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Sample records for ace inhibitory peptide

  1. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  2. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and ACE inhibitory peptides of salmon (Salmo salar) protein hydrolysates obtained by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-08-13

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  3. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Bioactive Peptides Purified from Egg Yolk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yousr, Marwa; Howell, Nazlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein by-products from the extraction of lecithin from egg yolk can be converted into value-added products, such as bioactive hydrolysates and peptides that have potential health enhancing antioxidant, and antihypertensive properties. In this study, the antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of peptides isolated and purified from egg yolk protein were investigated. Defatted egg yolk was hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin and sequentially fractionated by ultrafiltration, followed by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fractions (EYGF). Of these, two fractions, EYGF-23 and EYGF-33, effectively inhibited the peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in an oxidizing linoleic acid model system. The antioxidant mechanism involved superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and ferrous chelation. The presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine (Y) and tryptophan (W), in sequences identified by LC-MS as WYGPD (EYGF-23) and KLSDW (EYGF-33), contributed to the antioxidant activity and were not significantly different from the synthetic BHA antioxidant. A third fraction (EYGF-56) was also purified from egg yolk protein by gel filtration and exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity (69%) and IC50 value (3.35 mg/mL). The SDNRNQGY peptide (10 mg/mL) had ACE inhibitory activity, which was not significantly different from that of the positive control captopril (0.5 mg/mL). In addition, YPSPV in (EYGF-33) (10 mg/mL) had higher ACE inhibitory activity compared with captopril. These findings indicated a substantial potential for producing valuable peptides with antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity from egg yolk. PMID:26690134

  4. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Bioactive Peptides Purified from Egg Yolk Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yousr, Marwa; Howell, Nazlin

    2015-12-07

    Protein by-products from the extraction of lecithin from egg yolk can be converted into value-added products, such as bioactive hydrolysates and peptides that have potential health enhancing antioxidant, and antihypertensive properties. In this study, the antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of peptides isolated and purified from egg yolk protein were investigated. Defatted egg yolk was hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin and sequentially fractionated by ultrafiltration, followed by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fractions (EYGF). Of these, two fractions, EYGF-23 and EYGF-33, effectively inhibited the peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in an oxidizing linoleic acid model system. The antioxidant mechanism involved superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and ferrous chelation. The presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine (Y) and tryptophan (W), in sequences identified by LC-MS as WYGPD (EYGF-23) and KLSDW (EYGF-33), contributed to the antioxidant activity and were not significantly different from the synthetic BHA antioxidant. A third fraction (EYGF-56) was also purified from egg yolk protein by gel filtration and exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity (69%) and IC50 value (3.35 mg/mL). The SDNRNQGY peptide (10 mg/mL) had ACE inhibitory activity, which was not significantly different from that of the positive control captopril (0.5 mg/mL). In addition, YPSPV in (EYGF-33) (10 mg/mL) had higher ACE inhibitory activity compared with captopril. These findings indicated a substantial potential for producing valuable peptides with antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity from egg yolk.

  5. Isolation and antihypertensive effect of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from spinach Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjun; Marczak, Ewa D; Yokoo, Megumi; Usui, Hachiro; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2003-08-13

    Four new inhibitory peptides for angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE), that is, MRWRD, MRW, LRIPVA, and IAYKPAG, were isolated from the pepsin-pancreatin digest of spinach Rubisco with the use of HPLC. IC(50) values of individual peptides were 2.1, 0.6, 0.38, and 4.2 microM, respectively. MRW and MRWRD had an antihypertensive effect after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats. Maximal reduction occurred 2 h after oral administration of MRW, whereas MRWRD showed maximal decrease 4 h after oral administration at doses of 20 and 30 mg/kg, respectively. IAYKPAG also exerted antihypertensive activity after oral administration at the dose of 100 mg/kg, giving a maximum decrease 4 h after oral administration. IAYKP, IAY, and KP, the fragment peptides of IAYKPAG, also exerted antihypertensive activity. LRIPVA [corrected] did not show any antihypertensive effect at a dose of 100 mg/kg despite its potent ACE-inhibitory activity.

  6. Enzymolysis kinetics and activities of ACE inhibitory peptides from wheat germ protein prepared with SFP ultrasound-assisted processing.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wenjuan; Ma, Haile; Jia, Junqiang; He, Ronghai; Luo, Lin; Pan, Zhongli

    2012-09-01

    There is a great demand for developing efficient enzymolysis methods in order to increase the enzymolysis efficiencies and activities of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from wheat germ protein. The enzymolysis kinetics, ACE inhibitory activity of peptide and conversion rate of protein were studied using sweep frequency and pulsed (SFP) ultrasound-assisted enzymolysis and the results were compared with traditional enzymolysis. The studied factors were enzymolysis time and substrate concentration. By considering the activity of ACE inhibitory peptide and operation cost, the recommended conditions of SFP ultrasound-assisted enzymolysis were enzymolysis time of 120 min and substrate concentration of 24.0 g/L, which gave high conversion rates of protein (60.7%) and ACE inhibitory activity of peptide (65.9%). Compared to traditional enzymolysis, SFP ultrasound-assisted enzymolysis significantly increased the initial reaction rate (V) by 60.0% at substrate concentration of 24.0 g/L, increased the apparent breakdown rate constant (k(A)) by 66.7%, decreased the apparent constant (K(M)) by 6.9%, and raised the conversion rate of protein by 35.5% and ACE inhibitory activity of peptides by 35.6% under the recommended conditions. It has been concluded that SFP ultrasound can remarkably raise the enzymolysis efficiency and activity of ACE inhibitory peptides from wheat germ protein.

  7. Extraction of antioxidant and ACE inhibitory peptides from Thai traditional fermented shrimp pastes.

    PubMed

    Kleekayai, Thanyaporn; Harnedy, Pádraigín A; O'Keeffe, Martina B; Poyarkov, Alexey A; CunhaNeves, Adriana; Suntornsuk, Worapot; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides were extracted and isolated from two different types of Thai traditional fermented shrimp pastes, Kapi Ta Dam (Kp-B6) and Kapi Ta Deang (Kp-R6). Compounds with masses less than 500Da were found to be predominantly presented in both extracts. Following fractionation with sequential anion exchange chromatography and solid phase extraction (C18 matrix), three dipeptides were identified. Ser-Val and Ile-Phe were shown to exhibit ACE inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 60.68±1.06 and 70.03±1.45μM, respectively. Trp-Pro was shown to have high 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging activity (EC50 17.52±0.46μM). These results indicate that Thai traditional fermented shrimp pastes are potential sources of bioactive peptides possessing ACE inhibitory and antioxidant activities.

  8. Production of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory (ACE-I) Peptides during Milk Fermentation and Their Role in Reducing Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rai, Amit Kumar; Sanjukta, Samurailatpam; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2015-10-13

    Fermented milk is a potential source of various biologically active peptides with specific health benefits. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory (ACE-I) peptides are one of the most studied bioactive peptides produced during milk fermentation. The presence of these peptides is reported in various fermented milk products such as yoghurt, cheese, sour milk, etc, which are also available as commercial products. Many of the ACE-I peptides formed during milk fermentation are resistant to gastrointestinal digestion and inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the rennin angiotension system (RAS). There are various factors, which affect the formation ACE-I peptides and their ability to reach the target tissue in active form, which includes type of starters (lactic acid bacteria, yeast, etc), substrate composition (casein type, whey protein, etc), composition of ACE-I peptide, pre and post fermentation treatments, and its stability during gastrointestinal digestion. The antihypertensive effect of fermented milk products has also been proved by various in-vitro and in-vivo (animal and human trials) experiments. This article reviews the literature on fermented milk products as a source of ACE-I peptides and various factors affecting the production and activity of ACE-I peptides.

  9. ACE-I Inhibitory Activity from Phaseolus lunatus and Phaseolus vulgaris Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Betancur-Ancona, David; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Chel-Guerrero, Luis Antonio; Torruco-Uco, Juan Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The involvement of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) as one of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure is being studied to find alternative means of control of hypertension on human beings. On the market there are synthetic drugs that can control it, but these can cause undesirable health side effects. In this work was assessed the fractionation by ultrafiltration of the Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Jamapa bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), protein hydrolysates obtained with Alcalase(®) and Flavourzyme(®) on ACE-I inhibitory activity. Four membranes of different molecular cutoffs (10, 5, 3, and 1 kDa) were used. Fractions that had a higher inhibitory activity in both legumes were denominated as E (<1 kDa) with IC50 of 30.3 and 51.8 μg/mL values for the P. lunatus with Alcalase and Flavourzyme, respectively, and for the Phaseolus vulgaris with Alcalase and Flavourzyme with about 63.8 and 65.8 μg/mL values, respectively. The amino acid composition of these fractions showed residues in essential amino acids, which make a good source of energy and amino acids. On the other hand, the presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as V and P is a determining factor in the ACE-I inhibitor effect. The results suggest the possibility of obtaining and utilizing these peptide fractions in the development and innovation of a functional product that helps with treatment and/or prevention of hypertension.

  10. The impact of photo-induced molecular changes of dairy proteins on their ACE-inhibitory peptides and activity.

    PubMed

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Shrestha, Kshitij; Van Camp, John; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Among all dietary proteins, dairy proteins are the most important source of bio-active peptides which can, however, be affected by modifications upon processing and storage. Since it is still unknown to which extent the biological activity of dairy proteins is altered by chemical reactions, this study focuses on the effect of photo-induced molecular changes on the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Milk proteins were dissolved in phosphate buffer containing riboflavin and stored under light at 4 °C for one month during which the molecular changes and the ACE-inhibitory activity were analysed. An increase in the total protein carbonyls and the N-formylkynurenine content was observed, besides a decrease in the free thiol, tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine content. These changes were more severe in caseins compared with whey proteins and resulted moreover in the aggregation of caseins. Due to these photo-induced molecular changes, a significant loss of the ACE-inhibitory activity was observed for casein peptides. A peptide analysis moreover illustrated that the decreased activity was not attributed to a reduced digestibility but to losses of specific ACE-inhibitory peptides. The observed molecular changes, more specifically the degradation of specific amino acids and the casein aggregation, could be assigned as the cause of the altered peptide pattern and as such of the loss in ACE-inhibitory activity.

  11. Enterococcus faecalis strains from food, environmental, and clinical origin produce ACE-inhibitory peptides and other bioactive peptides during growth in bovine skim milk.

    PubMed

    Gútiez, Loreto; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Recio, Isidra; del Campo, Rosa; Cintas, Luis M; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E

    2013-08-16

    Enterococcus faecalis isolates from food and environmental origin were evaluated for their angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA) after growth in bovine skim milk (BSM). Most (90% active) but not all (10% inactive) E. faecalis strains produced BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA. Known ACE-inhibitory peptides (ACE-IP) and an antioxidant peptide were identified in the E. faecalis hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-MS/MS). Antimicrobial activity against Pediococcus damnosus CECT4797 and Listeria ivanovii CECT913 was also observed in the E. faecalis hydrolysates. The incidence of virulence factors in the E. faecalis strains with ACE-IA and producers of ACE-IP was variable but less virulence factors were observed in the food and environmental strains than in the clinical reference strains. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based analysis demonstrated that food and environmental E. faecalis strains were genetically different from those of clinical origin. When evaluated, most E. faecalis strains of clinical origin also originated BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA due to the production of ACE-IP. Accordingly, the results of this work suggest that most E. faecalis strains of food, environmental and clinical origin produce BSM-derived bioactive peptides with human health connotations and potential biotechnological applications.

  12. Characterization of ACE inhibitory peptides from Mactra veneriformis hydrolysate by nano-liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (Nano-LC-ESI-MS) and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Zhu, Yunhan; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Hao; Shi, Lei; Wang, Xinzhi; Wang, Lingchong

    2014-06-30

    Food-derived bioactive compounds are gaining increasing significance in life sciences. In the present study, we identified angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides from Mactra veneriformis hydrolysate using a nano-LC-MS/MS method. Mactra veneriformis hydrolysate was first separated into four fractions (F1-F4) based on molecular weight by ultrafiltration. The fraction with molecular weight lower than 1 kDa (F1) showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity. F1 was then analyzed by a high throughput nano-LC-MS/MS method and sequences of peptides in F1 were calculated accordingly. The 27 peptides identified as above were chemically synthesized and tested for ACE-inhibitory activity. The hexapeptide VVCVPW showed the highest potency with an IC50 value of 4.07 μM. We then investigated the interaction mechanism between the six most potent peptides and ACE by molecular docking. Our docking results suggested that the ACE inhibitory peptides bind to ACE via interactions with His383, His387, and Glu411 residues. Particularly, similar to the thiol group of captopril, the cysteine thiol group of the most potent peptide VVCVPW may play a key role in the binding of this peptide to the ACE active site.

  13. Separation and Characterization of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Peptides from Saurida elongata Proteins Hydrolysate by IMAC-Ni2+

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lixia; Wu, Shanguang; Zhou, Liqin; Wang, Feng; Lan, Xiongdiao; Sun, Jianhua; Tong, Zhangfa; Liao, Dankui

    2017-01-01

    Lizard fish protein hydrolysates (LFPH) were prepared from Lizard fish (Saurida elongata) proteins possessing powerful angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and the fraction (LFPH-I) with high ACE inhibitory activity was obtained through ultrafiltration. The active Fraction (F2) was isolated from LFPH-I using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC-Ni2+). Analysis of amino acid levels revealed that F2 eluted from IMAC was enriched in Met, His, Tyr, Pro, Ile, and Leu compared to the crude peptide LFPH-I. F2 with the high ACE inhibitory activity (IC50 of 0.116 mg·mL−1) was further separated by a reverse-phase column to yield a novel ACE inhibitory peptide with IC50 value of 52 μM. The ACE inhibitory peptide was identified as Arg-Tyr-Arg-Pro, RYRP. The present study demonstrated that IMAC may be a useful tool for the separation of ACE inhibitory peptides from protein hydrolysate. PMID:28212269

  14. Identification of the major ACE-inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate from cuttlefish wastewater.

    PubMed

    Amado, Isabel Rodríguez; Vázquez, José Antonio; González, Pilar; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Carrera, Mónica; Piñeiro, Carmen

    2014-03-10

    The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC₅₀ = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL⁻¹) after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC₅₀ value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL⁻¹. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Four fractions (A-D) with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR) followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC₅₀ values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL⁻¹, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions.

  15. Identification of the Major ACE-Inhibitory Peptides Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Protein Concentrate from Cuttlefish Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Amado, Isabel; Vázquez, José Antonio; González, Pilar; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Carrera, Mónica; Piñeiro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC50 = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL−1) after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC50 value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL−1. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Four fractions (A–D) with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR) followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC50 values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL−1, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions. PMID:24619242

  16. Purification and characterisation of a novel angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide derived from the enzymatic hydrolysate of Enteromorpha clathrata protein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Saikun; Wang, Shujun; Jing, Lingling; Yao, Dongrui

    2016-11-15

    Hydrolysates containing angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide were prepared from Enteromorpha clathrata protein using alcalase. The hydrolysates were fractionated into two molecular-weight ranges (below and above 10kDa) by ultrafiltration. The below-10kDa fraction showed higher ACE-inhibitory activity and was subsequently purified by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration chromatography. The structure of active peptide was identified as Pro-Ala-Phe-Gly by HPLC-Q-TOF-MS and its IC50 value was 35.9μM. The yield of this peptide from E. clathrata protein was 0.82%. Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the inhibitory kinetic mechanism of this peptide was non-competitive. Stability study revealed that the purified peptide showed resistance against gastrointestinal proteases. Thus, E. clathrata protein hydrolysate treated with alcalase is a beneficial ingredient of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals against hypertension and related diseases.

  17. Effect of combined ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment on enzymatic preparation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from native collagenous materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Ma, Liang; Cai, Luyun; Liu, Yi; Li, Jianrong

    2017-05-01

    The combined effect of ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment for the hydrolysis of native collagenous materials and release of ACE inhibitory peptides was investigated. The ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment of pig skin could accelerate the release of the ACE inhibitory peptides from the triple helix of collagen in early stages of hydrolysis. Furthermore, the pretreatment could also accelerate collapse of the triple helix and release more ACE inhibitory peptides during hydrolysis than collagen samples left untreated. Compared to untreated and alkali pretreated samples, the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could decrease the thermostability of pig skin significantly (P<0.05) because the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could weaken hydrogen bonds and break parts of covalent bonds in collagen, leading to damage of the triple helical structure in collagen. Therefore, the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could damage the triple helical structure of collagen in native collagenous materials and expose more inner sites for subsequent hydrolysis, and it could be a potential way to prepare ACE inhibitory peptides effectively from collagen-rich raw material.

  18. Human gut endogenous proteins as a potential source of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides.

    PubMed

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Hayes, Maria; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that endogenous bioactive proteins and peptides play a substantial role in the body's first line of immunological defence, immune-regulation and normal body functioning. Further, the peptides derived from the luminal digestion of proteins are also important for body function. For example, within the peptide database BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/en/biopep) 12 endogenous antimicrobial and 64 angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory peptides derived from human milk and plasma proteins are listed. The antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) lists over 111 human host-defence peptides. Several endogenous proteins are secreted in the gut and are subject to the same gastrointestinal digestion processes as food proteins derived from the diet. The human gut endogenous proteins (GEP) include mucins, serum albumin, digestive enzymes, hormones, and proteins from sloughed off epithelial cells and gut microbiota, and numerous other secreted proteins. To date, much work has been carried out regarding the health altering effects of food-derived bioactive peptides but little attention has been paid to the possibility that GEP may also be a source of bioactive peptides. In this review, we discuss the potential of GEP to constitute a gut cryptome from which bioactive peptides such as ACE-I inhibitory, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides may be derived.

  19. Purification and identification of endogenous antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory peptides from donkey milk by multidimensional liquid chromatography and nanoHPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    Donkey milk is a valuable product for the food industry due to its nutraceutical, nutritional, and functional properties. In this work, the endogenous peptides from donkey milk were investigated for their antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities, combining a two-dimensional peptide fractionation strategy with high-resolution mass spectrometry, bioinformatics analysis, and in vitro assays. After extraction, the endogenous peptides were fractionated twice, first by polymeric reversed phase and then by hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Fractions were screened for the investigated bioactivities and only the most active ones were finally analyzed by nanoRP-HPLC-MS/MS; this approach allowed to reduce the total number of possible bioactive sequences. Results were further mined by in silico analysis using PeptideRanker, BioPep, and PepBank, which provided a bioactivity score to the identified peptides and matched sequences to known bioactive peptides, in order to select candidates for chemical synthesis. Thus, five peptides were prepared and then compared to the natural occurring ones, checking their retention times and fragmentation patterns in donkey milk alone and in spiked donkey milk samples. Pure peptide standards were finally in vitro tested for the specific bioactivity. In this way, two novel endogenous antioxidant peptides, namely EWFTFLKEAGQGAKDMWR and GQGAKDMWR, and two ACE-inhibitory peptides, namely REWFTFLK and MPFLKSPIVPF, were successfully validated from donkey milk. Graphical Abstract Analytical workflow for purification and identification of bioactive peptides from donkey milk sample.

  20. A novel angiotensin-І converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide from gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate of silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein: Biochemical characterization and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiongying; Jia, Junqiang; Yan, Hui; Du, Jinjuan; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2015-06-01

    Silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein was hydrolyzed using gastrointestinal endopeptidases (pepsin, trypsin and α-chymotrypsin). Then, the hydrolysate was purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. A novel ACE inhibitory peptide, Ala-Ser-Leu, with the IC50 value of 102.15μM, was identified by IT-MS/MS. This is the first report of Ala-Ser-Leu from natural protein. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that the peptide is a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The molecular docking studies revealed that the ACE inhibition of Ala-Ser-Leu is mainly attributed to forming very strong hydrogen bonds with the S1 pocket (Ala354) and the S2 pocket (Gln281 and His353). The results indicate that silkworm pupa (B. mori) protein or its gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate could be used as a functional ingredient in auxiliary therapeutic foods against hypertension.

  1. Nine novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) muscle protein hydrolysates and antihypertensive effect of the potent active peptide in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Balti, Rafik; Bougatef, Ali; Sila, Assaâd; Guillochon, Didier; Dhulster, Pascal; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to identify novel ACE inhibitory peptides from the muscle of cuttlefish. Proteins were hydrolyzed and the hydrolysates were then subjected to various types of chromatography to isolate the active peptides. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides were isolated and their molecular masses and amino acid sequences were determined using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS, respectively. The structures of the most potent peptides were identified as Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro, Ala-Phe-Val-Gly-Tyr-Val-Leu-Pro and Glu-Lys-Ser-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Pro. The first peptide displayed the highest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 5.22μM. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro acts as a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE. Furthermore, antihypertensive effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) also revealed that oral administration of Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro can decrease systolic blood pressure significantly (p<0.01). These results suggest that the Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro would be a beneficial ingredient for nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals acting against hypertension and its related diseases.

  2. Pretreatment of defatted wheat germ proteins (by-products of flour mill industry) using ultrasonic horn and bath reactors: effect on structure and preparation of ACE-inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cunshan; Ma, Haile; Yu, Xiaojie; Liu, Bin; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Pan, Zhongli

    2013-11-01

    The ultrasonic horn and bath reactors were compared based on production of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from defatted wheat germ proteins (DWGP). The DWGP was sonicated before hydrolysis by Alcalase. Degree of hydrolysis, ACE-inhibitory activity, surface hydrophobicity, fluorescence intensity, free sulfhydryl (SH), and disulfide bond (SS) were determined. The highest ACE-inhibitory activity of DWGP hydrolysate was obtained at power intensity of 191.1 W/cm(2) for 10 min in the ultrasonic horn reactor. The fixed frequency of 33 kHz and the sweep frequency of 40±2 kHz resulted in the maximum ACE-inhibitory activity. The combined irradiation of dual fixed frequency (24/68 kHz) produced significant increase in ACE-inhibitory activity compared with single frequency (33 kHz). The ultrasonic probe resulted in significant higher ACE-inhibitory activity compared with ultrasonic bath operating at single or dual fixed and sweep frequencies. The changes in conformation of the DWGP due to sonication were confirmed by the changes in fluorescence intensity, surface hydrophobicity, SHf and SS contents and they were found in conformity with the ACE-inhibitory activity in case of the ultrasonic horn reactor but not in bath reactor.

  3. Bioactive peptides: are there more antihypertensive mechanisms beyond ACE inhibition?

    PubMed

    Marques, Claudia; Amorim, Maria Manuela; Pereira, Joana Odila; Pintado, Manuela Estevez; Moura, Daniel; Calhau, Conceicao; Pinheiro, Helder

    2012-01-01

    Diet has a high relevance in health. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and has an important impact on public health, and consequently on countries economy. Scientific research gathered strong evidence about the role of several dietary factors either in etiology or in treatment/prevention of these diseases. Peptides from different food matrices have been studied, and indicated as compounds with particular interest in the context of hypertension. The classical approach involves the identification of peptides with an in vitro ACE inhibitory activity and the assumption that the observed in vivo effects are due to this enzyme blockade. However, in some cases the potency of ACE blockade does not correlate with the antihypertensive activity in vivo. This paper reviews the current literature that identifies mechanisms of action, other than ACE inhibition, that might explain antihypertensive effects of biologically active peptides from different food sources.

  4. ACE Inhibitory and Antioxidant Activities of Collagen Hydrolysates from the Ribbon Jellyfish (Chrysaora sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Latiff, Aishah Abd; Gan, Chee-Yuen; Abedin, Md. Zainul; Alias, Abd Karim

    2014-01-01

    Summary Collagen isolated from the ribbon jellyfish (Chrysaora sp.) was hydrolysed using three different proteases (i.e. trypsin, alcalase and Protamex) to obtain bioactive peptides. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and antioxidant activities (i.e. ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity) of the peptides were measured and compared, and the effect of the duration of hydrolysis on the bioactivity (ACE inhibitory and antioxidant activities) of peptides was also evaluated. FRAP activity was the highest in Protamex-induced (25–27 mM) and trypsin-induced hydrolysates (24–26 mM) at 7 and 9 h, respectively. Conversely, hydrolysates produced by trypsin for 1 and 3 h showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activities (94 and 92%, respectively). Trypsin-induced hydrolysates (at 3 h) also showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (89%). The peptide sequences with the highest activities were identified using tandem mass spectrometry, and the results show that the hydrolysates had a high content of hydrophobic amino acids as well as unique amino acid sequences, which likely contribute to their biological activities. PMID:27904323

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of peptides derived from caprine kefir.

    PubMed

    Quirós, A; Hernández-Ledesma, B; Ramos, M; Amigo, L; Recio, I

    2005-10-01

    In this study, a potent angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity was found in a commercial kefir made from caprine milk. The low molecular mass peptides released from caseins during fermentation were mainly responsible for this activity. Sixteen peptides were identified by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Two of these peptides, with sequences PYVRYL and LVYPFTGPIPN, showed potent ACE-inhibitory properties. The impact of gastrointestinal digestion on ACE-inhibitory activity of kefir peptides was also evaluated. Some of these peptides were resistant to the incubation with pepsin followed by hydrolysis with Corolase PP. The ACE-inhibitory activity after simulated digestion was similar to or slightly lower than unhydrolyzed peptides, except for peptide beta-casein f(47-52) (DKIHPF), which exhibited an activity 8 times greater after hydrolysis.

  6. Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Phycobiliproteins of Dulse Palmaria palmata

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Tomoe; Miyabe, Yoshikatsu; Yasui, Hajime; Kinoshita, Yasunori; Kishimura, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    We examined the inhibitory activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) in protein hydrolysates from dulse, Palmaria palmata. The proteins extracted from dulse were mainly composed of phycoerythrin (PE) followed by phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC). The dulse proteins showed slight ACE inhibitory activity, whereas the inhibitory activity was extremely enhanced by thermolysin hydrolysis. The ACE inhibitory activity of hydrolysates was hardly affected by additional pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin treatments. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides (YRD, AGGEY, VYRT, VDHY, IKGHY, LKNPG, LDY, LRY, FEQDWAS) were isolated from the hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was demonstrated that the synthetic peptide LRY (IC50: 0.044 μmol) has remarkably high ACE inhibitory activity. Then, we investigated the structural properties of dulse phycobiliproteins to discuss the origin of dulse ACE inhibitory peptides. Each dulse phycobiliprotein possesses α-subunit (Mw: 17,477–17,638) and β-subunit (Mw: 17,455–18,407). The sequences of YRD, AGGEY, VYRT, VDHY, LKNPG and LDY were detected in the primary structure of PE α-subunit, and the LDY also exists in the APC α- and β-subunits. In addition, the LRY sequence was found in the β-subunits of PE, PC and APC. From these results, it was suggested that the dulse ACE inhibitory peptides were derived from phycobiliproteins, especially PE. To make sure the deduction, we carried out additional experiment by using recombinant PE. We expressed the recombinant α- and β-subunits of PE (rPEα and rPEβ, respectively), and then prepared their peptides by thermolysin hydrolysis. As a result, these peptides showed high ACE inhibitory activities (rPEα: 94.4%; rPEβ: 87.0%). Therefore, we concluded that the original proteins of dulse ACE inhibitory peptides were phycobiliproteins. PMID:26861357

  7. ACE-inhibitory activity of enzymatic protein hydrolysates from lupin and other legumes.

    PubMed

    Boschin, Giovanna; Scigliuolo, Graziana Maria; Resta, Donatella; Arnoldi, Anna

    2014-02-15

    The objective of this investigation was to compare the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates obtained by pepsin digestion of proteins of some legumes, such as chickpea, common bean, lentil, lupin, pea, and soybean, by using the same experimental procedure. The ACE-inhibitory activity was measured by using the tripeptide hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL), as model peptide, and HPLC-DAD, as analytical method. The peptide mixtures of all legumes were active, with soybean and lupin the most efficient, with IC50 values of 224 and 226 μg/ml, respectively. Considering the promising results obtained with lupin, and aiming to identify the protein(s) that release(s) the peptides responsible for the activity, the peptides obtained from the pepsin digestion of some industrial lupin protein isolates and purified protein fractions were tested. The most active mixture, showing an IC50 value of 138 μg/ml, was obtained hydrolysing a mixture of lupin α+β conglutin.

  8. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  9. Effect of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava on angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, W.A.J.P.; Ko, Seok-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity is the most common mechanism underlying the lowering of blood pressure. In the present study, five organic extracts of a marine brown seaweed Ecklonia cava were prepared by using ethanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform, hexane, and diethyl ether as solvents, which were then tested for their potential ACE inhibitory activities. Ethanol extract showed the strongest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.96 mg/ml. Five kinds of phlorotannins, phloroglucinol, triphlorethol-A, eckol, dieckol, and eckstolonol, were isolated from ethanol extract of E. cava, which exhibited potential ACE inhibition. Dieckol was the most potent ACE inhibitor and was found to be a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE according to Lineweaver-Burk plots. Dieckol had an inducible effect on the production of NO in EAhy926 cells without having cytotoxic effect. The results of this study indicate that E. cava could be a potential source of phlorotannins with ACE inhibitory activity for utilization in production of functional foods. PMID:21556221

  10. Effect of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava on angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, W A J P; Ko, Seok-Chun; Jeon, You-Jin

    2011-04-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity is the most common mechanism underlying the lowering of blood pressure. In the present study, five organic extracts of a marine brown seaweed Ecklonia cava were prepared by using ethanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform, hexane, and diethyl ether as solvents, which were then tested for their potential ACE inhibitory activities. Ethanol extract showed the strongest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC(50) value of 0.96 mg/ml. Five kinds of phlorotannins, phloroglucinol, triphlorethol-A, eckol, dieckol, and eckstolonol, were isolated from ethanol extract of E. cava, which exhibited potential ACE inhibition. Dieckol was the most potent ACE inhibitor and was found to be a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE according to Lineweaver-Burk plots. Dieckol had an inducible effect on the production of NO in EAhy926 cells without having cytotoxic effect. The results of this study indicate that E. cava could be a potential source of phlorotannins with ACE inhibitory activity for utilization in production of functional foods.

  11. Impact of in Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion and Transepithelial Transport on Antioxidant and ACE-Inhibitory Activities of Brewer's Spent Yeast Autolysate.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Elsa F; das Neves, José; Vitorino, Rui; Dias da Silva, Diana; Carmo, Helena; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2016-10-05

    Brewer's spent yeast (BSY) autolysates may have potential applications as food ingredients or nutraceuticals due to their antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities. The impact of simulated gastrointestinal (GI) digestion, the interaction with intracellular sources of oxidative stress, the intestinal cell permeability of BSY peptides, and the antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of BSY permeates were assayed. Gastrointestinal digestion of BSY autolysates enhanced antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities as measured in vitro. No cytotoxic effects were observed on Caco-2 cells after exposure to the digested BSY autolysates within a concentration range of 0.5 to 3.0 mg of peptides/mL. A protective role to induced oxidative stress was observed. The transepithelial transport assays indicate high apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) values for BSY peptides across Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell monolayer (14.5-26.1 × 10(-6) cm/s) and for Caco-2 cell monolayer model (12.4-20.8 × 10(-6) cm/s), while the antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities found in flux material from the basolateral side suggest transepithelial absorption of bioactive compounds.

  12. Novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from an edible mushroom, Pleurotus cystidiosus O.K. Miller identified by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been reported to reduce mortality in patients with hypertension. Compared to chemosynthetic drugs, ACE inhibitors derived from natural sources such as food proteins are believed to be safer for consumption and to have fewer adverse effects. Some edible mushrooms have been reported to significantly reduce blood pressure after oral administration. In addition, mushrooms are known to be rich in protein content. This makes them a potential source of ACE inhibitory peptides. Hence, the objective of the current study was to isolate and characterise ACE inhibitory peptides from an edible mushroom, Pleurotus cystidiosus. Methods ACE inhibitory proteins were isolated from P. cystidiosus based on the bioassay guided purification steps, i.e. ammonium sulphate precipitation, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Active fraction was then analysed by LC-MS/MS and potential ACE inhibitory peptides identified were chemically synthesized. Effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestions on the ACE inhibitory activity of the peptides and their inhibition patterns were evaluated. Results Two potential ACE inhibitory peptides, AHEPVK and GPSMR were identified from P. cystidiosus with molecular masses of 679.53 and 546.36 Da, respectively. Both peptides exhibited potentially high ACE inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 62.8 and 277.5 μM, respectively. SEC chromatograms and BIOPEP analysis of these peptides revealed that the peptide sequence of the hexapeptide, AHEPVK, was stable throughout gastrointestinal digestion. The pentapeptide, GPSMR, was hydrolysed after digestion and it was predicted to release a dipeptide ACE inhibitor, GP, from its precursor. The Lineweaver-Burk plot of AHEPVK showed that this potent and stable ACE inhibitor has a competitive inhibitory effect against ACE. Conclusion The present study indicated that the peptides from P. cystidiosus could be

  13. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Sadiq, Faizan A.; Fu, Li; Zhu, Hui; Zhong, Minghua; Sohail, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH) (45.87%) followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84%) and alcalase (30.55%). The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY) was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits. PMID:27271639

  14. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Sadiq, Faizan A; Fu, Li; Zhu, Hui; Zhong, Minghua; Sohail, Muhammad

    2016-06-03

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH) (45.87%) followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84%) and alcalase (30.55%). The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY) was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits.

  15. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptide derived from glycinin, the 11S globulin of soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Mallikarjun Gouda, K G; Gowda, Lalitha R; Rao, A G Appu; Prakash, V

    2006-06-28

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE), a dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase, catalyzes the conversion of Angiotensin I to the potent vasoconstrictor Angiotensin II and plays an important physiological role in regulating blood pressure. Inhibitors of angiotensin 1-converting enzyme derived from food proteins are utilized for pharmaceuticals and physiologically functional foods. ACE inhibitory properties of different enzymatic hydrolysates of glycinin, the major storage protein of soybean, have been demonstrated. The IC50 value for the different enzyme digests ranges from 4.5 to 35 microg of N2. The Protease P hydrolysate contained the most potent suite of ACE inhibitory peptides. The ACE inhibitory activity of the Protease P hydrolysate after fractionation by RP-HPLC and ion-pair chromatography was ascribed to a single peptide. The peptide was homogeneous as evidenced by MALDI-TOF and identified to be a pentapeptide. The sequence was Val-Leu-Ile-Val-Pro. This peptide was synthesized using solid-phase FMOC chemistry. The IC50 for ACE inhibition was 1.69 +/- 0.17 microM. The synthetic peptide was a potent competitive inhibitor of ACE with a Ki of 4.5 +/- 0.25 x 10(-6) M. This peptide was resistant to digestion by proteases of the gastrointestinal tract. The antihypertensive property of this peptide derived from glycinin might find importance in the development of therapeutic functional foods.

  16. Lactoferricin B-derived peptides with inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Musoles, Ricardo; López-Díez, José Javier; Torregrosa, Germán; Vallés, Salvador; Alborch, Enrique; Manzanares, Paloma; Salom, Juan B

    2010-10-01

    Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), a key peptidase in the endothelin (ET) system, cleaves inactive big ET-1 to produce active ET-1, which binds to ET(A) receptors to exert its vasoconstrictor and pressor effects. ECE inhibition could be beneficial in the treatment of hypertension. In this study, a set of eight lactoferricin B (LfcinB)-derived peptides, previously characterized in our laboratory as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides, was examined for their inhibitory effects on ECE. In vitro inhibitory effects on ECE activity were assessed using both the synthetic fluorogenic peptide substrate V (FPS V) and the natural substrate big ET-1. To study vasoactive effects, an ex vivo functional assay was developed using isolated rabbit carotid artery segments. With FPS V, only four LfcinB-derived peptides induced inhibition of ECE activity, whereas the eight peptides showed ECE inhibitory effects with big ET-1 as substrate. Regarding the ex vivo assays, six LfcinB-derived peptides showed inhibition of big ET-1-induced, ECE-dependent vasoconstriction. A positive correlation between the inhibitory effects of LfcinB-derived peptides on ECE activity when using big ET-1 and the inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction was shown. ECE-independent vasoconstriction induced by ET-1 was not affected, thus discarding effects of LfcinB-derived peptides on ET(A) receptors or intracellular signal transduction mechanisms. In conclusion, a combined in vitro and ex vivo method to assess the effects of potentially antihypertensive peptides on the ET system has been developed and applied to show the inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction of six LfcinB-derived peptides, five of which were dual vasopeptidase (ACE/ECE) inhibitors.

  17. Megastigmane glycosides from leaves of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver with ACE inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian-Kun; Ding, Li-Qin; Shi, Xu-Liu; Donkor, Paul Owusu; Chen, Li-Xia; Qiu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Four new megastigmane glycosides, eucomegastigsides A-D (2, 3, 5 and 7), together with three known megastigmane glycosides, (6R, 7E, 9R)-9-hydroxy-4, 7-megastigmadien-3-one-9-O-[α-l-arabinopyranosyl-(l→6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (1), foliasalacioside B1 (4) and eleganoside A (6), were isolated from the leaves of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver. Their anti-hypertensive effect was investigated in vitro based on the inhibition of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) using HPLC. The results showed that the isolates (2, 3, 4, 5, 7) had moderate inhibitory effects on ACE in vitro compared with captopril.

  18. Effect of Jatropha curcas Peptide Fractions on the Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Campos, Maira R.; Peralta-González, Fanny; Castellanos-Ruelas, Arturo; Chel-Guerrero, Luis A.; Betancur-Ancona, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common worldwide diseases in humans. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and hypertension. An evaluation was done on the effect of Alcalase hydrolysis of defatted Jatropha curcas kernel meal on ACE inhibitory activity in the resulting hydrolysate and its purified fractions. Alcalase exhibited broad specificity and produced a protein hydrolysate with a 21.35% degree of hydrolysis and 34.87% ACE inhibition. Ultrafiltration of the hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with increased biological activity (24.46–61.41%). Hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to the peptides' inhibitory potency. The 5–10 and <1 kDa fractions were selected for further fractionation by gel filtration chromatography. ACE inhibitory activity (%) ranged from 22.66 to 45.96% with the 5–10 kDa ultrafiltered fraction and from 36.91 to 55.83% with the <1 kDa ultrafiltered fraction. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was observed in F2 (IC50 = 6.7 μg/mL) from the 5–10 kDa fraction and F1 (IC50 = 4.78 μg/mL) from the <1 kDa fraction. ACE inhibitory fractions from Jatropha kernel have potential applications in alternative hypertension therapies, adding a new application for the Jatropha plant protein fraction and improving the financial viability and sustainability of a Jatropha-based biodiesel industry. PMID:24224169

  19. Optimization of Hydrolysis Conditions for the Production of Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme-Inhibitory Peptides and Isolation of a Novel Peptide from Lizard Fish (Saurida elongata) Muscle Protein Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shanguang; Sun, Jianhua; Tong, Zhangfa; Lan, Xiongdiao; Zhao, Zhongxing; Liao, Dankui

    2012-01-01

    Lizard fish (Saurida elongata) muscle protein was hydrolyzed using neutral protease to produce protein hydrolysate (LFPH), and the hydrolysis conditions were investigated using response-surface methodology. The optimum conditions for producing peptides with the highest angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity were the following: enzyme-to-substrate ratio of 10,000 U/g, temperature of 48 °C, pH 7.0, and hydrolysis time of 2 h. Under these conditions, the ACE-inhibitory activity of LFPH and the degree of hydrolysis were 84% and 24%, respectively. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide was isolated from LFPH using ultrafiltration, Sephadex G-15, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the ACE-inhibitory peptide was identified as Ser-Pro-Arg-Cys-Arg (SPRCR), and its IC50 was 41 ± 1 µM. PMID:22822357

  20. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven- and freeze-dried protein hydrolysate from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Elavarasan, K; Shamasundar, B A; Badii, Faraha; Howell, Nazlin

    2016-09-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven-dried (OD-FPH) and freeze-dried (FD-FPH) protein hydrolysates derived from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala) muscle, using papain, were investigated. Amino acid profiles indicated a higher proportion of hydrophobic residues in OD-FPH and hydrophilic residues in FD-FPH samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed random coil structure in OD-FPH and β-sheet in FD-FPH samples. The approximate molecular weight of peptides in OD-FPH and FD-FPH was in the range of 7030-339Da. The IC50 values for ACE inhibition by OD-FPH and FD-FPH samples were found to be 1.15 and 1.53mg of proteinml(-1), respectively. The ACE-inhibitory activity of OD-FPH was more stable (during sequential digestion, using pepsin and pancreatin) than that of FD-FPH sample. The study suggested that the ACE inhibitory activity of protein hydrolysate was not affected by oven-drying.

  1. Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms for Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Noorlidah; Ismail, Siti Marjiana; Aminudin, Norhaniza; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Lau, Beng Fye

    2012-01-01

    Considering the importance of diet in prevention of oxidative stress-related diseases including hypertension, this study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms extracted by boiling in water for 30 min. Antioxidant capacity was measured using the following assays: DPPH free radical scavenging activity, β-carotene bleaching, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, reducing power ability, and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC). Antioxidant potential of each mushroom species was calculated based on the average percentages relative to quercetin and summarized as Antioxidant Index (AI). Ganoderma lucidum (30.1%), Schizophyllum commune (27.6%), and Hericium erinaceus (17.7%) showed relatively high AI. Total phenolics in these mushrooms varied between 6.19 to 63.51 mg GAE/g extract. In the ACE inhibitory assay, G. lucidum was shown to be the most potent species (IC50 = 50 μg/mL). Based on our findings, culinary-medicinal mushrooms can be considered as potential source of dietary antioxidant and ACE inhibitory agents. PMID:21716693

  2. Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms for Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Activities.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Noorlidah; Ismail, Siti Marjiana; Aminudin, Norhaniza; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Lau, Beng Fye

    2012-01-01

    Considering the importance of diet in prevention of oxidative stress-related diseases including hypertension, this study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms extracted by boiling in water for 30 min. Antioxidant capacity was measured using the following assays: DPPH free radical scavenging activity, β-carotene bleaching, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, reducing power ability, and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC). Antioxidant potential of each mushroom species was calculated based on the average percentages relative to quercetin and summarized as Antioxidant Index (AI). Ganoderma lucidum (30.1%), Schizophyllum commune (27.6%), and Hericium erinaceus (17.7%) showed relatively high AI. Total phenolics in these mushrooms varied between 6.19 to 63.51 mg GAE/g extract. In the ACE inhibitory assay, G. lucidum was shown to be the most potent species (IC(50) = 50 μg/mL). Based on our findings, culinary-medicinal mushrooms can be considered as potential source of dietary antioxidant and ACE inhibitory agents.

  3. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides of Chia (Salvia hispanica) Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Segura Campos, Maira Rubi; Peralta González, Fanny; Chel Guerrero, Luis; Betancur Ancona, David

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitors can have undesirable side effects, while natural inhibitors have no side effects and are potential nutraceuticals. A protein-rich fraction from chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed was hydrolyzed with an Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequential system and the hydrolysate ultrafiltered through four molecular weight cut-off membranes (1 kDa, 3 kDa, 5 kDa, and 10 kDa). ACE-I inhibitory activity was quantified in the hydrolysate and ultrafiltered fractions. The hydrolysate was extensive (DH = 51.64%) and had 58.46% ACE-inhibitory activity. Inhibition ranged from 53.84% to 69.31% in the five ultrafiltered fractions and was highest in the <1 kDa fraction (69.31%). This fraction's amino acid composition was identified and then it was purified by gel filtration chromatography and ACE-I inhibition measured in the purified fractions. Amino acid composition suggested that hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to chia peptide ACE-I inhibitory strength, probably by blocking angiotensin II production. Inhibitory activity ranged from 48.41% to 62.58% in the purified fractions, but fraction F1 (1.5-2.5 kDa) exhibited the highest inhibition (IC50 = 3.97 μg/mL; 427-455 mL elution volume). The results point out the possibility of obtaining bioactive peptides from chia proteins by means of a controlled protein hydrolysis using Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequentional system.

  4. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides of Chia (Salvia hispanica) Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Segura Campos, Maira Rubi; Peralta González, Fanny; Chel Guerrero, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitors can have undesirable side effects, while natural inhibitors have no side effects and are potential nutraceuticals. A protein-rich fraction from chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed was hydrolyzed with an Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequential system and the hydrolysate ultrafiltered through four molecular weight cut-off membranes (1 kDa, 3 kDa, 5 kDa, and 10 kDa). ACE-I inhibitory activity was quantified in the hydrolysate and ultrafiltered fractions. The hydrolysate was extensive (DH = 51.64%) and had 58.46% ACE-inhibitory activity. Inhibition ranged from 53.84% to 69.31% in the five ultrafiltered fractions and was highest in the <1 kDa fraction (69.31%). This fraction's amino acid composition was identified and then it was purified by gel filtration chromatography and ACE-I inhibition measured in the purified fractions. Amino acid composition suggested that hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to chia peptide ACE-I inhibitory strength, probably by blocking angiotensin II production. Inhibitory activity ranged from 48.41% to 62.58% in the purified fractions, but fraction F1 (1.5–2.5 kDa) exhibited the highest inhibition (IC50 = 3.97 μg/mL; 427–455 mL elution volume). The results point out the possibility of obtaining bioactive peptides from chia proteins by means of a controlled protein hydrolysis using Alcalase-Flavourzyme sequentional system. PMID:26904588

  5. Occurrence and fate of ACE-inhibitor peptides in cheeses and in their digestates following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, Milda; Cattaneo, Stefano; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of the casein-derived angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACE-I) peptides VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP and HLPLP were investigated in 12 different cheese samples by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The total amount of ACE-I peptides was in the range 0.87-331mgkg(-1). VPP and IPP largely prevailed in almost all cheeses. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion of Cheddar, Gorgonzola, Maasdam and Grana Padano cheeses, type and amount of ACE-I peptides changed, and only VPP, IPP, HLPLP and LHLPLP were detected in the intestinal digestates. The results evidenced that the degree of proteolysis itself cannot be regarded as a promoting or hindering factor for ACE-I peptide release during cheese digestion. Moreover, the data indicated that the ACE-I potential of cheeses cannot be inferred based on the type and amount of ACE-I peptides present in undigested samples.

  6. Accumulation and identification of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Zou, Yu; Yu, Nanjing; Gu, Zhenxin

    2011-04-27

    The incubation conditions of wheat germ for angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity (ACEI) elevation and peptide accumulation were investigated, and five ACE inhibitory peptides were obtained. The effect of individual factors such as incubation time, temperature, initial pH, and liquid to solid ratio on ACEI and peptide concentration of incubation medium was evaluated, respectively. The combinations of four factors were further optimized using a Box-Behnken design. Under the best incubation condition (pH 4.4 with a liquid to solid ratio 8.14 mL/g at temperature 47 °C, for 7 h), maximum ACEI (92.16%) and peptide concentration (88.12 mg/g) were obtained, which were 6.2- and 2.4-fold, respectively, as compared to the unincubated wheat germ. After they were purified, five ACE inhibitory peptides, VEV, W, NPPSV, QV, and AMY, were identified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The IC(50) were 115.20, 94.87, 40.56, 26.82, and 5.86 μM, respectively.

  7. γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Production and Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Containing Sea Tangle by the Co-Culture of Lactobacillus brevis with Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Nam Yeun; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Ji, Geun Eog

    2015-08-01

    To enhance the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content, the optimized fermentation of soybean with added sea tangle extract was evaluated at 30°C and pH 5.0. The medium was first inoculated with Aspergillus oryzae strain FMB S46471 and fermented for 3 days, followed by the subsequent inoculation with Lactobacillus brevis GABA 100. After fermentation for 7 days, the fermented soybean showed approximately 1.9 g/kg GABA and exhibited higher ACE inhibitory activity than the traditional soybean product. Furthermore, several peptides in the fraction containing the highest ACE inhibitory activity were identified. The novel fermented soybean enriched with GABA and ACE inhibitory components has great pharmaceutical and functional food values.

  8. Identification of novel dipeptidyl peptidase-IV and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from meat proteins using in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Tomas; O'Connor, Paula; Hayes, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I, EC 3.4.15.1), renin (EC 3.4.23.15), and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5) play key roles in the control of hypertension and the development of type-2 diabetes and other diseases associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to utilize known in silico methodologies, peptide databases and software including ProtParam (http://web.expasy.org/protparam/), Basic Local Alignment Tool (BLAST), ExPASy PeptideCutter (http://web.expasy.org/peptide_cutter/) and BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/pl/biopep) to assess the release of potentially bioactive DPP-IV, renin and ACE-I inhibitory peptides from bovine and porcine meat proteins including hemoglobin, collagen and serum albumin. These proteins were chosen as they are found commonly in meat by-products such as bone, blood and low-value meat cuts. In addition, the bioactivities of identified peptides were confirmed using chemical synthesis and in vitro bioassays. The concentration of peptide required to inhibit the activity of ACE-I and DPP-IV by 50% was determined for selected, active peptides. Novel ACE-I and DPP-IV inhibitory peptides were identified in this study using both in silico analysis and a literature search to streamline enzyme selection for peptide production. These novel peptides included the ACE-I inhibitory tri-peptide Ile-Ile-Tyr and the DPP-IV inhibitory tri-peptide Pro-Pro-Leu corresponding to sequences f (182-184) and f (326-328) of both porcine and bovine serum albumin which can be released following hydrolysis with the enzymes papain and pepsin, respectively. This work demonstrates that meat proteins are a suitable resource for the generation of bioactive peptides and further demonstrates the usefulness of in silico methodologies to streamline identification and generation of bioactive peptides.

  9. ACE2 and vasoactive peptides: novel players in cardiovascular/renal remodeling and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Torres, Evelyn; Oyarzún, Alejandra; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Azocar, Andrés; Castro, Pablo F; Jalil, Jorge E; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key component of cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis due to its influence on the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, vascular tone and cardiovascular remodeling. Deregulation of this system contributes significantly to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Numerous studies have generated new perspectives about a noncanonical and protective RAS pathway that counteracts the proliferative and hypertensive effects of the classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis. The key components of this pathway are ACE2 and its products, Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9). These two vasoactive peptides act through the Mas receptor (MasR) and AT2R, respectively. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR and ACE2/Ang-(1-9)/AT2R axes have opposite effects to those of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis, such as decreased proliferation and cardiovascular remodeling, increased production of nitric oxide and vasodilation. A novel peptide from the noncanonical pathway, alamandine, was recently identified in rats, mice and humans. This heptapeptide is generated by catalytic action of ACE2 on Ang A or through a decarboxylation reaction on Ang-(1-7). Alamandine produces the same effects as Ang-(1-7), such as vasodilation and prevention of fibrosis, by interacting with Mas-related GPCR, member D (MrgD). In this article, we review the key roles of ACE2 and the vasoactive peptides Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and alamandine as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II axis as well as the biological properties that allow them to regulate blood pressure and cardiovascular and renal remodeling.

  10. Ex vivo digestion of carp muscle tissue--ACE inhibitory and antioxidant activities of the obtained hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Borawska, J; Darewicz, M; Vegarud, G E; Iwaniak, A; Minkiewicz, P

    2015-01-01

    In the digestive tract of humans, bioactive peptides, i.e. protein fragments impacting the physiological activity of the body, may be released during the digestion of food proteins, including those of fish. The aim of the study was to establish the method of human ex vivo digestion of carp muscle tissue and evaluate the angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities of hydrolysates obtained after digestion. It was found that the hydrolysates of carp muscle tissue obtained with the three-stage method of simulated ex vivo digestion showed ACE inhibitory as well as antioxidative activities. It was demonstrated that the degree of hydrolysis depended on the duration of individual stages and the degree of comminution of the examined material. Although the applied gastric juices initiated the process of hydrolysis of carp muscle tissue, the duodenal juices caused a rapid increase in the amount of hydrolysed polypeptide bonds. The antihypertensive and antioxidative activities of the hydrolysates of carp muscle tissue increased together with progressive protein degradation. However, the high degree of protein hydrolysis does not favour an increase in the activity of free radical scavenging. The presented results are an example of the first preliminary screening of the potential health-promoting biological activity of carp muscle tissue in an ex vivo study.

  11. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  12. Bioactive peptides from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with angiotensin converting enzyme and dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory, and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Neves, Adriana C; Harnedy, Pádraigín A; O'Keeffe, Martina B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    The pH shift method was utilised for the recovery of proteins from salmon trimmings (ST), yielding 93% (w/w) protein. ST protein (STP) hydrolysates were generated with different enzyme preparations. STP incubated with Corolase PP for 1h (STP-C1) had the most potent angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) activities. Analysis of fractions of STP-C1 using UPLC-MS/MS identified sixteen peptides/amino acids. Tyr-Pro had the highest ACE inhibitory activity (ACE IC50=5.21±0.94μM). The highest DPP-IV inhibitory activity was found with the amino acid Tyr (DPP-IV IC50=75.15±0.84μM). Val-Pro had the highest ORAC activity (19.45±2.15μmol of TEg(-1)). To our knowledge, the peptides Gly-Pro-Ala-Val, Val-Cys, and Phe-Phe have not been previously identified to have the activities tested in this study. These results indicate that STP hydrolysates are potential sources of bioactive peptides.

  13. Does the cis/trans configuration of peptide bonds in bioactive tripeptides play a role in ACE-1 enzyme inhibition?

    PubMed Central

    Siltari, Aino; Viitanen, Riikka; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Valjakka, Jarkko

    2014-01-01

    Background The milk casein-derived bioactive tripeptides isoleucine-proline-proline (IPP) and valine-proline-proline (VPP) have been shown to prevent development of hypertension in animal models and to lower blood pressure in moderately hypertensive subjects in most but not all clinical trials. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme 1 (ACE-1) has been suggested as the explanation for these antihypertensive and beneficial vascular effects. Previously, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) have not been used to test ACE-1 inhibiting properties of casein derived tripeptides in vasculature. Purpose We focused on the cis/trans configurations of the peptide bonds in proline-containing tripeptides in order to discover whether the different structural properties of these peptides influence their activity in ACE-1 inhibition. We hypothesized that the configuration of proline-containing peptides plays a significant role in enzyme inhibition. Methods AutoDock 4.2 docking software was used to predict suitable peptide bond configurations of the tripeptides. Besides modeling studies, we completed ACE-1 activity measurements in vitro using HUVEC cultures. Results In HUVEC cells, both IPP and VPP inhibited ACE-1. Based on molecular docking studies, we propose that in ACE-1 inhibition IPP and VPP share a similar cis configuration between the first aliphatic (isoleucine or valine) and the second (proline) amino acid residues and more different configurations between two proline residues. In vivo experiments are needed to validate the significance of the present findings. PMID:24596454

  14. Cleavage of arginyl-arginine and lysyl-arginine from the C-terminus of pro-hormone peptides by human germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and the C-domain of human somatic ACE.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R E; Williams, T A; Sajid, M; Corvol, P; Coates, D

    1997-01-01

    Mammalian germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) is a single-domain dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase found exclusively in male germ cells, which has almost identical sequence and enzymic properties with the C-domain of the two-domain somatic ACE. Mutant mice that do not express gACE are infertile, suggesting a role for the enzyme in the processing of undefined peptides involved in fertilization. A number of spermatid peptides [e.g. cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin] are processed from pro-hormones by endo- and exo-proteolytic cleavages which might generate substrates for gACE. We have shown that peptide hormone intermediates with Lys/Arg-Arg at the C-terminus are high-affinity substrates for human gACE. gACE from human sperm cleaved Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of the CCK5-GRR (GWMDFGRR), a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of a CCK-gastrin prohormone intermediate. Hydrolysis of CCK5-GRR by recombinant human C-domain ACE was Cl- dependent, with maximal activity achieved in 5-10 mM NaCl at pH 6.4. C-Domain ACE cleaved Lys/Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of dynorphin-(1-7), a pro-TRH peptide KRQHPGKR, and two insect peptides FSPRLGKR and FSPRLGRR. C-Domain ACE displayed high affinity towards all these substrates with Vmax/Km values between 14 and 113 times greater than the Vmax/Km for the conversion of the best known ACE substrate, angiotensin I, into angiotensin II. In conclusion, we have identified a new class of substrates for human gACE, and we suggest that gACE might be an alternative to carboxypeptidase E for the trimming of basic dipeptides from the C-terminus of intermediates generated from pro-hormones by subtilisin-like convertases in human male germ cells. PMID:9371719

  15. Effect of Flavourzyme(®) on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Formed in Skim Milk and Whey Protein Concentrate during Fermentation by Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Ahtesh, Fatah; Stojanovska, Lily; Shah, Nagendra; Mishra, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACE-I) activity as affected by Lactobacillus helveticus strains (881315, 881188, 880474, and 880953), and supplementation with a proteolytic enzyme was studied. Reconstituted skim milk (12% RSM) or whey protein concentrate (4% WPC), with and without Flavourzyme(®) (0.14% w/w), were fermented with 4 different L. helveticus strains at 37 °C for 0, 4, 8, and 12 h. Proteolytic and in vitro ACE-I activities, and growth were significantly affected (P < 0.05) by strains, media, and with enzyme supplementation. RSM supported higher growth and produced higher proteolysis and ACE-I compared to WPC without enzyme supplementation. The strains L. helveticus 881315 and 881188 were able to increase ACE-I to >80% after 8 h of fermentation when combined with Flavourzyme(®) in RSM compared to the same strains without enzyme supplementation. Supplementation of media by Flavourzyme(®) was beneficial in increasing ACE-I peptides in both media. The best media to release more ACE-I peptides was RSM with enzyme supplementation. The L. helveticus 881315 outperformed all strains as indicated by highest proteolytic and ACE-I activities.

