldosterone, Parathyroid Hormone, and the Use of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Inhibitors: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenifer; de Boer, Ian H.; Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Siscovick, David S.; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Allison, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Context: Aldosterone and PTH are implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and skeletal diseases. An expanding body of evidence supports a bidirectional and positive physiologic relationship between aldosterone and PTH. Large population-based studies confirming this relationship, and whether it may be targeted as a potential method to mitigate the clinical consequences associated with excess aldosterone and PTH, are needed. Objective: We hypothesized that higher aldosterone levels would associate with higher PTH, and that the use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors would predict lower PTH in a large, multi-ethnic, community-based cohort. Design, Setting, Participants: We conducted cross-sectional analyses of participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis without apparent primary hyperparathyroidism or chronic kidney disease (n = 5668). We evaluated associations of RAAS inhibitor use with PTH concentration among 1888 treated hypertensive participants. We also tested associations of serum aldosterone concentration with PTH concentration among 1547 participants with these measurements. Outcome: Serum PTH concentration. Results: Higher aldosterone associated with higher PTH (β = 0.19 pg/ml per 1 ng/dl of aldosterone, P < .0001), and this finding was most pronounced among those with a primary hyperaldosteronism-like phenotype. There was a stepwise increment in PTH when comparing untreated normotensives, hypertensives using RAAS inhibitors, untreated hypertensives, and treated hypertensives using non-RAAS inhibitors (40.8, 45.0, 46.2, 47.1 pg/ml, respectively). The use of any RAAS inhibitor independently associated with lower PTH (β = −2.327 pg/ml per use of RAAS inhibitor, P = .006), when compared with the use of any non-RAAS inhibitor medication. Conclusions: Higher serum aldosterone concentration is associated with higher serum PTH concentration, and the use of RAAS inhibitors is associated with lower PTH concentration

  16. Different effects of thiol and nonthiol ace inhibitors on copper-induced lipid and protein oxidative modification.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A C; Filipe, P M; Freitas, J P; Manso, C F

    1996-01-01

    Differences among angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) in scavenging reactive oxygen species were described and mainly attributed to the presence or absence of a thiol group. Plasma constituents and red cells are known targets for oxidative damage. Transition metals, like copper, are well known catalizers of free radical generation. In the present study we compared the abilities of captopril (a thiol ACEI), enalaprilat, and lisinopril (two nonthiol ACEI) for inhibiting copper-induced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation and fluorescence generation in whole human plasma and low-density lipoprotein. The effects of those ACEI on copper/hydrogen peroxide-induced fluorescence development and electrophoretic mobility modification in albumin and on copper-induced TBARS formation and hemolysis in human red cells were also compared. Captopril was more effective than the two nonthiol ACEI in inhibiting plasma and LDL lipid peroxidation, but it was ineffective in inhibiting the albumin oxidative modification that was moderately inhibited by enalaprilat and lisinopril. On the contrary, the inhibitory effects of the three ACEI on copper-induced lipid peroxidation and hemolysis in red cell suspensions were more uniform. This as yet unreported red cell protective effect may deserve pharmacological evaluation. Our results show that captopril is a more effective antioxidant than the nonthiol ACEI in some systems. However, the nonthiol ACEI also have the ability to partially protect some targets against oxidative damage. These observations suggest that the presence of a thiol group in the ACEI structure is not the only determinant for the antioxidant properties. PMID:8904291

  17. A genome-wide association study identifies variants in KCNIP4 associated with ACE inhibitor-induced cough

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, J D; Shaffer, C M; Van Driest, S L; Weeke, P E; Wells, Q S; Karnes, J H; Velez Edwards, D R; Wei, W-Q; Teixeira, P L; Bastarache, L; Crawford, D C; Li, R; Manolio, T A; Bottinger, E P; McCarty, C A; Linneman, J G; Brilliant, M H; Pacheco, J A; Thompson, W; Chisholm, R L; Jarvik, G P; Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Baldwin, E; Ralston, J; Larson, E B; Grafton, J; Scrol, A; Jouni, H; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Borthwick, K M; Kuivaniemi, H; Carey, D J; Ritchie, M D; Bradford, Y; Verma, S S; Chute, C G; Veluchamy, A; Siddiqui, M K; Palmer, C N A; Doney, A; MahmoudPour, S H; Maitland-van der Zee, A H; Morris, A D; Denny, J C; Roden, D M

    2016-01-01

    The most common side effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) drugs is cough. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ACEi-induced cough among 7080 subjects of diverse ancestries in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network. Cases were subjects diagnosed with ACEi-induced cough. Controls were subjects with at least 6 months of ACEi use and no cough. A GWAS (1595 cases and 5485 controls) identified associations on chromosome 4 in an intron of KCNIP4. The strongest association was at rs145489027 (minor allele frequency=0.33, odds ratio (OR)=1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–1.4), P=1.0 × 10−8). Replication for six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KCNIP4 was tested in a second eMERGE population (n=926) and in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside, Scotland (GoDARTS) cohort (n=4309). Replication was observed at rs7675300 (OR=1.32 (1.01–1.70), P=0.04) in eMERGE and at rs16870989 and rs1495509 (OR=1.15 (1.01–1.30), P=0.03 for both) in GoDARTS. The combined association at rs1495509 was significant (OR=1.23 (1.15–1.32), P=1.9 × 10−9). These results indicate that SNPs in KCNIP4 may modulate ACEi-induced cough risk. PMID:26169577

  18. Catalytic properties of recombinant dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase from Escherichia coli: a comparative study with angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carlos Eduardo L; Magliarelli, Helena de Fátima; Paschoalin, Thaysa; Nchinda, Aloysius T; Lima, Jackson C; Juliano, Maria A; Paiva, Paulo B; Sturrock, Edward D; Travassos, Luiz R; Carmona, Adriana K

    2009-09-01

    Dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase from Escherichia coli (EcDcp) is a zinc metallopeptidase with catalytic properties closely resembling those of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). However, EcDcp and ACE are classified in different enzyme families (M3 and M2, respectively) due to differences in their primary sequences. We cloned and expressed EcDcp and studied in detail the enzyme's S(3) to S(1)' substrate specificity using positional-scanning synthetic combinatorial (PS-SC) libraries of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides. These peptides contain ortho-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) and 2,4-dinitrophenyl (Dnp) as donor/acceptor pair. In addition, using FRET substrates developed for ACE [Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH, Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH and Abz-LFK(Dnp)-OH] as well as natural ACE substrates (angiotensin I, bradykinin, and Ac-SDKP-OH), we show that EcDcp has catalytic properties very similar to human testis ACE. EcDcp inhibition studies were performed with the ACE inhibitors captopril (K(i)=3 nM) and lisinopril (K(i)=4.4 microM) and with two C-domain-selective ACE inhibitors, 5-S-5-benzamido-4-oxo-6-phenylhexanoyl-L-tryptophan (kAW; K(i)=22.0 microM) and lisinopril-Trp (K(i)=0.8 nM). Molecular modeling was used to provide the basis for the differences found in the inhibitors potency. The phylogenetic relationship of EcDcp and related enzymes belonging to the M3 and M2 families was also investigated and the results corroborate the distinct origins of EcDcp and ACE. PMID:19558329

  19. Proangiogenic effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition is mediated by the bradykinin B(2) receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, J S; Bergaya, S; Tamarat, R; Duriez, M; Boulanger, C M; Levy, B I

    2001-10-12

    Recent studies have suggested a proangiogenic effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. We hypothesized that such a proangiogenic effect of ACE inhibition may be mediated, in part, by bradykinin (BK) B(2)-receptor pathway. This study therefore examined the neovascularization induced by ACE inhibitor treatment in B(2) receptor-deficient mice (B(2)(-/-)) in a model of surgically induced hindlimb ischemia. After artery femoral occlusion, wild-type and B(2)(-/-) mice were treated with or without ACE inhibitor (perindopril, 3 mg/kg/d) for 28 days. Angiogenesis was then quantitated by microangiography, capillary density measurement, and laser Doppler perfusion imaging. The protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were determined by Western blot. In wild-type animals, vessel density and capillary number in the ischemic leg were raised by 1.8- and 1.4-fold, respectively, in mice treated with ACE inhibitor when compared with the nontreated animals (P<0.01). This corresponded to an improved ischemic/nonischemic leg perfusion ratio by 1.5-fold in ACE inhibitor-treated animals when compared with the untreated ones (0.87+/-0.07 versus 0.59+/-0.05, respectively, P<0.01). Activation of the angiogenic process was also associated with a 1.7-fold increase in tissue eNOS protein level in mice treated with ACE inhibitor (P<0.05 versus control) but not with changes in VEGF protein level. Conversely, ACE inhibition did not affect vessel density, blood flow, and eNOS protein level in ischemic hindlimb of B(2)(-/-) mice. Therefore, proangiogenic effect of ACE inhibition is mediated by B(2)-receptor signaling and was associated with upregulation of eNOS content, independently of VEGF expression. PMID:11597990

  20. Angiotensin II regulation of angiotensin-converting enzymes in spontaneously hypertensive rat primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Gowrisankar, Yugandhar V; Clark, Michelle A

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays a critical role in cardiovascular and blood pressure regulation. Ang II is produced by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and it interacts with the Ang AT1 receptor to cause much of its well-known cardiovascular effects. Ang-(1-7) is another active peptide produced by the rennin-angiotensin system. This peptide is produced from Ang I or Ang II by the catalytic activity of ACE2. Ang-(1-7) interacts with the Mas receptor to counteract many of the effects of Ang II. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis acts opposite of the ACE/Ang II/AT1 axis. In this study we investigated how Ang II regulates the key enzymes of these axes, ACE and its homolog ACE2, and determined whether they are dysregulated in the hypertensive condition. Brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes isolated from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) were used in these studies. Ang II effect on the enzymes' mRNA and protein levels was measured using quantitative PCR and western blotting techniques, respectively. Results from this study showed that Ang II up-regulated ACE protein levels, but down-regulated ACE mRNA levels in brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes in both models. Ang II also reduced ACE2 mRNA expression in SHR and Wistar astrocytes isolated from both brain regions. Ang II effects on ACE2 protein were biphasic. In SHR astrocytes, Ang II-mediated ACE2 protein initially increased then decreased at later time points. In contrast, in Wistar astrocytes, Ang II initially decreased ACE2 protein expression, but up-regulated the protein at later time points. The findings of these studies suggest that Ang II has a differential effect on ACE and ACE2 expression. Furthermore, in the SHR model there may be alteration in the ACE/ACE2 balance in a manner that favors increased Ang II generation and decreased Ang-(1-7) production contributing to the hypertensive phenotype observed in this model. The levels of angiotensin (Ang) II depend on the actions of angiotensin-converting enzyme

  1. Des-Aspartate-Angiotensin I Attenuates Mortality of Mice Exposed to Gamma Radiation via a Novel Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Sethi, Gautam; Loke, Weng-Keong; Sim, Meng-Kwoon

    2015-01-01

    ACE inhibitors and ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers) have been shown to attenuate radiation injuries in animal models of lethal gamma irradiation. These two classes of drug act by curtailing the actions of angiotensin II-linked inflammatory pathways that are up-regulated during gamma radiation in organ systems such as the brain, lung, kidney, and bone marrow. ACE inhibitors inhibit ACE and attenuate the formation of angiotensin II from angiotensin I; ARBs block the angiotensin AT1 receptor and attenuate the actions of angiotensin II that are elicited through the receptor. DAA-I (des-aspartate-angiotensin I), an orally active angiotensin peptide, also attenuates the deleterious actions of angiotensin II. It acts as an agonist on the angiotensin AT1 receptor and elicits responses that oppose those of angiotensn II. Thus, DAA-I was investigated for its anticipated radioprotection in gamma irradiated mice. DAA-I administered orally at 800 nmole/kg/day for 30 days post exposure (6.4 Gy) attenuated the death of mice during the 30-day period. The attenuation was blocked by losartan (50 nmole/kg/day, i.p.) that was administered sequential to DAA-I administration. This shows that the radioprotection was mediated via the angiotensin AT1 receptor. Furthermore, the radioprotection correlated to an increase in circulating PGE2 of surviving animals, and this suggests that PGE2 is involved in the radioprotection in DAA-I-treated mice. At the hematopoietic level, DAA-I significantly improved two syndromes of myelosuppression (leucopenia and lymphocytopenia), and mice pre-treated with DAA-I prior to gamma irradiation showed significant improvement in the four myelodysplastic syndromes that were investigated, namely leucopenia, lymphocytopenia, monocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Based on the known ability of PGE2 to attenuate the loss of functional hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in radiation injury, we hypothesize that PGE2 mediated the action of DAA-I. DAA-I completely

  2. Dual renin-angiotensin system inhibition for prevention of renal and cardiovascular events: do the latest trials challenge existing evidence?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Circulatory and tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) play a central role in cardiovascular (CV) and renal pathophysiology, making RAS inhibition a logical therapeutic approach in the prevention of CV and renal disease in patients with hypertension. The cardio- and renoprotective effects observed with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) monotherapy, together with the availability of a direct renin inhibitor (DRI), led to the investigation of the potential benefits of dual RAS inhibition. In small studies, ARB and ACE inhibitor combinations were shown to be beneficial in patients with CV or renal disease, with improvement in surrogate markers. However, in larger outcome trials, involving combinations of ACE inhibitors, ARBs or DRIs, dual RAS inhibition did not show reduction in mortality in patients with diabetes, heart failure, coronary heart disease or after myocardial infarction, and was in fact, associated with increased harm. A recent meta-analysis of all major trials conducted over the past 22 years involving dual RAS inhibition has clearly shown that the risk-benefit ratio argues against the use of dual RAS inhibition. Hence, the recent evidence clearly advocates against the use of dual RAS inhibition, and single RAS inhibition appears to be the most suitable approach to controlling blood pressure and improving patient outcomes. PMID:23866091

  3. Effects of nabumetone, celecoxib, and ibuprofen on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Robert; Weiss, Robert; Zusman, Randall M; Haig, Ann; Flavin, Susan; MacDonald, Brian

    2003-02-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs interfere with certain antihypertensive therapies. In a double-blind study, 385 hypertensive patients stabilized on an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor were treated with nabumetone, celecoxib, ibuprofen, or placebo for 4 weeks. Ibuprofen caused significantly greater increases in systolic (P < .001) and diastolic (P < .01) blood pressures (BPs) compared to placebo, but not nabumetone or celecoxib. The proportion of patients with systolic BP increases of clinical concern at end point was significantly higher (P < .001) for the ibuprofen group (16.7%; 15 of 90), but not for the nabumetone group (5.5%; 5 of 91) or the celecoxib group (4.6%; 4 of 87) compared to the placebo group (1.1%; 1 of 91). PMID:12559680

  4. An Unusual Case of Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibitor-Related Penile Angioedema with Evolution to the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jonathan G.; Bench, Elias M.; Plantmason, Lee

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old African American male with a long history of poorly controlled hypertension presented to the emergency department (ED) with two days of genital edema and pain. During ED work-up, the patient developed sudden onset of non-pitting, non-pruritic, and non-urticarial upper lip edema. Review of his antihypertensive medication list revealed that he normally took benazepril, highly suggestive of a diagnosis of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor-related angioedema (ACEI-RA). We present the first reported case of penile ACEI-RA that progressed to involve the oropharynx. The ED management of the condition and some of the newer treatment options available for ACEI-RA is also briefly discussed. PMID:26759679

  5. Chinese medicinal formula Fufang Xueshuantong capsule could inhibit the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Shujing; Wang, Yonggang; Long, Chaofeng; Su, Weiwei; Rong, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Fufang Xueshuantong (FXST) capsule, a Chinese medicinal formula composed of four herbals – Panax notoginseng, Radix Astragali, Radix Salvia Miltiorrhizae and Radix Scrophulariaceae, has been used to treat cardiovascular diseases for many years, but the pharmacological mechanisms underlying its effects has not been clarified. This study investigates if a connection between FXST and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) might be an explanation for its pharmacological effects. ACE inhibition assay was performed on FXST capsule, 50% ethanol extracts from the four herbals and three selected saponins most abundant in P. notoginseng (Ginsenoside Rg1, Ginsenoside Rb1 and Notoginsenoside R1) using a biochemical test. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of liberated hippuric acid from the ACE assay was conducted to determine the inhibitory effect. As a result, FXST and extracts from P. notoginseng showed a significant and dose-dependent inhibition on ACE activity with the IC50 values of 115 μg/ml and 179 μg/ml, respectively. But extracts from the other three herbals and the three selected saponins had no significant effect on ACE inhibition. Compared to other reported plant extracts, FXST could be considered as an effective ACE inhibitor. The inhibition of ACE activity supports the traditional use of FXST on blood circulation and the inhibitory property of FXST is mainly caused by P. notoginseng. PMID:26019516

  6. Data of the natural and pharmaceutical angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor isoleucine-tryptophan as a potent blocker of matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Kopaliani, Irakli; Martin, Melanie; Zatschler, Birgit; Müller, Bianca; Deussen, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The present data are related to the research article entitled "Whey peptide isoleucine-tryptophan inhibits expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in rat aorta" [1]. Here we present data on removal of endothelium from aorta, endothelium dependent aortic relaxation and inhibition of expression of pro-MMP2 by di-peptide isoleucine-tryptophan (IW). Experiments were performed in rat aortic endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vitro, along with isolated rat aorta ex vivo. The cells and isolated aorta were stimulated with angiotensin II (ANGII) or angiotensin I (ANGI). ACE activity was inhibited by treatment with either IW or captopril (CA). Losartan was used as a blocker of angiotensin type-1 receptor. IW inhibited MMP2 protein expression induced with ANGI in a dose-dependent manner. IW was effective both in ECs and SMCs, as well as in isolated aorta. Similarly, captopril (CA) inhibited ANGI-induced MMP2 protein expression in both in vitro and ex vivo. Neither IW nor CA inhibited ANGII-induced MMP2 protein expression in contrast to losartan. The data also displays that removal of endothelium in isolated rat aorta abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxation induced with acetylcholine. However, SMC-dependent relaxation induced with sodium nitroprusside remained intact. Finally, the data provides histological evidence of selective removal of endothelial cells from aorta. PMID:27508250

  7. Aronia melanocarpa Elliot Reduces the Activity of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme—In Vitro and Ex Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Joanna; Broncel, Marlena; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of two-month supplementation with chokeberry preparation on the activity of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). During the in vitro stage of the study, we determined the concentration of chokeberry extract, which inhibited the activity of ACE by 50% (IC50). Methods. The participants (n = 70) were divided into three groups: I—patients with MS who received chokeberry extract supplements, II—healthy controls, and III—patients with MS treated with ACE inhibitors. Results. After one and two months of the experiment, a decrease in ACE activity corresponded to 25% and 30%, respectively. We documented significant positive correlations between the ACE activity and the systolic (r = 0.459, P = 0.048) and diastolic blood pressure, (r = 0.603, P = 0.005) and CRP. The IC50 of chokeberry extract and captopril amounted to 155.4 ± 12.1 μg/mL and 0.52 ± 0.18 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusions. Our in vitro study revealed that chokeberry extract is a relatively weak ACE inhibitor. However, the results of clinical observations suggest that the favorable hypotensive action of chokeberry polyphenols may be an outcome of both ACE inhibition and other pleotropic effects, for example, antioxidative effect. PMID:25050143

  8. Interactions between carnosine and captopril on free radical scavenging activity and angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazuo; Ueno, Akemi; Nishikawa, Yukari

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine), being plentiful in skeletal muscles and neuronal tissues, and captopril, a widely used angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were examined concerning free radical scavenging activity and ACE activity in vitro. Not only captopril, but also carnosine, at concentrations less than those ordinarily found in muscles and neuronal tissues, significantly scavenged 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) radical cations, and inhibited ACE activity. Cupric ions reversed the ABTS scavenging activity of carnosine and captopril, whereas cupric ions strengthened the inhibitory action of carnosine on ACE activity. In contrast, cupric ions antagonized the inhibition of ACE activity induced by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, indicating that the inhibitory effect of carnosine on ACE activity is not related to the chelating action of carnosine. On the other hand, carnosine and captopril synergistically enhanced the free radical scavenging activity, but not the inhibitory effect on the ACE activity. These data suggest that carnosine in its concurrent use with captopril could act as a beneficial free radical scavenger, with less danger of overdose, in the inhibition of ACE activity. PMID:16394648

  9. An evaluation of the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor on the growth rate of small abdominal aortic aneurysms: a randomised placebo-controlled trial (AARDVARK).

    PubMed Central

    Kiru, Gaia; Bicknell, Colin; Falaschetti, Emanuela; Powell, Janet; Poulter, Neil

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although data are inconsistent, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) have been associated with a reduced incidence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture in analysis of administrative databases. OBJECTIVES (1) To investigate whether or not the ACE-I perindopril (Coversyl arginine, Servier) reduces small AAA growth rate and (2) to evaluate blood pressure (BP)-independent effects of perindopril on small AAA growth and to compare the repeatability of measurement of internal and external aneurysm diameters. DESIGN A three-arm, multicentre, single-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial. SETTING Fourteen hospitals in England. PARTICIPANTS Men or women aged ≥ 55 years with an AAA of 3.0-5.4 cm in diameter by internal or external measurement according to ultrasonography and who met the trial eligibility criteria. INTERVENTIONS Patients were randomised to receive 10 mg of perindopril arginine daily, 5 mg of the calcium channel blocker amlodipine daily or placebo daily. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was AAA diameter growth using external measurements in the longitudinal plane, which in-trial studies suggested was the preferred measure. Secondary outcome measures included AAA rupture, AAA repair, modelling of the time taken for the AAA to reach the threshold for intervention (5.5 cm) or referral for surgery, tolerance of study medication (measured by compliance, adverse events and quality of life) and a comparison of the repeatability of measures of internal and external AAA diameter. Patients were followed up every 3-6 months over 2 years. RESULTS In total, 227 patients were recruited and randomised into the three groups, which were generally well matched at baseline. Multilevel modelling was used to determine the maximum likelihood estimates for AAA diameter growth. No significant differences in the estimates of annual growth were apparent [1.68 (standard error 0.02) mm, 1.77 (0.02) mm and 1.81 (0.02) mm in the

  10. Chronobiology and Pharmacologic Modulation of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Dogs: What Have We Learned?

    PubMed

    Mochel, Jonathan P; Danhof, Meindert

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a primary cause of morbidity and mortality with an increasing prevalence in human and canine populations. Recognition of the role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) overactivation in the pathophysiology of CHF has led to significant medical advances. By decreasing systemic vascular resistance and angiotensin II (AII) production, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril improve cardiac hemodynamics and reduce mortality in human and dog CHF patients. Although several experiments have pointed out that efficacy of ACE inhibitors depends on the time of administration, little attention is paid to the optimum time of dosing of these medications. A thorough characterization of the chronobiology of the renin cascade has the potential to streamline the therapeutic management of RAAS-related diseases and to help determining the optimal time of drug administration that maximizes efficacy of ACE inhibitors, while minimizing the occurrence of adverse effects. We have developed an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model that adequately captures the disposition kinetics of the paradigm drug benazeprilat, as well as the time-varying changes of systemic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone biomarkers, without and with ACE inhibition therapy. Based on these chronobiological investigations, the optimal efficacy of ACE inhibitors is expected with bedtime dosing. The data further show that benazepril influences the dynamics of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone cascade, resulting in a profound decrease in AII and aldosterone (ALD), while increasing renin activity for about 24 h. From the results of recent investigations in human, it is hypothesized that reduction of AII and ALD is one of the drivers of increased survival and improved quality of life in dogs receiving ACE inhibitors. To support and consolidate this hypothesis, additional efforts should be directed toward the collection of circulating RAAS peptides

  11. Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2

    SciTech Connect

    Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan; Wen Fuqiang

    2010-05-15

    Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

  12. Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

  13. High Incidence of ACE/PAI-1 in Association to a Spectrum of Other Polymorphic Cardiovascular Genes Involving PBMCs Proinflammatory Cytokines in Hypertensive Hypercholesterolemic Patients: Reversibility with a Combination of ACE Inhibitor and Statin

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Charbel; Haddad, Katia; Hamoui, Samar; Azar, Albert; Fajloun, Ziad; Makdissy, Nehman

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are significantly high in the Lebanese population with the two most predominant forms being atherosclerosis and venous thrombosis. The purpose of our study was to assess the association of a spectrum of CVD related genes and combined state of hypertension hypercholesterolemia (HH) in unrelated Lebanese. Twelve polymorphisms were studied by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization of DNA from 171 healthy individuals and 144 HH subjects. Two genes were significantly associated with HH: ACE (OR: 9.20, P<0.0001) and PAI-1 (OR: 2.29, P = 0.007), respectively with the occurrence of the risky alleles “Del” and “4G”. The frequencies of the Del and 4G alleles were found to be 0.98 and 0.90 in the HH group versus 0.84 and 0.79 in the healthy group, respectively. Serum ACE activity and PAI-I increased significantly with Del/Del and 4G/5G genotypes. The co-expression of Del/4G(+/+) was detected in 113 out of 171 (66.0%) controls and 125 out of 144 (86.8%) HH subjects. Del/4G(-/-) was detected in only 6 (3.5%) controls and undetected in the HH group. Three venous thrombosis related genes [FV(Leiden), MTHFR(A1298C) and FXIII(V34L)] were significantly related to the prominence of the co-expression of Del/4G(+/+). A range of 2 to 8 combined polymorphisms co-expressed per subject where 5 mutations were the most detected. In Del/4G(+/+) subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced significant elevated levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α contrary to IL-10, and no variations occurred for IL-4. ACE inhibitor (ramipril) in combination with statin (atorvastatin) and not alone reversed significantly the situation. This first report from Lebanon sheds light on an additional genetic predisposition of a complex spectrum of genes involved in CVD and suggests that the most requested gene FVL by physicians may not be sufficient to diagnose eventual future problems that can occur in the cardiovascular system. Subjects expressing the double mutations

  14. Pharmacogenetic Risk Stratification in Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Treated Patients with Congestive Heart Failure: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Nelveg-Kristensen, Karl Emil; Busk Madsen, Majbritt; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Egfjord, Martin; Berg Rasmussen, Henrik; Riis Hansen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence for pharmacogenetic risk stratification of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) treatment is limited. Therefore, in a cohort of ACEI-treated patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), we investigated the predictive value of two pharmacogenetic scores that previously were found to predict ACEI efficacy in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypertension, respectively. Score A combined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the angiotensin II receptor type 1 gene (rs275651 and rs5182) and the bradykinin receptor B1 gene (rs12050217). Score B combined SNPs of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (rs4343) and ABO blood group genes (rs495828 and rs8176746). Methods Danish patients with CHF enrolled in the previously reported Echocardiography and Heart Outcome Study were included. Subjects were genotyped and categorized according to pharmacogenetic scores A and B of ≤1, 2 and ≥3 each, and followed for up to 10 years. Difference in cumulative incidences of cardiovascular death and all-cause death were assessed by the cumulative incidence estimator. Survival was modeled by Cox proportional hazard analyses. Results We included 667 patients, of whom 80% were treated with ACEIs. Differences in cumulative incidences of cardiovascular death (P = 0.346 and P = 0.486) and all-cause death (P = 0.515 and P = 0.486) were not significant for score A and B, respectively. There was no difference in risk of cardiovascular death or all-cause death between subjects with score A ≤1 vs. 2 (HR 1.03 [95% CI 0.79–1.34] and HR 1.11 [95% CI 0.88–1.42]), score A ≤1 vs. ≥3 (HR 0.80 [95% CI 0.59–1.08] and HR 0.91 [95% CI 0.70–1.20]), score B ≤1 vs. 2 (HR 1.02 [95% CI 0.78–1.32] and HR 0.98 [95% CI 0.77–1.24]), and score B ≤1 vs. ≥3 (HR 1.03 [95% CI 0.75–1.41] and HR 1.05 [95% CI 0.79–1.40]), respectively. Conclusions We found no association between either of the analyzed pharmacogenetic scores and fatal outcomes in ACEI

  15. Renal ACE immunohistochemical localization in NIDDM patients with nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Yoshikawa, H; Tanegashima, M; Miyagi, M; Kobayashi, M; Sakai, K; Hayashi, I; Aikawa, A; Ohara, T; Hasegawa, A

    1998-02-01

    A role of renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in diabetic nephropathy has been suggested. Immunohistochemical localization of ACE was studied in 20 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic nephropathy and 17 healthy kidney transplant donors, with ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism also examined in the latter. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that ACE staining was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced in glomeruli and slightly decreased in proximal tubules in diabetic patients. Glomeruli positive for ACE immunostaining were observed in 23.5% of the healthy subjects and in 80% of the diabetic patients. All patients with nodular lesions had ACE-positive glomeruli and showed significantly (P < 0.01) more intense glomerular ACE immunostaining than patients without nodular lesions. Among healthy controls, subjects with the DD genotype had ACE-positive glomeruli more frequently and tended to show slightly increased intensity on proximal tubule ACE immunostaining compared with subjects with other genotypes. These observations suggest that increased ACE localization in glomeruli is likely to be one of the factors in the increased renin-angiotensin system activity in glomeruli in patients with diabetic nephropathy. There is a possibility that ACE gene I/D polymorphism may be related to renal ACE immunohistochemical localization. PMID:9469501

  16. Predictors of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced reduction of urinary albumin excretion in nondiabetic patients.

    PubMed

    van de Wal, Ruud M A; Gansevoort, Ron T; van der Harst, Pim; Boomsma, Frans; Thijs Plokker, H W; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; de Jong, Paul E; van Gilst, Wiek H; Voors, Adriaan A

    2006-11-01

    Urinary albumin excretion is a predictor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated which parameters determine baseline urinary albumin excretion in nondiabetic subjects, without renal disease. In addition, we evaluated the parameters that predict the albuminuria-lowering efficacy of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. In this substudy of the Prevention of Renal and Vascular Endstage Disease Intervention Trial, 384 microalbuminuric patients were included. Patient and biochemical characteristics were obtained at baseline and after 3 months of double-blinded, randomized treatment (fosinopril 20 mg or placebo). Mean age was 51.1+/-11.5 years, and 65.6% were male. Median urinary albumin excretion was 22.2 mg per 24 hours. At baseline, mean arterial pressure (beta(standardized)=0.161; P=0.006), urinary sodium excretion (beta(standardized)=0.154; P=0.011), and estimated renal function were independently associated with albumin excretion. In these predominantly normotensive to prehypertensive subjects, fosinopril reduced albumin excretion by 18.5% versus a 6.1% increase on placebo after 3 months (P<0.001). Fosinopril use and blood pressure reduction independently predicted the change in urinary albumin excretion. Baseline urinary albumin excretion independently predicted the antialbuminuric effect of fosinopril (beta(standardized)=-0.303; P<0.001). In conclusion, at baseline, sodium intake and blood pressure were positively associated with urinary albumin excretion. Fosinopril reduced albuminuria more than might be expected from its blood pressure-lowering effect alone, and this effect was more outspoken in subjects with higher baseline albumin excretion. Based on our data, we hypothesize that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition may result in superior cardiovascular protection when compared with other blood pressure-lowering agents in subjects with higher baseline levels of albuminuria. PMID:17000930

  17. Renoprotective effects of renin–angiotensin system inhibitor combined with calcium channel blocker or diuretic in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yiming; Huang, Rongshuang; Kim, Sehee; Zhao, Yuliang; Li, Yi; Fu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To conduct a meta-analysis of studies comparing the renoprotective effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) combined with either calcium channel blocker (CCB) or diuretic, but not both, in hypertensive patients. Data sources: Pubmed, Embase, Medline, and Cochrane databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of blood pressure lowering treatments in patients with hypertension. Study selection: RCTs comparing the renoprotective effects of ACEI/ARB plus CCB with ACEI/ARB plus diuretic in hypertensive patients, with at least one of the following reported outcomes: urinary protein, estimated glomerular filtration rate/creatinine clearance (eGFR/CrCl), or serum creatinine. Results: Based on 14 RCTs with 18,125 patients, statistically significant benefits were found in ACEI/ARB plus CCB for maintaining eGFR/CrCl (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.20–0.53; P < 0.001), serum creatinine reduction (mean difference [MD] = −0.05 mg/dL; 95% CI: −0.07 to −0.03; P < 0.001). However, no statistical differences were found between the 2 therapeutic strategies in terms of urinary protein (MD = 7.48%; 95% CI: –6.13% to 21.08%; P = 0.28; I2 = 92%). Conclusions: This meta-analysis concluded that ACEI/ARB plus CCB have a stronger effect on the maintenance of renal function in patients with hypertension than ACEI/ARB plus diuretic. PMID:27428210

  18. Novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from an edible mushroom, Pleurotus cystidiosus O.K. Miller identified by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been reported to reduce mortality in patients with hypertension. Compared to chemosynthetic drugs, ACE inhibitors derived from natural sources such as food proteins are believed to be safer for consumption and to have fewer adverse effects. Some edible mushrooms have been reported to significantly reduce blood pressure after oral administration. In addition, mushrooms are known to be rich in protein content. This makes them a potential source of ACE inhibitory peptides. Hence, the objective of the current study was to isolate and characterise ACE inhibitory peptides from an edible mushroom, Pleurotus cystidiosus. Methods ACE inhibitory proteins were isolated from P. cystidiosus based on the bioassay guided purification steps, i.e. ammonium sulphate precipitation, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Active fraction was then analysed by LC-MS/MS and potential ACE inhibitory peptides identified were chemically synthesized. Effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestions on the ACE inhibitory activity of the peptides and their inhibition patterns were evaluated. Results Two potential ACE inhibitory peptides, AHEPVK and GPSMR were identified from P. cystidiosus with molecular masses of 679.53 and 546.36 Da, respectively. Both peptides exhibited potentially high ACE inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 62.8 and 277.5 μM, respectively. SEC chromatograms and BIOPEP analysis of these peptides revealed that the peptide sequence of the hexapeptide, AHEPVK, was stable throughout gastrointestinal digestion. The pentapeptide, GPSMR, was hydrolysed after digestion and it was predicted to release a dipeptide ACE inhibitor, GP, from its precursor. The Lineweaver-Burk plot of AHEPVK showed that this potent and stable ACE inhibitor has a competitive inhibitory effect against ACE. Conclusion The present study indicated that the peptides from P. cystidiosus could be

  19. Identification of prolyl carboxypeptidase as an alternative enzyme for processing of renal angiotensin II using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Weir, Nathan M.; Leiva, Orly; Ong, Frank S.; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Schmaier, Alvin H.; Morris, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) catalyzes conversion of ANG II to ANG-(1–7). The present study uses newly established proteomic approaches and genetic mouse models to examine the contribution of alternative renal peptidases to ACE2-independent formation of ANG-(1–7). In situ and in vitro mass spectrometric characterization showed that substrate concentration and pH control renal ANG II processing. At pH ≥6, ANG-(1–7) formation was significantly reduced in ACE2 knockout (KO) mice. However, at pH <6, formation of ANG-(1–7) in ACE2 KO mice was similar to that in wild-type (WT) mice, suggesting alternative peptidases for renal ANG II processing. Furthermore, the dual prolyl carboxypeptidase (PCP)-prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) inhibitor Z-prolyl-prolinal reduced ANG-(1–7) formation in ACE2 KO mice, while the ACE2 inhibitor MLN-4760 had no effect. Unlike the ACE2 KO mice, ANG-(1–7) formation from ANG II in PEP KO mice was not different from that in WT mice at any tested pH. However, at pH 5, this reaction was significantly reduced in kidneys and urine of PCP-depleted mice. In conclusion, results suggest that ACE2 metabolizes ANG II in the kidney at neutral and basic pH, while PCP catalyzes the same reaction at acidic pH. This is the first report demonstrating that renal ANG-(1–7) formation from ANG II is independent of ACE2. Elucidation of ACE2-independent ANG-(1–7) production pathways may have clinically important implications in patients with metabolic and renal disease. PMID:23392115

  20. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme stimulates fracture healing and periosteal callus formation – role of a local renin-angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, P; Schwenzer, S; Slotta, JE; Scheuer, C; Tami, AE; Holstein, JH; Histing, T; Burkhardt, M; Pohlemann, T; Menger, MD

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) regulates blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis. In addition, ‘local’ tissue-specific RAS have been identified, regulating regeneration, cell growth, apoptosis, inflammation and angiogenesis. Although components of the RAS are expressed in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, a local RAS in bone has not yet been described and there is no information on whether the RAS is involved in fracture healing. Therefore, we studied the expression and function of the key RAS component, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), during fracture healing. Experimental approach: In a murine femur fracture model, animals were treated with the ACE inhibitor perindopril or vehicle only. Fracture healing was analysed after 2, 5 and 10 weeks using X-ray, micro-CT, histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and biomechanical testing. Key results: ACE was expressed in osteoblasts and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the periosteal callus during fracture healing, accompanied by expression of the angiotensin type-1 and type-2 receptors. Perindopril treatment reduced blood pressure and bone mineral density in unfractured femora. However, it improved periosteal callus formation, bone bridging of the fracture gap and torsional stiffness. ACE inhibition did not affect cell proliferation, but reduced apoptotic cell death. After 10 week treatment, a smaller callus diameter and bone volume after perindopril treatment indicated an advanced stage of bone remodelling. Conclusions: Our study provides evidence for a local RAS in bone that influenced the process of fracture healing. We show for the first time that inhibition of ACE is capable of accelerating bone healing and remodelling. PMID:20233225

  1. Cell cycle dependence of ACE-2 explains downregulation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Uhal, Bruce D; Dang, MyTrang; Dang, Vinh; Llatos, Roger; Cano, Esteban; Abdul-Hafez, Amal; Markey, Jonathan; Piasecki, Christopher C; Molina-Molina, Maria

    2013-07-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II cells, a major source of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2 in the adult lung, are normally quiescent but actively proliferate in lung fibrosis and downregulate this protective enzyme. It was, therefore, hypothesised that ACE-2 expression might be related to cell cycle progression. To test this hypothesis, ACE-2 mRNA levels, protein levels and enzymatic activity were examined in fibrotic human lungs and in the alveolar epithelial cell lines A549 and MLE-12 studied at postconfluent (quiescent) versus subconfluent (proliferating) densities. ACE-2 mRNA, immunoreactive protein and enzymatic activity were all high in quiescent cells, but were severely downregulated or absent in actively proliferating cells. Upregulation of the enzyme in cells that were progressing to quiescence was completely inhibited by the transcription blocker actinomycin D or by SP600125, an inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In lung biopsy specimens obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, immunoreactive enzyme was absent in alveolar epithelia that were positive for proliferation markers, but was robustly expressed in alveolar epithelia devoid of proliferation markers. These data explain the loss of ACE-2 in lung fibrosis and demonstrate cell cycle-dependent regulation of this protective enzyme by a JNK-mediated transcriptional mechanism. PMID:23100504

  2. Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibition in Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are effective in reducing the risk of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and death from cardiovascular causes in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction or heart failure. ACE inhibitors have also been shown to reduce atherosclerotic complications in patients who have vascular disease without heart failure. METHODS In the Prevention of Events with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibition (PEACE) Trial, we tested the hypothesis that patients with stable coronary artery disease and normal or slightly reduced left ventricular function derive therapeutic benefit from the addition of ACE inhibitors to modern conventional therapy. The trial was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which 8290 patients were randomly assigned to receive either trandolapril at a target dose of 4 mg per day (4158 patients) or matching placebo (4132 patients). RESULTS The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 64±8 years, the mean blood pressure 133±17/78±10 mm Hg, and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction 58±9 percent. The patients received intensive treatment, with 72 percent having previously undergone coronary revascularization and 70 percent receiving lipid-lowering drugs. The incidence of the primary end point — death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization — was 21.9 percent in the trandolapril group, as compared with 22.5 percent in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the trandolapril group, 0.96; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.88 to 1.06; P=0.43) over a median follow-up period of 4.8 years. CONCLUSIONS In patients with stable coronary heart disease and preserved left ventricular function who are receiving “current standard” therapy and in whom the rate of cardiovascular events is lower than in previous trials of ACE inhibitors in patients with vascular disease, there is no evidence that the addition of an ACE inhibitor provides further benefit in

  3. Effects of aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system of Nigerians with mild to moderate essential hypertension: A comparative study with lisinopril

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Daniel Chukwu; Aneke, Eddy Ikemefuna; Obika, Leonard Fidelis; Nwachukwu, Nkiru Zuada

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The present study investigated the effects of aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) on the three basic components of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system: Plasma renin, serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and plasma aldosterone (PA) in mild to moderate essential hypertensive Nigerians and compared with that of lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor. Materials and Methods: A double-blind controlled randomized clinical study was used. Seventy-eight newly diagnosed but untreated mild to moderate hypertensive subjects attending Medical Outpatients Clinic of Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu were recruited for the study. Those in Group A received placebo (150 mg/kg/day), Group B were given lisinopril (10 mg once daily) while those in Group C received aqueous extract of HS (150 mg/kg/day). After 4 weeks of treatment, the levels of plasma renin, serum ACE, and PA were determined. Results: HS and lisinopril significantly (P < 0.001) reduced PA compared to placebo by 32.06% and 30.01%, respectively. Their effects on serum ACE and plasma renin activity (PRA) were not significant compared to placebo; they reduced ACE by 6.63% and 5.67% but increased plasma PRA by 2.77% and 5.36%, respectively. Conclusion: HS reduced serum ACE and PA in mild to moderate hypertensive Nigerians with equal efficacy as lisinopril. These actions are possibly due to the presence of anthocyanins in the extract. PMID:26600645

  4. Uric acid induces oxidative stress via an activation of the renin-angiotensin system in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-xia; Zhang, Yu-ping; Wu, Qi-nan; Chen, Bing

    2015-02-01

    Hyperuricemia is recently reported involving in various obesity-related cardiovascular disorders, especially hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated whether uric acid upregulates renin-angiotensin system (RAS) expression in adipocytes. We also examined whether RAS activation plays a role in uric acid-induced oxidative stress in adipocytes. The adipocytes of different phenotypes were incubated with uric acid for 48 h, respectively. Losartan (10(-4) M) or captopril (10(-4) M) was used to block adipose tissue RAS activation. mRNA expressions of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1), renin, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), and angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) were evaluated with real-time PCR. Angiotensin II concentrations in supernatant were measured by ELISA. Intracellular reactive species (ROS) levels were measured by fluorescent probe DCFH-DA, DHR, or NBT assay. The uric acid upregulated both RAS (AGT, ACE1, renin, AT1R, and AT2R) mRNA expressions and angiotensin II protein secretion and caused a significant increase in ROS production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These effects could be prevented by RAS inhibitors, either losartan or captopril. RAS activation has been causally implicated in oxidative stress induced by uric acid in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting a plausible mechanism through which hyperuricemia contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24671741

  5. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Talha; Jahan, Shah; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2015-01-01

    The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]) were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5(th) day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) test and pole climbing test (PCT). Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril. PMID:26317078

  6. Sleep-related movement disorder symptoms in SHR are attenuated by physical exercise and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Frank, Miriam Kannebley; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Lee, Kil Sun; Daubian-Nosé, Paulo; Tufik, Sergio; Esteves, Andrea Maculano

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between hypertension and sleep-related movement disorders has been hypothesized for humans, but the causes and mechanisms have not been elucidated. We investigated whether an alteration in blood pressure (BP) induced by physical exercise and/or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril) could affect locomotor activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats, with emphasis on the dopaminergic system. We used SHR and normotensive Wistar rats distributed into 4 groups for each strain: control, physical exercise, enalapril and physical exercise+enalapril. Physical exercise was performed on a treadmill, and enalapril was administered by gavage, both for 8weeks. During this period, locomotor activity was evaluated in an open field test, and BP was evaluated by tail plethysmography. Dopaminergic receptors, dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase levels at the striatum were evaluated by Western blotting. The control group of spontaneously hypertensive rats showed higher BP, increased activity in the open field test and lower levels of D2 receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase compared with all other groups throughout the experimental period. In general, physical exercise and enalapril attenuated these alterations. This study suggested the existence of comorbidity between hypertension and sleep-related movement disorders in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Physical exercise and enalapril conferred protection for both hypertension and the observed behavioral changes. In addition, these treatments led to changes in dopaminergic signaling in the striatal region (i.e., D2 receptor, TH and DAT). PMID:26650246

  7. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Talha; Jahan, Shah; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2015-01-01

    The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]) were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5th day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) test and pole climbing test (PCT). Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril. PMID:26317078

  8. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction assessment between LCZ696, an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, and hydrochlorothiazide, amlodipine, or carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hsiu-Ling; Langenickel, Thomas Heiko; Greeley, Michael; Roberts, John; Zhou, Wei; Pal, Parasar; Rebello, Sam; Rajman, Iris; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2015-11-01

    LCZ696 is a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor in development for treatments of hypertension and heart failure indications. In 3 separate studies, pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) potential was assessed when LCZ696 was coadministered with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), amlodipine, or carvedilol. The studies used a open-label, single-sequence, 3-period, crossover design in healthy subjects. Blood samples were collected to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of LCZ696 analytes (AHU377, LBQ657, and valsartan), HCTZ, amlodipine, or carvedilol (R[+]- and S[-]-carvedilol) for statistical analysis. When coadministered LCZ696 with HCTZ, the 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios of AUCtau,ss of HCTZ and that of LBQ657 were within a 0.80-1.25 interval, whereas HCTZ Cmax,ss decreased by 26%, LBQ657 Cmax,ss increased by 19%, and the AUCtau,ss and Cmax,ss of valsartan increased by 14% and 16%, respectively. Pharmacokinetics of amlodipine, R(+)- and S(-)-carvedilol, or LBQ657 were not altered after coadministration of LCZ696 with amlodipine or carvedilol. Coadministration of LCZ696 400 mg once daily (qd) with HCTZ 25 mg qd, amlodipine 10 mg qd, or carvedilol 25 mg twice a day (bid) had no clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. LCZ696, HCTZ, amlodipine, and carvedilol were safe and well tolerated when given alone or concomitantly in the investigated studies. PMID:27137712

  9. β-blockers and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: Comparison of Effects on Aortic Growth in Pediatric Patients with Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Phomakay, Venusa; Huett, Wilson G.; Gossett, Jeffrey M.; Tang, Xinyu; Bornemeier, Renee A.; Collins, R. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have been shown to decrease AGV in Marfan syndrome (MFS). We sought to compare the effect of β-blockers and ACEI on aortic growth velocity (AGV) in MFS. Study design We reviewed retrospectively all data from all patients with MFS seen at Arkansas Children’s Hospital between January 1, 1976 and January 1, 2013. Generalized least squares were used to evaluate AGV over time as a function of age, medication group, and the interaction between the two. A mixed model was used to compare AGV between medication groups as a function of age, medication group (none, β-blocker, ACEI), and the interaction between the two. Results A total of 67 patients with confirmed MFS were identified (34/67, 51% female). Mean age at first encounter was 13 ± 10 years, with mean follow-up of 7.6 ± 5.8 years. There were 839 patient encounters with a median of 10 (range 2–42) encounters per patient. AGV was nearly normal in the β-blocker group, and was less than either the ACEI or untreated groups. The AGV was higher than normal in ACEI and untreated groups (p<0.001 for both). Conclusions β-blocker therapy results in near-normalization of AGV in MFS. ACEI did not decrease AGV in a clinically significant manner. PMID:25109242

  10. Primacy of cardiac chymase over angiotensin converting enzyme as an angiotensin-(1-12) metabolizing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Varagic, Jasmina; VonCannon, Jessica L; Groban, Leanne; Collawn, James F; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-09-16

    We showed previously that rat angiotensin-(1-12) [Ang-(1-12)] is metabolized by chymase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to generate Angiotensin II (Ang II). Here, we investigated the affinity of cardiac chymase and ACE enzymes for Ang-(1-12) and Angiotensin I (Ang I) substrates. Native plasma membranes (PMs) isolated from heart and lung tissues of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were incubated with radiolabeled (125)I-Ang-(1-12) or (125)I-Ang I, in the absence or presence of a chymase or ACE inhibitor (chymostatin and lisinopril, respectively). Products were quantitated by HPLC connected to an in-line flow-through gamma detector. The rate of (125)I-Ang II formation from (125)I-Ang-(1-12) by chymase was significantly higher (heart: 7.0 ± 0.6 fmol/min/mg; lung: 33 ± 1.2 fmol/min/mg, P < 0.001) when compared to (125)I-Ang I substrate (heart: 0.8 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg; lung: 2.1 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg). Substrate affinity of (125)I-Ang-(1-12) for rat cardiac chymase was also confirmed using excess unlabeled Ang-(1-12) or Ang I (0-250 μM). The rate of (125)I-Ang II formation was significantly lower using unlabeled Ang-(1-12) compared to unlabeled Ang I substrate. Kinetic data showed that rat chymase has a lower Km (64 ± 6.3 μM vs 142 ± 17 μM), higher Vmax (13.2 ± 1.3 μM/min/mg vs 1.9 ± 0.2 μM/min/mg) and more than 15-fold higher catalytic efficiency (ratio of Vmax/Km) for Ang-(1-12) compared to Ang I substrate, respectively. We also investigated ACE mediated hydrolysis of (125)I-Ang-(1-12) and (125)I-Ang I in solubilized membrane fractions of the SHR heart and lung. Interestingly, no significant difference in (125)I-Ang II formation by ACE was detected using either substrate, (125)I-Ang-(1-12) or (125)I-Ang I, both in the heart (1.8 ± 0.2 fmol/min/mg and 1.8 ± 0.3 fmol/min/mg, respectively) and in the lungs (239 ± 25 fmol/min/mg and 248 ± 34 fmol/min/mg, respectively). Compared to chymase, ACE

  11. Pre-treatment with LCZ696, an orally active angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, prevents ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui-Yu; Mogi, Masaki; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Kan-No, Harumi; Tsukuda, Kana; Chisaka, Toshiyuki; Wang, Xiao-Li; Kukida, Masayoshi; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Yamauchi, Toshifumi; Higaki, Akinori; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are known to prevent ischemic brain damage after stroke. Natriuretic peptides, which are increased by a neprilysin inhibitor, are also reported to protect against brain damage. Therefore, we investigated the possible protective effect of valsartan (VAL) compared with LCZ696 (VAL+ neprilysin inhibitor; 1:1) after middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were treated with VAL (3mg/kg per day) or LCZ696 (6mg/kg per day) for 2 weeks before MCA occlusion. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured by telemetry. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined by laser-Doppler flowmetry. Ischemic area was evaluated by triphenytetrasodium chloride staining, and oxidative stress was determined by dihydroethidium staining. Blood pressure and heart rate were not significantly different before and after treatment. Pre-treatment with LCZ696 or VAL reduced the ischemic area, and this effect of LCZ696 was more marked than that of VAL pre-treatment. The decrease in CBF in the peripheral region of the ischemic area was significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with LCZ696 or VAL, without any significant effect on CBF in the core region. VAL or LCZ696 pre-treatment significantly decreased the increase of superoxide anion production in the cortex on the ischemic side. However, no significant difference in CBF and superoxide anion production was observed between VAL and LCZ696 pre-treatment. The preventive effect of LCZ696 on ischemic brain damage after stroke was more marked than that of VAL. LCZ696 could be used as a new approach to prevent brain damage after stroke. (246 words). PMID:26057694

  12. Drug discovery in renin-angiotensin system intervention: past and future.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan

    2016-06-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a central role in the control of blood pressure in the body and the way this interacts with other systems is widely recognized. This has not always been the case and this review summarizes how our knowledge has evolved from the initial discovery of renin by Tigerstedt and Berman in 1898. This includes the identification of angiotensin in the 1950s to the proposed relationship between this system, hypertension and ultimately cardiovascular disease. While the RAS is far more complex than originally thought, much is now known about this system and the wide ranging effects of angiotensin in the body. This has enabled the development of therapies that target the various proteins in this pathway and hence are implicated in disease. The first of these treatments was the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), followed by the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and more recently the direct renin inhibitors (DRIs). Clinical outcome trials have shown these drugs to be effective, but as they act at contrasting points in the RAS, there are differences in their efficacy and safety profiles. RAS blockade is the foundation of modern combination therapy with a calcium channel blocker and/or a diuretic given to reduce blood pressure and limit the impact of RAS activation. Other options that complement these treatments may be available in the future and will offer more choice to clinicians. PMID:27126389

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid-plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin-angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect-plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid-plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid–plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin–angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect–plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid–plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  15. LCZ696, a First-in-Class Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibitor: The First Clinical Experience in Patients With Severe Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi; Tamaki, Yuko; Okino, Naoko; Gotou, Hiromi; Zhu, Min; Zhang, Jack

    2016-04-01

    The safety of LCZ696, a novel angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor, was evaluated for the first time in patients with severe hypertension in this 8-week, multicenter, open-label study. Thirty-five Japanese patients with either office systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥180 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥110 mm Hg received LCZ696 200 mg. If blood pressure was uncontrolled, the LCZ696 dose was increased to 400 mg after 2 weeks (if there were no safety concerns; n=32), followed by an optional addition of another antihypertensive drug (except angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor) after 4 weeks (n=21). Reductions in office SBP/DBP (baseline, 173.4 mm Hg/112.4 mm Hg) and pulse pressure (baseline, 61.0 mm Hg) at week 8 were 35.3/22.1 mm Hg and 13.2 mm Hg, respectively. The overall incidence of adverse events was 48.6% with no reports of dizziness, hypotension, or angioedema. The LCZ696-based regimen was generally well-tolerated and could present a treatment option for severe hypertension in Asian patients especially in reducing SBP and pulse pressure. PMID:26402918

  16. Influence of ACE I/D Polymorphism on Circulating Levels of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, D-Dimer, Ultrasensitive C-Reactive Protein and Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Sara Santos; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Sabino, Adriano de Paula; Evangelista, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo; Gomes, Karina Braga; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases are associated with coagulation disorders, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and fibrosis. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion polymorphism (ACE I/D polymorphism) has also be linked to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to compare plasma levels of ultrassensible C-reactive protein (usCRP), PAI-1, D-dimer and TGF-β1 in patients undergoing HD with different ACE I/D polymorphisms. Methods The study was performed in 138 patients at ESRD under hemodialysis therapy for more than six months. The patients were divided into three groups according to the genotype. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood cells (leukocytes). ACE I/D polymorphism was investigated by single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of D-dimer, PAI-1 and TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the determination of plasma levels of usCRP was performed by immunonephelometry. Data were analyzed by the software SigmaStat 2.03. Results Clinical characteristics were similar in patients with these three ACE I/D polymorphisms, except for interdialytic weight gain. I allele could be associated with higher interdialytic weight gain (P = 0.017). Patients genotyped as DD and as ID had significantly higher levels of PAI-1 than those with II genotype. Other laboratory parameters did not significantly differ among the three subgroups (P = 0.033). Despite not reaching statistical significance, plasma levels of usCRP were higher in patients carrying the D allele. Conclusion ACE I/D polymorphisms could be associated with changes in the regulation of sodium, fibrinolytic system, and possibly, inflammation. Our data showed that high levels of PAI-1 are detected when D allele is present, whereas greater interdialytic gain is associated with the presence of I allele. However, further studies with different experimental designs are necessary to elucidate the

  17. Beta-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, nitrate-hydralazine, diuretics, aldosterone antagonist, ivabradine, devices and digoxin (BANDAID(2) ): an evidence-based mnemonic for the treatment of systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chia, N; Fulcher, J; Keech, A

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure causes significant morbidity and mortality, with recognised underutilisation rates of guideline-based therapies. Our aim was to review current evidence for heart failure treatments and derive a mnemonic summarising best practice, which might assist physicians in patient care. Treatments were identified for review from multinational society guidelines and recent randomised trials, with a primary aim of examining their effects in systolic heart failure patients on mortality, hospitalisation rates and symptoms. Secondary aims were to consider other clinical benefits. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched using a structured keyword strategy and the retrieved articles were evaluated methodically to produce an optimised reference list for each treatment. We devised the mnemonic BANDAID (2) , standing for beta-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, nitrate-hydralazine (or potentially neprilysin inhibitor), diuretics, aldosterone antagonist, ivabradine, devices (automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator, cardiac resynchronisation therapy or both) and digoxin as a representation of treatments with strong evidence for their use in systolic heart failure. Treatment with omega-3 fatty acids, statins or anti-thrombotic therapies has limited benefits in a general heart failure population. Adoption of this mnemonic for current evidence-based treatments for heart failure may help improve prescribing rates and patient outcomes in this debilitating, high mortality condition. PMID:26109136

  18. Addition of Angiotensin Receptor Blockade or Mineralocorticoid Antagonism to Maximal Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibition in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Uzma F.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Raskin, Philip; Vega, Gloria L.