  16. Antihypertensive peptides from animal products, marine organisms, and plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yun; Hur, Sun Jun

    2017-08-01

    Bioactive peptides from food proteins exert beneficial effects on human health, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and antihypertensive activity. Several studies have reported that ACE-inhibitory peptides can come from animal products, marine organisms, and plants-derived by hydrolyzing enzymes such as pepsin, chymotrypsin, and trypsin-and microbial enzymes such as alcalase, thermolysin, flavourzyme, and proteinase K. Different ACE-inhibitory effects are closely related with different peptide sequences and molecular weights. Sequences of ACE-inhibitory peptides are composed of hydrophobic (proline) and aliphatic amino acids (isoleucine and leucine) at the N-terminus. As result of this review, we assume that low molecular weight peptides have a greater ACE inhibition because lower molecular weight peptides have a higher absorbency in the body. Therefore, the ACE-inhibitory effect is closely related with the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis and the composition of the peptide sequence.

  17. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides generated from in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of pork meat.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Elizabeth; Sentandreu, Miguel Angel; Arihara, Keizo; Toldrá, Fidel

    2010-03-10

    The main purpose of this work was to study the generation of Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACEI) peptides after gastrointestinal digestion of pork meat by the action of pepsin and pancreatin at simulated gut conditions. The hydrolysate was further subjected to reverse phase chromatography in order to separate the fractions with ACEI activity. Using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, 12 peptides were identified in these fractions. It is worth highlighting the novel peptides ER, KLP, and RPR with IC(50) values of 667 microM, 500 microM, and 382 microM, respectively. Results obtained by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry were complemented by a second approach consisting of the analysis of the hydrolysate directly by nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS followed by a study of the obtained sequences and comparison with known ACEI peptide sequences. By using these two approaches, a total of 22 peptides were selected for its synthesis and further in vitro assay of ACEI activity. The strongest ACE inhibition was observed for peptide KAPVA (IC(50) = 46.56 microM) followed by the sequence PTPVP (IC(50) = 256.41 microM). Sequence similarity searches revealed that these two peptides derive from muscle titin, constituting the first identified ACEI peptides coming from this protein. This is also the first time that ACEI sequences MYPGIA and VIPEL have been reported. Other identified and synthesized sequences showed less ACEI activity. The obtained results evidence the potential of pork meat proteins as a source of antihypertensive peptides after gastrointestinal digestion.

  18. Quantification of ACE inhibiting peptides in human plasma using high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Platerink, Chris J; Janssen, Hans-Gerd M; Horsten, Roos; Haverkamp, Johan

    2006-01-02

    An HPLC-MRM-MS method was developed for the quantification of 17 small ACE inhibiting (ACEI) peptides in plasma samples collected from human volunteers after the consumption of a peptide-enriched drink. The assay shows the high selectivity and sensitivity necessary to monitor small changes in the levels of the ACEI peptides after consumption of drinks developed to effect lowering of the blood pressure. Four different sample preparation methods were tested and evaluated. The final sample preparation method selected is simple and effective and consists mainly of the removal of proteins by acidification and heating, followed by a large volume injection. Additional sample preparation steps such as solid phase extraction and liquid/liquid partitioning were studied. Although they resulted in cleaner extracts, losses of specific peptides such as SAP were frequently seen. The isotope labeled form of one of the peptides to be quantified, [U(13)C]IPP, was used as an internal standard. The limit of detection of the assay is below 0.01 ng ml(-1). The limit of quantification is between 0.05 and 0.2 ng ml(-1), which is approximately 10% of the expected peptide concentration in plasma based on a normal diet. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations for all peptides have shown to be below 25% and the method has an accuracy of better than 75%. The long-term stability is good. At least 200 samples could be analysed before the system had to be cleaned. The assay has been successfully applied to blood samples collected from volunteers during a human trial.

  19. Investigations into inhibitor type and mode, simulated gastrointestinal digestion, and cell transport of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme-inhibitory peptides in Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) fillet hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Cinq-Mars, Crystal D; Hu, Chun; Kitts, David D; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2008-01-23

    Fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) produced by incubation of Pacific hake fillet with 3.00% Protamex at pH 6.5 and 40 degrees C for 125 min demonstrated in vitro ACE-inhibitory activity (IC50 = 165 microg/mL), which was enhanced by ultrafiltration through a 10 kDa molecular weight cutoff membrane (IC50 = 44 microg/mL). However, after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, FPH and ultrafiltrate had similar ACE-inhibitory activity (IC 50 = 90 microg/mL), indicating that FPH peptides act as "pro-drug type" inhibitors and that enrichment by ultrafiltration may be unnecessary. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry confirmed that the molecular weights of major peaks were <1 kDa regardless of ultrafiltration. ACE-inhibitory activities of digested hydrolysates were not significantly affected by preincubation with ACE ( P > 0.05) and exhibited a competitive inhibitory mode. A permeability assay using fully differentiated colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells showed an apical to basolateral transport of peptides that ranged from approximately 2 to 20% after 2 h at 37 degrees C. Pacific hake fillet hydrolysates are a potentially bioavailable source of ACE-inhibitory peptides awaiting further in vivo study.

  20. LC-MS/MS quantification of bioactive angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides in rye malt sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Stromeck, Achim; Loponen, Jussi; Lopes-Lutz, Daise; Schieber, Andreas; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-11-23

    This study quantified antiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides in rye malt sourdoughs supplemented with gluten proteins and fermented with six strains of Lactobacillus spp. Bioinformatic analysis of prolamins from barley, rye, and wheat demonstrated that the ACE inhibitory peptides LQP, LLP, VPP, and IPP are frequently encrypted in their primary sequence. These tripeptides were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Tripeptide levels in sourdoughs were generally higher as compared to the chemically acidified controls. Sourdoughs fermented with different strains showed different concentrations of LQP and LLP. These differences corresponded to strain-specific differences in PepO and PepN activities. The highest levels of peptides VPP, IPP, LQP, and LLP, 0.23, 0.71, 1.09, and 0.09 mmol (kg DM)(-1), respectively, were observed in rye malt: gluten sourdoughs fermented with Lactobacillus reuteri TMW 1.106 and added protease. These concentrations were 6-7 times higher as compared to sourdough without fungal protease and exceed the IC(50) by 100-1000-fold.

  1. Identification of native angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory peptides in commercial soybean based infant formulas using HPLC-Q-ToF-MS.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Patrycja; Concepción García, M; Luisa Marina, M

    2014-08-15

    This work evaluates, the presence of native antihypertensive peptides in five soybean-based infant formulas (SBIFs). SBIFs peptide extracts (<10 kDa) and their sub-fractions (5-10 kDa, 3-5 kDa, and <3 kDa) from a variety of samples were obtained by ultrafiltration and ACE inhibitory activity was determined. The highest activities were observed in the smaller (<5 kDa) peptide fractions. A set of peptides present in various SBIFs were studied, and identified using HPLC-Q-ToF-MS. Despite ACE inhibitory activity decreasing after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, it still remained at a high value (IC50 values of 18.2±0.1 and 4.9±0.1 μg/mL). Peptides resisting the action of gastrointestinal enzymes were identified and compared to previously identified peptides, highlighting the presence of peptide RPSYT. This peptide was synthesised, its antihypertensive and antioxidant activity were evaluated, and its resistance to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion and to high processing temperatures were studied.

  2. Osteoclast Inhibitory Peptide-1 Therapy for Paget’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    1 (SQSTM1/p62) gene have been widely identified in PDB patients. We previously detected expression of measles virus nucleocapsid (MVNP) transcripts...high bone turnover in PDB. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Paget’s Disease, measles virus nucleocapsid, sequestosome1 , osteoclast, osteoclast inhibitory peptide...detected expression of measles virus nucleocapsid (MVNP) transcripts in osteoclasts from patients with PDB. Also, we have shown that MVNP gene

  3. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies of interaction between two different angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from gluten hydrolysate and human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Assaran Darban, Reza; Shareghi, Behzad; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2016-12-26

    The present study was carried out to characterize Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides which are released from the trypsin hydrolysate of wheat gluten protein. The binding of two inhibitory peptide (P4 and P6) to human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions has been investigated by multi-spectroscopic in combination with molecular modeling techniques. Time-resolved and quenching fluorescence spectroscopies results revealed that the quenching of HSA fluorescence by P4 and P6 in the binary and ternary systems caused HSA-peptides complexes formation. The results indicated that both peptides quenched the fluorescence intensity of HSA through a static mechanism. The binding affinities and number of binding sites were obtained for the HSA-peptides complexes. The circular dichroism (CD) data revealed that the presence of both peptides increased the α-helix content of HSA and induced the remarkable folding of the polypeptide of the protein. Therefore, the CD data determined that the protein structure has been stabilized in the percent of ACE inhibitory peptides in binary and ternary systems. The binding distances between HSA and both peptides were estimated by the Forster theory, and it was revealed that nonradiative energy transfer from HSA to peptides occurred with a high probability. ITC experiments reveal that, in the absence and presence of P6, the dominant forces are electrostatic in binary and ternary systems. Furthermore, molecular modeling studies confirmed the experimental results. Molecular modeling investigation suggested that P4 bound to the site IA and IIA of HSA in binary and ternary systems, respectively. This study on the interaction of peptides with HSA should prove helpful for realizing the distribution and transportation of food compliments and drugs in vivo, elucidating the action mechanism and dynamics of food compliments and drugs at the molecular level. It should moreover be of great use for understanding the

  4. The Evaluation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase (DPP)-IV, α-Glucosidase and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activities of Whey Proteins Hydrolyzed with Serine Protease Isolated from Asian Pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia).

    PubMed

    Konrad, Babij; Anna, Dąbrowska; Marek, Szołtysik; Marta, Pokora; Aleksandra, Zambrowicz; Józefa, Chrzanowska

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, whey protein concentrate (WPC-80) and β-lactoglobulin were hydrolyzed with a noncommercial serine protease isolated from Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia). Hydrolysates were further fractionated by ultrafiltration using membranes with cut-offs equal 3 and 10 kDa. Peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 and 3-10 kDa were further subjected to the RP-HPLC. Separated preparations were investigated for their potential as the natural inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-IV), α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). WPC-80 hydrolysate showed higher inhibitory activities against the three tested enzymes than β-lactoglobulin hydrolysate. Especially high biological activities were exhibited by peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 kDa, with ACE IC50 <0.64 mg/mL and DPP-IV IC50 <0.55 mg/mL. This study suggests that peptides generated from whey proteins may support postprandial glycemia regulation and blood pressure maintenance, and could be used as functional food ingredients in the diet of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  5. High throughput and rapid screening of marine protein hydrolysates enriched in peptides with angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    He, Hai-Lun; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Wu, Hao; Sun, Cai-Yun; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Zhou, Bai-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    Twelve kinds of marine protein materials, including fish, shrimp, seashell, algae and seafood wastes were selected for the hydrolysis using four different proteases. The IC(50) values for angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of 48 hydrolysates were rapidly determined by capillary electrophoresis (CE). The values ranged from 0.17 to 501.7mg/ml, and were affected by both the marine protein resources and the selected proteases. Hydrolysates of the lowest IC(50) values were from shrimp (Acetes chinensis), shark meat, mackerel bone, Polysiphonia urceolata and Spirulina platensis, indicating these five kinds of marine food proteins contained beneficial materials for the production of ACE inhibitory peptides by proteolysis. The hydrolysates obtained using proteases Protamex and SM98011 had lower IC(50) values, showing these two proteases were superior to others. The CE method achieved the same sensitivity as the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. However, the CE method was faster and, as a result, more economical. Therefore, CE had potential for rapid screening of marine protein hydrolysates enriched in ACE inhibitory peptides.

  6. Enhancement of ACE and prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitory potency of protein hydrolysates from sardine and tuna by-products by simulated gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Batista, Irineu; Ramos, Cristina; Montero, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    This work was focused on the study of the bioactive potential of three fish protein hydrolysates, one of them prepared from industrial sardine by-products (head and viscera) and the others from tuna by-products (head, and muscle and viscera). These protein hydrolysates exhibited moderate ability to inhibit Angiotensin Converting Enzyme or ACE (IC50 between 0.24-1.16 mg dry weight per ml) and prolyl oligopeptidase or PO (IC50 between 3.30-9.57 mg ml(-1)), those obtained from tuna by-products being the most effective. Overall, ACE- and PO-inhibiting activities were enhanced by sequential nanofiltration through 3 and 1 kDa MWCO membranes (IC50 between 0.02-0.16 mg ml(-1) (ACE) and 1.10-4.21 mg ml(-1) (PO)). The inhibitory properties of the hydrolysates were greatly improved by in vitro gastric digestion, and were barely affected by further intestinal digestion. The digested tuna hydrolysates, mainly that from heads, proved to be the best source of PO- and ACE- inhibiting molecules (IC50 = 0.16 mg ml(-1) (ACE) and 1.04 mg ml(-1) (PO)) and could be potential new ingredients in food with interest in the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular and neurological diseases.

  7. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Protein Hydrolysate from Actinopyga lecanora (Sea Cucumber) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh Vishkaei, Mahdokht; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2016-01-01

    Food protein hydrolysates are known to exhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and can be used as a novel functional food for prevention of hypertension. This study evaluated the ACE inhibitory potentials of Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate (ALP) in vivo. The pre-fed rats with ALP at various doses (200, 400, 800 mg/kg body weight) exhibited a significant (p ≤ 0.05) suppression effect after inducing hypertension. To determine the optimum effective dose that will produce maximal reduction in blood pressure, ALP at three doses was fed to the rats after inducing hypertension. The results showed that the 800 mg/kg body weight dose significantly reduced blood pressure without noticeable negative physiological effect. In addition, there were no observable changes in the rats’ heart rate after oral administration of the ALP. It was concluded that Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate could potentially be used for the development of functional foods and nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of hypertension. PMID:27706040

  8. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Protein Hydrolysate from Actinopyga lecanora (Sea Cucumber) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sadegh Vishkaei, Mahdokht; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2016-09-30

    Food protein hydrolysates are known to exhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and can be used as a novel functional food for prevention of hypertension. This study evaluated the ACE inhibitory potentials of Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate (ALP) in vivo. The pre-fed rats with ALP at various doses (200, 400, 800 mg/kg body weight) exhibited a significant (p ≤ 0.05) suppression effect after inducing hypertension. To determine the optimum effective dose that will produce maximal reduction in blood pressure, ALP at three doses was fed to the rats after inducing hypertension. The results showed that the 800 mg/kg body weight dose significantly reduced blood pressure without noticeable negative physiological effect. In addition, there were no observable changes in the rats' heart rate after oral administration of the ALP. It was concluded that Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate could potentially be used for the development of functional foods and nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of hypertension.

  9. Hydrolysates of sheep cheese whey as a source of bioactive peptides with antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Ana Paula Folmer; Daroit, Daniel Joner; Fontoura, Roberta; Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Segalin, Jeferson; Brandelli, Adriano

    2014-11-01

    Enzymatic proteolysis may be employed to release bioactive peptides, which have been investigated for potential benefits from both technological and human health perspectives. In this study, sheep cheese whey (SCW) was hydrolyzed with a protease preparation from Bacillus sp. P7, and the hydrolysates were evaluated for antioxidant and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities. Soluble protein and free amino acids increased during hydrolysis of SCW for up to 4h. Antioxidant activity of hydrolysates, evaluated by the 2,2'azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid radical scavenging method, increased 3.2-fold from 0 h (15.9%) to 6h of hydrolysis (51.3%). Maximum Fe(2+) chelation was reached in 3h hydrolysates, and the reducing power peaked at 1h of hydrolysis, representing 6.2 and 2.1-fold increase, respectively, when compared to that of non-hydrolyzed SCW. ACE inhibition by SCW (12%) was improved through hydrolysis, reaching maximal values (55% inhibition) in 4h, although 42% inhibition was already observed after 1h hydrolysis. The peptide LAFNPTQLEGQCHV, derived from β-lactoglobulin, was identified from 4-h hydrolysates. Such a biotechnological approach might be an interesting strategy for SCW processing, potentially contributing to the management and valorization of this abundant dairy byproduct.

  10. A Tricholoma matsutake Peptide with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitory and Antioxidative Activities and Antihypertensive Effects in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xueran; Tian, Guoting; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhao, Yongchang; Zhao, Liyan; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. A crude water extract of the fruiting bodies of a highly prized mushroom Tricholoma matsutakei exerted an antihypertensive action on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) at a dosage of 400 mg/kg. An angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide with an IC50 of 0.40 μM was purified from the extract and designated as TMP. Its amino acid sequence was elucidated to be WALKGYK through LC-MS/MS analysis. The Lineweaver-Burk plot suggested that TMP was a non-competitive inhibitor of ACE. A short-term assay of antihypertensive activity demonstrated that TMP at the dosage of 25 mg/kg could significantly lower the systolic blood pressure (SBP) of SHRs. TMP exhibited remarkable stability over a wide range of temperatures and pH values. It also demonstrated 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. The aforementioned activities of TMP were corroborated by utilizing the synthetic peptide. Hence T. matsutake can be used as a functional food to help prevent hypertension- associated diseases. PMID:27052674

  11. A Tricholoma matsutake Peptide with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitory and Antioxidative Activities and Antihypertensive Effects in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xueran; Tian, Guoting; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhao, Yongchang; Zhao, Liyan; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-04-07

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. A crude water extract of the fruiting bodies of a highly prized mushroom Tricholoma matsutakei exerted an antihypertensive action on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) at a dosage of 400 mg/kg. An angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide with an IC50 of 0.40 μM was purified from the extract and designated as TMP. Its amino acid sequence was elucidated to be WALKGYK through LC-MS/MS analysis. The Lineweaver-Burk plot suggested that TMP was a non-competitive inhibitor of ACE. A short-term assay of antihypertensive activity demonstrated that TMP at the dosage of 25 mg/kg could significantly lower the systolic blood pressure (SBP) of SHRs. TMP exhibited remarkable stability over a wide range of temperatures and pH values. It also demonstrated 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. The aforementioned activities of TMP were corroborated by utilizing the synthetic peptide. Hence T. matsutake can be used as a functional food to help prevent hypertension- associated diseases.

  12. Chebulin: Terminalia chebula Retz. fruit-derived peptide with angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Sornwatana, Thakorn; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Wetprasit, Nuanchawee; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Ratanapo, Sunanta

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in blood pressure regulation. In this study, an ACE-hexapeptide inhibitor (Asp-Glu-Asn-Ser-Lys-Phe) designated as chebulin was produced from the fruit protein of Terminalia chebula Retz. by pepsin digestion, ultrafiltrated through a 3 KDa cut-off membrane, a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Chebulin was found to inhibit ACE in a noncompetitive manner, as supported by the structural model. It bounds to ACE by the hydrogen bond, hydrophobic and ionic interactions via the interactions of C-terminal Phe (Phe-6), and N-terminal residues (Asp-1 and Glu-2) with the amino acid residues on noncatalytic sites of the ACE. The results showed that chebulin derived from fruits of T. chebula Retz. is a potential ACE-peptide inhibitor that could be used as a functional food additive for the prevention of hypertension and as an alternative to ACE inhibitor drug.

  13. Investigation on cellular uptake and pharmacodynamics of DOCK2-inhibitory peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Umemoto, Tadashi; Fukuda, Yasunori; Tani, Akiyoshi; Asami, Taiji

    2017-04-01

    Protein-protein interaction between dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is an attractive intracellular target for transplant rejection and inflammatory diseases. Recently, DOCK2-selective inhibitory peptides have been discovered, and conjugation with oligoarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) improved inhibitory activity in a cell migration assay. Although a number of CPPs have been reported, oligoarginine was only one example introduced to the inhibitory peptides. In this study, we aimed to confirm the feasibility of CPP-conjugation approach for DOCK2-inhibitory peptides, and select preferable sequences as CPP moiety. First, we evaluated cell permeability of thirteen known CPPs and partial sequences of influenza A viral protein PB1-F2 using an internalization assay system based on luciferin-luciferase reaction, and then selected four CPPs with efficient cellular uptake. Among four conjugates of these CPPs and a DOCK2-inhibitory peptide, the inhibitory activity of a novel CPP, PB1-F2 fragment 5 (PF5), conjugate was comparable to oligoarginine conjugate and higher than that of the non-conjugated peptide. Finally, internalization assay revealed that oligoarginine and PF5 increased the cellular uptake of inhibitory peptides to the same extent. Hence, we demonstrated that CPP-conjugation approach is applicable to the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs based on DOCK2 inhibition by investigating both cellular uptake and bioactivity.

  14. Additivity and synergy between an antimicrobial peptide and inhibitory ions.

    PubMed

    Walkenhorst, William F; Sundrud, Justine N; Laviolette, Joshua M

    2014-09-01

    Recently we described the pH dependence of activity for a family of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selected from a combinatorial library. In the current work we report on the effects of toxic ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and F(-)) and the chelator EDTA on the activity profiles of one member of this family, the 12-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide *ARVA, against a panel of microorganisms. All four ions exhibited either synergy or additivity with *ARVA for all organisms tested with the exception of *ARVA combined with NaF against Candida albicans which exhibited indifference. CuCl2 and ZnCl2 exhibited synergy with *ARVA against both the Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus as well as strong additivity against Escherichia coli at submillimolar concentrations. The chelator EDTA was synergistic with *ARVA against the two Gram negative organisms but showed only simple additivity with S. aureus and C. albicans despite their much lower MICs with EDTA. This effect may be related to the known differences in the divalent ion binding properties of the Gram negative LPS layer as compared to the peptidoglycan layer of the Gram positive organism. Unlike the other ions, NaF showed only additivity or indifference when combined with *ARVA and required much higher concentrations for activity. The yeast C. albicans did not show synergy or strong additivity with any of the inhibitory compounds tested. The effects of toxic ions and chelators observed here have important implications for applications using CAMPs and for the design of novel formulations involving CAMPs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova.

  15. Antiproliferative and GH-inhibitory activity of chimeric peptides consisting of GHRP-6 and somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, P; Singh, A T; Mukherjee, R

    1999-06-07

    Chimeric peptides consisting of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP-6) linked to somatostatin (6-11) via an amide bond to provide the effector parts of both the peptides were synthesized. The anti-proliferative, cytotoxic, and GH-inhibitory activities of these chimeric peptides were determined in vitro in the rat pituitary adenoma cell line GH3. One of the chimeric peptides, GSD, exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.001) anti-neoplastic and GH-inhibitory activity, as compared to RC-160. The hybrid peptides displayed high affinity binding to somatostatin receptors on GH3 cells. The bioactivity of GSD was found to be mediated by the stimulation of tyrosine phosphatase, involving a cGMP-dependent pathway, through pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. Such potent GH-inhibitory chimeric peptides may be of potential importance in the therapy of acromegaly, as well as provide novel tools to study the regulation of GH secretion by GHRP and somatostatin.

  16. Calcitonin gene related peptide as inhibitory neurotransmitter in the ureter.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S; Meini, S; Santicioli, P

    1995-07-01

    A dense plexus of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) containing nerve fibres is present in the mammalian ureter, from which CGRP is released by depolarizing stimuli, including chemical normally present in the urine. CGRP exerts a profound, receptor-mediated, inhibitory effect on the evoked motility of the ureter by suppressing latent pacemakers in the smooth muscle. This effect is largely glibenclamide sensitive, indicating the activation of potassium (K) channels in its genesis. Electrical stimulation of intramural nerves in the guinea-pig ureter produces a transient membrane hyperpolarization, which is blocked by glibenclamide or by capsaicin pretreatment, enhanced in a low-K medium, and inhibited by a CGRP receptor antagonist. Thus endogenous CGRP acts as a neurotransmitter K channel opener in the ureter. The refractory period of the guinea-pig ureter is markedly and similarly reduced by capsaicin pretreatment or administration of a CGRP receptor antagonist, indicating that endogenous CGRP can modulate the maximal frequency of ureteral peristalsis. Using a three-chamber organ bath that enabled the separate perfusion of the renal, middle, and bladder regions of the organ, evidence was obtained that CGRP blocks propagation of impulses along the ureter through a glibenclamide-sensitive mechanism. These findings indicate a role of CGRP in the local regulation of ureteral motility and peristalsis.

  17. Further identification of bioactive peptides in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus: two contractile and three inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Y; Takahashi, T; Ikeda, T; Muneoka, Y; Kubota, I; Minakata, H; Nomoto, K; Nose, T; Miki, W

    1993-09-01

    1. Two contractile and three inhibitory peptides were newly isolated from the anterior byssus retractor muscles (ABRMs) of the bivalve mollusc Mytilus edulis by using the muscle as the bioassay system. 2. The structures of the two contractile peptides were GPFGTHIKamide (GPFG-8) and GPFGLNKHGamide (GPFG-9). The contractile response of the ABRM to the first-time application of GPFG-8 or GPFG-9 was of considerable size. The threshold concentrations of the peptides were around 10(-9) M. However, the contractile response to the second-time application was far smaller than that to the first-time application in both cases. Namely, the muscle showed tachyphylaxis to the peptides. 3. Two of the three inhibitory peptides were members of the Mytilus-inhibitory-peptide (MIP) family. Their structures were RAPLFIamide (MIP6) and RSPMFVamide (MIP7). The peptides, as well as the other MIPs previously identified, showed a potent inhibitory effect on phasic contraction of the ABRM in response to repetitive electrical stimulation. The remaining one was an MIP-related peptide (MIP-RP) having the sequence of MRYFVamide. The MIP-RP was less potent than the two MIPs in inhibiting the contraction of the ABRM.

  18. Simulated digestion of proanthocyanidins in grape skin and seed extracts and the effects of digestion on the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Katherina; Labra, Javiera

    2013-08-15

    This study investigated the effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion on the stability and composition of flavan-3-ols from red grape skin and seed extracts (raw and purified, which are high in proanthocyanidins (PAs)). In addition, the effects of digestion on the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of these extracts were evaluated. The extracts were digested with a mixture of pepsin-HCl for 2 h, followed by a 2 h incubation with pancreatin and bile salts including a cellulose dialysis tubing (molecular weight cut-off 12 kDa) at 37°C with shaking in the dark and under N2. Under gastric conditions, the mean degree of polymerisation (mDP) of seed extracts, raw (mDP≈6, p<0.05), and purified (mDP≈10, p<0.05) was stable. The mDP of the raw skin extracts increased from 19 to 25 towards the end of the digestion. The PAs were significantly degraded (up to 80%) during the pancreatic digestion, yielding low-molecular-weight compounds that diffused into the serum-available fraction (mDP≈2). The overall mass transfer coefficient (K) of the seed extracts was 10(-7) m(2)/s. After simulated gastrointestinal digestion, over 80% of ACE inhibition by raw seed and skin extracts was preserved. However, the purified seed and skin extracts lost their ability to inhibit ACE after intestinal digestion.

  19. In Vivo Efficacy of Anuran Trypsin Inhibitory Peptides against Staphylococcal Skin Infection and the Impact of Peptide Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Malik, U.; Silva, O. N.; Fensterseifer, I. C. M.; Chan, L. Y.; Clark, R. J.; Franco, O. L.; Daly, N. L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of superficial and invasive infections. Its resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs is a global problem, and the development of novel antimicrobial agents is crucial. Antimicrobial peptides from natural resources offer potential as new treatments against staphylococcal infections. In the current study, we have examined the antimicrobial properties of peptides isolated from anuran skin secretions and cyclized synthetic analogues of these peptides. The structures of the peptides were elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, revealing high structural and sequence similarity with each other and with sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1). SFTI-1 is an ultrastable cyclic peptide isolated from sunflower seeds that has subnanomolar trypsin inhibitory activity, and this scaffold offers pharmaceutically relevant characteristics. The five anuran peptides were nonhemolytic and noncytotoxic and had trypsin inhibitory activities similar to that of SFTI-1. They demonstrated weak in vitro inhibitory activities against S. aureus, but several had strong antibacterial activities against S. aureus in an in vivo murine wound infection model. pYR, an immunomodulatory peptide from Rana sevosa, was the most potent, with complete bacterial clearance at 3 mg · kg−1. Cyclization of the peptides improved their stability but was associated with a concomitant decrease in antimicrobial activity. In summary, these anuran peptides are promising as novel therapeutic agents for treating infections from a clinically resistant pathogen. PMID:25624332

  20. Antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) protein hydrolysates produced by the proteases AFP, HT, Pro-G, actinidin and zingibain.

    PubMed

    Teh, Sue-Siang; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Carne, Alan; Birch, John

    2016-07-15

    Hemp protein isolates (HPIs) were hydrolysed by proteases (AFP, HT, ProG, actinidin and zingibain). The enzymatic hydrolysis of HPIs was evaluated through the degree of hydrolysis and SDS-PAGE profiles. The bioactive properties of the resultant hydrolysates (HPHs) were accessed through ORAC, DPPḢ scavenging and ACE-inhibitory activities. The physical properties of the resultant HPHs were evaluated for their particle sizes, zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity. HT had the highest rate of caseinolytic activity at the lowest concentration (0.1 mg mL(-1)) compared to other proteases that required concentration of 100 mg mL(-1) to achieve their maximum rate of caseinolytic activity. This led to the highest degree of hydrolysis of HPIs by HT in the SDS-PAGE profiles. Among all proteases and substrates, HT resulted in the highest bioactivities (ORAC, DPPḢ scavenging and ACE-inhibitory activities) generated from alkali extracted HPI in the shortest time (2 h) compared to the other protease preparations.

  1. Rice Bran Protein as a Potent Source of Antimelanogenic Peptides with Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Seiya; Tanaka, Takaaki; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2016-10-28

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is consumed as a staple food globally, and rice bran, the byproduct, is an unused biomass that is ultimately discarded as waste. Thus, in the present study, a technique for producing tyrosinase inhibitory peptides from rice bran protein (RBP) was developed. Simultaneous treatment of RBP with chymotrypsin and trypsin produced numerous peptides. Subsequently, six tyrosinase inhibitory peptides were isolated from the hydrolysate fractions in a multistep purification protocol, and their amino acid sequences were determined. Three of these peptides had a C-terminal tyrosine residue and exhibited significant inhibitory effects against tyrosinase-mediated monophenolase reactions. Furthermore, peptide CT-2 (Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-Tyr) potently inhibited melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells without causing cytotoxicity, suggesting the potential of CT-2 as an agent for melanin-related skin disorder treatment. The present data indicate that RBP is a potent source of tyrosinase inhibitory peptides and that simultaneous treatment of RBP with chymotrypsin and trypsin efficiently produces these peptides.

  2. Inhibitory activity and mechanism of two scorpion venom peptides against herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Li, Tian; Song, Yu; Zhang, Runhong; Zeng, Zhengyang; Han, Shisong; Zhang, Xianzheng; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a widespread human pathogen that causes severe diseases, but there are not effective and safe drugs in clinical therapy besides acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogs. In this study, two new venom peptides from the scorpion Heterometrus petersii were identified with effective inhibitory effect on HSV-1 infection in vitro. Both Hp1036 and Hp1239 peptides exhibited potent virucidal activities against HSV-1 (EC50=0.43±0.09 and 0.41±0.06μM, respectively) and effective inhibitory effects when added at the viral attachment (EC50=2.87±0.16 and 5.73±0.61μM, respectively), entry (EC50=4.29±0.35 and 4.32±0.47μM, respectively) and postentry (EC50=7.86±0.80 and 8.41±0.73μM, respectively) steps. Both Hp1036 and Hp1239 peptides adopted α-helix structure in approximate membrane environment and resulted in the destruction of the viral morphology. Moreover, Hp1036 and Hp1239 peptides entered Vero cells and reduced the intracellular viral infectivity. Taken together, Hp1036 and Hp1239 peptides are two anti-viral peptides with effective inhibitory effect on multiple steps of HSV-1 life cycle and therefore are good candidate for development as virucides.

  3. Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors from Marine Resources: Prospects in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekara, Isuru; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1; ACE) plays an important physiological role in regulation of blood pressure by converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor. Therefore, the inhibition of ACE activity is a major target in the prevention of hypertension. Recently, the search for natural ACE inhibitors as alternatives to synthetic drugs is of great interest to prevent several side effects and a number of novel compounds such as bioactive peptides, chitooligosaccharide derivatives (COS) and phlorotannins have been derived from marine organisms as potential ACE inhibitors. These inhibitory derivatives can be developed as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals with potential to prevent hypertension. Hence, the aim of this review is to discuss the marine-derived ACE inhibitors and their future prospects as novel therapeutic drug candidates for treat hypertension. PMID:20479968

  4. Enhancement of the inhibitory effect of an IL-15 antagonist peptide by alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Savio, Alicia Santos; Acosta, Osvaldo Reyes; Pérez, Haydee Gerónimo; Alvarez, Yunier Rodríguez; Chico, Araceli; Pérez, Hilda Garay; Ojeda, Miriam Ojeda; Aguero, Celia Aurora Arrieta; Estévez, Miguel; Nieto, Gerardo Guillen

    2012-01-01

    IL-15 is a proinflammatory cytokine that acts early in the inflammatory response and has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, where it had been proposed as a therapeutic target. We recently reported an IL-15 antagonist peptide corresponding to sequence 36-45 of IL-15 (KVTAMKCFLL) named P8, which specifically binds to IL-15Rα and inhibits IL-15 biological activity with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 130 µ m in CTLL-2 proliferation assay. In order to improve binding of peptide P8 to the receptor IL-15Rα, we used an Ala scan strategy to study contribution of each individual amino acid to the peptide's antagonist effect. Here, we found that Phe and Cys are important for peptide binding to IL-15Rα. We also investigated other single site mutations and replaced the second Lys in the sequence by the polar non-charged amino acid threonine. The resulting peptide [K6T]P8 exhibited a higher activity than P8 with an IC50 of 24 µm. We also found that this peptide was more active than peptide P8 in the inhibition of TNFα secretion by synovial cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients. The peptide [K6T]P8 described in this work is a new type of IL-15 antagonist and constitutes a potential therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Inhibitory role of adiponectin peptide I on rat choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lyzogubov, Valeriy V.; Tytarenko, Ruslana G.; Bora, Nalini S.; Bora, Puran S.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of central blindness in elderly population. Wet type of AMD is characterized by extensive growth of new vessels. One of the effective strategies to treat wet AMD is to limit the choroidal neovascularization (CNV). We studied effect of adiponectin peptide I (APNpI) on new vessel growth in laser-induced rat model of wet AMD and on rat choroidal endothelial cell (CEC) culture. CNV size and vessel density was investigated by microscopy. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) for Von Willebrand Factor (vWF), APN, APN receptors 1 (AdipoR1), 2 (AdipoR2), VEGF, VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was performed in CNV area. The mRNA expression of VEGF and VEGF-R2 in RPE-choroid was investigated by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. APNpI inhibited area of CNV by 4 fold, number of vWF positive vessels by 99% and area of subretinal tissue by 40%. The expression of VEGF and VEGF-R2 at mRNA and protein levels were decreased after APNpI treatment in vivo. Proliferative index (PCNA) was 5 fold less in laser spots of APNpI treated rats compared to controls. In conclusion, APNpI inhibited formation of new vessels in rat model of CNV by decreasing VEGF, VEGF-R2 expression and cell proliferation. Thus, APNpI may have potential therapeutic use for AMD treatment since it significantly inhibited CNV. PMID:22633972

  6. Influence of starter culture and a protease on the generation of ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant bioactive nitrogen compounds in Iberian dry-fermented sausage "salchichón".

    PubMed

    Fernández, Margarita; Benito, María J; Martín, Alberto; Casquete, Rocío; Córdoba, Juan J; Córdoba, María G

    2016-03-01

    The effect of the addition of an autochthonous starter culture and the protease EPg222 on the generation of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory and antioxidant compounds by the dry-fermented sausage "salchichón" was investigated. Sausages were prepared with purified EPg222 and Pediococcus acidilactici MS200 and Staphylococcus vitulus RS34 as the starter culture (P200S34), separately and together, ripened for 90 days, and compared to a control batch. Among the ripening time points (20, 35, 65, 90 days) studied, batches inoculated with EPg222 had higher nitrogen compound concentrations at 63 days of ripening. ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities were also highest in both batches with EPg222 at 63 days of ripening, and these activities were stable in most cases after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion. These activities were correlated with the most relevant compounds detected by HLPC-ESI-MS. The principal components analysis (PCA) linked the P200S34 + EPg222 batch with the major compounds identified. The antioxidant activity was higher at 63 days of ripening, especially in highly proteolytic batches, such as P200S34 + EPg222. The ACE-inhibitory activity was not associated with any of the major compounds. The use of the enzyme EPg222 in association with the starter culture P200S34 in the preparation of dry-cured meat products could be of great importance due to their demonstrated ability to produce compounds with high biological activity, such as ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activity.

  7. Thermally Targeted Delivery of a c-Myc Inhibitory Peptide In Vivo Using Elastin-Like Polypeptide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), bactenecin (Bac), penetratin ( Pen ), or Tat, is conjugated to the ELP to enhance delivery of the polypeptide across the...CPPs are short peptides known to enhance the cellular uptake of large cargo. The three CPPs proposed for this study are the penetratin ( Pen ...we conjugated the c-Myc inhibitory peptide and the Pen peptide to ELP for thermally targeted delivery ( Pen -ELP-H1) (1). Uptake of Pen -ELP-H1 in MCF-7

  8. Inhibitory properties of cysteine protease pro-peptides from barley confer resistance to spider mite feeding.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, M Estrella; Arnaiz, Ana; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    C1A plant cysteine proteases are synthesized as pre-pro-enzymes that need to be processed to become active by the pro-peptide claves off from its cognate enzyme. These pro-sequences play multifunctional roles including the capacity to specifically inhibit their own as well as other C1A protease activities from diverse origin. In this study, it is analysed the potential role of C1A pro-regions from barley as regulators of cysteine proteases in target phytophagous arthropods (coleopteran and acari). The in vitro inhibitory action of these pro-sequences, purified as recombinant proteins, is demonstrated. Moreover, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different fragments of HvPap-1 barley gene containing the pro-peptide sequence were generated and the acaricide function was confirmed by bioassays conducted with the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Feeding trials resulted in a significant reduction of leaf damage in the transgenic lines expressing the pro-peptide in comparison to non-transformed control and strongly correlated with an increase in mite mortality. Additionally, the analysis of the expression levels of a selection of potential mite targets (proteases and protease inhibitors) revealed a mite strategy to counteract the inhibitory activity produced by the C1A barley pro-prodomain. These findings demonstrate that pro-peptides can control mite pests and could be applied as defence proteins in biotechnological systems.

  9. Inhibitory Properties of Cysteine Protease Pro-Peptides from Barley Confer Resistance to Spider Mite Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    C1A plant cysteine proteases are synthesized as pre-pro-enzymes that need to be processed to become active by the pro-peptide claves off from its cognate enzyme. These pro-sequences play multifunctional roles including the capacity to specifically inhibit their own as well as other C1A protease activities from diverse origin. In this study, it is analysed the potential role of C1A pro-regions from barley as regulators of cysteine proteases in target phytophagous arthropods (coleopteran and acari). The in vitro inhibitory action of these pro-sequences, purified as recombinant proteins, is demonstrated. Moreover, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different fragments of HvPap-1 barley gene containing the pro-peptide sequence were generated and the acaricide function was confirmed by bioassays conducted with the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Feeding trials resulted in a significant reduction of leaf damage in the transgenic lines expressing the pro-peptide in comparison to non-transformed control and strongly correlated with an increase in mite mortality. Additionally, the analysis of the expression levels of a selection of potential mite targets (proteases and protease inhibitors) revealed a mite strategy to counteract the inhibitory activity produced by the C1A barley pro-prodomain. These findings demonstrate that pro-peptides can control mite pests and could be applied as defence proteins in biotechnological systems. PMID:26039069

  10. Characterization of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of fermented milk produced by Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongfu; Li, Changkun; Xue, Jiangang; Kwok, Lai-yu; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Heping; Menghe, Bilige

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension affects up to 30% of the adult population in most countries. It is a known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, and stroke. Owing to the increased health awareness of consumers, the application of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides produced by Lactobacillushelveticus to prevent or control high blood pressure has drawn wide attention. A total of 59 L. helveticus strains were isolated from traditional fermented dairy products and the ACE-inhibitory activity of the fermented milks produced with the isolated microorganisms was assayed. The ACE-inhibitory activity of 38 L. helveticus strains was more than 50%, and 3 strains (IMAU80872, IMAU80852, and IMAU80851) expressing the highest ACE-inhibitory activity were selected for further studies. Particularly, the gastrointestinal protease tolerance and thermostability of the ACE-inhibitory activity in the fermented milks were assessed. Based on these 2 criteria, IMAU80872 was found to be superior over the other 2 strains. Furthermore, IMAU80872 exhibited a high in vitro ACE-inhibitory activity at the following fermentation conditions: fermentation temperature at 40°C, inoculation concentration of 1×10(6) cfu/mL, and fermentation for 18h. Finally, by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we observed changes of the metabolome along the milk fermentation process of IMAU80872. Furthermore, 6 peptides were identified, which might have ACE-inhibitory activity. In conclusion, we identified a novel ACE-inhibitory L. helveticus strain suitable for the production of fermented milk or other functional dairy products.

  11. In silico and in vitro analyses of the angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity of hydrolysates generated from crude barley (Hordeum vulgare) protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Nirupama; Wynne, Kieran; O'Connor, Paula; Gallagher, Eimear; Brunton, Nigel P; Rai, Dilip K; Hayes, Maria

    2016-07-15

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) plays a key role in control of hypertension, and type-2 diabetes mellitus, which frequently co-exist. Our current work utilised in silico methodologies and peptide databases as tools for predicting release of ACE-I inhibitory peptides from barley proteins. Papain was the enzyme of choice, based on in silico analysis, for experimental hydrolysis of barley protein concentrate, which was performed at the enzyme's optimum conditions (60 °C, pH 6.0) for 24 h. The generated hydrolysate was subjected to molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filtration, following which the non-ultrafiltered hydrolysate (NUFH), and the generated 3 kDa and 10 kDa MWCO filtrates were assessed for their in vitro ACE-I inhibitory activities. The 3 kDa filtrate (1 mg/ml), that demonstrated highest ACE-I inhibitory activity of 70.37%, was characterised in terms of its peptidic composition using mass spectrometry and 1882 peptides derived from 61 barley proteins were identified, amongst which 15 peptides were selected for chemical synthesis based on their predicted ACE-I inhibitory properties. Of the synthesized peptides, FQLPKF and GFPTLKIF were most potent, demonstrating ACE-I IC50 values of 28.2 μM and 41.2 μM respectively.

  12. An extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaves and purified gymnemic acid inhibits glucose-stimulated gastric inhibitory peptide secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fushiki, T; Kojima, A; Imoto, T; Inoue, K; Sugimoto, E

    1992-12-01

    Gastric inhibitory peptide release into the portal vein in response to duodenal infusion of D-glucose was studied in the presence of a leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and inhibitors of some putative glucose sensors and carriers in the intestinal lumen. Intraduodenal infusion of D-glucose significantly increased the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentration in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide induced by glucose was significantly depressed by concomitantly infused leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin but not by cytochalasin B. Mannoheptulose, which inhibits glycolysis, and procaine and lidocaine, which inhibit the vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen, did not affect portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentrations. These results suggest that a glucose receptor, which interacts with the leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin, exists for the release of immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide and that the glucose receptor for gastric inhibitory peptide release is not likely to be identical with a glucose transporter or a vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen.

  13. Structure activity relationship modelling of milk protein-derived peptides with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative structure activity type models were developed in an attempt to predict the key features of peptide sequences having dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity. The models were then employed to help predict the potential of peptides, which are currently reported in the literature to be present in the intestinal tract of humans following milk/dairy product ingestion, to act as inhibitors of DPP-IV. Two models (z- and v-scale) for short (2-5 amino acid residues) bovine milk peptides, behaving as competitive inhibitors of DPP-IV, were developed. The z- and the v-scale models (p<0.05, R(2) of 0.829 and 0.815, respectively) were then applied to 56 milk protein-derived peptides previously reported in the literature to be found in the intestinal tract of humans which possessed a structural feature of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides (P at the N2 position). Ten of these peptides were synthetized and tested for their in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory properties. There was no agreement between the predicted and experimentally determined DPP-IV half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for the competitive peptide inhibitors. However, the ranking for DPP-IV inhibitory potency of the competitive peptide inhibitors was conserved. Furthermore, potent in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity was observed with two peptides, LPVPQ (IC50=43.8±8.8μM) and IPM (IC50=69.5±8.7μM). Peptides present within the gastrointestinal tract of human may have promise for the development of natural DPP-IV inhibitors for the management of serum glucose.

  14. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiaonan; Yang Chunying; Liu Hai; Wang Qi; Wu Shixiu; Li Xia; Xie Tian; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian; Xu Bo; Zheng, Shu

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  15. Peptide array on cellulose support--a screening tool to identify peptides with dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitory activity within the sequence of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Isabelle M E; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2014-11-13

    The inhibition of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is an effective pharmacotherapeutic approach for the management of type 2 diabetes. Recent findings have suggested that dietary proteins, including bovine α-lactalbumin, could be precursors of peptides able to inhibit DPP-IV. However, information on the location of active peptide sequences within the proteins is far from being comprehensive. Moreover, the traditional approach to identify bioactive peptides from foods can be tedious and long. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use peptide arrays to screen α-lactalbumin-derived peptides for their interaction with DPP-IV. Deca-peptides spanning the entire α-lactalbumin sequence, with a frame shift of 1 amino acid between successive sequences, were synthesized on cellulose membranes using "SPOT" technology, and their binding to and inhibition of DPP-IV was studied. Among the 114 α-lactalbumin-derived decamers investigated, the peptides 60WCKDDQNPHS69 (αK(i) = 76 µM), 105LAHKALCSEK114 (K(i) = 217 µM) and 110LCSEKLDQWL119 (K(i) = 217 µM) were among the strongest DPP-IV inhibitors. While the SPOT- and traditionally-synthesized peptides showed consistent trends in DPP-IV inhibitory activity, the cellulose-bound peptides' binding behavior was not correlated to their ability to inhibit the enzyme. This research showed, for the first time, that peptide arrays are useful screening tools to identify DPP-IV inhibitory peptides from dietary proteins.

  16. Broad spectrum antiviral activity for paramyxoviruses is modulated by biophysical properties of fusion inhibitory peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Augusto, Marcelo T.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Horvat, Branka; Palermo, Laura M.; Sanna, Giuseppina; Madeddu, Silvia; Huey, Devra; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Porotto, Matteo; Santos, Nuno C.; Moscona, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Human paramyxoviruses include global causes of lower respiratory disease like the parainfluenza viruses, as well as agents of lethal encephalitis like Nipah virus. Infection is initiated by viral glycoprotein-mediated fusion between viral and host cell membranes. Paramyxovirus viral fusion proteins (F) insert into the target cell membrane, and form a transient intermediate that pulls the viral and cell membranes together as two heptad-repeat regions refold to form a six-helix bundle structure that can be specifically targeted by fusion-inhibitory peptides. Antiviral potency can be improved by sequence modification and lipid conjugation, and by adding linkers between the protein and lipid components. We exploit the uniquely broad spectrum antiviral activity of a parainfluenza F-derived peptide sequence that inhibits both parainfluenza and Nipah viruses, to investigate the influence of peptide orientation and intervening linker length on the peptides’ interaction with transitional states of F, solubility, membrane insertion kinetics, and protease sensitivity. We assessed the impact of these features on biodistribution and antiviral efficacy in vitro and in vivo. The engineering approach based on biophysical parameters resulted in a peptide that is a highly effective inhibitor of both paramyxoviruses and a set of criteria to be used for engineering broad spectrum antivirals for emerging paramyxoviruses. PMID:28344321

  17. [Pyr1]Apelin-13(1–12) Is a Biologically Active ACE2 Metabolite of the Endogenous Cardiovascular Peptide [Pyr1]Apelin-13

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peiran; Kuc, Rhoda E.; Brame, Aimée L.; Dyson, Alex; Singer, Mervyn; Glen, Robert C.; Cheriyan, Joseph; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Davenport, Anthony P.; Maguire, Janet J.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Apelin is a predicted substrate for ACE2, a novel therapeutic target. Our aim was to demonstrate the endogenous presence of the putative ACE2 product [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) in human cardiovascular tissues and to confirm it retains significant biological activity for the apelin receptor in vitro and in vivo. The minimum active apelin fragment was also investigated. Methods and Results: [Pyr1]apelin-13 incubated with recombinant human ACE2 resulted in de novo generation of [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) identified by mass spectrometry. Endogenous [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) was detected by immunostaining in human heart and lung localized to the endothelium. Expression was undetectable in lung from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. In human heart [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) (pKi = 8.04 ± 0.06) and apelin-13(F13A) (pKi = 8.07 ± 0.24) competed with [125I]apelin-13 binding with nanomolar affinity, 4-fold lower than for [Pyr1]apelin-13 (pKi = 8.83 ± 0.06) whereas apelin-17 exhibited highest affinity (pKi = 9.63 ± 0.17). The rank order of potency of peptides to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP was apelin-17 (pD2 = 10.31 ± 0.28) > [Pyr1]apelin-13 (pD2 = 9.67 ± 0.04) ≥ apelin-13(F13A) (pD2 = 9.54 ± 0.05) > [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) (pD2 = 9.30 ± 0.06). The truncated peptide apelin-13(R10M) retained nanomolar potency (pD2 = 8.70 ± 0.04) but shorter fragments exhibited low micromolar potency. In a β-arrestin recruitment assay the rank order of potency was apelin-17 (pD2 = 10.26 ± 0.09) >> [Pyr1]apelin-13 (pD2 = 8.43 ± 0.08) > apelin-13(R10M) (pD2 = 8.26 ± 0.17) > apelin-13(F13A) (pD2 = 7.98 ± 0.04) ≥ [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) (pD2 = 7.84 ± 0.06) >> shorter fragments (pD2 < 6). [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) and apelin-13(F13A) contracted human saphenous vein with similar sub-nanomolar potencies and [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) was a potent inotrope in paced mouse right ventricle and human atria. [Pyr1]apelin-13(1–12) elicited a dose-dependent decrease in blood

  18. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Niida, Ayumu; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Miwa, Masanori; Ohkubo, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Cho, Nobuo; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-03-11

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly(12) (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH2) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. KD and IC50 values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH2) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC50 = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs.

  19. Inhibitory effects of small molecular peptides from Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis on cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhujun; Zhang, Xuewu

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the whole proteins of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis were extracted, hydrolysis with three proteases (trypsin, alcalase and papain) was performed, and gel filtration chromatography was employed to separate hydrolysates. Totally, 15 polypeptides were isolated, which showed anti-proliferation activities on five cancer cells (HepG-2, MCF-7, SGC-7901, A549 and HT-29), with the IC50 values between <31.25 and 336.57 μg mL(-1). Moreover, a new peptide YGFVMPRSGLWFR was identified from papain-digested hydrolysates. It also exhibited inhibitory activities on cancer cells, and the best activity was observed on A549 cancer cells (IC50 values 104.05 μg mL(-1)). In other words, these polypeptides exhibited anti-proliferation activities on cancer cells, and low toxicity or stimulatory activity on normal cells, suggesting that they are promising ingredients in food and pharmaceutical applications.

  20. Targeting ACE and ECE with dual acting inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hanessian, Stephen; Guesné, Sébastien; Riber, Ludivine; Marin, Julien; Benoist, Alain; Mennecier, Philippe; Rupin, Alain; Verbeuren, Tony J; De Nanteuil, Guillaume

    2008-02-01

    A series of urea analogues related to SA6817 and a GSK phosphonic acid with reported ACE inhibitory activity were prepared and tested for dual ACE and ECE activities. Although excellent ACE and NEP inhibition was achieved, only modest ECE inhibition was observed with one analogue.

  1. Neonatal NET-inhibitory factor and related peptides inhibit neutrophil extracellular trap formation

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Christian C.; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Cody, Mark J.; Wallace, Jared A.; Campbell, Robert A.; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Araujo, Claudia V.; Schubert, Sebastian; Harris, Estelle S.; Rowley, Jesse W.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Koening, Curry L.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes, also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), extrude molecular lattices of decondensed chromatin studded with histones, granule enzymes, and antimicrobial peptides that are referred to as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs capture and contain bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens. Nevertheless, experimental evidence indicates that NETs also cause inflammatory vascular and tissue damage, suggesting that identifying pathways that inhibit NET formation may have therapeutic implications. Here, we determined that neonatal NET-inhibitory factor (nNIF) is an inhibitor of NET formation in umbilical cord blood. In human neonatal and adult neutrophils, nNIF inhibits key terminal events in NET formation, including peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) activity, neutrophil nuclear histone citrullination, and nuclear decondensation. We also identified additional nNIF-related peptides (NRPs) that inhibit NET formation. nNIFs and NRPs blocked NET formation induced by pathogens, microbial toxins, and pharmacologic agonists in vitro and in mouse models of infection and systemic inflammation, and they improved mortality in murine models of systemic inflammation, which are associated with NET-induced collateral tissue injury. The identification of NRPs as neutrophil modulators that selectively interrupt NET generation at critical steps suggests their potential as therapeutic agents. Furthermore, our results indicate that nNIF may be an important regulator of NET formation in fetal and neonatal inflammation. PMID:27599294

  2. Neonatal NET-inhibitory factor and related peptides inhibit neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Yost, Christian C; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Cody, Mark J; Wallace, Jared A; Campbell, Robert A; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Araujo, Claudia V; Schubert, Sebastian; Harris, Estelle S; Rowley, Jesse W; Rondina, Matthew T; Fulcher, James M; Koening, Curry L; Weyrich, Andrew S; Zimmerman, Guy A

    2016-10-03

    Neutrophil granulocytes, also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), extrude molecular lattices of decondensed chromatin studded with histones, granule enzymes, and antimicrobial peptides that are referred to as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs capture and contain bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens. Nevertheless, experimental evidence indicates that NETs also cause inflammatory vascular and tissue damage, suggesting that identifying pathways that inhibit NET formation may have therapeutic implications. Here, we determined that neonatal NET-inhibitory factor (nNIF) is an inhibitor of NET formation in umbilical cord blood. In human neonatal and adult neutrophils, nNIF inhibits key terminal events in NET formation, including peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) activity, neutrophil nuclear histone citrullination, and nuclear decondensation. We also identified additional nNIF-related peptides (NRPs) that inhibit NET formation. nNIFs and NRPs blocked NET formation induced by pathogens, microbial toxins, and pharmacologic agonists in vitro and in mouse models of infection and systemic inflammation, and they improved mortality in murine models of systemic inflammation, which are associated with NET-induced collateral tissue injury. The identification of NRPs as neutrophil modulators that selectively interrupt NET generation at critical steps suggests their potential as therapeutic agents. Furthermore, our results indicate that nNIF may be an important regulator of NET formation in fetal and neonatal inflammation.