    2009-01-01

    Aldosterone promotes glomerular and tubular sclerosis independent of angiotensin II in animal models of diabetic nephropathy. Most human studies testing the renoprotective benefit of adding an angiotensin receptor blocker or a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to a regimen based on inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) used relatively low doses of ACE inhibitors. Furthermore, these studies did not determine whether antiproteinuric effects were independent of BP lowering. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 81 patients with diabetes, hypertension, and albuminuria (urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥300 mg/g) who all received lisinopril (80 mg once daily). We randomly assigned the patients to placebo, losartan (100 mg daily), or spironolactone (25 mg daily) for 48 wk. We obtained blood and urine albumin, urea, creatinine, electrolytes, A1c, and ambulatory BP at baseline, 24, and 48 wk. Compared with placebo, the urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio decreased by 34.0% (95% CI, −51.0%, −11.2%, P = 0.007) in the group assigned to spironolactone and by 16.8% (95% CI, −37.3%, +10.5%, P = 0.20) in the group assigned to losartan. Clinic and ambulatory BP, creatinine clearance, sodium and protein intake, and glycemic control did not differ between groups. Serum potassium level was significantly higher with the addition of either spironolactone or losartan. In conclusion, the addition of spironolactone, but not losartan, to a regimen including maximal ACE inhibition affords greater renoprotection in diabetic nephropathy despite a similar effect on BP. These results support the need to conduct a long-term, large-scale, renal failure outcomes trial. PMID:19926893

  19. Angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibition in heart failure: mechanistic action and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Buggey, Jonathan; Mentz, Robert J; DeVore, Adam D; Velazquez, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly common syndrome associated with high mortality and economic burden, and there has been a paucity over the past decade of new pharmacotherapies that improve outcomes. However, recent data from a large randomized controlled trial compared the novel agent LCZ696, a dual-acting angiotensin receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi), with the well established angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril and found significant reduction in mortality among the chronic reduced ejection fraction HF population. Preclinical and clinical data suggest that neprilysin inhibition provides beneficial outcomes in HF patients by preventing the degradation of natriuretic peptides and thereby promoting natriuresis and vasodilatation and counteracting the negative cardiorenal effects of the up-regulated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Agents such as omapatrilat combined neprilysin and ACE inhibition but had increased rates of angioedema. Goals of an improved safety profile provided the rationale for the development of the ARNi LCZ696. Along with significant reductions in mortality and hospitalizations, clinical trials suggest that LCZ696 may improve surrogate markers of HF severity. In this paper, we review the preclinical and clinical data that led to the development of LCZ696, the understanding of the underlying mechanistic action, and the robust clinical impact that LCZ696 may have in the near future. PMID:26209000

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema: a multicenter review and an algorithm for airway management.

    PubMed

    Chiu, A G; Newkirk, K A; Davidson, B J; Burningham, A R; Krowiak, E J; Deeb, Z E

    2001-09-01

    Angioedema is a nonpitting edema of which the presentation ranges from benign facial swelling to airway obstruction managed by intubation or tracheotomy. The presentation of this disease is reviewed, and a treatment algorithm based on initial signs and symptoms is proposed for proper airway management. We performed a retrospective review of 108 patients treated in 2 tertiary care centers in the Washington, DC, area over a 5-year period. Ninety-eight patients (90.7%) were African-American, and 81 (75%) were female. Seventy-four patients (68.5%) were taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). A classification system was developed based on the location of the edema at initial presentation: 1) isolated facial swelling and oral cavity edema, excluding the floor of the mouth; 2) floor of mouth and/or oropharyngeal edema, and 3) oropharyngeal edema with glottic and/or supraglottic involvement. Fourteen patients (13%) needed airway intervention, 2 of whom underwent a cricothyrotomy after a failed intubation attempt. Eleven (78.6%) were taking ACEIs. The indication for each intubation was massive tongue and floor of mouth edema. The patients were extubated 48 to 72 hours later. No patient demonstrated symptom progression after medical treatment was initiated. Therapy included discontinuation of the ACEI or other inciting agent, a high-humidity face tent, an initial dose of intravenous antihistamines, and a continued course of intravenous steroids. Within 48 hours, most patients had a resolution of their edema. Only cases of significant tongue and oropharyngeal edema took longer than 48 hours to resolve. The ACEIs are a common cause of angioedema. Left untreated, angioedema may progress to involve the oropharynx and supraglottis, resulting in a life-threatening airway compromise. Marked floor of mouth and tongue edema are the indications for airway intervention. An algorithm based on the initial presentation is essential for proper airway and patient management

  1. Fast gradient high performance liquid chromatography method with UV detection for simultaneous determination of seven angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors together with hydrochlorothiazide in pharmaceutical dosage forms and spiked human plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Elsebaei, Fawzi; Zhu, Yan

    2011-07-15

    The development of a reversed phase liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of seven angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors; five drugs namely benazepril HCl (BZL), enalapril maleate (ENL), fosinopril sodium (FSP), lisinopril (LSP) and ramipril (RMP) and two metabolites captopril disulfide (CPD) and enalaprilat (ENT) together with hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) is described. The method can serve as a substitute for many published papers for the analysis of the targeted compounds with or without hydrochloothiazide in pharmaceutical formulations as well as in spiked human plasma and urine samples. The method utilizes a simple gradient procedure for the separation in a 11 min run time using acetonitrile aqueous ammonia buffer (pH 9) solution and an Extend RP-C18 (25 μm particle size, 4.6 mm×250 mm, Agilent) HPLC column. The effluent was monitored on a UV detector at 215 nm. The effect of pH, solvent strength and analysis time on the peak shape and quantification were carefully studied in order to optimize the method. Adopting the proposed procedure, the analytes produce well-shaped peaks with good linear relationship over the investigated concentration ranges. The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) from standard drug solutions lie in the range of 17-64 and 56-212 ng mL(-1), respectively. Correlation coefficient values (r) higher than 0.997 were obtained for all the studied drugs in spiked human plasma and urine samples. The intra-day and inter-day precision of the method was evaluated with relative standard deviation values being satisfactory for their purposed analysis. The method was validated with respect to specificity, recovery, accuracy, precision and linearity. PMID:21645680

  2. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides of Chia (Salvia hispanica) Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Segura Campos, Maira Rubi; Peralta González, Fanny; Chel Guerrero, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitors can have undesirable side effects, while natural inhibitors have no side effects and are potential nutraceuticals. A protein-rich fraction from chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed was hydrolyzed with an Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequential system and the hydrolysate ultrafiltered through four molecular weight cut-off membranes (1 kDa, 3 kDa, 5 kDa, and 10 kDa). ACE-I inhibitory activity was quantified in the hydrolysate and ultrafiltered fractions. The hydrolysate was extensive (DH = 51.64%) and had 58.46% ACE-inhibitory activity. Inhibition ranged from 53.84% to 69.31% in the five ultrafiltered fractions and was highest in the <1 kDa fraction (69.31%). This fraction's amino acid composition was identified and then it was purified by gel filtration chromatography and ACE-I inhibition measured in the purified fractions. Amino acid composition suggested that hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to chia peptide ACE-I inhibitory strength, probably by blocking angiotensin II production. Inhibitory activity ranged from 48.41% to 62.58% in the purified fractions, but fraction F1 (1.5–2.5 kDa) exhibited the highest inhibition (IC50 = 3.97 μg/mL; 427–455 mL elution volume). The results point out the possibility of obtaining bioactive peptides from chia proteins by means of a controlled protein hydrolysis using Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequentional system. PMID:26904588

  3. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides of Chia (Salvia hispanica) Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Segura Campos, Maira Rubi; Peralta González, Fanny; Chel Guerrero, Luis; Betancur Ancona, David

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitors can have undesirable side effects, while natural inhibitors have no side effects and are potential nutraceuticals. A protein-rich fraction from chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed was hydrolyzed with an Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequential system and the hydrolysate ultrafiltered through four molecular weight cut-off membranes (1 kDa, 3 kDa, 5 kDa, and 10 kDa). ACE-I inhibitory activity was quantified in the hydrolysate and ultrafiltered fractions. The hydrolysate was extensive (DH = 51.64%) and had 58.46% ACE-inhibitory activity. Inhibition ranged from 53.84% to 69.31% in the five ultrafiltered fractions and was highest in the <1 kDa fraction (69.31%). This fraction's amino acid composition was identified and then it was purified by gel filtration chromatography and ACE-I inhibition measured in the purified fractions. Amino acid composition suggested that hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to chia peptide ACE-I inhibitory strength, probably by blocking angiotensin II production. Inhibitory activity ranged from 48.41% to 62.58% in the purified fractions, but fraction F1 (1.5-2.5 kDa) exhibited the highest inhibition (IC50 = 3.97 μg/mL; 427-455 mL elution volume). The results point out the possibility of obtaining bioactive peptides from chia proteins by means of a controlled protein hydrolysis using Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequentional system. PMID:26904588

  4. Effects of a novel ACE inhibitor, 3-(3-thienyl)-l-alanyl-ornithyl-proline, on endothelial vasodilation and hepatotoxicity in l-NAME-induced hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Mahesh Kumar; Hussain, M Ejaz; Pasha, Santosh; Fahim, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a widespread biological mediator involved in many physiological and pathological processes, eg, in the regulation of vascular tone and hypertension. Chronic inhibition of NO synthase by NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) hydrochloride results in the development of hypertension accompanied by an increase in vascular responsiveness to adrenergic stimuli. Recently, we developed a novel sulfur-containing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor: 3-(3-thienyl)-l-alanyl-ornithyl-proline (TOP). Our previous studies indicated a superior nature of the molecule as an antihypertensive agent in spontaneously hypertensive rats (showing the involvement of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system) in comparison to captopril. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of TOP on NO pathway in l-NAME-induced hypertensive rats, and captopril was included as the standard treatment group. Treatment with both TOP (20 mg/kg) and captopril (40 mg/kg) prevented the development of hypertension in l-NAME model, but TOP showed better restoration of NO and normal levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme. In addition, in vitro vasorelaxation assay showed an improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in both the cases. Further, the biochemical (malondialdehyde, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase) and the histopathological effects of TOP on rat liver tissues revealed a protective nature of TOP in comparison to captopril in the l-NAME model. In conclusion, TOP at 50% lesser dose than captopril was found to be better in the l-NAME model. PMID:27143859

  5. One-year effectiveness and safety of open-label losartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy in Japanese patients with hypertension uncontrolled with ARBs or ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Toshihiro; Yokota, Naoto; Ichiki, Yoshinari; Ayabe, Takao; Etoh, Takuma; Tamaki, Noboru; Kato, Johji; Eto, Tanenao; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2010-04-01

    The long-term antihypertensive efficacy and safety of losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) combinations have not been appropriately evaluated in Japan. In this study, treated hypertensive patients taking angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) regimens not at blood pressure (BP) goals proposed by the Japanese Society of Hypertension (JSH) were switched to losartan/HCTZ combinations and followed for 1 year. Data analysis included 244 patients aged 64.5+/-10.7 years, 56% male, 27% with diabetes mellitus and 36% with dyslipidemia. Pre-switching BP 157+/-16/88+/-10 mm Hg promptly decreased and maintained a steady state, reaching 132+/-15/77+/-9 mm Hg (P<0.001) 1 year later. After 1 year of treatment, 50% of patients cleared the goals of the JSH guideline for systolic BP and 79% for diastolic BP. Patients with maximal doses of ARBs tended to show larger decreases in BP (159+/-11/90+/-10 to 128+/-10/75+/-8 mm Hg, P<0.001, n=32). Clinical and laboratory adverse events were reported for 29 patients (11%), but serious abnormalities were not observed. In particular, plasma levels of uric acid (UA) were well-maintained for 1 year, and significant decreases in UA were observed in patients with higher levels of UA (>/=7.0 mg dl(-1)). Losartan/HCTZ combinations showed strong and steady hypotensive abilities and acceptable safety and tolerability in patients currently not at BP goals with regimens including ARBs or ACEIs in Japan. PMID:20075934

  6. Effects of ACE2 deficiency on physical performance and physiological adaptations of cardiac and skeletal muscle to exercise.

    PubMed

    Motta-Santos, Daisy; Dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Oliveira, Marilene; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Poglitsch, Marko; Mosienko, Valentina; Kappes Becker, Lenice; Campagnole-Santos, Maria Jose; M Penninger, Joseph; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is related to physiological adaptations induced by exercise. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a major regulator of the RAS in tissues, as it metabolizes angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1-7). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ACE2 deficiency on physical performance and physiological adaptations induced by voluntary running. Physical performance, body composition and plasma angiotensin levels, as well as tissue morphology and gene expression of RAS components in the left ventricle (LV) and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius), were evaluated in ACE2-deficient (ACE2(-/y)) and wild-type (ACE2(+/y)) mice after 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running. ACE2(-/y) mice run less than ACE2(+/y) mice (19±4.7 vs. 26±12.6 revolutions per day × 100, P<0.01). The ACE2(+/y) group presented a lower fat mass (15±1.1%) and higher muscle mass (76.6±1.6%) after 6 weeks of voluntary running compared with the sedentary control group (fat mass: 18.3±2.1%; muscle mass: 72.7±2.2). However, no change in body composition was observed in ACE2(-/y) mice after exercise. Heart and skeletal muscle hypertrophy was observed only in trained ACE2(+/y) mice. Besides a small decrease in Ang I in ACE2(-/y) mice, plasma levels of angiotensin peptides remained unchanged by exercise or ACE2 deficiency. In the LV of trained animals, AT2 gene expression was higher in ACE2(+/y) compared with ACE2(-/y) mice. ACE2 deficiency leads to an increase in AT1 gene expression in skeletal muscle. ACE expression in soleus was increased in all exercised groups. ACE2 deficiency affects physical performance and impairs cardiac and skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise. PMID:27053009

  7. Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme in myelomonocytic cells enhances the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Khan, Zakir; Giani, Jorge F.; Zhao, Tuantuan; Eriguchi, Masahiro; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and thereby plays an important role in blood pressure control. However, ACE is relatively non-specific in its substrate specificity and cleaves many other peptides. Recent analysis of mice overexpressing ACE in monocytes, macrophages, and other myelomonocytic cells shows that these animals have a marked increase in resistance to experimental melanoma and to infection by Listeria monocytogenes or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Several other measures of immune responsiveness, including antibody production, are enhanced in these animals. These studies complement a variety of studies indicating an important role of ACE in the immune response. PMID:27018193

  8. Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes of Renin–Angiotensin System Blockade in Adult Patients with Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review with Network Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Macías Saint-Gerons, Diego; González-Bermejo, Diana; Rosano, Giuseppe M.; Davis, Barry R.; Ridao, Manuel; Zaragoza, Abel; Montero-Corominas, Dolores; Tobías, Aurelio; de la Fuente-Honrubia, César; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Hutton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background Medications aimed at inhibiting the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) have been used extensively for preventing cardiovascular and renal complications in patients with diabetes, but data that compare their clinical effectiveness are limited. We aimed to compare the effects of classes of RAS blockers on cardiovascular and renal outcomes in adults with diabetes. Methods and Findings Eligible trials were identified by electronic searches in PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1 January 2004 to 17 July 2014). Interventions of interest were angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and direct renin (DR) inhibitors. The primary endpoints were cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke—singly and as a composite endpoint, major cardiovascular outcome—and end-stage renal disease [ESRD], doubling of serum creatinine, and all-cause mortality—singly and as a composite endpoint, progression of renal disease. Secondary endpoints were angina pectoris and hospitalization for heart failure. In all, 71 trials (103,120 participants), with a total of 14 different regimens, were pooled using network meta-analyses. When compared with ACE inhibitor, no other RAS blocker used in monotherapy and/or combination was associated with a significant reduction in major cardiovascular outcomes: ARB (odds ratio [OR] 1.02; 95% credible interval [CrI] 0.90–1.18), ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.79–1.19), DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (1.32; 95% CrI 0.96–1.81), and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.00; 95% CrI 0.73–1.38). For the risk of progression of renal disease, no significant differences were detected between ACE inhibitor and each of the remaining therapies: ARB (OR 1.10; 95% CrI 0.90–1.40), ACE inhibitor plus ARB (0.97; 95% CrI 0.72–1.29), DR inhibitor plus ACE inhibitor (0.99; 95% CrI 0.65–1.57), and DR inhibitor plus ARB (1.18; 95% CrI 0.78–1.84). No significant

  9. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098–4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  10. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  11. From gene to protein—experimental and clinical studies of ACE2 in blood pressure control and arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheila K.; Velkoska, Elena; Freeman, Melanie; Wai, Bryan; Lancefield, Terase F.; Burrell, Louise M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, coronary events, heart and renal failure, and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in its pathogenesis. Within the RAS, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin (Ang) I into the vasoconstrictor Ang II. An “alternate” arm of the RAS now exists in which ACE2 counterbalances the effects of the classic RAS through degradation of Ang II, and generation of the vasodilator Ang 1-7. ACE2 is highly expressed in the heart, blood vessels, and kidney. The catalytically active ectodomain of ACE2 undergoes shedding, resulting in ACE2 in the circulation. The ACE2 gene maps to a quantitative trait locus on the X chromosome in three strains of genetically hypertensive rats, suggesting that ACE2 may be a candidate gene for hypertension. It is hypothesized that disruption of tissue ACE/ACE2 balance results in changes in blood pressure, with increased ACE2 expression protecting against increased blood pressure, and ACE2 deficiency contributing to hypertension. Experimental hypertension studies have measured ACE2 in either the heart or kidney and/or plasma, and have reported that deletion or inhibition of ACE2 leads to hypertension, whilst enhancing ACE2 protects against the development of hypertension, hence increasing ACE2 may be a therapeutic option for the management of high blood pressure in man. There have been relatively few studies of ACE2, either at the gene or the circulating level in patients with hypertension. Plasma ACE2 activity is low in healthy subjects, but elevated in patients with cardiovascular risk factors or cardiovascular disease. Genetic studies have investigated ACE2 gene polymorphisms with either hypertension or blood pressure, and have produced largely inconsistent findings. This review discusses the evidence regarding ACE2 in experimental hypertension models and the association between circulating ACE2 activity and ACE2 polymorphisms with blood pressure and arterial

  12. Treatment with patiromer decreases aldosterone in patients with chronic kidney disease and hyperkalemia on renin-angiotensin system inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Bakris, George L; Gross, Coleman; Mayo, Martha R; Garza, Dahlia; Stasiv, Yuri; Yuan, Jinwei; Berman, Lance; Williams, Gordon H

    2016-09-01

    Elevated serum aldosterone can be vasculotoxic and facilitate cardiorenal damage. Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors reduce serum aldosterone levels and/or block its effects but can cause hyperkalemia. Patiromer, a nonabsorbed potassium binder, decreases serum potassium in patients with chronic kidney disease on renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. Here we examined the effect of patiromer treatment on serum aldosterone, blood pressure, and albuminuria in patients with chronic kidney disease on renin-angiotensin system inhibitors with hyperkalemia (serum potassium 5.1-6.5 mEq/l). We analyzed data from the phase 3 OPAL-HK study (4-week initial treatment phase of 243 patients; 8-week randomized withdrawal phase of 107 patients). In the treatment phase, the (mean ± standard error) serum potassium was decreased concordantly with the serum aldosterone (-1.99 ± 0.51 ng/dl), systolic/diastolic blood pressure (-5.64 ± 1.04 mm Hg/-3.84 ± 0.69 mm Hg), and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (-203.7 ± 54.7 mg/g), all in a statistically significant manner. The change in the plasma renin activity (-0.44 ± 0.63 μg/l/hr) was not significant. In the withdrawal phase, mean aldosterone levels were sustained with patiromer (+0.23 ± 1.07 ng/dl) and significantly increased with placebo (+2.78 ± 1.25 ng/dl). Patients on patiromer had significant reductions in mean systolic/diastolic blood pressure (-6.70 ± 1.59/-2.15 ± 1.06 mm Hg), whereas those on placebo did not (-1.21 ± 1.89 mm Hg/+1.72 ± 1.26 mm Hg). Significant changes in plasma renin activity were found only in the placebo group (-3.90 ± 1.41 μg/l/hr). Thus, patiromer reduced serum potassium and aldosterone levels independent of plasma renin activity in patients with chronic kidney disease and hyperkalemia on renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. PMID:27350174

  13. Determination of angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity in cell culture using fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, R A; Bersanetti, P A; Farias, S L; Juliano, L; Juliano, M A; Casarini, D E; Carmona, A K; Paiva, A C M; Pesquero, J B

    2007-04-15

    An assay using fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides was developed to assess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity directly on the membrane of transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) stably expressing the full-length somatic form of the enzyme. The advantage of the new method is the possibility of using selective substrates for the two active sites of the enzyme, namely Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH for somatic ACE, Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH for the N domain, and Abz-LFK(Dnp)-OH for the C domain. Hydrolysis of a peptide bond between the donor/acceptor pair (Abz/Dnp) generates detectable fluorescence, allowing quantitative measurement of the enzymatic activity. The kinetic parameter K(m) for the hydrolysis of the three substrates by ACE in this system was also determined and the values are comparable to those obtained using the purified enzyme in solution. The specificity of the activity was demonstrated by the complete inhibition of the hydrolysis by the ACE inhibitor lisinopril. Therefore, the results presented in this work show for the first time that determination of ACE activity directly on the surface of intact CHO cells is feasible and that the method is reliable and sensitive. In conclusion, we describe a methodology that may represent a new tool for the assessment of ACE activity which will open the possibility to study protein interactions in cells in culture. PMID:17320031

  14. Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Obtained after In Vitro Hydrolysis of Pea (Pisum sativum var. Bajka) Globulins

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Pea seeds represent a valuable source of active compounds that may positively influence health. In this study, the pea globulins were digested in vitro under gastrointestinal condition and potentially bioaccessible angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides were identified. The degree of hydrolysis after pepsin, 14.42%, and pancreatin, 30.65%, were noted. The peptides with the highest ACE inhibitory properties were separated using ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Thirteen peptides fractions were obtained but only four showed potential antihypertensive properties. The highest inhibitory activity was determined for the fraction F8 (IC50 = 0.0014 mg/mL). This fraction was separated on Sephadex G10 and two peptide fractions were obtained. The peptides fraction (B) with the highest ACE inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.073 mg/mL) was identified by ESI-MS/MS. The sequences of ACE inhibitory peptides were GGSGNY, DLKLP, GSSDNR, MRDLK, and HNTPSR. Based on Lineweaver-Burk plots for the fraction B, the kinetic parameters as Km, Vmax, and Ki and mode of inhibition were determined. This fraction belongs to uncompetitive inhibitor of ACE activity. The seeds of pea are the source of precursor protein, which releases the ACE inhibitory peptides as a result of enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:25250321

  15. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Sadiq, Faizan A.; Fu, Li; Zhu, Hui; Zhong, Minghua; Sohail, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH) (45.87%) followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84%) and alcalase (30.55%). The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY) was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits. PMID:27271639

  16. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Sadiq, Faizan A; Fu, Li; Zhu, Hui; Zhong, Minghua; Sohail, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH) (45.87%) followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84%) and alcalase (30.55%). The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY) was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits. PMID:27271639

  17. The pharmacological mechanism of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition by green tea, Rooibos and enalaprilat - a study on enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ingrid A-L

    2012-04-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) and Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis Dahlg.) inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro and in vivo. The ACE inhibitor enalaprilat has been described previously as a competitive inhibitor and sometimes as a non-competitive inhibitor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of ACE inhibition of green tea and Rooibos by enzyme kinetics, and to compare this with enalaprilat. A Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Lineweaver-Burk graph showed mean values of V(max)  = 3.73 µM and K(m)  = 0.71 µM for green tea, of V(max)  = 6.76 µM and K(m)  = 0.78 µM for Rooibos, of V(max)  = 12.54 µM and K(m)  = 2.77 µM for enalaprilat, and of V(max)  = 51.33 µM and K(m)  = 9.22 µM for the PBS control. Incubating serum with green tea or Rooibos saturated with zinc chloride did not change the inhibitory effect. Enalaprilat preincubated with zinc chloride showed a decrease in the inhibitory effect. In conclusion, green tea, Rooibos and enalaprilat seem to inhibit ACE activity using a mixed inhibitor mechanism. PMID:22095883

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory effects by plant phenolic compounds: a study of structure activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Van Camp, John; Gonzales, Gerard Bryan; Staljanssens, Dorien; Struijs, Karin; Zotti, Moises J; Raes, Katleen; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-12-01

    In this study, 22 phenolic compounds were investigated to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Tannic acid showed the highest activity (IC50 = 230 μM). The IC50 values obtained for phenolic acids and flavonoids ranged between 0.41 and 9.3 mM. QSAR analysis confirmed that the numbers of hydroxyl groups on the benzene ring play an important role for activity of phenolic compounds and that substitution of hydroxyl groups by methoxy groups decreased activity. Docking studies indicated that phenolic acids and flavonoids inhibit ACE via interaction with the zinc ion and this interaction is stabilized by other interactions with amino acids in the active site. Other compounds, such as resveratrol and pyrogallol, may inhibit ACE via interactions with amino acids at the active site, thereby blocking the catalytic activity of ACE. These structure-function relationships are useful for designing new ACE inhibitors and potential blood-pressure-lowering compounds based on phenolic compounds. PMID:24219111

  19. Angiotensin converting enzyme of Thalassophryne nattereri venom.

    PubMed

    da Costa Marques, Maria Elizabeth; de Araújo Tenório, Humberto; Dos Santos, Claudio Wilian Victor; Dos Santos, Daniel Moreira; de Lima, Maria Elena; Pereira, Hugo Juarez Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Animal venoms are complex mixtures, including peptides, proteins (i.e., enzymes), and other compounds produced by animals in predation, digestion, and defense. These molecules have been investigated regarding their molecular mechanisms associated with physiological action and possible pharmacological applications. Recently, we have described the presence of a type of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity in the venom of Thalassophryne nattereri. It is a zinc-dependent peptidase with a wide range of effects. By removing dipeptide His-Leu from terminal C, the ACE converts angiotensinI (AngI) into angiotensin II (AngII) and inactivates bradykinin, there by regulating blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis. The fractionation of T. nattereri venom in CM-Sepharose indicated a peak (CM2) with angiotensin-converting activity, converting AngI into Ang II. Electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel (12%) revealed one band with 30kDa for CM2 similar in size to natterins, which are toxins with proteolytic activity found in T. nattereri venom. Mass spectrometry indicated that the protein sequence of the ACE purified from T. nattereri venom corresponds to natterin 1. The isolated protein has also demonstrated inhibition through captopril and EDTA and is characterized as a classic ACE. Thus, the isolated enzyme purified from T. nattereri venom is the first ACE isolated from fish venom. PMID:27327905

  20. Rationale and study design of the Prospective comparison of Angiotensin Receptor neprilysin inhibitor with Angiotensin receptor blocker MEasuring arterial sTiffness in the eldERly (PARAMETER) study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bryan; Cockcroft, John R; Kario, Kazuomi; Zappe, Dion H; Cardenas, Pamela; Hester, Allen; Brunel, Patrick; Zhang, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension in elderly people is characterised by elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) and increased pulse pressure (PP), which indicate large artery ageing and stiffness. LCZ696, a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI), is being developed to treat hypertension and heart failure. The Prospective comparison of Angiotensin Receptor neprilysin inhibitor with Angiotensin receptor blocker MEasuring arterial sTiffness in the eldERly (PARAMETER) study will assess the efficacy of LCZ696 versus olmesartan on aortic stiffness and central aortic haemodynamics. Methods and analysis In this 52-week multicentre study, patients with hypertension aged ≥60 years with a mean sitting (ms) SBP ≥150 to <180 and a PP>60 mm Hg will be randomised to once daily LCZ696 200 mg or olmesartan 20 mg for 4 weeks, followed by a forced-titration to double the initial doses for the next 8 weeks. At 12–24 weeks, if the BP target has not been attained (msSBP <140  and ms diastolic BP <90 mm Hg), amlodipine (2.5–5 mg) and subsequently hydrochlorothiazide (6.25–25 mg) can be added. The primary and secondary endpoints are changes from baseline in central aortic systolic pressure (CASP) and central aortic PP (CAPP) at week 12, respectively. Other secondary endpoints are the changes in CASP and CAPP at week 52. A sample size of 432 randomised patients is estimated to ensure a power of 90% to assess the superiority of LCZ696 over olmesartan at week 12 in the change from baseline of mean CASP, assuming an SD of 19 mm Hg, the difference of 6.5 mm Hg and a 15% dropout rate. The primary variable will be analysed using a two-way analysis of covariance. Ethics and dissemination The study was initiated in December 2012 and final results are expected in 2015. The results of this study will impact the design of future phase III studies assessing cardiovascular protection. Clinical trials identifier EUDract number 2012

  1. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help diagnose and monitor a disorder called sarcoidosis . People with sarcoidosis may have their ACE level tested regularly to ... normal ACE level may be a sign of sarcoidosis. ACE levels may rise or fall as sarcoidosis ...

  2. Renal angiotensin-converting enzyme localization in diabetic rats and the effect of low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Kobayashi, M; Nakanishi, T; Yoshikawa, H; Miyagi, M; Tanegashima, M; Sakai, K; Hayashi, I; Fushimi, T; Hasegawa, A

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in diabetic nephropathy. The effect of diabetes and low protein diet on renal immunohistochemical ACE localization was studied in streptozotocin-induced DM rats. Immunohistochemical ACE localization was reduced in DM rats, and a low protein diet partially resolved this abnormality while inhibiting the progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:9200410

  3. Angiotensin system inhibitors and survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with VEGF-targeted therapy: A pooled secondary analysis of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sorich, Michael J; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Rowland, Andrew; Woodman, Richard J; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2016-05-01

    Use of angiotensin system inhibitors (ASIs; angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) has been reported to be associated with improved survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), particularly when used with vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapies. This study was a secondary pooled analysis of two Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of patients with mRCC: NCT00334282 comparing pazopanib to placebo and NCT00720941 comparing pazopanib to sunitinib. ASI users were defined as patients using an ASI at baseline. Association with overall survival (OS; primary outcome) and progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. The association was adjusted in multivariable analysis for baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP), use of other antihypertensive drugs and prognostic factors comprising the Heng risk criteria for mRCC. Of 1,545 patients pooled from the two RCTs, 649 (42%) were using one or more antihypertensive drugs at baseline, 385 (59%) of which were using an ASI. In the multivariable analysis of patients using pazopanib or sunitinib, no significant association was observed between baseline ASI use and OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-1.18], p = 0.80) or PFS (HR 0.88 [95% CI 0.73-1.06], p = 0.17). Exploratory subgroup analysis of NCT00720941 highlighted that the effect of baseline ASI use on OS may differ between patients treated with sunitinib and pazopanib. In conclusion, use of ASIs at baseline was not a significant independent prognostic factor for improved survival in a pooled analysis of mRCC patients treated with pazopanib or sunitinib. PMID:26685869

  4. Effect of Beta Blockers and Renin-Angiotensin System Inhibitors on Survival in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pil Hyung; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Young-Hak; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Chang, Mineok; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Sung-Han; Ahn, Jung-Min; Park, Duk-Woo; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Seung-Jung

    2016-03-01

    Because it remains uncertain whether β-blockers (BBs) and/or renin-angiotensin system inhibitors benefit a broad population of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, we sought to evaluate the effectiveness of these drugs in improving survival for post-AMI patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).From the nationwide data of the South Korea National Health Insurance, 33,390 patients with a diagnosis of AMI who underwent a PCI between 2009 and 2013 and survived at least 30 days were included in this study. We evaluated the risk of all-cause death for patients treated with both BB and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)/angiotensin II receptor antagonist (ARB) (n = 16,280), only BB (n = 3683), and only ACEI/ARB (n = 9849), with the drug-untreated patients (n = 3578) as the reference.Over a median follow-up of 2.4 years, although treated patients displayed a trend toward improved survival, there were no significant differences in the adjusted risk of all-cause death when patients were treated with both drugs (hazard ratio [HR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.06, P = 0.154), BB (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.68-1.14, P = 0.325), or ACEI/ARB (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.68-1.04, P = 0.111). No additional benefit was found for the combination therapy compared with either isolated BB (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.80-1.21, P = 0.856) or ACEI/ARB (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.89-1.19, P = 0.727) therapy.Treatment with BB and/or ACEI/ARB has limited effect on survival in unselected nonfatal AMI patients who undergo PCI. PMID:26962802

  5. Brain renin-angiotensin system and dopaminergic cell vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Labandeira-García, Jose L.; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Rodriguez-Pallares, Jannette; Valenzuela, Rita; Borrajo, Ana; Rodríguez-Perez, Ana I.

    2014-01-01

    Although the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was classically considered as a circulating system that regulates blood pressure, many tissues are now known to have a local RAS. Angiotensin, via type 1 receptors, is a major activator of the NADPH-oxidase complex, which mediates several key events in oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory processes involved in the pathogenesis of major aging-related diseases. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of RAS components in the basal ganglia, and particularly in the nigrostriatal system. In the nigrostriatal system, RAS hyperactivation, via NADPH-oxidase complex activation, exacerbates OS and the microglial inflammatory response and contributes to progression of dopaminergic degeneration, which is inhibited by angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Several factors may induce an increase in RAS activity in the dopaminergic system. A decrease in dopaminergic activity induces compensatory upregulation of local RAS function in both dopaminergic neurons and glia. In addition to its role as an essential neurotransmitter, dopamine may also modulate microglial inflammatory responses and neuronal OS via RAS. Important counterregulatory interactions between angiotensin and dopamine have also been observed in several peripheral tissues. Neurotoxins and proinflammatory factors may also act on astrocytes to induce an increase in RAS activity, either independently of or before the loss of dopamine. Consistent with a major role of RAS in dopaminergic vulnerability, increased RAS activity has been observed in the nigra of animal models of aging, menopause and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which also showed higher dopaminergic vulnerability. Manipulation of the brain RAS may constitute an effective neuroprotective strategy against dopaminergic vulnerability and progression of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25071471

  6. [Comparative evaluation of the influence of sulfhydryl and phosphate ACE inhibitors on thrombocyte aggregation in patients suffering from atrerial hypertension with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; Medvedev, I N; Tolmachev, V V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the influence of two ACE inhibitors--captopril, a sulfhydryl one, and fozinopril, a phosphate one--on the aggregation activity of thrombocytes in patients suffering from arterial hypertension (AH) with metabolic syndrome (MS). Sixty-nine patients suffering from AH with MS were examined; 36 patients were administered captopril during 16 weeks, while 33 patients were treated with fozinopril during the same period of time. Changes in anthropometric parameters, blood lipid spectrum, lipid peroxidation in blood plasma and thrombocytes, and the antioxidative protection of liquid part of blood and platelets, as well as the aggregation activity of thrombocytes were assessed. The data received were processed using Student criterion and system multifactor analysis. The study shows that the use of fozinopril in patients with AH and metabolic syndrome attenuates peroxidation syndrome and optimizes thrombocyte aggregation. Prolonged fozinopril application will stabilize the achieved effect. Captopril did not have a positive effect on the parameters under study. In conclusion, fozinopril should be applied in combination with non-drug means to lower body weight in patients suffering from AH with MS. PMID:17564032

  7. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade in chronic kidney disease: current strategies and a look ahead.

    PubMed

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Cappadona, Francesca; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of renal and cardiovascular organ damage, and has been the preferred therapeutic target for renal protection for over 30 years. Monotherapy with either an Angiotensin Converting Enzime Inhibitor (ACE-I) or an Angiotensin Receptor Blocker (ARB), together with optimal blood pressure control, remains the mainstay treatment for retarding the progression toward end-stage renal disease. Combining ACE-Is and ARBs, or either one with an Aldosterone Receptor Antagonist (ARA), has been shown to provide greater albuminuria reduction, and to possibly improve renal outcome, but at an increased risk of potentially severe side effects. Moreover, combination therapy has failed to provide additional cardiovascular protection, and large prospective trials on hard renal endpoints are lacking. Therefore this treatment should, at present, be limited to selected patients with residual proteinuria and high renal risk. Future studies with novel agents, which directly act on the RAAS at multiple levels or have a more favourable side effect profile, are greatly needed to further explore and define the potential for and the limitations of profound pharmacologic RAAS inhibition. PMID:26984204

  8. Polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin system genes predict progression of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kretowski, Adam; McFann, Kim; Hokanson, John E; Maahs, David; Kinney, Gregory; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Wadwa, R Paul; Eckel, Robert H; Ogden, Lorraine; Garg, Satish; Li, Jia; Cheng, Suzanne; Erlich, Henry A; Rewers, Marian

    2007-03-01

    Premature coronary artery disease (CAD) in subjects with type 1 diabetes dramatically affects quality of life and morbidity and leads to premature death, but there is still little known about the mechanisms and predictors of this complication. In the present study, we explored the role of genetic variants of angiotensinogen (AGT, M235T), ACE (I/D), and angiotensin type 1 receptor (ATR1, A1166C) as predictors of rapid progression of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Five-hundred eighty-five type 1 diabetic patients and 592 similar age and sex control subjects were evaluated for progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC), a marker of subclinical CAD, before and after a 2.5-year follow-up. In logistic regression analysis, CAC progression was dramatically more likely in type 1 diabetic subjects not treated with ACE inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker who had the TT-ID-AA/AC genotype combination than in those with other genotypes (odds ratio 11.6 [95%CI 4.5-29.6], P < 0.0001) and was even stronger when adjusted for cardiovascular disease risk factors and the mean A1C (37.5 [3.6-388], P = 0.002). In conclusion, a combination of genotype variants of the renin-angiotensin system genes is a powerful determinant of subclinical progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetic patients and may partially explain accelerated CAD in type 1 diabetes. PMID:17327458

  9. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion. PMID:23145508

  10. Distribution of angiotensin converting enzyme in sheep hypothalamus and medulla oblongata visualized by in vitro autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; McKinley, M.J.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic mapping of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in sheep brain using the specific ACE inhibitor, /sup 125/I-351A, revealed very high densities of binding in large blood vessels and choroid plexus. In the a very high density of labelling occurred in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and median eminence and a high density in the subfornical organ and moderate density in supraoptic, suprachiasmatic, arcuate and paraventricular nuclei. All fiber tracts were unlabelled. In the medulla oblongata, a very high density of binding was detected in the area postrema and a high density in the nucleus of the solitary tract and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus; a moderate density was found in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal tract and the inferior olivary nucleus.

  11. Characterization of a secretase activity which releases angiotensin-converting enzyme from the membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Oppong, S Y; Hooper, N M

    1993-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.1.15.1) exists in both membrane-bound and soluble forms. Phase separation in Triton X-114 and a competitive e.l.i.s.a. have been employed to characterize the activity which post-translationally converts the amphipathic, membrane-bound form of ACE in pig kidney microvilli into a hydrophilic, soluble form. This secretase activity was enriched to a similar extent as other microvillar membrane proteins, was tightly membrane-associated, being resistant to extensive washing of the microvillar membranes with 0.5 M NaCl, and displayed a pH optimum of 8.4. The ACE secretase was not affected by inhibitors of serine-, thiol- or aspartic-proteases, nor by reducing agents or alpha 2-macroglobulin. The metal chelators, EDTA and 1,10-phenanthroline, inhibited the secretase activity, with, in the case of EDTA, an inhibitor concentration of 2.5 mM causing 50% inhibition. In contrast, EGTA inhibited the secretase by a maximum of 15% at a concentration of 10 mM. The inhibition of EDTA was reactivated substantially (83%) by Mg2+ ions, and partially (34% and 29%) by Zn2+ and Mn2+ ions respectively. This EDTA-sensitive secretase activity was also present in microsomal membranes prepared from pig lung and testis, and from human lung and placenta, but was absent from human kidney and human and pig intestinal brush-border membranes. The form of ACE released from the microvillar membrane by the secretase co-migrated on SDS/PAGE with ACE purified from pig plasma, thus the action and location of the secretase would be consistent with it possibly having a role in the post-translational proteolytic cleavage of membrane-bound ACE to generate the soluble form found in blood, amniotic fluid, seminal plasma and other body fluids. Images Figure 4 PMID:8389141

  12. Novel roles of nuclear angiotensin receptors and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gwathmey, TanYa M; Alzayadneh, Ebaa M; Pendergrass, Karl D; Chappell, Mark C

    2012-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) constitutes an important hormonal system in the physiological regulation of blood pressure. The dysregulation of the RAS is considered a major influence in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease and other pathologies. Indeed, experimental and clinical evidence indicates that blockade of this system with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonists is an effective therapy to attenuate hypertension and diabetic renal injury, and to improve heart failure. Originally defined as a circulating system, multiple tissues express a complete RAS, and compelling evidence now favors an intracellular system involved in cell signaling and function. Within the kidney, intracellular expression of the three predominant ANG receptor subtypes is evident in the nuclear compartment. The ANG type 1 receptor (AT1R) is coupled to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the activation of phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and PKC. In contrast, both ANG type 2 (AT2R) and ANG-(1-7) (AT7R) receptors stimulate nitric oxide (NO) formation, which may involve nuclear endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Moreover, blockade of either ACE2-the enzyme that converts ANG II to ANG-(1-7)-or the AT7 receptor exacerbates the ANG II-ROS response on renal nuclei. Finally, in a model of fetal programmed hypertension, the nuclear ROS response to ANG II is enhanced, while both AT2 and AT7 stimulation of NO is attenuated, suggesting that an imbalance in the intracellular RAS may contribute to the development of programming events. We conclude that a functional intracellular or nuclear RAS may have important implications in the therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease. PMID:22170620

  13. Angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart. Predominance of the angiotensin-converting enzyme pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, L S; Abraham, W T; Meixell, G E; Vamvakias, B N; Quaife, R A; Lowes, B D; Roden, R L; Peacock, S J; Groves, B M; Raynolds, M V

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the contribution of myocardial tissue angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to angiotensin II (Ang II) formation in the human heart is low compared with non-ACE pathways. However, little is known about the actual in vivo contribution of these pathways to Ang II formation in the human heart. To examine angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart, we administered intracoronary 123I-labeled angiotensin I (Ang I) with and without intracoronary enalaprilat to orthotopic heart transplant recipients. The fractional conversion of Ang I to Ang II, calculated after separation of angiotensin peptides by HPLC, was 0.415 +/- 0.104 (n = 5, mean +/- SD). Enalaprilat reduced fractional conversion by 89%, to a value of 0.044 +/- 0.053 (n = 4, P = 0.002). In a separate study of explanted hearts, a newly developed in vitro Ang II-forming assay was used to examine cardiac tissue ACE activity independent of circulating components. ACE activity in solubilized left ventricular membrane preparations from failing hearts was 49.6 +/- 5.3 fmol 125I-Ang II formed per minute per milligram of protein (n = 8, +/- SE), and 35.9 +/- 4.8 fmol/min/mg from nonfailing human hearts (n = 7, P = 0.08). In the presence of 1 microM enalaprilat, ACE activity was reduced by 85%, to 7.3 +/- 1.4 fmol/min/mg in the failing group and to 4.6 +/- 1.3 fmol/min/mg in the nonfailing group (P < 0.001). We conclude that the predominant pathway for angiotensin II formation in the human heart is through ACE. Images PMID:7657820

  14. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Activity in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Handjani, Farhad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Kalafi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the hair follicle. The exact pathogenesis of AA remains unknown, although recent studies support a T-cell mediated autoimmune process. On the other hand, some studies have proposed that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a role in autoimmunity. Therefore, we assessed serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a component of this system, in AA. Methods. ACE activity was measured in the sera of 19 patients with AA and 16 healthy control subjects. In addition, the relationship between severity and duration of the disease and ACE activity was evaluated. Results. Serum ACE activity was higher in the patient group (55.81 U/L) compared to the control group (46.41 U/L), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.085). Also, there was no correlation between ACE activity and severity (P = 0.13) and duration of disease (P = 0.25) in the patient group. Conclusion. The increased serum ACE activity found in this study may demonstrate local involvement of the RAAS in the pathogenesis of AA. Assessment of ACE in a study with a larger sample size as well as in tissue samples is recommended in order to further evaluate the possible role of RAAS in AA. PMID:25349723

  15. An Improved Model for Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis Incorporating Clinical and Dosimetric Variables;Lung cancer; Radiation pneumonitis; Dose-volume histogram; Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Peter; Watts, Joanne

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Single dose-volume metrics are of limited value for the prediction of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in day-to-day clinical practice. We investigated whether multiparametric models that incorporate clinical and physiologic factors might have improved accuracy. Methods and Materials: The records of 160 patients who received radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer were reviewed. All patients were treated to the same dose and with an identical technique. Dosimetric, pulmonary function, and clinical parameters were analyzed to determine their ability to predict for the subsequent development of RP. Results: Twenty-seven patients (17%) developed RP. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly correlated with the risk of pneumonitis: fractional volume of lung receiving >5-20 Gy, absolute volume of lung spared from receiving >5-15 Gy, mean lung dose, craniocaudal position of the isocenter, transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide (KCOc), total lung capacity, coadministration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and coadministration of angiotensin receptor antagonists. By combining the absolute volume of lung spared from receiving >5 Gy with the KCOc, we defined a new parameter termed Transfer Factor Spared from receiving >5 Gy (TFS{sub 5}). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for TFS{sub 5} was 0.778, increasing to 0.846 if patients receiving modulators of the renin-angiotensin system were excluded from the analysis. Patients with a TFS{sub 5} <2.17 mmol/min/kPa had a risk of RP of 30% compared with 5% for the group with a TFS{sub 5} {>=}2.17. Conclusions: TFS{sub 5} represents a simple parameter that can be used in routine clinical practice to more accurately segregate patients into high- and low-risk groups for developing RP.

  16. Early administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril, prevents the development of hypertension programmed by intrauterine exposure to a maternal low-protein diet in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sherman, R C; Langley-Evans, S C

    1998-04-01

    administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. The actions of angiotensin II in the late suckling period may be a critical determinant of long-term cardiovascular functions in these animals. PMID:9640343

  17. Tissue Specificity of Human Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kryukova, Olga V.; Tikhomirova, Victoria E.; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Evdokimov, Valery V.; Kalantarov, Gavreel F.; Trakht, Ilya N.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Gusakov, Alexander V.; Uporov, Igor V.; Kost, Olga A.; Danilov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), which metabolizes many peptides and plays a key role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling, as well as in reproductive functions, is expressed as a type-1 membrane glycoprotein on the surface of endothelial and epithelial cells. ACE also presents as a soluble form in biological fluids, among which seminal fluid being the richest in ACE content - 50-fold more than that in blood. Methods/Principal Findings We performed conformational fingerprinting of lung and seminal fluid ACEs using a set of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to 17 epitopes of human ACE and determined the effects of potential ACE-binding partners on mAbs binding to these two different ACEs. Patterns of mAbs binding to ACEs from lung and from seminal fluid dramatically differed, which reflects difference in the local conformations of these ACEs, likely due to different patterns of ACE glycosylation in the lung endothelial cells and epithelial cells of epididymis/prostate (source of seminal fluid ACE), confirmed by mass-spectrometry of ACEs tryptic digests. Conclusions Dramatic differences in the local conformations of seminal fluid and lung ACEs, as well as the effects of ACE-binding partners on mAbs binding to these ACEs, suggest different regulation of ACE functions and shedding from epithelial cells in epididymis and prostate and endothelial cells of lung capillaries. The differences in local conformation of ACE could be the base for the generation of mAbs distingushing tissue-specific ACEs. PMID:26600189

  18. Angiotensin II-inhibiting drugs have no effect on intraneuronal Aβ or oligomeric Aβ levels in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrington, Linda; Miners, J Scott; Palmer, Laura E; Bond, Susan M; Povey, Joanne E; Kelly, Paul AT; Love, Seth; Horsburgh, Karen J; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reducing the excessive accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a key objective of most AD therapies. Several studies suggest that pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) or its by-product angiotensin II may delay onset or progression of dementia and it has been suggested that this occurs via regulation of Aβ. Intraneuronal oligomeric accumulation of Aβ is postulated to be one of the earliest pathological events. Thus this study investigated the effect of an ACE-inhibitor, captopril, and two angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), eprosartan and valsartan, on intraneuronal Aβ pathology and oligomeric Aβ levels in a triple transgenic (3xTGAD) mouse model of AD. Methods: Male, adult (3-4 month old) 3xTgAD mice (n=39) were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: valsartan (0.17g/l), eprosartan (0.8g/l), captopril (5g/l) or normal drinking water and the drugs given ad libitum for 2 months. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was measured at baseline, at 2 weeks and at 2 months when the mice were sacrificed and the brains hemisected for analysis. One hemisphere was processed for Aβ and amyloid precursor protein (APP) immunohistochemistry and the other for biochemical measurement of oligomeric Aβ and APP. ACE activity was measured in the brain and kidney. Results: MABP was significantly reduced at 2 weeks and 2 months in the ACE-I group (p=0.0006) but was unaltered in the ARB groups compared to vehicle. Neither ACE-I nor ARB treatment altered Aβ and APP immunolabelling or the level of Aβ or APP in brain tissue homogenates. Similarly neither ACE-I nor ARB treatment altered ACE activity in either brain or kidney compared to control tissue. Conclusions: ACE-I or ARB administration over 2 months did not affect APP levels or either intraneuronal Aβ or oligomeric Aβ levels in 3xTGAD mice. While ARBs did not alter MABP, captopril did mediate reductions in MABP in the 3xTGAD mice which appeared to

  19. Mas-Mediated Antioxidant Effects Restore the Functionality of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2-Angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas Axis in Diabetic Rat Carotid

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Mayara Santos; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araujo

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of reactive oxygen species during type I-diabetes impairs carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality, which accounts for the impaired carotid flow in diabetic rats. We also hypothesized that angiotensin-(1–7) chronic treatment of diabetic rats restores carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality and carotid flow. Relaxant curves for angiotensin II or angiotensin-(1–7) were obtained in carotid from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Superoxide or hydrogen peroxide levels were measured by flow cytometry in carotid endothelial cells. Carotid flow was also determined. We found that endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in diabetic rat carotid impairs ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality, which reduces carotid flow. In this mechanism, hydrogen peroxide derived from superoxide dismutation inhibits ACE2 activity in generating angiotensin-(1–7) seemingly by activating ICl,SWELL, while superoxide inhibits the nitrergic Mas-mediated vasorelaxation evoked by angiotensin-(1–7). Angiotensin-(1–7) treatment of diabetic rats restored carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality by triggering a positive feedback played by endothelial Mas receptors, that blunts endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of reactive oxygen species. Mas-mediated antioxidant effects also restored diabetic rat carotid flow, pointing to the contribution of ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis in maintaining carotid flow. PMID:24877125

  20. Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves glycemia in angiotensin II-infused mice

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Xia, Huijing; Pedersen, Kim Brint; Speth, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    An overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to contribute to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although ACE2 overexpression has been shown to be protective against the overactive RAS, a role for pancreatic ACE2, particularly in the islets of Langerhans, in regulating glycemia in response to elevated angiotensin II (Ang II) levels remains to be elucidated. This study examined the role of endogenous pancreatic ACE2 and the impact of elevated Ang II levels on the enzyme's ability to alleviate hyperglycemia in an Ang II infusion mouse model. Male C57bl/6J mice were infused with Ang II or saline for a period of 14 days. On the 7th day of infusion, either an adenovirus encoding human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2) or a control adenovirus (Ad-eGFP) was injected into the mouse pancreas. After an additional 7–8 days, glycemia and plasma insulin levels as well as RAS components expression and oxidative stress were assessed. Ang II-infused mice exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets compared with control mice. This phenotype was associated with decreased ACE2 expression and activity, increased Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, and increased oxidative stress in the mouse pancreas. Ad-hACE2 treatment restored pancreatic ACE2 expression and compensatory activity against Ang II-mediated impaired glycemia, thus improving β-cell function. Our data suggest that decreased pancreatic ACE2 is a link between overactive RAS and impaired glycemia in T2DM. Moreover, maintenance of a normal endogenous ACE2 compensatory activity in the pancreas appears critical to avoid β-cell dysfunction, supporting a therapeutic potential for ACE2 in controlling diabetes resulting from an overactive RAS. PMID:23462816

  1. [Preplacentation pregnancy loss in cases of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P; Konova, E; Komsa-Penkova, R; Kovacheva, K; Nikolov, N; Simeonova, M; Tanchev, St

    2014-01-01

    The balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis processes is critical for establishment and development of early pregnancy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is related with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity which is a key regulator in embryo implantation. Therefor polymorphisms in ACE gene and variation in ACE activity could be associated with an early pregnancy wastage risk. This study investigated carrier status for insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in introne 16 of ACE gene in 71 women with two or more pregnancy loss in preplacentation period (between 10 and 14 weeks of gestation) and 75 women without pregnancy complications. DD genotype for I/D polymorphism was found respectively in 31% and 24% in patients and controls. Heterozygosity of D allele was found correspondingly in 47.9% and 54.7%. The dominant genetic model was used for allele prevalence comparison. D allele in DD genotype was not significantly prevalent in women with early pregnancy wastage compared with the control subjects, OR = 1.42, 95% CI (0.64-3.15). The study found a weak association between I/D polymorphism and preplacentation pregnancy loss. The additive effect over the pregnancy loss risk of I/D polymorphism could be supposed in a presence of other inherited or acquired factors connected with endometrial receptivity and implantation process. PMID:25510065

  2. Effect of Beta Blockers and Renin–Angiotensin System Inhibitors on Survival in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pil Hyung; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Young-Hak; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Chang, Mineok; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Sung-Han; Ahn, Jung-Min; Park, Duk-Woo; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Seung-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Because it remains uncertain whether β-blockers (BBs) and/or renin–angiotensin system inhibitors benefit a broad population of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, we sought to evaluate the effectiveness of these drugs in improving survival for post-AMI patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). From the nationwide data of the South Korea National Health Insurance, 33,390 patients with a diagnosis of AMI who underwent a PCI between 2009 and 2013 and survived at least 30 days were included in this study. We evaluated the risk of all-cause death for patients treated with both BB and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)/angiotensin II receptor antagonist (ARB) (n = 16,280), only BB (n = 3683), and only ACEI/ARB (n = 9849), with the drug-untreated patients (n = 3578) as the reference. Over a median follow-up of 2.4 years, although treated patients displayed a trend toward improved survival, there were no significant differences in the adjusted risk of all-cause death when patients were treated with both drugs (hazard ratio [HR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–1.06, P = 0.154), BB (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.68–1.14, P = 0.325), or ACEI/ARB (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.68–1.04, P = 0.111). No additional benefit was found for the combination therapy compared with either isolated BB (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.80–1.21, P = 0.856) or ACEI/ARB (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.89–1.19, P = 0.727) therapy. Treatment with BB and/or ACEI/ARB has limited effect on survival in unselected nonfatal AMI patients who undergo PCI. PMID:26962802

  3. Renoprotective Effect of the Combination of Renin-angiotensin System Inhibitor and Calcium Channel Blocker in Patients with Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong-Shuang; Cheng, Yi-Ming; Zeng, Xiao-Xi; Kim, Sehee; Fu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renin-angiotensin system inhibitor and calcium channel blocker (CCB) are widely used in controlling blood pressure (BP) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We carried out a meta-analysis to compare the renoprotective effect of the combination of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) and CCB (i.e., ACEI/ARB + CCB) with ACEI/ARB monotherapy in patients with hypertension and CKD. Methods: Publications were identified from PubMed, Embase, Medline, and Cochrane databases. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of BP lowering treatment for patients with hypertension and CKD were considered. The outcomes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular events, BP, urinary protein measures, estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and adverse events were extracted. Results: Based on seven RCTs with 628 patients, ACEI/ARB + CCB did not show additional benefit for the incidence of ESRD (risk ratio [RR] = 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.52–1.33) and cardiovascular events (RR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.21–1.63) significantly, compared with ACEI/ARB monotherapy. There were no significant differences in change from baseline to the end points in diastolic BP (weighted mean difference [WMD] = −1.28 mmHg; 95% CI: −3.18 to −0.62), proteinuria (standard mean difference = −0.55; 95% CI: −1.41 to −0.30), GFR (WMD = −0.32 ml/min; 95% CI: −1.53 to −0.89), and occurrence of adverse events (RR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.72–1.53). However, ACEI/ARB + CCB showed a greater reduction in systolic BP (WMD = −4.46 mmHg; 95% CI: −6.95 to −1.97), compared with ACEI/ARB monotherapy. Conclusion: ACEI/ARB + CCB had no additional renoprotective benefit beyond than what could be achieved with ACEI/ARB monotherapy. PMID:26904991

  4. The renin-angiotensin system: a target of and contributor to dyslipidemias, altered glucose homeostasis, and hypertension of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Kelly; Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Cassis, Lisa A

    2012-03-15

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important therapeutic target in the treatment of hypertension. Obesity has emerged as a primary contributor to essential hypertension in the United States and clusters with other metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypertension, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol) defined within the metabolic syndrome. In addition to hypertension, RAS blockade may also serve as an effective treatment strategy to control impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and dyslipidemias in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or specific cholesterol metabolites have been demonstrated to activate components required for the synthesis [angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)], degradation (ACE2), or responsiveness (angiotensin II type 1 receptors, Mas receptors) to angiotensin peptides in cell types (e.g., pancreatic islet cells, adipocytes, macrophages) that mediate specific disorders of the metabolic syndrome. An activated local RAS in these cell types may contribute to dysregulated function by promoting oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. This review will discuss data demonstrating the regulation of components of the RAS by cholesterol and its metabolites, glucose, and/or insulin in cell types implicated in disorders of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, we discuss data supporting a role for an activated local RAS in dyslipidemias and glucose intolerance/insulin resistance and the development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome. Identification of an activated RAS as a common thread contributing to several disorders of the metabolic syndrome makes the use of angiotensin receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors an intriguing and novel option for multisymptom treatment. PMID:22227126

  5. Human Recombinant ACE2 Reduces the Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oudit, Gavin Y.; Liu, George C.; Zhong, JiuChang; Basu, Ratnadeep; Chow, Fung L.; Zhou, Joyce; Loibner, Hans; Janzek, Evelyne; Schuster, Manfred; Penninger, Josef M.; Herzenberg, Andrew M.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Scholey, James W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most common causes of end-stage renal failure. Inhibition of ACE2 function accelerates diabetic kidney injury, whereas renal ACE2 is downregulated in diabetic nephropathy. We examined the ability of human recombinant ACE2 (hrACE2) to slow the progression of diabetic kidney injury. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male 12-week-old diabetic Akita mice (Ins2WT/C96Y) and control C57BL/6J mice (Ins2WT/WT) were injected daily with placebo or with rhACE2 (2 mg/kg, i.p.) for 4 weeks. Albumin excretion, gene expression, histomorphometry, NADPH oxidase activity, and peptide levels were examined. The effect of hrACE2 on high glucose and angiotensin II (ANG II)–induced changes was also examined in cultured mesangial cells. RESULTS Treatment with hrACE2 increased plasma ACE2 activity, normalized blood pressure, and reduced the urinary albumin excretion in Akita Ins2WT/C96Y mice in association with a decreased glomerular mesangial matrix expansion and normalization of increased α-smooth muscle actin and collagen III expression. Human recombinant ACE2 increased ANG 1–7 levels, lowered ANG II levels, and reduced NADPH oxidase activity. mRNA levels for p47phox and NOX2 and protein levels for protein kinase Cα (PKCα) and PKCβ1 were also normalized by treatment with hrACE2. In vitro, hrACE2 attenuated both high glucose and ANG II–induced oxidative stress and NADPH oxidase activity. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with hrACE2 attenuates diabetic kidney injury in the Akita mouse in association with a reduction in blood pressure and a decrease in NADPH oxidase activity. In vitro studies show that the protective effect of hrACE2 is due to reduction in ANG II and an increase in ANG 1–7 signaling. PMID:19934006

  6. Does the addition of losartan improve the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors in patients with anterior myocardial infarction? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Di, P; Bucca, V; Scalzo, S; Cannizzaro, S; Giubilato, A; Paterna, S

    1999-01-01

    (141) pg/ml; AII 12.77 (4.79) v 12.65 (4.71) pg/ml) or 10 days after admission (NA 283 (93) v 277 (98) pg/ml; AII 5.31 (2.25) v 6.09 (3.31) pg/ml). However, patients in group C had higher plasma concentrations of AII (14.79 (5.7) pg/ml on the third day and 7.98 (4.92) pg/ml on the 10th day) than patients in either group A or B (p = 0.006). After 90 days following treatment, group B (captopril plus losartan) patients had a smaller ESV than patients in group A (captopril) and group C (losartan).
CONCLUSION—The data suggest that the combination of captopril plus losartan is feasible in the early treatment of acute myocardial infarction patients, and it appears that this combination has more effect on ESV than captopril alone in the short term.