  3. Inhibitory and antimicrobial activities of OGTI and HV-BBI peptides, fragments and analogs derived from amphibian skin.

    PubMed

    Dębowski, Dawid; Łukajtis, Rafał; Łęgowska, Anna; Karna, Natalia; Pikuła, Michał; Wysocka, Magdalena; Maliszewska, Irena; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Lesner, Adam; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2012-06-01

    A series of linear and cyclic fragments and analogs of two peptides (OGTI and HV-BBI) isolated from skin secretions of frogs were synthesized by the solid-phase method. Their inhibitory activity against several serine proteinases: bovine β-trypsin, bovine α-chymotypsin, human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G from human neutrophils, was investigated together with evaluation of their antimicrobial activities against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive species isolated from patients (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus sp., Streptococcus sp.). The cytotoxicity of the selected peptides toward an immortal human skin fibroblast cell line was also determined. Three peptides: HV-BBI, its truncated fragment HV-BBI(3-18) and its analog [Phe(8)]HV-BBI can be considered as bifunctional compounds with inhibitory as well as antibacterial properties. OGTI, although it did not display trypsin inhibitory activity as previously reported in the literature, exerted antimicrobial activity toward S. epidermidis. In addition, under our experimental conditions, this peptide did not show cytotoxicity.

  4. Antioxidative and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory potential of a Pacific Hake ( Merluccius productus ) fish protein hydrolysate subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion and Caco-2 cell permeation.

    PubMed

    Samaranayaka, Anusha G P; Kitts, David D; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2010-02-10

    Pacific hake fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) with promising chemical assay based antioxidative capacity was studied for in vitro angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory potential, intestinal cell permeability characteristics, and intracellular antioxidative potential using the Caco-2 cell model system. FPH showed substrate-type inhibition of ACE with IC(50) of 161 microg of peptides/mL. HPLC analysis revealed that different peptides were responsible for antioxidative and ACE-inhibitory activity. FPH inhibited 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride-induced oxidation in Caco-2 cells at noncytotoxic concentrations. In vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion increased (P < 0.05) antioxidative capacity; ACE-inhibitory activity of FPH remained unchanged, although individual peptide fractions showed decreased or no activity after digestion. Some FPH peptides passed through Caco-2 cells: the permeates showed 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging activity but no ACE-inhibitory activity. These results suggest the potential for application of Pacific hake FPH to reduce oxidative processes in vivo. Further studies are needed to assess prospective antihypertensive effects.

  5. Changes of proteolysis and angiotensin-I converting enzyme-inhibitory activity in white-brined cheese as affected by adjunct culture and ripening temperature.

    PubMed

    Sahingil, Didem; Hayaloglu, Ali A; Kirmaci, Huseyin A; Ozer, Barbaros; Simsek, Osman

    2014-11-01

    The effects of use of adjunct cultures (Lactobacillus helveticus and Lb. casei) and ripening temperatures (6 or 12 °C) on proteolysis and angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity in white-brined cheeses were investigated during 120 d ripening. Proteolysis was monitored by urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (urea-PAGE) and reversed phase-HPLC (RP-HPLC) of water-insoluble and -soluble fractions of the cheeses, respectively. Urea-PAGE patterns of the samples revealed that the intensities of the bands representing casein fractions decreased in the experimental cheeses, being more pronounced in the cheeses made with adjunct cultures. Similarly, peptide profiles and the concentrations of individual and total free amino acids were influenced by both the adjunct cultures and ripening temperatures. The ACE-inhibitory activity of the water-soluble extracts of the cheeses were higher in the cheeses made using adjunct cultures (especially Lb. helveticus) and ripened at 12 °C. The ACE-inhibitory activity did not decrease during ripening. The contribution of Lb. helveticus to the development of proteolysis and ACE-inhibitory peptide activities were higher than that of Lb. casei. To conclude, the use of Lb. helveticus as adjunct culture in white-brined cheese and ripening at 12 °C would be recommended to obtain white-brined cheese with high ACE-I-inhibitory peptides activity and higher levels of preoteolysis.

  6. Zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) erases long-term memories in a cockroach.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhouheng; Lubinski, Alexander J; Page, Terry L

    2015-02-01

    Recent efforts to identify the molecules that are involved in the maintenance of long-term memories in mammals have focused attention on atypical isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). Inhibition of these kinases by either the general PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine, or the more specific inhibitor, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), can abolish both long-term potentiation in the hippocampus and as well as spatial, fear, appetitive, and sensorimotor memories. These inhibitors can also abolish long-term facilitation and long-term sensitization in the mollusk Aplysia californica. We have extended these results to an insect, the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. We show that systemic injections of either chelerythrine or ZIP erase long-term olfactory memories in the cockroach, but have no effect on memory acquisition during conditioning. We also show that inhibition of either protein kinase A (PKA) or protein synthesis can block memory acquisition but neither has an effect on the memory once it is formed. The results suggest that sustaining memories in insects requires the persistent activity of one or more isoforms of PKC and point to a strong evolutionary conservation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the persistence of long-term memories in the central nervous system.

  7. Hippocampal Infusion of Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Impairs Recent, but Not Remote, Recognition Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Jena B.; Ocampo, Amber C.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Clark, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial memory in rodents can be erased following the infusion of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) into the dorsal hippocampus via indwelling guide cannulas. It is believed that ZIP impairs spatial memory by reversing established late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it is unclear whether other forms of hippocampus-dependent memory, such as recognition memory, are also supported by hippocampal LTP. In the current study, we tested recognition memory in rats following hippocampal ZIP infusion. In order to combat the limited targeting of infusions via cannula, we implemented a stereotaxic approach for infusing ZIP throughout the dorsal, intermediate, and ventral hippocampus. Rats infused with ZIP 3–7 days after training on the novel object recognition task exhibited impaired object recognition memory compared to control rats (those infused with aCSF). In contrast, rats infused with ZIP 1 month after training performed similar to control rats. The ability to form new memories after ZIP infusions remained intact. We suggest that enhanced recognition memory for recent events is supported by hippocampal LTP, which can be reversed by hippocampal ZIP infusion. PMID:26380123

  8. PvD1 defensin, a plant antimicrobial peptide with inhibitory activity against Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Viviane V; Mello, Érica de O; Carvalho, Laís P; de Melo, Edésio J T; Carvalho, André de O; Fernandes, Katia V S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2015-08-18

    Plant defensins are small cysteine-rich peptides and exhibit antimicrobial activity against a variety of both plant and human pathogens. Despite the broad inhibitory activity that plant defensins exhibit against different micro-organisms, little is known about their activity against protozoa. In a previous study, we isolated a plant defensin named PvD1 from Phaseolus vulgaris (cv. Pérola) seeds, which was seen to be deleterious against different yeast cells and filamentous fungi. It exerted its effects by causing an increase in the endogenous production of ROS (reactive oxygen species) and NO (nitric oxide), plasma membrane permeabilization and the inhibition of medium acidification. In the present study, we investigated whether PvD1 could act against the protozoan Leishmania amazonensis. Our results show that, besides inhibiting the proliferation of L. amazonensis promastigotes, the PvD1 defensin was able to cause cytoplasmic fragmentation, formation of multiple cytoplasmic vacuoles and membrane permeabilization in the cells of this organism. Furthermore, we show, for the first time, that PvD1 defensin was located within the L. amazonensis cells, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular target.

  9. PvD1 defensin, a plant antimicrobial peptide with inhibitory activity against Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Viviane V.; Mello, Érica de O.; Carvalho, Laís P.; de Melo, Edésio J.T.; Carvalho, André de O.; Fernandes, Katia V.S.; Gomes, Valdirene M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant defensins are small cysteine-rich peptides and exhibit antimicrobial activity against a variety of both plant and human pathogens. Despite the broad inhibitory activity that plant defensins exhibit against different micro-organisms, little is known about their activity against protozoa. In a previous study, we isolated a plant defensin named PvD1 from Phaseolus vulgaris (cv. Pérola) seeds, which was seen to be deleterious against different yeast cells and filamentous fungi. It exerted its effects by causing an increase in the endogenous production of ROS (reactive oxygen species) and NO (nitric oxide), plasma membrane permeabilization and the inhibition of medium acidification. In the present study, we investigated whether PvD1 could act against the protozoan Leishmania amazonensis. Our results show that, besides inhibiting the proliferation of L. amazonensis promastigotes, the PvD1 defensin was able to cause cytoplasmic fragmentation, formation of multiple cytoplasmic vacuoles and membrane permeabilization in the cells of this organism. Furthermore, we show, for the first time, that PvD1 defensin was located within the L. amazonensis cells, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular target. PMID:26285803

  10. Identification and functional analysis of a novel bradykinin inhibitory peptide in the venoms of New World Crotalinae pit vipers.

    PubMed

    Graham, Robert Leslie James; Graham, Ciaren; McClean, Stephen; Chen, Tianbao; O'Rourke, Martin; Hirst, David; Theakston, David; Shaw, Chris

    2005-12-23

    A novel undecapeptide has been isolated and structurally characterized from the venoms of three species of New World pit vipers from the subfamily, Crotalinae. These include the Mexican moccasin (Agkistrodon bilineatus), the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis), and the South American bushmaster (Lachesis muta). The peptide was purified from all three venoms using a combination of gel permeation chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Automated Edman degradation sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established its peptide primary structure as: Thr-Pro-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-Asp-Val-Gly-Pro-Arg-OH, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1063.18 Da. A synthetic replicate of the peptide was found to be an antagonist of bradykinin action at the rat vascular B2 receptor. This is the first bradykinin inhibitory peptide isolated from snake venom. Database searching revealed the peptide to be highly structurally related (10/11 residues) with a domain residing between the bradykinin-potentiating peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide domains of a recently cloned precursor from tropical rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom gland. BIP thus represents a novel biological entity from snake venom.

  11. Identification and functional analysis of a novel bradykinin inhibitory peptide in the venoms of New World Crotalinae pit vipers

    SciTech Connect

    James Graham, Robert Leslie . E-mail: rl.graham@ulster.ac.uk; Graham, Ciaren; McClean, Stephen; Chen, Tianbao; O'Rourke, Martin; Hirst, David; Theakston, David; Shaw, Chris

    2005-12-23

    A novel undecapeptide has been isolated and structurally characterized from the venoms of three species of New World pit vipers from the subfamily, Crotalinae. These include the Mexican moccasin (Agkistrodon bilineatus), the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis), and the South American bushmaster (Lachesis muta). The peptide was purified from all three venoms using a combination of gel permeation chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Automated Edman degradation sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established its peptide primary structure as: Thr-Pro-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-Asp-Val-Gly-Pro-Arg-OH, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1063.18 Da. A synthetic replicate of the peptide was found to be an antagonist of bradykinin action at the rat vascular B2 receptor. This is the first bradykinin inhibitory peptide isolated from snake venom. Database searching revealed the peptide to be highly structurally related (10/11 residues) with a domain residing between the bradykinin-potentiating peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide domains of a recently cloned precursor from tropical rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom gland. BIP thus represents a novel biological entity from snake venom.

  12. Relationship between structure and P-glycoprotein inhibitory activity of dimeric peptides related to the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Ambo, Akihiro; Ohkatsu, Hiromichi; Minamizawa, Motoko; Watanabe, Hideko; Sugawara, Shigeki; Nitta, Kazuo; Tsuda, Yuko; Okada, Yoshio; Sasaki, Yusuke

    2012-03-15

    To develop novel inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), dimeric peptides related to an opioid peptide containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore were synthesized and their P-gp inhibitory activities were analyzed. Of the 30 analogs synthesized, N(α),N(ε)-[(CH(3))(2)Mle-Tic](2)Lys-NH(2) and its D-Lys analog were found to exhibit potent P-gp inhibitory activity, twice that of verapamil, in doxorubicin-resistant K562 cells. Structure-activity studies indicated that the correct hydrophobicity and spacer length between two aromatic rings are important structural elements in this series of analogs for inhibition of P-gp.

  13. New developments and applications of bacteriocins and peptides in foods.

    PubMed

    Mills, S; Stanton, C; Hill, C; Ross, R P

    2011-01-01

    There is an increased desire for sophisticated foods, whereby consumers harbor higher expectations of health-promoting benefits above basic nutrition. Moreover, there is a move from the adulteration of foods with chemical preservatives toward biopreservation. Such expectations have led scientists to identify novel approaches to satisfy both demands, which utilize bacteriocin and peptide-based solutions. The best known examples of biopreservation involve bacteriocins. However, with the exception of nisin, bacteriocins have received limited use in the food industry. Peptides can be added to foods to improve consumer health. Some of the best known examples are angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides, which inhibit ACE, a key enzyme involved in blood pressure (BP) regulation. To be effective, these peptides must be bioavailable, but by their nature, peptides are degraded by digestion with proteolytic enzymes. This review critically discusses the use and potential of peptides and bacteriocins in food systems in terms of safety, quality, and improvement of human health.

  14. ACE--Some Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Annie, Ed.; Curtin, Penelope, Ed.

    This publication contains four papers that identify issues within the adult and community education (ACE) sector. "Overview" (Annie Campbell, Peter Thomson) considers what defines ACE; who offers ACE programs; who participates in ACE programs and who does not participate; what are the barriers to participation; who is responsible for…

  15. MK2 inhibitory peptide delivered in nanopolyplexes prevents vascular graft intimal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Brian C.; Hocking, Kyle M.; Osgood, Michael J.; Voskresensky, Igor; Dmowska, Julia; Kilchrist, Kameron V.; Brophy, Colleen M.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2017-01-01

    Autologous vein grafts are commonly used for coronary and peripheral artery bypass but have a high incidence of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and failure. We present a nanopolyplex (NP) approach that efficiently delivers a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)–activated protein (MAPKAP) kinase 2 inhibitory peptide (MK2i) to graft tissue to improve long-term patency by inhibiting pathways that initiate IH. In vitro testing in human vascular smooth muscle cells revealed that formulation into MK2i-NPs increased cell internalization, endosomal escape, and intracellular half-life of MK2i. This efficient delivery mechanism enabled MK2i-NPs to sustain potent inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production and migration in vascular cells. In intact human saphenous vein, MK2i-NPs blocked inflammatory and migratory signaling, as confirmed by reduced phosphorylation of the posttranscriptional gene regulator heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A0, the transcription factor cAMP (adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate) element–binding protein, and the chaperone heat shock protein 27. The molecular effects of MK2i-NPs caused functional inhibition of IH in human saphenous vein cultured ex vivo. In a rabbit vein transplant model, a 30-min intraoperative graft treatment with MK2i-NPs significantly reduced in vivo IH 28 days posttransplant compared with untreated or free MK2i–treated grafts. The decrease in IH in MK2i-NP–treated grafts in the rabbit model also corresponded with decreased cellular proliferation and maintenance of the vascular wall smooth muscle cells in a more contractile phenotype. These data indicate that nanoformulated MK2 inhibitors are a promising strategy for preventing graft failure. PMID:26062847

  16. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide as a Novel Therapy to Control Chronic Visceral Hypersensitivity in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Guo, Lixia; Dai, Hengfen; Huang, Yang; Chen, Qianqian; Lin, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of multiple chronic visceral pain syndromes, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is not well known, and as a result current therapies are ineffective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of spinal protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ) on visceral pain sensitivity in rats with IBS to better understand the pathogenesis and investigate the effect of zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP) as a therapy for chronic visceral pain. Methods Visceral hypersensitivity rats were produced by neonatal maternal separation (NMS). Visceral pain sensitivity was assessed by electromyographic (EMG) responses of abdominal muscles to colorectal distention (CRD). Spinal PKMζ and phosphorylated PKMζ (p-PKMζ) were detected by western blot. Varying doses of ZIP were intrathecally administered to investigate the role of spinal PKMζ in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. The open field test was used to determine if ZIP therapy causes spontaneous motor activity side effects. Results Graded CRD pressure significantly increased EMG responses in NMS rats compared to control rats (p < 0.05). p-PKMζ expression increased in the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral spinal cord in the IBS-like rats with notable concomitant chronic visceral pain compared to control rats (p < 0.05). EMG data revealed that intrathecal ZIP injection (1, 5, and 10 μg) dose-dependently attenuated visceral pain hypersensitivity in IBS-like rats. Conclusions Phosphorylated PKMζ may be involved in the spinal central sensitization of chronic visceral hypersensitivity in IBS, and administration of ZIP could effectively treat chronic visceral pain with good outcomes in rat models. PMID:27776136

  17. Bioactive peptides released from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under accelerated autolysis in a wine model system.

    PubMed

    Alcaide-Hidalgo, J M; Pueyo, E; Polo, M C; Martínez-Rodríguez, A J

    2007-09-01

    The ACE inhibitory activity (IACE) and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC-FL) values of yeast peptides isolated from a model wine during accelerated autolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied. Samples were taken at 6, 24, 48, 121, and 144 h of autolysis. Peptide concentration increased throughout autolysis process. Peptides were fractionated into 2 fractions: F1, constituted by hydrophilic peptides, and F2, containing hydrophobic peptides. Both IACE activity and ORAC-FL values increased during 121 h of autolysis, then decreased afterward. Peptide fraction F2 was the main fraction involved in IACE activity and ORAC-FL.

  18. ACE and ACE2 in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizuiri, Sonoo; Ohashi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) activation has a significant influence on renal disease progression. The classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-angiotensin II (Ang II)-Ang II type 1 (AT1) axis is considered to control the effects of RAS activation on renal disease. However, since its discovery in 2000 ACE2 has also been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the RAS. The synthesis and catabolism of Ang II are regulated via a complex series of interactions, which involve ACE and ACE2. In the kidneys, ACE2 is expressed in the proximal tubules and less strongly in the glomeruli. The synthesis of inactive Ang 1-9 from Ang I and the catabolism of Ang II to produce Ang 1-7 are the main functions of ACE2. Ang 1-7 reduces vasoconstriction, water retention, salt intake, cell proliferation, and reactive oxygen stress, and also has a renoprotective effect. Thus, in the non-classical RAS the ACE2-Ang 1-7-Mas axis counteracts the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. This review examines recent human and animal studies about renal ACE and ACE2. PMID:25664248

  19. Water deprivation enhances the inhibitory effect of natriuretic peptides on cAMP synthesis in rat renal glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Geoffrey E; Li, Xiaohong; Rosado, Juan A

    2004-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of water deprivation on the expression of atrial natiruretic peptide (ANP)(1-28) binding sites in rat kidney. Water deprivation increased the B(max) of glomerular binding sites for ANP(1-28) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)(1-22) without modifying their affinity, an effect that was prevented in the presence of C-atrial natriuretic factor (C-ANF), suggesting that natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) binding sites might be enhanced. Our results indicate that ANP(1-28), CNP(1-22), and C-ANF inhibit cAMP synthesis directly stimulated by forskolin or by the physiological agonists histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine. The inhibitory effect was found to be significantly greater in water-deprived rats than in controls. Our observations suggest that this effect must be attributed to the 67-kDa NPR-C-like protein, because the 67- and 77-kDa NPR-C-like proteins show high and low affinities for CNP(1-22), respectively, and the enhanced inhibitory effect of CNP on cAMP generation in water-deprived rats was detected at subnanomolar concentrations. In addition, using affinity cross-linking studies we have observed that water deprivation increases the expression of the 67-kDa NPR-C-like protein, and HS-142, which binds to NPR-A and the 77-kDa NPR-C-like but not the 67-kDa protein, reduced ligand internalization without affecting cAMP inhibition by ANP(1-28). Finally, we have found that ligand binding to the 67-kDa NPR-C-like protein is reduced by GTPgammaS, suggesting that this receptor is associated with a G protein in renal glomeruli. The enhanced inhibitory role of natriuretic peptides on cAMP synthesis induced by water deprivation may influence glomerular function in the rat kidney.

  20. Hypotensive effects and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides of reishi (Ganoderma lingzhi) auto-digested extract.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hai-Bang; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Ito, Hisatomi; Igami, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Toshitsugu; Kondo, Ryuichiro; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-08-29

    Reishi (Ganoderma lingzhi) has been used as a traditional medicine for millennia. However, relatively little is known about this mushroom's proteins and their bioactivities. In this study, we used reishi's own proteases to hydrolyze its protein and obtained auto-digested reishi (ADR) extract. The extract was subjected to in vitro assays and administered to spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) to determine its potential for use as a hypotensive medication. Bioassay-guided fractionation and de novo sequencing were used for identifying the active compounds. After 4 h administration of ADR, the systolic pressure of SHRs significantly decreased to 34.3 mmHg (19.5% change) and the effect was maintained up to 8 h of administration, with the decrease reaching as low as 26.8 mmHg (15% reduction-compare to base line a decrease of 26.8 mmHg is less than a decrease of 34.3 mmHg so it should give a smaller % reduction). Eleven peptides were identified and four of them showed potent inhibition against ACE with IC50 values ranging from 73.1 μM to 162.7 μM. The results showed that ADR could be a good source of hypotensive peptides that could be used for antihypertensive medication or incorporation into functional foods.

  1. Bi-functional peptides with both trypsin-inhibitory and antimicrobial activities are frequent defensive molecules in Ranidae amphibian skins.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiuwen; Liu, Huan; Yang, Xuening; Che, Qiaolin; Liu, Rui; Yang, Hailong; Liu, Xiuhong; You, Dewen; Wang, Aili; Li, Jianxu; Lai, Ren

    2012-07-01

    Amphibian skins act as the first line against noxious aggression by microorganisms, parasites, and predators. Anti-microorganism activity is an important task of amphibian skins. A large amount of gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been identified from amphibian skins. Only a few of small protease inhibitors have been found in amphibian skins. From skin secretions of 5 species (Odorrana livida, Hylarana nigrovittata, Limnonectes kuhlii, Odorrana grahami, and Amolops loloensis) of Ranidae frogs, 16 small serine protease inhibitor peptides have been purified and characterized. They have lengths of 17-20 amino acid residues (aa). All of them are encoded by precursors with length of 65-70 aa. These small peptides show strong trypsin-inhibitory abilities. Some of them can exert antimicrobial activities. They share the conserved GCWTKSXXPKPC fragment in their primary structures, suggesting they belong to the same families of peptide. Signal peptides of precursors encoding these serine protease inhibitors share obvious sequence similarity with those of precursors encoding AMPs from Ranidae frogs. The current results suggest that these small serine protease inhibitors are the common defensive compounds in frog skin of Ranidae as amphibian skin AMPs.

  2. Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory peptides generated by tryptic hydrolysis of a whey protein concentrate rich in β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Silvana T; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Recio, Isidra; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca

    2013-11-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) is a serine protease involved in the degradation and inactivation of incretin hormones that act by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion after meal ingestion. DPP-IV inhibitors have emerged as new and promising oral agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of β-lactoglobulin as natural source of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides. A whey protein concentrate rich in β-lactoglobulin was hydrolysed with trypsin and fractionated using a chromatographic separation at semipreparative scale. Two of the six collected fractions showed notable DPP-IV inhibitory activity. These fractions were analysed by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to identify peptides responsible for the observed activity. The most potent fragment (IPAVF) corresponded to β-lactoglobulin f(78-82) which IC50 value was 44.7μM. The results suggest that peptides derived from β-lactoglobulin would be beneficial ingredients of foods against type 2 diabetes.

  3. Colon-targeted cell-permeable NFκB inhibitory peptide is orally active against experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungchae; Yum, Soohwan; Yoo, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Sookjin; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Min, Dosik; Kim, Young Mi; Jung, Yunjin

    2012-05-07

    For the purpose of development of orally active peptide therapeutics targeting NFκB for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), two major barriers in oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, metabolic lability and tissue impermeability, were circumvented by introduction of a colon-targeted delivery system and cell permeable peptides (CPP) to NFκB inhibitory peptides (NIP). Suppression of NFκB activation was compared following treatment with various CPP conjugated NIPs (CPP-NIP). The most potent CPP-NIP was loaded in a capsule coated with a colon specific polymer, which was administered orally to colitic rats. The anti-inflammatory activity of the colon-targeted CPP-NIP was evaluated by measuring inflammatory indices in the inflamed colonic tissue. For confirmation of the local action of the CPP-NIP, the same experiment was done after rectal administration. Tissue permeability of the CPP-NIP was examined microscopically and spectrophotometrically using FITC-labeled CPP-NIP (CPP-NIP-FITC). NEMO binding domain peptide (NBD, TALDWSWLQTE) fused with a cell permeable peptide CTP (YGRRARRRARR), CTP-NBD, was most potent in inhibiting NFκB activity in cells. Colon-targeted CTP-NBD, but not colon-targeted NBD and CTP-NBD in an enteric capsule, ameliorated the colonic injury, which was in parallel with decrease in MPO activity and the levels of inflammatory mediators. Intracolonic treatment with CTP-NBD alleviated rat colitis and improved all the inflammatory indicators. CTP-NBD-FITC was detected at much greater level in the inflamed tissue than was NBD-FITC. Taken together, introduction of cell permeability and colon targetability to NIP may be a feasible strategy for an orally active peptide therapy for treatment of IBD.

  4. Empirical and bioinformatic characterization of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) colostrum whey peptides & their angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ashok, N R; Aparna, H S

    2017-08-01

    Whey based peptides are well known for their nutritional and multifunctional properties. In this context, whey proteins from buffalo colostrum & milk were digested by in vitro simulation digestion and analyzed by nano-LC-MS/MS. Functional protein association networks, gene annotations and localization of identified proteins were carried out. An ACE inhibitory peptide sorted from the library was custom synthesized and an in vitro ACE assay was performed. The study led to the identification of 74 small peptides which were clustered into 5 gene functional groups and majority of them were secretory proteins. Among the identified peptides, majority of them were found identical to angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, antioxidant, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory and opioidal peptides. An octapeptide (m/z - 902.51, IQKVAGTW) synthesized was found to inhibit ACE with an IC50 of 300±2µM. The present investigation thus establishes newer vista for food derived peptides having ACE inhibitory potential for nutraceutical or therapeutic applications.

  5. Lysozyme and bilirubin bind to ACE and regulate its conformation and shedding

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Sergei M.; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Akinbi, Henry T.; Nesterovitch, Andrew B.; Epshtein, Yuliya; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Kryukova, Olga V.; Piegeler, Tobias; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Kost, Olga A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) hydrolyzes numerous peptides and is a critical participant in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. Elevated tissue ACE levels are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Blood ACE concentrations are determined by proteolytic cleavage of ACE from the endothelial cell surface, a process that remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified a novel ACE gene mutation (Arg532Trp substitution in the N domain of somatic ACE) that increases blood ACE activity 7-fold and interrogated the mechanism by which this mutation significantly increases blood ACE levels. We hypothesized that this ACE mutation disrupts the binding site for blood components which may stabilize ACE conformation and diminish ACE shedding. We identified the ACE-binding protein in the blood as lysozyme and also a Low Molecular Weight (LMW) ACE effector, bilirubin, which act in concert to regulate ACE conformation and thereby influence ACE shedding. These results provide mechanistic insight into the elevated blood level of ACE observed in patients on ACE inhibitor therapy and elevated blood lysozyme and ACE levels in sarcoidosis patients. PMID:27734897

  6. Bioactive Peptides from Muscle Sources: Meat and Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joseph Thomas; Ross, Reynolds Paul; Bolton, Declan; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Stanton, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive peptides have been identified in a range of foods, including plant, milk and muscle, e.g., beef, chicken, pork and fish muscle proteins. Bioactive peptides from food proteins offer major potential for incorporation into functional foods and nutraceuticals. The aim of this paper is to present an outline of the bioactive peptides identified in the muscle protein of meat to date, with a focus on muscle protein from domestic animals and fish. The majority of research on bioactives from meat sources has focused on angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant peptides. PMID:22254123

  7. Catalytic Features of the Botulinum Neurotoxin A Light Chain Revealed by High Resolution Structure of an Inhibitory Peptide Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Wilson, D.; Tzipori, S.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoNT/A-LC) is a Zn(II)-dependent metalloprotease that blocks the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAP-25, one of the SNARE proteins required for exocytosis. Because of the potential for use of the toxin in bioterrorism and the increasingly widespread application of the toxin in the medical field, there is significant interest in the development of small-molecule inhibitors of the metalloprotease. Efforts to design such inhibitors have not benefited from knowledge of how peptides bind to the active site since the enzyme-peptide structures available previously either were not occupied in the vicinity of the catalytic Zn(II) ion or did not represent the product of SNAP-25 substrate cleavage. Herein we report the 1.4 Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between the BoNT/A-LC and the inhibitory peptide N-Ac-CRATKML, the first structure of the light chain with an inhibitory peptide bound at the catalytic Zn(II) ion. The peptide is bound with the Cys S? atom coordinating the metal ion. Surprisingly, the cysteine sulfur is oxidized to the sulfenic acid form. Given the unstable nature of this species in solution, is it likely that oxidation occurs on the enzyme. In addition to the peptide-bound structure, we report two structures of the unliganded light chain with and without the Zn(II) cofactor bound at 1.25 and 1.20 Angstroms resolution, respectively. The two structures are nearly identical, confirming that the Zn(II) ion plays a purely catalytic role. Additionally, the structure of the Zn(II)-bound uncomplexed enzyme allows identification of the catalytic water molecule and a second water molecule that occupies the same position as the peptidic oxygen in the tetrahedral intermediate. This observation suggests that the enzyme active site is prearranged to stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate of the protease reaction.

  8. Identification of bioactive peptide from Oreochromis niloticus skin gelatin.

    PubMed

    Choonpicharn, Sadabpong; Tateing, Suriya; Jaturasitha, Sanchai; Rakariyatham, Nuansri; Suree, Nuttee; Niamsup, Hataichanoke

    2016-02-01

    Fish skin, one type of wastes generated from Nile tilapia processing, is still a good source of collagen and gelatin. Bioactive peptides can be obtained from Nile tilapia skin gelatin by trypsin digestion. Trypsin hydrolysate was subsequently purified by gel filtration chromatography. Trypsin A fraction showed the greatest reducing power (5.138 ± 1.060 μM trolox/mg peptide) among all hydrolysate fractions, while trypsin B fraction from gel filtration column was found to exhibit the best radical scavenging and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities 8.16 ± 2.18 μg trolox/mg peptide and 59.32 ± 9.97 % inhibition, respectively. The most active fraction was subjected to MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS. After annotation by Mascot sequence matching software (Matrix Science) with Ludwig NR Database, two peptide sequences were identified; GPEGPAGAR (MW 810.87 Da) and GETGPAGPAGAAGPAGPR (MW 1490.61 Da). The docking analysis suggested that the shape of the shorter peptide may be slightly more proper, to fit into the binding cleft of the ACE. However, the binding affinities calculated from the docking showed no significant difference between the two peptides. In good agreement with the in silico data, results from the in vitro ACE inhibitory activity with synthetic peptides also showed no significant difference. Both peptides are thus interesting novel candidates suitable for further development as ACE inhibitory and antioxidant agents from the natural source.

  9. Inhibition of ovarian cancer cell proliferation by a cell cycle inhibitory peptide fused to a thermally responsive polypeptide carrier

    PubMed Central

    Massodi, Iqbal; Moktan, Shama; Rawat, Aruna; Bidwell, Gene L.; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-01-01

    Current treatment of solid tumors is limited by normal tissue tolerance, resulting in a narrow therapeutic index. To increase drug specificity and efficacy and to reduce toxicity in normal tissues, we have developed a polypeptide carrier for a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, which has the potential to be thermally targeted to the tumor site. The design of this polypeptide is based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). The coding sequence of ELP was modified by the addition of the cell penetrating peptide Bac-7 at the N-terminus and a 23 amino acid peptide derived from p21 at the C-terminus (Bac-ELP1-p21). Bac-ELP1-p21 is soluble in aqueous solutions below physiological temperature (37°C) but aggregates when the temperature is raised above 39°C, making it a promising thermally responsive therapeutic carrier that may be actively targeted to solid tumors by application of focused hyperthermia. While Bac-ELP1-p21 at 37°C did not have any effect on SKOV-3 cell proliferation, the use of hyperthermia increased the antiproliferative effect of Bac-ELP1-p21 compared with a thermally unresponsive control polypeptide. Bac-ELP1-p21 displayed both a cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution in the SKOV-3 cells, with nuclear-localized polypeptide enriched in the heated cells, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Using Western blotting, we show that Bac-ELP1-p21 caused a decrease in Rb phosphorylation levels in cells treated at 42°C. The polypeptide also induced caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and cell cycle arrest in S-phase and G2/M-phase. These studies indicate that ELP is a promising macromolecular carrier for the delivery of cell cycle inhibitory peptides to solid tumors. PMID:19588502

  10. The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor an anti-inflammatory peptide; therapeutics originating from amebic abscess of the liver.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, Juan R

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica in culture produces a pentapeptide (MQCNS). This oligopeptide inhibits the in vitro and in vivo locomotion of human monocytes, hence its denomination Monocyte Locomotion Inhibitory Factor (MLIF). The original isolated peptide and its synthetic construct display similar effects, among others, being inhibition of the respiratory burst in monocytes and neutrophils, decrease of Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) skin hypersensitivity in guinea pigs and gerbils, and delay of mononuclear leukocytes in human Rebuck skin windows with inhibition of vascular cell Very late antigen (VLA)-4 and Vascular adhesion molecules (VCAM) in endothelia and monocytes. The MLIF molecular mechanism of action is unknown, but data reveal its implication in Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. This could explain MLIF multiplicity of biological effects. On the other hand, the amebic peptide has been useful in treating experimental amebiasis of the liver. The amebic peptide is effective in reducing inflammation induced by carragenin and arthritis in a Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Microarray data from experimental arthritis revealed an MLIF gene expression profile that includes genes that are involved in apoptosis, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, and inflammation / chemotaxis. MLIF could be involved in unsuspected biological factions because there is increasing data on the peptide effect on several cell activities. This review also presents uses of MLIF as described in patents.

  11. Generation and functional characterization of a BCL10-inhibitory peptide that represses NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Daniela; Stilo, Romania; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Monti, Simona Maria; Tizzano, Barbara; de Capua, Antonia; Varricchio, Ettore; Liguoro, Domenico; Zotti, Tiziana; Formisano, Silvestro; Ruvo, Menotti; Vito, Pasquale

    2009-08-27

    The molecular complex containing BCL10 and CARMA [CARD (caspase recruitment domain)-containing MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase)] proteins has recently been identified as a key component in the signal transduction pathways that regulate activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells. Assembly of complexes containing BCL10 and CARMA proteins relies on homophilic interactions established between the CARDs of these proteins. In order to identify BCL10-inhibitory peptides, we have established a method of assaying peptides derived from the CARD of BCL10 in binding competition assays of CARD-CARD self-association. By this procedure, a short peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 91-98 of BCL10 has been selected as an effective inhibitor of protein self-association. When tested in cell assays for its capacity to block NF-kappaB activation, this peptide represses activation of NF-kappaB mediated by BCL10, CARMA3 and PMA/ionomycin stimulation. Collectively, these results indicate that residues 91-98 of BCL10 are involved in BCL10 self-association and also participate in the interaction with external partners. We also show that blocking of the CARD of BCL10 may potentially be used for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with inappropriate NF-kappaB activation.

  12. Stability to gastrointestinal enzymes and structure-activity relationship of beta-casein-peptides with antihypertensive properties.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Ana; del Mar Contreras, María; Ramos, Mercedes; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra

    2009-10-01

    Physiological digestion plays a key role in the formation and degradation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides. In this study, we evaluated the impact of a simulated gastrointestinal digestion on the stability of eight peptides previously identified in fermented milk with antihypertensive activity. Two of these identified peptides with sequences LHLPLP and LVYPFPGPIPNSLPQNIPP, possess ACE-inhibitory activity in vitro and antihypertensive activity in vivo. The results showed that LHLPLP was resistant to digestive enzymes. In contrast, LVYPFPGPIPNSLPQNIPP was totally hydrolyzed and its activity decreased after incubation with pepsin and a pancreatic extract. The peptide LHLPLP was incubated with ACE and was found to be a true inhibitor of the enzyme and to exhibit a competitive inhibitor pattern. A structure-activity relationship study of this peptide was carried out by synthesizing several modified peptides related to the sequence LHLPLP. The substitution of amino acid Leu in the penultimate position by Gly improved the ACE-inhibitory activity twofold and the substitution of Pro at C-terminal position by Arg increased the activity twofold, with an IC50 of LHLPLR as low as 1.8 microM.

  13. Triple ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition in heart failure: a comparison with ACE and dual ECE-NEP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mellin, Virginie; Jeng, Arco Y; Monteil, Christelle; Renet, Sylvanie; Henry, Jean Paul; Thuillez, Christian; Mulder, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Mortality remains high in chronic heart failure (CHF) because under ACE inhibitor treatment other neurohumoral systems remain/become (de)activated, such as the endothelin and atrial natriuretic peptide pathways. Dual endothelin-converting enzyme-neutral endopeptidase (ECE-NEP) inhibition exerts beneficial effects in experimental CHF, but whether "triple" ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition is superior to ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition is unknown. We compared, in rats with CHF, ACE-ECE-NEP to ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition in terms of left ventricular (LV) hemodynamics and remodeling. Benazepril (2 mg/kg/d) or the ECE-NEP inhibitor CGS26303 (10 mg/kg/d) were administered alone or in combination (subcutaneously for 28 days starting 7 days after coronary ligation). ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition reduced blood pressure more markedly than ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition. All treatments increased cardiac output to the same extent, but ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition reduced LV diameter and LV end-diastolic pressure more markedly than ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition. The reduction of LV weight and collagen accumulation in the "viable" myocardium was most pronounced after ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition. These results, obtained in experimental CHF, illustrate a further improvement of LV hemodynamics and structure after ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition compared with either ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition, but whether this is associated with a further improvement of exercise tolerance and/or survival remains to be determined.

  14. Comprehensive Database Service : ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, Morio; Abe, Tetsuya

    The Data base, ACE commercialized by Chunichi Shimbun in Feb. 1986, aims at covering not only newspaper articles but also the other information which composes different data bases. This paper introduces newspaper articles, new material information and character information which are included in ACE. The content of ACE, how to use the online service, and future subjects are described.

  15. Characterization of Peptides from Capsicum annuum Hybrid Seeds with Inhibitory Activity Against α-Amylase, Serine Proteinases and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Vieira Bard, Gabriela C; Nascimento, Viviane V; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Rodrigues, Rosana; Perales, Jonas; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, André O; Fernandes, Katia Valevski S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last several years, the activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), isolated from plant species, against different microorganisms has been demonstrated. More recently, some of these AMPs have been described as potent inhibitors of α-amylases and serine proteinases from insects and mammals. The aim of this work was to obtain AMPs from protein extracts of a hybrid Capsicum (Ikeda × UENF 1381) seeds and to evaluate their microbial and enzyme inhibitory activities. Initially, proteins were extracted from the Capsicum hybrid seeds in buffer (sodium phosphate pH 5.4,) and precipitated with ammonium sulfate (90% saturated). Extract of hybrid seeds was subjected to size exclusion chromatography, and three fractions were obtained: S1, S2 and S3. The amino acid sequence, obtained by mass spectrometry, of the 6 kDa peptide from the S3 fraction, named HyPep, showed 100% identity with PSI-1.2, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from C. annuum seeds, however the bifunctionality of this inhibitor against two enzymes is being shown for the first time in this work. The S3 fraction showed the highest antifungal activity, inhibiting all the yeast strains tested, and it also exhibited inhibitory activity against human salivary and Callosobruchus maculatus α-amylases as well as serine proteinases.

  16. The inhibitory effects of synthetic short peptides, mimicking MICA and targeting at NKG2D receptors, on function of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Wei, Haiming; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2005-03-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on most of human NK cells, one of whose ligands is MICA. Based on the crystal structure of NKG2D-MICA complex, we synthesized three short peptides (P1, P2 and P3), mimicking functional alpha1 and alpha2 domain of MICA. The inhibitory effects of three peptides on NK-92 cells, a human NK cell line against Hela cells were observed and the inhibitory percentage was 38% at maximum for P1+P2+P3 in concentration of 1nM. The same peptides had no effect on NK-92 cell against target cells lacking MICA (K562 cells line). The unrelated peptides as controls had no effect on the system. Two peptides (P2 and P3) were prolonged at one or both ends, and the longer forms of peptides exerted stronger inhibitory effects than their shorter forms. Each combination of two peptides exerted a stronger function than single peptide (P1, P2, P3), indicating that shedding of longer amino acid sequence of alpha1 domain or more domain sites of MICA are better than shorter sequence and fewer sites. P1+P2+P3 revealed the almost same inhibitory rate as the soluble MICA (sMICA). P1+P2+P3 were also able to alleviate the concanavalin A-induced murine autoimmune hepatitis in vivo, conforming the similarity of NKG2D between human and mice. The results demonstrate that MICA-mimicking peptides will be useful to search the specific functional sites for NKG2D-MICA interaction, but also promising in explaining NKG2D-related autoimmunity.

  17. The solution structure of horseshoe crab antimicrobial peptide tachystatin B with an inhibitory cystine-knot motif.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Naoki; Kouno, Takahide; Nakahara, Taku; Takaya, Kenji; Osaki, Tsukasa; Kawabata, Shun-Ichiro; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2007-04-01

    Tachystatin B is an antimicrobial and a chitin-binding peptide isolated from the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus) consisting of two isopeptides called tachystatin B1 and B2. We have determined their solution structures using NMR experiments and distance geometry calculations. The 20 best converged structures of tachystatin B1 and B2 exhibited root mean square deviations of 0.46 and 0.49 A, respectively, for the backbone atoms in Cys(4)-Arg(40). Both structures have identical conformations, and they contain a short antiparallel beta-sheet with an inhibitory cystine-knot (ICK) motif that is distributed widely in the antagonists for voltage-gated ion channels, although tachystatin B does not have neurotoxic activity. The structural homology search provided several peptides with structures similar to that of tachystatin B. However, most of them have the advanced functions such as insecticidal activity, suggesting that tachystatin B may be a kind of ancestor of antimicrobial peptide in the molecular evolutionary history. Tachystatin B also displays a significant structural similarity to tachystatin A, which is member of the tachystatin family. The structural comparison of both tachystatins indicated that Tyr(14) and Arg(17) in the long loop between the first and second strands might be the essential residues for binding to chitin.

  18. Structural analysis of calmodulin binding by nNOS inhibitory amphibian peptides.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Antonio N; Bowie, John H; Pukala, Tara L

    2015-01-20

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous protein in nature and plays a regulatory role in numerous biological processes, including the upregulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in vivo. Several peptides that prevent NO production by interacting with CaM have been isolated in the cutaneous secretions of Australian amphibians, and are thought to serve as a defense mechanism against predators. In this work, we probe the mechanism by which three of these peptides, namely, caerin 1.8, dahlein 5.6, and a synthetic modification of citropin 1.1, interact with CaM to inhibit NO signaling. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the binding interactions and revealed that all the peptides bind to CaM in a similar fashion, with the peptide encapsulated between the two lobes of CaM. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry was used to investigate the changes in collision cross section that occur as a result of complexation, providing additional evidence for this binding mode. Finally, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to track chemical shift changes upon binding. The results obtained confirm that these complexes adopt canonical collapsed structures and demonstrate the strength of the interaction between the peptides and CaM. An understanding of these molecular recognition events provides insights into the underlying mechanism of the amphibian host-defense system.

  19. Inhibitory effects of a peptide-fusion protein (Latarcin-PAP1-Thanatin) against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Bahrani, Hirbod; Shankar, Esaki M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2014-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) outbreaks have led to a serious economic burden, as the available treatment strategies can only alleviate disease symptoms, and no effective therapeutics or vaccines are currently available for human use. Here, we report the use of a new cost-effective approach involving production of a recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein that is scalable for the treatment of CHIKV infection. A peptide-fusion recombinant protein LATA-PAP1-THAN that was generated by joining Latarcin (LATA) peptide with the N-terminus of the PAP1 antiviral protein, and the Thanatin (THAN) peptide to the C-terminus, was produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. The antiviral LATA-PAP1-THAN protein showed 89.0% reduction of viral plaque formation compared with PAP1 (46.0%), LATA (67.0%) or THAN (79.3%) peptides alone. The LATA-PAP1-THAN protein reduced the viral RNA load that was 0.89-fold compared with the untreated control cells. We also showed that PAP1 resulted in 0.44-fold reduction, and THAN and LATA resulting in 0.78-fold and 0.73-fold reductions, respectively. The LATA-PAP1-THAN protein inhibited CHIKV replication in the Vero cells at an EC50 of 11.2μg/ml, which is approximately half of the EC50 of PAP1 (23.7μg/ml) and protected the CHIKV-infected mice at the dose of 0.75mg/ml. We concluded that production of antiviral peptide-fusion protein in E. coli as inclusion bodies could accentuate antiviral activities, enhance cellular internalisation, and could reduce product toxicity to host cells and is scalable to epidemic response quantities.

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2): comparative modeling of the active site, specificity requirements, and chloride dependence.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie L; Jackson, Richard M; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2003-11-18

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, represents a new and potentially important target in cardio-renal disease. A model of the active site of ACE2, based on the crystal structure of testicular ACE, has been developed and indicates that the catalytic mechanism of ACE2 resembles that of ACE. Structural differences exist between the active site of ACE (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase) and ACE2 (carboxypeptidase) that are responsible for the differences in specificity. The main differences occur in the ligand-binding pockets, particularly at the S2' subsite and in the binding of the peptide carboxy-terminus. The model explains why the classical ACE inhibitor lisinopril is unable to bind to ACE2. On the basis of the ability of ACE2 to cleave a variety of biologically active peptides, a consensus sequence of Pro-X-Pro-hydrophobic/basic for the protease specificity of ACE2 has been defined that is supported by the ACE2 model. The dipeptide, Pro-Phe, completely inhibits ACE2 activity at 180 microM with angiotensin II as the substrate. As with ACE, the chloride dependence of ACE2 is substrate-specific such that the hydrolysis of angiotensin I and the synthetic peptide substrate, Mca-APK(Dnp), are activated in the presence of chloride ions, whereas the cleavage of angiotensin II is inhibited. The ACE2 model is also suggestive of a possible mechanism for chloride activation. The structural insights provided by these analyses for the differences in inhibition pattern and substrate specificity among ACE and its homologue ACE2 and for the chloride dependence of ACE/ACE2 activity are valuable in understanding the function and regulation of ACE2.

  1. Isolation, characterization and mechanism of action of an antimicrobial peptide from Lecythis pisonis seeds with inhibitory activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Maria Eliza Brambila; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares; Gomes, Valdirene Moreira; Carvalho, André de Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are produced by a range of organisms as a first line of defense against invaders or competitors. Owing to their broad antimicrobial activity, AMPs have attracted attention as a potential source of chemotherapeutic drugs. The increasing prevalence of infections caused by Candida species as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients requires new drugs. Lecythis pisonis is a Lecythydaceae tree that grows in Brazil. The AMPs produced by this tree have not been described previously. We describe the isolation of 12 fractions enriched in peptides from L. pisonis seeds. Of the 12 fractions, at 10 μg/ml, the F4 fraction had the strongest growth inhibitory effect (53.7%) in Candida albicans, in addition to a loss of viability of 94.9%. The F4 fraction was separated into seven sub-fractions by reversed-phase chromatography. The F4.7' fraction had the strongest activity at 10 μg/ml, inhibiting C. albicans growth by 38.5% and a 69.3% loss of viability. The peptide in F4.7' was sequenced and was found to be similar to plant defensins. For this reason, the peptide was named L. pisonis defensin 1 (Lp-Def1). The mechanism of action that is responsible for C. albicans inhibition by Lp-Def1 includes a slight increase of reactive oxygen species induction and a significant loss of mitochondrial function. The results described here support the future development of plant defensins, specifically Lp-Def1, as new therapeutic substances against fungi, especially C. albicans.

  2. Inhibitory mechanism of peptides with a repeating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residue pattern on interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guoying; Wang, Yuejian; Cummins, Scott; Walton, Shelley; Mounsey, Kate; Liu, Xiaosong; Wei, Ming Q; Wang, Tianfang

    2017-03-04

    Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a cytokine that is able to downregulate inflammation. Its overexpression is directly associated with the difficulty in the clearance of chronic viral infections, such as chronic hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV infection, and infection-related cancer. IL-10 signaling blockade has been proposed as a promising way of clearing chronic viral infection and preventing tumor growth in animal models. Recently, we have reported that peptides with a helical repeating pattern of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues are able to inhibit IL-10 significantly both in vitro and in vivo. (1) In this work, we seek to further study the inhibiting mechanism of these peptides using sequence-modified peptides. As evidenced by both experimental and molecular dynamics simulation in concert the N-terminal hydrophobic peptide constructed with repeating hydrophobic and hydrophilic pattern of residues is more likely to inhibit IL10. In addition, the sequence length and the ability of protonation are also important for inhibition activity.

  3. Binding properties of a peptide derived from beta-lactamase inhibitory protein.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, G W; Huang, W; Palzkill, T

    2001-12-01

    To overcome the antibiotic resistance mechanism mediated by beta-lactamases, small-molecule beta-lactamase inhibitors, such as clavulanic acid, have been used. This approach, however, has applied selective pressure for mutations that result in beta-lactamases no longer sensitive to beta-lactamase inhibitors. On the basis of the structure of beta-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP), novel peptide inhibitors of beta-lactamase have been constructed. BLIP is a 165-amino-acid protein that is a potent inhibitor of TEM-1 beta-lactamase (K(i) = 0.3 nM). The cocrystal structure of TEM-1 beta-lactamase and BLIP indicates that residues 46 to 51 of BLIP make critical interactions with the active site of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. A peptide containing this six-residue region of BLIP was found to retain sufficient binding energy to interact with TEM-1 beta-lactamase. Inhibition assays with the BLIP peptide reveal that, in addition to inhibiting TEM-1 beta-lactamase, the peptide also inhibits a class A beta-lactamase and a class C beta-lactamase that are not inhibited by BLIP. The crystal structures of class A and C beta-lactamases and two penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) reveal that the enzymes have similar three-dimensional structures in the vicinity of the active site. This similarity suggests that the BLIP peptide inhibitor may have a broad range of activity that can be used to develop novel small-molecule inhibitors of various classes of beta-lactamases and PBPs.

  4. Binding Properties of a Peptide Derived from β-Lactamase Inhibitory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rudgers, Gary W.; Huang, Wanzhi; Palzkill, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    To overcome the antibiotic resistance mechanism mediated by β-lactamases, small-molecule β-lactamase inhibitors, such as clavulanic acid, have been used. This approach, however, has applied selective pressure for mutations that result in β-lactamases no longer sensitive to β-lactamase inhibitors. On the basis of the structure of β-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP), novel peptide inhibitors of β-lactamase have been constructed. BLIP is a 165-amino-acid protein that is a potent inhibitor of TEM-1 β-lactamase (Ki = 0.3 nM). The cocrystal structure of TEM-1 β-lactamase and BLIP indicates that residues 46 to 51 of BLIP make critical interactions with the active site of TEM-1 β-lactamase. A peptide containing this six-residue region of BLIP was found to retain sufficient binding energy to interact with TEM-1 β-lactamase. Inhibition assays with the BLIP peptide reveal that, in addition to inhibiting TEM-1 β-lactamase, the peptide also inhibits a class A β-lactamase and a class C β-lactamase that are not inhibited by BLIP. The crystal structures of class A and C β-lactamases and two penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) reveal that the enzymes have similar three-dimensional structures in the vicinity of the active site. This similarity suggests that the BLIP peptide inhibitor may have a broad range of activity that can be used to develop novel small-molecule inhibitors of various classes of β-lactamases and PBPs. PMID:11709298

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity. PMID:27621684

  6. Isolation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting triterpenes from Schinus molle.

    PubMed

    Olafsson, K; Jaroszewski, J W; Smitt, U W; Nyman, U

    1997-08-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of extracts of Schinus molle leaves, using an in vitro assay, led to the isolation of ACE-inhibitory steroidal triterpenes of the euphane type, identified by means of NMR spectroscopic methods. One of the triterpenes was isolated as an equilibrium mixture of epimeric aldehydes. The triterpenes showed moderate ACE-inhibitory activity (IC(50) about 250 microM).

  7. The HGF inhibitory peptide HGP-1 displays promising in vitro and in vivo efficacy for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lisha; Li, Chunlin; Zhu, Yimin

    2015-10-06

    HGF/MET pathway mediates cancer initiation and development. Thus, inhibition on HGF-initiated MET signaling pathway would provide a new approach to cancer targeted therapeutics. In our study, we identified a targeting peptide candidate binding to HGF which was named HGF binding peptide-1 (HGP-1) via bacterial surface display methods coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). HGP-1 showed the moderate affinity when determined with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique and high specificity in binding to HGF while assessed by fluorescence-based ELISA assay. The results from MTT and in vitro migration assay indicated that HGF-dependent cell proliferation and migration could be inhibited by HGP-1. In vivo administration of HGP-1 led to an effective inhibitory effect on tumor growth in A549 tumor xenograft models. Moreover, findings from Western Blots revealed that HGP-1 could down-regulated the phosphorylation levels of MET and ERK1/2 initiated by HGF, which suggested that HGP-1 could disrupt the activation of HGF/MET signaling to influence the cell activity. All the data highlighted the potential of HGP-1 to be a potent inhibitor for HGF/MET signaling.

  8. Directed Evolution of an LBP/CD14 Inhibitory Peptide and Its Anti-Endotoxin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Li; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Guan-song; Ji, Fu-yun; Mei, Chun-xia; Liu, Juan; Wu, Guo-ming

    2014-01-01

    Background LPS-binding protein (LBP) and its ligand CD14 are located upstream of the signaling pathway for LPS-induced inflammation. Blocking LBP and CD14 binding might prevent LPS-induced inflammation. In previous studies, we obtained a peptide analog (MP12) for the LBP/CD14 binding site and showed that this peptide analog had anti-endotoxin activity. In this study, we used in vitro directed evolution for this peptide analog to improve its in vivo and in vitro anti-endotoxin activity. Methods We used error-prone PCR (ep-PCR) and induced mutations in the C-terminus of LBP and attached the PCR products to T7 phages to establish a mutant phage display library. The positive clones that competed with LBP for CD14 binding was obtained by screening. We used both in vivo and in vitro experiments to compare the anti-endotoxin activities of a polypeptide designated P1 contained in a positive clone and MP12. Results 11 positive clones were obtained from among target phages. Sequencing showed that 9 positive clones had a threonine (T) to methionine (M) mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. Compared to polypeptide MP12, polypeptide P1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α expression and NF-κB activity in U937 cells (P<0.05). Compared to MP12, P1 significantly improved arterial oxygen pressure, an oxygenation index, and lung pathology scores in LPS-induced ARDS rats (P<0.05). Conclusion By in vitro directed evolution of peptide analogs for the LBP/CD14 binding site, we established a new polypeptide (P1) with a threonine (T)-to-methionine (M) mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. This polypeptide had high anti-endotoxin activity in vitro and in vivo, which suggested that amino acid 287 in the C-terminus of LBP may play an important role in LBP binding with CD14. PMID:25025695

  9. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  10. Preparation and characterization of novel bioactive peptides responsible for angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibition from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Li, C H; Osajima, Y

    1999-07-01

    Reported is the preparation of wheat germ (WG) hydrolyzate with potent angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, and the characterization of peptides responsible for ACE inhibition. Successful hydrolyzate with the most potent ACE inhibitory activity was obtained by 0.5 wt.%-8 h Bacillus licheniformis alkaline protease hydrolysis after 3.0 wt.%-3 h alpha-amylase treatment of defatted WG (IC50; 0.37 mg protein ml(-1)). The activity of WG hydrolyzate was markedly increased by ODS and subsequent AG50W purifications (IC50; 0.018 mg protein ml(-1)). As a result of isolations by high performance liquid chromatographies, 16 peptides with the IC50 value of less than 20 microM, composed of 2-7 amino acid residues were identified from the WG hydrolyzate. Judging from the high content (260 mg in 100 g of AG50W fraction) and powerful ACE inhibitory activity (IC50; 0.48 microM), Ile-Val-Tyr was identified as a main contributor to the ACE inhibition of the hydrolyzate.