Keywords: acute myocardial infarction; angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; captopril; losartan PMID:10336919

  7. Chronic Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) Blockade May Not Induce Hypotension During Anaesthesia for Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Guido; Di Salvo, Claudio; Ceccarini, Giovanni; Abramo, Antonio; Fierabracci, Paola; Magno, Silvia; Piaggi, Paolo; Vitti, Paolo; Santini, Ferruccio

    2016-06-01

    The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) for the treatment of hypertensive obese patients is steadily increasing. Some studies have reported that the use of these drugs was associated with an increased risk of hypotensive episodes, during general anaesthesia. The number of bariatric procedures is also increasing worldwide, but there is a lack of studies investigating the hypotensive effect of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers in severely obese patients during general anaesthesia for bariatric surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate hemodynamic changes induced by general anaesthesia in obese patients chronically treated with ACE-I or ARB compared to a control group not treated with antihypertensive therapy. Fourteen obese subjects (mean body mass index (BMI) 47.5 kg/m(2)) treated with ACE-I or ARB and twelve obese (mean BMI 45.7 kg/m2) controls not treated with antihypertensive therapy underwent general anaesthesia to perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored continuously and registered at different time points: T0 before induction, then at 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min after induction, and the last time point taken following recovery from anaesthesia. A progressive reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure values was observed without significant differences between the two groups. A similar trend of heart rate values was observed. In conclusion, our pilot study suggests that RAS blockers may be continued during the perioperative period in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, without increasing the risk of hypotensive episodes. PMID:26328531

  8. Optimal antagonism of the Renin-Angiotensin-aldosterone system: do we need dual or triple therapy?

    PubMed

    Werner, Christian; Pöss, Janine; Böhm, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The cardiovascular and cardiorenal disease continuum comprises the transition from cardiovascular risk factors to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, to clinical complications such as myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, to the development of persistent target-organ damage and, ultimately, to chronic congestive heart failure (CHF), end-stage renal disease or premature death. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is involved in all steps along this pathway, and RAAS blockade with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT(1)-receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers; ARBs) has turned out to be beneficial for patient outcomes throughout the disease continuum. Both ACE inhibitors and ARBs can prevent or reverse endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. These drugs have further been shown to reduce end-organ damage in the heart, kidneys and brain. Aldosterone antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly recognized as a third class of RAAS inhibitor with potent risk-reducing properties, especially but not solely with respect to the inhibition of cardiac remodelling and the possible prevention of heart failure. In secondary prevention, head-to-head comparisons of ACE inhibitors and ARBs, such as the recent ONTARGET study, provided evidence that, in addition to better tolerability, ARBs are non-inferior to ACE inhibitors in the prevention of clinical endpoints such as MI and stroke in cardiovascular high-risk patients. However, the combination of both ramipril and telmisartan at the maximally tolerated dosage achieved no further benefits and was associated with more adverse events such as symptomatic hypotension and renal dysfunction. In acute MI complicated by heart failure, the VALIANT trial has shown similar effects of ACE inhibition with captopril and ARB treatment with valsartan, but dual RAAS blockade did not further reduce events. In CHF, meta-analyses of RESOLVD, Val

  9. A Low-Protein Diet Enhances Angiotensin II Production in the Lung of Pregnant Rats but Not Nonpregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haijun; Tanchico, Daren Tubianosa; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary angiotensin II production is enhanced in pregnant rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet. Here we assessed if LP diet induces elevations in angiotensin II production in nonpregnant rats and whether Ace expression and ACE activity in lungs are increased. Nonpregnant rats were fed a normal (CT) or LP diet for 8, 12, or 17 days and timed pregnant rats fed for 17 days from Day 3 of pregnancy. Plasma angiotensin II, expressions of Ace and Ace2, and activities of these proteins in lungs, kidneys, and plasma were measured. These parameters were compared among nonpregnant rats or between nonpregnant and pregnant rats fed different diets. Major findings are as follows: (1) plasma angiotensin II levels were slightly higher in the LP than CT group on Days 8 and 12 in nonpregnant rats; (2) expression of Ace and Ace2 and abundance and activities of ACE and ACE2 in lungs, kidneys, and plasma of nonpregnant rats were unchanged by LP diet except for minor changes; (3) the abundance and activities of ACE in lungs of pregnant rats fed LP diet were greater than nonpregnant rats, while those of ACE2 were decreased. These results indicate that LP diet-induced increase in pulmonary angiotensin II production depends on pregnancy. PMID:27195150

  10. Aldosterone response to angiotensin II during hypoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Colice, G.L.; Ramirez, G.

    1986-07-01

    Exercise stimulates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). However, increases in plasma aldosterone concentrations (PAC) are suppressed when exercise is performed at high altitude or under hypoxemic conditions. As the angiotensin-II response to high-altitude exercise is normal, it is speculated that an inhibitor, discharged during hypoxemia, acted to suppress angiotensin-II-mediated aldosterone release. A study was conducted to test this hypothesis, taking into account the measurement of the aldosterone response to exogenous angiotensin II during normoxemia and hypoxemia. It was found that the dose-response curve of PAC to angiotensin II was not significantly inhibited by the considered model of hypoxemia. The hypoxemia-mediated release of an angiotensin II inhibitor does, therefore, not explain the previous observations of PAC suppression during hypoxemic exercise. 28 references.

  11. ACE2 overexpression inhibits acquired platinum resistance-induced tumor angiogenesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Ling; Zhou, Jianping; Wan, Huanying; Li, Qingyun; Feng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a multifunctional bioactive peptide in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a newly identified component of RAS. We previously reported that ACE2 overexpression may inhibit cell growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ACE2 on tumor-associated angiogen-esis after the development of acquired platinum resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Four NSCLC cell lines, A549, LLC, A549-DDP and LLC-DDP, were used in vitro, while A549 and A549-DDP cells were used in vivo. A549-DDP and LLC-DDP cells were newly established at our institution as acquired platinum-resistant sublines by culturing the former parent cells in cisplatin (CDDP)-containing conditioned medium for 6 months. These platinum-resistant cells showed significantly higher angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), ACE and VEGF production and lower ACE2 expression than their corresponding parent cells. We showed that ACE2 overexpression inhibited the production of VEGF in vitro and in vivo compared to their corresponding parent cells. We also found that ACE2 overexpression reduced the expression of AT1R and ACE. Additionally, we confirmed that ACE2 overexpres-sion inhibited cell growth and VEGF production while simultaneously suppressing ACE and AT1R expression in human lung cancer xenografts. Our findings indicate that ACE2 overexpression may potentially suppress angiogenesis in NSCLC after the development of acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27460845

  12. Intrarenal distributions and changes of Angiotensin-converting enzyme and Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in feline and canine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Sawa, Mariko; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). ACE2 is a newly identified member of the RAS. The present immunohistochemical study focused on changes in intrarenal ACE and ACE2 immunoreactivity in feline and canine chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACE immunoreactivity was predominantly observed in the brush border of the proximal tubules in dogs and cats. ACE immunoreactivity was lower in CKD kidneys than in normal kidneys, and quantitative analysis demonstrated negative correlations between ACE and renal tissue damage in dogs. ACE2 immunoreactivity was also detected in the proximal tubules; it increased or decreased with CKD in dogs, depending on the renal region assessed. The changes in ACE and ACE2 in CKD were associated with the plasma creatinine concentration in dogs. Findings from dogs with glomerulonephritis were similar to those from dogs with non-glomerulonephritis. The present study suggests that changes in the intrarenal expression of ACE and ACE2 contribute to the pathological mechanisms of canine CKD, but not to the mechanisms of feline CKD. PMID:24004970

  13. Angiotensin Blockade in Late Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Vicente E.; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Schrier, Robert W.; Braun, William E.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Winklhofer, Franz T.; Brosnahan, Godela; Czarnecki, Peter G.; Hogan, Marie C.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic F.; Grantham, Jared J.; Harris, Peter C.; Flessner, Michael F.; Moore, Charity G.; Perrone, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hypertension develops early in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and is associated with disease progression. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with ADPKD. Dual blockade of the RAAS may circumvent compensatory mechanisms that limit the efficacy of monotherapy with an angiotensin-converting–enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin II–receptor blocker (ARB). METHODS In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 486 patients, 18 to 64 years of age, with ADPKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR], 25 to 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m2 of body-surface area) to receive an ACE inhibitor (lisinopril) and placebo or lisinopril and an ARB (telmisartan), with the doses adjusted to achieve a blood pressure of 110/70 to 130/80 mm Hg. The composite primary outcome was the time to death, end-stage renal disease, or a 50% reduction from the baseline estimated GFR. Secondary outcomes included the rates of change in urinary aldosterone and albumin excretion, frequency of hospitalizations for any cause and for cardiovascular causes, incidence of pain, frequency of ADPKD-related symptoms, quality of life, and adverse study-medication effects. Patients were followed for 5 to 8 years. RESULTS There was no significant difference between the study groups in the incidence of the composite primary outcome (hazard ratio with lisinopril–telmisartan, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.42). The two treatments controlled blood pressure and lowered urinary aldosterone excretion similarly. The rates of decline in the estimated GFR, urinary albumin excretion, and other secondary outcomes and adverse events, including hyperkalemia and acute kidney injury, were also similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Monotherapy with an ACE inhibitor was associated with blood-pressure control in most patients with ADPKD and stage 3 chronic kidney disease

  14. Prevention of atrial fibrillation with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors on essential hypertensive patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Wang, Ze-Mu; Wang, Lian-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to investigate the effectiveness and safety of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) on preventing atrial fibrillation in essential hypertensive patients. Systematic literature retrieval was carried out to obtain randomized controlled trials on the effects of ACEI/ARBs on essential hypertensive patients before December, 2013. Data extraction and quality evaluation were performed. Meta-analysis was performed by Review Manager 5.2.3. Ten high quality studies (11 articles) with a total of 42,892 patients (20,491 patients in the ACEI/ARBs group and 22,401 patients in the β-blocker or the calcium antagonist group) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed that ACEI/ARBs reduced the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence compared to calcium antagonists (RR = 0.48; 95%CI, 0.40-0.58; P<0.00001) or β-blockers (RR = 0.39; 95%CI, 0.20-0.74; P = 0.005) in long-term follow-up, respectively. Furthermore, ACEI/ARBs reduced the incidence of congestive heart failure (RR = 0.86; 95%CI, 0.77-0.96; P = 0.007). However, no significant effects were observed on the incidence of new AF, cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Our results suggest that ACEI/ARBs may reduce the incidence of AF recurrence and congestive heart failure, with fewer serious adverse effects. PMID:26668582

  15. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 as a Therapeutic Target for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A.R.; Shao, Zhili; Tang, W. H. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disorders. Angiotensin II (Ang-II), the final product of this pathway, is known for its vasoconstrictive and proliferative effects. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a newly discovered homolog of ACE, plays a key role as the central negative regulator of the RAS. It diverts the generation of vasoactive Ang-II into the vasodilatory and growth inhibiting peptide angiotensin(1-7) [Ang(1-7)], thereby providing counter-regulatory responses to neurohormonal activation. There is substantial experimental evidence evaluating the role of ACE2/Ang(1-7) in hypertension, heart failure, and atherosclerosis. In this review, we aim to focus on the conceptual facts of the ACE2-Ang(1-7) axis with regards to clinical implications and therapeutic targets in cardiovascular disorders, with emphasis on the potential therapeutic role in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24293035

  16. Proteolytic Processing of Angiotensin-I in Human Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Diana; Merkel, Philipp; Eggers, Lars Florian; Schlüter, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian species, except humans, N-terminal processing of the precursor peptide angiotensin I (ANG-1-10) into ANG-2-10 or ANG-3-10 was reported. Here we hypothesize that aminopeptidase-generated angiotensins bearing the same C-terminus as ANG-1-10 are also present in humans. We demonstrate the time dependent generation of ANG-2-10, ANG-3-10, ANG-4-10, ANG-5-10 and ANG-6-10 from the precursor ANG-1-10 by human plasma proteins. The endogenous presence of ANG-4-10, ANG-5-10 and ANG-6-10 in human plasma was confirmed by an immuno-fluorescence assay. Generation of ANG-2-10, ANG-3-10 and ANG-4-10 from ANG-1-10 by immobilized human plasma proteins was sensitive to the cysteine/serine protease inhibitor antipain. The metal ion chelator EDTA inhibited Ang-6-10-generation. Incubation of the substrates ANG-3-10, ANG-4-10 and ANG-5-10 with recombinant aminopeptidase N (APN) resulted in a successive N-terminal processing, finally releasing ANG-6-10 as a stable end product, demonstrating a high similarity concerning the processing pattern of the angiotensin peptides compared to the angiotensin generating activity in plasma. Recombinant ACE-1 hydrolyzed the peptides ANG-2-10, ANG-3-10, ANG-4-10 and ANG-5-10 into ANG-2-8, ANG-3-8, ANG-4-8 and ANG-5-8. Since ANG-2-10 was processed into ANG-2-8, ANG-4-8 and ANG-5-8 by plasma proteases the angiotensin peptides bearing the same C-terminus as ANG-1-10 likely have a precursor function in human plasma. Our results confirm the hypothesis of aminopeptidase mediated processing of ANG-1-10 in humans. We show the existence of an aminopeptidase mediated pathway in humans that bypasses the known ANG-1-8-carboxypeptidase pathway. This expands the knowledge about the known human renin angiotensin system, showing how efficiently the precursor ANG-1-10 is used by nature. PMID:23724017

  17. Oral Delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1–7) Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells Protects against Experimental Uveitis and Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Shil, Pollob K; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Zhu, Ping; Verma, Amrisha; Daniell, Henry; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) resulting in elevated Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to all stages of inflammatory responses including ocular inflammation. The discovery of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has established a protective axis of RAS involving ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas that counteracts the proinflammatory and hypertrophic effects of the deleterious ACE/AngII/AT1R axis. Here we investigated the hypothesis that enhancing the systemic and local activity of the protective axis of the RAS by oral delivery of ACE2 and Ang-(1–7) bioencapsulated in plant cells would confer protection against ocular inflammation. Both ACE2 and Ang-(1–7), fused with the non-toxic cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) were expressed in plant chloroplasts. Increased levels of ACE2 and Ang-(1–7) were observed in circulation and retina after oral administration of CTB-ACE2 and Ang-(1–7) expressing plant cells. Oral feeding of mice with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1–7) significantly reduced endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in mice. Treatment with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1–7) also dramatically decreased cellular infiltration, retinal vasculitis, damage and folding in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Thus, enhancing the protective axis of RAS by oral delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1–7) bioencapsulated in plant cells provide an innovative, highly efficient and cost-effective therapeutic strategy for ocular inflammatory diseases. PMID:25228068

  18. Alternative Roles of STAT3 and MAPK Signaling Pathways in the MMPs Activation and Progression of Lung Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke Exposure in ACE2 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yi-Han; Hsieh, Wen-Yeh; Hsieh, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Fon-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Hung; Lu, Li-Che; Huang, Chen-Yi; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-mediated abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury. Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) homologue that displays antagonist effects on ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) axis, could also play a protective role against lung diseases. However, the relationship between ACE2 and MMPs activation in lung injury is still largely unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether MMPs activity could be affected by ACE2 and which ACE2 derived signaling pathways could be also involved via using a mouse model with lung injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure for 1 to 3 weeks. Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6) and ACE2 KO mice (ACE2(-/-)) were utilized to study CS-induced lung injury. Increases in the resting respiratory rate (RRR), pulmonary immunokines, leukocyte infiltration and bronchial hyperplasia were observed in the CS-exposed mice. Compared to WT mice, more serious physiopathological changes were found in ACE2(-/-) mice in the first week of CS exposure. CS exposure increased pulmonary ACE and ACE2 activities in WT mice, and significantly increased ACE in ACE2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, the activity of pulmonary MMPs was decreased in CS-exposed WT mice, whereas this activity was increased in ACE2(-/-) mice. CS exposure increased the pulmonary p-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK1/2 level in all mice. In ACE2(-/-) mice, a significant increase p-STAT3 signaling was detected; however, no effect was observed on the p-STAT3 level in WT mice. Our results support the hypothesis that ACE2 deficiency influences MMPs activation and STAT3 phosphorylation signaling to promote more pulmonary inflammation in the development of lung injury. PMID:27019629

  19. ACE2 deficiency reduces β-cell mass and impairs β-cell proliferation in obese C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Thatcher, Sean; Cassis, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    Drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) decrease the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Pancreatic islets express RAS components, including angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which cleaves angiotensin II (Ang II) to angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]. Overexpression of ACE2 in pancreas of diabetic mice improved glucose homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to determine if deficiency of endogenous ACE2 contributes to islet dysfunction and T2D. We hypothesized that ACE2 deficiency potentiates the decline in β-cell function and augments the development of diet-induced T2D. Male Ace2(+/y) or Ace2(-/y) mice were fed a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet for 1 or 4 mo. A subset of 1-mo HF-fed mice were infused with Sal (Sal), losartan (Los), or Ang-(1-7). At 4 mo, while both genotypes of HF-fed mice developed a similar level of insulin resistance, adaptive hyperinsulinemia was reduced in Ace2(-/y) vs. Ace2(+/y) mice. Similarly, in vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was reduced in 1-mo HF-fed Ace2(-/y) compared with Ace2(+/y) mice, resulting in augmented hyperglycemia. The average islet area was significantly smaller in both LF- and HF-fed Ace2(-/y) vs. Ace2(+/y) mice. Additionally, β-cell mass and proliferation were reduced significantly in HF-fed Ace2(-/y) vs. Ace2(+/y) mice. Neither infusion of Los nor Ang-(1-7) was able to correct impaired in vivo GSIS of HF-fed ACE2-deficient mice. These results demonstrate a critical role for endogenous ACE2 in the adaptive β-cell hyperinsulinemic response to HF feeding through regulation of β-cell proliferation and growth. PMID:26389599

  20. Alternative Roles of STAT3 and MAPK Signaling Pathways in the MMPs Activation and Progression of Lung Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke Exposure in ACE2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yi-Han; Hsieh, Wen-Yeh; Hsieh, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Fon-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Hung; Lu, Li-Che; Huang, Chen-Yi; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-mediated abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury. Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) homologue that displays antagonist effects on ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) axis, could also play a protective role against lung diseases. However, the relationship between ACE2 and MMPs activation in lung injury is still largely unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether MMPs activity could be affected by ACE2 and which ACE2 derived signaling pathways could be also involved via using a mouse model with lung injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure for 1 to 3 weeks. Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6) and ACE2 KO mice (ACE2-/-) were utilized to study CS-induced lung injury. Increases in the resting respiratory rate (RRR), pulmonary immunokines, leukocyte infiltration and bronchial hyperplasia were observed in the CS-exposed mice. Compared to WT mice, more serious physiopathological changes were found in ACE2-/- mice in the first week of CS exposure. CS exposure increased pulmonary ACE and ACE2 activities in WT mice, and significantly increased ACE in ACE2-/- mice. Furthermore, the activity of pulmonary MMPs was decreased in CS-exposed WT mice, whereas this activity was increased in ACE2-/- mice. CS exposure increased the pulmonary p-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK1/2 level in all mice. In ACE2-/- mice, a significant increase p-STAT3 signaling was detected; however, no effect was observed on the p-STAT3 level in WT mice. Our results support the hypothesis that ACE2 deficiency influences MMPs activation and STAT3 phosphorylation signaling to promote more pulmonary inflammation in the development of lung injury. PMID:27019629

  1. Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) prevented hypertension by an inhibitory effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in the kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sanae, Matsuda; Yasuo, Aoyagi

    2013-06-12

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is known to be rich in functional components. In the present study, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were used to clarify whether green asparagus prevents hypertension by inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. Six-week-old male SHR were fed a diet with (AD group) or without (ND group) 5% asparagus for 10 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) (AD: 159 ± 4.8 mmHg, ND: 192 ± 14.7 mmHg), urinary protein excretion/creatinine excretion, and ACE activity in the kidney were significantly lower in the AD group compared with the ND group. Creatinine clearance was significantly higher in the AD group compared with the ND group. In addition, ACE inhibitory activity was observed in a boiling water extract of asparagus. The ACE inhibitor purified and isolated from asparagus was identified as 2″-hydroxynicotianamine. In conclusion, 2″-hydroxynicotianamine in asparagus may be one of the factors inhibiting ACE activity in the kidney, thus preventing hypertension and preserving renal function. PMID:23647085

  2. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas Axis Regulates the Development of Pancreatic Endocrine Cells in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Liang, Juan; Leung, Po Sing

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), its product Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], and Ang-(1-7) receptor Mas, have been shown to regulate organogenesis during embryonic development in various species. However, it is not known whether a local ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis is present in the fetal pancreas. It is hypothesized that there is a local ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the embryonic pancreas in mice that is involved in regulating islet cell development. To address this issue, the endogenous expression profile of axis constituents in embryonic mouse pancreata was examined. Involvement of the ACE2 axis in the regulation of pancreatic development was also examined. The present experiments showed in an in vivo animal model that endogenous expression levels of ACE2 and the Mas receptor were upregulated in mouse pancreata in late embryogenesis, peaking on embryonic day E16.5, when it reached 3 folds compared to that seen at E12.5. Consistently, endogenous expression of Ang-(1-7) also peaked at E16.5. Treatment with the ACE2 inhibitor DX600 did not alter islet development. However, prenatal treatment with A779, a Mas receptor antagonist, reduced the β-cell to α-cell ratio in neonatal islets, impaired islet insulin secretory function, and impaired the pups’ glucose tolerance. In ex vivo pancreas explant cultures, A779 again decreased the β-cell to α-cell ratio, apparently through its effects on β-cell proliferation (reduced proliferation shown with Ki67 staining), and also decreased Insulin and Ngn3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment of explant cultures with Ang-(1-7) increased mRNA levels of Insulin and pancreatic progenitor marker Ngn3, as well as Nox4, the ROS generation enzyme; these stimulatory effects were attenuated by co-treatment with A779, suggesting that Ang-(1-7), via Mas receptor signaling, may promote differentiation of pancreatic progenitors into insulin-producing cells via modulation of reactive oxygen species. These data together suggest that a

  3. Localization of angiotensin converting enzyme in rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Fabris, B.; Allen, A.M.; Jackson, B.; Johnston, C.I.; Mendelsohn, A.O. )

    1991-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was localized in rat heart by quantitative in vitro autoradiography with 125I-351A as the radioligand. The binding association constant (KA) of the radioligand was measured in membrane-rich fractions of atrium, ventricle, and lung by a radioinhibitor binding assay. A single class of high-affinity binding sites was detected in each tissue, and a significant difference was found between KA values for atria and ventricles with a rank order of atria greater than lungs greater than ventricles. For autoradiography, coronal sections (10 micron) of the frozen heart were incubated with 125I-351A and exposed to x-ray film. The autoradiographs were quantitated by computerized image analysis. The highest density of ACE in the heart was found on valve leaflets (aortic, pulmonary, mitral, and tricuspid), which contrasted markedly with very low ACE labeling in the endocardium. The coronary arteries also showed dense labeling of ACE. The right atrium had a moderate density of ACE, which was higher than the left atrium and the ventricles. Both the endothelial and adventitial layers of the aorta and pulmonary artery displayed high densities of ACE, with very low density in the media. ACE was not detected in either the sinoatrial node or atrioventricular node. These results reveal a markedly nonuniform localization of ACE in the rat heart and suggest possible sites for local angiotensin II generation and bradykinin or other peptide metabolism.

  4. Sardine peptide with angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity improves glucose tolerance in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Otani, Lila; Ninomiya, Toshio; Murakami, Megumi; Osajima, Katsuhiro; Kato, Hisanori; Murakami, Tetsuo

    2009-10-01

    An enzymatic hydrolysate of sardine protein (sardine peptide, SP) derived from sardine muscle possesses angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of SP on the blood glucose levels in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs). Ten-week-old SHRSPs were assigned to three groups. The control group was given tap water for 4 weeks, while the experimental groups were given water containing SP (1 g/kg/d) or an ACE inhibitor, captopril (8 mg/kg/d). Treatment with SP and captopril decreased ACE activity in the kidney, aorta, and mesentery. There were no differences in fasting blood glucose levels among the three groups, whereas SP and captopril administration significantly suppressed the increase in blood glucose after glucose loading in the control SHRSPs. No difference was observed in plasma insulin levels among the three groups. Thus treatment with captopril and ACE-inhibitory sardine peptides ameliorated the glucose tolerance of this rat strain. PMID:19809178

  5. Retroviruses Pseudotyped with the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein Efficiently Infect Cells Expressing Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Dorfman, Tatyana; Li, Wenhui; Wong, Swee Kee; Li, Yanhan; Kuhn, Jens H.; Coderre, James; Vasilieva, Natalya; Han, Zhongchao; Greenough, Thomas C.; Farzan, Michael; Choe, Hyeryun

    2004-01-01

    Infection of receptor-bearing cells by coronaviruses is mediated by their spike (S) proteins. The coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infects cells expressing the receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Here we show that codon optimization of the SARS-CoV S-protein gene substantially enhanced S-protein expression. We also found that two retroviruses, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and murine leukemia virus, both expressing green fluorescent protein and pseudotyped with SARS-CoV S protein or S-protein variants, efficiently infected HEK293T cells stably expressing ACE2. Infection mediated by an S-protein variant whose cytoplasmic domain had been truncated and altered to include a fragment of the cytoplasmic tail of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein was, in both cases, substantially more efficient than that mediated by wild-type S protein. Using S-protein-pseudotyped SIV, we found that the enzymatic activity of ACE2 made no contribution to S-protein-mediated infection. Finally, we show that a soluble and catalytically inactive form of ACE2 potently blocked infection by S-protein-pseudotyped retrovirus and by SARS-CoV. These results permit studies of SARS-CoV entry inhibitors without the use of live virus and suggest a candidate therapy for SARS. PMID:15367630

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition by Brazilian plants.

    PubMed

    Braga, Fernão C; Serra, Carla P; Viana, Nilton S; Oliveira, Alaíde B; Côrtes, Steyner F; Lombardi, Júlio A

    2007-07-01

    The potential antihypertensive activity of Brazilian plants was evaluated in vitro by its ability to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Forty-four plants belonging to 30 families were investigated. Plants were selected based on their popular use as antihypertensive and/or diuretics. The following plants presented significant ACE inhibition rates: Calophyllum brasiliense, Combretum fruticosum, Leea rubra, Phoenix roebelinii and Terminalia catappa. PMID:17513067

  7. Design, synthesis, and antihypertensive activity of curcumin-inspired compounds via ACE inhibition and vasodilation, along with a bioavailability study for possible benefit in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiao-Dong; Liao, Li-Zhen; Dong, Xiao-Bian; Hu, Xun; Guo, Yue; Du, Zhi-Min; Liao, Xin-Xue; Wang, Li-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of a novel series of curcumin-inspired compounds via a facile synthetic route. The structures of these derivatives were ascertained using various spectroscopic and analytic techniques. The pharmacological effects of the target analogs were assessed by assaying their inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). All of the synthesized derivatives exhibited considerable inhibition of ACE, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 1.23 to 120.32 μM. In a docking analysis with testicular ACE (tACE), the most promising inhibitor (4j) was efficiently accommodated in the deep cleft of the protein cavity, making close interatomic contacts with Glu162, His353, and Ala356, comparable with lisinopril. Compounds 4i, 4j, 4k, and 4l were further selected for determination of their vasodilator activity (cardiac output and stroke volume) on isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. The bioavailability of compound 4j was determined in experimental mice. PMID:26792980

  8. Design, synthesis, and antihypertensive activity of curcumin-inspired compounds via ACE inhibition and vasodilation, along with a bioavailability study for possible benefit in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiao-dong; Liao, Li-zhen; Dong, Xiao-bian; Hu, Xun; Guo, Yue; Du, Zhi-min; Liao, Xin-xue; Wang, Li-chun

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of a novel series of curcumin-inspired compounds via a facile synthetic route. The structures of these derivatives were ascertained using various spectroscopic and analytic techniques. The pharmacological effects of the target analogs were assessed by assaying their inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). All of the synthesized derivatives exhibited considerable inhibition of ACE, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 1.23 to 120.32 μM. In a docking analysis with testicular ACE (tACE), the most promising inhibitor (4j) was efficiently accommodated in the deep cleft of the protein cavity, making close interatomic contacts with Glu162, His353, and Ala356, comparable with lisinopril. Compounds 4i, 4j, 4k, and 4l were further selected for determination of their vasodilator activity (cardiac output and stroke volume) on isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. The bioavailability of compound 4j was determined in experimental mice. PMID:26792980

  9. The dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitor linagliptin and the angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan show renal benefit by different pathways in rats with 5/6 nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Tsuprykov, Oleg; Ando, Ryotaro; Reichetzeder, Christoph; von Websky, Karoline; Antonenko, Viktoriia; Sharkovska, Yuliya; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rahnenführer, Jan; Hasan, Ahmed A; Tammen, Harald; Alter, Markus; Klein, Thomas; Ueda, Seiji; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Okuda, Seiya; Hocher, Berthold

    2016-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors delay chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression in experimental diabetic nephropathy in a glucose-independent manner. Here we compared the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin versus telmisartan in preventing CKD progression in non-diabetic rats with 5/6 nephrectomy. Animals were allocated to 1 of 4 groups: sham operated plus placebo; 5/6 nephrectomy plus placebo; 5/6 nephrectomy plus linagliptin; and 5/6 nephrectomy plus telmisartan. Interstitial fibrosis was significantly decreased by 48% with linagliptin but a non-significant 24% with telmisartan versus placebo. The urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio was significantly decreased by 66% with linagliptin and 92% with telmisartan versus placebo. Blood pressure was significantly lowered by telmisartan, but it was not affected by linagliptin. As shown by mass spectrometry, the number of altered peptide signals for linagliptin in plasma was 552 and 320 in the kidney. For telmisartan, there were 108 peptide changes in plasma and 363 in the kidney versus placebo. Linagliptin up-regulated peptides derived from collagen type I, apolipoprotein C1, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, a potential downstream target of atrial natriuretic peptide, whereas telmisartan up-regulated angiotensin II. A second study was conducted to confirm these findings in 5/6 nephrectomy wild-type and genetically deficient DPP-4 rats treated with linagliptin or placebo. Linagliptin therapy in wild-type rats was as effective as DPP-4 genetic deficiency in terms of albuminuria reduction. Thus, linagliptin showed comparable efficacy to telmisartan in preventing CKD progression in non-diabetic rats with 5/6 nephrectomy. However, the underlying pathways seem to be different. PMID:27083282

  10. In vivo kinetics of indoxyl sulfate in humans and its renal interaction with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor quinapril in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoe; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Shuichi; Nakamura, Tomomi; Maeda, Mika; Kobayashi, Mami; Sahashi, Kunihiko; Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Kumagai, Yuji; Majima, Masataka

    2012-06-01

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is an organic anion uremic toxin that accumulates in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aims of this study were to examine the kinetic profiles of IS in humans at a steady state after multiple doses of L-Trp, a precursor of IS, and the in vivo interaction of IS with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor quinapril, whose active metabolite is a substrate of organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3) in rats. First, 12-h kinetics after single doses of Trp (2, 4, and 8 g) were examined in two healthy volunteers. Second, 24-h kinetics after a single dose of 2 g of Trp was studied in six volunteers. Third, 35-h kinetics after single and multiple doses of 2 g of Trp were examined in five volunteers. In anesthetized rats, quinapril or probenecid, an inhibitor of OATs, was given intravenously before IS, and blood and urine samples were taken until 90 min. Trp and IS concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ultrafiltration was used to measure serum unbound IS concentrations. Renal tubular secretion of IS accounted for more than 90% of its renal clearance in the steady state of serum IS levels after multiple doses in humans. In animals, the serum area under the curve of IS increased in conjunction with a decrease in renal clearances after coadministration of IS with quinapril or probenecid. It is concluded that quinapril may inhibit the urine excretion of IS via OAT3-mediated renal tubular transport in patients with CKD. PMID:22389425

  11. Chronic endothelin-A receptor antagonism is as protective as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition against cardiac dysfunction in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wölkart, G; Pang, X; Stessel, H; Kirchengast, M; Brunner, F

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Diabetes mellitus is associated with a specific cardiomyopathy. We compared the cardioprotective effects of an endothelin-A receptor blocker (ETA-RB) with those of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. Experimental approach: Diabetic rats were left untreated or received either the ETA-RB atrasentan or the ACE-I ramipril (each 3 mg kg−1 per day) orally for 8 weeks. Isolated isovolumic heart function was studied during normoxia and in response to ischaemia-reperfusion. Cardiac fibrosis, tissue oxidative stress and tissue nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity were determined. Key results: Basal left ventricular systolic contractility was lower in diabetic compared to nondiabetic hearts and ETA-RB or ACE-I treatment significantly antagonised the decline. Following 15 min of no-flow ischaemia, reperfusion systolic function was depressed and left-ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was elevated in diabetic hearts. ETA-RB or ACE-I treatment significantly improved recovery of reperfusion systolic and diastolic function, without differences between groups. Hydroxyproline (an index of tissue fibrosis) and malondialdehyde (a measure of tissue oxidative stress) were elevated at the end of reperfusion in diabetic, compared to nondiabetic hearts. Either treatment reduced hydroxyproline and malondialdehyde to control level. Constitutive NOS activity was similar in nondiabetic and diabetic hearts and unaffected by ETA-RB or ACE-I treatment. Conclusions and implications: These results suggest that in experimental type 1 diabetes ETA-RB is as effective as an ACE-I in ameliorating myocardial functions during normoxia and ischaemia-reperfusion. Combining the two treatments neither afforded additive effects, nor diminished any protection effect seen with either drug. PMID:17572700

  12. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and receptor blockers on appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator shock in patients with severe systolic heart failure (from the GRADE Multicenter Study).

    PubMed

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Refaat, Marwan M; Habib, Robert H; Al-Shaar, Laila; Singh, Madhurmeet; Gutmann, Rebecca; Bloom, Heather L; Dudley, Samuel C; Ellinor, Patrick T; Saba, Samir F; Shalaby, Alaa A; Weiss, Raul; McNamara, Dennis M; Halder, Indrani; London, Barry

    2015-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a leading cause of mortality in patients with cardiomyopathy. Although angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) decrease cardiac mortality in these cohorts, their role in preventing SCD has not been well established. We sought to determine whether the use of ACEi or ARB in patients with cardiomyopathy is associated with a lower incidence of appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) shocks in the Genetic Risk Assessment of Defibrillator Events study that included subjects with an ejection fraction of ≤30% and ICDs. Treatment with ACEi/ARB versus no-ACEi/ARB was physician dependent. There were 1,509 patients (mean age [SD] 63 [12] years, 80% men, mean [SD] EF 21% [6%]) with 1,213 (80%) on ACEi/ARB and 296 (20%) not on ACEi/ARB. We identified 574 propensity-matched patients (287 in each group). After a mean (SD) of 2.5 (1.9) years, there were 334 (22%) appropriate shocks in the entire cohort. The use of ACEi/ARB was associated with lower incidence of shocks at 1, 3, and 5 years in the matched cohort (7.7%, 16.7%, and 18.5% vs 13.2%, 27.5%, and 32.0%; RR = 0.61 [0.43 to 0.86]; p = 0.005). Among patients with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) >60 and 30 to 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2), those on no-ACEi/ARB were at 45% and 77% increased risk of ICD shock compared with those on ACEi/ARB, respectively. ACEi/ARB were associated with significant lower incidence of appropriate ICD shock in patients with cardiomyopathy and GFR ≥30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and with neutral effect in those with GFR <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2). PMID:25682436

  13. Essential residues in angiotensin converting enzyme: Modification with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Bunning, P.; Kleemann, S.G.; Riordan, J.F. )

    1990-11-01

    The peptidase and esterase activities of rabbit pulmonary angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) are rapidly abolished on reaction with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (Dnp-F). Inactivation follows first-order kinetics with respect to the reagent and is accompanied by stoichiometric incorporation of 3,5-({sup 3}H)Dnp, indicating that the effect is due to a specific modification of the enzyme. Thin-layer chromatography of an acid hydrolysate of the modifed enzyme indicates that most of the radioactive label is present as O-Dnp-tyrosine (65 to >95{percent}) and the rest at N{epsilon}-Dnp-lysine. The pH dependence of the reaction is consistent with modification of either tyrosine or lysine. The presence of a competitive inhibitor effectively protects the enzyme against inactivation by Dnp-F. Acetylation of ACE with N-acetylimidazole also protects the enzyme against modification with Dnp-F. The results indicate the presence of catalytically essential tyrosine and lysine residues at the active site of ACE.

  14. The Cooperative Effect of Local Angiotensin-II in Liver with Adriamycin Hepatotoxicity on Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Taskin, Eylem; Guven, Celal; Sahin, Leyla; Dursun, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Background Adriamycin (ADR) is a drug used clinically for anticancer treatment; however, it causes adverse effects in the liver. The mechanism by which these adverse effects occur remains unclear, impeding efforts to enhance the therapeutic effects of ADR. Its hepatotoxicity might be related to increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial dysfunction. The interaction between ADR and the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the liver is unclear. ADR might activate the RAS. Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) leads to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study we investigated whether ADR’s hepatotoxicity interacts with local RAS in causing oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction in the rat liver. Material/Methods Rats were divided into 5 groups: control, ADR, co-treated ADR with captopril, co-treated ADR with Aliskiren, and co-treated ADR with both captopril and Aliskiren. Mitochondria and cytosol were separated from the liver, then biochemical measurements were made from them. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels were evaluated. Results ADR remarkably decreased MMP and ATP in liver mitochondria (p<0.05). Co-administration with ADR and Aliskiren and captopril improved the dissipation of MMP (p<0.05). The decreased ATP level was restored by treatment with inhibitors of ACE and renin. Conclusions Angiotensin-II may contribute to hepatotoxicity of in the ADR via mitochondrial oxidative production, resulting in the attenuation of MMP and ATP production. PMID:27019222

  15. Screening assay of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity from complex natural colourants and foods using high-throughput LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Kitade, Marie; Hino, Tomoaki; Oka, Hisao

    2011-06-15

    Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) by various foods decreases the blood pressure. ACE inhibitors derived from natural components may be of therapeutic value in preventive medicine. In this study, we report a novel screening assay of ACE inhibitors from complex natural colourants and foods that employ solid phase extraction (SPE), high-throughput liquid chromatography (LC) separation, and stable isotope dilution electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (SID-ESI-MS/MS). When a target sample was subjected to N-Hippuryl-His-Leu (HHL) and ACE in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), generated hippuric acid (HA) was extracted by SPE. LC/SID-ESI-MS/MS detection of HA allowed us to accurately identify the effects of complex substances such natural colourants and foods that inhibit the ACE of HHL. The major HA and HA-d5 fragment ions at m/z 180→105 and 185→110 in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode can quantify levels that are lower than other methods. The LC/SID-ESI-MS/MS method described here is a rapid, selective, sensitive, and highly reproducible method for the determination of HA in various samples. Based on the assay developed, all samples such as natural colourants, infant formula, soy paste, ketchup, mayonnaise, wheat flour, orange juice, supplement drink, tea, and coffee could be accurately measured for ACE inhibition in various matrices. High-throughput LC/SID-ESI-MS/MS assay has no limitations in the evaluation of inhibition activity in various natural samples such as colour, high-matrix, and processed foods. PMID:25213976

  16. Effect of chronic treatment with the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE 7688 and ramipril on endothelial function in atherogenic diet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Weckler, Nadine; Leitzbach, Daniela; Kalinowski, Leszek; Malinski, Tadeusz; Busch, Andreas E; Linz, Wolfgang; Kalinowski, Ludmila

    2003-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in Western nations, although improved possibilities regarding diagnosis and therapy now exist. Endothelial dysfunction is triggered by cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, adiposity and smoking, contributing to the common endpoint of atherosclerosis. This study examined the pharmacological effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and combined ACE-neutral endopeptidase (NEP) (vasopeptidase) inhibitors on endothelial dysfunction in the model of hyperlipidaemic rabbits. The focus of the study was to assess endothelial function after treatment with the ACE-NEP inhibitor AVE 7688 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison to the ACE inhibitor (ACE-I) ramipril (1 mg/kg/day). Different parameters, such as endothelial function, blood pressure (BP), expansion of plaques, endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2-) release and plasma levels of various lipidaemic parameters were analysed. Control groups consisted of one group fed only with normal diet, one group fed only with atherogenic diet and the direct control group fed with varied diets (six weeks atherogenic diet followed by 12 weeks normal diet). Since for the treatment of atherosclerosis, a change in feeding is absolutely necessary, in the present study, at the start of the treatments with AVE 7688 and ramipril, the rabbits food was changed to a normal diet. At the end of the study, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was measured in the anaesthetised animals. The values in standard, atherogenic and varied diet-fed rabbits were around 73 2 mmHg. Angiotensin I (Ang I) given intravenous (i.v.) induced a strong increase in MAP of about 20%. In both the treated groups Ang I-induced BP increase was inhibited. In contrast, i.v. bradykinin led to a strong reduction in MAP in both the treated groups of around 50%. Six weeks feeding with an atherogenic diet in the rabbits induced an enduring endothelial dysfunction despite the food

  17. Renin-Angiotensin Activation and Oxidative Stress in Early Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Smita I.; Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Shukrullah, Irfan; Veleder, Emir; Jones, Dean P.; Fan, Tai-Hwang M.; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Danilov, Sergei M.; Fukai, Tohru; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models have suggested a role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation and subsequent cardiac oxidation in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Nevertheless, RAS blockade has failed to show efficacy in treatment of HFpEF. We evaluated the role of RAS activation and subsequent systemic oxidation in HFpEF. Oxidative stress markers were compared in 50 subjects with and without early HFpEF. Derivatives of reactive oxidative metabolites (DROMs), F2-isoprostanes (IsoPs), and ratios of oxidized to reduced glutathione (Eh GSH) and cysteine (Eh CyS) were measured. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels and activity were measured. On univariate analysis, HFpEF was associated with male sex (p = 0.04), higher body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.003), less oxidized Eh CyS (p = 0.001), lower DROMs (p = 0.02), and lower IsoP (p = 0.03). Higher BMI (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1–1.6) and less oxidized Eh CyS (OR: 1.2; 95% CI: 1.1–1.4) maintained associations with HFpEF on multivariate analysis. Though ACE levels were higher in early HFpEF (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.01–1.05), ACE activity was similar to that in controls. HFpEF is not associated with significant systemic RAS activation or oxidative stress. This may explain the failure of RAS inhibitors to alter outcomes in HFpEF. PMID:26504834

  18. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  19. Analysis of novel angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from protease-hydrolyzed marine shrimp Acetes chinensis.

    PubMed

    Hai-Lun, He; Xiu-Lan, Chen; Cai-Yun, Sun; Yu-Zhong, Zhang; Bai-Cheng, Zhou

    2006-11-01

    Acetes chinensis is an underutilized shrimp species thriving in the Bo Hai Gulf of China. In a previous study, we had used the protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 to digest this kind of shrimp and found that the oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysate possessed antioxidant activity and high angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.97 mg/ml. In this paper, by ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), five peptides with high ACE inhibitory activity were purified from the shrimp hydrolysates and their sequences were identified by amino acid composition analysis and molecular weight (MW) analysis. Three of them, FCVLRP (a), IFVPAF (f) and KPPETV (j), were novel ACE inhibitory peptides. Their IC50 values were 12.3 microM, 3.4 microM and 24.1 microM, respectively, and their recoveries were 30 mg/100 g (solid basis of shrimp), 19 mg/100 g and 33 mg/100 g, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots for the three novel peptides showed that they are all competitive inhibitors. To test the ACE inhibitory activity of peptide a, f, j after they were digested by digestive enzymes in vivo, 12 derived peptides from FCVLRP and IFVPAF were synthesized based on their amino acid sequences and the cleavage sites of digestive enzymes. No digestive enzyme cleavage site was found in KPPETV. The IC50 values of the derived peptides were determined and the result showed that except for VPAF, FC and FCVL, the ACE inhibitory activity of the other nine derived peptides did not significantly change when compared with their original peptides. Surprisingly, five peptides had lower IC50 values than their original peptides, particularly for RP (IC50 value = 0.39 microM), which is about 30 times lower than its original peptide and almost the lowest IC50 value for ACE inhibitory peptides reported. Therefore, the novel peptides identified from A. chinensis hydrolysates probably still maintain a high ACE

  20. Meta-analysis of the effects of preoperative renin-angiotensin system inhibitor therapy on major adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaocheng; Tong, Jin; Hu, Qiongwen; Chen, Shaojie; Yin, Yuehui; Liu, Zengzhang

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess the role of preoperative renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (RASI) therapy on major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The Medline, Cochrane Library and Embase databases were searched for clinical studies published up to May 2014. Studies that evaluated the effects of preoperative RASI therapy in cardiac surgery were included. Odds ratio (OR) estimates were generated under a random-effects model. After a literature search in the major databases, 18 studies were identified [three randomized prospective clinical trials (RCTs) and 15 observational trials] that reported outcomes of 54 528 cardiac surgery patients with (n = 22 661; 42%) or without (n = 31 867; 58%) preoperative RASI therapy. Pool analysis indicated that preoperative RASI therapy was not associated with a significant reduction of early all-cause mortality [OR: 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.15, P = 0.93; I(2) = 25%], myocardial infarction (OR: 1.04; 95% CI 0.91-1.19, P = 0.60; I(2) = 16%), or stroke (OR: 0.93; 95% CI 0.75-1.14, P = 0.46; I(2) = 38%). Meta-regression analysis confirmed that there was a strong negative correlation between the percentage of diabetics and early all-cause mortality (P = 0.03). Furthermore, preoperative RASI therapy significantly reduced mortality in studies containing a high proportion of diabetic patients (OR: 0.84; 95% CI 0.71-0.99, P = 0.04; I(2) = 0%). In conclusion, our meta-analysis indicated that although preoperative RASI therapy was not associated with a lower risk of MACE in cardiac surgery patients, it might provide benefits for diabetic patients. PMID:25301954

  1. Effect of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Receptor Blockers on Appropriate Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator Shock in Patients with Severe Systolic Heart Failure (From the GRADE Multicenter Study)

    PubMed Central

    AlJaroudi, Wael A.; Refaat, Marwan M.; Habib, Robert H.; Al-Shaar, Laila; Singh, Madhurmeet; Gutmann, Rebecca; Bloom, Heather L.; Dudley, Samuel C.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Saba, Samir F.; Shalaby, Alaa A.; Weiss, Raul; McNamara, Dennis M.; Halder, Indrani; London, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a leading cause of mortality in patients with cardiomyopathy. While angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and receptor blockers (ARB) decrease cardiac mortality in these cohorts, their role in preventing SCD has not been well established. We sought to determine whether the use of ACEi or ARB in patients with cardiomyopathy is associated with a lower incidence of appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) shocks in the Genetic Risk Assessment of Defibrillator Events (GRADE) study which included subjects with an ejection fraction of ≤30% and ICDs. Treatment with ACEi/ARB versus no ACEi/ARB was physician dependent. There were 1509 patients (mean age [SD] 63[12] years, 80% male, mean [SD] EF 21% [6%]) with 1213 (80%) on ACEi/ARB, and 296 (20%) not on ACEi/ARB. We identified 574 propensity matched patients (287 in each group). After a mean (SD) of 2.5(1.9) years, there were 334 (22%) appropriate shocks in the entire cohort. The use of ACEi/ARB was associated with lower incidence of shocks at 1, 3 and 5 years in the matched cohort (7.7%, 16.7%, 18.5% vs. 13.2%, 27.5%, and 32.0% (RR= 0.61[0.43–0.86], p =0.005). Among patients with GFR >60 and 30–60 ml/min/1.73m2, those on no-ACEi/ARB were at 45% and 77% increased risk of ICD shock as compared to those on ACEi/ARB, respectively. ACEi/ARB were associated with significant lower incidence of appropriate ICD shock in patients with cardiomyopathy and GFR ≥30 ml/min/1.73m2, and with neutral effect among those GFR <30 ml/min/1.73m2. PMID:25682436

  2. In Vitro Biliary Clearance of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors in Sandwich-Cultured Rat Hepatocytes: Comparison to In Vivo Biliary Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Koji; Bridges, Arlene S.; Yue, Wei; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2008-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that in vitro biliary clearance (Clbiliary) determined in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes correlates well with in vivo Clbiliary for limited sets of compounds. This study was designed to estimate the in vitro Clbiliary in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRH) of angiotensin II receptor blockers and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors that undergo limited metabolism, to compare the estimated Clbiliary values with published in vivo Clbiliary data in rats, and to characterize the mechanism(s) of basolateral uptake and canalicular excretion of these drugs in rats. Average biliary excretion index (BEI) and in vitro Clbiliary of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and pitavastatin were 15%, 19%, 43%, 45%, and 20%, respectively, and 1.7, 3.2, 4.4, 46.1, and 34.6 ml/min/kg, respectively. Clbiliary predicted from SCRH, accounting for plasma unbound fraction, correlated with reported in vivo Clbiliary for these drugs. The rank order of Clbiliary values predicted from SCRH was consistent with in vivo Clbiliary values. Bromosulfophthalein inhibited the uptake of all drugs. BEI and Clbiliary values of olmesartan, valsartan, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin, known multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp)2 substrates, were reduced in SCRH from Mrp2-deficient (TR−) compared to wild-type (WT) rats. Although Mrp2 plays a minor role in pitavastatin biliary excretion, pitavastatin BEI and Clbiliary were reduced in TR− compared to WT SCRH; Bcrp expression in SCRH from TR− rats was decreased. In conclusion, in vitro Clbiliary determined in SCRH can be used to estimate and compare in vivo Clbiliary of compounds in rats, and to characterize transport proteins responsible for their hepatic uptake and excretion. PMID:18574002

  3. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction assessment of LCZ696 (an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor) with omeprazole, metformin or levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Jiang, Xuemin; Mendonza, Anisha; Swan, Therese; Reynolds, Christine; Nguyen, Joanne; Pal, Parasar; Neelakantham, Srikanth; Dahlke, Marion; Langenickel, Thomas; Rajman, Iris; Akahori, Mizuki; Zhou, Wei; Rebello, Sam; Sunkara, Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    LCZ696 is a novel angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor in development for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we assessed the potential for pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction of LCZ696 (400 mg, single dose or once daily [q.d.]) when co-administered with omeprazole 40 mg q.d. (n = 28) or metformin 1000 mg q.d. (n = 27) or levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol 150/30 μg single dose (n = 24) in three separate open-label, single-sequence studies in healthy subjects. Pharmacokinetic parameters of LCZ696 analytes (sacubitril, LBQ657, and valsartan), metformin, and levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol were assessed. Omeprazole did not alter the AUCinf of sacubitril and pharmacokinetics of LBQ657; however, 7% decrease in the Cmax of sacubitril, and 11% and 13% decreases in AUCinf and Cmax of valsartan were observed. Co-administration of LCZ696 with metformin had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of LBQ657 and valsartan; however, AUCtau,ss and Cmax,ss of metformin were decreased by 23%. Co-administration of LCZ696 with levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of ethinyl estradiol and LBQ657 or AUCinf of levonorgestrel. The Cmax of levonorgestrel decreased by 15%, and AUCtau,ss and Cmax,ss of valsartan decreased by 14% and 16%, respectively. Co-administration of LCZ696 with omeprazole, metformin, or levonorgestrel-ethinyl estradiol was not associated with any clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions. PMID:27119576

  4. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and the kidney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces a marked reduction in renal blood flow at doses well below those required to induce a pressor response, and as blood flow falls there is a decline in glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion. This striking sensitivity of the renal blood supply led many workers to consider the possibility that angiotensin functions as a local renal hormone. As angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was found in particular abundance in the lung, it seemed reasonable to suspect that most of the conversion occurred there, and that the function of Ang II would be primarily systemic, rather than intrarenal. In this review, I will explore the evidence that has accumulated on these two possibilities, since they have important implications for our current understanding of normal kidney function and derangements of kidney function in disease.

  5. Chronic infusion of enalaprilat into hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy by restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Qing; Qi, Jie; Su, Qing; Suo, Yu-Ping; Yue, Li-Ying; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Qin, Da-Nian

    2014-02-01

    The renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We hypothesized that inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) attenuates angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension via restoring neurotransmitters and cytokines. Rats underwent subcutaneous infusions of ANG II or saline and bilateral PVN infusions of ACE inhibitor enalaprilat (ENL, 2.5 μg/h) or vehicle for 4 weeks. ANG II infusion resulted in higher mean arterial pressure and cardiac hypertrophy as indicated by increased whole heart weight/body weight ratio, whole heart weight/tibia length ratio, left ventricular weight/tibia length ratio, and mRNA expressions of cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide and beta-myosin heavy chain. These ANG II-infused rats had higher PVN levels of glutamate, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) and the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and lower PVN levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, interleukin (IL)-10 and the 67-kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), and higher plasma levels of PICs, norepinephrine and aldosterone, and lower plasma IL-10, and higher renal sympathetic nerve activity. However, PVN treatment with ENL attenuated these changes. PVN microinjection of ANG II induced increases in IL-1β and IL-6, and a decrease in IL-10 in the PVN, and pretreatment with angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) antagonist losartan attenuated these changes. These findings suggest that ANG II infusion induces an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the PVN, and PVN inhibition of the RAS restores neurotransmitters and cytokines in the PVN, thereby attenuating ANG II-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. - Highlights: • Chronic ANG II infusion results in sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiac hypertrophy. • PVN inhibition of ACE

  6. Molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of angiotensin II-induced muscle wasting: potential therapeutic targets for cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Tabony, A Michael; Galvez, Sarah; Mitch, William E; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2013-10-01

    Cachexia is a serious complication of many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many factors are involved in the development of cachexia, and there is increasing evidence that angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), plays an important role in this process. Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. In rodent models, an increase in systemic Ang II leads to weight loss through increased protein breakdown, reduced protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and decreased appetite. Ang II activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system via generation of reactive oxygen species and via inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and disrupts normal energy balance. Ang II also increases cytokines and circulating hormones such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A, glucocorticoids and myostatin, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II acts on hypothalamic neurons to regulate orexigenic/anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide-Y, orexin and corticotropin-releasing hormone, leading to reduced appetite. Also, Ang II may regulate skeletal muscle regenerative processes. Several clinical studies have indicated that blockade of Ang II signaling via ACE inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers prevents weight loss and improves muscle strength. Thus the RAS is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with CHF and CKD. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23769949

  7. Involvement of human plasma angiotensin I-converting enzyme in the degradation of the haemoregulatory peptide N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline.