  11. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Oat (Avena sativa L.), Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), and Highland Barley (Hordeum vulgare trifurcatum (L.) Trofim) Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Yu, Guoyong; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Bolin; Fan, Junfeng

    2015-11-04

    Peptides released from oat, buckwheat, and highland barley proteins were examined for their in vitro inhibitory effects on dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4), an enzyme that deactivates incretin hormones involved in insulin secretion. All of the hydrolysates exhibited DPP4 inhibitory activities, with IC50 values ranging from 0.13 mg/mL (oat glutelin alcalase digestion) to 8.15 mg/mL (highland barley albumin tryptic digestion). The lowest IC50 values in gastrointestinal, alcalase, and tryptic digestions were 0.99 mg/mL (oat flour), 0.13 mg/mL (oat glutelin), and 1.83 mg/mL (highland barley glutelin). In all, 35 peptides of more than seven residues were identified in the tryptic hydrolysates of oat globulin using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Peptides LQAFEPLR and EFLLAGNNK were synthesized and their DPP4 inhibitory activities determined. LQAFEPLR showed high in vitro DPP4 inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 103.5 μM.

  12. Inhibitory effect of polysaccharide peptide (PSP) against Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Hao, Xingan; Wu, Yunfeng

    2015-04-01

    Polysaccharides are essential macromolecules present in all living organisms, and have many kinds of biological activities, such as anti-oxidation, hypoglycemic, enhancing immunity, anti-aging, anti-rheumatism, anti-cancer and so on. In this study, the antiviral activity of polysaccharide peptide (PSP) was tested, compared with Ningnanmycin, and firstly found it has a stronger antiviral activity by using half-leaf method and leaf disk method. Subsequently, the mechanism of antiviral activity of PSP was preliminarily studied. As a result, its antiviral effect was better than the commercial agent Ningnanmycin, despite of protective effect, curative effect and inactivation effect. On the other hand, PSP as a commercial anti-cancer drug could easily and rapidly get in large quantities by liquid fermentation, which makes the industrialized production feasible. Also PSP is less toxic, easily biodegradable and ecofriendly. All the results are suggesting that PSP has potential as a pesticide to be used for the control of plant virus in the future.

  13. Lineage -CD34+CD31+ cells that appear in association with severe burn injury are inhibitory on the production of antimicrobial peptides by epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shohei; Lee, Jong O; Nakamura, Kiwamu; Suzuki, Sumihiro; Hendon, David N; Kobayashi, Makiko; Suzuki, Fujio

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are major host defense effectors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa skin infections. Due to the lack of such peptide production, severely burned hosts are greatly susceptible to P. aeruginosa burn wound infection. β-Defensin (HBD) production by normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) was inhibited by lineage(-)CD34(+) cells isolated from peripheral blood of severely burned patients. Lineage(-)CD34(+) cells obtained from severely burned patients were characterized as CD31(+), while healthy donor lineage(-)CD34(+) cells were shown to be CD31(-) cells. Lineage(-)CD34(+)CD31(-) cells did not show any inhibitory activities on HBD-1 production by NHEK. CCL2 and IL-10 released from lineage(-)CD34(+)CD31(+) cells were shown to be inhibitory on the peptide production by NHEK, while these soluble factors were not produced by lineage(-)CD34(+)CD31(-) cells. After treatment with a mixture of mAbs for CCL2 and IL-10, the culture fluids of lineage(-)CD34(+)CD31(+) cells did not show any inhibitory activities on HBD-1 production by NHEK. Lineage(-)CD34(+)CD31(+) cells that appear in association with burn injuries play a role on the inhibition of antimicrobial peptide production by skin keratinocytes through the production of CCL2 and IL-10.

  14. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konop, Christopher J.; Knickelbine, Jennifer J.; Sygulla, Molly S.; Wruck, Colin D.; Vestling, Martha M.; Stretton, Antony O. W.

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript ( As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10-9 M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level.

  15. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Konop, Christopher J; Knickelbine, Jennifer J; Sygulla, Molly S; Wruck, Colin D; Vestling, Martha M; Stretton, Antony O W

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript (As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10(-9) M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. Influence of polar side chains modifications on the dual enkephalinase inhibitory activity and conformation of human opiorphin, a pain perception related peptide.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mònica; Marcelo, Filipa; Calle, Luis P; Rougeot, Catherine; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Arsequell, Gemma; Valencia, Gregorio

    2015-11-15

    The dual inhibitory action of the pain related peptide opiorphin (H-Gln-Arg-Phe-Ser-Arg-OH) against neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and aminopeptidase N (AP-N) was further investigated by a SAR study involving minor modifications on the polar side chains of Arg residues and glycosylation with monosaccharides at Ser. None of them exerted dual or individual inhibitory potency superior than opiorphin. However, the correlations deduced offer further proof for the key role of these residues upon the binding and bioactive conformational stabilization of opiorphin. NMR conformational studies on the glycopeptides suggest that they are still very flexible compounds that may attain their respective bioactive conformations.

  17. A novel short anionic antibacterial peptide isolated from the skin of Xenopus laevis with broad antibacterial activity and inhibitory activity against breast cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Siming; Hao, Linlin; Bao, Wanguo; Zhang, Ping; Su, Dan; Cheng, Yunyun; Nie, Linyan; Wang, Gang; Hou, Feng; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A vastarray of bioactive peptides from amphibian skin secretions is attracting increasing attention due to the growing problem of bacteria resistant to conventional antibiotics. In this report, a small molecular antibacterial peptide, named Xenopus laevis antibacterial peptide-P1 (XLAsp-P1), was isolated from the skin of Xenopus laevis using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The primary structure of XLAsp-P1, which has been proved to be a novel peptide by BLAST search in AMP database, was DEDDD with a molecular weight of 607.7 Da analysed by Edman degradation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS). The highlight of XLAsp-P1 is the strong in vitro potency against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) starting at 10 μg/mL and potent inhibitory activity against breast cancer cell at tested concentrations from 5 to 50 μg/mL. In addition, only 6.2 % of red blood cells was haemolytic when incubated with 64 μg/mL (higher than MICs of all bacterial strain) of XLAsp-P1. The antimicrobial mechanism for this novel peptide was the destruction of the cell membrane investigated by transmission electron microscopy. All these showed that XLAsp-P1 is a novel short anionic antibacterial peptide with broad antibacterial activity and inhibitory activity against breast cancer cell.

  18. Identification of peptides in wheat germ hydrolysate that demonstrate calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Akiyama, Sayaka; Guo, Jian; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-12-15

    Hydrolysis of wheat germ by proteases resulted in bioactive peptides that demonstrated an inhibitory effect against the vasoconstrictive Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). The hydrolysate by thermolysin (1.0wt%, 5h) showed a particularly potent CaMK II inhibition. As a result of mixed mode high-performance liquid chromatography of thermolysin hydrolysate with pH elution gradient ranging between 4.8 and 8.9, the fraction eluted at pH 8.9 was the most potent CaMK II inhibitor. From this fraction, Trp-Val and Trp-Ile were identified as CaMK II inhibitors. In Sprague-Dawley rats, an enhanced aortic CaMK II activity by 1μM phenylephrine was significantly (p<0.05) suppressed by 15-min incubation with 300μM Trp-Val or Trp-Ile. On the basis of Ca(2+)-chelating fluorescence and CaMK II activity assays, it was concluded that Trp-Val and Trp-Ile competed with Ca(2+)-CaM complex to bind to CaMK II with Ki values of 5.4 and 3.6μM, respectively.

  19. Gastric inhibitory peptide, serotonin, and glucagon are unexpected chloride secretagogues in the rectal gland of the skate (Leucoraja erinacea)

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Catherine A.; Decker, Sarah E.; Silva, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the rectal gland of the dogfish shark 50 years ago, experiments with this tissue have greatly aided our understanding of secondary active chloride secretion and the secretagogues responsible for this function. In contrast, very little is known about the rectal gland of skates. In the present experiments, we performed the first studies in the perfused rectal gland of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), an organ weighing less than one-tenth of the shark rectal gland. Our results indicate that the skate gland can be studied by modified perfusion techniques and in primary culture monolayers, and that secretion is blocked by the inhibitors of membrane proteins required for secondary active chloride secretion. Our major finding is that three G protein-coupled receptor agonists, the incretin gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, as well as glucagon and serotonin, are unexpected potent chloride secretagogues in the skate but not the shark. Glucagon stimulated chloride secretion to a mean value of 1,661 ± 587 μeq·h−1·g−1 and serotonin stimulated to 2,893 ± 699 μeq·h−1·g−1. GIP stimulated chloride secretion to 3,733 ± 679 μeq·h−1·g−1 and significantly increased tissue cAMP content compared with basal conditions. This is the first report of GIP functioning as a chloride secretagogue in any species or tissue. PMID:24553297

  20. Molecular Insights into the Interaction between Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1 and an Invasion-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Geqing; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Mobli, Mehdi; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Anders, Robin F.; Simpson, Jamie S.; McGowan, Sheena; Norton, Raymond S.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been implicated in invasion of the host erythrocyte. It interacts with malarial rhoptry neck (RON) proteins in the moving junction that forms between the host cell and the invading parasite. Agents that block this interaction inhibit invasion and may serve as promising leads for anti-malarial drug development. The invasion-inhibitory peptide R1 binds to a hydrophobic cleft on AMA1, which is an attractive target site for small molecules that block parasite invasion. In this work, truncation and mutational analyses show that Phe5-Phe9, Phe12 and Arg15 in R1 are the most important residues for high affinity binding to AMA1. These residues interact with two well-defined binding hot spots on AMA1. Computational solvent mapping reveals that one of these hot spots is suitable for small molecule targeting. We also confirm that R1 in solution binds to AMA1 with 1∶1 stoichiometry and adopts a secondary structure consistent with the major form of R1 observed in the crystal structure of the complex. Our results provide a basis for designing high affinity inhibitors of the AMA1-RON2 interaction. PMID:25343578

  1. Arctic Collaborative Environment (ACE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    distribution is unlimited. Key Data Requirements • Sea Ice – Location: Area, Onset, Growth, Drift, and Decay – Characterization: % Coverage, Thickness...Cloud ACE Developmental Server hosted at UAHuntsville ACE User Community Public Internet Tailored Ice Product Generation (NIC) Arctic Research...distribution is unlimited. Arctic Map 26 July 2012 13 Multi-sensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent; National Data Buoy Center DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A

  2. Savinase, the most suitable enzyme for releasing peptides from lentil (Lens culinaris var. Castellana) protein concentrates with multifunctional properties.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mora, Patricia; Peñas, Elena; Frias, Juana; Martínez-Villaluenga, Cristina

    2014-05-07

    The aim of this study was to produce multifunctional hydrolysates from lentil protein concentrates. Four different proteases (Alcalase, Savinase, Protamex, and Corolase 7089) and different hydrolysis times were evaluated for their degree and pattern of proteolysis and their angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Alcalase and Savinase showed the highest proteolytic effectiveness (P ≤ 0.05), which resulted in higher yield of peptides. The hydrolysate produced by Savinase after 2 h of hydrolysis (S2) displayed the highest ACE-inhibitory (IC50 = 0.18 mg/mL) and antioxidant activity (1.22 μmol of Trolox equiv/mg of protein). Subsequent reverse-phase HPLC-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of 3 kDa permeates of S2 showed 32 peptides, mainly derived from convicilin, vicilin, and legumin containing bioactive amino acid sequences, which makes them potential contributors to ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities detected. The ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities of S2 were significantly improved after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion (P ≤ 0.05). Multifunctional hydrolysates could encourage value-added utilization of lentil proteins for the formulation of functional foods and nutraceuticals.

  3. Cell growth and proteolytic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and Streptococcus thermophilus in milk as affected by supplementation with peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation examined the effects of supplementation of milk peptide fractions produced by enzymatic hydrolysis on the fermentation of reconstituted skim milk (RSM). Changes in pH, cell growth, proteolytic activity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity were monitored during fermentation of RSM by pure cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. The study showed that supplementation with peptide fractions of different molecular weights did not significantly affect the bacterial growth in RSM. All bacteria showed an increased proteolytic activity in RSM supplemented with large peptides (>10 kDa), and L. helveticus in general exhibited the highest proteolytic activity among the bacteria studied. The ACE-inhibitory activity was observed to be the maximum in RSM supplemented with larger peptides (>10 kDa) for all bacteria. The results suggest that proteolysis by bacteria leads to increased production of ACE-inhibitory peptides compared to the supplemented peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis.

  4. Enzyme-assisted extraction and identification of antioxidative and α-amylase inhibitory peptides from Pinto beans (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto).

    PubMed

    Ngoh, Ying-Yuan; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant and α-amylase inhibitor peptides were successfully extracted from Pinto bean protein isolate (PBPI) using Protamex. A factorial design experiment was conducted and the effects of extraction time, pH and temperature were studied. pH 7.5, extraction time of 1h, S/E ratio of 10 (w/w) and temperature of 50 °C gave the highest antioxidant activities (i.e., ABTS scavenging activity (53.3%) and FRAP value (3.71 mM)), whereas pH 6.5 with the same extraction time, S/E ratio and temperature, gave the highest α-amylase inhibitory activity (57.5%). It was then fractioned using membrane ultrafiltration with molecular weight cutoffs of 100, 50, 30, 10 and 3 kDa. Peptide fraction <3 kDa, which exhibited the highest antioxidant activities (i.e., ABTS (42.2%) and FRAP (0.81 mM)) and α-amylase inhibitory activity (62.1%), was then subjected to LCMS and MS/MS analyses. Six sequences were identified for antioxidant peptides, whereas seven peptides for α-amylase inhibitor.

  5. Memory Retrieval Has a Dynamic Influence on the Maintenance Mechanisms That Are Sensitive to ζ-Inhibitory Peptide (ZIP).

    PubMed

    Levitan, David; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Figueroa, Joshua A; Reid, Emily E; Yoshida, Takashi; Barry, Nicholas C; Russo, Abigail; Katz, Donald B

    2016-10-12

    In neuroscientists' attempts to understand the long-term storage of memory, topics of particular importance and interest are the cellular and system mechanisms of maintenance (e.g., those sensitive to ζ-inhibitory peptide, ZIP) and those induced by memory retrieval (i.e., reconsolidation). Much is known about each of these processes in isolation, but less is known concerning how they interact. It is known that ZIP sensitivity and memory retrieval share at least some molecular targets (e.g., recycling α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, AMPA, receptors to the plasma membrane); conversely, the fact that sensitivity to ZIP emerges only after consolidation ends suggests that consolidation (and by extension reconsolidation) and maintenance might be mutually exclusive processes, the onset of one canceling the other. Here, we use conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in rats, a cortically dependent learning paradigm, to test this hypothesis. First, we demonstrate that ZIP infusions into gustatory cortex begin interfering with CTA memory 43-45 h after memory acquisition-after consolidation ends. Next, we show that a retrieval trial administered after this time point interrupts the ability of ZIP to induce amnesia and that ZIP's ability to induce amnesia is reengaged only 45 h after retrieval. This pattern of results suggests that memory retrieval and ZIP-sensitive maintenance mechanisms are mutually exclusive and that the progression from one to the other are similar after acquisition and retrieval. They also reveal concrete differences between ZIP-sensitive mechanisms induced by acquisition and retrieval: the latency with which ZIP-sensitive mechanisms are expressed differ for the two processes.

  6. The auto-inhibitory state of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5/TIM can be relieved by targeting its SH3 domain with rationally designed peptide aptamers.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Tan, De-Li; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lv, Feng-Lin; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The short isoform of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 is known as TIM, which plays diverse roles in, for example, tumorigenesis, neuronal development and Src-induced podosome formation through the activation of its substrates, the Rho family of GTPases. The activation is auto-inhibited by a putative helix N-terminal to the DH domain of TIM, which is stabilized by the intramolecular interaction of C-terminal SH3 domain with a poly-proline sequence between the putative helix and the DH domain. In this study, we systematically investigated the structural basis, energetic landscape and biological implication underlying TIM auto-inhibition by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis. The computational study revealed that the binding of SH3 domain to poly-proline sequence is the prerequisite for the stabilization of TIM auto-inhibition. Thus, it is suggested that targeting SH3 domain with competitors of the poly-proline sequence would be a promising strategy to relieve the auto-inhibitory state of TIM. In this consideration, we rationally designed a number of peptide aptamers for competitively inhibiting the SH3 domain based on modeled TIM structure and computationally generated data. Peptide binding test and guanine nucleotide exchange analysis solidified that these designed peptides can both bind to the SH3 domain potently and activate TIM-catalyzed RhoA exchange reaction effectively. Interestingly, a positive correlation between the peptide affinity and induced exchange activity was observed. In addition, separate mutation of three conserved residues Pro49, Pro52 and Lys54 - they are required for peptide recognition by SH3 domain -- in a designed peptide to Ala would completely abolish the capability of this peptide activating TIM. All these come together to suggest an intrinsic relationship between peptide binding to SH3 domain and the activation of TIM.

  7. Fermentation characteristics and angiotensin I-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus helveticus isolate H9 in cow milk, soy milk, and mare milk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jicheng; Li, Changkun; Xue, Jiangang; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Heping; Chen, Yongfu

    2015-06-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus isolate H9 demonstrated high angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity in previous research. Here, we evaluated the fermentation characteristics (pH, titratable acidity, free amino nitrogen, and viable bacterial counts), ACE-inhibitory activity, and contents of Val-Pro-Pro (VPP) and Ile-Pro-Pro (IPP) peptides of stored yogurt (4°C for 28 d) fermented by L. helveticus isolate H9 (initially inoculated at 4 concentrations), from cow, mare, and soy milks. During storage, the pH and titratable acidity remained stable in yogurts produced from all milk types and all inoculation concentrations. The viable bacterial counts in all stored yogurts ranged between 10(6.72) and 10(8.59) cfu/g. The highest ACE-inhibitory activity (70.9-74.5%) was achieved at inoculation concentrations of 5×10(6) cfu/mL. The ACE-inhibitory tripeptides VPP and IPP as determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were not produced in yogurt made from soy milk or mare milk. These evaluations indicate that L. helveticus H9 has good probiotic properties and would be a promising candidate for production of fermented food with probiotic properties.

  8. ACES--Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Presents text of Presidential Address delivered March 24, 1991, at the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) luncheon, part of the American Association for Counseling and Development Convention held in Reno, Nevada. Comments on past, present, and future of ACES, particularly on future challenges and role of ACES. (ABL)

  9. A Review of Potential Marine-derived Hypotensive and Anti-obesity Peptides.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, V; Vasiljevic, T; Donkor, O N; Mathai, M L

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are food derived components, usually consisting of 3-20 amino acids, which are inactive when incorporated within their parent protein. Once liberated by enzymatic or chemical hydrolysis, during food processing and gastrointestinal transit, they can potentially provide an array of health benefits to the human body. Owing to an unprecedented increase in the worldwide incidence of obesity and hypertension, medical researchers are focusing on the hypotensive and anti-obesity properties of nutritionally derived bioactive peptides. The role of the renin-angiotensin system has long been established in the aetiology of metabolic diseases and hypertension. Targeting the renin-angiotensin system by inhibiting the activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and preventing the formation of angiotensin II can be a potential therapeutic approach to the treatment of hypertension and obesity. Fish-derived proteins and peptides can potentially be excellent sources of bioactive components, mainly as a source of ACE inhibitors. However, increased use of marine sources, poses an unsustainable burden on particular fish stocks, so, the underutilized fish species and by-products can be exploited for this purpose. This paper provides an overview of the techniques involved in the production, isolation, purification, and characterization of bioactive peptides from marine sources, as well as the evaluation of the ACE inhibitory (ACE-I) activity and bioavailability.

  10. The host-seeking inhibitory peptide, Aea-HP-1, is made in the male accessory gland and transferred to the female during copulation

    PubMed Central

    Naccarati, Chiara; Audsley, Neil; Keen, Jeffrey N.; Kim, Jung-Ha; Howell, Gareth J.; Kim, Young-Joon; Isaac, R. Elwyn

    2012-01-01

    Male accessory glands (MAGs) of insects are responsible for the production of many of the seminal fluid proteins and peptides that elicit physiological and behavioral responses in the post-mated female. In the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, seminal fluid components are responsible for stimulating egg production, changing female behavior away from host-seeking toward egg-laying and mating refractoriness, but hitherto no behavior-modifying molecule from the MAGs has been structurally characterized. We now show using mass spectrometry and HPLC/ELISA that the MAG is a major site of synthesis of the biologically active decapeptide, Aea-HP-1 (pERPhPSLKTRFamide) that was first characterized by Matsumoto and colleagues in 1989 from mosquito head extracts and shown to have host-seeking inhibitory properties. The peptide is localized to the anterior portion of the MAG, occurs at high concentrations in the gland and is transferred to the female reproductive tract on copulation. Aea-HP-1 has a pyroglutamic acid at the N-terminus, an amidated carboxyl at the C-terminus and an unusual 4-hydroxyproline in position 4 of the peptide. The structure of the peptide with its blocked N- and C-termini confers resistance to metabolic inactivation by MAG peptidases; however the peptide persists for less than 2 h in the female reproductive tract after copulation. Aea-HP-1 is not a ligand for the mosquito sex peptide/myoinhibitory peptide receptor. A. aegypti often mate close to the host and therefore it is possible that male-derived Aea-HP-1 induces short-term changes to female host-seeking behavior to reduce potentially lethal encounters with hosts soon after insemination. PMID:22080116

  11. Screening of inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) employing high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QqQ-MS).

    PubMed

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Bhatti, Muhammad Salman; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-Ur

    2017-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a key role in regulating blood pressure in the body by converting the angiotensin I (AI) into angiotensin II (AII). Angiotensin II is a potent vaso-active peptide that causes arterioles to constrict, resulting in increased blood pressure. A rapid and sensitive method for the identification of inhibitors of ACE was developed, and optimized employing HPLC-ESI-QqQ-MS. In this assay, angiotensin I substrate was converted into the product angiotensin II with the catalytic action of ACE. A calibration curve for depleting concentration of angiotensin I was developed and linearity of R(2)=0.999 with a remarkably low concentration of substrate range 20-200nM. The limit of detection and quantification of angiotensin I was found to be 1.93 and 5.84nM, respectively. The enzymatic reaction was optimized for incubation time, concentration, and volume of enzyme and substrate. All reactions were performed at 37°C at pH7.5 with standard incubation time of 20min. Two standard inhibitors, Captopril and Lisinopril, were checked through the newly developed method for their inhibitory potential, and their IC50 values were found to be 3.969 and 0.852μM, respectively. Reproducibility and precision analysis of different experiments showed <9.9% RSD. The developed method can be used for the identification of new ACE inhibitors.

  12. Biodistribution and Efficacy of Targeted Pulmonary Delivery of a Protein Kinase C-δ Inhibitory Peptide: Impact on Indirect Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mondrinos, Mark J.; Knight, Linda C.; Kennedy, Paul A.; Wu, Jichuan; Kauffman, Matthew; Baker, Sandy T.; Wolfson, Marla R.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-induced lung injury remain a leading cause of death in intensive care units. We identified protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) as a critical regulator of the acute inflammatory response and demonstrated that PKCδ inhibition was lung-protective in a rodent sepsis model, suggesting that targeting PKCδ is a potential strategy for preserving pulmonary function in the setting of indirect lung injury. In this study, whole-body organ biodistribution and pulmonary cellular distribution of a transactivator of transcription (TAT)–conjugated PKCδ inhibitory peptide (PKCδ-TAT) was determined following intratracheal (IT) delivery in control and septic [cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)] rats to ascertain the impact of disease pathology on biodistribution and efficacy. There was negligible lung uptake of radiolabeled peptide upon intravenous delivery [<1% initial dose (ID)], whereas IT administration resulted in lung retention of >65% ID with minimal uptake in liver or kidney (<2% ID). IT delivery of a fluorescent-tagged (tetramethylrhodamine-PKCδ-TAT) peptide demonstrated uniform spatial distribution and cellular uptake throughout the peripheral lung. IT delivery of PKCδ-TAT at the time of CLP surgery significantly reduced PKCδ activation (tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and cleavage) and acute lung inflammation, resulting in improved lung function and gas exchange. Importantly, peptide efficacy was similar when delivered at 4 hours post-CLP, demonstrating therapeutic relevance. Conversely, spatial lung distribution and efficacy were significantly impaired at 8 hours post-CLP, which corresponded to marked histopathological progression of lung injury. These studies establish a functional connection between peptide spatial distribution, inflammatory histopathology in the lung, and efficacy of this anti-inflammatory peptide. PMID:26243739

  13. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  14. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitory peptide attenuates Helicobacter pylori-mediated hyper-proliferation in AGS enteric epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Himaya, S.W.A.; Dewapriya, Pradeep; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-06-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most critical causes of stomach cancer. The current study was conducted to explore the protective effects of an isolated active peptide H-P-6 (Pro-Gln-Pro-Lys-Val-Leu-Asp-Ser) from microbial hydrolysates of Chlamydomonas sp. against H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. The peptide H-P-6 has effectively suppressed H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of gastric epithelial cells (AGS). However, the peptide did not inhibit the viability of the bacteria or invasion into AGS cells. Therefore, the effect of the peptide on regulating H. pylori-induced molecular signaling was investigated. The results indicated that H. pylori activates the EGFR tyrosine kinase signaling and nuclear translocation of the β-catenin. The EGFR activation has led to the up-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Moreover, the nuclear translocation levels of β-catenin were significantly increased as a result of Akt mediated down-regulation of GSK3/β protein levels in the cytoplasm. Both of these consequences have resulted in increased expression of cell survival and migration related genes such as c-Myc, cyclin-D, MMP-2 and matrilysin. Interestingly, the isolated peptide potently inhibited H. pylori-mediated EGFR activation and thereby down-regulated the subsequent P13K/Akt signaling leading to β-catenin nuclear translocation. The effect of the peptide was confirmed with the use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1487 and molecular docking studies. Collectively this study identifies a potent peptide which regulates the H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells at molecular level. - Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. derived peptide H-P-6 inhibits H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. • H-P-6 suppresses H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells. • The peptide inhibits H. pylori-induced EGFR activation.

  15. Solution Structures, Dynamics, and Ice Growth Inhibitory Activity of Peptide Fragments Derived from an Antarctic Yeast Protein

    PubMed Central

    Asmawi, Azren A.; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A.; Murad, Abdul Munir A.; Mahadi, Nor M.; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A.; Salleh, Abu B.; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A.; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities. PMID:23209600

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and ACE2) imbalance correlates with the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixia; Qi, Haiyu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Cui, Lijian; Wen, Yan; Yin, Chenghong

    2014-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and its effector peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades Ang II to angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] and has recently been described to have an antagonistic effect on ACE signalling. However, the specific underlying role of ACE2 in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is unclear. In the present study, the local imbalance of ACE and ACE2, as well as Ang II and Ang-(1-7) expression, was compared in wild-type (WT) and ACE2 knock-out (KO) or ACE2 transgenic (TG) mice subjected to cerulein-induced SAP. Serum amylase, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 levels and histological morphometry were used to determine the severity of pancreatitis. In WT mice, pancreatic ACE and Ang II and serum Ang II expression increased (P < 0.05), while pancreatic ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) and serum Ang-(1-7) levels were also significantly elevated (P < 0.05) from 2 to 72 h after the onset of SAP. However, the ratio of pancreatic ACE2 to ACE expression was significantly reduced (from 1.46 ± 0.09 to 0.27 ± 0.05, P < 0.001) and paralleled the severity of pancreatitis. The Ace2 KO mice exhibited increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, multifocal coagulative necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate, and lower levels of serum IL-10 and pancreatic Ang-(1-7) (4.70 ± 2.13 versus 10.87 ± 2.51, P < 0.001) compared with cerulein-treated WT mice at the same time point. Conversely, Ace2 TG mice with normal ACE expression were more resistant to SAP challenge as evidenced by a decreased inflammatory response, attenuated pathological changes and increased survival rates. These data suggest that the ACE2-ACE imbalance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP and that pancreatic ACE2 is an important factor in determining the severity of SAP.

  17. Reduction of hepatic insulin clearance after oral glucose ingestion is not mediated by glucagon-like peptide 1 or gastric inhibitory polypeptide in humans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J; Holst, Jens J; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Nauck, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Changes in hepatic insulin clearance can occur after oral glucose or meal ingestion. This has been attributed to the secretion and action of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1. Given the recent availability of drugs based on incretin hormones, such clearance effects may be important for the future treatment of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we determined insulin clearance in response to endogenously secreted and exogenously administered GIP and GLP-1. Insulin clearance was estimated from the molar C-peptide-to-insulin ratio calculated at basal conditions and from the respective areas under the curve after glucose, GIP, or GLP-1 administration. Oral glucose administration led to an approximately 60% reduction in the C-peptide-to-insulin ratio (P < 0.0001), whereas intravenous glucose administration had no effect (P = 0.09). The endogenous secretion of GIP or GLP-1 was unrelated to the changes in insulin clearance. The C-peptide-to-insulin ratio was unchanged after the intravenous administration of GIP or GLP-1 in the fasting state (P = 0.27 and P = 0.35, respectively). Likewise, infusing GLP-1 during a meal course did not alter insulin clearance (P = 0.87). An inverse nonlinear relationship was found between the C-peptide-to-insulin ratio and the integrated insulin levels after oral and during intravenous glucose administration. Insulin clearance is reduced by oral but not by intravenous glucose administration. Neither GIP nor GLP-1 has significant effects on insulin extraction. An inverse relationship between insulin concentrations and insulin clearance suggests that the secretion of insulin itself determines the rate of hepatic insulin clearance.

  18. Peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) inhibit the angiotensin-I converting enzyme by interacting with its catalytic cavity independent of their antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; González de Mejía, Elvira; Mendoza, Sandra; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory potential and the antioxidant capacity of pure synthesized peptides (GLTSK, LSGNK, GEGSGA, MPACGSS and MTEEY) originally identified in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans (P. vulgaris L.) that had previously demonstrated antiproliferative activity against human colorectal cancer cells. The five peptides were able to inhibit ACE with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 65.4 (GLTSK) to 191.5 μM (MPACGSS). The combination of GLTSK and MTEEY increased the ACE inhibition by 30% compared to equieffective doses of the single peptides. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides had lower estimated free energy values (-6.47 to -9.34 kcal mol(-1)) when they interacted with the catalytic site of ACE than that of the substrate hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (-5.41 kcal mol(-1)), thus inhibiting the enzymatic activity. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides interacted with four (His353, Ala354, Glu411 and Tyr523) out of 6 catalytic residues. Moreover, MPACGSS had the highest antioxidant activity according to Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) (421.58 μmol FeSO4 mg(-1)), Fe(2+) chelation (2.01 μmol Na2EDTA mg(-1)) assays, and also in DPPH (748.39 μmol Trolox per mg of dry peptide) and ABTS (561.42 μmol Trolox mg(-1)) radical scavenging assays. The results support the hypothesis that peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) may exert their physiological benefits independent of their antioxidant capacity, by ACE inhibition through interaction with its catalytic cavity.

  19. In vitro angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibition by a peptide isolated from Chiropsalmus quadrigatus Haeckel (box jellyfish) venom hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    So, Pamela Berilyn T; Rubio, Peter; Lirio, Stephen; Macabeo, Allan Patrick; Huang, Hsi-Ya; Corpuz, Mary Jho-Anne T; Villaflores, Oliver B

    2016-09-01

    The anti-angiotensin I converting enzyme activity of box jellyfish, Chiropsalmus quadrigatus Haeckel venom hydrolysate was studied. The venom extract was obtained by centrifugation and ultrasonication. Protein concentration of 12.99 μg/mL was determined using Bradford assay. The pepsin and papain hydrolysate was tested for its toxicity by Limit test following the OECD Guideline 425 using 5 female Sprague-Dawley rats. Results showed that the hydrolysate is nontoxic with an LD50 above 2000 mg/kg. In vitro angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was determined using ACE kit-WST. Isolation of ACE inhibitory peptides using column chromatography with SP-Sephadex G-25 yielded 8 pooled fractions with fraction 3 (86.5%) exhibiting the highest activity. This was followed by reverse phase - high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with an octadecyl silica column (Inertsil ODS-3) using methanol:water 15:85 at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Among the 13 fractions separated with the RP-HPLC, fraction 3.5 exhibited the highest ACE inhibitory activity (84.1%). The peptide sequence ACPGPNPGRP (IC50 2.03 μM) from fraction 3.5 was identified using Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with time-of-flight tandem mass spectroscopy analysis (MALDI-TOF/MS).

  20. Juruin: an antifungal peptide from the venom of the Amazonian Pink Toe spider, Avicularia juruensis, which contains the inhibitory cystine knot motif

    PubMed Central

    Ayroza, Gabriela; Ferreira, Ivan L. C.; Sayegh, Raphael S. R.; Tashima, Alexandre K.; da Silva, Pedro I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen the venom of the theraposid spider Avicularia juruensis for the identification of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which could be further used as prototypes for drug development. Eleven AMPs, named juruentoxins, with molecular weight ranging from 3.5 to 4.5 kDa, were identified by mass spectrometry after the soluble venom was separated by high performance liquid chromatography. Juruentoxins have a putative inhibitory cystine knot (ICK) motif, generally found in neurotoxins, which are also resistant to proteolysis. One juruentoxin that has 38 amino acid residues and three disulfide bonds were characterized, to which we proposed the name Juruin. Based on liquid growth inhibition assays, it has potent antifungal activity in the micromolar range. Importantly, Juruin lacks haemolytic activity on human erythrocytes at the antimicrobial concentrations. Based on the amino acid sequence, it is highly identical to the insecticidal peptides from the theraposid spiders Selenocosmia huwena, Chilobrachys jingzhao, and Haplopelma schmidti from China, indicating they belong to a group of conserved toxins which are likely to inhibit voltage-gated ion channels. Juruin is a cationic AMP, and Lys22 and Lys23 show maximum positive charge localization that might be important for receptor recognition. Although it shows marked sequence similarity to neurotoxic peptides, Juruin is a novel exciting molecule with potent antifungal activity, which could be used as a novel template for development of drugs against clinical resistant fungi strains. PMID:22973266

  1. Binding site and inhibitory mechanism of the mambalgin-2 pain-relieving peptide on acid-sensing ion channel 1a.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Miguel; Besson, Thomas; Delettre, Quentin; Diochot, Sylvie; Boulakirba, Sonia; Douguet, Dominique; Lingueglia, Eric

    2014-05-09

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are neuronal proton-gated cation channels associated with nociception, fear, depression, seizure, and neuronal degeneration, suggesting roles in pain and neurological and psychiatric disorders. We have recently discovered black mamba venom peptides called mambalgin-1 and mambalgin-2, which are new three-finger toxins that specifically inhibit with the same pharmacological profile ASIC channels to exert strong analgesic effects in vivo. We now combined bioinformatics and functional approaches to uncover the molecular mechanism of channel inhibition by the mambalgin-2 pain-relieving peptide. Mambalgin-2 binds mainly in a region of ASIC1a involving the upper part of the thumb domain (residues Asp-349 and Phe-350), the palm domain of an adjacent subunit, and the β-ball domain (residues Arg-190, Asp-258, and Gln-259). This region overlaps with the acidic pocket (pH sensor) of the channel. The peptide exerts both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on ASIC1a, and we propose a model where mambalgin-2 traps the channel in a closed conformation by precluding the conformational change of the palm and β-ball domains that follows proton activation. These data help to understand inhibition by mambalgins and provide clues for the development of new optimized blockers of ASIC channels.

  2. Discovery of pan-VEGF inhibitory peptides directed to the extracellular ligand-binding domains of the VEGF receptors

    PubMed Central

    Michaloski, Jussara S.; Redondo, Alexandre R.; Magalhães, Leila S.; Cambui, Caio C.; Giordano, Ricardo J.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are key molecules in numerous cellular processes, the inhibitors of which play an important role in the clinic. Among them are the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members and their receptors (VEGFR), which are essential in the formation of new blood vessels by angiogenesis. Anti-VEGF therapy has already shown promising results in oncology and ophthalmology, but one of the challenges in the field is the design of specific small-molecule inhibitors for these receptors. We show the identification and characterization of small 6-mer peptides that target the extracellular ligand-binding domain of all three VEGF receptors. These peptides specifically prevent the binding of VEGF family members to all three receptors and downstream signaling but do not affect other angiogenic RTKs and their ligands. One of the selected peptides was also very effective at preventing pathological angiogenesis in a mouse model of retinopathy, normalizing the vasculature to levels similar to those of a normal developing retina. Collectively, our results suggest that these peptides are pan-VEGF inhibitors directed at a common binding pocket shared by all three VEGFRs. These peptides and the druggable binding site they target might be important for the development of novel and selective small-molecule, extracellular ligand-binding inhibitors of RTKs (eTKIs) for angiogenic-dependent diseases. PMID:27819042

  3. Bioactive properties of peptides obtained from Argentinian defatted soy flour protein by Corolase PP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Coscueta, Ezequiel R; Amorim, Maria M; Voss, Glenise B; Nerli, Bibiana B; Picó, Guillermo A; Pintado, Manuela E

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of soybean meal protein isolate (SPI) obtained under two temperature conditions with Corolase PP was studied, assessing the impact of hydrolysis on potential antioxidant and antihypertensive activities. The protein was isolated from soybean meal under controlled conditions of time and temperature (70 °C, 1h; 90 °C, 30 min). Degree of hydrolysis assessed the progress of hydrolysis at different sampling times. For hydrolysates the antioxidant and angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities were measured. As observed, the DH was increasing until reaching 20% at 10h with disappearance of globular proteins and generation of low molecular weight peptides (less than 3kDa). A significant increase in antioxidant and ACE inhibitory capacities was observed. Five main peptides were identified, which may explain through their sequences the bioactive properties analyzed. Through this study was possible to obtain for the first time with Corolase PP soy hydrolysates with potential antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activities, which can be used to obtain new added value functional ingredients from soy meal.

  4. Production of the blood pressure lowing peptides from brown alga ( Undaria pinnatifida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoru, Sato; Takashi, Oba; Takao, Hosokawa; Toshiyasu, Yamaguchi; Toshiki, Nakano; Tadao, Saito; Koji, Muramoto; Takashi, Kahara; Katsura, Funayama; Akio, Kobayashi; Takahisa, Nakano

    2005-07-01

    Brown alga ( Undaria pinnatifida) was treated with alginate lyase and hydrolyzed using 17 kinds of proteases and the inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates for the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) was measured. Four hydrolysates with potent ACE-inhibitory activity were administered singly and orally to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The systolic blood pressure of SHRs decreases significantly after single oral administration of the brown alga hydrolysates by protease S ‘Amano’ (from Bacillus stearothermophilus) at the concentration of 10 (mg protein) (kg body weight)-1. In the 17 weeks of feeding experiment, 7-week-old SHRs were fed standard diet supplemented with the brown alga hydrolysates for 10 weeks. In SHRs fed 1.0 and 0.1% brown alga hydrolysates, elevating of systolic bloodpressure was significantly suppressed for 7 weeks. To elucidate the active components, the brown alga hydrolysates were fractionated by 1-butanol extraction and HPLC on a reverse-phase column. Seven kinds of ACE-inhibitory peptides were isolated and identified by amino acid composition analysis, sequence analysis, and LC-MS with the results Val-Tyr, Ile-Tyr, Ala-Trp, Phe-Tyr, Val-Trp, Ile-Trp, and Leu-Trp. Each peptide was determined to have an antihypertensive effect after a single oral administration in SHRs. The brown alga hydrolysates were also confirmed to decrease the blood pressure in humans.

  5. Thermoase-Derived Flaxseed Protein Hydrolysates and Membrane Ultrafiltration Peptide Fractions Have Systolic Blood Pressure-Lowering Effects in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi D.; Girgih, Abraham T.; Malomo, Sunday A.; Onuh, John O.; Aluko, Rotimi E.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoase-digested flaxseed protein hydrolysate (FPH) samples and ultrafiltration membrane-separated peptide fractions were initially evaluated for in vitro inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and renin activities. The two most active FPH samples and their corresponding peptide fractions were subsequently tested for in vivo antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The FPH produced with 3% thermoase digestion showed the highest ACE- and renin-inhibitory activities. Whereas membrane ultrafiltration resulted in significant (p < 0.05) increases in ACE inhibition by the <1 and 1–3 kDa peptides, only a marginal improvement in renin-inhibitory activity was observed for virtually all the samples after membrane ultrafiltration. The FPH samples and membrane fractions were also effective in lowering systolic blood pressure (SBP) in SHR with the largest effect occurring after oral administration (200 mg/kg body weight) of the 1–3 kDa peptide fraction of the 2.5% FPH and the 3–5 kDa fraction of the 3% FPH. Such potent SBP-lowering capacity indicates the potential of flaxseed protein-derived bioactive peptides as ingredients for the formulation of antihypertensive functional foods and nutraceuticals. PMID:25302619

  6. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  7. ACE gene titration in mice uncovers a new mechanism for ACE on the control of body weight.

    PubMed

    Heimann, A S; Favarato, M H; Gozzo, F C; Rioli, V; Carreño, F R; Eberlin, M N; Ferro, E S; Krege, J H; Krieger, J E

    2005-01-20

    Mice harboring 1, 2, or 3 copies of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene were used to evaluate the quantitative role of the ACE locus on obesity. Three-copy mice fed with a high-fat diet had lower body weight and peri-epididymal adipose tissue than did 1- and 2-copy mice (P < 0.05). On regular diet, 3-copy mice had to eat more to maintain the same body weight; on a high-fat diet, they ate the same but weighed less than 1- and 2-copy mice (P < 0.05), indicating a higher metabolic rate in 3-copy mice that was not affected by ANG II AT(1) blocker treatment. A catalytically inactive form of thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15; EP24.15) was used to isolate ACE substrates from adipose tissue. Liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) identified 162 peptide peaks; 16 peptides were present in both groups (1- and 3-copy mice fed with a high-fat diet), whereas 58 of the 72 unique peptides were found only in the 3-copy mice. Peptide size distribution was shifted to lower molecular weight in 3-copy mice. Two of the identified peptides, LVVYPWTQRY and VVYPWTQRY, which are ACE substrates, inhibited in vitro protein kinase C phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16; EP24.16) activity was lower in fat tissue from 3- vs. 1-copy mice (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results provide evidence that ACE is associated with body weight and peri-epididymal fat accumulation. This response may involve the generation of oligopeptides that inhibit the activity of EP24.16 and other oligopeptidases within the adipose tissue.

  8. A Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitory Peptide with Anti-Platelet Aggregation Activity from Agkistrodon acutus Venom Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Ye, Xiaohui; Ming, Xin; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Ying; Su, Xingli; Su, Wen; Kong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom is a natural substance that contains numerous bioactive proteins and peptides, nearly all of which have been identified over the last several decades. In this study, we subjected snake venom to enzymatic hydrolysis to identify previously unreported bioactive peptides. The novel peptide ACH-11 with the sequence LTFPRIVFVLG was identified with both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities. ACH-11 inhibited the catalytic function of FXa towards its substrate S-2222 via a mixed model with a Ki value of 9.02 μM and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP and U46619 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACH-11 exhibited potent antithrombotic activity in vivo. It reduced paralysis and death in an acute pulmonary thrombosis model by 90% and attenuated thrombosis weight in an arterio-venous shunt thrombosis model by 57.91%, both at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Additionally, a tail cutting bleeding time assay revealed that ACH-11 did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Together, our results reveal that ACH-11 is a novel antithrombotic peptide exhibiting both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities, with a low bleeding risk. We believe that it could be a candidate or lead compound for new antithrombotic drug development. PMID:26035670

  9. Actin-based motility of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes: assessing the inhibitory specificity of ABM-1 peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Purich, D L; Southwick, F S

    1999-06-01

    Actin-Based Motility motifs [ABM-1 sequence = (D/E)FPPPPX(D/E), where X = P or T, and ABM-2 sequence = XPPPPP, where X denotes G, A, L, P, and S] facilitate assembly of an activated motility complex. Potent inhibition of intracellular motility of pathogens by ABM-1 and ABM-2 peptide analogues has served as a criterion for investigating actin-based motility. To assess the specificity of ABM-1 peptide inhibitors, we microinjected proline-rich peptides into Listeria-infected PtK2 host cells. Use of a combinatorial ABM-1 peptide library (empirical formula = D1E2F2P4T1) demonstrated that high-potency inhibition requires a precise sequence, and not merely a particular amino acid composition. Calculated concentrations of specific sequences in this library indicate that the entire (D/E)FPPPPX(D/E) motif is needed to achieve high-affinity inhibition in living cells. The failure of the well known proline-rich SH3 binding antagonists VSL-12 or APP-12 to inhibit Listeria motility also indicates that SH3 interactions are unlikely to control actin-based motility directly.

  10. Identification of an antifungal peptide from Trapa natans fruits with inhibitory effects on Candida tropicalis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2011-08-01

    Due to recent emergence of fungal pathogens resistant to current antifungal therapies, several studies have been focused on screening of plant peptides to find novel compounds having antifungal activities. Here, a novel antifungal plant peptide, with molecular mass of 1230 Da was purified from fruits of Trapa natans by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography using 300SB-C18 column and named as Tn-AFP1. Determination of complete amino acid sequences of this peptide by tandem mass spectrometry showed to contain following eleven amino acid residues: LMCTHPLDCSN. Purified Tn-AFP1 showed the inhibition of Candida tropicalis growth in vitro and disrupted the biofilm formation in a concentration dependent manner. It also showed downregulation of MDR1 and ERG11 gene expression in real time-PCR analysis. In silico molecular modeling predicted the structure of Tn-AFP1 as a single coil attached by a unique disulfide bond. Characterization of Tn-AFP1 could contribute in designing novel derivative(s) of this peptide for the development of more effective antimycotic compounds.

  11. ACES's Challenges: Past Presidents Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeley, Vernon Lee

    1990-01-01

    Recognizes the golden anniversary of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) and presents the statements of 15 past presidents of the association. Presidential leaders briefly review the association's past and suggest opportunities to help create a promising future for ACES. Outlines nine challenges which confront members of…

  12. FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR Project Title:  FIRE III ACE Discipline:  ... Level:  L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Instrument:  Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer ... Info:  Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) Ship SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  13. FIRE_ACE_UTRECHT_TOWER

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    FIRE_ACE_UTRECHT_TOWER Project Title:  FIRE II ACE Discipline:  ... L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Site; Meteorological tower Instrument:  Eppley precision pyrgeometers Meteorological tower Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  14. Development of a workflow for screening and identification of α-amylase inhibitory peptides from food source using an integrated Bioinformatics-phage display approach: Case study - Cumin seed.

    PubMed

    Siow, Hwee-Leng; Lim, Theam Soon; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an efficient workflow to discover α-amylase inhibitory peptides from cumin seed. A total of 56 unknown peptides was initially found in the cumin seed protein hydrolysate. They were subjected to 2 different in silico screenings and 6 peptides were shortlisted. The peptides were then subjected to in vitro selection using phage display technique and 3 clones (CSP3, CSP4 and CSP6) showed high affinity in binding α-amylase. These clones were subjected to the inhibitory test and only CSP4 and CSP6 exhibited high inhibitory activity. Therefore, these peptides were chemically synthesized for validation purposes. CSP4 exhibited inhibition of bacterial and human salivary α-amylases with IC50 values of 0.11 and 0.04μmol, respectively, whereas CSP6 was about 0.10 and 0.15μmol, respectively. Results showed that the strength of each protocol has been successfully combined as deemed fit to enhance the α-amylase inhibitor peptide discovery.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Several Novel Dipeptides with Angiotensin-I-converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity from In-silico Screening of Silkworm Pupae Protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Nan; Zhu, Zuoyi

    2014-01-01

    An in silico screening method for novel dipeptides from a dipeptide training set was performed. A 3D pharmacophore model with three H-bond acceptor projections (Acc2), and one H-bond donor projection (Don2) was obtained. To validate the pharmacophore model, a test set containing 10 reported dipeptides was screened and all were found to be bioactive. Eleven novel dipeptides (IF, GD, DA, TE, TA, ES, SS, ST, SD, QD, QE) from the silkworm pupae protein peptide database were predicted to have ACE inhibitory bioactivity. The interaction mechanisms of the dipeptides with the ACE active pocket were elucidated by molecule docking, and besides involving interaction bonds, the interaction force equipoise of the peptides was also an important factor in their bioactivity.

  16. The inhibitory effects of steroidal and non-steroidal antirheumatic drugs on articular cartilage in osteoarthrosis and its counteraction by a biological GAG-peptide complex (Rumalon).

    PubMed

    Kalbhen, D A

    1982-01-01

    In-vitro studies have confirmed that various corticosteroids and also many nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs exert inhibitory effects on anabolic processes in connective tissue cells. Depending on dose and at concentrations that in many cases correspond to therapeutic plasma levels, these drugs may lead to a pronounced reduction or complete blockade of synthesis of the proteoglycans and collagen of the cartilage matrix. Our in-vivo animal experiments have shown that single or repeated intraarticular applications of various antiinflammatory antirheumatics into the knee joint of hens or rats can induce progressive joint degeneration within 3-4 months. The degenerative process was monitored by macroscopic, radiological, histological, biochemical, and stereoelectronmicroscopic methods and corresponded very well with the pathology of human osteoarthrosis. Our experimental osteoarthrosis, induced by metabolic lesions or inhibition of chondrocytes, can be influenced therapeutically by intraarticular or intramuscular treatment with the biological GAG-peptide complex (Rumalon) or with its high molecular fraction DAK-16. These compounds significantly reduce or even stop the degenerative progression in the osteoarthrotic knee joints. The chondroprotective and anti-arthritic properties of Rumalon or DAK-16 can be explained by its stimulation of connective tissue anabolism as well as by its inhibitory effect on catabolic enzymes responsible for cartilage breakdown. Our experiments also indicate that catabolic reactions of corticosteroids on articular cartilage can be counteracted or reduced by concomitant administration of the chondroprotective agents. This effect might be desirable and beneficial during treatment of inflammatory phases of osteoarthrosis with intraarticular injections of corticosteroids.

  17. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Disrupts Electrostatic Interactions That Maintain Atypical Protein Kinase C in Its Active Conformation on the Scaffold p62.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Xie, Lei; Dore, Kim; Xie, Li; Del Rio, Jason C; King, Charles C; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Hulme, Christopher; Malinow, Roberto; Bourne, Philip E; Newton, Alexandra C

    2015-09-04

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) enzymes signal on protein scaffolds, yet how they are maintained in an active conformation on scaffolds is unclear. A myristoylated peptide based on the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate fragment of the atypical PKCζ, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), has been extensively used to inhibit aPKC activity; however, we have previously shown that ZIP does not inhibit the catalytic activity of aPKC isozymes in cells (Wu-Zhang, A. X., Schramm, C. L., Nabavi, S., Malinow, R., and Newton, A. C. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 12879-12885). Here we sought to identify a bona fide target of ZIP and, in so doing, unveiled a novel mechanism by which aPKCs are maintained in an active conformation on a protein scaffold. Specifically, we used protein-protein interaction network analysis, structural modeling, and protein-protein docking to predict that ZIP binds an acidic surface on the Phox and Bem1 (PB1) domain of p62, an interaction validated by peptide array analysis. Using a genetically encoded reporter for PKC activity fused to the p62 scaffold, we show that ZIP inhibits the activity of wild-type aPKC, but not a construct lacking the pseudosubstrate. These data support a model in which the pseudosubstrate of aPKCs is tethered to the acidic surface on p62, locking aPKC in an open, signaling-competent conformation. ZIP competes for binding to the acidic surface, resulting in displacement of the pseudosubstrate of aPKC and re-engagement in the substrate-binding cavity. This study not only identifies a cellular target for ZIP, but also unveils a novel mechanism by which scaffolded aPKC is maintained in an active conformation.

  18. CD36/Sirtuin 1 Axis Impairment Contributes to Hepatic Steatosis in ACE2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Penninger, Josef M.; Santos, Robson Augusto S.; Bader, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system. Since angiotensin peptides have been shown to be involved in hepatic steatosis, we aimed to evaluate the hepatic lipid profile in ACE2-deficient (ACE2−/y) mice. Methods. Male C57BL/6 and ACE2−/y mice were analyzed at the age of 3 and 6 months for alterations in the lipid profiles of plasma, faeces, and liver and for hepatic steatosis. Results. ACE2−/y mice showed lower body weight and white adipose tissue at all ages investigated. Moreover, these mice had lower levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids in plasma. Strikingly, ACE2−/y mice showed high deposition of lipids in the liver. Expression of CD36, a protein involved in the uptake of triglycerides in liver, was increased in ACE2−/y mice. Concurrently, these mice exhibited an increase in hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and expression of uncoupling protein 2, and downregulation of sirtuin 1. ACE2−/y mice also showed impairments in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the liver. Conclusions. Deletion of ACE2 causes CD36/sirtuin 1 axis impairment and thereby interferes with lipid homeostasis, leading to lipodystrophy and steatosis. PMID:28101297

  19. CD36/Sirtuin 1 Axis Impairment Contributes to Hepatic Steatosis in ACE2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Alenina, Natalia; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Penninger, Josef M; Santos, Robson Augusto S; Bader, Michael; Rabelo, Luiza A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system. Since angiotensin peptides have been shown to be involved in hepatic steatosis, we aimed to evaluate the hepatic lipid profile in ACE2-deficient (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Methods. Male C57BL/6 and ACE2(-/y) mice were analyzed at the age of 3 and 6 months for alterations in the lipid profiles of plasma, faeces, and liver and for hepatic steatosis. Results. ACE2(-/y) mice showed lower body weight and white adipose tissue at all ages investigated. Moreover, these mice had lower levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids in plasma. Strikingly, ACE2(-/y) mice showed high deposition of lipids in the liver. Expression of CD36, a protein involved in the uptake of triglycerides in liver, was increased in ACE2(-/y) mice. Concurrently, these mice exhibited an increase in hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and expression of uncoupling protein 2, and downregulation of sirtuin 1. ACE2(-/y) mice also showed impairments in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the liver. Conclusions. Deletion of ACE2 causes CD36/sirtuin 1 axis impairment and thereby interferes with lipid homeostasis, leading to lipodystrophy and steatosis.

  20. Bioactive peptides of animal origin: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Z F; Kumar, Sunil; Bhat, Hina Fayaz

    2015-09-01

    Bioactive peptides are specific protein fragments which, above and beyond their nutritional capabilities, have a positive impact on the body's function or condition which may ultimately influence health. Although, inactive within the sequence of the parent proteins, these peptides can be released during proteolysis or fermentation and play an important role in human health by affecting the digestive, endocrine, cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems. Several peptides that are released in vitro or in vivo from animal proteins have been attributed to different health effects, including antimicrobial properties, blood pressure-lowering (ACE inhibitory) effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic and antioxidant activities, opioid activities, enhancement of mineral absorption and/or bioavailability, cytomodulatory and immunomodulatory effects, antiobesity, and anti-genotoxic activity. Several functional foods based on the bioactivities of these peptides with scientifically evidenced health claims are already on the market or under development by food companies. Consumer's increasing interest in these products has given an impetus to the food industry and scientific sector who are continuously exploring the possibilities for the development of new functional products based on these peptides. In this review, we describe above stated properties of bioactive peptides of animal origin.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a novel angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory tripeptide from enzymatic hydrolysis of soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) egg white: in vitro, in vivo, and in silico study.

    PubMed

    Rawendra, Reynetha D S; Aisha; Chen, Sin-Hong; Chang, Chi-I; Shih, Wen-Ling; Huang, Tzou-Chi; Liao, Ming-Huei; Hsu, Jue-Liang

    2014-12-17

    In this study, a novel angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory tripeptide (IVR) was isolated and identified from unfertilized soft-shelled turtle egg white (SSTEW). The IC50 value of IVR was measured in vitro as low as 0.81 ± 0.03 μM, and its inhibition type was suggested as competitive according to the Lineweaver-Burk plot. This peptide can be generated from either thermolysin followed by trypsin digestion (two stages) or only trypsin digestion (one stage). Quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis indicated that two-stage digestion gave 3.14 ± 0.17 mg of IVR from 1 g of SSTEW, better than that from one-stage digestion (1.31 ± 0.12 mg). In vivo antihypertensive activity of the tripeptide IVR after single oral administration (0.1 and 1 mg/kg of body weight) led to a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure 2-4 h after administration in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In addition, the binding mechanism of IVR has been rationalized through docking simulations using the testicular ACE (tACE)-lisinopril complex at 2 Å resolution (PDB 108A ). The best docking pose was located at the tACE catalytic site resembling the mode of inhibition exerted by lisinopril, an effective hypertensive synthetic drug. The degree of inhibition of this peptide correlated with the H-bond interaction between the C-terminal of IVR and Lys511 and Tyr520 residues of tACE, a significant inhibitor registration for lisinopril. This study illustrated that IVR behaves as a transition-state analogue inhibitor and is useful in therapeutic intervention for blood pressure control. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an efficient ACE-inhibitory tripeptide generated from the unfertilized egg of soft-shelled turtle.

  2. Short communication: Inhibition of angiotensin 1-converting enzyme by peptides derived from variants of bovine β-casein upon apical exposure to a Caco-2 cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Petrat-Melin, Bjørn; Le, Thao T; Møller, Hanne S; Larsen, Lotte B; Young, Jette F

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the consequence of genetically contingent amino acid substitutions in bovine β-casein (CN) genetic variants A(1), A(2), B, and I on the structure and bioactive potential of peptides following in vitro digestion. The β-CN variants were digested in vitro using pepsin and pancreatin, and a peptide profile was obtained by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, revealing among others, the β-casomorphin precursor peptides VYPFPGPIHN and VYPFPGPIPN, derived from variant A(1)/B and from A(2)/I, respectively. These 2 peptides were synthesized and assessed for angiotensin 1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacity before and after incubation with a monolayer of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The VYPFPGPIHN was a stronger ACE inhibitor than VYPFPGPIPN, with the concentration needed to reach half-maximal inhibition (IC50) of 123 ± 14.2 μM versus 656 ± 7.6 μM. Exposure to a Caco-2 intestinal cell monolayer did not affect ACE inhibition by VYPFPGPIHN, but resulted in an almost 2-fold increase in inhibition by VYPFPGPIPN after incubation. Subsequent tandem mass spectrometric analysis identified the truncated peptide VYPFPGPIP, suggesting hydrolysis by a cell membrane associated peptidase. Thus, genetic variation in bovine β-CN results in the generation of peptides that differ in bioactivity, and are differently affected by intestinal brush border peptidases.

  3. Identification of a Potent and Broad-Spectrum Hepatitis C Virus Fusion Inhibitory Peptide from the E2 Stem Domain

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xiaojing; Niu, Yuqiang; Cheng, Min; Liu, Xiuying; Feng, Yetong; Zheng, Fuxiang; Fan, Jingjing; Li, Xiang; Jin, Qi; Zhong, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry. However, the fusion mechanisms of HCV remain largely unclear, hampering the development of efficient fusion inhibitors. Here, we developed two cell-based membrane fusion models that allow for screening a peptide library covering the full-length E1 and E2 amino acid sequences. A peptide from the E2 stem domain, named E27, was found to possess the ability to block E1E2-mediated cell-cell fusion and inhibit cell entry of HCV pseudoparticles and infection of cell culture-derived HCV at nanomolar concentrations. E27 demonstrated broad-spectrum inhibition of the major genotypes 1 to 6. A time-of-addition experiment revealed that E27 predominantly functions in the late steps during HCV entry, without influencing the expression and localization of HCV co-receptors. Moreover, we demonstrated that E27 interfered with hetero-dimerization of ectopically expressed E1E2 in cells, and mutational analysis suggested that E27 might target a conserved region in E1. Taken together, our findings provide a novel candidate as well as a strategy for developing potent and broad-spectrum HCV fusion inhibitors, which may complement the current direct-acting antiviral medications for chronic hepatitis C, and shed light on the mechanism of HCV membrane fusion. PMID:27121372

  4. [ACE inhibitors and the kidney].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment with ACE inhibitors results in kidney protection due to reduction of systemic blood pressure, intraglomerular pressure, an antiproliferative effect, reduction of proteinuria and a lipid-lowering effect in proteinuric patients (secondary due to reduction of protein excretion). Elderly patients with diabetes melitus, coronary heart disease or peripheral vascular occlusion are at risk for deterioration of kidney function due to a high frequency of renal artery stenosis in these patients. In patients with renal insufficiency dose reduction of ACE inhibitors is necessary (exception: fosinopril) but more important is the risk for development of hyperkalemia. Patients at risk for renal artery stenosis and patients pretreated with diuretics should receive a low ACE inhibitor dosage initially ("start low - go slow"). For compliance reasons once daily ACE inhibitor dosage is recommended.

  5. Atmospheric Constituent Explorer System (ACES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrach, M. R.; Madzunkov, S.; Neidholdt, E.; Simcic, J.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the Atmospheric Constituent Explorer System (ACES), a mass spectrometer based instrument for atmospheric probe missions (e.g. Venus and ice giant) that can determine abundances and isotopic ratios of the noble-gases and trace species.

  6. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The page information was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  7. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Biomonitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The page information was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  8. Gallotannins and Tannic Acid: First Chemical Syntheses and In Vitro Inhibitory Activity on Alzheimer's Amyloid β-Peptide Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Tahiri; Pouységu, Laurent; Da Costa, Grégory; Deffieux, Denis; Monti, Jean-Pierre; Quideau, Stéphane

    2015-07-06

    The screening of natural products in the search for new lead compounds against Alzheimer's disease has unveiled several plant polyphenols that are capable of inhibiting the formation of toxic β-amyloid fibrils. Gallic acid based gallotannins are among these polyphenols, but their antifibrillogenic activity has thus far been examined using "tannic acid", a commercial mixture of gallotannins and other galloylated glucopyranoses. The first total syntheses of two true gallotannins, a hexagalloylglucopyranose and a decagalloylated compound whose structure is commonly used to depict "tannic acid", are now described. These depsidic gallotannins and simpler galloylated glucose derivatives all inhibit amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) aggregation in vitro, and monogalloylated α-glucogallin and a natural β-hexagalloylglucose are shown to be the strongest inhibitors.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of novel triazoles and mannich bases functionalized 1,4-dihydropyridine as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumbhare, Ravindra M; Kosurkar, Umesh B; Bagul, Pankaj K; Kanwal, Abhinav; Appalanaidu, K; Dadmal, Tulshiram L; Banerjee, Sanjay Kumar

    2014-11-01

    A series of novel diethyl 2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate embedded triazole and mannich bases were synthesized, and evaluated for their angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Screening of above synthesized compounds for ACE inhibition showed that triazoles functionalized compounds have better ACE inhibitory activity compared to that of mannich bases analogues. Among all triazoles we found 6 h, 6 i and 6 j to have good ACE inhibition activity with IC50 values 0.713 μM, 0.409 μM and 0.653 μM, respectively. Among mannich bases series compounds, only 7c resulted as most active ACE inhibitor with IC50 value of 0.928 μM.

  10. Antihypertensive activity of peptides identified in the in vitro gastrointestinal digest of pork meat.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Elizabeth; Toldrá, Fidel; Sentandreu, Miguel Angel; Nishimura, Hitoshi; Arihara, Keizo

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the in vivo antihypertensive activity of three novel peptides identified in the in vitro digest of pork meat. These peptides were RPR, KAPVA and PTPVP and all of them showed significant antihypertensive activity after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats, RPR being the peptide with the greatest in vivo activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the in vivo antihypertensive action of the three peptides from nebulin (RPR) and titin (KAPVA and PTPVP), thus confirming their reported in vitro angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. These findings suggest that pork meat could constitute a source of bioactive constituents that could be utilized in functional foods or nutraceuticals.

  11. Identification of Antihypertensive Peptides Derived from Low Molecular Weight Casein Hydrolysates Generated during Fermentation by Bifidobacterium longum KACC 91563

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Go Eun; Chang, Oun Ki; Jo, Su-Mi; Han, Gi-Sung; Park, Beom-Young; Ham, Jun-Sang; Jeong, Seok-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was evaluated for the low-molecular-weight fraction (<3 kDa) obtained from milk fermentation by Bifidobacterium longum KACC91563. The ACE inhibitory activity in this fraction was 62.3%. The peptides generated from the <3 kDa fraction were identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quantitative time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Of the 28 peptides identified, 11 and 16 were identified as β-casein (CN) and αs1-CN, respectively. One peptide was identified as κ-CN. Three peptides, YQEPVLGPVRGPFPIIV, QEPVLGPVRGPFPIIV, and GPVRGPFPIIV, from β-CN corresponded to known antihypertensive peptides. We also found 15 peptides that were identified as potential antihypertensive peptides because they included a known antihypertensive peptide fragment. These peptides were as follows: RELEELNVPGEIVE (f1-14), YQEPVLGPVRGPFP (f193-206), EPVLGPVRGPFPIIV (f195-206), PVLGPVRGPFPIIV (f196-206), VLGPVRGPFPIIV (f197-206), and LGPVRGPFPIIV (f198-206) for β-CN; and APSFSDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f176-199), SFSDIPNPIGSENSEKT- TMPLW (f178-199), FSDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f179-199), SDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f180-199), DIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f181-199), IPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f182-199), PIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f185-199), IGSENSEKTTMPLW (f186-199), and SENSEKTTMPLW (f188-199) for αs1-CN. From these results, B. longum could be used as a starter culture in combination with other lactic acid bacteria in the dairy industry, and/or these peptides could be used in functional food manufacturing as additives for the development of a product with beneficial effects for human health. PMID:26877633

  12. Isolation and Identification of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV-Inhibitory Peptides from Trypsin/Chymotrypsin-Treated Goat Milk Casein Hydrolysates by 2D-TLC and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Ran; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-10-14

    New dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV)-inhibitory peptides from trypsin/chymotrypsin-treated goat milk casein hydrolysates were isolated and identified by two-dimensional silica thin-layer chromatography (2D-TLC) combined to nano LC-MS/MS. 2D-TLC with chloroform/methanol/25% ammonia (2:2:1) and n-butanol/acetic acid/water (4:1:1) as the first- and second-dimension eluents, respectively, in analytical and semipreparative scales, was set up and verified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) to be feasible and efficient to separate the hydrolysates. Five new DPP-IV-inhibitory peptides, four relatively large oligopeptides (MHQPPQPL, SPTVMFPPQSVL, VMFPPQSVL, and INNQFLPYPY), and AWPQYL were identified, and INNQFLPYPY showed a notable IC50 value of 40.08 μM as an uncompetitive inhibitor. Interactive effects on DPP-IV inhibition were also observed among separated fractions and pure synthetic peptide mixtures with concentration-dependent activity. The study gives new insights into goat casein hydrolysates with identified DPP-IV-inhibitory peptides efficiently isolated by 2D-TLC, which provides a simple and cost-efficient separation process and is compatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identification.

  13. ACE2 is augmented in dystrophic skeletal muscle and plays a role in decreasing associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cecilia; Acuña, María José; Torrejón, Javiera; Rebolledo, Daniela; Cabrera, Daniel; Santos, Robson A; Brandan, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common inherited neuromuscular disease and is characterized by absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, and fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that systemic infusion or oral administration of angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), a peptide with opposing effects to angiotensin II, normalized skeletal muscle architecture, decreased local fibrosis, and improved muscle function in mdx mice, a dystrophic model for DMD. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, and localization of ACE2, the enzyme responsible for Ang-(1-7) production, in wild type (wt) and mdx skeletal muscle and in a model of induced chronic damage in wt mice. All dystrophic muscles studied showed higher ACE2 activity than wt muscle. Immunolocalization studies indicated that ACE2 was localized mainly at the sarcolemma and, to a lesser extent, associated with interstitial cells. Similar results were observed in the model of chronic damage in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE2 overexpression in mdx TA muscle using an adenovirus containing human ACE2 sequence and showed that expression of ACE2 reduced the fibrosis associated with TA dystrophic muscles. Moreover, we observed fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating the mdx muscle. Finally, mdx gastrocnemius muscles from mice infused with Ang-(1-7), which decreases fibrosis, contain less ACE2 associated with the muscle. This is the first evidence supporting ACE2 as an important therapeutic target to improve the dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype.

  14. A stereological evaluation of secretin and gastric inhibitory peptide-containing mucosal cells of the perinatal small intestine of the pig.

    PubMed

    Van Ginneken, C; Weyns, A

    2004-10-01

    Stereological methods were used to quantify secretin and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP)-immunoreactivity (GIP-IR) in paraffin sections of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of fetal and neonatal piglets. In addition, sections were processed for GLP-1-immunohistochemistry. The volume density of the tunica mucosa increased after birth, giving rise to a decreased volume density of the tela submucosa and tunica muscularis. Generally known region-specific morphological distinctions were reflected in differing volume densities of the various layers. The highest volume density of GIP-IR epithelial cells was observed in the jejunum of the neonate. In contrast, the volume density of secretin-IR epithelial cells was highest in the duodenum of both fetal and neonatal piglets. The volume occupied by GIP-IR and secretin-IR epithelial cells increased in the jejunum after birth. Additionally, ileal secretin-IR epithelial cells were more numerous in the neonatal piglet. In conclusion, the quantitative and qualitative presence of GIP-IR and secretin-IR epithelial cells agree with earlier reports of their presence and co-localization between GIP-IR and GLP-1-IR, in the pig small intestine. Furthermore, the differences suggest that age- and region-related functional demands are temporally and probably causally related with the morphological diversification of the intestine and its endocrine cells.

  15. New Perspectives in the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) II: Albumin Suppresses Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Activity in Human

    PubMed Central

    Fagyas, Miklós; Úri, Katalin; Siket, Ivetta M.; Fülöp, Gábor Á.; Csató, Viktória; Daragó, Andrea; Boczán, Judit; Bányai, Emese; Szentkirályi, István Elek; Maros, Tamás Miklós; Szerafin, Tamás; Édes, István; Papp, Zoltán; Tóth, Attila

    2014-01-01

    About 8% of the adult population is taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to treat cardiovascular disease including hypertension, myocardial infarction and heart failure. These drugs decrease mortality by up to one-fifth in these patients. We and others have reported previously that endogenous inhibitory substances suppress serum ACE activity, in vivo, similarly to the ACE inhibitor drugs. Here we have made an effort to identify this endogenous ACE inhibitor substance. ACE was crosslinked with interacting proteins in human sera. The crosslinked products were immunoprecipitated and subjected to Western blot. One of the crosslinked products was recognized by both anti-ACE and anti-HSA (human serum albumin) antibodies. Direct ACE-HSA interaction was confirmed by binding assays using purified ACE and HSA. HSA inhibited human purified (circulating) and human recombinant ACE with potencies (IC50) of 5.7±0.7 and 9.5±1.1 mg/mL, respectively. Effects of HSA on the tissue bound native ACE were tested on human saphenous vein samples. Angiotensin I evoked vasoconstriction was inhibited by HSA in this vascular tissue (maximal force with HSA: 6.14±1.34 mN, without HSA: 13.54±2.63 mN), while HSA was without effects on angiotensin II mediated constrictions (maximal force with HSA: 18.73±2.17 mN, without HSA: 19.22±3.50 mN). The main finding of this study is that HSA was identified as a potent physiological inhibitor of the ACE. The enzymatic activity of ACE appears to be almost completely suppressed by HSA when it is present in its physiological concentration. These data suggest that angiotensin I conversion is limited by low physiological ACE activities, in vivo. PMID:24691203

  16. Novel strategy for the revalorization of olive (Olea europaea) residues based on the extraction of bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Esteve, C; Marina, M L; García, M C

    2015-01-15

    This work proposes a new strategy for the revalorization of residual materials from table-olive and olive oil production based on the extraction of bioactive peptides. Enzymatic hydrolysates of olive seed protein isolate were prepared by treatment with five different proteases: Alcalase, Thermolysin, Neutrase, Flavourzyme and PTN. Although all hydrolysates presented antioxidant properties, Alcalase was the enzyme that yielded the hydrolysate with the highest antioxidant capacity. All hydrolysates showed antihypertensive capacity, obtaining IC50 values from 29 to 350 μg/ml. Thermolysin was the enzyme which yielded the hydrolysate with the highest ACE-inhibitory capacity. Hydrolysates were fractionated by ultrafiltration showing a high concentration of short chain peptides, which exhibited significantly higher antioxidant and antihypertensive capacities than fractions with higher molecular weights. Peptides in most active fractions were identified by LC-MS/MS, observing homologies with other recognized antioxidant and antihypertensive peptides. Finally, their antioxidant and antihypertensive capacities were evaluated after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

  17. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.

    2017-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), also called SCISAT, is a Canadian-led small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere. ACE was launched into a low Earth circular orbit by NASA on August 12, 2003 and it continues to function nominally. The ACE instruments are a high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2.2 to 13.3 μm (750-4400 cm-1), a spectrophotometer known as Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (MAESTRO) with wavelength coverage of 285-1020 nm and two filtered detector arrays to image the Sun at 0.525 and 1.02 μm. ACE operates in solar occultation mode to provide altitude profiles of temperature, pressure, atmospheric extinction and the volume mixing ratios (VMRs) for several dozen molecules and related isotopologues. This paper presents a mission overview and a summary of selected scientific results.

  18. Selective separation and concentration of antihypertensive peptides from rapeseed protein hydrolysate by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Girgih, Abraham T; Rozoy, Elodie; Bazinet, Laurent; Ju, Xing-Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2016-04-15

    Rapeseed protein isolate was subjected to alcalase digestion to obtain a protein hydrolysate that was separated into peptide fractions using electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) technology. The EDUF process (6h duration) led to isolation of three peptide fractions: anionic (recovered in KCl-1 compartment), cationic (recovered in KCl-2 compartment), and those that remained in the feed compartment, which was labeled final rapeseed protein hydrolysate (FRPH). As expected the KCl-1 peptides were enriched in negatively-charged (43.57%) while KCl-2 contained high contents of positively-charged (28.35%) amino acids. All the samples inhibited angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and renin activities in dose-dependent manner with original rapeseed protein hydrolysate having the least ACE-inhibitory IC50 value of 0.0932±0.0037 mg/mL while FRPH and KCl-2 had least renin-inhibitory IC50 values of 0.47±0.05 and 0.55±0.06 mg/mL, respectively. Six hours after oral administration (100 mg/kg body weight) to spontaneously hypertensive rats, the FRPH produced the maximum systolic blood pressure reduction of -51 mmHg.

  19. Simultaneous separation of acid and basic bioactive peptides by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Jean-François; Amiot, Jean; Bazinet, Laurent

    2006-05-29

    beta-Lactoglobulin (beta-lg), one of the major whey components, can release by enzymatic hydrolysis different bioactive peptidic sequences according to the enzyme used. However, these protein hydrolysates have to be fractionated to obtain peptides in a more purified form. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the feasibility of separating peptides from a beta-lg hydrolysate using an ultrafiltration (UF) membrane stacked in an electrodialysis (ED) cell and to study the effect of pH on the migration of basic/cationic and acid/anionic peptides in the ED configuration. Electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) appeared to be a selective method of separation since amongst a total of 40 peptides in the raw hydrolysate, only 13 were recovered in the separated adjacent solutions (KCl 1 and KCl 2). Amongst these 13 migrating peptides, 3 acid/anionic peptides migrated only in one compartment (KCl 1), while 3 basic/cationic peptides migrated only in the second compartment (KCl 2) and that whatever the pH conditions of the hydrolysate solution. Furthermore, the highest migration was obtained for the ACE-inhibitory peptide beta-lg 142-148, with a value of 10.75%. The integrity of the UF membrane was kept and EDUF would minimize the fouling of UF membrane.

  20. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  1. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  2. ACE2 alterations in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler, María José; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase that degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7). ACE2 is highly expressed within the kidneys, it is largely localized in tubular epithelial cells and less prominently in glomerular epithelial cells and in the renal vasculature. ACE2 activity has been shown to be altered in diabetic kidney disease, hypertensive renal disease and in different models of kidney injury. There is often a dissociation between tubular and glomerular ACE2 expression, particularly in diabetic kidney disease where ACE2 expression is increased at the tubular level but decreased at the glomerular level. In this review, we will discuss alterations in circulating and renal ACE2 recently described in different renal pathologies and disease models as well as their possible significance. PMID:23956234

  3. Short communication: Measuring the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of an 8-amino acid (8mer) fragment of the C12 antihypertensive peptide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An eight amino acid fragment (PFPEVFGK) of a known milk protein-derived antihypertensive peptide was synthesized by microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis and purified by reverse phase HPLC. Its ability to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme was assessed and compared to that of the ...

  4. Adverse cardiac effects of exogenous angiotensin 1-7 in rats with subtotal nephrectomy are prevented by ACE inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Karen; Patel, Sheila K.

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that exogenous angiotensin (Ang) 1–7 has adverse cardiac effects in experimental kidney failure due to its action to increase cardiac angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity. This study investigated if the addition of an ACE inhibitor (ACEi) to Ang 1–7 infusion would unmask any beneficial effects of Ang 1–7 on the heart in experimental kidney failure. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent subtotal nephrectomy (STNx) and were treated with vehicle, the ACEi ramipril (oral 1mg/kg/day), Ang 1–7 (subcutaneous 24 μg/kg/h) or dual therapy (all groups, n = 12). A control group (n = 10) of sham-operated rats were also studied. STNx led to hypertension, renal impairment, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and increased both left ventricular ACE2 activity and ACE binding. STNx was not associated with changes in plasma levels of ACE, ACE2 or angiotensin peptides. Ramipril reduced blood pressure, improved cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and inhibited cardiac ACE. Ang 1–7 infusion increased blood pressure, cardiac interstitial fibrosis and cardiac ACE binding compared to untreated STNx rats. Although in STNx rats, the addition of ACEi to Ang 1–7 prevented any deleterious cardiac effects of Ang 1–7, a limitation of the study is that the large increase in plasma Ang 1–7 with ramipril may have masked any effect of infused Ang 1–7. PMID:28192475

  5. Characterization of ACE and ACE2 Expression within Different Organs of the NOD Mouse.

    PubMed

    Roca-Ho, Heleia; Riera, Marta; Palau, Vanesa; Pascual, Julio; Soler, Maria Jose

    2017-03-05

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is known to play a key role in several diseases such as diabetes, and renal and cardiovascular pathologies. Its blockade has been demonstrated to delay chronic kidney disease progression and cardiovascular damage in diabetic patients. In this sense, since local RAS has been described, the aim of this study is to characterize angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 activities, as well as protein expression, in several tissues of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. After 21 or 40 days of diabetes onset, mouse serums and tissues were analyzed for ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities and protein expression. ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities were detected in different tissues. Their expressions vary depending on the studied tissue. Thus, whereas ACE activity was highly expressed in lungs, ACE2 activity was highly expressed in pancreas among the studied tissues. Interestingly, we also observed that diabetes up-regulates ACE mainly in serum, lung, heart, and liver, and ACE2 mainly in serum, liver, and pancreas. In conclusion, we found a marked serum and pulmonary alteration in ACE activity of diabetic mice, suggesting a common regulation. The increase of ACE2 activity within the circulation in diabetic mice may be ascribed to a compensatory mechanism of RAS.

  6. Characterization of ACE and ACE2 Expression within Different Organs of the NOD Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Ho, Heleia; Riera, Marta; Palau, Vanesa; Pascual, Julio; Soler, Maria Jose

    2017-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is known to play a key role in several diseases such as diabetes, and renal and cardiovascular pathologies. Its blockade has been demonstrated to delay chronic kidney disease progression and cardiovascular damage in diabetic patients. In this sense, since local RAS has been described, the aim of this study is to characterize angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 activities, as well as protein expression, in several tissues of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. After 21 or 40 days of diabetes onset, mouse serums and tissues were analyzed for ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities and protein expression. ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities were detected in different tissues. Their expressions vary depending on the studied tissue. Thus, whereas ACE activity was highly expressed in lungs, ACE2 activity was highly expressed in pancreas among the studied tissues. Interestingly, we also observed that diabetes up-regulates ACE mainly in serum, lung, heart, and liver, and ACE2 mainly in serum, liver, and pancreas. In conclusion, we found a marked serum and pulmonary alteration in ACE activity of diabetic mice, suggesting a common regulation. The increase of ACE2 activity within the circulation in diabetic mice may be ascribed to a compensatory mechanism of RAS. PMID:28273875

  7. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): MLT Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, Peter

    2010-05-01

    ACE (also known as SCISAT) is making a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of numerous trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The primary instrument is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-1). ACE was launched by NASA on 12 August 2003 for a nominal 2-year mission; after 6 years on orbit the ACE-FTS performance is still excellent. The first results of ACE have been presented in a special issue of Geophysics Research Letters (http://www.agu.org/journals/ss/ACECHEM1/) in 2005 and recently a special issue on ACE validation has been prepared for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/special_issue114.html) by K. Walker and K. Strong; more information can be found at http://www.ace.uwaterloo.ca. The ACE mission goals were initially focussed mainly on polar ozone chemistry, and more recently have shifted more to the troposphere where organic pollutants such as methanol and formaldehyde have been detected. ACE makes limb observations from about 5 km (cloud free scenes) up to nearly 150 km in the lower thermosphere, where CO2 absorption is still weakly detectable. This talk will review ACE-FTS results in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Topics covered will include the mesospheric descent of NOx in the polar winter, spectra of polar mesospheric clouds, concentration profiles of CO2 (which do not match model predictions), and combined Odin-Osiris/ACE-FTS observations.

  8. ACE program/UNIX user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Feng-Berman, S.K.

    1993-01-12

    This report the following: How to use the ace program?; Introduction to the ace program; Online command; Define a macro file; Macro commands; Counters and MCA; Counters usage; Counters database; Feedback Counter Database; MCA functions and macro command; X window Interclient Communication; and How to get around in UNIX?

  9. ACE program/UNIX user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Feng-Berman, S.K.

    1993-01-12

    This report the following: How to use the ace program ; Introduction to the ace program; Online command; Define a macro file; Macro commands; Counters and MCA; Counters usage; Counters database; Feedback Counter Database; MCA functions and macro command; X window Interclient Communication; and How to get around in UNIX

  10. The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Remer, L.; Kahn, R.; Starr, D.; Hildebrand, P.; Colarco, P.; Diner, D.; Vane, D.; Im, E.; Behrenfeld, M.; Stephens, G.; Maring, H.; Bontempi, P.; Martins, J. V.

    2008-12-01

    The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission is a second tier Decadal Survey mission designed to characterize the role of aerosols in climate forcing, especially their impact on precipitation and cloud formation. ACE also includes ocean biosphere measurements (chlorophyll and dissolved organic materials) which will be greatly improved by simultaneous measurements of aerosols. The nominal ACE payload includes lidar and multiangle spectropolarimetric polarimetric measurements of aerosols, radar measurements of clouds and multi-band spectrometer for the measurement of ocean ecosystems. An enhancement to ACE payload under consideration includes µ-wave radiometer measurements of cloud ice and water outside the nadir path of the radar/lidar beams. This talk will cover ACE instrument and science options, updates on the science team definition activity and science potential.

  11. AVP-IC50 Pred: Multiple machine learning techniques-based prediction of peptide antiviral activity in terms of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50).

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abid; Tandon, Himani; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-11-01

    Peptide-based antiviral therapeutics has gradually paved their way into mainstream drug discovery research. Experimental determination of peptides' antiviral activity as expressed by their IC50 values involves a lot of effort. Therefore, we have developed "AVP-IC50 Pred," a regression-based algorithm to predict the antiviral activity in terms of IC50 values (μM). A total of 759 non-redundant peptides from AVPdb and HIPdb were divided into a training/test set having 683 peptides (T(683)) and a validation set with 76 independent peptides (V(76)) for evaluation. We utilized important peptide sequence features like amino-acid compositions, binary profile of N8-C8 residues, physicochemical properties and their hybrids. Four different machine learning techniques (MLTs) namely Support vector machine, Random Forest, Instance-based classifier, and K-Star were employed. During 10-fold cross validation, we achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs) of 0.66, 0.64, 0.56, 0.55, respectively, for the above MLTs using the best combination of feature sets. All the predictive models also performed well on the independent validation dataset and achieved maximum PCCs of 0.74, 0.68, 0.59, 0.57, respectively, on the best combination of feature sets. The AVP-IC50 Pred web server is anticipated to assist the researchers working on antiviral therapeutics by enabling them to computationally screen many compounds and focus experimental validation on the most promising set of peptides, thus reducing cost and time efforts. The server is available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/ic50avp.

  12. Kinetics and molecular docking studies of the inhibitions of angiotensin converting enzyme and renin activities by hemp seed (Cannabis sativa L.) peptides.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-05-07

    Four novel peptide sequences (WVYY, WYT, SVYT, and IPAGV) identified from an enzymatic digest of hemp seed proteins were used for enzyme inhibition kinetics and molecular docking studies. Results showed that WVYY (IC50 = 0.027 mM) was a more potent (p < 0.05) ACE-inhibitory peptide than WYT (IC50 = 0.574 mM). However, WYT (IC50 = 0.054 mM) and SVYT (IC50 = 0.063 mM) had similar renin-inhibitory activity, which was significantly better than that of IPAGV (IC50 = 0.093 mM). Kinetics studies showed that WVYY had a lower inhibition constant (Ki) of 0.06 mM and hence greater affinity for ACE when compared to the 1.83 mM obtained for WYT. SVYT had lowest Ki value of 0.89 mM against renin, when compared to the values obtained for WYT and IPAGV. Molecular docking results showed that the higher inhibitory activities of WVYY and SVYT were due to the greater degree of noncovalent bond-based interactions with the enzyme protein, especially formation of higher numbers of hydrogen bonds with active site residues.

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) dimerization is the initial step in the ACE inhibitor-induced ACE signaling cascade in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Friedrich, Matthias; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2006-05-01

    The binding of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to ACE initiates a signaling cascade that involves the phosphorylation of the enzyme on Ser1270 as well as activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and leads to alterations in gene expression. To clarify how ACE inhibitors activate this pathway, we determined their effect on the ability of the enzyme to dimerize and the role of ACE dimerization in the initiation of the ACE signaling cascade. In endothelial cells, ACE was detected as a monomer as well as a dimer in native gel electrophoresis and dimerization/oligomerization was confirmed using the split-ubiquitin assay in yeast. ACE inhibitors elicited a rapid, concentration-dependent increase in the dimer/monomer ratio that correlated with that of the ACE inhibitorinduced phosphorylation of ACE. Cell treatment with galactose and glucose to prevent the putative lectin-mediated self-association of ACE or with specific antibodies shielding the N terminus of ACE failed to affect either the basal or the ACE inhibitor-induced dimerization of the enzyme. In ACE-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells, ACE inhibitors elicited ACE dimerization and phosphorylation as well as the activation of JNK with similar kinetics to those observed in endothelial cells. However, these effects were prevented by the mutation of the essential Zn2+-complexing histidines in the C-terminal active site of the enzyme. Mutation of the N-terminal active site of ACE was without effect. Together, our data suggest that ACE inhibitors can initiate the ACE signaling pathway by inducing ACE dimerization, most probably via the C-terminal active site of the enzyme.

  14. Polysaccharide with antioxidant, α-amylase inhibitory and ACE inhibitory activities from Momordica charantia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hwee-Feng; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2016-04-01

    Functional polysaccharide was isolated from Momordica charantia, with a yield of 36% (w/w). M. charantia bioactive polysaccharide (MCBP) was an acidic and branched heteropolysaccharide with a molecular weight of 92 kDa. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis indicated that MCBP was a pectin-like polysaccharide with an esterification degree of 53% and it contains numerous monosaccharides, predominantly glucose, galactose, and galaturonic acid. The results also showed that MCBP exhibited free radical scavenging activity (31.9%), ferric reducing antioxidant power (0.95 mM), α-amylase inhibition (89.1%), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (94.1%). In the terms of functionality, MCBP showed a lower water-holding capacity but higher in oil-holding capacity, emulsifying activity and foaming capacity compared to citrus pectin. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated that MCBP formed gels with a porous structure, and flow analysis showed that the gel solution exhibited pseudoplastic shear-thinning behavior. These findings indicated that MCBP is a promising functional macromolecular carbohydrate for the food and nutraceutical industries.

  15. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  16. Molecular and Thermodynamic Mechanisms of the Chloride-dependent Human Angiotensin-I-converting Enzyme (ACE)*

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Christopher J.; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Schwager, Sylva L. U.; Akif, Mohd; Sturrock, Edward D.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (sACE), a key regulator of blood pressure and electrolyte fluid homeostasis, cleaves the vasoactive angiotensin-I, bradykinin, and a number of other physiologically relevant peptides. sACE consists of two homologous and catalytically active N- and C-domains, which display marked differences in substrate specificities and chloride activation. A series of single substitution mutants were generated and evaluated under varying chloride concentrations using isothermal titration calorimetry. The x-ray crystal structures of the mutants provided details on the chloride-dependent interactions with ACE. Chloride binding in the chloride 1 pocket of C-domain ACE was found to affect positioning of residues from the active site. Analysis of the chloride 2 pocket R522Q and R522K mutations revealed the key interactions with the catalytic site that are stabilized via chloride coordination of Arg522. Substrate interactions in the S2 subsite were shown to affect chloride affinity in the chloride 2 pocket. The Glu403-Lys118 salt bridge in C-domain ACE was shown to stabilize the hinge-bending region and reduce chloride affinity by constraining the chloride 2 pocket. This work demonstrated that substrate composition to the C-terminal side of the scissile bond as well as interactions of larger substrates in the S2 subsite moderate chloride affinity in the chloride 2 pocket of the ACE C-domain, providing a rationale for the substrate-selective nature of chloride dependence in ACE and how this varies between the N- and C-domains. PMID:24297181

  17. Role of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in diabetic cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Parajuli, Nirmal; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus results in severe cardiovascular complications, and heart disease and failure remain the major causes of death in patients with diabetes. Given the increasing global tide of obesity and diabetes, the clinical burden of diabetes-induced cardiovascular disease is reaching epidemic proportions. Therefore urgent actions are needed to stem the tide of diabetes which entails new prevention and treatment tools. Clinical and pharmacological studies have demonstrated that AngII (angiotensin II), the major effector peptide of the RAS (renin-angiotensin system), is a critical promoter of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. The role of RAS and AngII has been implicated in the progression of diabetic cardiovascular complications and AT1R (AngII type 1 receptor) blockers and ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors have shown clinical benefits. ACE2, the recently discovered homologue of ACE, is a monocarboxypeptidase which converts AngII into Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] which, by virtue of its actions on the MasR (Mas receptor), opposes the effects of AngII. In animal models of diabetes, an early increase in ACE2 expression and activity occurs, whereas ACE2 mRNA and protein levels have been found to decrease in older STZ (streptozotocin)-induced diabetic rats. Using the Akita mouse model of Type 1 diabetes, we have recently shown that loss of ACE2 disrupts the balance of the RAS in a diabetic state and leads to AngII/AT1R-dependent systolic dysfunction and impaired vascular function. In the present review, we will discuss the role of the RAS in the pathophysiology and treatment of diabetes and its complications with particular emphasis on potential benefits of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR axis activation.

  18. ACE2 links amino acid malnutrition to microbial ecology and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tatsuo; Perlot, Thomas; Rehman, Ateequr; Trichereau, Jean; Ishiguro, Hiroaki; Paolino, Magdalena; Sigl, Verena; Hanada, Toshikatsu; Hanada, Reiko; Lipinski, Simone; Wild, Birgit; Camargo, Simone M R; Singer, Dustin; Richter, Andreas; Kuba, Keiji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Schreiber, Stefan; Clevers, Hans; Verrey, Francois; Rosenstiel, Philip; Penninger, Josef M

    2012-07-25

    Malnutrition affects up to one billion people in the world and is a major cause of mortality. In many cases, malnutrition is associated with diarrhoea and intestinal inflammation, further contributing to morbidity and death. The mechanisms by which unbalanced dietary nutrients affect intestinal homeostasis are largely unknown. Here we report that deficiency in murine angiotensin I converting enzyme (peptidyl-dipeptidase A) 2 (Ace2), which encodes a key regulatory enzyme of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), results in highly increased susceptibility to intestinal inflammation induced by epithelial damage. The RAS is known to be involved in acute lung failure, cardiovascular functions and SARS infections. Mechanistically, ACE2 has a RAS-independent function, regulating intestinal amino acid homeostasis, expression of antimicrobial peptides, and the ecology of the gut microbiome. Transplantation of the altered microbiota from Ace2 mutant mice into germ-free wild-type hosts was able to transmit the increased propensity to develop severe colitis. ACE2-dependent changes in epithelial immunity and the gut microbiota can be directly regulated by the dietary amino acid tryptophan. Our results identify ACE2 as a key regulator of dietary amino acid homeostasis, innate immunity, gut microbial ecology, and transmissible susceptibility to colitis. These results provide a molecular explanation for how amino acid malnutrition can cause intestinal inflammation and diarrhoea.

  19. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Environments and Contaminants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The information on this page was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  20. FIRE_ACE_ER2_MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) NASA ER-2 Moderate Resolution Imaging ... SSFR Location:  Northern Alaska Arctic Ocean Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  1. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Special Features

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The page information was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  2. Single Residue Substitutions That Confer Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channel Subtype Selectivity in the NaV1.7 Inhibitory Peptide GpTx-1.

    PubMed

    Murray, Justin K; Long, Jason; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Andrews, Kristin L; Poppe, Leszek; Biswas, Kaustav; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2016-03-24

    There is interest in the identification and optimization of new molecular entities selectively targeting ion channels of therapeutic relevance. Peptide toxins represent a rich source of pharmacology for ion channels, and we recently reported GpTx-1 analogs that inhibit NaV1.7, a voltage-gated sodium ion channel that is a compelling target for improved treatment of pain. Here we utilize multi-attribute positional scan (MAPS) analoging, combining high-throughput synthesis and electrophysiology, to interrogate the interaction of GpTx-1 with NaV1.7 and related NaV subtypes. After one round of MAPS analoging, we found novel substitutions at multiple residue positions not previously identified, specifically glutamic acid at positions 10 or 11 or lysine at position 18, that produce peptides with single digit nanomolar potency on NaV1.7 and 500-fold selectivity against off-target sodium channels. Docking studies with a NaV1.7 homology model and peptide NMR structure generated a model consistent with the key potency and selectivity modifications mapped in this work.

  3. ACE-FTS measurements of HCFC-22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Strahan, S.; McLinden, C. A.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.; Bernath, P. F.

    2012-04-01

    In the 1980s scientists discovered an annual springtime minimum in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic. It was determined that the decline in ozone concentration was primarily caused by catalytic reactions of ozone and chlorine. The emissions of anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were determined to be major sources of the chlorine. The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (with its subsequent amendments) restricts the emissions of ozone depleting substances. To fulfill the need for safe, stable replacements of CFCs, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were developed. The use of HCFC-22 as a replacement has led to an increase in its atmospheric abundance. This is of concern due to its ozone depletion potential and its global warming potential. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT. The primary instrument on SCISAT is a high-resolution infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). With its wide spectral range, the ACE-FTS is capable of measuring an extensive range of gases including key CFC and HCFC species. The altitude distribution from the ACE-FTS profiles provides information that is complementary to the ground-based measurements that have been used to monitor these species. The global distribution of HCFC-22 has been computed from measurements by ACE-FTS. Both seasonal variations and an inter-hemispheric difference are observed. Additionally, a rapid increase in the global concentration of HCFC-22 has been observed since the start of the ACE mission in 2004. Comparisons to ground-based and air-borne measurements show good agreement with the ACE-FTS measurements. The global distributions of HCFC-22 have also been compared to a chemistry and transport model (CTM), the Global Modelling Initiative Combined Stratospheric-Tropospheric Model. There are distinct differences between the model results and ACE-FTS measurements. The causes and

  4. The Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The goals and measurement strategy of the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE) are described. ACE will help to answer fundamental science questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and global ocean ecosystems. Specifically, the goals of ACE are: 1) to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions and to assess the impact of aerosols on the hydrological cycle and 2) determine Ocean Carbon Cycling and other ocean biological processes. It is expected that ACE will: narrow the uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction and quantify the role of aerosols in climate change; measure the ocean ecosystem changes and precisely quantify ocean carbon uptake; and, improve air quality forecasting by determining the height and type of aerosols being transported long distances. Overviews are provided of the aerosol-cloud community measurement strategy, aerosol and cloud observations over South Asia, and ocean biology research goals. Instruments used in the measurement strategy of the ACE mission are also highlighted, including: multi-beam lidar, multiwavelength high spectra resolution lidar, the ocean color instrument (ORCA)--a spectroradiometer for ocean remote sensing, dual frequency cloud radar and high- and low-frequency micron-wave radiometer. Future steps for the ACE mission include refining measurement requirements and carrying out additional instrument and payload studies.

  5. Release of angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor peptides during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of Parmigiano Reggiano PDO cheese and their absorption through an in vitro model of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, L; Catalani, E; Morera, P; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Bernabucci, U; De Noni, I; Nardone, A

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of 8 bovine casein-derived peptides (VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP, and HLPLP) reported as angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors (ACE-I) was investigated in the 3-kDa ultrafiltered water-soluble extract (WSE) of Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) cheese samples by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry via an electrospray ionization source. Only VPP, IPP, LHLPLP, and HLPLP were revealed in the WSE, and their total amount was in the range of 8.46 to 21.55 mg/kg of cheese. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion, the same ACE-I peptides along with the newly formed AYFYPEL and AYFYPE were found in the 3 kDa WSE of PR digestates. Digestates presented high amounts (1,880-3,053 mg/kg) of LHLPLP, whereas the remaining peptides accounted for 69.24 to 82.82 mg/kg. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values decreased from 7.92 ± 2.08 in undigested cheese to 3.20 ± 1.69 after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The 3-kDa WSE of digested cheeses were used to study the transport of the 8 ACE-I peptides across the monolayers of the Caco-2 cell culture grown on a semipermeable membrane of the transwells. After 1h of incubation, 649.20 ± 148.85 mg/kg of LHLPLP remained in the apical compartment, whereas VPP, IPP, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, and HLPLP accounted in total for less than 36.78 mg/kg. On average, 0.6% of LHLPLP initially present in the digestates added to the apical compartment were transported intact to the basolateral chamber after the same incubation time. Higher transport rate (2.9%) was ascertained for the peptide HLPLP. No other intact ACE-I peptides were revealed in the basolateral compartment. For the first time, these results demonstrated that the ACE-I peptides HLPLP and LHLPLP present in the in vitro digestates of PR cheese are partially absorbed through an in vitro model of human intestinal epithelium.

  6. Identification of a novel brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-inhibitory factor: regulation of BDNF by teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP)-1 in immortalized embryonic mouse hypothalamic cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tiffany; Chand, Dhan; Song, Lifang; Al Chawaf, Arij; Watson, John D; Boutros, Paul C; Belsham, Denise D; Lovejoy, David A

    2012-02-10

    The teneurins are a family of four large transmembrane proteins that are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) where they have been implicated in development and CNS function. At the tip of the carboxyl terminus of each teneurin lies a 43-amino acid sequence, that when processed, could liberate an amidated 41-residue peptide. We have called this region the teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP). Picomolar concentrations of the synthetic version of TCAP-1 inhibit stress-induced cocaine reinstatement in rats. Because cocaine-seeking is associated with increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain, we examined whether synthetic mouse TCAP-1 has the potential to regulate BDNF expression in immortalized mouse neurons. Immortalized mouse neurons (N38; mHypoE38) show strong FITC-labeled [K(8)]-TCAP-1 uptake and BDNF labeling in the cytosol. Moreover, FITC-labeled [K(8)]-TCAP-1 bound competitively to membrane fractions. In culture, the labeled TCAP-1 peptide could be detected on cell membranes within 15 min and subsequently became internalized in the cytosol and trafficked toward the nucleus. Administration of 10(-8)M unlabeled TCAP-1 to cultures of the N38 cells resulted in a significant decrease of total cell BDNF immunoreactivity over 4h as determined by western blot and ELISA analyses. Real-time PCR, utilizing primers to the various BDNF transcripts showed a significant decline of promoter IIB- and VI-driven transcripts. Taken together, these studies indicated that in vitro, TCAP-1 induces a significant decline in BDNF transcription and protein labeling in embyronic mouse immortalized hypothalamic neurons. Thus, TCAP-1 may act as a novel BDNF inhibitory factor.

  7. Enhanced antifungal and insect α-amylase inhibitory activities of Alpha-TvD1, a peptide variant of Tephrosia villosa defensin (TvD1) generated through in vitro mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, S; Imani, J; Tanneeru, K; Guruprasad, L; Kogel, K H; Kirti, P B

    2012-02-01

    TvD1 is a small, cationic, and highly stable defensin from the weedy legume, Tephrosia villosa with demonstrated in vitro antifungal activity. We show here peptide modifications in TvD1 that lead to enhanced antifungal activities. Three peptide variants, S32R, D37R, and Alpha-TvD1 (-G-M-T-R-T-) with variations in and around the β2-β3 loop region that imposes the two β-strands, β2 and β3 were generated through in vitro mutagenesis. Alpha-TvD1 exhibited enhanced antifungal activity against the fungal pathogens, Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium oxysporum with respective IC(50) values of 2.5 μM and 3.0 μM, when compared to S32R (<5.0 μM and >5.0 μM), D37R (5.5 μM and 4.5 μM), and the wild type TvD1 (6.5 μM). Because of the enhanced antifungal activity, this variant peptide was characterized further. Growth of F. culmorum in the presence of Alpha-TvD1 showed deformities in hyphal walls and nuclear damage. With respect to the plant pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, both Alpha-TvD1 and the wild type TvD1 showed comparable antibacterial activity. Both wild type TvD1 and Alpha-TvD1 displayed inhibitory activity against the α-amylase of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (TMA) with the latter showing enhanced activity. The human salivary as well as barley α-amylase activities were not inhibited even at concentrations of up to 50 μM, which has been predicted to be due to differences in the pocket size and the size of the interacting loops. Present study shows that the variant Alpha-TvD1 exhibits enhanced antifungal as well as insect α-amylase inhibitory activity.

  8. Partial Molecular Characterization of Arctium minus Aspartylendopeptidase and Preparation of Bioactive Peptides by Whey Protein Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Cecilia V; Colombo, María Laura; Liggieri, Constanza; Bruno, Mariela; Vairo-Cavalli, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we report the cloning of an aspartic protease (AP) from flowers of Arctium minus (Hill) Bernh. (Asteraceae) along with the use of depigmented aqueous flower extracts, as a source of APs, for the hydrolysis of whey proteins. The isolated cDNA encoded a protein product with 509 amino acids called arctiumisin, with the characteristic primary structure organization of typical plant APs. Bovine whey protein hydrolysates, obtained employing the enzyme extracts of A. minus flowers, displayed inhibitory angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and antioxidant activities. Hydrolysates after 3 and 5 h of reaction (degree of hydrolysis 2.4 and 5.6, respectively) and the associated peptide fraction with molecular weight below 3 kDa were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry, and reverse phase-high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the viability of using proteases from A. minus to increase the antioxidant and inhibitory ACE capacity of whey proteins.

  9. Computational study of the inhibitory mechanism of the kinase CDK5 hyperactivity by peptide p5 and derivation of a pharmacophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, A.; Brady, M.; Sriram, R.; Pant, H. C.; Hassan, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The hyperactivity of the cyclic dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) induced by the activator protein p25 has been linked to a number of pathologies of the brain. The CDK5-p25 complex has thus emerged as a major therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative conditions. Experiments have shown that the peptide p5 reduces the CDK5-p25 activity without affecting the endogenous CDK5-p35 activity, whereas the peptide TFP5, obtained from p5, elicits similar inhibition, crosses the blood-brain barrier, and exhibits behavioral rescue of AD mice models with no toxic side effects. The molecular basis of the kinase inhibition is not currently known, and is here investigated by computer simulations. It is shown that p5 binds the kinase at the same CDK5/p25 and CDK5/p35 interfaces, and is thus a non-selective competitor of both activators, in agreement with available experimental data in vitro. Binding of p5 is enthalpically driven with an affinity estimated in the low µM range. A quantitative description of the binding site and pharmacophore is presented, and options are discussed to increase the binding affinity and selectivity in the design of drug-like compounds against AD.

  10. Investigation of lactic acid bacterial strains for meat fermentation and the product's antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting-enzyme inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shiro; Matsufuji, Hisashi; Nakade, Koji; Takenoyama, Shin-Ichi; Ahhmed, Abdulatef; Sakata, Ryoichi; Kawahara, Satoshi; Muguruma, Michio

    2016-08-02

    In the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains screened from our LAB collection, Lactobacillus (L.) sakei strain no. 23 and L. curvatus strain no. 28 degraded meat protein and tolerated salt and nitrite in vitro. Fermented sausages inoculated strains no. 23 and no. 28 showed not only favorable increases in viable LAB counts and reduced pH, but also the degradation of meat protein. The sausages fermented with these strains showed significantly higher antioxidant activity than those without LAB or fermented by each LAB type strain. Angiotensin-I-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was also significantly higher in the sausages fermented with strain no. 23 than in those fermented with the type strain. Higher ACE inhibitory activity was also observed in the sausages fermented with strain no. 28, but did not differ significantly from those with the type strain. An analysis of the proteolysis and degradation products formed by each LAB in sausages suggested that those bioactivities yielded fermentation products such as peptides. Therefore, LAB starters that can adequately ferment meat, such as strains no. 23 and no. 28, should contribute to the production of bioactive compounds in meat products.

  11. Effect of temperature on the stability of various peptidases during peptide-enriched soy sauce fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Takeharu; Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Uchida, Riichiro

    2012-03-01

    We previously developed a peptide-enriched soy sauce-like seasoning called Fermented Soybean Seasoning (FSS) with high-temperature fermentation, and we have reported the antihypertensive effects of FSS. Seryl-tyrosine (Ser-Tyr) and glycyl-tyrosine (Gly-Tyr) were identified from FSS as active constituents in the antihypertensive effects. They were found to be particularly enriched in FSS; more so than in regular soy sauce. In the present study, we clarified one of the mechanisms underlying the accumulation of these bioactive peptides during high temperature soy sauce brewing. Crude enzyme extracts were prepared from model soy sauce mash (moromi) fermented at various temperatures. Leucine aminopeptidase-I, II, and seryl-tyrosine hydrolytic activity were found to decrease in the moromi incubated at the fermentation temperature of FSS whereas almost no decrease was observed in that of regular soy sauce. The concentrations of ACE inhibitory peptides, Ser-Tyr and Gly-Tyr, in the moromi incubated at high temperature were revealed to be higher than those at low temperature through quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis. These results suggested that the peptidases responsible for degrading low molecular weight bioactive peptides were inactivated during the high temperature fermentation, thus, these peptides would be likely to remain in the high temperature fermentation.

  12. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  13. The Blockade of NF-κB Activation by a Specific Inhibitory Peptide Has a Strong Neuroprotective Role in a Sprague-Dawley Rat Kernicterus Model*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengwen; Song, Sijie; Li, Shengjun; Feng, Jie; Hua, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    Kernicterus, the permanent nerve damage occurring as a result of bilirubin precipitation, still occurs worldwide and may lead to death or permanent neurological impairments. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, and effective therapeutic strategies are lacking. The present study aims to investigate the activation of NF-κB and to identify the effect of NF-κB inhibition on the newborn rat kernicterus model. The NF-κB essential modifier-binding domain peptide (NBD), coupled with the HIV trans-activator of transcription peptide (TAT) was used to inhibit NF-κB. NF-κB was significantly activated in the cerebrum at 1 and 3 h (p < 0.05) after the model was established, as measured by EMSA. NF-κB activation was inhibited by intraperitoneal administration of TAT-NBD. The general conditions of the TAT-NBD-treated rats were improved; meanwhile, these rats performed much better on the neurological evaluation, the rotarod test, and the Morris water maze test (p < 0.05) than the vehicle-treated rats at 28 days. Furthermore, the morphology of the nerve cells was better preserved in the TAT-NBD group, and these cells displayed less neurodegeneration and astrocytosis. Simultaneously, apoptosis in the brain was attenuated, and the levels of the TNF-α and IL-1β proteins were decreased (p < 0.01). These results suggested that NF-κB was activated, and inhibition of NF-κB activation by TAT-NBD not only attenuated the acute neurotoxicity, apoptosis, and inflammation, but also improved the long term neurobehavioral impairments in the kernicterus model rats in vivo. Thus, inhibiting NF-κB activation might be a potential therapeutic approach for kernicterus. PMID:26499797

  14. Interaction of a dengue virus NS1-derived peptide with the inhibitory receptor KIR3DL1 on natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Townsley, E; O'Connor, G; Cosgrove, C; Woda, M; Co, M; Thomas, S J; Kalayanarooj, S; Yoon, I-K; Nisalak, A; Srikiatkhachorn, A; Green, S; Stephens, H A F; Gostick, E; Price, D A; Carrington, M; Alter, G; McVicar, D W; Rothman, A L; Mathew, A

    2016-03-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) interact with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands and play a key role in the regulation and activation of NK cells. The functional importance of KIR-HLA interactions has been demonstrated for a number of chronic viral infections, but to date only a few studies have been performed in the context of acute self-limited viral infections. During our investigation of CD8(+) T cell responses to a conserved HLA-B57-restricted epitope derived from dengue virus (DENV) non-structural protein-1 (NS1), we observed substantial binding of the tetrameric complex to non-T/non-B lymphocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a long-standing clinical cohort in Thailand. We confirmed binding of the NS1 tetramer to CD56(dim) NK cells, which are known to express KIRs. Using depletion studies and KIR-transfected cell lines, we demonstrated further that the NS1 tetramer bound the inhibitory receptor KIR3DL1. Phenotypical analysis of PBMC from HLA-B57(+) subjects with acute DENV infection revealed marked activation of NS1 tetramer-binding natural killer (NK) cells around the time of defervescence in subjects with severe dengue disease. Collectively, our findings indicate that subsets of NK cells are activated relatively late in the course of acute DENV illness and reveal a possible role for specific KIR-HLA interactions in the modulation of disease outcomes.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones in the extract of Ginkgo biloba and evaluation of their inhibitory activity towards fibril formation of β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyan; Wang, Jing-Rong; Yau, Lee-Fong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Liang; Han, Quan-Bin; Zhao, Zhongzhen; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-04-10

    The standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761) is used clinically in Europe for the symptomatic treatment of impaired cerebral function in primary degenerative dementia syndromes, and the results of numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have supported such clinical use. The abnormal production and aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and the deposition of fibrils in the brain are regarded as key steps in the onset of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and the inhibition of Aβ aggregation and destabilization of the preformed fibrils represent viable approaches for the prevention and treatment of AD. Flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones (TTLs) are the two main components of EGb761 which represent 24 and 6% of the overall content, respectively. In our research, seven abundant flavonoid glycosides 1-7 were isolated from the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves and characterized by spectroscopic analysis. Furthermore, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method was established for the simultaneous quantification of these seven flavonoids. The inhibitory activities of these flavonoids, as well as four TTLs, i.e., ginkgolides A, B, and C and bilobalide (compounds 8-11), were evaluated towards Aβ42 fibril formation using a thioflavin T fluorescence assay. It was found that three flavonoids 1, 3 and 4 exhibited moderate inhibitory activities, whereas the other four flavonoids 2, 5, 6 and 7, as well as the four terpene trilactones, showed poor activity. This is the first report of the inhibition of Aβ fibril formation of two characteristic acylated flavonoid glycosides 6, 7 in Ginkgo leaves, on the basis of which the structure-activity relationship of these flavonoids 1-7 was discussed.