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, K J; Saez-Servent, N; Papet, M P; Wdzieczak-Bakala, J; Morgat, J L; Thierry, J; Voelter, W; Lenfant, M

    1993-01-01

    The degradation of N-Ac-Ser-Asp-Lys-Pro (AcSDKP), a negative regulator controlling the proliferation of the haematopoietic stem cell, by enzymes present in human plasma, has been investigated. Radiolabelled AcSD[4-3H]KP ([3H]AcSDKP, 1 mM) was completely metabolized in human plasma with a half-life of 80 min, leading exclusively to the formation of radiolabelled lysine. The cleavage of AcSDKP was insensitive to classical proteinase inhibitors including leupeptin, but sensitive to metalloprotease inhibitors. The degradation was completely blocked by specific inhibitors of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE; kininase II; peptidyldipeptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.15.1), showing that the first step of the hydrolysis was indeed due to ACE. In dialysed plasma, the hydrolysis proceeded at only 17% of the maximal rate, whereas addition of 20 mM NaCl led to the recovery of the initial rate observed with normal plasma. Hydrolysis of AcSDKP by commercial rabbit lung ACE generated the C-terminal dipeptide Lys-Pro. Thus, ACE cleaves AcSDKP by a dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase activity. In fact the formation of Lys-Pro was observed when AcSDKP was incubated in human plasma in the presence of HgCl2. These results suggest that ACE is involved in the first limiting step of AcSDKP degradation in human plasma. The second step seems to be under the control of a leupeptin- and E-64-insensitive, HgCl2-sensitive plasmatic enzyme. PMID:8257427

  8. Kidney scintigraphy after ACE inhibition in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Ghione, S.; Fommei, E.; Palombo, C.; Giaconi, S.; Mantovanelli, A.; Ragazzini, A.; Palla, L.

    1986-01-01

    Suppression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition may induce renal failure in patients with bilateral renal artery stenosis. Recent scintigraphic studies with the glomerular tracer technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetate (99m-Tc DTPA) indicate that in patients with unilateral renal artery stenosis, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) may be markedly reduced in the affected kidney after inhibition of ACE. This finding reflects the important role of the RAS in maintaining GFR (by increasing postglomerular resistance) in states of low renal perfusion pressure. Preliminary observations suggest that this scintigraphic test might be useful in the detection of renovascular hypertension.

  9. ACE2 and vasoactive peptides: novel players in cardiovascular/renal remodeling and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Torres, Evelyn; Oyarzún, Alejandra; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Azocar, Andrés; Castro, Pablo F; Jalil, Jorge E; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key component of cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis due to its influence on the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, vascular tone and cardiovascular remodeling. Deregulation of this system contributes significantly to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Numerous studies have generated new perspectives about a noncanonical and protective RAS pathway that counteracts the proliferative and hypertensive effects of the classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis. The key components of this pathway are ACE2 and its products, Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9). These two vasoactive peptides act through the Mas receptor (MasR) and AT2R, respectively. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR and ACE2/Ang-(1-9)/AT2R axes have opposite effects to those of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis, such as decreased proliferation and cardiovascular remodeling, increased production of nitric oxide and vasodilation. A novel peptide from the noncanonical pathway, alamandine, was recently identified in rats, mice and humans. This heptapeptide is generated by catalytic action of ACE2 on Ang A or through a decarboxylation reaction on Ang-(1-7). Alamandine produces the same effects as Ang-(1-7), such as vasodilation and prevention of fibrosis, by interacting with Mas-related GPCR, member D (MrgD). In this article, we review the key roles of ACE2 and the vasoactive peptides Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and alamandine as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II axis as well as the biological properties that allow them to regulate blood pressure and cardiovascular and renal remodeling. PMID:26275770

  10. Investigation of the energy barrier to the rotation of amide CN bonds in ACE inhibitors by NMR, dynamic HPLC and DFT.

    PubMed

    Bouabdallah, S; Ben Dhia, M T; Driss, M R; Touil, S

    2016-09-01

    The isomerizations of Enalapril, Perindopril, Enalaprilat and Lisinopril have been investigated using NMR spectroscopic, dynamic chromatographic, unified equation and DFT theoretical calculations. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were determined by varying the temperature in the NMR experiments. At the coalescence temperature, we can evaluate the isomerization barrier to the rotation (ΔG(≠)) around the amide bond. Using dynamics chromatography and an unified equation introduced by Trap, we can determine isomerization rate constants and Gibbs activation energies. Molecular mechanics calculations also provided evidence for the presence of low energy conformers for the ACE due to restricted amide rotation. With the value of barriers (ΔE) between them of the order of (20kJmol(-1)), which is in agreement with the dynamic NMR results and DFT calculations. PMID:27344631

  11. Why do hypertensive patients of African ancestry respond better to calcium blockers and diuretics than to ACE inhibitors and β-adrenergic blockers? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinicians are encouraged to take an individualized approach when treating hypertension in patients of African ancestry, but little is known about why the individual patient may respond well to calcium blockers and diuretics, but generally has an attenuated response to drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system and to β-adrenergic blockers. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the factors associated with the differential drug response of patients of African ancestry to antihypertensive drug therapy. Methods Using the methodology of the systematic reviews narrative synthesis approach, we sought for published or unpublished studies that could explain the differential clinical efficacy of antihypertensive drugs in patients of African ancestry. PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, African Index Medicus and the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency databases were searched without language restriction from their inception through June 2012. Results We retrieved 3,763 papers, and included 72 reports that mainly considered the 4 major classes of antihypertensive drugs, calcium blockers, diuretics, drugs that interfere with the renin-angiotensin system and β-adrenergic blockers. Pharmacokinetics, plasma renin and genetic polymorphisms did not well predict the response of patients of African ancestry to antihypertensive drugs. An emerging view that low nitric oxide and high creatine kinase may explain individual responses to antihypertensive drugs unites previous observations, but currently clinical data are very limited. Conclusion Available data are inconclusive regarding why patients of African ancestry display the typical response to antihypertensive drugs. In lieu of biochemical or pharmacogenomic parameters, self-defined African ancestry seems the best available predictor of individual responses to antihypertensive drugs. PMID:23721258

  12. [Angiotensin-receptor- and neprilysin-inhibition: a new option against heart failure].

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The molecular combination of sacubitril and valsartan (Entresto) is a new drug for reducing the risk of cardiovascular death and hospitalization for heart failure in patients with chronic heart failure (NYHA Class II-IV) and reduced ejection fraction. It is usually administered in conjunction with other heart failure therapies, instead of an ACE inhibitor or an angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB). In studies, sacubitril/ valsartan was superior to enalapril in reducing the risks of death and hospitalization for heart failure. Possible side effects of sacubitril/valsartan are hypotension, angioedema, impaired renal function and elevation in serum potassium levels. The drug should not be used in times of pregnancy and breast feeding, in patients with servere hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh C) and in combination with aliskiren in patients with diabetes. PMID:26975167

  13. ACE-I Inhibitory Activity from Phaseolus lunatus and Phaseolus vulgaris Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Betancur-Ancona, David; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Chel-Guerrero, Luis Antonio; Torruco-Uco, Juan Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The involvement of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) as one of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure is being studied to find alternative means of control of hypertension on human beings. On the market there are synthetic drugs that can control it, but these can cause undesirable health side effects. In this work was assessed the fractionation by ultrafiltration of the Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Jamapa bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), protein hydrolysates obtained with Alcalase(®) and Flavourzyme(®) on ACE-I inhibitory activity. Four membranes of different molecular cutoffs (10, 5, 3, and 1 kDa) were used. Fractions that had a higher inhibitory activity in both legumes were denominated as E (<1 kDa) with IC50 of 30.3 and 51.8 μg/mL values for the P. lunatus with Alcalase and Flavourzyme, respectively, and for the Phaseolus vulgaris with Alcalase and Flavourzyme with about 63.8 and 65.8 μg/mL values, respectively. The amino acid composition of these fractions showed residues in essential amino acids, which make a good source of energy and amino acids. On the other hand, the presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as V and P is a determining factor in the ACE-I inhibitor effect. The results suggest the possibility of obtaining and utilizing these peptide fractions in the development and innovation of a functional product that helps with treatment and/or prevention of hypertension. PMID:26061663

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 inhibits lung injury induced by respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongjing; Xie, Zhengde; Li, Tieling; Zhang, Shaogeng; Lai, Chengcai; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Keyu; Han, Lina; Duan, Yueqiang; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Yang, Xiaolan; Xing, Li; Zhang, Peirui; Wang, Zhouhai; Li, Ruisheng; Yu, Jane J.; Wang, Xiliang; Yang, Penghui

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a major cause of severe lower respiratory illness in infants and young children, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for viral pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated. To date, no drugs or vaccines have been employed to improve clinical outcomes for RSV-infected patients. In this paper, we report that angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) protected against severe lung injury induced by RSV infection in an experimental mouse model and in pediatric patients. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency aggravated RSV-associated disease pathogenesis, mainly by its action on the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). Furthermore, administration of a recombinant ACE2 protein alleviated the severity of RSV-induced lung injury. These findings demonstrate that ACE2 plays a critical role in preventing RSV-induced lung injury, and suggest that ACE2 is a promising potential therapeutic target in the management of RSV-induced lung disease. PMID:26813885

  15. Effects of bradykinin B2 receptor antagonism on the hypotensive effects of ACE inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Bouaziz, H; Joulin, Y; Safar, M; Benetos, A

    1994-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to determine the participation of endogenous bradykinin (BK) in the antihypertensive effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), perindoprilat, in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) on different salt diets. 2. Conscious SHRs receiving either a low or a high NaCl diet were used in order to evaluate the respective roles of angiotensin II suppression and bradykinin stimulation in the acute hypotensive effects of perindoprilat. Two different B2 receptor antagonists (B 4146 and Hoe 140) were used after bolus administration of 7 mg kg-1 of the ACEI, perindoprilat. In separate animals, Hoe 140 was administered before the injection of perindoprilat. In other experiments, the effects of Hoe 140 on the hypotensive effects of the calcium antagonist, nicardipine, were tested. 3. The different NaCl diets had no effect on baseline blood pressure. Hoe 140 injection before ACE inhibition did not modify blood pressure. Perindoprilat caused more marked hypotension in the low salt-fed rats than in the high salt animals (P < 0.01). Administration of Hoe 140 or B4146 after perindoprilat significantly reduced the antihypertensive effects of perindoprilat in the different groups, but this effect was more pronounced in high salt-fed rats. However, in SHRs receiving Hoe 140 before perindoprilat, the antihypertensive effect of perindoprilat was completely abolished in both high or low salt diet rats. In separate experiments we confirmed that Hoe 140 did not affect the hypotensive efficacy of the calcium antagonist, nicardipine. 4. Our study shows that inhibition of endogenous bradykinin degradation participates in the acute antihypertensive effects of perindoprilat in SHRs. The role of bradykinin is more pronounced following exposure to a high salt diet i.e., when the renin-angiotensin system is suppressed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7858859

  16. Angiotensin converting enzyme and memory: preclinical and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Sudilovsky, A; Turnbull, B; Croog, S H; Crook, T

    Results from both preclinical and clinical studies described here suggest that ACE may have a role in the modulation of cognitive memory processes in the rat and in humans. The finding of improved cognitive performance among patients treated with captopril relative to those treated with propranolol or methyldopa is consistent with other clinical and prec-clinical data. Clinical data derive primarily from quality of life measures based on interviews with patients in the same clinical trial from which our other cognitive data are drawn. For example, mental acuity in the workplace was reported to have improved significantly from baseline to week 24 in patients on captopril (p less than 0.05), although it did not change in patients treated with propranolol and worsened in those receiving methyldopa (Croog et al, 1987). The difference between captopril and methyldopa was significant (p less than 0.01). Pre-clinical data come primarily from studies demonstrating that inhibitors of ACE delay CAE in rats when compared not only with methyldopa, but also with saline (Sudilovsky et al, 1984, 1986). A fundamental question is how could inhibition of ACE improve cognitive functioning independent of blood pressure control. It is known that captopril exerts its antihypertensive effects primarily through inhibition of the ACE and that this is present in the brain as well as in non-neuronal tissues elsewhere (Ganten et al, 1982; Strittmatter et al, 1983, 1984). The activity of the enzyme has been found to be significantly increased in the caudate nucleus, the frontal cortex, parahyppocampal gyrus, and medial hippocampus of patients dying with Alzheimer's disease when compared to age-matched controls (Arregui et al, 1982). In addition, AII has been shown to impair performance on various learning and memory paradigms in animals (Melo and Graeff, 1975; Morgan and Routtenberg, 1977). Raising the level of endogenous AII by intravenous administration of its precursor renin has similar

  17. Production of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from β-lactoglobulin- and casein-derived peptides: an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Welderufael, Fisseha T; Gibson, Trevor; Jauregi, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition is one of the mechanisms by which reduction in blood pressure is exerted. Whey proteins are a rich source of ACE inhibitory peptides and have shown a blood pressure reduction effect i.e. antihypertensive activity. The aim of this work was to develop a simplified process using a combination of adsorption and microfiltration steps for the production of hydrolysates from whey with high ACE inhibitory activity and potency; the latter was measured as the IC50, which is the peptide concentration required to reduce ACE activity by half. This process integrates the selective separation of β-lactoglobulin- and casein-derived peptides (CDP) from rennet whey and their hydrolysis, which results in partially pure, less complex hydrolysates with high bioactive potency. Hydrolysis was carried out with protease N "Amano" in a thermostatically controlled membrane reactor operated in a batch mode. By applying the integrative approach it was possible to produce from the same feedstock two different hydrolysates that exhibited high ACE inhibition. One hydrolysate was mainly composed of casein-derived peptides with IC50=285 μg/mL. In this hydrolysate we identified the well-known potent ACE-inhibitor and antihypertensive tripeptide Ile-Pro-Pro (IPP) and another novel octapeptide Gln-Asp-Lys-Thr-Glu-Ile-Pro-Thr (QDKTEIPT). The second hydrolysate was mainly composed of β-lactoglobulin derived peptides with IC50=28 μg/mL. This hydrolysate contained a tetrapeptide (Ile-Ile-Ala-Glu) IIAE as one of the two major peptides. A further advantage to this process is that enzyme activity was substantially increased as enzyme product inhibition was reduced. PMID:22467199

  18. Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated (Sar1, Ile8)ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides.

  19. Effect of Functional Bread Rich in Potassium, γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Blood Pressure, Glucose Metabolism and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Tomás, Nerea; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Quilez, Joan; Merino, Jordi; Ferré, Raimon; Díaz-López, Andrés; Bulló, Mònica; Hernández-Alonso, Pablo; Palau-Galindo, Antoni; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Because it has been suggested that food rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) peptides have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) and other cardiovascular risk factors, we tested the effects of low-sodium bread, but rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides on 24-hour BP, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function. A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 30 patients with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension, comparing three 4-week nutritional interventions separated by 2-week washout periods. Patients were randomly assigned to consume 120 g/day of 1 of the 3 types of bread for each nutritional intervention: conventional wheat bread (CB), low-sodium wheat bread enriched in potassium (LSB), and low-sodium wheat bread rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides (LSB + G). For each period, 24-hour BP measurements, in vivo endothelial function, and biochemical samples were obtained. After LSB + G consumption, 24-hour ambulatory BP underwent a nonsignificant greater reduction than after the consumption of CB and LSB (0.26 mm Hg in systolic BP and −0.63 mm Hg in diastolic BP for CB; −0.71 mm Hg in systolic BP and −1.08 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB; and −0.75 mm Hg in systolic BP and −2.12 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB + G, respectively). Diastolic BP at rest decreased significantly during the LSB + G intervention, although there were no significant differences in changes between interventions. There were no significant differences between interventions in terms of changes in in vivo endothelial function, glucose metabolism, and peripheral inflammatory parameters. Compared with the consumption of CB or LSB, no greater beneficial effects on 24-hour BP, endothelial function, or glucose metabolism were demonstrated after the consumption of LSB + G in a population with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension. Further studies are warranted to clarify the

  20. Safety and efficacy of LCZ696, a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, in Japanese patients with hypertension and renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sadayoshi; Satoh, Minoru; Tamaki, Yuko; Gotou, Hiromi; Charney, Alan; Okino, Naoko; Akahori, Mizuki; Zhang, Jack

    2015-04-01

    This 8-week, multi-center, open-label study assessed the safety and efficacy of LCZ696, a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, in Japanese patients with hypertension and renal dysfunction. Patients (n=32) with mean sitting systolic blood pressure (msSBP) ⩾140 mm Hg (after a 2-5-week washout of previous antihypertensive medications) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ⩾15 and <60 ml min(-1) 1.73 m(-2) received LCZ696 100 mg with an optional titration to 200 and 400 mg in a sequential manner starting from Week 2 in patients with inadequate BP control (msSBP ⩾130 mm Hg and mean sitting diastolic blood pressure (msDBP) ⩾80 mm Hg) and without safety concerns. Safety was assessed by monitoring and recording all adverse events (AEs) and change in potassium and creatinine. Efficacy was assessed as change from baseline in msSBP/msDBP. The mean baseline BP was 151.6/86.9 mm Hg, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) geometric mean was 7.3 mg mmol(-1) and eGFR was ⩾30 and <60 in 25 (78.1%) patients and was ⩾15 and <30 in 7 (21.9%) patients. Fourteen (43.8%) patients reported at least one AE, which were mild in severity. No severe AEs or deaths were reported. There were no clinically meaningful changes in creatinine, potassium, blood urea nitrogen and eGFR. The geometric mean reduction in UACR was 15.1%, and the mean reduction in msSBP and msDBP was 20.5±11.3 and 8.3±6.3 mm Hg, respectively, from baseline to Week 8 end point. LCZ696 was generally safe and well tolerated and showed effective BP reduction in Japanese patients with hypertension and renal dysfunction without a decline in renal function. PMID:25693859

  1. Safety and efficacy of LCZ696, a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, in Japanese patients with hypertension and renal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Sadayoshi; Satoh, Minoru; Tamaki, Yuko; Gotou, Hiromi; Charney, Alan; Okino, Naoko; Akahori, Mizuki; Zhang, Jack

    2015-01-01

    This 8-week, multi-center, open-label study assessed the safety and efficacy of LCZ696, a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, in Japanese patients with hypertension and renal dysfunction. Patients (n=32) with mean sitting systolic blood pressure (msSBP) ⩾140 mm Hg (after a 2–5-week washout of previous antihypertensive medications) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ⩾15 and <60 ml min−1 1.73 m−2 received LCZ696 100 mg with an optional titration to 200 and 400 mg in a sequential manner starting from Week 2 in patients with inadequate BP control (msSBP ⩾130 mm Hg and mean sitting diastolic blood pressure (msDBP) ⩾80 mm Hg) and without safety concerns. Safety was assessed by monitoring and recording all adverse events (AEs) and change in potassium and creatinine. Efficacy was assessed as change from baseline in msSBP/msDBP. The mean baseline BP was 151.6/86.9 mm Hg, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) geometric mean was 7.3 mg mmol−1 and eGFR was ⩾30 and <60 in 25 (78.1%) patients and was ⩾15 and <30 in 7 (21.9%) patients. Fourteen (43.8%) patients reported at least one AE, which were mild in severity. No severe AEs or deaths were reported. There were no clinically meaningful changes in creatinine, potassium, blood urea nitrogen and eGFR. The geometric mean reduction in UACR was 15.1%, and the mean reduction in msSBP and msDBP was 20.5±11.3 and 8.3±6.3 mm Hg, respectively, from baseline to Week 8 end point. LCZ696 was generally safe and well tolerated and showed effective BP reduction in Japanese patients with hypertension and renal dysfunction without a decline in renal function. PMID:25693859

  2. ACE2 Deficiency Worsens Epicardial Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Cardiac Dysfunction in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Mori, Jun; McLean, Brent A; Basu, Ratnadeep; Das, Subhash K; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Parajuli, Nirmal; Penninger, Josef M; Grant, Maria B; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. We studied the role of ACE2 in obesity-mediated cardiac dysfunction. ACE2 null (ACE2KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control diet and studied at 6 months of age. Loss of ACE2 resulted in decreased weight gain but increased glucose intolerance, epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) inflammation, and polarization of macrophages into a proinflammatory phenotype in response to HFD. Similarly, human EAT in patients with obesity and heart failure displayed a proinflammatory macrophage phenotype. Exacerbated EAT inflammation in ACE2KO-HFD mice was associated with decreased myocardial adiponectin, decreased phosphorylation of AMPK, increased cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, and myocardial insulin resistance, which worsened heart function. Ang 1-7 (24 µg/kg/h) administered to ACE2KO-HFD mice resulted in ameliorated EAT inflammation and reduced cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, resulting in normalization of heart failure. In conclusion, ACE2 plays a novel role in heart disease associated with obesity wherein ACE2 negatively regulates obesity-induced EAT inflammation and cardiac insulin resistance. PMID:26224885

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  4. An additive effect of eplerenone to ACE inhibitor on slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy in the db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangyu; Johansson, Ulrika; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Bamberg, Krister; Huang, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Although blockade of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) has become standard therapy for diabetic nephropathy (DN), decline in kidney function towards end-stage renal disease is seen in many patients. Elevated plasma aldosterone often accompanies RAS blockade by a phenomenon known as “aldosterone escape” and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). We therefore examined whether addition of the MR antagonist eplerenone to an ACEI would enhance the efficacy in slowing the progression of DN. Untreated uninephrectomized diabetic db/db mice developed progressive albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis between weeks 18 and 22, associated with decreased number of podocytes and increased renal expression of fibrotic markers. The therapeutic effect of eplerenone at 100 mg/kg BW/d on albuminuria, podocyte injury and renal fibrosis was similar to that of enalapril given alone at maximally effective doses. Adding eplerenone to enalapril resulted in further reduction in these measurements. Renal expressions of TNF-α, MCP-1, Nox2 and p47phox and renal TBARS levels, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, were increased during disease progression in diabetic mice, which were reduced by eplerenone or enalapril given alone and further reduced by the two drugs given in combination. However, there were no treatment related effects on plasma K+. Our results suggest that eplerenone is effective in slowing the progression of DN in db/db mice and that the effect is additive to an ACEI. The addition of an MR antagonist void of effects on plasma K+ to an ACEI may offer additional renoprotection in progressive DN via blocking the effects of aldosterone due to escape or diabetes-induction. PMID:27186263

  5. Fetal sex affects expression of renin-angiotensin system components in term human decidua.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Pringle, Kirsty G; Sykes, Shane D; Marques, Francine Z; Morris, Brian J; Zakar, Tamas; Lumbers, Eugenie R

    2012-01-01

    The maternal decidua expresses the genes of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Human decidua was collected at term either before labor (i.e. cesarean delivery) or after spontaneous labor. The mRNA for prorenin (REN), prorenin receptor (ATP6AP2), angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin-converting enzymes 1 and 2 (ACE1 and ACE2), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1), and angiotensin 1-7 receptor (MAS1) were measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Decidual explants were cultured in duplicate for 24 and 48 h, and all RAS mRNA, and the secretion of prorenin, angiotensin II, and angiotensin 1-7 was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, ELISA, and radioimmunoassay, respectively. In the decidua collected before labor, REN mRNA levels were higher if the fetus was female. In addition, REN, ATP6AP2, AGT, and MAS1 mRNA abundance was greater in decidual explants collected from women carrying a female fetus, as was prorenin protein. After 24 h, ACE1 mRNA was higher in the decidual explants from women with a male fetus, whereas after 48 h, both ACE1 and ACE2 mRNA was higher in decidual explants from women with a female fetus. Angiotensin II was present in all explants, but angiotensin 1-7 levels often registered below the lower limits of sensitivity for the assay. After labor, decidua, when compared with nonlaboring decidua, demonstrated lower REN expression when the fetus was female. Therefore, the maternal decidual RAS is regulated in a sex-specific manner, suggesting that it may function differently when the fetus is male than when it is female. PMID:22045662

  6. H2S Inhibits Hyperglycemia-Induced Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System Activation via Attenuation of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jun; Li, Chen; Shao, Decui; Liu, Jia; Shen, Yang; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yu; Yu, Chen; Wang, Rui; Lu, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Decrease in endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was reported to participate in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study is aimed at exploring the relationship between the abnormalities in H2S metabolism, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and the activation of intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Cultured renal mesangial cells (MCs) and streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats were used for the studies. The expressions of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) type I receptor (AT1), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and collagen IV were measured by real time PCR and Western blot. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed by fluorescent probe assays. Cell proliferation was analyzed by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assay. Ang II concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. AGT, ACE and AT1 receptor mRNA levels and Ang II concentration were increased in high glucose (HG) -treated MCs, the cell proliferation rate and the production of TGF-β1 and of collagen IV productions were also increased. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylenechloride iodonium (DPI) was able to reverse the HG-induced RAS activation and the changes in cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. Supplementation of H2S attenuated HG-induced elevations in ROS and RAS activation. Blockade on H2S biosynthesis from cystathione-γ-lyase (CSE) by DL-propargylglycine (PPG) resulted in effects similar to that of HG treatment. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, the changes in RAS were also reversed by H2S supplementation without affecting blood glucose concentration. These data suggested that the decrease in H2S under hyperglycemic condition leads to an imbalance between oxidative and reductive species. The increased oxidative species results in intrarenal RAS activation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. PMID:24058553

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibition for Skeletal Muscle Dysfunction in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Lee, Jen Y.; Natanek, Amanda; Lewis, Amy; Murphy, Patrick B.; Hart, Nicholas; Moxham, John; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Kemp, Paul R.; Polkey, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle impairment is a recognized complication of COPD, predicting mortality in severe disease. Increasing evidence implicates the renin-angiotensin system in control of muscle phenotype. We hypothesized that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition would improve quadriceps function and exercise performance in COPD. METHODS: This double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial investigated the effect of the ACE inhibitor, fosinopril, on quadriceps function in patients with COPD with quadriceps weakness. Primary outcomes were change in quadriceps endurance and atrophy signaling at 3 months. Quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction (QMVC), mid-thigh CT scan of the cross-sectional area (MTCSA), and incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD) were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Eighty patients were enrolled (mean [SD], 65 [8] years, FEV1 43% [21%] predicted, 53% men). Sixty-seven patients (31 fosinopril, 36 placebo) completed the trial. The treatment group demonstrated a significant reduction in systolic BP (Δ−10.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, −19.9 to −1.1; P = .03) and serum ACE activity (Δ−20.4 IU/L; 95% CI, −31.0 to −9.8; P < .001) compared with placebo. No significant between-group differences were observed in the primary end points of quadriceps endurance half-time (Δ0.5 s; 95% CI, −13.3-14.3; P = .94) or atrogin-1 messenger RNA expression (Δ−0.03 arbitrary units; 95% CI, −0.32-0.26; P = .84). QMVC improved in both groups (fosinopril: Δ1.1 kg; 95% CI, 0.03-2.2; P = .045 vs placebo: Δ3.6 kg; 95% CI, 2.1-5.0; P < .0001) with a greater increase in the placebo arm (between-group, P = .009). No change was shown in the MTCSA (P = .09) or ISWD (P = .51). CONCLUSIONS: This randomized controlled trial found that ACE inhibition, using fosinopril for 3 months, did not improve quadriceps function or exercise performance in patients with COPD with quadriceps weakness. TRIAL REGISTRY: Current Controlled Trials; No.: ISRCTN05581879; URL: www

  8. ACES--Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Presents text of Presidential Address delivered March 24, 1991, at the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) luncheon, part of the American Association for Counseling and Development Convention held in Reno, Nevada. Comments on past, present, and future of ACES, particularly on future challenges and role of ACES. (ABL)

  9. Association between ACE polymorphism, cognitive phenotype and APOE E4 allele in a Tunisian population with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Achouri-Rassas, Afef; Ali, Nadia Ben; Cherif, Aroua; Fray, Saloua; Siala, Hajer; Zakraoui, Nouria Oudiaa; Hadj-Fredj, Sondes; Kechaou, Mariem; Anane, Nadia; Echebi, Slim; Messaoud, Taieb; Belal, Samir

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has shown altered activity in patients with neurological diseases. An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene encoding angiotensin-converting enzyme has been reported to be associated with the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is generally considered to be a disorder primarily affecting memory. We conducted a case-control study in a sample composed of 85 sporadic AD patients and 90 age- and sex-matched controls to investigate the possible effect of the polymorphism and cognitive profile. Our data revealed an association between the ACE polymorphism and AD risk. There was a significant difference in the ACE allele or genotype frequencies between cases and controls. The D/D genotype showed an increased risk for AD and in the amnestic group and the effect was independent on ApoE genotypes. PMID:26456241

  10. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vinícius A.; Probst, Vanessa S.; Nogari, Bruna M.; Teixeira, Denilson C.; Felcar, Josiane M.; Santos, Denis C.; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M.; Andraus, Rodrigo A. C.; Fernandes, Karen B. P.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group − individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength. PMID:27065543

  11. Age-Associated Changes in the Vascular Renin-Angiotensin System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hye Eun; Kim, Eun Nim; Kim, Min Young; Lim, Ji Hee; Jang, In-Ae; Ban, Tae Hyun; Shin, Seok Joon; Park, Cheol Whee; Chang, Yoon Sik; Choi, Bum Soon