  16. Stiffening of the ACES deployable space boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidwell, Vince

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this design project was to design an active planar stiffening device for the existing ACES (Acoustic Containerless Experiment System) structure. the ACES structure was modeled using simple beam theory. Various concepts were generated about how the stiffening device should be configured in order to perform at an optimum level. The optimum configuration was selected to be a single set of spreaders located approximately 63% of the distance down the beam. Actuation was to be provided by a DC electric motor. From the test results, the design group was able to draw conclusions and make recommendations about the utility of further research into this area.

  17. Inhibitory effects of C-type natriuretic peptide on the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts, and secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHI-QIANG; LIU, YING-LONG; LI, GANG; LI, BIN; LIU, YANG; LI, XIAO-FENG; LIU, AI-JUN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) on the function of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). Western blotting was used to investigate the expression of myofibroblast marker proteins: α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), extra domain-A fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III, and the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Immunofluorescence was used to examine the morphological changes; a transwell assay was used to analyze migration, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ELISA were employed to determine the mRNA expression and protein secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The results demonstrated that CNP significantly reduced the protein expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III, and suppressed the migratory ability of CFs. Additionally, the mRNA and protein expression of MCP-1 and PAI-1 was inhibited under the CNP treatment; and this effect was mediated by the inhibition of the ERK1/2 activity. In conclusion, CNP inhibited cardiac fibroblast differentiation and migration, and reduced the secretion of MCP-1 and PAI-1, which demonstrates novel mechanisms to explain the antifibrotic effect of CNP. PMID:25352084

  18. Impact of the co-culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae-Oenococcus oeni on malolactic fermentation and partial characterization of a yeast-derived inhibitory peptidic fraction.

    PubMed

    Nehme, Nancy; Mathieu, Florence; Taillandier, Patricia

    2010-02-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the impact of the co-culture on the output of malolactic fermentation and to further investigate the reasons of the antagonism exerted by yeasts towards bacteria during sequential cultures. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae D strain/Oenococcus oeni X strain combination was tested by applying both sequential culture and co-culture strategies. This pair was chosen amongst others because the malolactic fermentation was particularly difficult to realize during the sequential culture. During this traditional procedure, malolactic fermentation started when alcoholic fermentation was achieved. For the co-culture, both fermentations were conducted together by inoculating yeasts and bacteria into a membrane bioreactor at the same time. Results obtained during the sequential culture and compared to a bacterial control medium, showed that the inhibition exerted by S. cerevisiae D strain in term of decrease of the malic acid consumption rate was mainly due to ethanol (75%) and to a peptidic fraction (25%) having an MW between 5 and 10 kDa. 0.4 g l(-1) of L-malic acid was consumed in this case while 3.7 g l(-1) was consumed when the co-culture was applied. In addition, there was no risk of increased volatile acidity during the co-culture. Therefore, the co-culture strategy was considered effective for malolactic fermentation with the yeast/bacteria pair studied.

  19. Antiaggregation Potential of Padina gymnospora against the Toxic Alzheimer’s Beta-Amyloid Peptide 25–35 and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Property of Its Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Balakrishnan; Sheeja Malar, Dicson; Sathya, Sethuraman; Pandima Devi, Kasi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation in the cerebral cortex of the brain is a promising therapeutic and defensive strategy in identification of disease modifying agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since natural products are considered as the current alternative trend for the discovery of AD drugs, the present study aims at the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic potential of the marine seaweed Padina gymnospora. Prevention of aggregation and disaggregation of the mature fibril formation of Aβ 25–35 by acetone extracts of P. gymnospora (ACTPG) was evaluated in two phases by Thioflavin T assay. The results were further confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. The results of antiaggregation and disaggregation assay showed that the increase in fluorescence intensity of aggregated Aβ and the co-treatment of ACTPG (250 μg/ml) with Aβ 25–35, an extensive decrease in the fluorescence intensity was observed in both phases, which suggests that ACTPG prevents the oligomers formation and disaggregation of mature fibrils. In addition, ACTPG was subjected to column chromatography and the bioactivity was screened based on the cholinesterase inhibitory activity. Finally, the active fraction was subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for the identification of bioactive compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the bioactive compound alpha bisabolol present in the alga might be responsible for the observed cholinesterase inhibition with the IC50 value < 10 μg/ml for both AChE and BuChE when compared to standard drug donepezil (IC50 value < 6 μg/ml) and support its use for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:26536106

  20. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Walker, K.; McLeod, S.; Nassar, R.

    2003-12-01

    The ACE mission goals are: (1) to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region; (2) to explore the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and climate change; (3) to study the effects of biomass burning in the free troposphere; (4) to measure aerosol number density, size distribution and composition in order to reduce the uncertainties in their effects on the global energy balance. ACE will make a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols, and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The solar occultation advantages are high sensitivity and self-calibration. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4100 cm-1) will measure the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. The ACE concept is derived from the now-retired ATMOS FTS instrument, which flew on the Space Shuttle in 1985, 1992, 1993, 1994. Climate-chemistry coupling may lead to the formation of an Arctic ozone hole. ACE will provide high quality data to confront these model predictions and will monitor polar chemistry as chlorine levels decline. The ACE-FTS can measure water vapor and HDO in the tropical tropopause region to study dehydration and strat-trop exchange. The molecular signatures of massive forest fires will evident in the ACE infrared spectra. The CO2 in our spectra can be used to either retrieve atmospheric pressure or (if the instrument pointing knowledge proves to be satisfactory) for an independent retrieval of a CO2 profile for carbon cycle science. Aerosols and clouds will be monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at

  1. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P.

    2003-04-01

    The ACE mission goals are: (1) to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region; (2) to explore the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and climate change; (3) to study the effects of biomass burning in the free troposphere; (4) to measure aerosol number density, size distribution and composition in order to reduce the uncertainties in their effects on the global energy balance. ACE will make a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols, and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) will give ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The solar occultation advantages are high sensitivity and self-calibration. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4100 cm-1) will measure the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. The ACE concept is derived from the now-retired ATMOS FTS instrument, which flew on the Space Shuttle in 1985, 1992, 1993, 1994. Climate-chemistry coupling may lead to the formation of an Arctic ozone hole. ACE will provide high quality data to confront these model predictions and will monitor polar chemistry as chlorine levels decline. The ACE-FTS can measure water vapor and HDO in the tropical tropopause region to study dehydration and strat-trop exchange. The molecular signatures of massive forest fires will evident in the ACE infrared spectra. The CO_2 in our spectra can be used to either retrieve atmospheric pressure or (if the instrument pointing knowledge proves to be satisfactory) for an independent retrieval of a CO_2 profile for carbon cycle science. Aerosols and clouds will be monitored using the extinction of solar

  2. Gastrointestinal Endogenous Protein-Derived Bioactive Peptides: An in Vitro Study of Their Gut Modulatory Potential

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Lakshmi A.; Hayes, Maria; Mora, Leticia; Montoya, Carlos A.; Moughan, Paul J.; Rutherfurd, Shane M.

    2016-01-01

    A recently proposed paradigm suggests that, like their dietary counterparts, digestion of gastrointestinal endogenous proteins (GEP) may also produce bioactive peptides. With an aim to test this hypothesis, in vitro digests of four GEP namely; trypsin (TRYP), lysozyme (LYS), mucin (MUC), serum albumin (SA) and a dietary protein chicken albumin (CA) were screened for their angiotensin-I converting (ACE-I), renin, platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory (DPP-IV) and antioxidant potential following simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. Further, the resultant small intestinal digests were enriched to obtain peptides between 3–10 kDa in size. All in vitro digests of the four GEP were found to inhibit ACE-I compared to the positive control captopril when assayed at a concentration of 1 mg/mL, while the LYS < 3-kDa permeate fraction inhibited renin by 40% (±1.79%). The LYS < 10-kDa fraction inhibited PAF-AH by 39% (±4.34%), and the SA < 3-kDa fraction inhibited DPP-IV by 45% (±1.24%). The MUC < 3-kDa fraction had an ABTS-inhibition antioxidant activity of 150 (±24.79) µM trolox equivalent and the LYS < 10-kDa fraction inhibited 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) by 54% (±1.62%). Moreover, over 190 peptide-sequences were identified from the bioactive GEP fractions. The findings of the present study indicate that GEP are a significant source of bioactive peptides which may influence gut function. PMID:27043546

  3. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  4. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  5. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  6. Ace the Verbal on the SAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meierding, Loren

    2005-01-01

    Many students are not accepted in to certain colleges and universities because of low SAT scores. Loren Meierding has written Ace the Verbal on the SAT to help students with minimal preparation do well by improving their vocabulary and use better techniques for finding the answers to the questions. This book provides strategies needed to score…

  7. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  8. A novel peptide-processing activity of insect peptidyl-dipeptidase A (angiotensin I-converting enzyme): the hydrolysis of lysyl-arginine and arginyl-arginine from the C-terminus of an insect prohormone peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R; Schoofs, L; Williams, T A; Veelaert, D; Sajid, M; Corvol, P; Coates, D

    1998-01-01

    Insect peptidyl-dipeptidase A [angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)] is a soluble single-domain peptidyl-dipeptidase that has many properties in common with the C-domain of mammalian somatic ACE and with the single-domain mammalian germinal ACE. Mammalian somatic ACE is important in blood homoeostasis, but the role of ACE in insects is not known. Immunocytochemistry has been used to localize ACE in the neuroendocrine system of the locust, Locusta migratoria. Staining was observed in five groups of neurosecretory cells in the brain and suboesophageal ganglion, in the nervi corpori cardiaci, the storage part of the corpora cardiaca and in the nervi corpori allati. In three groups of neurosecretory cells, ACE co-localized with locustamyotropins, suggesting a possible role for the enzyme in the metabolism of these neuropeptides. We demonstrate in vitro a novel activity of ACE that removes pairs of basic amino acid residues from a locustamyotropin peptide extended at the C-terminus with either Gly-Lys-Arg or Gly-Arg-Arg, corresponding to a consensus recognition sequence for endoproteolysis of prohormone proteins by prohormone convertases. The low Km and high kcat values (Km 7.3 and 5.0 microM, kcat 226 and 207 s-1 for the hydrolysis of Phe-Ser-Pro-Arg-Leu-Gly-Lys-Arg and Phe-Ser-Pro-Arg-Leu-Gly-Arg-Arg, respectively) obtained for the hydrolysis of these two peptides by insect ACE means that these peptides, along with mammalian bradykinin, are the most favoured in vitro ACE substrates so far identified. The discovery of this in vitro prohormone-processing activity of insect ACE provides a possible explanation for the intracellular co-localization of the enzyme with locustamyotropin peptides, and provides evidence for a new role for ACE in the biosynthesis of peptide hormones and transmitters. PMID:9461491

  9. Structural determinants for binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Daniel; Hanchapola, Iresha; Thomas, Walter G.; Widdop, Robert E.; Smith, Alexander I.; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a zinc carboxypeptidase involved in the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and inactivates the potent vasopressive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) by removing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue to yield Ang1–7. This conversion inactivates the vasoconstrictive action of Ang II and yields a peptide that acts as a vasodilatory molecule at the Mas receptor and potentially other receptors. Given the growing complexity of RAS and level of cross-talk between ligands and their corresponding enzymes and receptors, the design of molecules with selectivity for the major RAS binding partners to control cardiovascular tone is an on-going challenge. In previous studies we used single β-amino acid substitutions to modulate the structure of Ang II and its selectivity for ACE2, AT1R, and angiotensin type 2 (AT2R) receptor. We showed that modification at the C-terminus of Ang II generally resulted in more pronounced changes to secondary structure and ligand binding, and here, we further explore this region for the potential to modulate ligand specificity. In this study, (1) a library of 47 peptides derived from the C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence (-IHPF) of Ang II was synthesized and assessed for ACE2 binding, (2) the terminal group requirements for high affinity ACE2 binding were explored by and N- and C-terminal modification, (3) high affinity ACE2 binding chimeric AngII analogs were then synthesized and assessed, (4) the structure of the full-length Ang II analogs were assessed by circular dichroism, and (5) the Ang II analogs were assessed for AT1R/AT2R selectivity by cell-based assays. Studies on the C-terminus of Ang II demonstrated varied specificity at different residue positions for ACE2 binding and four Ang II chimeric peptides were identified as selective ligands for the AT2 receptor. Overall, these results provide insight into the residue and structural requirements for ACE2 binding and angiotensin receptor selectivity. PMID

  10. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  11. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and expression in rat central nervous system after sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Visniauskas, Bruna; Oliveira, Vitor; Carmona, Adriana K; D'Almeida, Vânia; de Melo, Robson L; Tufik, Sérgio; Chagas, Jair R

    2011-04-01

    Proteases are essential either for the release of neuropeptides from active or inactive proteins or for their inactivation. Neuropeptides have a fundamental role in sleep-wake cycle regulation and their actions are also likely to be regulated by proteolytic processing. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates, specific protease inhibitors and real-time PCR we demonstrate changes in angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and proteolytic activity in the central nervous system in an animal model of paradoxical sleep deprivation during 96 h (PSD). Male rats were distributed into five groups (PSD, 24 h, 48 h and 96 h of sleep recovery after PSD and control). ACE activity and mRNA levels were measured in hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem, cerebral cortex and striatum tissue extracts. In the hypothalamus, the significant decrease in activity and mRNA levels, after PSD, was only totally reversed after 96 h of sleep recovery. In the brainstem and hippocampus, although significant, changes in mRNA do not parallel changes in ACE specific activity. Changes in ACE activity could affect angiotensin II generation, angiotensin 1-7, bradykinin and opioid peptides metabolism. ACE expression and activity modifications are likely related to some of the physiological changes (cardiovascular, stress, cognition, metabolism function, water and energy balance) observed during and after sleep deprivation.

  12. Interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with membrane-bound carboxypeptidase M (CPM) - a new function of ACE.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoou; Wiesner, Burkhard; Lorenz, Dorothea; Papsdorf, Gisela; Pankow, Kristin; Wang, Po; Dietrich, Nils; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Maul, Björn

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) demonstrates, besides its typical dipeptidyl-carboxypeptidase activity, several unusual functions. Here, we demonstrate with molecular, biochemical, and cellular techniques that the somatic wild-type murine ACE (mACE), stably transfected in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, interacts with endogenous membranal co-localized carboxypeptidase M (CPM). CPM belongs to the group of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Here we report that ACE, completely independent of its known dipeptidase activities, has GPI-targeted properties. Our results indicate that the spatial proximity between mACE and the endogenous CPM enables an ACE-evoked release of CPM. These results are discussed with respect to the recently proposed GPI-ase activity and function of sperm-bound ACE.

  13. Wild Mushrooms in Nepal: Some Potential Candidates as Antioxidant and ACE-Inhibition Sources

    PubMed Central

    Hai Bang, Tran; Suhara, Hiroto; Doi, Katsumi; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Fukami, Katsuya; Parajuli, Gopal Prasad; Katakura, Yoshinori; Yamashita, Shuntaro; Watanabe, Kazuo; Adhikari, Mahesh Kumar; Manandhar, Hira Kaji; Kondo, Ryuichiro; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-nine mushrooms collected in the mountainous areas of Nepal were analyzed for antioxidant activity by different methods, including Folin-Ciocalteu, ORAC, ABTS, and DPPH assays. Intracellular H2O2-scavenging activity was also performed on HaCaT cells. The results showed that phenolic compounds are the main antioxidant of the mushrooms. Among studied samples, Inonotus andersonii, and Phellinus gilvus exhibited very high antioxidant activity with the phenolic contents up to 310.8 and 258.7 mg GAE/g extracts, respectively. The H2O2-scavenging assay on cells also revealed the potential of these mushrooms in the prevention of oxidative stress. In term of ACE-inhibition, results showed that Phlebia tremellosa would be a novel and promising candidate for antihypertensive studies. This mushroom exhibited even higher in vitro ACE-inhibition activity than Ganoderma lingzhi, with the IC50 values of the two mushrooms being 32 μg/mL and 2 μg/mL, respectively. This is the first time biological activities of mushrooms collected in Nepal were reported. Information from this study should be a valuable reference for future studies on antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of mushrooms. PMID:24672576

  14. Effect of Allium sativum and fish collagen on the proteolytic and angiotensin-I converting enzyme-inhibitory activities in cheese and yogurt.

    PubMed

    Shori, A B; Baba, A S; Keow, J N

    2012-12-15

    There is an increasing demand of functional foods in developed countries. Yogurt plays an important role in the management of blood pressure. Several bioactive peptides isolated from Allium sativum or fish collagen have shown antihypertensive activity. Thus, in the present study the effects of A. sativum and/or Fish Collagen (FC) on proteolysis and ACE inhibitory activity in yogurt (0, 7 and 14 day) and cheese (0, 14 and 28 day) were investigated. Proteolytic activities were the highest on day 7 of refrigerated storage in A. sativum-FC-yogurt (337.0 +/- 5.3 microg g(-1)) followed by FC-yogurt (275.3 +/- 2.0 microg g(-1)), A. sativum-yogurt (245.8 +/- 4.2 microg g(-1)) and plain-yogurt (40.4 +/- 1.2 microg g(-1)). On the other hand, proteolytic activities in cheese ripening were the highest (p < 0.05) on day 14 of storage for plain and A. sativum-cheeses (411.4 +/- 4.3 and 528.7 +/- 1.6 microg g(-1), respectively). However, the presence of FC increased the proteolysis to the highest level on day 28 of storage for FC- and A. sativum-FC cheeses (641.2 +/- 0.1 and 1128.4 +/- 4.5 microg g(-1), respectively). In addition, plain- and A. sativum-yogurts with or without FC showed maximal inhibition of ACE on day 7 of storage. Fresh plain- and A. sativum-cheeses showed ACE inhibition (72.3 +/- 7.8 and 50.4 +/- 1.6 % respectively), the presence of FC in both type of cheeses reduced the ACE inhibition to 62.9 +/- 0.8 and 44.5 +/- 5.0%, respectively. However, refrigerated storage increased ACE inhibition in cheeses (p < 0.05 on day 28) in the presence of FC more than in the absence. In conclusion, the presence of FC in A. sativum-yogurt or cheese enhanced the proteolytic activity. Thus, it has potential in the development of an effective dietary strategy for hypertension associated cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Tissue-Specific Expression of Transgenic Secreted ACE in Vasculature Can Restore Normal Kidney Functions, but Not Blood Pressure, of Ace-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Kessler, Sean P.; Colucci, Juliana Almada; Yamashita, Michifumi; Senanayake, Preenie deS; Sen, Ganes C.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) regulates normal blood pressure and fluid homeostasis through its action in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS). Ace-/- mice are smaller in size, have low blood pressure and defective kidney structure and functions. All of these defects are cured by transgenic expression of somatic ACE (sACE) in vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice. sACE is expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells and undergoes a natural cleavage secretion process to generate a soluble form in the body fluids. Both the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE are enzymatically active, and generate the vasoactive octapeptide Angiotensin II (Ang II) with equal efficiency. To assess the relative physiological roles of the secreted and the cell-bound forms of ACE, we expressed, in the vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice, the ectodomain of sACE, which corresponded to only the secreted form of ACE. Our results demonstrated that the secreted form of ACE could normalize kidney functions and RAS integrity, growth and development of Ace-/- mice, but not their blood pressure. This study clearly demonstrates that the secreted form of ACE cannot replace the tissue-bound ACE for maintaining normal blood pressure; a suitable balance between the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE is essential for maintaining all physiological functions of ACE. PMID:24475296

  16. ACE2, angiotensin-(1-7) and Mas receptor axis in inflammation and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, AC; Silveira, KD; Ferreira, AJ; Teixeira, MM

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have improved our understanding of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). These have included the recognition that angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) is a biologically active product of the RAS cascade. The identification of the ACE homologue ACE2, which forms Ang-(1-7) from Ang II, and the GPCR Mas as an Ang-(1-7) receptor have provided the necessary biochemical and molecular background and tools to study the biological significance of Ang-(1-7). Most available evidence supports a counter-regulatory role for Ang-(1-7) by opposing many actions of Ang II on AT1 receptors, especially vasoconstriction and proliferation. Many studies have now shown that Ang-(1-7) by acting via Mas receptor exerts inhibitory effects on inflammation and on vascular and cellular growth mechanisms. Ang-(1-7) has also been shown to reduce key signalling pathways and molecules thought to be relevant for fibrogenesis. Here, we review recent findings related to the function of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis and focus on the role of this axis in modifying processes associated with acute and chronic inflammation, including leukocyte influx, fibrogenesis and proliferation of certain cell types. More attention will be given to the involvement of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in the context of renal disease because of the known relevance of the RAS for the function of this organ and for the regulation of kidney inflammation and fibrosis. Taken together, this knowledge may help in paving the way for the development of novel treatments for chronic inflammatory and renal diseases. PMID:23488800

  17. Regulation of urinary ACE2 in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Jan; Garcia-Halpin, Laura; Ye, Minghao; Maier, Christoph; Sowers, Kurt; Burns, Kevin D; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) enhances the degradation of ANG II and its expression is altered in diabetic kidneys, but the regulation of this enzyme in the urine is unknown. Urinary ACE2 was studied in the db/db model of type 2 diabetes and stretozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes during several physiological and pharmacological interventions. ACE2 activity in db/db mice was increased in the serum and to a much greater extent in the urine compared with db/m controls. Neither a specific ANG II blocker, telmisartan, nor an ACE inhibitor, captopril, altered the levels of urinary ACE2 in db/db or db/m control mice. High-salt diet (8%) increased whereas low-salt diet (0.1%) decreased urinary ACE2 activity in the urine of db/db mice. In STZ mice, urinary ACE2 was also increased, and insulin decreased it partly but significantly after several weeks of administration. The increase in urinary ACE2 activity in db/db mice reflected an increase in enzymatically active protein with two bands identified of molecular size at 110 and 75 kDa and was associated with an increase in kidney cortex ACE2 protein at 110 kDa but not at 75 kDa. ACE2 activity was increased in isolated tubular preparations but not in glomeruli from db/db mice. Administration of soluble recombinant ACE2 to db/m and db/db mice resulted in a marked increase in serum ACE2 activity, but no gain in ACE2 activity was detectable in the urine, further demonstrating that urinary ACE2 is of kidney origin. Increased urinary ACE2 was associated with more efficient degradation of exogenous ANG II (10(-9) M) in urine from db/db compared with that from db/m mice. Urinary ACE2 could be a potential biomarker of increased metabolism of ANG II in diabetic kidney disease.

  18. Multiphysics Applications of ACE3P

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Lee, C. Ko, Z. Li, C.-K. Ng, L. Xiao, G. Cheng, H. Wang

    2012-07-01

    The TEM3P module of ACE3P, a parallel finite-element electromagnetic code suite from SLAC, focuses on the multiphysics simulation capabilities, including thermal and mechanical analysis for accelerator applications. In this pa- per, thermal analysis of coupler feedthroughs to supercon- ducting rf (SRF) cavities will be presented. For the realistic simulation, internal boundary condition is implemented to capture RF heating effects on the surface shared by a di- electric and a conductor. The multiphysics simulation with TEM3P matched the measurement within 0.4%.

  19. The ACES Mission: System Tests Results and Development Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapuoti, Luigi

    Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) testing fundamental laws of physics with high-performance atomic clocks1 . Operated on-board the International Space Station, the ACES payload will distribute a clock signal with fractional frequency instability and inaccuracy of 1·10-16 . This frequency reference is resulting from the medium-term stability of an active hydrogen maser (SHM) and the long-term stability and accuracy of a primary standard based on samples of laser cooled Cs atoms (PHARAO). The ACES clocks are combined by two servo-loops, the first stabilizing the PHARAO local oscillator on SHM, the second controlling the long-term instabilities of SHM using the error signal generated by the PHARAO Cesium resonator. A link in the microwave domain (MWL) and an optical link (ELT) will make the ACES clock signal available to ground laboratories equipped with atomic clocks, connecting them in a worldwide network. Space-to-ground and ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards will be used to test Einstein's theory of general relativity including a precision measurement of the gravitational red-shift, a search for time variations of fundamental constants, and Lorentz Invariance tests. Applications in geodesy, optical time transfer, and ranging will also be supported. The ACES main instruments and subsystems have now reached an advanced status of devel-opment, demonstrated by the completion and the successful test of their engineering models. In particular, a dedicated test campaign has recently verified the performance of the ACES system, where PHARAO and SHM, locked together via the ACES servo loops, are operated as a unique oscillator to generate the ACES frequency reference. The test campaign conducted 1 Luigi Cacciapuoti and Christophe Salomon, Space Clocks and Fundamental Tests: The ACES Experiment, EPJ Special topics 172, 57 (2009). at CNES premises in Toulouse between July and November 2009 concluded

  20. Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J.; Yuen, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Air Force goal is to develop vibration control techniques for large flexible spacecraft by addressing sensor, actuator, and control hardware and dynamic testing. The Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) program will address the Air Force goal by looking at two leading control techniques and implementing them on a structural model of a flexible spacecraft under laboratory testing. The first phase in the ACES program is to review and to assess the High Authority Control/Low Authority Control (HAC/LAC) and Filter accomodated Model Error Sensitivity Suppression (FAMESS) control techniques for testing on the modified VCOSS structure. Appropriate sensors and actuators will be available for use with both techniques; locations will be the same for both techniques. The control actuators will be positioned at the midpoint and free end of the structure. The laser source for the optical sensor is mounted on the feed mast. The beam will be reflected from a mirror on the offset antenna onto the detectors mounted above the shaker table bay. The next phase is to develop an analysis simulation with the control algorithms implemented for dynamics verification. The third phase is to convert the control laws into high level computer language and test them in the NASA-MSFC facility. The final phase is to compile all analytical and test results for performance comparisons.

  1. ACE: Detecting Volatile Organic Compounds from Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.; Allen, Nicholas D. C.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution infrared absorption cross sections for ethane, propane (both in the 3 μm region) and acetone (in the 3 μm and 5-8 μm regions) have been determined from spectra recorded using a high-resolution FTIR spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125/HR). Data are presented for mixtures with dry synthetic air at 0.015 cm-1 resolution (calculated as 0.9/MOPD using the Bruker definition of resolution), at a number of temperatures and pressures appropriate for atmospheric conditions. Intensities were calibrated using spectra taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database. Methane measurements are currently being performed in the 3 μm region in order to retrieve line mixing parameters, which will be used in an improved ACE forward model to minimize CH4 residuals in the retrievals of organic species. Preliminary retrievals of acetone from ACE spectra using a microwindow from 1364.7 to 1367.1 cm-1 have been performed.

  2. In vitro digestion of purified β-casein variants A(1), A(2), B, and I: effects on antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Petrat-Melin, B; Andersen, P; Rasmussen, J T; Poulsen, N A; Larsen, L B; Young, J F

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of bovine milk proteins affect the protein profile of the milk and, hence, certain technological properties, such as casein (CN) number and cheese yield. However, reports show that such polymorphisms may also affect the health-related properties of milk. Therefore, to gain insight into their digestion pattern and bioactive potential, β-CN was purified from bovine milk originating from cows homozygous for the variants A(1), A(2), B, and I by a combination of cold storage, ultracentrifugation, and acid precipitation. The purity of the isolated β-CN was determined by HPLC, variants were verified by mass spectrometry, and molar extinction coefficients at λ=280nm were determined. β-Casein from each of the variants was subjected to in vitro digestion using pepsin and pancreatic enzymes. Antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacities of the hydrolysates were assessed at 3 stages of digestion and related to that of the undigested samples. Neither molar extinction coefficients nor overall digestibility varied significantly between these 4 variants; however, clear differences in digestion pattern were indicated by gel electrophoresis. In particular, after 60min of pepsin followed by 5min of pancreatic enzyme digestion, one ≈4kDa peptide with the N-terminal sequence (106)H-K-E-M-P-F-P-K- was absent from β-CN variant B. This is likely a result of the (122)Ser to (122)Arg substitution in variant B introducing a novel trypsin cleavage site, leading to the changed digestion pattern. All investigated β-CN variants exhibited a significant increase in antioxidant capacity upon digestion, as measured by the Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. After 60min of pepsin + 120min of pancreatic enzyme digestion, the accumulated increase in antioxidant capacity was ≈1.7-fold for the 4 β-CN variants. The ACE inhibitory capacity was also significantly increased by digestion, with the B variant reaching the highest inhibitory

  3. Phytochemical screening and evaluation of in vitro angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of Artocarpus altilis leaf.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Angaswamy, Nataraju; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe S

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of Artocarpus altilis leaf extracts on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. Among the extracts tested, hot ethanol extract exhibited a potent ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC₅₀ value of 54.08 ± 0.29 µg mL⁻¹ followed by cold ethyl acetate extract (IC₅₀ of 85.44 ± 0.85 µg mL⁻¹). In contrast, the hot aqueous extracts showed minimum inhibition with the IC₅₀ value of 765.52 ± 11.97 µg mL⁻¹ at the maximum concentration tested. Further, the phytochemical analysis indicated the varied distribution of tannins, phenolics, glycosides, saponins, steroids, terpenoids and anthraquinones in cold and hot leaf extracts. The correlation between the phytochemical analysis and ACE-inhibitory activity suggests that the high content of glycosidic and phenolic compounds could be involved in exerting ACE-inhibitory activity. In conclusion, this study supports the utilisation of A. altilis leaf in the folk medicine for the better treatment of hypertension. Further studies on isolation and characterisation of specific ACE-inhibitory molecule(s) from ethyl acetate, ethanol and methanol extracts of A. altilis leaf would be highly interesting.

  4. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion.

  5. Desert Dust Layers Over Polluted Marine Boundary Layers: ACE-2 Measurements and ACE-Asia Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosols in ACE-Asia are expected to have some commonalties with those in ACE-2, along with important differences. Among the commonalities are occurrences of desert dust layers over polluted marine boundary layers. Differences include the nature of the dust (yellowish in the East Asia desert outflow, vs. reddish-brown in the Sahara Outflow measured in ACE-2) and the composition of boundary-layer aerosols (e.g., more absorbing, soot and organic aerosol in-the Asian plume, caused by coal and biomass burning, with limited controls). In this paper we present ACE-2 measurements and analyses as a guide to our plans for ACE-2 Asia. The measurements include: (1) Vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth and extinction (380-1558 nm), and of water vapor column and concentration, from the surface through the elevated desert dust, measured by the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14); (2) Comparisons of airborne and shipborne sunphotometer optical depths to satellite-retrieved values, with and without desert dust; (3) Comparisons between airborne Sunphotometer optical depth and extinction spectra and those derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption; (4) Comparisons between size distributions measured in situ and retrieved from sunphotometer optical depth spectra; (5) Comparisons between aerosol single scattering albedo values obtained by several techniques, using various combinations of measurements of backscatter, extinction, size distribution, scattering, absorption, and radiative flux. We show how analyses of these data can be used to address questions important to ACE-Asia, such as: (1) How do dust and other absorbing aerosols affect the accuracy of satellite optical depth retrievals? How important are asphericity effects? (2) How important are supermicron dust and seasalt aerosols to overall aerosol optical depth and radiative forcing? How well are these aerosols sampled by aircraft

  6. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University install solar array panels on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. The panel on which they are working is identical to the panel (one of four) seen in the foreground on the ACE spacecraft. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low- energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles for a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  7. ACE2 and Microbiota: Emerging Targets for Cardiopulmonary Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Jeffrey, Colleen T; Liu, Meng; Katovich, Michael J; Raizada, Mohan K; Shenoy, Vinayak

    2015-01-01

    The health of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is inextricably linked to the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Physiologically speaking, a balance between the vasodeleterious (ACE/Ang II/AT1R) and vasoprotective (ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/MasR) components of the RAS is critical for cardiopulmonary homeostasis. Upregulation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis shifts the system toward vasoconstriction, proliferation, hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, all factors that contribute to the development and progression of cardiopulmonary diseases. Conversely, stimulation of the vasoprotective ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/MasR axis produces a counter-regulatory response that promotes cardiovascular health. Current research is investigating novel strategies to augment actions of the vasoprotective RAS components, particularly ACE2, in order to treat various pathologies. While multiple approaches to increase the activity of ACE2 have displayed beneficial effects against experimental disease models, the mechanisms behind its protective actions remain incompletely understood. Recent work demonstrating a non-catalytic role for ACE2 in amino acid transport in the gut has led us to speculate that the therapeutic effects of ACE2 can be mediated, in part, by its actions on the gastrointestinal tract and/or gut microbiome. This is consistent with emerging data which suggests that dysbiosis of the gut and lung microbiomes is associated with cardiopulmonary disease. This review highlights new developments in the protective actions of ACE2 against cardiopulmonary disorders, discusses innovative approaches to targeting ACE2 for therapy, and explores an evolving role for gut and lung microbiota in cardiopulmonary health. PMID:26322922

  8. ACE2 and Microbiota: Emerging Targets for Cardiopulmonary Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cole-Jeffrey, Colleen T; Liu, Meng; Katovich, Michael J; Raizada, Mohan K; Shenoy, Vinayak

    2015-12-01

    The health of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is inextricably linked to the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Physiologically speaking, a balance between the vasodeleterious (Angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE]/Angiotensin II [Ang II]/Ang II type 1 receptor [AT1R]) and vasoprotective (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 [ACE2]/Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor [MasR]) components of the RAS is critical for cardiopulmonary homeostasis. Upregulation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis shifts the system toward vasoconstriction, proliferation, hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, all factors that contribute to the development and progression of cardiopulmonary diseases. Conversely, stimulation of the vasoprotective ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR axis produces a counter-regulatory response that promotes cardiovascular health. Current research is investigating novel strategies to augment actions of the vasoprotective RAS components, particularly ACE2, in order to treat various pathologies. Although multiple approaches to increase the activity of ACE2 have displayed beneficial effects against experimental disease models, the mechanisms behind its protective actions remain incompletely understood. Recent work demonstrating a non-catalytic role for ACE2 in amino acid transport in the gut has led us to speculate that the therapeutic effects of ACE2 can be mediated, in part, by its actions on the gastrointestinal tract and/or gut microbiome. This is consistent with emerging data which suggest that dysbiosis of the gut and lung microbiomes is associated with cardiopulmonary disease. This review highlights new developments in the protective actions of ACE2 against cardiopulmonary disorders, discusses innovative approaches to targeting ACE2 for therapy, and explores an evolving role for gut and lung microbiota in cardiopulmonary health.

  9. Bioactive Peptides in Cereals and Legumes: Agronomical, Biochemical and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Malaguti, Marco; Dinelli, Giovanni; Leoncini, Emanuela; Bregola, Valeria; Bosi, Sara; Cicero, Arrigo F. G.; Hrelia, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cereals and legumes are key components of a healthy and balanced diet. Accordingly, many national nutritional guidelines emphasize their health promoting properties by placing them at the base of nutritional food pyramids. This concept is further validated by the observed correlation between a lower risk and occurrence of chronic diseases and the adherence to dietary patterns, like the Mediterranean diet, in which cereal grains, legumes and derived products represent a staple food. In the search for a dietary approach to control/prevent chronic degenerative diseases, protein derived bioactive peptides may represent one such source of health-enhancing components. These peptides may already be present in foods as natural components or may derive from hydrolysis by chemical or enzymatic treatments (digestion, hydrolysis or fermentation). Many reports are present in the literature regarding the bioactivity of peptides in vitro and a wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial properties, blood pressure-lowering (ACE inhibitory) effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic and antioxidant activities, enhancement of mineral absorption/bioavailability, cyto- or immunomodulatory effects, and opioid-like activities. However it is difficult to translate these observed effects to human. In fact, the active peptide may be degraded during digestion, or may not be absorbed or reach the target tissues at a concentration necessary to exert its function. This review will focus on bioactive peptides identified in cereals and legumes, from an agronomical and biochemical point of view, including considerations about requirements for the design of appropriate clinical trials necessary for the assessment of their nutraceutical effect in vivo. PMID:25405741

  10. Bioactive peptides in cereals and legumes: agronomical, biochemical and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Dinelli, Giovanni; Leoncini, Emanuela; Bregola, Valeria; Bosi, Sara; Cicero, Arrigo F G; Hrelia, Silvana

    2014-11-14

    Cereals and legumes are key components of a healthy and balanced diet. Accordingly, many national nutritional guidelines emphasize their health promoting properties by placing them at the base of nutritional food pyramids. This concept is further validated by the observed correlation between a lower risk and occurrence of chronic diseases and the adherence to dietary patterns, like the Mediterranean diet, in which cereal grains, legumes and derived products represent a staple food. In the search for a dietary approach to control/prevent chronic degenerative diseases, protein derived bioactive peptides may represent one such source of health-enhancing components. These peptides may already be present in foods as natural components or may derive from hydrolysis by chemical or enzymatic treatments (digestion, hydrolysis or fermentation). Many reports are present in the literature regarding the bioactivity of peptides in vitro and a wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial properties, blood pressure-lowering (ACE inhibitory) effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic and antioxidant activities, enhancement of mineral absorption/bioavailability, cyto- or immunomodulatory effects, and opioid-like activities. However it is difficult to translate these observed effects to human. In fact, the active peptide may be degraded during digestion, or may not be absorbed or reach the target tissues at a concentration necessary to exert its function. This review will focus on bioactive peptides identified in cereals and legumes, from an agronomical and biochemical point of view, including considerations about requirements for the design of appropriate clinical trials necessary for the assessment of their nutraceutical effect in vivo.

  11. Active Control Technique Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-16

    Due to Test Results 3-9 3.5 Representative Data 3-11 3.6 Control Model 3-21 4.0 Simulation 4-1 5.0 HAC/LAC 5-1 5.1 Theory 5-1...5.1.1 HAC Theory 5-1 5.1.2 LAC Theory 5-4 5.1.3 HAC/LAC Combined Control 5-6 5.1.4 HAC/LAC Applied to ACES 5-7 5.2 Model Selection and...5-39 5-50 6.0 Positivity 6-1 6-1 6-9 6-9 6-17 6-31 5.4 Observation 5.5 Test Results 5.6 Conclusions 6.1 Theory 6.2 Model

  12. Human ACE gene polymorphism and distilled water induced cough

    PubMed Central

    Morice, A. H.; Turley, A. J.; Linton, T. K.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) cause a non-productive cough. The insertion/deletion polymorphism of ACE was used as a genetic marker to investigate the relationship between ACE genotype and cough sensitivity. METHODS: A double blind cough challenge was performed in 66 normotensive subjects (34 men) of mean age 34.8 years (range 18-80) using aerosols of distilled water. The number of coughs during the one minute exposure to water was recorded. DNA samples from venous blood were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and resolved on a 1% agarose gel. They were analysed for the presence of a polymorphism in intron 16 of the ACE gene consisting of an insertion (I) or deletion (D) of an Alu repetitive sequence 287 base pairs long. RESULTS: The distribution of genotypes was 20 II, 26 ID, and 20 DD. The cough response was significantly (p < 0.01) related to the ACE genotype, the mean number of coughs being 15.8, 11.3, and 9.6, respectively, in subjects with the II, ID, and DD genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: The observation that cough challenge is dependent on ACE genotype in normal subjects is evidence of a link between ACE activity and the cough reflex. 


 PMID:9059468

  13. What are the ideal properties for functional food peptides with antihypertensive effect? A computational peptidology approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Yang, Chao; Ren, Yanrong; Wang, Congcong; Tian, Feifei

    2013-12-01

    Peptides with antihypertensive potency have long been attractive to the medical and food communities. However, serving as food additives, rather than therapeutic agents, peptides should have a good taste. In the present study, we explore the intrinsic relationship between the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition and bitterness of short peptides in the framework of computational peptidology, attempting to find out the appropriate properties for functional food peptides with satisfactory bioactivities. As might be expected, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling reveals a significant positive correlation between the ACE inhibition and bitterness of dipeptides, but this correlation is quite modest for tripeptides and, particularly, tetrapeptides. Moreover, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics analysis of the structural basis and energetic profile involved in ACE-peptide complexes unravels that peptides of up to 4 amino acids long are sufficient to have efficient binding to ACE, and more additional residues do not bring with substantial enhance in their ACE-binding affinity and, thus, antihypertensive capability. All of above, it is coming together to suggest that the tripeptides and tetrapeptides could be considered as ideal candidates for seeking potential functional food additives with both high antihypertensive activity and low bitterness.

  14. Screening and profiling stilbene-type natural products with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity from Ampelopsis brevipedunculata var. hancei (Planch.) Rehder.

    PubMed

    Su, Pei-Shiuan; Doerksen, Robert J; Chen, Sin-Hong; Sung, Wang-Chou; Juan, Chia-Chi; Rawendra, Reynetha D S; Chen, Chiy-Rong; Li, Jia-Wei; Aisha; Huang, Tzou-Chi; Liao, Ming-Huei; Chang, Chi-I; Hsu, Jue-Liang

    2015-04-10

    In this study, we screened 10 resveratrol derivatives isolated from Ampelopsis brevipedunculata var. hancei (Planch.) Rehder (ABH) for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory (ACEI) activity. Among these compounds, (+)-hopeaphenol and (+)-vitisin A showed the lowest IC50 values (∼ 1.5 μM) toward ACE. In addition, the compounds' abundances and distributions in ABH were profiled using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Interestingly, trimers and tetramers of resveratrol were mainly obtained from the bark of ABH when 90% ethanol was used for extraction. This result implies that the antihypertension effect of ABH extract may be mainly contributed by (+)-hopeaphenol (F1) and (+)-vitisin A (F2) in the ABH bark due to their remarkable ACE inhibitions. Moreover, the sizes and structures of these compounds were further correlated to their affinities toward ACE using molecular docking calculations. The results showed that resveratrol tetramers interact with ACE more favorably than other smaller oligomers.

  15. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  16. ACE--Alliance for Clinical Enhancement: a collaborative model.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, G P; Granger, M; Todaro, M

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces an innovative collaborative model developed by nursing educators and practitioners, the Alliance for Clinical Enhancement Program (ACE), that combines components of traditional internship and extender programs. The goals of ACE are opportunities for role socialization, role transition, and role modeling for nursing students; enhancing clinical competence and provision of financial assistance to the students; increased recruitment of RN graduates by the involved hospital; and decreased RN time spent on non-nursing tasks by hospital RNs. The total development, implementation, and analysis of ACE Program is discussed.

  17. Molecular cloning and characterisation of in vitro immune response against astacin-like metalloprotease Ace-MTP-2 from Ancylostoma ceylanicum.

    PubMed

    Bąska, Piotr; Wiśniewski, Marcin; Krzyżowska, Małgorzata; Długosz, Ewa; Zygner, Wojciech; Górski, Paweł; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2013-04-01

    Ancylostoma ceylanicum belongs to the group of parasites commonly known as hookworms, blood-sucking nematodes which infect around 576 million people and hundreds of millions of animals. The interactions between these parasites and host immune systems are complicated and yet to be determined. Hookworm infections are usually long lasting and recurrent, due in part to their ability to synthesize macromolecules capable of modulating the host immune response. The interaction of parasite proteins with host immune systems has been proven, but so far there is no data describing the influence of astacin-like metalloproteases (expressed among different parasitic nematodes) on the human immune system. The cDNA encoding A. ceylanicum metalloprotease 2 (Ace-mtp-2) was cloned using RACE-PCR. Computational analysis was used to examine the immunogenicity and recombinant Ace-MTP-2 was used to investigate its influence on human THP-1 monocytes and macrophages. The Ace-mtp-2 gene encodes an astascin-like metalloprotease, with a theoretical molecular mass of 26.7 kDa. The protease has a putative signal peptide, 11 potential phosphorylation sites, and two disulfide bridges revealed by computational analysis. Maximal expression of Ace-mtp-2 by A. ceylanicum occurs in the adult stage of the parasite, and Western blot indicates the secretory nature of the protease. This suggests the protease is working at the host-parasite interface and would likely be exposed to the hosts immune response. Recombinant protein were expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. Recombinant Ace-MTP-2 amplified the in vitro release of TNFα and induced release of IFNγ by lipopolysaccharide activated THP-1 macrophages. The presence of Ace-MTP-2 in secretory products of the adult parasite and the induction of IFNγ release may suggest an important role for Ace-MTP-2 in host-parasite interactions since IFNγ is suggested to be responsible for the protective immune response against adult hookworms.

  18. ACE-Asia Chemical Transport Modeling Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    UNO, I.; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Ginoux, P.; Rasch, P.; Carmichael, G. R.; Yienger, J. J.

    2001-12-01

    ACE-Asia (Asia Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment) was designed to increase our understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth?s climate system. The intensive observation period was carried out during March to May, 2001, and more than 100 researchers from several countries (United States, Japan, Korea, China, and many other Asian countries) participated using aircraft, a research vessel, surface stations and numerical models. Aerosol transport forecast activities played an important role during the ACE-Asia intensive observation period. Three independent modeling groups operated chemical transport models in forecast mode and participated in flight planning activities at the operations center. These models were: MATCH (Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry; Rasch and Collins); GOCART (Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model; Chin and Ginour) and CFORS (Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University + University of Iowa - Chemical weather FORecast System; Uno, Carmichael and Yienger). The MATCH model used in ACE-Asia was a transport model applied for the Asia region, driven by NCEP forecast meteorology. A unique feature of this model was that it assimilated satellite derived optical depths into its forecast algorithm. The GOCART model provided global aerosol forecast using forecast meteorological fields provided by the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The CFORS model provided regional forecasts using a limited area transport model coupled with Regional Meteorological Modeling System (RAMS), initialized by NCEP and JMA forecasts. All models produced 3-d aerosol forecast products consisting of aerosol mass distributions and optical depths for sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt, and dust. In the field these model products were made available to all participating scientists via the Web, and were also presented during the

  19. Top-down Targeted Metabolomics Reveals a Sulfur-Containing Metabolite with Inhibitory Activity against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme in Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Nishizawa, Tomoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-05-22

    The discovery of bioactive natural compounds containing sulfur, which is crucial for inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is a challenging task in metabolomics. Herein, a new S-containing metabolite, asparaptine (1), was discovered in the spears of Asparagus officinalis by targeted metabolomics using mass spectrometry for S-containing metabolites. The contribution ratio (2.2%) to the IC50 value in the crude extract showed that asparaptine (1) is a new ACE inhibitor.

  20. Towards generation of bioactive peptides from meat industry waste proteins: Generation of peptides using commercial microbial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Kate; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; McConnell, Michelle; Carne, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Five commercially available food-grade microbial protease preparations were evaluated for their ability to hydrolyse meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts to produce bioactive peptides. A bacterial-derived protease (HT) extensively hydrolysed both meat protein extracts, producing peptide hydrolysates with significant in vitro antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. The hydrolysates retained bioactivity after simulated gastrointestinal hydrolysis challenge. Gel permeation chromatography sub-fractionation of the crude protein hydrolysates showed that the smaller peptide fractions exhibited the highest antioxidant and ACE inhibitor activities. OFFGEL electrophoresis of the small peptides of both hydrolysates showed that low isoelectric point peptides had antioxidant activity; however, no consistent relationship was observed between isoelectric point and ACE inhibition. Cell-based assays indicated that the hydrolysates present no significant cytotoxicity towards Vero cells. The results indicate that HT protease hydrolysis of meat myofibrillar and connective tissue protein extracts produces bioactive peptides that are non-cytotoxic, should be stable in the gastrointestinal tract and may contain novel bioactive peptide sequences.

  1. The Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Validation Project: Overview and results from ten years of ACE operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kaley; Strong, Kimberly

    2014-05-01

    As of February 2014, the Canadian-led Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite mission has been making measurements of the Earth's atmosphere for ten years. As ACE operations have extended beyond the initial two-year mission, there is a continuing need to validate the trace gas data products from the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instruments. Ground-based measurements provide critical data for the validation of satellite retrievals of trace gases and for the assessment of long-term stability of these measurements. In particular, validation comparisons are needed for ACE during Arctic springtime to understand better the measurements of species involved in stratospheric ozone chemistry. To this end, eleven Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Validation Campaigns have been conducted during the spring period (February - April in 2004 - 2014) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W). This period coincides with the most chemically active time of year in the Arctic, as well as a significant number of satellite overpasses. A suite of as many as 12 ground-based instruments, as well as frequent balloon-borne ozonesonde and radiosonde launches, have been used in each campaign. These instruments include: a ground-based version of the ACE-FTS (PARIS - Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer), a terrestrial version of the ACE-MAESTRO, a SunPhotoSpectrometer, two zenith-viewing UV-visible grating spectrometers, a Bomem DA8 Fourier transform spectrometer, a Bruker 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer, a Systeme d'Analyse par Observations Zenithales (SAOZ) instrument, and several Brewer spectrophotometers. In the past several years, these results have been used to validate the measurements by the ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO instruments on SCISAT as well

  2. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory Engineer Cliff Willey (kneeling) and Engineering Assistant Jim Hutcheson from Johns Hopkins University install solar array panels on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles for a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  3. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University assist in guiding the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) as it is hoisted over a platform for solar array installation in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The ACE observatory will contribute to the understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  4. Transport of Antihypertensive Peptide RVPSL, Ovotransferrin 328-332, in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ding, Long; Wang, Liying; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-09-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transepithelial transport of RVPSL (Arg-Val-Pro-Ser-Leu), an egg-white-derived peptide with angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antihypertensive activity, in human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers. Results revealed that RVPSL could be passively transported across Caco-2 cell monolayers. However, during the process of transport, 36.31% ± 1.22% of the initial RVPSL added to the apical side was degraded, but this degradation decreased to 23.49% ± 0.68% when the Caco-2 cell monolayers were preincubated with diprotin A (P < 0.001), suggesting that RVPSL had a low resistance to various brush border membrane peptidases. When transport from the apical side to the basolateral side was investigated, the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) was (6.97 ± 1.11) × 10(-6) cm/s. The transport route of RVPSL appears to be the paracellular pathway via tight junctions, as only cytochalasin D, a disruptor of tight junctions (TJs), significantly increased the transport rate (P < 0.001). In addition, the relationship between the structure of RVPSL and transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers was studied by mutation of RVPSL. It was found that N-terminal Pro residues were more beneficial for transport of pentapeptides across Caco-2 cell monolayers than Arg and Val. Furthermore, RVPSL could be more easily transported as smaller peptides, especially in the form of dipeptides and tripeptides.

  5. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 cleaves allergenic peptides of β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Pescuma, Micaela; Hébert, Elvira M; Haertlé, Thomas; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Mozzi, Fernanda; Font de Valdez, Graciela

    2015-03-01

    Whey, a cheese by-product used as a food additive, is produced worldwide at 40.7 million tons per year. β-Lactoglobulin (BLG), the main whey protein, is poorly digested and is highly allergenic. We aimed to study the contribution of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 to BLG digestion and to analyse its ability to degrade the main allergenic sequences of this protein. Pre-hydrolysis of BLG by L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 increases digestion of BLG assayed by an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal system. Moreover, peptides from hydrolysis of the allergenic sequences V41-K60, Y102-R124, C121-L140 and L149-I162 were found when BLG was hydrolysed by this strain. Interestingly, peptides possessing antioxidant, ACE inhibitory, antimicrobial and immuno-modulating properties were found in BLG degraded by both the Lactobacillus strain and digestive enzymes. To conclude, pre-hydrolysis of BLG by L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 454 has a positive effect on BLG digestion and could diminish allergenic reactions.

  6. Aircraft Command in Emergency Situations (ACES). Phase 1. Concept. Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    63 6-3 Schematic Layout of the York Fiber- Optic DTS System... optic thermal detection system. XS Federal Aviation Administration Aircraft Command in Emergency Situations (ACES) Final Report II N ’(0) 1 ( .i...fiber optic (York) 2.1 (OBECTIVES OF STUDY S;ivo n Imoli.0it ,moke, fire emergency: The oh1cctivc tf the ACES study was to develop two system concepts

  7. The Louisiana ACES Student-built BalloonSat Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, B.; Giammanco, J.; Guzik, T. G.; Johnson, K.; Wefel, J. P.

    The Aerospace Catalyst Experiences for Students (ACES) pilot project was funded at Louisiana State University by NASA's National Space Grant College and Fellowship program during the 2002-2003 academic year with the primary goal of giving students a true hands-on experience with project management, life-cycle, experiment construction, data collection, analysis and interpretation. In this project students design, build, fly and analyze the data returned from small payloads (typical dimensions 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm, typical weight ˜ 500 grams) carried up to ˜ 100,000 feet by a helium-filled latex sounding balloon. During the pilot project the 13 students that participated in the program, grouped in 4 teams, built payloads that included studies in atmospheric science, cosmic rays and remote sensing. These payloads were then launched from the NASA National Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas on May 21, 2003. Most recently, the LaACES (Louisiana ACES) program has been selected for funding by NASA. During LaACES we will expand the pilot program to institutions across the state including developing student training materials, holding a workshop for institution representatives, awarding payload development grants to student teams, monitoring the progress of these teams and supporting the balloon flight of the completed payloads. Here we describe the ACES pilot, the outcomes, and plans for La ACES.

  8. Molecular and recombinational mapping of mutations in the Ace locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Nagoshi, R.N.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-11-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region with which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace/sup -/ phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/ is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region.

  9. Molecular and Recombinational Mapping of Mutations in the Ace Locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nagoshi, Rodney N.; Gelbart, William M.

    1987-01-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region within which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace- phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)AceHD1, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)AceHD1 is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region. PMID:2826288

  10. Inhibitory control of hippocampal inhibitory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chamberland, Simon; Topolnik, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Information processing within neuronal networks is determined by a dynamic partnership between principal neurons and local circuit inhibitory interneurons. The population of GABAergic interneurons is extremely heterogeneous and comprises, in many brain regions, cells with divergent morphological and physiological properties, distinct molecular expression profiles, and highly specialized functions. GABAergic interneurons have been studied extensively during the past two decades, especially in the hippocampus, which is a relatively simple cortical structure. Different types of hippocampal inhibitory interneurons control spike initiation [e.g., axo-axonic and basket cells (BCs)] and synaptic integration (e.g., bistratified and oriens–lacunosum moleculare interneurons) within pyramidal neurons and synchronize local network activity, providing a means for functional segregation of neuronal ensembles and proper routing of hippocampal information. Thus, it is thought that, at least in the hippocampus, GABAergic inhibitory interneurons represent critical regulating elements at all stages of information processing, from synaptic integration and spike generation to large-scale network activity. However, this raises an important question: if inhibitory interneurons are fundamental for network computations, what are the mechanisms that control the activity of the interneurons themselves? Given the essential role of synaptic inhibition in the regulation of neuronal activity, it would be logical to expect that specific inhibitory mechanisms have evolved to control the operation of interneurons. Here, we review the mechanisms of synaptic inhibition of interneurons and discuss their role in the operation of hippocampal inhibitory circuits. PMID:23162426

  11. Cromolyn sodium for ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Allen, T L; Gora-Harper, M L

    1997-06-01

    There are several theories on the cause of ACE inhibitor-induced cough, but the exact mechanism is not known. In many patients, if cough develops, the ACE inhibitor can be discontinued and a drug in another therapeutic class used in its place. However, in patients with CHF, diabetic nephropathy, and patients who have experienced a myocardial infarction, discontinuing the ACE inhibitor may not be in the best interest of the patient. In this patient population it would be reasonable to try cromolyn sodium to treat cough, while continuing the ACE inhibitor. Data are not available to support the efficacy of cromolyn sodium to treat cough in patients with diabetic nephropathy, but these patients clearly benefit from the use of an ACE inhibitor. Other factors not addressed in the case reports and the clinical trial such as patient adherence, cost, and quality of life should also play a role in the decision to use cromolyn sodium. Cromolyn sodium has been effective for the treatment of ACE inhibitor-induced cough in many case reports and has had mild success in one small clinical trial. Although none of the reports adequately assessed adverse effects, studies examining cromolyn for other indications have demonstrated a relatively benign adverse effect profile. It is difficult to recommend an exact dose to use because of the dosing variability in the case reports. The majority of the case reports and the one clinical trial used dosages similar to recommendations for bronchial asthma (i.e., 2 puffs [1.6 mg] 4 times daily via MDI or 20-mg capsules 4 times daily via breath-activated inhalation). At this time, the use of cromolyn sodium is a viable option, but more controlled studies are needed to fully elucidate its role in the treatment of ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

  12. Dual ACE and neutral endopeptidase inhibitors: novel therapy for patients with cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Tabrizchi, Reza

    2003-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure is a risk factor for a variety of cardiovascular disorders, including coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, cardiac failure and cerebrovascular disease. The prevailing view is that an elevated systolic rather than diastolic blood pressure is the major contributor in mortality and morbidity attributed to cardiovascular disorders. Isolated high systolic blood pressure, especially in the elderly, is a major risk factor and should undoubtedly be a target for drug treatment. In the general population, systolic and diastolic blood pressure are highly correlated, and thus it is difficult to dissociate the effects of these two components of the blood pressure and specifically ascribe cardiovascular risk factors to just elevated systolic blood pressure. Therefore, the goal in therapy of an individual with hypertension must be to reduce elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure in order to reduce mortality and morbidity. ACE and neutral peptidase inhibitors are a new class of drugs that may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with hypertension and heart failure. They may also be useful in the treatment of diabetic patients with hypertension and/or heart failure. Drugs of this class are dual inhibitors of ACE and neutral endopeptidase, and are capable of affecting vascular tone and fluid balance. They are capable of producing vasodilatation by virtue of inhibiting the production of angiotensin II, degradation of natriuretic peptides and bradykinin. They also appear to promote natriuresis and diuresis by amplifying the actions of natriuretic peptidase and reducing aldosterone effects. In addition, they should also attenuate trophogenic actions of the renin angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system. Omapatrilat is one drug that appears to be at the advanced stages of clinical development. This drug has been shown to be quite effective in the treatment of hypertension. Evidence also seems to indicate that treatment

  13. Contemplating Synergistic Algorithms for the NASA ACE Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Starr, David O.; Marchand, Roger; Ackerman, Steven A.; Platnick, Steven E.; Fridlind, Ann; Cooper, Steven; Vane, Deborah G.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2013-01-01

    ACE is a proposed Tier 2 NASA Decadal Survey mission that will focus on clouds, aerosols, and precipitation as well as ocean ecosystems. The primary objective of the clouds component of this mission is to advance our ability to predict changes to the Earth's hydrological cycle and energy balance in response to climate forcings by generating observational constraints on future science questions, especially those associated with the effects of aerosol on clouds and precipitation. ACE will continue and extend the measurement heritage that began with the A-Train and that will continue through Earthcare. ACE planning efforts have identified several data streams that can contribute significantly to characterizing the properties of clouds and precipitation and the physical processes that force these properties. These include dual frequency Doppler radar, high spectral resolution lidar, polarimetric visible imagers, passive microwave and submillimeter wave radiometry. While all these data streams are technologically feasible, their total cost is substantial and likely prohibitive. It is, therefore, necessary to critically evaluate their contributions to the ACE science goals. We have begun developing algorithms to explore this trade space. Specifically, we will describe our early exploratory algorithms that take as input the set of potential ACE-like data streams and evaluate critically to what extent each data stream influences the error in a specific cloud quantity retrieval.

  14. The absence of intrarenal ACE protects against hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Janjoulia, Tea; Fletcher, Nicholas K.; Giani, Jorge F.; Nguyen, Mien T.X.; Riquier-Brison, Anne D.; Seth, Dale M.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Eladari, Dominique; Picard, Nicolas; Bachmann, Sebastian; Delpire, Eric; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Navar, L. Gabriel; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; McDonough, Alicia A.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) can elicit hypertension independently from the systemic RAS. However, the precise mechanisms by which intrarenal Ang II increases blood pressure have never been identified. To this end, we studied the responses of mice specifically lacking kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) to experimental hypertension. Here, we show that the absence of kidney ACE substantially blunts the hypertension induced by Ang II infusion (a model of high serum Ang II) or by nitric oxide synthesis inhibition (a model of low serum Ang II). Moreover, the renal responses to high serum Ang II observed in wild-type mice, including intrarenal Ang II accumulation, sodium and water retention, and activation of ion transporters in the loop of Henle (NKCC2) and distal nephron (NCC, ENaC, and pendrin) as well as the transporter activating kinases SPAK and OSR1, were effectively prevented in mice that lack kidney ACE. These findings demonstrate that ACE metabolism plays a fundamental role in the responses of the kidney to hypertensive stimuli. In particular, renal ACE activity is required to increase local Ang II, to stimulate sodium transport in loop of Henle and the distal nephron, and to induce hypertension. PMID:23619363

  15. The absence of intrarenal ACE protects against hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Janjoulia, Tea; Fletcher, Nicholas K; Giani, Jorge F; Nguyen, Mien T X; Riquier-Brison, Anne D; Seth, Dale M; Fuchs, Sebastien; Eladari, Dominique; Picard, Nicolas; Bachmann, Sebastian; Delpire, Eric; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Navar, L Gabriel; Bernstein, Kenneth E; McDonough, Alicia A

    2013-05-01

    Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) can elicit hypertension independently from the systemic RAS. However, the precise mechanisms by which intrarenal Ang II increases blood pressure have never been identified. To this end, we studied the responses of mice specifically lacking kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) to experimental hypertension. Here, we show that the absence of kidney ACE substantially blunts the hypertension induced by Ang II infusion (a model of high serum Ang II) or by nitric oxide synthesis inhibition (a model of low serum Ang II). Moreover, the renal responses to high serum Ang II observed in wild-type mice, including intrarenal Ang II accumulation, sodium and water retention, and activation of ion transporters in the loop of Henle (NKCC2) and distal nephron (NCC, ENaC, and pendrin) as well as the transporter activating kinases SPAK and OSR1, were effectively prevented in mice that lack kidney ACE. These findings demonstrate that ACE metabolism plays a fundamental role in the responses of the kidney to hypertensive stimuli. In particular, renal ACE activity is required to increase local Ang II, to stimulate sodium transport in loop of Henle and the distal nephron, and to induce hypertension.

  16. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    accessible with the availability of the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) on ISS. To meet these goals, the ACE experiment is being built-up in stages, with the availability of confocal microscopy being the ultimate objective. Supported by NASAs Physical Sciences Research Program, ESAESTEC, and the authors respective governments.

  17. [Job satisfaction among the professionals of AceS Baixo Vouga II].

    PubMed

    Santana, Silvina; Cerdeira, José

    2011-12-01

    Job satisfaction is a measure of quality of life at work and is related to emotional states. The interest for this theme is increasing and, in the last years, many studies have attempted to demonstrate its relation with professional performance. Primary care professionals are in the first line of the Serviço Nacional de Saúde (SNS). Therefore, it is necessary that they feel satisfaction with their jobs, in order to perform the tasks with the quality required. Several factors seem to have impact in the satisfaction of these professionals, such as payment, promotion, recognition from supervisors and peers, physical conditions at work and available resources, opportunities for personal development, among others. Insatisfaction may lead to absentism and in the limit to job quit. The main objective of this work is to study job satisfaction among the professionals working at the health centers of ACeS Baixo Vouga II, namely, the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction and between job characteristics and considering job quit as a serious option. All the professionals working in the four health centers were inquired. Results show that job characteristics are defined by six dimensions: leadership and supervision, task characteristics and autonomy, payment, personal and professional development and promotion, peers and relations inside the organization and work environment. Globally, payment and opportunities for personal and professional development and promotion are perceived at low level by all the professional groups. Results also show that there are differences by gender and professional groups regarding job satisfaction and the will to quit job. Considering the specificity of the tasks performed by these professionals, measures should be taken in order to improve job satisfaction in the Portuguese health centers.

  18. Design, synthesis, and antihypertensive activity of curcumin-inspired compounds via ACE inhibition and vasodilation, along with a bioavailability study for possible benefit in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiao-dong; Liao, Li-zhen; Dong, Xiao-bian; Hu, Xun; Guo, Yue; Du, Zhi-min; Liao, Xin-xue; Wang, Li-chun

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of a novel series of curcumin-inspired compounds via a facile synthetic route. The structures of these derivatives were ascertained using various spectroscopic and analytic techniques. The pharmacological effects of the target analogs were assessed by assaying their inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). All of the synthesized derivatives exhibited considerable inhibition of ACE, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 1.23 to 120.32 μM. In a docking analysis with testicular ACE (tACE), the most promising inhibitor (4j) was efficiently accommodated in the deep cleft of the protein cavity, making close interatomic contacts with Glu162, His353, and Ala356, comparable with lisinopril. Compounds 4i, 4j, 4k, and 4l were further selected for determination of their vasodilator activity (cardiac output and stroke volume) on isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. The bioavailability of compound 4j was determined in experimental mice. PMID:26792980

  19. Insulin treatment attenuates renal ADAM17 and ACE2 shedding in diabetic Akita mice.

    PubMed

    Salem, Esam S B; Grobe, Nadja; Elased, Khalid M

    2014-03-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is located in several tissues and is highly expressed in renal proximal tubules, where it degrades the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG II) to ANG-(1-7). Accumulating evidence supports protective roles of ACE2 in several disease states, including diabetic nephropathy. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 17 is involved in the shedding of several transmembrane proteins, including ACE2. Our previous studies showed increased renal ACE2, ADAM17 expression, and urinary ACE2 in type 2 diabetic mice (Chodavarapu H, Grobe N, Somineni HK, Salem ES, Madhu M, Elased KM. PLoS One 8: e62833, 2013). The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of insulin on ACE2 shedding and ADAM17 in type 1 diabetic Akita mice. Results demonstrate increased renal ACE2 and ADAM17 expression and increased urinary ACE2 fragments (≈70 kDa) and albumin excretion in diabetic Akita mice. Immunostaining revealed colocalization of ACE2 with ADAM17 in renal tubules. Renal proximal tubular cells treated with ADAM17 inhibitor showed reduced ACE2 shedding into the media, confirming ADAM17-mediated shedding of ACE2. Treatment of Akita mice with insulin implants for 20 wk normalized hyperglycemia and decreased urinary ACE2 and albumin excretion. Insulin also normalized renal ACE2 and ADAM17 but had no effect on tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) protein expression. There was a positive linear correlation between urinary ACE2 and albuminuria, blood glucose, plasma creatinine, glucagon, and triglycerides. This is the first report showing an association between hyperglycemia, cardiovascular risk factors, and increased shedding of urinary ACE2 in diabetic Akita mice. Urinary ACE2 could be used as a biomarker for diabetic nephropathy and as an index of intrarenal ACE2 status.

  20. Vascular Wall ACE is not required for Atherogenesis in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Daiana; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Adams, Jonathan; Synetos, Andreas; Taylor, W. Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that elements of the renin angiotensin system expressed in the arterial wall are critical for the development of atherosclerosis. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is highly expressed by the endothelium and is responsible for a critical enzymatic step in the generation of angiotensin II. However, the functional contribution of ACE expression in the vascular wall in atherogenesis is unknown. Therefore, we made use of unique genetic models in which mice without expression of ACE in the vascular wall were crossed with apoE-/- mice in order to determine the contribution of tissue ACE expression to atherosclerotic lesion formation. Methods and Results Mice expressing either a soluble form of ACE (ACE 2/2) or mice with somatic ACE expression restricted to the liver and kidney (ACE 3/3) on an ApoE-/- background were placed on a standard chow or Western diet for 6 months. Atherosclerotic lesion area in the ACE 2/2 mice was significantly lower than that seen in the ACE 3/3 mice. However, these animals also had significantly lower blood pressure and reduced plasma ACE activity which precluded establishing a specific causal relationship between absent tissue ACE activity and decreased atherosclerotic lesion extent. Therefore, we studied the ACE 3/3 mice which are normotensive and lack vascular ACE expression. In the ACE 3/3 animals, atherosclerotic lesion area was no different from wild type controls despite reduced plasma ACE activity. Conclusions We concluded that under these experimental conditions, expression of ACE in the arterial wall is not required for atherosclerotic lesion formation. PMID:19880118

  1. Improved ACE-FTS observations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy; Chipperfield, Martyn; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), on board the SCISAT satellite, has been recording solar occultation spectra through the Earth's atmosphere since 2004 and continues to take measurements with only minor loss in performance. ACE-FTS time series are available for a range of chlorine 'source' gases, including CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3Cl and CCl4. Recently there has been much community interest in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a substance regulated by the Montreal Protocol because it leads to the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. Estimated sources and sinks of CCl4 remain inconsistent with observations of its abundance. Satellite observations of CCl4 in the stratosphere are particularly useful in validating stratospheric loss (photolysis) rates; in fact the atmospheric loss of CCl4 is essentially all due to photolysis in the stratosphere. However, the latest ACE-FTS v3.5 CCl4 retrieval is biased high by ˜ 20-30%. A new ACE-FTS retrieval scheme utilising new laboratory spectroscopic measurements of CCl4 and improved microwindow selection has recently been developed. This improves upon the v3.5 retrieval and resolves the issue of the high bias; this new scheme will form the basis for the upcoming v4 processing version of ACE-FTS data. This presentation will outline the improvements made in the retrieval, and a subset of data will be compared with modelled CCl4 distributions from SLIMCAT, a state-of-the-art three-dimensional chemical transport model. The use of ACE-FTS data to evaluate the modelled stratospheric loss rate of CCl4 will also be discussed. The evaluated model, which also includes a treatment of surface soil and ocean sinks, will then be used to quantify current uncertainties in the global budget of CCl4.

  2. Advanced Crew Escape Suits (ACES): Particle Impact Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility to assist in determining the effects of impaired anodization on aluminum parts in advanced crew escape suits (ACES). Initial investigation indicated poor anodization could lead to an increased risk of particle impact ignition, and a lack of data was prevalent for particle impact of bare (unanodized) aluminum; therefore, particle impact tests were performed. A total of 179 subsonic and 60 supersonic tests were performed with no ignition of the aluminum targets. Based on the resulting test data, WSTF found no increased particle impact hazard was present in the ACES equipment.

  3. Defective intestinal amino acid absorption in Ace2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Singer, Dustin; Camargo, Simone M R; Ramadan, Tamara; Schäfer, Matthias; Mariotta, Luca; Herzog, Brigitte; Huggel, Katja; Wolfer, David; Werner, Sabine; Penninger, Josef M; Verrey, François

    2012-09-15

    Mutations in the main intestinal and kidney luminal neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (Slc6a19) lead to Hartnup disorder, a condition that is characterized by neutral aminoaciduria and in some cases pellagra-like symptoms. These latter symptoms caused by low-niacin are thought to result from defective intestinal absorption of its precursor L-tryptophan. Since Ace2 is necessary for intestinal B(0)AT1 expression, we tested the impact of intestinal B(0)AT1 absence in ace2 null mice. Their weight gain following weaning was decreased, and Na(+)-dependent uptake of B(0)AT1 substrates measured in everted intestinal rings was defective. Additionally, high-affinity Na(+)-dependent transport of L-proline, presumably via SIT1 (Slc6a20), was absent, whereas glucose uptake via SGLT1 (Slc5a1) was not affected. Measurements of small intestine luminal amino acid content following gavage showed that more L-tryptophan than other B(0)AT1 substrates reach the ileum in wild-type mice, which is in line with its known lower apparent affinity. In ace2 null mice, the absorption defect was confirmed by a severalfold increase of L-tryptophan and of other neutral amino acids reaching the ileum lumen. Furthermore, plasma and muscle levels of glycine and L-tryptophan were significantly decreased in ace2 null mice, with other neutral amino acids displaying a similar trend. A low-protein/low-niacin diet challenge led to differential changes in plasma amino acid levels in both wild-type and ace2 null mice, but only in ace2 null mice to a stop in weight gain. Despite the combination of low-niacin with a low-protein diet, plasma niacin concentrations remained normal in ace2 null mice and no pellagra symptoms, such as photosensitive skin rash or ataxia, were observed. In summary, mice lacking Ace2-dependent intestinal amino acid transport display no total niacin deficiency nor clear pellagra symptoms, even under a low-protein and low-niacin diet, despite gross amino acid homeostasis alterations.

  4. Performance Enhancement of the Automated Concrete Evaluation System (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart,C.W.; Cave,S.P.; Linder,K.E.

    2002-02-14

    The objective of this proposed research is to improve and expand the detection and analysis capabilities of the automated, concrete evaluation (ACE) system. MoDOT and Honeywell jointly developed this system. The focus of this proposed research will be on the following: Coordination of concrete imaging efforts with other states, Validation and testing of the ACE system on a broad range of concrete samples, and Identification and development of software and hardware enhancements. These enhancements will meet the needs of diverse users in the field of concrete materials, construction, and research.

  5. ACE-Asia: Ground Stations Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Sugimoto, N.; Shimizu, A.; Kim, J.; Oh, S.; Kang, C.; Asia Science Team; Murayama, T.; Delta Group; Zhang, X.; Kim, Y.; VMAP Group

    2001-12-01

    Observations of aerosol properties made at a network of ground stations were an integral part of ACE-Asia. During an intensive observation period (IOP, March - May 2001), high dust loadings were observed at many stations. At Zhenbeitai, China mass loadings well above average (260 μ g m-3) were observed during eleven dust storms, and ˜82% of the total particle mass at the site could be attributed to Asian dust. Daily bulk dust concentrations at Kosan, Korea ranged from 130 to 350 μ g m-3 from April 10 - 13. Important sub-micron dust signatures were obtained during this storm, coincident with highly absorbing ultra-fine (< 0.24 μ m) soot and other anthropogenic materials. PM2.5 aerosol concentrations at Kosan varied from 15.7 to 92.6 μ g m-3 during the IOP. Comparisons with prior data show some evidence for a decrease in the relative amount of nitrate vs. sulfate. An Asian dust storm with peak PM10 concentrations of about 200 μ g m-3 was observed over Taiwan on April 12 - 13. While most of the PM10 was dust, significant levels (up to about 30%) of pollutants also were found. Analysis of this and previous events indicates that the concentrations of pollutants over Taiwan during Asian dust storms are controlled more by long-range transport than local sources. Measurements of aerosols and associated species on four Japanese islands showed clear intermittent transport of continental aerosols, especially at Rishiri. A Mie and Raman lidar system with auxiliary instruments, including a sun photometer, operated at Tokyo during the IOP; some of these data were used for C-130 flight planning. From combined Raman lidar observations of dust at Tokyo, a typical extinction-to-backscatter ratio was found to be ˜40 sr, ranging from 30 and 70 sr and tending to increase with Angstrom exponent. A lidar intercomparison with C-130 flight observations on April 23 showed widely distributed dust and non-dust aerosols up to 8 km. A multi-channel backscatter lidar system operating at

  6. 77 FR 48527 - National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Simplified Entry: Modification of Participant Selection Criteria and... (NCAP) test concerning the simplified entry functionality in the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...) National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) test concerning Automated Commercial Environment...

  7. Variations in chemical composition, vasorelaxant and angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activities of essential oil from aerial parts of Seseli pallasii Besser (Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Suručić, Relja; Kundaković, Tatjana; Lakušić, Branislava; Drakul, Dragana; Milovanović, Slobodan R; Kovačević, Nada

    2016-12-10

    The present paper describes environmental and seasonal-related chemical composition variations, vasorelaxant and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activities of essential oil from aerial parts of Seseli pallasii Besser. The composition was analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Monoterpens were found to be the most abundant chemical class with α-pinene (42.7-48.2%) as the most prevalent component. Seseli pallasi essential oil relaxed isolated endothelium-intact mesenteric arteries rings precontracted with phenylephrine with IC50 = 3.10 nl/ml (IC50 =2.70 μg/ml). Also, S. pallasii essential oil was found to exhibit a dose-dependent ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.33 mg/ml. In silico evaluation of ACE inhibitory activity of the individual components showed that spathulenol exhibited the best binding affinity with ACE, and the lowest binding energy of -7.5 kcal/mol. The results suggested that combination of vasorelaxing and ACE inhibitory effects of the analyzed S. pallasii essential oil might have the potential therapeutic significance in hypertension. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypotensive and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Eisenia fetida Extract in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shumei; Li, Chengde

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the antihypertensive effects of an Eisenia fetida extract (EFE) and its possible mechanisms in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR rats). Methods. Sixteen-week-old SHR rats and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY rats) were used in this study. Rats were, respectively, given EFE (EFE group), captopril (captopril group), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (normal control group and SHR group) for 4 weeks. ACE inhibitory activity of EFE in vitro was determined. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured using a Rat Tail-Cuff Blood Pressure System. Levels of angiotensin II (Ang II), aldosterone (Ald), and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1α) in plasma were determined by radioimmunoassay, and serum nitric oxide (NO) concentration was measured by Griess reagent systems. Results. EFE had marked ACE inhibitory activity in vitro (IC50 = 2.5 mg/mL). After the 4-week drug management, SHR rats in EFE group and in captopril group had lower SBP and DBP, lower levels of Ang II and Ald, and higher levels of 6-keto-PGF1α and NO than the SHR rats in SHR group. Conclusion. These results indicate that EFE has hypotensive effects in SHR rats and its effects might be associated with its ACE inhibitory activity. PMID:26798397

  9. 76 FR 69755 - National Customs Automation Program Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... Commercial Environment (ACE) Simplified Entry AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... Commercial Environment (ACE) entry capability. This new capability will include functionality specific to the... was on trade compliance and the development of the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE), the...

  10. ACE TECH: The Fourth Year of CTE and Academic Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Eileen Quinn; Donahue, John; Knight, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    It only takes an hour or two of roaming the halls of Architecture, Construction and Engineering (ACE) Tech Charter High School to detect an enduring attitude of accomplishment from both the teachers and the students. This atmosphere is intentional. The school, located in Chicago, was created specifically to hone the skills of individuals choosing…

  11. Hyperspectral Detection and Discrimination Using the ACE Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-08

    08-2011 Proceedings AUG 2011 - SEPT 2011 Hyperspectral Detection and Discrimination Using the ACE Algorithm FA8720-05-C-0002 M. L. Pieper , D...relative to the background. If an object spectrum has a close resemblance to its surroundings, it will Correspondence to M. L. Pieper E-mail: mpieper

  12. Linkages between ACE Vocational Provision and Mainstream VET.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, John

    A study investigated linkages between adult community education (ACE) and mainstream vocational education and training (VET) in Australia, which enable people to move between the two sectors in their pursuit of vocational learning, and the ways in which linkages might be improved or new ones developed. The data from the study were derived from 69…

  13. Applying computationally efficient schemes for biogeochemical cycles (ACES4BGC)

    SciTech Connect

    Vertenstein, Mariana

    2016-01-11

    NCAR contributed to the ACES4BGC project through software engineering work on aerosol model implementation, build system and script changes, coupler enhancements for biogeochemical tracers, improvements to the Community Land Model (CLM) code and testing infrastructure, and coordinating and integrating code changes from the various project participants.

  14. AceDRG: a stereochemical description generator for ligands

    PubMed Central

    Emsley, Paul; Gražulis, Saulius; Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas

    2017-01-01

    The program AceDRG is designed for the derivation of stereochemical information about small molecules. It uses local chemical and topological environment-based atom typing to derive and organize bond lengths and angles from a small-molecule database: the Crystallography Open Database (COD). Information about the hybridization states of atoms, whether they belong to small rings (up to seven-membered rings), ring aromaticity and nearest-neighbour information is encoded in the atom types. All atoms from the COD have been classified according to the generated atom types. All bonds and angles have also been classified according to the atom types and, in a certain sense, bond types. Derived data are tabulated in a machine-readable form that is freely available from CCP4. AceDRG can also generate stereochemical information, provided that the basic bonding pattern of a ligand is known. The basic bonding pattern is perceived from one of the computational chemistry file formats, including SMILES, mmCIF, SDF MOL and SYBYL MOL2 files. Using the bonding chemistry, atom types, and bond and angle tables generated from the COD, AceDRG derives the ‘ideal’ bond lengths, angles, plane groups, aromatic rings and chirality information, and writes them to an mmCIF file that can be used by the refinement program REFMAC5 and the model-building program Coot. Other refinement and model-building programs such as PHENIX and BUSTER can also use these files. AceDRG also generates one or more coordinate sets corresponding to the most favourable conformation(s) of a given ligand. AceDRG employs RDKit for chemistry perception and for initial conformation generation, as well as for the interpretation of SMILES strings, SDF MOL and SYBYL MOL2 files. PMID:28177307

  15. AceDRG: a stereochemical description generator for ligands.

    PubMed

    Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A; Emsley, Paul; Graǽulis, Saulius; Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas; Murshudov, Garib N

    2017-02-01

    The program AceDRG is designed for the derivation of stereochemical information about small molecules. It uses local chemical and topological environment-based atom typing to derive and organize bond lengths and angles from a small-molecule database: the Crystallography Open Database (COD). Information about the hybridization states of atoms, whether they belong to small rings (up to seven-membered rings), ring aromaticity and nearest-neighbour information is encoded in the atom types. All atoms from the COD have been classified according to the generated atom types. All bonds and angles have also been classified according to the atom types and, in a certain sense, bond types. Derived data are tabulated in a machine-readable form that is freely available from CCP4. AceDRG can also generate stereochemical information, provided that the basic bonding pattern of a ligand is known. The basic bonding pattern is perceived from one of the computational chemistry file formats, including SMILES, mmCIF, SDF MOL and SYBYL MOL2 files. Using the bonding chemistry, atom types, and bond and angle tables generated from the COD, AceDRG derives the `ideal' bond lengths, angles, plane groups, aromatic rings and chirality information, and writes them to an mmCIF file that can be used by the refinement program REFMAC5 and the model-building program Coot. Other refinement and model-building programs such as PHENIX and BUSTER can also use these files. AceDRG also generates one or more coordinate sets corresponding to the most favourable conformation(s) of a given ligand. AceDRG employs RDKit for chemistry perception and for initial conformation generation, as well as for the interpretation of SMILES strings, SDF MOL and SYBYL MOL2 files.

  16. Association between ACE D allele and elite short distance swimming.

    PubMed

    Costa, Aldo Matos; Silva, António José; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; Louro, Hugo; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Breitenfeld, Luiza

    2009-08-01

    The influence of ACE gene on athletic performance has been widely explored, and most of the published data refers to an I/D polymorphism leading to the presence (I allele) or absence (D allele) of a 287-bp sequence in intron 16, determining ACE activity in serum and tissues. A higher I allele frequency has been reported among elite endurance athletes, while the D allele was more frequent among those engaged in more power-orientated sports. However, on competitive swimming, the reproducibility of such associations is controversial. We thus compared the ACE genotype of elite swimmers with that of non-elite swimming cohort and of healthy control subjects. We thus sought an association of the ACE genotype of elite swimmers with their competitive distance. 39 Portuguese Olympic swimming candidates were classified as: short (<200 m) and middle (400-1,500 m) distance swimmers, respectively. A group of 32 non-elite swimmers were studied and classified as well, and a control group (n = 100) was selected from the Portuguese population. Chelex 100 was used for DNA extraction and genotype was determined by PCR-RFLP methods. We found that ACE genotype distribution and allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance only among elite swimmers (P < or = 0.05). Moreover, the allelic frequency of the elite short distance swimmers differed significantly from that of the controls (P = 0.021). No associations were found between middle distance swimmers and controls. Our results seem to support an association between the D allele and elite short distance swimming.

  17. Epitope mapping of mAbs to denatured human testicular ACE (CD143).

    PubMed

    Balyasnikova, I V; Metzger, R; Franke, F E; Conrad, N; Towbin, H; Schwartz, D E; Sturrock, E D; Danilov, S M

    2008-10-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE; CD143) has two homologous enzymatically active domains (N and C) and plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. A wide spectrum of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to different epitopes on the N and C domains of human ACE have been used to study different aspects of ACE biology. In this study, we characterized a set of nine mAbs, developed against the C domain of human ACE, which recognize the denatured forms of ACE and thus are suitable for the detection and quantification of somatic ACE (sACE) and testicular ACE (tACE) using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded human tissues. The epitopes for these mAbs were defined using species cross-reactivity, phage display library screening, Western blotting and ACE mutagenesis. Most of the mAbs recognized common/overlapping region(s) on both somatic and testicular forms of human ACE, whereas mAb 4E10 was relatively specific for the testicular isoform and mAb 5B9 mainly recognized the glycan attached to Asn 731. This set of mAbs is useful for identifying even subtle changes in human ACE conformation because of denaturation. These mAbs are also sensitive tools for the detection of human sACE and tACE in biological fluids and tissues using proteomic approaches. Their high reactivity in paraffin-embedded tissues provides opportunities to study changes in the pattern of ACE expression and glycosylation (particularly with mAb 5B9) in different tissues and cells.

  18. Modulation of the renal response to ACE inhibition by ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism during hyperglycemia in normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Weekers, Laurent; Bouhanick, Béatrice; Hadjadj, Samy; Gallois, Yves; Roussel, Ronen; Pean, Franck; Ankotche, Amos; Chatellier, Gilles; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Lefebvre, Pierre J; Marre, Michel

    2005-10-01

    ACE inhibition protects kidney function, but ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism affects renal prognosis in type 1 diabetic patients. ACE genotype may influence the renal benefits of ACE inhibition. We studied the impact of ACE I/D polymorphism on the renal hemodynamic changes induced by ACE inhibition in type 1 diabetes. We studied renal hemodynamics (glomerular filtration rate [GFR], effective renal plasma flow [ERPF], filtration fraction [GFR/ERPF], mean arterial pressure [MAP], and total renal resistances [MAP/ERPF]) repeatedly during normoglycemia and then hyperglycemia in 12 normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes and the II genotype (associated with nephroprotection) versus 22 age- and sex-matched subjects with the ACE D allele after three randomly allocated 2- to 6-week periods on placebo, 1.25 mg/day ramipril, and 5 mg/day ramipril in a double-blind, cross-over study. During normoglycemia, the hemodynamic changes induced by ramipril were similar in both genotypes. During hyperglycemia, the changes induced by ramipril were accentuated in the II genotype group and attenuated dose dependently in the D allele group (treatment-genotype interaction P values for ERPF, 0.018; MAP, 0.018; and total renal resistances, 0.055). These results provide a basis to different renal responses to ACE inhibition according to ACE genotype in type 1 diabetes.

  19. A Discussion of Aerodynamic Control Effectors (ACEs) for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    A Reynolds number based, unmanned air vehicle classification structure has been developed which identifies four classes of unmanned air vehicle concepts. The four unmanned air vehicle (UAV) classes are; Micro UAV, Meso UAV, Macro UAV, and Mega UAV. In a similar fashion a labeling scheme for aerodynamic control effectors (ACE) was developed and eleven types of ACE concepts were identified. These eleven types of ACEs were laid out in a five (5) layer scheme. The final section of the paper correlated the various ACE concepts to the four UAV classes and ACE recommendations are offered for future design activities.

  20. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) questionnaire and Adult Attachment Interview (AAI): implications for parent child relationships.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Anne; Steele, Miriam; Dube, Shanta Rishi; Bate, Jordan; Bonuck, Karen; Meissner, Paul; Goldman, Hannah; Steele, Howard

    2014-02-01

    Although Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are linked to increased health problems and risk behaviors in adulthood, there are no studies on the association between ACEs and adults' states of mind regarding their early childhood attachments, loss, and trauma experiences. To validate the ACEs questions, we analyzed the association between ACEs and emotional support indicators and Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) classifications in terms of unresolved mourning regarding past loss or trauma and discordant states of mind in cannot classify (U/CC) interviews. Seventy-five urban women (41 clinical and 34 community) completed a questionnaire on ACEs, which included 10 categories of abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction, in addition to emotional support. Internal psychological processes or states of mind concerning attachment were assessed using the AAI. ACE responses were internally consistent (Cronbach's α=.88). In the clinical sample, 84% reported≥4 ACEs compared to 27% among the community sample. AAIs judged U/CC occurred in 76% of the clinical sample compared to 9% in the community sample. When ACEs were≥4, 65% of AAIs were classified U/CC. Absence of emotional support in the ACEs questionnaire was associated with 72% of AAIs being classified U/CC. As the number of ACEs and the lack of emotional support increases so too does the probability of AAIs being classified as U/CC. Findings provide rationale for including ACEs questions in pediatric screening protocols to identify and offer treatment reducing the intergenerational transmission of risk associated with problematic parenting.

  1. Characterization of inhibitory mechanism and antifungal activity between group-1 and group-2 phytocystatins from taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Ming; Kumar, Senthil; Cheng, Yi-Sheng; Venkatagiri, Shripathi; Yang, Ai-Hwa; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2008-10-01

    Tarocystatin from Colocasia esculenta, a group-2 phytocystatin, is a defense protein against phytopathogenic nematodes and fungi. It is composed of a highly conserved N-terminal region, which is homological to group-1 cystatin, and a repetitive peptide at the C-terminus. The purified recombinant proteins of tarocystatin, such as full-length (FL), N-terminus (Nt) and C-terminus (Ct) peptides, were produced and their inhibitory activities against papain as well as their antifungal effects were investigated. Kinetic analysis revealed that FL peptide exhibited mixed type inhibition (K(ia) = 0.098 microM and K(ib) = 0.252 microM) and Nt peptide showed competitive inhibition (K(i) = 0.057 microM), whereas Ct peptide possessed weak papain activation properties. A shift in the inhibitory pattern from competitive inhibition of Nt peptide alone to mixed type inhibition of FL peptide implied that the Ct peptide has an regulatory effect on the function of FL peptide. Based on the inhibitory kinetics of FL (group-2) and Nt (group-1) peptides on papain activity, an inhibitory mechanism of group-2 phytocystatins and a regulatory mechanism of extended Ct peptide have each been proposed. By contrast, the antifungal activity of Nt peptide appeared to be greater than that of FL peptide, and the Ct peptide showed no effect on antifungal activity, indicating that the antifungal effect is not related to proteinase inhibitory activity. The results are valid for most phytocystatins with respect to the inhibitory mechanism against cysteine proteinase.

  2. ACE and platelet aggregation inhibitors from Tamarix hohenackeri Bunge (host plant of Herba Cistanches) growing in Xinjiang

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yachao; Liao, Jing; Tang, Yingzhan; Zhang, Peng; Tan, Chengyu; Ni, Hui; Wu, Xueqin; Li, Ning; Jia, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tamarix hohenackeri Bunge is a salt cedar that grows widespread in the desert mountains in Xinjiang. T. hohenackeri has not been investigated earlier, although there are many reports of phytochemical work on other Tamarix species. Materials and Methods: To find out natural angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitors, the bioactive extract (ethyl acetate [EtOAc] fraction) from the dried aerial parts of T. hohenackeri were investigated. The active fraction was purified by repeated column chromatography, including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 column, medium-pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC) (polyamide column) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The isolated major constituents were tested for their anti-platelet aggregation activity. Results: Bioassay-directed separation of the EtOAc fraction of the 70% ethanol extract from the air-dried aerial parts of T. hohenackeri led to the isolation of a new triterpenoid lactone (1), together with 13 known compounds (2-14). It was the first time to focus on screening bioactive constituents for this plant. The chemical structures were established on the basis of spectral data (ESI-MS and NMR). The results showed that the flavonoid compounds (7 and 8) and phenolic compounds (9, 10, 11, and 14) were potential ACE inhibitors. And the flavonoid compounds (5 and 7) showed significant anti-platelet aggregation activities. Conclusion: On the basis of the chemical and biological data, the material basis of ACE inhibitory activity for the active part was the phenolic constituents. However, the flavonoid compounds were responsible for the anti-platelet aggregation. The primary structure and activity relationship were also discussed respectively. PMID:24914275

  3. Parallel Signal Processing and System Simulation using aCe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular for both signal processing and system simulation. A new language is ideally suited for parallel signal processing applications and system simulation since it allows the programmer to explicitly express the computations that can be performed concurrently. In addition, the new C based parallel language (ace C) for architecture-adaptive programming allows programmers to implement algorithms and system simulation applications on parallel architectures by providing them with the assurance that future parallel architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of ace C and present a signal processing application (FFT).

  4. ACE infrared spectral atlases of the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Ryan; Bernath, Peter; Boone, Chris

    2014-11-01

    Five infrared atmospheric atlases are presented using solar occultation spectra from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) in low earth orbit. The spectral atlases were created for Arctic summer, Arctic winter, mid-latitude summer, mid-latitude winter and the tropics. Each covers the spectral range from 700 to 4400 cm-1 and consists of 31 spectra that span an altitude range of 6-126 km in 4-km altitude intervals. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, each spectrum in the atlas is an average of at least several hundred individual ACE-FTS limb transmission spectra. Representative plots in pdf format at 10 km (troposphere), 30 km (stratosphere), 70 km (mesosphere), and 110 km (lower thermosphere) are also available.

  5. An inhibitory corticostriatal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Crystal; Zurita, Hector; Wilson, Charles; Apicella, Alfonso junior

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological studies have led to the assumption that the dorsal striatum receives exclusively excitatory afferents from the cortex. Here we test the hypothesis that the dorsal striatum receives also GABAergic projections from the cortex. We addressed this fundamental question by taking advantage of optogenetics and directly examining the functional effects of cortical GABAergic inputs to spiny projection neurons (SPNs) of the mouse auditory and motor cortex. We found that the cortex, via corticostriatal somatostatin neurons (CS-SOM), has a direct inhibitory influence on the output of the striatum SPNs. Our results describe a corticostriatal long-range inhibitory circuit (CS-SOM inhibitory projections → striatal SPNs) underlying the control of spike timing/generation in SPNs and attributes a specific function to a genetically defined type of cortical interneuron in corticostriatal communication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15890.001 PMID:27159237

  6. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD) on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells.

    PubMed

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Li, Shuang; Kotlabova, Katerina; Dickinson, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450-463) plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1) and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A) by CD3+CD56+ (NKT), CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by the treatment

  7. Space clocks to test relativiy: ACES and SAGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Peter; Salomon, Christophe; Reynaud, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Atomic clocks are an outstanding tool for the experimental verification of general relativity and more generally for fundamental astronomy (VLBI, pulsar timing, navigation, etc). Recent years have seen a rapid improvement in the performance of such clocks, promising new improved tests of relativity, in particular onboard terrestrial and interplanetary space missions. We present the scientific motivations of such tests taking the ACES Salomon et al. and SAGAS Wolf et al. (2009) projects as particular examples.

  8. [ACE inhibitors from the viewpoint of the clinical pharmacologist].

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, G

    1996-01-01

    For treatment of hypertension drugs are desirable which exert a 24 hours lasting blood pressure control. Among the ACE-inhibitors some drugs exist which have this action. The elimination pathway plays a minor role in this respect. Not only the inhibition of Angiotensin II generation but also the decreased inhibition of bradykinin-degeneration plays a crucial role with regard to several endothelial functions controlling the so called remodeling of the cardiovascular system.

  9. ACES: An Enabling Technology for Next Generation Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Wuerl, Adam M.; Andrews, Jason E.; Andrews, Dana G.

    2004-02-01

    Andrews Space has developed the ``Alchemist'' Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES), a dual-mode propulsion system that enables safe, economical launch systems that take off and land horizontally. Alchemist generates liquid oxygen through separation of atmospheric air using the refrigeration capacity of liquid hydrogen. The key benefit of Alchemist is that it minimizes vehicle takeoff weight. All internal and NASA-funded activities have shown that ACES, previously proposed for hypersonic combined cycle RLVs, is a higher payoff, lower-risk technology if LOX generation is performed while the vehicle cruises subsonically. Andrews Space has developed the Alchemist concept from a small system study to viable Next Generation launch system technology, conducting not only feasibility studies but also related hardware tests, and it has planned a detailed risk reduction program which employs an experienced, proven contractor team. Andrews also has participated in preliminary studies of an evolvable Next Generation vehicle architecture-enabled by Alchemist ACES-which could meet civil, military, and commercial space requirements within two decades.

  10. The Louisiana ACES student-built BalloonSat program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Brad; Giammanco, James; Guzik, T. Gregory; Johnson, Karen; Wefel, John P.

    2006-01-01

    A major concern of many aerospace industries and space agencies worldwide is the continuing decrease in undergraduate student enrollment and graduation from aerospace and closely related degree programs. With a decreasing number of new aerospace workforce candidates, expanding or sustaining our exploration of the universe over the coming decades could be at risk. In Louisiana, we have developed the Aerospace Catalyst Experiences for Students (ACES) program to address this issue by attracting new students to aerospace-related programs and providing interdisciplinary training on how to design, build, and manage aerospace payloads. Based upon the National Space Grant Student Satellite Program "Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly!" methodology, ACES closely ties cross-discipline content knowledge with extensive hands-on experiences to instill skills that are then applied by the students to design, document, build, test, and operate a small balloon-borne scientific payload. The ACES concept was initially piloted during 2002-2003 and now includes a semi-formal "Student Ballooning Course", five Louisiana institutions and serves ˜45 students.

  11. Identification of candidate angiogenic inhibitors processed by matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) in cell-based proteomic screens: disruption of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/heparin affin regulatory peptide (pleiotrophin) and VEGF/Connective tissue growth factor angiogenic inhibitory complexes by MMP-2 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Richard A; Butler, Georgina S; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina; Delbé, Jean; Brigstock, David R; Courty, José; Overall, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) exert both pro- and antiangiogenic functions by the release of cytokines or proteolytically generated angiogenic inhibitors from extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling. In the Mmp2-/- mouse neovascularization is greatly reduced, but the mechanistic aspects of this remain unclear. Using isotope-coded affinity tag labeling of proteins analyzed by multidimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry we explored proteome differences between Mmp2-/- cells and those rescued by MMP-2 transfection. Proteome signatures that are hallmarks of proteolysis revealed cleavage of many known MMP-2 substrates in the cellular context. Proteomic evidence of MMP-2 processing of novel substrates was found. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6, follistatin-like 1, and cystatin C protein cleavage by MMP-2 was biochemically confirmed, and the cleavage sites in heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP; pleiotrophin) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. MMP-2 processing of HARP and CTGF released vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from angiogenic inhibitory complexes. The cleaved HARP N-terminal domain increased HARP-induced cell proliferation, whereas the HARP C-terminal domain was antagonistic and decreased cell proliferation and migration. Hence the unmasking of cytokines, such as VEGF, by metalloproteinase processing of their binding proteins is a new mechanism in the control of cytokine activation and angiogenesis.

  12. Administration of bovine casein-derived peptide prevents cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsukuda, Kana; Yamada, Akio; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Iwanami, Jun; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in identifying natural food ingredients that may serve to prevent dementia such as that due to Alzheimer disease (AD). Peptides derived from food proteins have been demonstrated to have various physiological activities such as a hypotensive action. Recent findings have indicated possible associations of hypertension with AD progression, and suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with potential to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB) may reduce the risk of AD. In this study, we investigated the effect of milk peptide (CH-3) on cognitive function in AD model mice. CH-3 contains a tripeptide (methionine-lysine-proline, MKP) that has been found to have a strong ACE inhibitory effect and the potential to pass through the BBB. Adult male ddY mice were used in this study, and an animal model of AD was induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ1–42. CH-3 (250 mg/kg/day) or MKP (0.5 mg/kg/day) was orally administered every day starting 2 days before ICV injection. At 3 weeks after ICV injection, cognitive function was evaluated by the Morris water maze test. Brain samples were obtained after behavioral testing, and expression of inflammatory cytokines and NADPH oxidase subunits was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. ICV injection of Aβ1–42 significantly impaired cognitive function compared with that in PBS-injected mice. Daily administration of CH-3 markedly attenuated this Aβ1-42-induced cognitive decline. Aβ1–42 injection significantly enhanced the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and p22phox in the mouse hippocampus compared with PBS injection, and showed a tendency to increase the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), p47phox and gp91phox, whereas CH-3 treatment markedly reduced Aβ1-42-induced TNF-α, MCP-1, iNOS, p47phox and gp91phox expression. Finally, administration of MKP also attenuated Aβ1-42-induced

  13. VO2 max is associated with ACE genotype in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, J M; Ferrell, R E; McCole, S D; Wilund, K R; Moore, G E

    1998-11-01

    Relationships have frequently been found between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype and various pathological and physiological cardiovascular outcomes and functions. Thus we sought to determine whether ACE genotype affected maximal O2 consumption (VO2 max) and maximal exercise hemodynamics in postmenopausal women with different habitual physical activity levels. Age, body composition, and habitual physical activity levels did not differ among ACE genotype groups. However, ACE insertion/insertion (II) genotype carriers had a 6.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1 higher VO2 max (P < 0.05) than the ACE deletion/deletion (DD) genotype group after accounting for the effect of physical activity levels. The ACE II genotype group also had a 3.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1 higher VO2 max (P < 0.05) than the ACE insertion/deletion (ID) genotype group. The ACE ID group tended to have a higher VO2 max than the DD genotype group, but the difference was not significant. ACE genotype accounted for 12% of the variation in VO2 max among women after accounting for the effect of habitual physical activity levels. The entire difference in VO2 max among ACE genotype groups was the result of differences in maximal arteriovenous O2 difference (a-vDO2). ACE genotype accounted for 17% of the variation in maximal a-vDO2 in these women. Maximal cardiac output index did not differ whatsoever among ACE genotype groups. Thus it appears that ACE genotype accounts for a significant portion of the interindividual differences in VO2 max among these women. However, this difference is the result of genotype-dependent differences in maximal a-vDO2 and not of maximal stroke volume and maximal cardiac output.

  14. Inhibitory effect of leaves extracts of Ocimum basilicum and Ocimum gratissimum on two key enzymes involved in obesity and hypertension in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Irondi, Emmanuel Anyachukwu; Agboola, Samson Olalekan; Oboh, Ganiyu; Boligon, Aline Augusti

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the phenolics composition and inhibitory effect of the leaves extracts of Ocimum basilicum and Ocimum gratissimum on two key enzymes (pancreatic lipase [PL] and angiotensin 1-converting enzyme [ACE]) involved in obesity and hypertension in vitro. Materials and Methods: The phenolics (flavonoids and phenolic acids) were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection. PL and ACE inhibitory effects; DPPH* and ABTS*+ scavenging activities of the extracts were tested using spectrophotometric methods. Results: O. basilicum had the following major phenolics: Rutin, quercetin, and quercitrin (flavonoids); caffeic, chlorogenic, and gallic acids (phenolic acids); while O. gratissimum had the following major phenolics: Rutin, quercitrin, and luteolin (flavonoids); ellagic and chlorogenic acids (phenolic acids). “Extracts of both plants inhibited PL and ACE; scavenged DPPH* in a dose-dependent manner”. O. gratissimum extract was more potent in inhibiting PL (IC50: 20.69 µg/mL) and ACE (IC50: 29.44 µg/mL) than O. basilicum (IC50: 52.14 µg/mL and IC50: 64.99 µg/mL, against PL and ACE, respectively). O. gratissimum also scavenged DPPH* and ABTS*+ more than O. basilicum. Conclusion: O. basilicum and O. gratissimum leaves could be used as functional foods for the management of obesity and obesity-related hypertension. However, O. gratissimum may be more effective than O. basilicum. PMID:27757270

  15. Antihypertensive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jäkälä, Pauliina; Vapaatalo, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    Dietary proteins possess a wide range of nutritional and functional properties. They are used as a source of energy and amino acids, which are needed for growth and development. Many dietary proteins, especially milk proteins, contain physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein sequence. These peptides may be released during gastrointestinal digestion or food processing and once liberated, cause different physiological functions. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are shown to have antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidative and mineral-binding properties. During the fermentation of milk with certain lactobacilli, two interesting tripeptides Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro are released from casein to the final product. These lactotripeptides have attenuated the development of hypertension in several animal models and lowered blood pressure in clinical studies. They inhibit ACE in vitro at micromolar concentrations, protect endothelial function in vitro and reduce arterial stiffness in humans. Thus, milk as a traditional food product can after certain processing serve as a functional food and carry specific health-promoting effects, providing an option to control blood pressure. PMID:27713251

  16. Peptide redesign for inhibition of the complement system: Targeting age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rohith R.; Cabrera, Andrea P.; Harrison, Reed E. S.; Gorham, Ronald D.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To redesign a complement-inhibiting peptide with the potential to become a therapeutic for dry and wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods We present a new potent peptide (Peptide 2) of the compstatin family. The peptide is developed by rational design, based on a mechanistic binding hypothesis, and structural and physicochemical properties derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The inhibitory activity, efficacy, and solubility of Peptide 2 are evaluated using a hemolytic assay, a human RPE cell–based assay, and ultraviolet (UV) absorption properties, respectively, and compared to the respective properties of its parent peptide (Peptide 1). Results The sequence of Peptide 2 contains an arginine-serine N-terminal extension (a characteristic of parent Peptide 1) and a novel 8-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block C-terminal extension. Peptide 2 has significantly improved aqueous solubility compared to Peptide 1 and comparable complement inhibitory activity. In addition, Peptide 2 is more efficacious in inhibiting complement activation in a cell-based model that mimics the pathobiology of dry AMD. Conclusions We have designed a new peptide analog of compstatin that combines N-terminal polar amino acid extensions and C-terminal PEGylation extensions. This peptide demonstrates significantly improved aqueous solubility and complement inhibitory efficacy, compared to the parent peptide. The new peptide overcomes the aggregation limitation for clinical translation of previous compstatin analogs and is a candidate to become a therapeutic for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27829783

  17. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  18. Structure of human ACE gives new insights into inhibitor binding and design.

    PubMed

    Brew, Keith

    2003-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a primary target of drugs used for controlling hypertension. A new X-ray crystallographic structure of the key catalytic domain of ACE provides detailed information about the structure of its active site, located in a deep channel, and its interactions with an inhibitor. Such information might facilitate the rational design of ACE inhibitors that are more potent and more selective and therefore of clinical use.

  19. Accessory cholera enterotoxin, Ace, from Vibrio cholerae: structure, unfolding, and virstatin binding.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Mukherjee, Debadrita; Dey, Sucharita; Pal, Aritrika; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2011-04-12

    Vibrio cholerae accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) is the third toxin, along with cholera toxin (CT) and zonula occludens toxin (Zot), that causes the endemic disease cholera. Structural characterization of Ace has been restricted because of the limited production of this toxic protein by V. cholerae. We have cloned, overexpressed, and purified Ace from V. cholerae strain O395 in Escherichia coli to homogeneity and determined its biological activity. The unfolding of the purified protein was investigated using circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Because Ace is predominantly a hydrophobic protein, the degree of exposure of hydrophobic regions was identified from the spectral changes of the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-binaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid (bis-ANS) that quenches the fluorescence of tryptophan residues of Ace in a concentration-dependent manner. Results showed that bis-ANS binds one monomeric unit of Ace with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a K' of 0.72 μM. Ace exists as a dimer, with higher oligomeric forms appearing upon glutaraldehyde cross-linking. This study also reports the binding of virstatin, a small molecule that inhibits virulence regulation in V. cholerae, to Ace. The binding constant (K=9×10(4) M(-1)) and the standard free energy change (ΔG°=-12 kcal mol(-1)) of Ace-virstatin interaction have been evaluated by the fluorescence quenching method. The binding does not affect the oligomeric status of Ace. A cell viability assay of the antibacterial activity of Ace has been performed using various microbial strains. A homology model of Ace, consistent with the experimental results, has been constructed.

  20. Brain ACE2 shedding contributes to the development of neurogenic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Lazartigues, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Over-activity of the brain Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a major contributor to neurogenic hypertension. While over-expression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) has been shown to be beneficial in reducing hypertension by transforming Angiotensin (Ang)-II into Ang-(1-7), several groups have reported decreased brain ACE2 expression and activity during the development of hypertension. Objective We hypothesized that ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding results in decreased membrane-bound ACE2 in the brain, thus promoting the development of neurogenic hypertension. Methods and Results To test this hypothesis, we used the DOCA-salt model of neurogenic hypertension in non-transgenic (NT) and syn-hACE2 mice over-expressing ACE2 in neurons. DOCA-salt treatment in NT mice led to significant increases in blood pressure, hypothalamic Ang-II levels, inflammation, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, autonomic dysfunction, as well as decreased hypothalamic ACE2 activity and expression, while these changes were blunted or prevented in syn-hACE2 mice. In addition, reduction of ACE2 expression and activity in the brain paralleled a rise in ACE2 activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of NT mice following DOCA-salt treatment and was accompanied by enhanced ADAM17 expression and activity in the hypothalamus. Chronic knockdown of ADAM17 in the brain blunted the development of hypertension and restored ACE2 activity and baroreflex function. Conclusions Our data provide the first evidence that ADAM17-mediated shedding impairs brain ACE2 compensatory activity, thus contributing to the development of neurogenic hypertension. PMID:24014829

  1. Extension of the ACE solar panels is tested in SAEF-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the solar panels is tested on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II (SAEF-II). Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  2. Birth control vaccine targeting leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Lemons, Angela R; Naz, Rajesh K

    2012-02-01

    The population explosion and unintended pregnancies resulting in elective abortions continue to impose major public health issues. This calls for a better method of contraception. Immunocontraception has been proposed as a valuable alternative that can fulfill most, if not all, of the properties of an ideal contraceptive. There are several targets that are being explored for contraceptive vaccine development. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of interleukin-6 family, is required for embryo development and successful blastocyst implantation in several mammalian species. The present study was conducted to examine if LIF can be a target for the development of a birth control vaccine. Three sequences from LIF and two sequences from LIF-receptor (LIF-R) that span the regions involved in ligand-receptor binding were delineated, and peptides were synthesized based upon these sequences. Antibodies raised against these five peptides reduced LIF bioactivity in an in vitro culture assay using BA/F3 mLIF-R-mpg130 cells. Vaccines were prepared by conjugating these peptides to various carrier proteins. Immunization of female mice with these peptide vaccines induced a long-lasting, circulating as well as local antibody response in various parts of the genital tract, and resulted in a significant (P ≤ 0.05) inhibition in fertility in all the three trials; the LIF-R peptide vaccines proved to be a better vaccine target. The data indicate that LIF/LIF-R is an excellent target for the development of a birth control vaccine. This is the first study, to our knowledge, that examined LIF/LIF-R as a target for immunocontraception. The findings of this study can be easily translated to humans since LIF/LIF-R is also important for implantation and pregnancy in women.