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated whether the change in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is associated with arterial aging in mice. Methods. Histologic changes and expressions of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), collagen IV, fibronectin, angiotensin II (Ang II), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R), prorenin receptor (PRR), Mas receptor (MasR), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), NADPH oxidase 2 and oxidase 4 (Nox2 and Nox4), 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), 3-nitrotyrosine, and superoxide dismutase 1 and dismutase 2 (SOD1 and SOD2) were measured in the thoracic aortas from 2-month-old, 12-month-old, and 24-month-old C57/BL6 mice. Results. Twenty-four-month-old mice showed significantly increased aortic media thickness and expressions of TGF-β, collagen IV, and fibronectin, compared to 2-month-old and 12-month-old mice. The expressions of PRR, ACE, and Ang II, and AT1R-positive area significantly increased, whereas expressions of ACE2 and MasR and AT2R-positive area decreased with age. The expressions of phosphorylated serine1177-eNOS, SOD1, and SOD2 decreased, and the 8-OHdG-positive area and the 3-nitrotyrosine-positive area increased with age. The expression of Nox2 significantly increased with age, but that of Nox4 did not change. Conclusions. The enhanced PRR-ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis and reduced ACE2-MasR axis were associated with arterial aging in mice. PMID:27200147

  12. Severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes: impact of the renin-angiotensin system and other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2009-11-01

    system activity to maintain cognitive function during hypoglycaemia. The clinical implications of this finding which, however, must await additional independent confirmation, include prediction and possibly some prevention of severe hypoglycaemia. An evaluation of renin-angiotensin system activity may - together with assessment of other risk factors - contribute to rational individualized setting of glycaemic targets and thereby open for prevention of severe hypoglycaemia. Furthermore, subjects with elevated renin-angiotensin system activity and a high rate of severe hypoglycaemia might benefit from pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin system by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers or even renin blockers. This should be addressed in controlled trials. PMID:19939337

  13. Developmental expression of ACE2 in the SHR kidney: a role in hypertension?

    PubMed

    Tikellis, C; Cooper, M E; Bialkowski, K; Johnston, C I; Burns, W C; Lew, R A; Smith, A I; Thomas, M C

    2006-07-01

    The abnormal development of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is thought contribute to adult-onset hypertension in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a novel enzyme with complementary actions to that of ACE. Recent studies have shown that ACE2 expression is reduced in the adult SHR. However, its regulation in pre-hypertensive animals is unknown. In this study, we examine the developmental expression of ACE2 in the rodent kidney and its temporal expression, as it relates to the development of hypertension in the SHR model. Kidneys from SHR and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats (n=8-12/group) at birth, 6 weeks of age, and adulthood (80 days) were examined. Gene expression and activity of ACE2 were determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and quenched fluorescence assays, respectively. Renal expression was localized by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The expression and ACE2 activity are significantly increased in the SHR kidney at birth. With the onset of hypertension, the tubular expression of ACE2 falls in SHR compared to WKY and remains reduced in the adult SHR kidney. Glomerular expression is paradoxically increased in the SHR glomerulus. The overall developmental pattern of ACE2 expression in the SHR kidney is also modified, with declining expression over the course of renal development. The developmental pattern of ACE2 expression in the SHR kidney is altered before the onset of hypertension, consistent with the key role of the RAS in the pathogenesis of adult-onset hypertension. Further research is required to distinguish the contribution of these changes to the development and progression of hypertension in this model. PMID:16710353

  14. Genetic Deletion of ACE2 Induces Vascular Dysfunction in C57BL/6 Mice: Role of Nitric Oxide Imbalance and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luiza A.; Todiras, Mihail; Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Szijártó, István András; Gollasch, Maik; Penninger, Josef M.; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A.; Alenina, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays a critical role in cardiovascular homeostasis, and its altered expression is associated with major cardiac and vascular disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulation of vascular function and assess the vascular redox balance in ACE2-deficient (ACE2-/y) animals. Experiments were performed in 20–22 week-old C57BL/6 and ACE2-/y male mice. Evaluation of endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation revealed an impairment of in vitro and in vivo vascular function in ACE2-/y mice. Drastic reduction in eNOS expression at both protein and mRNA levels, and a decrease in •NO concentrations were observed in aortas of ACE2-/y mice in comparison to controls. Consistently, these mice presented a lower plasma and urine nitrite concentration, confirming reduced •NO availability in ACE2-deficient animals. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased and superoxide dismutase activity was decreased in aorta homogenates of ACE2-/y mice, indicating impaired antioxidant capacity. Taken together, our data indicate, that ACE2 regulates vascular function by modulating nitric oxide release and oxidative stress. In conclusion, we elucidate mechanisms by which ACE2 is involved in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis. Furthermore, these findings provide insights into the role of the renin-angiotensin system in both vascular and systemic redox balance. PMID:27070147

  15. Antihypertensive effect of angiotensin i converting enzyme-inhibitory peptide from hydrolysates of Bigeye tuna dark muscle, Thunnus obesus.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhong-Ji; Je, Jae-Young; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2007-10-17

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide was isolated from tuna dark muscle hydrolysate prepared by alcalase, neutrase, pepsin, papain, alpha-chymotrypsin, and trypsin, respectively. Among hydrolysates, the pepsin-derived hydrolysate exhibited the highest ACE I inhibitory activity versus those of other enzyme hydrolysates. The structure of the peptide was identified to be Trp-Pro-Glu-Ala-Ala-Glu-Leu-Met-Met-Glu-Val-Asp-Pro (molecular weight 1581 Da) by time of flight mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis, and the IC 50 value of the peptide was 21.6 microM. The Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed that the peptide acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor, and the inhibitor constant ( K i) was calculated as 26.6 microM using the secondary plots. The peptide had an antihypertensive effect according to the time-course measurement after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats. Maximal reduction was detected 3 h after oral administration at a dose of 10 mg/kg of body weight. These results suggest that the peptide derived from tuna dark muscle would be a beneficial ingredient for functional food or pharmaceuticals against hypertension and its related diseases. PMID:17894458

  16. ACE expression in monocytes is induced by cytokines, phorbol ester and steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, D.; Lanzillo, J.; Fanburg, B. )

    1991-03-15

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels are elevated in the serum and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) of patients with granulomatous diseases. However, the role of ACE in (Mo) physiology and the regulation of the inflammatory response is not well understood. Since Mo can be stimulated to form giant cells using phorbol esters, glucocorticoids or certain inflammatory cytokines, the authors examined production of ACE protein by normal PBM, a Mo-like cell line, THP-1, and a macrophage-like cell line, U937 following stimulation with these agents. Using a sensitive ELISA assay, they found that in U937 cells, expression of ACE protein increased by 3.4 fold with dexamethasone, 3.7. fold with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA), and 5.8 fold with the two agents combined. The cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF substantially increased ACE expression, by 7.6 and 7.7 fold respectively, with maximal effect at 0.01 U/ml, while IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} had little effect. Similar results were found with PBM and THP-1 cells. The combination of dexamethasone and PMA also induced homotypic cluster formation in PBM, suggesting a correlation between cell adhesion and ACE production. The authors conclude that ACE expression in monocytes and macrophages is stimulated by low concentration of glucocorticoids and certain inflammatory cytokines. ACE may participate in the initiation and propagation of granulomatous inflammatory processes.

  17. Differential regulation of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and nuclear factor-κB by angiotensin II receptor subtypes in type 2 diabetic kidney.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anuradha; Goru, Santosh Kumar; Kadakol, Almesh; Malek, Vajir; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts through Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE)/Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis to promote renal failure whereas the Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R)/Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang1-7/Mas axis constitutes the protective arm of Renin Angiotensin System (RAS). Though Ang II has been known to activate the Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling pathway through different receptor subtype(s) in different tissues under various diseases, the subtype orchestrating this stimulation in type 2 diabetic kidney remains elusive. ACE2, a protective monocarboxypeptidase, responsible for conversion of Ang II to Ang1-7, opposes the deleterious effects of RAS pathway but how its expression is altered with blockade of AT1R and AT2R is not yet known. Hence, the present study was conceived to understand the regulation of NF-κB and ACE2 by using specific AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists in non-genetic model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Our results show that the AT1R and AT2R antagonists lead to the repression and activation of NF-κB signalling pathway, respectively which suggests the role of AT1R in NF-κB activation. The blockade of AT2R led to an increase in ACE2 expression, which may be a compensatory response to the drastically increased inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the differential regulation of NF-κB and ACE2 by Ang II receptor subtypes and thus this study improves our understanding regarding regulation of inflammatory cascade and ACE2 by AT1R and AT2R in type 2 diabetic kidney, which may help in designing novel strategies to combat the disease in future. PMID:26271886

  18. Identification of the Major ACE-Inhibitory Peptides Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Protein Concentrate from Cuttlefish Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Amado, Isabel; Vázquez, José Antonio; González, Pilar; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Carrera, Mónica; Piñeiro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC50 = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL−1) after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC50 value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL−1. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Four fractions (A–D) with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR) followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC50 values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL−1, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions. PMID:24619242

  19. Plasma Kallikrein and Angiotensin I-converting enzyme N- and C-terminal domain activities are modulated by the insertion/deletion polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Almeida, S S; Barros, C C; Moraes, M R; Russo, F J; Haro, A S; Rosa, T S; Alves, M F; Pesquero, J B; Carmona, A K; Bacurau, R F P; Araújo, R C

    2010-04-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is recognized as one of the main effector molecules involved in blood pressure regulation. In the last few years some polymorphisms of ACE such as the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism have been described, but their physiologic relevance is poorly understood. In addition, few studies investigated if the specific activity of ACE domain is related to the I/D polymorphism and if it can affect other systems. The aim of this study was to establish a biochemical and functional characterization of the I/D polymorphism and correlate this with the corresponding ACE activity. For this purpose, 119 male brazilian army recruits were genotyped and their ACE plasma activities evaluated from the C- and N-terminal catalytic domains using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides, specific for the C-domain (Abz-LFK(Dnp)OH), N-domain (Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH) and both C- and N-domains (Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH). Plasma kallikrein activity was measured using Z-Phe-Arg-AMC as substrate and inhibited by selective plasma kallikrein inhibitor (PKSI). Some physiological parameters previously described related to the I/D polymorphism such as handgrip strength, blood pressure, heart rate and BMI were also evaluated. The genotype distribution was II n=27, ID n=64 and DD n=28. Total plasma ACE activity of both domains in II individuals was significantly lower in comparison to ID and DD. This pattern was also observed for C- and N-domain activities. Difference between ID and DD subjects was observed only with the N-domain specific substrate. Blood pressure, heart rate, handgrip strength and BMI were similar among the genotypes. This polymorphism also affected the plasma kallikrein activity and DD group presents high activity level. Thus, our data demonstrate that the I/D ACE polymorphism affects differently both ACE domains without effects on handgrip strength. Moreover, this polymorphism influences the kallikrein-kinin system of normotensive individuals

  20. An ACE diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nasher, Omar; Gupta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher's disease is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients with hepatosplenomegaly and increased serum ACE. A 19-year-old girl presented with recurrent epigastric and left hypochondrial pain over a period of 9 years, associated with episodes of nausea and diarrhoea. She was extensively investigated and found to have splenomegaly and raised serum ACE. A screen for haematological disorders was negative. She reported an insect bite during an overseas holiday preceding her symptoms. She was therefore also screened for infectious causes of hepatosplenomegaly but without success. Later on in life, she reported joint pain and discomfort. Sarcoidosis was thought to be the putative cause on more than one occasion. However, the presence of splenomegaly and her relatively young age, led the rheumatologist to the correct diagnosis. PMID:23417380

  1. An ACE diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nasher, Omar; Gupta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher's disease is not commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients with hepatosplenomegaly and increased serum ACE. A 19-year-old girl presented with recurrent epigastric and left hypochondrial pain over a period of 9 years, associated with episodes of nausea and diarrhoea. She was extensively investigated and found to have splenomegaly and raised serum ACE. A screen for haematological disorders was negative. She reported an insect bite during an overseas holiday preceding her symptoms. She was therefore also screened for infectious causes of hepatosplenomegaly but without success. Later on in life, she reported joint pain and discomfort. Sarcoidosis was thought to be the putative cause on more than one occasion. However, the presence of splenomegaly and her relatively young age, led the rheumatologist to the correct diagnosis. PMID:23417380

  2. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Modulation in the Management of Cardio-Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Ludovit; Foulquier, Sébastien; Namsolleck, Pawel; Recarti, Chiara; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha; Unger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or obesity are linked with chronic low-grade inflammation and dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Consequently, RAS inhibition by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1R) blockers is the evidence-based standard for cardiovascular risk reduction in high-risk patients, including diabetics with albuminuria. In addition, RAS inhibition reduces the new onset of diabetes mellitus. Yet, the high and increasing prevalence of metabolic disorders, and the high residual risk even in properly treated patients, calls for additional means of pharmacological intervention. In the past decade, the stimulation of the angiotensin AT2 receptor (AT2R) has been shown to reduce inflammation, improve cardiac and vascular remodeling, enhance insulin sensitivity and increase adiponectin production. Therefore, a concept of dual AT1R/AT2R modulation emerges as a putative means for risk reduction in cardio-metabolic diseases. The approach employing simultaneous RAS blockade (AT1R) and RAS stimulation (AT2R) is distinct from previous attempts of double intervention in the RAS by dual blockade. Dual blockade abolishes the AT1R-linked RAS almost completely with subsequent risk of hypotension and hypotension-related events, i.e. syncope or renal dysfunction. Such complications might be especially prominent in patients with renal impairment or patients with isolated systolic hypertension and normal-to-low diastolic blood pressure values. In contrast to dual RAS blockade, the add-on of AT2R stimulation does not exert significant blood pressure effects, but it may complement and enhance the anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic/de-stiffening effects of the AT1R blockade and improve the metabolic profile. Further studies will have to investigate these putative effects in particular for settings in which blood pressure reduction is not primarily desired. PMID:26631237

  3. Studies on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Genotype Distributions in Turkish Preeclampsia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bereketoğlu, Ceyhun; Kasap, Mülkiye; Pazarbaşı, Ayfer

    2012-01-01

    Placental, immune and genetic factors are thought to play an important role in preeclampia (PE)'s pathophysiology. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) plays a vital role in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) which regulates blood pressure by converting angiotensin I into a powerfull vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. A deletion polymorphism (D allele) has been reported to be associated with elevated ACE activity. The aim of the this study was to investigate whether there is an association between angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and PE. In this study, 120 preeclamptic and 116 normotensive Turkish pregnant women were genotyped for ACE I/D polymorphism and the distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of this polymorphism in preeclampsia and controls were evaluated. Codominant, dominant and recessive models were appplied in ACE gene I/D polymorphism. In the codominant model, DD genotype was found significantly more frequent in preeclampsia than controls (P = 0.016). Moreover, in dominant model (DD frequency versus DI+II frequency) there was a significant relation between DD genotype and preeclampsia (P = 0.006). D allele frequency was 64.6% in preeclampsia while it was 56.1% in controls (P = 0.062). In conclusion, there was significant difference in genotype distribution between preeclampsia and controls. PMID:22545216

  4. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for targeted imaging of angiotensin converting enzyme design, characterization, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William Emmanuel

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States with approximately one in every three death being attributed to these diseases. The overarching problem with heart diseases is that once a person has suffered from an attack, there is a high likelihood of a recurrent attack. According to the American Heart Association, approximately 785,000 Americans per year suffer from heart attacks for the first time and about half of the aforementioned experience an ensuing attack. The second attack is often fatal, and therefore relapse prevention is crucial. One of the possible ways of averting the recurrence of such an attack is through the precise monitoring of the preceding biomarkers or risk indicators. This project encompasses the design, synthesis, characterization, and application of nanoparticle-based contrast agents that can potentially be used in the monitoring of the reemergence of a biomarker expressed after a person has suffered myocardial infarction. The overexpression of this biomarker, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), is also associated with development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis. To this end, highly concentrated gold nanoparticles have been synthesized and conjugated to Lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor, for the molecular imaging of ACE using X-ray CT. Various stabilities studies were conducted to verify the resistance of this gold nanoprobe in biological relevant media. They have also been successfully used in X-ray computed tomography to visualize tissue ACE and thus render them potentially versatile in the monitoring of cardiovascular diseases. An MRI tag was also conjugated to the gold nanoparticle affording the opportunity for bimodal imaging of ACE. This contrast agent could further be used for the quantification using K-edge CT of the relationship between the amount of the said marker and its role in predicting the possibility of a successive heart attack. The prepared nanoparticle-based contrast

  5. Haplotypes extending across ACE are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Patrick G; Katzov, Hagit; Feuk, Lars; Bennet, Anna M; Johansson, Boo; Wiman, Björn; de Faire, Ulf; Cairns, Nigel J; Wilcock, Gordon K; Brookes, Anthony J; Blennow, Kaj; Prince, Jonathan A

    2003-04-15

    Numerous genes have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but, with the exception of a demonstrated association with the epsilon 4 allele of APOE, findings have not been consistently replicated across populations. One of the most widely studied is the gene for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE ). A meta-analysis of published data on a common Alu indel polymorphism in ACE was performed which indicated highly significant association of the insertion allele with AD (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.19 - 1.41; P=4 x 10(-8)). To further explore the influence of ACE on AD, several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in five independent populations represented by over 3100 individuals. Analyses based upon single markers and haplotypes revealed strong evidence of association in case-control models and also in a model examining the influence of variation in ACE upon cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid beta42 peptide (Abeta42). The most significant evidence for association with AD was found for an SNP, A-262T, located in the ACE promoter (OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.33 -1.94; P=2 x 10(-5)). Estimates of population attributable risk for the common allele of this SNP suggest that it, or an allele in tight linkage disequilibrium (LD) with it, may contribute to as much as 35% of AD in the general population. Results support a model whereby decreased ACE activity may influence AD susceptibility by a mechanism involving beta-amyloid metabolism. PMID:12668609

  6. Bioassay-guided preparative separation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory C-flavone glycosides from Desmodium styracifolium by recycling complexation high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Qi; Luo, Jian-Guang; Han, Chao; Xu, Jin-Fang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A new strategy of the convergence of high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) and bioactive assay technique was developed for rapidly screening and separating the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from the aerial parts of Desmodium styracifolium. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the crude extract was first established to target the bioactive fractions based on HSCCC coupled with in vitro ACE inhibitory assay. Subsequently, the bioactive fractions were further separated by the recycling complexation HSCCC respectively, using 0.10 mol/L copper sulfate in the lower phase of two-phase solvent system composed of n-butanol/water (1:1, v/v). Five C-glycosylflavones, vicenin 2 (1), carlinoside (2), vicenin 1 (3), schaftoside (4) and vicenin 3 (5), were successfully obtained. Their chemical structures were identified using ESI-MS and NMR. All the isolates showed in vitro ACE inhibitory activity with the IC50 values between 33.62 and 58.37 μM. The results demonstrated that the established method was proposed as an excellent strategy to systematically screen and purify active compounds from traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:25459924

  7. N- vs. C-Domain Selectivity of Catalytic Inactivation of Human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Hocharoen, Lalintip; Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The N- and C-terminal domains of human somatic Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) demonstrate distinct physiological functions, with resulting interest in the development of domain-selective inhibitors for specific therapeutic applications. Herein, the activity of lisinopril-coupled transition metal chelates were tested for both reversible binding and irreversible catalytic inactivation of sACE-1. C/N domain binding selectivity ratios ranged from 1 to 350, while rates of irreversible catalytic inactivation of the N- and C-domains were found to be significantly greater for the N-domain, suggesting a more optimal orientation of the M-chelate-lisinopril complexes within the active site of the N-domain of sACE-1. Finally, the combined effect of binding selectivity and inactivation selectivity was assessed for each catalyst (double-filter selectivity factors), and several catalysts were found to cause domain-selective catalytic inactivation. The results of this study demonstrate the ability to optimize the target selectivity of catalytic metallopeptides through both binding and orientation factors (double-filter effect). PMID:24228790

  8. Improved synthesis of lysine- and arginine-derived Amadori and Heyns products and in vitro measurement of their angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sudhanva M; Harohally, Nanishankar V

    2012-02-15

    The L-lysine- and L-arginine-derived Amadori and Heyns products consisting of N-(1-deoxy-d-fructos-1-yl)amino acid and N-(2-deoxy-d-glucos-2-yl)amino acid were prepared by reaction of d-fructose and d-glucose with l-lysine hydrochloride and l-arginine hydrochloride using commercial zinc powder as deprotonating reagent and also as catalyst precursor in a simple synthetic route in high yield. These compounds were screened for angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity using a high-throughput colorimetric assay (utilizing porcine kidney ACE). The IC(50) values fall in the range of 1030-1175 μM, with N(α)-(1-deoxy-d-fructos-1-yl)arginine showing the best IC(50) value (1030 ± 38 μM). This study demonstrates an improved synthetic method for simple Amadori and Heyns products and their moderate ACE inhibitor activity. PMID:22242891

  9. Acute stress and cardiovascular health: is there an ACE gene connection?

    PubMed

    Holman, E Alison

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular disorders (CVD) are associated with acute and posttraumatic stress responses, yet biological processes underlying this association are poorly understood. This study examined whether renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity, as indicated by a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene, is associated with both CVD and acute stress related to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks. European-American respondents (N = 527) from a nationally representative longitudinal study of coping following 9/11 provided saliva for genotyping. Respondents had completed health surveys before 9/11 and annually for 3 years after, and acute stress assessments 9 to 23 days after 9/11. Respondents with rs4291 AA or TT genotypes reported high acute stress twice as often as those with the AT genotype. Individuals with the TT genotype were 43% more likely to report increased physician-diagnosed CVD over 3 years following 9/11, when the following variables were included in the model: (a) pre-9/11 CVD, mental health, and non-CVD ailments; (b) cardiac risk factors; (c) ongoing endocrine disorders; and (d) significant demographics. The ACE rs4291 TT genotype, which has been associated with HPA axis hyperactivity and higher levels of serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), predicted acute stress response and reports of physician-diagnosed CVD in a national sample following collective stress. ACE gene function may be associated with both mental and physical health disorders following collective stress. PMID:23055331

  10. Crosstalk between ACE2 and PLGF regulates vascular permeability during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lantao; Li, Yong; Qin, Hao; Xing, Dong; Su, Jie; Hu, Zhenjie

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) treatment suppresses the severity of acute lung injury (ALI), through antagonizing hydrolyzing angiotensin II (AngII) and the ALI-induced apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the effects of ACE2 on vessel permeability and its relationship with placental growth factor (PLGF) remain ill-defined. In the current study, we examined the relationship between ACE2 and PLGF in ALI model in mice. We used a previously published bleomycin method to induce ALI in mice, and treated the mice with ACE2. We analyzed the levels of PLGF in these mice. The mouse lung vessel permeability was determined by a fluorescence pharmacokinetic assay following i.v. injection of 62.5 µg/kg Visudyne. PLGF pump or soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) pump was given to augment or suppress PLGF effects, respectively. The long-term effects on lung function were determined by measurement of lung resistance using methacholine. We found that ACE2 treatment did not alter PLGF levels in lung, but antagonized the effects of PLGF on increases of lung vessel permeability. Ectogenic PLGF abolished the antagonizing effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. On the other hand, suppression of PLGF signaling mimicked the effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. The suppression of vessel permeability resulted in improvement of lung function after ALI. Thus, ACE2 may antagonize the PLGF-mediated increases in lung vessel permeability during ALI, resulting in improvement of lung function after ALI. PMID:27158411

  11. Primary Systemic Amyloidosis and High Levels of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Praena-Segovia, J.; Sanchez-Gastaldo, A.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Ocete-Pérez, R.; Ávila-Polo, R.; Martino, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Infiltrative heart diseases are caused by a heterogeneous group of disorders; amyloidosis and sarcoidosis are two frequent causes of myocardial infiltration, which differ in clinical and biological outcome and treatment issues. The presence of high levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in a patient with infiltrative heart disease may increase suspicion of sarcoidosis. Nevertheless, no mention about increased ACE levels in extracerebral primary systemic amyloidosis is available. We present two cases of primary systemic amyloidosis, which are cardiac involvement and elevated ACE levels. PMID:24826302

  12. Activity Prediction and Molecular Mechanism of Bovine Blood Derived Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Nie, Shaoping; Liu, Boqun; Yu, Yiding; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Development of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE, EC 3.4.15.1) inhibitory peptides from food protein is under extensive research as alternative for the prevention of hypertension. However, it is difficult to identify peptides released from food sources. To accelerate the progress of peptide identification, a three layer back propagation neural network model was established to predict the ACE-inhibitory activity of pentapeptides derived from bovine hemoglobin by simulated enzyme digestion. The pentapeptide WTQRF has the best predicted value with experimental IC50 23.93 μM. The potential molecular mechanism of the WTQRF / ACE interaction was investigated by flexible docking. PMID:25768442

  13. Increasing brain angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity decreases anxiety-like behavior in male mice by activating central Mas receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; de Kloet, Annette D; Pati, Dipanwita; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; Pioquinto, David J; Ludin, Jacob A; Oh, S Paul; Katovich, Michael J; Frazier, Charles J; Raizada, Mohan K; Krause, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    Over-activation of the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibits RAS activity by converting angiotensin-II, the effector peptide of RAS, to angiotensin-(1-7), which activates the Mas receptor (MasR). Whether increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety by stimulating central MasR is unknown. To test the hypothesis that increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety-like behavior via central MasR stimulation, we generated male mice overexpressing ACE2 (ACE2 KI mice) and wild type littermate controls (WT). ACE2 KI mice explored the open arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM) significantly more than WT, suggesting increasing ACE2 activity is anxiolytic. Central delivery of diminazene aceturate, an ACE2 activator, to C57BL/6 mice also reduced anxiety-like behavior in the EPM, but centrally administering ACE2 KI mice A-779, a MasR antagonist, abolished their anxiolytic phenotype, suggesting that ACE2 reduces anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR. To identify the brain circuits mediating these effects, we measured Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, subsequent to EPM exposure and found that ACE2 KI mice had decreased Fos in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis but had increased Fos in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Within the BLA, we determined that ∼62% of GABAergic neurons contained MasR mRNA and expression of MasR mRNA was upregulated by ACE2 overexpression, suggesting that ACE2 may influence GABA neurotransmission within the BLA via MasR activation. Indeed, ACE2 overexpression was associated with increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (indicative of presynaptic release of GABA) onto BLA pyramidal neurons and central infusion of A-779 eliminated this effect. Collectively, these results suggest that ACE2 may reduce anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR that facilitate GABA release onto pyramidal neurons within the

  14. Combination treatment with a calcium channel blocker and an angiotensin blocker in a rat systolic heart failure model with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Namba, Masashi; Kim, Shokei; Zhan, Yumei; Nakao, Takafumi; Iwao, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    The mechanism and treatment of hypertensive systolic heart failure are not well defined. We compared the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (cilazapril, 10 mg/kg), an angiotensin receptor blocker (candesartan, 3 mg/kg), a calcium channel blocker (benidipine, 1, 3 or 6 mg/kg), and the same calcium channel blocker combined with renin-angiotensin blockers on systolic heart failure in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. DS rats were fed an 8% Na diet from 6 weeks of age and then subjected to the above drug treatments. Benidipine (1 mg/kg), cilazapril, and candesartan had compatible hypotensive effects and similar beneficial effects on cardiac hypertrophy, gene expression, and survival rate. The combination of benidipine with cilazapril or candesartan was found to have no additional beneficial effects on the above parameters, with the exception of a reduction in atrial natriuretic polypeptide gene expression. On the other hand, candesartan normalized serum creatinine, but serum creatinine was unaffected by either benidipine at 1 or 3 mg/kg or cilazapril. Further, the combined use of benidipine and either candesartan or cilazapril resulted in an additional reduction of urinary albumin excretion in DS rats. Thus systolic heart failure in DS rats is mainly mediated by hypertension, while renal dysfunction of DS rats is due to both hypertension and the AT1 receptor itself. These findings suggest that the combination of a calcium channel blocker with an AT1 receptor blocker or ACE inhibitor may be more effective in treating the renal dysfunction associated with systolic heart failure than monotherapy with either agent alone. However, further studies will be needed before reaching any definitive conclusion on the efficacy of this combination therapy in patients with heart failure. PMID:12135327

  15. Dual inhibition of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and endothelin-1 in treatment of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Komers, Radko; Plotkin, Horacio

    2016-05-15

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a pivotal role in treatment of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). However, reversal of the course of CKD or at least long-term stabilization of renal function are often difficult to achieve, and many patients still progress to end-stage renal disease. New treatments are needed to enhance protective actions of RAAS inhibitors (RAASis), such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and improve prognosis in CKD patients. Inhibition of endothelin (ET) system in combination with established RAASis may represent such an approach. There are complex interactions between both systems and similarities in their renal physiological and pathophysiological actions that provide theoretical rationale for combined inhibition. This view is supported by some experimental studies in models of both diabetic and nondiabetic CKD showing that a combination of RAASis with ET receptor antagonists (ERAs) ameliorate proteinuria, renal structural changes, and molecular markers of glomerulosclerosis, renal fibrosis, or inflammation more effectively than RAASis or ERAs alone. Practically all clinical studies exploring the effects of RAASis and ERAs combination in nephroprotection have thus far applied add-on designs, in which an ERA is added to baseline treatment with ACEIs or ARBs. These studies, conducted mostly in patients with diabetic nephropathy, have shown that ERAs effectively reduce residual proteinuria in patients with baseline RAASis treatment. Lo