  3. ACE2 orthologues in non-mammalian vertebrates (Danio, Gallus, Fugu, Tetraodon and Xenopus).

    PubMed

    Chou, Chih-Fong; Loh, Chay Boon; Foo, Yik Khoon; Shen, Shuo; Fielding, Burtram C; Tan, Timothy H P; Khan, Sehaam; Wang, Yue; Lim, Seng Gee; Hong, Wanjin; Tan, Yee-Joo; Fu, Jianlin

    2006-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a newly identified member in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), acts as a negative regulator of ACE. It is mainly expressed in cardiac blood vessels and the tubular epithelia of kidneys and abnormal expression has been implicated in diabetes, hypertension and heart failure. The mechanism and physiological function of this zinc metallopeptidase in mammals are not yet fully understood. Non-mammalian vertebrate models offer attractive and simple alternatives that could facilitate the exploration of ACE2 function. In this paper we report the in silico analysis of Ace2 genes from the Gallus (chicken), Xenopus (frog), Fugu and Tetraodon (pufferfish) genome assembly databases, and from the Danio (zebrafish) cDNA library. Exon ambiguities of Danio and Xenopus Ace2s were resolved by RT-PCR and 3'RACE. Analyses of the exon-intron structures, alignment, phylogeny and hydrophilicity plots, together with the conserved synteny among these vertebrates, support the orthologous relationship between mammalian and non-mammalian ACE2s. The putative promoters of Ace2 from human, Tetraodon and Xenopus tropicalis drove the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) specifically in the heart tissue of transgenic Xenopus thus making it a suitable model for future functional genomic studies. Additionally, the search for conserved cis-elements resulted in the discovery of WGATAR motifs in all the putative Ace2 promoters from 7 different animals, suggesting a possible role of GATA family transcriptional factors in regulating the expression of Ace2.

  4. Calmodulin interacts with angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and inhibits shedding of its ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel W; Clarke, Nicola E; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2008-01-23

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is a regulatory protein of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and a receptor for the causative agent of severe-acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the SARS-coronavirus. We have previously shown that ACE2 can be shed from the cell surface in response to phorbol esters by a process involving TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE; ADAM17). In this study, we demonstrate that inhibitors of calmodulin also stimulate shedding of the ACE2 ectodomain, a process at least partially mediated by a metalloproteinase. We also show that calmodulin associates with ACE2 and that this interaction is decreased by calmodulin inhibitors.

  5. The Aspergillus fumigatus Transcription Factor Ace2 Governs Pigment Production, Conidiation and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ejzykowicz, Daniele E.; Cunha, Marcel M.; Rozental, Sonia; Solis, Norma V.; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Sheppard, Donald C.; Filler, Scott G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Aspergillus fumigatus causes serious and frequently fatal infections in immunocompromised patients. To investigate the regulation of virulence of this fungus, we constructed and analyzed an A. fumigatus mutant that lacked the transcription factor Ace2, which influences virulence in other fungi. The Δace2 mutant had dysmorphic conidiophores, reduced conidia production, and abnormal conidial cell wall architecture. This mutant produced an orange pigment when grown on solid media, although its conidia had normal pigmentation. Conidia of the Δace2 mutant were larger and had accelerated germination. The resulting germlings were resistant to hydrogen peroxide, but not other stressors. Non-neutropenic mice that were immunosuppressed with cortisone acetate and infected with the Δace2 mutant had accelerated mortality, greater pulmonary fungal burden, and increased pulmonary inflammatory responses compared to mice infected with the wild-type or Δace2∷ace2 complemented strains. The Δace2 mutant had reduced ppoC, ecm33, and ags3 mRNA expression. It is known that A. fumigatus mutants with absent or reduced expression of these genes have increased virulence in mice, as well as other phenotypic similarities to the Δace2 mutant. Therefore, reduced expression of these genes likely contributes to the increased virulence of the Δace2 mutant. PMID:19220748

  6. Rediscovering ACE: Novel insights into the many roles of the angiotensin-converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Janjulia, Tea; Taylor, Brian; Giani, Jorge F.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Shi, Peng D.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Bernstein, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is best known for the catalytic conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. However, the use of gene-targeting techniques has led to mouse models highlighting many other biochemical properties and actions of this enzyme. This review discusses recent studies examining the functional significance of ACE tissue-specific expression and the presence in ACE of two independent catalytic sites with distinct substrates and biological effects. It is these features which explain why ACE makes important contributions to many different physiological processes including renal development, blood pressure control, inflammation and immunity. PMID:23686164

  7. RNAi of ace1 and ace2 in Blattella germanica reveals their differential contribution to acetylcholinesterase activity and sensitivity to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, L; Piulachs, M D; Bellés, X; Castañera, P; Ortego, F; Díaz-Ruíz, J R; Hernández-Crespo, P; Tenllado, F

    2009-12-01

    Cyclorrhapha insect genomes contain a single acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene while other insects contain at least two ace genes (ace1 and ace2). In this study we tested the hypothesis that the two ace paralogous from Blattella germanica have different contributions to AChE activity, using RNA interference (RNAi) to knockdown each one individually. Paralogous-specific depletion of Bgace transcripts was evident in ganglia of injected cockroaches, although the effects at the protein level were less pronounced. Using spectrophotometric and zymogram measurements, we obtained evidence that BgAChE1 represents 65-75% of the total AChE activity in nerve tissue demonstrating that ace1 encodes a predominant AChE. A significant increase in sensitivity of Bgace1-interfered cockroaches was observed after 48 h of exposure to chlorpyrifos. In contrast, Bgace2 knockdown had a negligible effect on mortality to this organophosphate. These results point out a key role, qualitative and/or quantitative, of AChE1 as target of organophosphate insecticides in this species. Silencing the expression of Bgace1 but not Bgace2 also produced an increased mortality in insects when synergized with lambda-cyhalothrin, a situation which resembles the synergistic effects observed between organophosphates and pyrethroids. Gene silencing of ace genes by RNAi offers an exciting approach for examining a possible functional differentiation in ace paralogous.

  8. Antioxidant, Liver Protective and Angiotensin I-converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Old Laying Hen Hydrolysate in Crab Meat Analogue.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang Keun; Choi, Jung Seok; Choi, Yeung Joon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Seung Yun; Hur, Sun Jin

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative activities of Crab meat analogue prepared with protein hydrolysates obtained from mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) from spent laying hens. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity was increased by adding MDCM hydrolysates during storage, and activity correlated with the concentration of DPPH added up to 6 weeks of storage. Hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity was increased in all analogues containing MDCM hydrolysates. At 0 days of storage, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity was increased by the addition of MDCM hydrolysates. Activity did not correlate after 6 weeks of storage, in which ACE-inhibitory activity was increased with low concentrations of MDCM hydrolysates, but no ACE-inhibitory activity was observed at higher concentrations. The liver-protecting activity of crab meat analogue was shown to be around 60% of the positive control; however, it was not significantly different among the samples during storage. These results support the use of MDCM as a source of health-promoting constituents in crab meat analogue.

  9. Antioxidant, Liver Protective and Angiotensin I-converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Old Laying Hen Hydrolysate in Crab Meat Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sang Keun; Choi, Jung Seok; Choi, Yeung Joon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Seung Yun; Hur, Sun Jin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative activities of Crab meat analogue prepared with protein hydrolysates obtained from mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) from spent laying hens. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity was increased by adding MDCM hydrolysates during storage, and activity correlated with the concentration of DPPH added up to 6 weeks of storage. Hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity was increased in all analogues containing MDCM hydrolysates. At 0 days of storage, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity was increased by the addition of MDCM hydrolysates. Activity did not correlate after 6 weeks of storage, in which ACE-inhibitory activity was increased with low concentrations of MDCM hydrolysates, but no ACE-inhibitory activity was observed at higher concentrations. The liver-protecting activity of crab meat analogue was shown to be around 60% of the positive control; however, it was not significantly different among the samples during storage. These results support the use of MDCM as a source of health-promoting constituents in crab meat analogue. PMID:26954200

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors modulate cellular retinol-binding protein 1 and adiponectin expression in adipocytes via the ACE-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Trouvain, Caroline; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fichtlscherer, Stephan; Fleming, Ingrid

    2009-03-01

    Inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) decrease angiotensin II production and activate an intracellular signaling cascade that affects gene expression in endothelial cells. Because ACE inhibitors have been reported to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, we determined ACE signaling-modulated gene expression in endothelial cells and adipocytes. Using differential gene expression analysis, several genes were identified that were 3-fold up- or down-regulated by ramiprilat in cells expressing wild-type ACE versus cells expressing a signaling-dead ACE mutant. One up-regulated gene was the cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1). In adipocytes, the overexpression of CRBP1 enhanced (4- to 5-fold) the activity of promoters containing response elements for retinol-dependent nuclear receptors [retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR)] or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). CRBP1 overexpression also enhanced the promoter activity (by 470 +/- 40%) and expression/release of the anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic adipokine adiponectin (cellular adiponectin by 196 +/- 24%, soluble adiponectin by 228 +/- 74%). Significantly increased adiponectin secretion was also observed after ACE inhibitor treatment of human preadipocytes, an effect prevented by small interfering RNA against CRBP1. Furthermore, in ob/ob mice, ramipril markedly potentiated both the basal (approximately 2-fold) and rosiglitazonestimulated circulating levels of adiponectin. In patients with coronary artery disease or type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibition also significantly increased plasma adiponectin levels (1.6- or 2.1-fold, respectively). In summary, ACE inhibitors affect adipocyte homeostasis via CRBP1 through the activation of RAR/RXR-PPAR signaling and up-regulation of adiponectin. The latter may contribute to the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors on the development of type 2 diabetes in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system.

  11. Helium at Interplanetary Discontinuities: ACE STEREO Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Allegrini, F.; Desai, M.; Klecker, B.; Popecki, M.; Farrugia, C.; Galvin, A.; Bochsler, P.; Karrer, R.; Opitz, A.; Simunac, K.

    2007-12-01

    ACE/SEPICA observations showed that, on average, energetic He+ is after H+ and He2+ the third most abundant energetic particle species in the heliosphere. Depending on the type of the energetic population the He+/He2+ ratio can reach unusually high values in the energy range 250 - 800keV/n ratios up to unity. As a major source of energetic He+ interplanetary pickup ions have been identified that are preferentially accelerated at co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), transient interaction regions (TIRs), and interplanetary traveling shocks. Most recent data from STEREO/PLASTIC in the energy range of 0.2-80keV/Q show clear evidence of abundant He+ at interplanetary discontinuities. Thus PLASTIC extends the energy range into injection region of the source. Furthermore, ACE/ULEIS and ACE/SEPICA measurements showed that very often 3He2+ and He+ are also accelerated simultaneously at CME-driven IP shocks. This is surprising because, these to species originate from different sources. However, this may indicate that the injection, or the acceleration efficiency of the accelerator for different source population may be similar. From observations, however, this cannot be differentiated easily. In numerical simulations this can be done because there is control over species and distribution functions. In a numerical study we applied test particle simulations and multi-dimensional hybrid simulations to address the contribution of source, injection and acceleration efficiency at shocks to the variability of the helium ratio. These, simulations with and without superimposed turbulence in the shock region will be compared with observations.

  12. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  13. RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Satake, Honoo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Since a peptide with a C-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide peptide) was first identified in the ganglia of the venus clam in 1977, RFamide peptides have been found in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, the RFamide peptide family includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa), and kisspeptins (kiss1 and kiss2). They are involved in important functions such as the release of hormones, regulation of sexual or social behavior, pain transmission, reproduction, and feeding. In contrast to tetrapods and jawed fish, the information available on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates is limited, thus preventing further insights into the evolution of RFamide peptides in vertebrates. In this review, we focus on the previous research and recent advances in the studies on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In agnathans, the genes encoding GnIH, NPFF, and PrRP precursors and the mature peptides have been identified in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and hagfish (Paramyxine atami). Putative kiss1 and kiss2 genes have also been found in the genome database of lamprey. In basal chordates, namely, in amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum), a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes and their mature peptides, as well as the ortholog of the QRFP gene have been identified. The studies revealed that the number of orthologs of vertebrate RFamide peptides present in agnathans and basal chordates is greater than expected, suggesting that the vertebrate RFamide peptides might have emerged and expanded at an early stage of chordate evolution.

  14. Dynamics of ADAM17-Mediated Shedding of ACE2 Applied to Pancreatic Islets of Male db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Kim Brint; Chodavarapu, Harshita; Porretta, Constance; Robinson, Leonie K.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene therapy aimed at counteracting pancreatic ACE2 depletion improves glucose regulation in two diabetic mouse models: db/db mice and angiotensin II-infused mice. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) can cause shedding of ACE2 from the cell membrane. The aim of our studies was to determine whether ADAM17 depletes ACE2 levels in pancreatic islets and β-cells. Dynamics of ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding were investigated in 832/13 insulinoma cells. Within a wide range of ACE2 expression levels, including the level observed in mouse pancreatic islets, overexpression of ADAM17 increases shed ACE2 and decreases cellular ACE2 levels. We provide a mathematical description of shed and cellular ACE2 activities as a function of the ADAM17 activity. The effect of ADAM17 on the cellular ACE2 content was relatively modest with an absolute control strength value less than 0.25 and approaching 0 at low ADAM17 activities. Although we found that ADAM17 and ACE2 are both expressed in pancreatic islets, the β-cell is not the major cell type expressing ACE2 in islets. During diabetes progression in 8-, 12-, and 15-week-old db/db mice, ACE2 mRNA and ACE2 activity levels in pancreatic islets were not decreased over time nor significantly decreased compared with nondiabetic db/m mice. Levels of ADAM17 mRNA and ADAM17 activity were also not significantly changed. Inhibiting basal ADAM17 activity in mouse islets failed to affect ACE2 levels. We conclude that whereas ADAM17 has the ability to shed ACE2, ADAM17 does not deplete ACE2 from pancreatic islets in diabetic db/db mice. PMID:26441236

  15. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  16. ACE Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema following Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Hussam

    2017-01-01

    Angioedema is a well-known side effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi). However, ACE inhibitors induced angioedema after cervical surgery is a rare condition. They result in increased levels of circulating bradykinins. Rare cases of angioedema following local trauma in patients using ACE inhibitors have been published. We present such a case. A 54-year-old Caucasian female with a history significant for hypertension, controlled with lisinopril, was admitted for routine cervical spine surgery. She has severe degenerative cervical disc disease and was admitted to the hospital for an elective cervical diskectomy. The patient failed weaning off the ventilator on multiple attempts postoperatively. There were no observed symptoms of an allergic reaction. A CT scan of the neck showed extensive soft tissue edema at the level of the arytenoids. Dexamethasone was given to reduce the edema without successful resolution. On review of her medications, it was found that the patient was resumed on lisinopril following the procedure. It was subsequently discontinued. By the following day the patient had a positive leak around the ET tube cuff and patient was successfully extubated. PMID:28348897

  17. ACE: A distributed system to manage large data archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, Mike I.; Allen, Frank W.

    1993-01-01

    Competitive pressures in the oil and gas industry are requiring a much tighter integration of technical data into E and P business processes. The development of new systems to accommodate this business need must comprehend the significant numbers of large, complex data objects which the industry generates. The life cycle of the data objects is a four phase progression from data acquisition, to data processing, through data interpretation, and ending finally with data archival. In order to implement a cost effect system which provides an efficient conversion from data to information and allows effective use of this information, an organization must consider the technical data management requirements in all four phases. A set of technical issues which may differ in each phase must be addressed to insure an overall successful development strategy. The technical issues include standardized data formats and media for data acquisition, data management during processing, plus networks, applications software, and GUI's for interpretation of the processed data. Mass storage hardware and software is required to provide cost effective storage and retrieval during the latter three stages as well as long term archival. Mobil Oil Corporation's Exploration and Producing Technical Center (MEPTEC) has addressed the technical and cost issues of designing, building, and implementing an Advanced Computing Environment (ACE) to support the petroleum E and P function, which is critical to the corporation's continued success. Mobile views ACE as a cost effective solution which can give Mobile a competitive edge as well as a viable technical solution.

  18. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  19. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of quorum sensing peptides and Peptide analogues against oral biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    LoVetri, Karen; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance is a major incentive for the investigation of novel ways to treat or prevent infections. Much effort has been put into the discovery of peptides in nature accompanied by manipulation of natural peptides to improve activity and decrease toxicity. The ever increasing knowledge about bacteria and the discovery of quorum sensing have presented itself as another mechanism to disrupt the infection process. We have shown that the natural quorum sensing (QS) peptide, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), used by the caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans when used in higher than normally present concentrations can actually contribute to cell death in S. mutans. Using an analogue of this quorum sensing peptide (KBI-3221), we have shown it to be beneficial at decreasing biofilm of various Streptococcus species. This chapter looks at a number of assay methods to test the inhibitory effects of quorum sensing peptides and their analogues on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria.

  20. Research progress in structure-activity relationship of bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yu, Jianmei

    2015-02-01

    Bioactive peptides are specific protein fragments that have positive impact on health. They are important sources of new biomedicine, energy and high-performance materials. The beneficial effects of bioactive peptides are due to their antioxidant, antihypertensive, anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory activities. The structure-activity relationship of bioactive peptides plays a significant role in the development of innovative and unconventional synthetic polymeric counterparts. It provides the basis of the stereospecific synthesis, transformation, and development of bioactive peptide products. This review covers the progress of studies in the structure-activity relationship of some bioactive peptides including antioxidant peptides, angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitory peptides, and anticarcinogenic peptides in the past decade.

  1. A Consolidation of ACE Research, 1990-2000. Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Barry; Davies, Merryn; Volkoff, Veronica

    The volume and scope of research into adult and community education (ACE) in Australia have increased significantly over the past decade. Studies designed to map, reevaluate, showcase, and promote ACE have been funded by Australia's federal and state governments and by bodies such as Adult Learning Australia. Practitioner-generated research has…

  2. Preparing GMAT for Operational Maneuver Planning of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qureshi, Rizwan Hamid; Hughes, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is an open-source space mission design, analysis and trajectory optimization tool. GMAT is developed by a team of NASA, private industry, public and private contributors. GMAT is designed to model, optimize and estimate spacecraft trajectories in flight regimes ranging from low Earth orbit to lunar applications, interplanetary trajectories and other deep space missions. GMAT has also been flight qualified to support operational maneuver planning for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission. ACE was launched in August, 1997 and is orbiting the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. The primary science objective of ACE is to study the composition of both the solar wind and the galactic cosmic rays. Operational orbit determination, maneuver operations and product generation for ACE are conducted by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF). This paper discusses the entire engineering lifecycle and major operational certification milestones that GMAT successfully completed to obtain operational certification for the ACE mission. Operational certification milestones such as gathering of the requirements for ACE operational maneuver planning, gap analysis, test plans and procedures development, system design, pre-shadow operations, training to FDF ACE maneuver planners, shadow operations, Test Readiness Review (TRR) and finally Operational Readiness Review (ORR) are discussed. These efforts have demonstrated that GMAT is flight quality software ready to support ACE mission operations in the FDF.

  3. Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in an Integrated Pediatric Care Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purewal, Sukhdip K.; Bucci, Monica; Wang, Lisa Gutiérrez; Koita, Kadiatou; Marques, Sara Silvério; Oh, Debora; Harris, Nadine Burke

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are stressful or traumatic events that place children at risk of negative health, mental health, and behavioral outcomes. The Center for Youth Wellness (CYW), working in partnership with the Bayview Child Health Center (BCHC), pioneered ACE screening for children and adolescents. This article describes the…

  4. 75 FR 64737 - Automated Commercial Environment (ACE): Announcement of a National Customs Automation Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Automated Commercial Environment (ACE): Announcement of a... required advance ocean and rail data through the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE). This notice... application period for participation, outlines the development and evaluation methodology to be used,...

  5. Formative Evaluation of ACES Program: Findings from Surveys and Interviews Year One, Grades 11 and 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolanin, Natalie; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2015-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability (OSA) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) is conducting a multiyear evaluation of the Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success (ACES) program. The ACES program is a collaboration between MCPS, Montgomery College (MC), and the Universities at Shady Grove (USG) to create a seamless pathway…

  6. Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance Models in ACES: Design Implementation and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don; Satapathy, Goutam; Kumar, Anil; Khanna, Manu

    2006-01-01

    Presentation objectives include: a) Overview of the ACES/CNS System Models Design and Integration; b) Configuration Capabilities available for Models and Simulations using ACES with CNS Modeling; c) Descriptions of recently added, Enhanced CNS Simulation Capabilities; and d) General Concepts Ideas that Utilize CNS Modeling to Enhance Concept Evaluations.

  7. The Evolution of the Automated Continuous Evaluation System (ACES) for Personnel Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-12

    recession, which reduced funding across the government for research and development of efficiencies like ACES, the obvious promise of ACES continues. The...Approved for Public Distribution: Distribution Unlimited Defense Personnel and Security Research Center Defense Manpower Data Center Technical... Research Center Defense Manpower Data Center Defense Personnel and Security Research Center Defense Manpower Data Center 400 Gigling

  8. ACE expression in monocytes is induced by cytokines, phorbol ester and steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, D.; Lanzillo, J.; Fanburg, B. )

    1991-03-15

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels are elevated in the serum and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) of patients with granulomatous diseases. However, the role of ACE in (Mo) physiology and the regulation of the inflammatory response is not well understood. Since Mo can be stimulated to form giant cells using phorbol esters, glucocorticoids or certain inflammatory cytokines, the authors examined production of ACE protein by normal PBM, a Mo-like cell line, THP-1, and a macrophage-like cell line, U937 following stimulation with these agents. Using a sensitive ELISA assay, they found that in U937 cells, expression of ACE protein increased by 3.4 fold with dexamethasone, 3.7. fold with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA), and 5.8 fold with the two agents combined. The cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF substantially increased ACE expression, by 7.6 and 7.7 fold respectively, with maximal effect at 0.01 U/ml, while IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} had little effect. Similar results were found with PBM and THP-1 cells. The combination of dexamethasone and PMA also induced homotypic cluster formation in PBM, suggesting a correlation between cell adhesion and ACE production. The authors conclude that ACE expression in monocytes and macrophages is stimulated by low concentration of glucocorticoids and certain inflammatory cytokines. ACE may participate in the initiation and propagation of granulomatous inflammatory processes.

  9. Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), Concept Simulations using Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don

    2006-01-01

    Project Objectives include: a) CNS Model Development; b Design/Integration of baseline set of CNS Models into ACES; c) Implement Enhanced Simulation Capabilities in ACES; d) Design and Integration of Enhanced (2nd set) CNS Models; and e) Continue with CNS Model Integration/Concept evaluations.

  10. An ace-1 gene duplication resorbs the fitness cost associated with resistance in Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Assogba, Benoît S.; Djogbénou, Luc S.; Milesi, Pascal; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Perez, Julie; Ayala, Diego; Chandre, Fabrice; Makoutodé, Michel; Labbé, Pierrick; Weill, Mylène

    2015-01-01

    Widespread resistance to pyrethroids threatens malaria control in Africa. Consequently, several countries switched to carbamates and organophophates insecticides for indoor residual spraying. However, a mutation in the ace-1 gene conferring resistance to these compounds (ace-1R allele), is already present. Furthermore, a duplicated allele (ace-1D) recently appeared; characterizing its selective advantage is mandatory to evaluate the threat. Our data revealed that a unique duplication event, pairing a susceptible and a resistant copy of the ace-1 gene spread through West Africa. Further investigations revealed that, while ace-1D confers less resistance than ace-1R, the high fitness cost associated with ace-1R is almost completely suppressed by the duplication for all traits studied. ace-1 duplication thus represents a permanent heterozygote phenotype, selected, and thus spreading, due to the mosaic nature of mosquito control. It provides malaria mosquito with a new evolutionary path that could hamper resistance management. PMID:26434951

  11. ACE2 Inhibits Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, QingQing; Dong, XueFei; Chen, Xu; Yan, Feng; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Haishui; Dong, Bo

    2017-01-31

    Recent study have demonstrated that ACE2 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). But, little study was reported about the direct effect of ACE2 overexpression on the aneurysm. In this study, we hypothesize that overexpression of ACE2 may prevent the pathogenesis of aneurysm by decreasing RAS activation. Thirty-nine Mice were assigned to 3 groups randomly (n=13 in each group), ACE2 group, Ad.EGFP group and Control group. After 8-week treatment, abdominal aortas with AAA were obtained for HE staining, VVG, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The incidence and severity of AAA, macrophage infiltration and MMP protein expression were all detected. The results showed that ACE2 gene transfer significantly decreased the occurrence of AAA and inhibited AAA formation in ApoE-/- mice by inhibiting inflammatory response and MMP activation, the mechanisms may involve decreased ERK and AngII-NF-kB signaling pathways.

  12. Unique Kinase Catalytic Mechanism of AceK with a Single Magnesium Ion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quanjie; Zheng, Jimin; Tan, Hongwei; Li, Xichen; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase (AceK) is the founding member of the protein phosphorylation system in prokaryotes. Based on the novel and unique structural characteristics of AceK recently uncovered, we sought to understand its kinase reaction mechanism, along with other features involved in the phosphotransfer process. Herein we report density functional theory QM calculations of the mechanism of the phosphotransfer reaction catalysed by AceK. The transition states located by the QM calculations indicate that the phosphorylation reaction, catalysed by AceK, follows a dissociative mechanism with Asp457 serving as the catalytic base to accept the proton delivered by the substrate. Our results also revealed that AceK prefers a single Mg2+-containing active site in the phosphotransfer reaction. The catalytic roles of conserved residues in the active site are discussed. PMID:23977203

  13. The effect of saturation of ACE binding sites on the pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, J R; Meredith, P A; Hughes, D M; Elliott, H L

    1992-01-01

    1. Eight healthy male volunteers received oral enalapril, 10 mg, in the presence and absence of pretreatment with captopril, 50 mg, twice daily for 5 days. 2. Enalaprilat pharmacokinetics were characterised after both doses of enalapril to investigate the effect of saturating ACE binding sites by pretreatment with captopril. 3. The pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat were best described by a one compartment model with zero order input incorporating saturable binding to plasma and tissue ACE. 4. Values of AUC (0.72 h) for enalaprilat were 419 +/- 97 and 450 +/- 87 ng ml-1 h in the presence and absence of captopril, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant nor were there any other differences in model parameters. 5. Induction of ACE by captopril resulting in an increase in the number of ACE binding sites, may have obscured any effect of captopril on the occupancy of ACE binding sites by enalapril. PMID:1312853

  14. Short communication: Potential of Fresco-style cheese whey as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Tarango-Hernández, S; Alarcón-Rojo, A D; Robles-Sánchez, M; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Rodríguez-Figueroa, J C

    2015-11-01

    Recently, traditional Mexican Fresco-style cheese production has been increasing, and the volume of cheese whey generated represents a problem. In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of Fresco-style cheese wheys and their potential as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities. Three samples from Fresco, Panela, and Ranchero cheeses whey were physicochemically characterized. Water-soluble extracts were fractionated to obtain whey fractions with different molecular weights: 10-5, 5-3, 3-1 and <1 kDa. The results indicated differences in the lactose, protein, ash, and dry matter contents (% wt/wt) in the different Fresco-style cheese wheys. All whey fractions had antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities. The 10-5 kDa whey fraction of Ranchero cheese had the highest Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (0.62 ± 0.00 mM), and the 3-1 kDa Panela and Fresco cheese whey fractions showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity (0.57 ± 0.02 and 0.59 ± 0.04 μg/mL 50%-inhibitory concentration values, respectively). These results suggest that Fresco-style cheese wheys may be a source of protein fractions with bioactivity, and thus could be useful ingredients in the manufacture of functional foods with increased nutritional value.

  15. Osteoclast Inhibitory Peptide-1 Therapy for Paget’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    precursor growth in methyl - cellulose cultures as described (3). Consistent with our previous findings that OIP-1 treatment inhibits CFU-GM colony...cells were cultured with hGM-CSF (10 ng/ml) in 1.2% methyl cellulose to form CFU-GM colonies. At the end of a 7-d culture period, CFU-GM colonies...inhibits osteoclast differentiation. Confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of OIP-1 with FcRIIB in osteoclasts, and we observed that OIP-1 carboxy

  16. Cosmic Ray Helium Intensities over the Solar Cycle from ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeNolfo, G. A.; Yanasak, N. E.; Binns, W. R.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink. P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Lave, K.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Ogliore, R.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenback, M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of cosmic-ray helium energy spectra provide important constraints on cosmic ray origin and propagation. However, helium intensities measured at Earth are affected by solar modulation, especially below several GeV/nucleon. Observations of helium intensities over a solar cycle are important for understanding how solar modulation affects galactic cosmic ray intensities and for separating the contributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays. The Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on ACE has been measuring cosmic ray isotopes, including helium, since 1997 with high statistical precision. We present helium elemental intensities between approx. 10 to approx. 100 MeV/nucleon from the Solar Isotope Spectrometer (SIS) and CRIS observations over a solar cycle and compare these results with the observations from other satellite and balloon-borne instruments, and with GCR transport and solar modulation models.

  17. Peptide inhibitors of dengue virus and West Nile virus infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hrobowski, Yancey M; Garry, Robert F; Michael, Scott F

    2005-01-01

    Viral fusion proteins mediate cell entry by undergoing a series of conformational changes that result in virion-target cell membrane fusion. Class I viral fusion proteins, such as those encoded by influenza virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), contain two prominent alpha helices. Peptides that mimic portions of these alpha helices inhibit structural rearrangements of the fusion proteins and prevent viral infection. The envelope glycoprotein (E) of flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV), are class II viral fusion proteins comprised predominantly of beta sheets. We used a physio-chemical algorithm, the Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity scale (WWIHS) [1] in combination with known structural data to identify potential peptide inhibitors of WNV and DENV infectivity that target the viral E protein. Viral inhibition assays confirm that several of these peptides specifically interfere with target virus entry with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the 10 μM range. Inhibitory peptides similar in sequence to domains with a significant WWIHS scores, including domain II (IIb), and the stem domain, were detected. DN59, a peptide corresponding to the stem domain of DENV, inhibited infection by DENV (>99% inhibition of plaque formation at a concentrations of <25 μM) and cross-inhibition of WNV fusion/infectivity (>99% inhibition at <25 μM) was also demonstrated with DN59. However, a potent WNV inhibitory peptide, WN83, which corresponds to WNV E domain IIb, did not inhibit infectivity by DENV. Additional results suggest that these inhibitory peptides are noncytotoxic and act in a sequence specific manner. The inhibitory peptides identified here can serve as lead compounds for the development of peptide drugs for flavivirus infection. PMID:15927084

  18. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  19. The Solar Package on ISS: SOL-ACES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienhold, F. G.; Anders, J.; Galuska, B.; Klocke, U.; Knothe, M.; Neske, E.; Riedel, W. J.; Schmidtke, G.; Singler, R.; Ulmer, U.; Wolf, H.

    The "solar package" comprises the experiments SOLSPEC (UV/Vis to IR spectral range), SOVIM (total solar radiation) and SOL-ACES to be installed on a Coarse Pointing Device (CPD) of the International Space Station for a 1.5 year mission launched in 2003. The CPD allows for measuring periods of at least fifteen minutes per orbit totaling approximately 600 hours per year of solar observations. The Solar Auto Calibrating EUV/UV Spectrometers (SOL-ACES) are currently developed to measure the solar radiation (full disk) in the 17 nm to 220 nm spectral range with four grazing-incidence grating spectrometers. To obtain high radiometric accuracy of better than 10 %, a double ionization chamber is assigned to each of the spectrometers as a primary detector standard. Optical bandpass filters are mounted on a filter wheel to be placed at the entrance apertures of the spectrometers and ionization chambers and thereby will establish the radiometric link between these devices. The spectrometers are designed as scanning monochromators operating at fixed incidence angles. The deflected radiation is monitored by rotating an assembly containing a parabolic mirror, an exit slit and a channel electron multiplier around the grating center. The optical length of the ionization chamber of 0.5 m is divided into two identical electrode sections. In addition, the transmitted radiation is measured by a silicon diode detector located at the end of the absorption path. Detector and electrode signals are recorded as a function of the gas pressure in the chamber, which is increased from zero to a few hectopascal during a single measurement. These data permit the absolute quantification of the radiant solar flux in the wavelength interval transmitted by the bandpass filter and the correction for secondary effects, such as ionization caused by photoelectrons. With these measurements the spectrometer efficiencies at the filter bandpass wavelengths can be recalibrated as required during the mission.

  20. Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) prevented hypertension by an inhibitory effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme activity in the kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sanae, Matsuda; Yasuo, Aoyagi

    2013-06-12

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is known to be rich in functional components. In the present study, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were used to clarify whether green asparagus prevents hypertension by inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. Six-week-old male SHR were fed a diet with (AD group) or without (ND group) 5% asparagus for 10 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) (AD: 159 ± 4.8 mmHg, ND: 192 ± 14.7 mmHg), urinary protein excretion/creatinine excretion, and ACE activity in the kidney were significantly lower in the AD group compared with the ND group. Creatinine clearance was significantly higher in the AD group compared with the ND group. In addition, ACE inhibitory activity was observed in a boiling water extract of asparagus. The ACE inhibitor purified and isolated from asparagus was identified as 2″-hydroxynicotianamine. In conclusion, 2″-hydroxynicotianamine in asparagus may be one of the factors inhibiting ACE activity in the kidney, thus preventing hypertension and preserving renal function.

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus helveticus strains from traditional fermented dairy foods and antihypertensive effect of fermented milk of strain H9.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongfu; Liu, Wenjun; Xue, Jiangang; Yang, Jie; Chen, Xia; Shao, Yuyu; Kwok, Lai-yu; Bilige, Menghe; Mang, Lai; Zhang, Heping

    2014-11-01

    Hypertension is a major global health issue which elevates the risk of a large world population to chronic life-threatening diseases. The inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is an effective target to manage essential hypertension. In this study, the fermentation properties (titratable acidity, free amino nitrogen, and fermentation time) and ACE-inhibitory (ACEI) activity of fermented milks produced by 259 Lactobacillus helveticus strains previously isolated from traditional Chinese and Mongolian fermented foods were determined. Among them, 37 strains had an ACEI activity of over 50%. The concentrations of the antihypertensive peptides, Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro, were further determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The change of ACEI activity of the fermented milks of 3 strains exhibiting the highest ACEI activity upon gastrointestinal protease treatment was assayed. Fermented milks produced by strain H9 (IMAU60208) had the highest in vitro ACEI activity (86.4 ± 1.5%), relatively short fermentation time (7.5 h), and detectable Val-Pro-Pro (2.409 ± 0.229 µM) and Ile-Pro-Pro (1.612 ± 0.114 µM) concentrations. Compared with the control, a single oral dose of H9-fermented milk significantly attenuated the systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) by 15 to 18 mmHg during the 6 to 12 h after treatment. The long-term daily H9-fermented milk intake over 7 wk exerted significant antihypertensive effect to SHR, but not normotensive rats, and the systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly lower, by 12 and 10 mmHg, respectively, compared with the control receiving saline. The feeding of H9-fermented milk to SHR resulted in a significantly higher weight gain at wk 7 compared with groups receiving saline, commercial yogurt, and captopril. Our study identified a novel probiotic L. helveticus strain originated from kurut sampled from Tibet

  2. An update on non-peptide angiotensin receptor antagonists and related RAAS modulators.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, G K; Sodhi, R K; Singh, M

    2007-08-02

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) is an important regulator of blood pressure and fluid-electrolyte homeostasis. RAAS has been implicated in pathogenesis of hypertension, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal failure. Aliskiren is the first non-peptide orally active renin inhibitor approved by FDA. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors are associated with frequent side effects such as cough and angio-oedema. Recently, the role of ACE2 and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) in the formation of an important active metabolite/mediator of RAAS, ang 1-7, has initiated attempts towards development of ACE2 inhibitors and combined ACE/NEP inhibitors. Furukawa and colleagues developed a series of low molecular weight nonpeptide imidazole analogues that possess weak but selective, competitive AT1 receptor blocking property. Till date, many compounds have exhibited promising AT1 blocking activity which cause a more complete RAAS blockade than ACE inhibitors. Many have reached the market for alternative treatment of hypertension, heart failure and diabetic nephropathy in ACE inhibitor intolerant patients and still more are waiting in the queue. But, the hallmark of this area of drug research is marked by a progress in understanding molecular interaction of these blockers at the AT1 receptor and unraveling the enigmatic influence of AT2 receptors on growth/anti-growth, differentiation and the regeneration of neuronal tissue. Different modeling strategies are underway to develop tailor made molecules with the best of properties like Dual Action (Angiotensin And Endothelin) Receptor Antagonists (DARA), ACE/NEP inhibitors, triple inhibitors, AT2 agonists, AT1/TxA2 antagonists, balanced AT1/AT2 antagonists, and nonpeptide renin inhibitors. This abstract gives an overview of these various angiotensin receptor antagonists.

  3. Is there an ACE ID - ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms interaction that influences sprint performance?

    PubMed

    Eynon, N; Alves, A J; Yamin, C; Sagiv, M; Duarte, J A; Oliveira, J; Ayalon, M; Goldhammer, E; Sagiv, M; Meckel, Y

    2009-12-01

    Functional R577X (rs.1815739) and ID (rs.5186) polymorphisms in the alpha-actinin-3 ( ACTN3) and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) genes, respectively, have been associated with sprint performance. The aim of this study was to determine their effect on sprint performance among 81 Israeli sprinters and 240 healthy controls. Results revealed that the ACE II genotype+ ACTN3 R allele (P=0.003 for sprinters vs. controls), and the ACTN3 RR genotype +ACE I allele (P=0.001 for sprinters vs. controls) might be the genotype for sprinters. In the whole cohort the probability of ACTN3 RR genotype+ ACE I allele being a sprinter (odds ratio 2.67, 95% confidence interval 1.45-4.93) and of ACE II genotype+ ACTN3 R allele being a sprinter (odds ratio 3.57, 95% confidence interval 1.78-7.15) was significantly higher than that in the controls. In conclusion, the above data suggest that ACE ID/ ACTN3 R577X genotype combination is associated with sprint ability. However, ACE ID/ ACTN3 R577X genotype combination is not related to the level of performance.

  4. ACE I/D Polymorphism in Hypertensive Patients of Kashmiri Population

    PubMed Central

    Sameer, A. Syed; Syeed, Nidda; Tak, Shahid A.; Bashir, Samina; Nissar, Saniya; Siddiqi, Mushtaq A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene in humans has an insertion-deletion (I/D) polymorphic state in intron 16 on chromosome 17q23. This polymorphism has been widely investigated in different diseases. In this study we aimed to investigate the ACE I/D genotype frequency in hypertensive cases in Kashmiri population. Materials and Methods We designed a case control study, where 52 hypertensive cases were studied for ACE I/D polymorphism against 150 age/sex matched controls taken from general population. The polymorphisms of ACE gene were investigated using polymerase chain reaction for detection of ACE I/D genotype. Fisher’s Chi square test was used for calculation of P value and OR. Results We found the frequency of ACE DD genotype to be 46.15% (24/52), II 23.07% (12/52) and DI 30.77% (16/52) in 52 hypertensive cases. Conclusions The ACE I/D genotype is positively associated with hypertension in our population.

  5. [Biologically active peptides derived from food proteins as the food components with cardioprotective properties].

    PubMed

    Iwaniak, Anna; Darewicz, Małgorzata; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Protasiewicz, Monika; Borawska, Justyna

    2014-06-01

    Food proteins are the source of peptides with many biological activities. One of them is their impact on blood circulatory system. This group of peptides includes the ones with the ability to reduce the blood pressure (inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme--ACE), antithrombotic, and to lower the cholesterol level. Among the above-mentioned peptides' bioactivities, the most of them act as the ACE inhibitors. Some of them are the functional food components and nutraceuticals and possess the status of food with special use. The main known source of antithrombotic and cholesterol lowering peptides are milk and soy proteins, respectively. However, the scientists make the efforts to find new alternative sources of peptides with the above-mentioned activities. It should be noted, that although the bioactive peptides are considered as the safe food components and thus be supportive in the cardiovascular diseases therapy, they cannot substitute the drugs. This review shows the characteristics of selected peptides with: blood pressure reducing, antithrombotic, and cholesterol level reducing activities. We focused on the sequences that were identified in food proteins as well as were tested on humans or animals.

  6. Investigation of the biochemical effects of renin inhibition in normal volunteers treated by an ACE inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Chauveau, D; Guyenne, T T; Cumin, F; Chatellier, G; Corvol, P; Ménard, J

    1992-01-01

    1. In order to investigate accurately the biochemical effects of renin inhibition in man, we have developed a sensitive assay to measure angiotensin I (1-10) decapeptide. 2. Angiotensins were extracted from plasma by adsorption to phenylsilylsilica, and angiotensin I (Ang I) was quantified by radioimmunoassay. The detection limit was 0.77 fmol ml-1, and the extraction recovery of [125I]-Ang I added to albumin buffer was 83% at the inflection point (10 fmol ml-1) of the standard curve. The overall recovery was 98.5 +/- 3.5%. The intra- and inter-assay reproducibility was 10.4% and 9.7% respectively. Cross-reactivity of the antiserum used was low (less than 0.3%) with all angiotensin peptides tested except Ang (2-10) nonapeptide. 3. A human pharmacological model was subsequently used to assess in vivo the biochemical effects of the renin inhibitor CGP 38560A. Six healthy volunteers received 20 mg lisinopril, a long-acting ACE-inhibitor. During the following 24 h, the renin-angiotensin system was reset with typically elevated active plasma renin and Ang I, at respectively 275 and 429% of basal values. 4. In a randomized three-way cross-over protocol, the six volunteers received a 30 min infusion of the renin inhibitor CGP 38560A (125 or 250 micrograms kg-1) or 5% glucose. The fall in plasma Ang I was 92% and 97.5% after the lowest and highest dose of the renin inhibitor, respectively. A concomitant increase in active plasma renin was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1315560

  7. MicroRNA-324-3p Promotes Renal Fibrosis and Is a Target of ACE Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tomasoni, Susanna; Romagnani, Paola; Trionfini, Piera; Sangalli, Fabio; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Rizzo, Paola; Lazzeri, Elena; Abbate, Mauro; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of microRNA (miRNA) to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis is not well understood. Here, we investigated whether miRNA modulates the fibrotic process in Munich Wistar Fromter (MWF) rats, which develop spontaneous progressive nephropathy. We analyzed the expression profile of miRNA in microdissected glomeruli and found that miR-324-3p was the most upregulated. In situ hybridization localized miR-324-3p to glomerular podocytes, parietal cells of Bowman’s capsule, and most abundantly, cortical tubules. A predicted target of miR-324-3p is prolyl endopeptidase (Prep), a serine peptidase involved in the metabolism of angiotensins and the synthesis of the antifibrotic peptide N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP). In cultured tubular cells, transient transfection with a miR-324-3p mimic reduced Prep protein and activity, validating Prep as a target of this miRNA. In MWF rats, upregulation of miR-324-3p associated with markedly reduced expression of Prep in both glomeruli and tubules, low urine Ac-SDKP, and increased deposition of collagen. ACE inhibition downregulated glomerular and tubular miR-324-3p, promoted renal Prep expression, increased plasma and urine Ac-SDKP, and attenuated renal fibrosis. In summary, these results suggest that dysregulation of the miR-324-3p/Prep pathway contributes to the development of fibrosis in progressive nephropathy. The renoprotective effects of ACE inhibitors may result, in part, from modulation of this pathway, suggesting that it may hold other potential therapeutic targets. PMID:22822076

  8. Absolute Side-chain Structure at Position 13 Is Required for the Inhibitory Activity of Bromein*

    PubMed Central

    Sawano, Yoriko; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain isoinhibitor (bromein), a cysteine proteinase inhibitor from pineapple stem, has a unique double-chain structure. The bromein precursor protein includes three homologous inhibitor domains, each containing an interchain peptide between the light and heavy chains. The interchain peptide in the single-chain precursor is immediately processed by bromelain, a target proteinase. In the present study, to clarify the essential inhibitory site of bromein, we constructed 44 kinds of site-directed and deletion mutants and investigated the inhibitory activity of each toward bromelain. As a result, the complete chemical structure of Leu13 in the light chain was revealed to be essential for inhibition. Pro12 prior to the leucine residue was also involved in the inhibitory activity and would control the location of the leucine side chain by the fixed φ dihedral angle of proline. Furthermore, the five-residue length of the interchain peptide was strictly required for the inhibitory activity. On the other hand, no inhibitory activity against bromelain was observed by the substitution of proline for the N terminus residue Thr15 of the interchain peptide. In summary, these mutational analyses of bromein demonstrated that the appropriate position and conformation of Leu13 are absolutely crucial for bromelain inhibition. PMID:18948264

  9. New Tools to Prepare ACE Cross-section Files for MCNP Analytic Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-06-17

    Monte Carlo calculations using one-group cross sections, multigroup cross sections, or simple continuous energy cross sections are often used to: (1) verify production codes against known analytical solutions, (2) verify new methods and algorithms that do not involve detailed collision physics, (3) compare Monte Carlo calculation methods with deterministic methods, and (4) teach fundamentals to students. In this work we describe 2 new tools for preparing the ACE cross-section files to be used by MCNP® for these analytic test problems, simple_ace.pl and simple_ace_mg.pl.

  10. Progress on the Multiphysics Capabilities of the Parallel Electromagnetic ACE3P Simulation Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, Oleksiy

    2015-03-26

    ACE3P is a 3D parallel simulation suite that is being developed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Effectively utilizing supercomputer resources, ACE3P has become a key tool for the coupled electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical research and design of particle accelerators. Based on the existing finite-element infrastructure, a massively parallel eigensolver is developed for modal analysis of mechanical structures. It complements a set of the multiphysics tools in ACE3P and, in particular, can be used for the comprehensive study of microphonics in accelerating cavities ensuring the operational reliability of a particle accelerator.

  11. Interaction of diabetes and ACE2 in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tikellis, Chris; Pickering, Raelene; Tsorotes, Despina; Du, Xiao-Jun; Kiriazis, Helen; Nguyen-Huu, Thu-Phuc; Head, Geoffrey A; Cooper, Mark E; Thomas, Merlin C

    2012-10-01

    Local and systemic AngII (angiotensin II) levels are regulated by ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2), which is reduced in diabetic tissues. In the present study, we examine the effect of ACE2 deficiency on the early cardiac and vascular changes associated with experimental diabetes. Streptozotocin diabetes was induced in male C57BL6 mice and Ace2-KO (knockout) mice, and markers of RAS (renin-angiotensin system) activity, cardiac function and injury were assessed after 10 weeks. In a second protocol, diabetes was induced in male ApoE (apolipoprotein E)-KO mice and ApoE/Ace2-double-KO mice, and plaque accumulation and markers of atherogenesis assessed after 20 weeks. The induction of diabetes in wild-type mice led to reduced ACE2 expression and activity in the heart, elevated circulating AngII levels and reduced cardiac Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] levels. This was associated structurally with thinning of the LV (left ventricular) wall and mild ventricular dilatation, and histologically with increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis on TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling) staining and compensatory hypertrophy denoted by an increased cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area. By contrast Ace2-KO mice failed to increase circulating AngII concentration, experienced a paradoxical fall in cardiac AngII levels and no change in Ang-(1-7) following the onset of diabetes. At the same time the major phenotypic differences between Ace2-deficient and Ace2-replete mice with respect to BP (blood pressure) and cardiac hypertrophy were eliminated following the induction of diabetes. Consistent with findings in the heart, the accelerated atherosclerosis that was observed in diabetic ApoE-KO mice was not seen in diabetic ApoE/Ace2-KO mice, which experienced no further increase in plaque accumulation or expression in key adhesion molecules beyond that seen in ApoE/Ace2-KO mice. These results point to the potential role of ACE2 deficiency in regulating

  12. APL workers install CRIS on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Workers from the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) install the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). From left, are Al Sadilek, Marcos Gonzalez and Cliff Willey. CRIS is one of nine instruments on ACE, which will investigate the origin and evolution of solar phenomenon, the formation of the solar corona, solar flares and the acceleration of the solar wind. ACE was developed for NASA by the APL. The spacecraft is scheduled to be launched Aug. 21 aboard a two-stage Delta II 7920-8 rocket from Space Launch Complex 17, Pad A.

  13. The first stage of the Delta II for ACE is erected at LC 17A, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The first stage of the Delta II rocket which will to be used to launch the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft is erected at Launch Complex 17A at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Scheduled for launch on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun.

  14. Differential regulation of the cellulase transcription factors XYR1, ACE2, and ACE1 in Trichoderma reesei strains producing high and low levels of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, Thomas; Margeot, Antoine; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Le Crom, Stéphane; Ben Chaabane, Fadhel; Linke, Rita; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2011-02-01

    Due to its capacity to produce large amounts of cellulases, Trichoderma reesei is increasingly being investigated for second-generation biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. The induction mechanisms of T. reesei cellulases have been described recently, but the regulation of the genes involved in their transcription has not been studied thoroughly. Here we report the regulation of expression of the two activator genes xyr1 and ace2, and the corepressor gene ace1, during the induction of cellulase biosynthesis by the inducer lactose in T. reesei QM 9414, a strain producing low levels of cellulase (low producer). We show that all three genes are induced by lactose. xyr1 was also induced by d-galactose, but this induction was independent of d-galactose metabolism. Moreover, ace1 was carbon catabolite repressed, whereas full induction of xyr1 and ace2 in fact required CRE1. Significant differences in these regulatory patterns were observed in the high-producer strain RUT C30 and the hyperproducer strain T. reesei CL847. These observations suggest that a strongly elevated basal transcription level of xyr1 and reduced upregulation of ace1 by lactose may have been important for generating the hyperproducer strain and that thus, these genes are major control elements of cellulase production.

  15. Salt Reduction in a Model High-Salt Akawi Cheese: Effects on Bacterial Activity, pH, Moisture, Potential Bioactive Peptides, Amino Acids, and Growth of Human Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chloride reduction and its substitution with potassium chloride on Akawi cheese during storage for 30 d at 4 °C. Survival of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum) and starter bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory and antioxidant activities, and concentrations of standard amino acids as affected by storage in different brine solutions (10% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl+KCl [1:1], 5% NaCl, and 5% NaCl+KCl [1:1]) were investigated. Furthermore, viability of human colon cells and human colon cancer cells as affected by the extract showing improved peptide profiles, highest release of amino acids and antioxidant activity (that is, from cheese brined in 7.5% NaCl+KCl) was evaluated. Significant increase was observed in survival of probiotic bacteria in cheeses with low salt after 30 d. Calcium content decreased slightly during storage in all cheeses brined in various solutions. Further, no significant changes were observed in ACE-inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of cheeses during storage. Interestingly, concentrations of 4 essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan, valine, and leucine) increased significantly during storage in brine solutions containing 7.5% total salt. Low concentration of cheese extract (100 μg/mL) significantly improved the growth of normal human colon cells, and reduced the growth of human colon cancer cells. Overall, the study revealed that cheese extracts from reduced-NaCl brine improved the growth of human colon cells, and the release of essential amino acids, but did not affect the activities of potential bioactive peptides.

  16. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF)

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26187859

  17. Effect of extrusion process on antioxidant and ACE inhibition properties from bovine haemoglobin concentrate hydrolysates incorporated into expanded maize products.

    PubMed

    Cian, Raúl E; Luggren, Pablo; Drago, Silvina R

    2011-11-01

    Extrusion process has been widely used for the development of many functional foods. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of extrusion process on antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition properties from bovine haemoglobin concentrate (BHC) hydrolysates (P, FC, PF and FCF). Extrusion was carried out with a Brabender single screw extruder. The ACE inhibition and the antioxidant capacity (AC) were estimated by the inhibition of the ACE and ABTS+√ radical cation expressed as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), respectively. The ACE inhibition and TEAC values from hydrolysates were significantly higher than that from BHC. The highest ACE inhibition corresponded to P hydrolysate and the highest TEAC corresponded to PF and FCF hydrolysates. The ACE inhibition and AC from extruded products with added hydrolysates were higher than that from maize control; however, the extrusion process modified both ACE inhibition and AC formerly present in hydrolysates.

  18. Differential downregulation of ACE2 by the spike proteins of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Glowacka, Ilona; Bertram, Stephanie; Herzog, Petra; Pfefferle, Susanne; Steffen, Imke; Muench, Marcus O; Simmons, Graham; Hofmann, Heike; Kuri, Thomas; Weber, Friedemann; Eichler, Jutta; Drosten, Christian; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The human coronaviruses (CoVs) severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV and NL63 employ angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) for cell entry. It was shown that recombinant SARS-CoV spike protein (SARS-S) downregulates ACE2 expression and thereby promotes lung injury. Whether NL63-S exerts a similar activity is yet unknown. We found that recombinant SARS-S bound to ACE2 and induced ACE2 shedding with higher efficiency than NL63-S. Shedding most likely accounted for the previously observed ACE2 downregulation but was dispensable for viral replication. Finally, SARS-CoV but not NL63 replicated efficiently in ACE2-positive Vero cells and reduced ACE2 expression, indicating robust receptor interference in the context of SARS-CoV but not NL63 infection.

  19. ACES: The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obland, M. D.; Prasad, N. S.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Dobler, J. T.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T.; Campbell, J.; Chen, S.; Cleckner, C. S.; DiJoseph, M.; Little, A.; Notari, A.; Refaat, T. F.; Rosenbaum, D.; Vanek, M. D.; Bender, J.; Braun, M.; Chavez-Pirson, A.; Neal, M.; Rayner, P. J.; Rosiewicz, A.; Shure, M.; Welch, W.

    2012-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a NASA Langley Research Center project funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technologies being advanced are: (1) a high bandwidth detector, (2) a multi-aperture telescope assembly, (3) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination, and (4) high-efficiency, multiple-amplifier CO2 and O2 laser transmitters. The instrument architecture will be developed to operate on a high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. These technologies are viewed as critical towards developing an airborne simulator and eventual spaceborne instrument with lower size, mass, and power consumption, and improved performance. The detector effort will improve the existing detector subsystem by increasing its bandwidth to a goal of 5 MHz, reducing its overall mass from 18 lbs to <10 lbs, and stretching the duration of autonomous, service-free operation periods from 4 hrs to >24 hrs. The development goals are to permit higher laser modulation rates, which provides greater flexibility for implementing thin-cloud discrimination algorithms as well as improving range resolution and error reduction, and to enable long flights on a high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The telescope development consists of a three-telescope design built for the constraints of the Global Hawk aircraft. This task addresses the ability of multiple smaller telescopes to provide equal or greater collection efficiency compared with a single larger telescope with a reduced impact on launch mass and cost. The telescope assembly also integrates fiber-coupled transmit collimators for all of the laser transmitters and fiber-coupled optical

  20. Tailoring elastase inhibition with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Azoia, Nuno G; Carvalho, Ana C; Gomes, Andreia C; Güebitz, Georg; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-09-01

    Chronic wounds are the result of excessive amounts of tissue destructive proteases such as human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The high levels of this enzyme found on those types of wounds inactivate the endogenous inhibitor barrier thus, the search for new HNE inhibitors is required. This work presents two new HNE inhibitor peptides, which were synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor protein. The results obtained indicated that these new peptides are competitive inhibitors for HNE and, the inhibitory activity can be modulated by modifications introduced at the N- and C-terminal of the peptides. Furthermore, these peptides were also able to inhibit elastase from a human wound exudate while showing no cytotoxicity against human skin fibroblasts in vitro, greatly supporting their potential application in chronic wound treatment.

  1. An antifungal peptide from baby lima bean.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2006-12-01

    A 6-kDa antifungal peptide with inhibitory activity on mycelial growth in Fusarium oxysporum, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, and Physalospora piricola was isolated from baby lima beans. The peptide suppressed growth in M. arachidicola with an IC(50) of 0.87 muM and inhibited activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 4 muM. The peptide exhibited an N-terminal amino acid sequence similar to those of leguminous defensins. The isolation procedure comprised ion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-cellulose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Affi-gel blue gel but was adsorbed on CM-cellulose.

  2. CART peptide in the nucleus accumbens regulates psychostimulants: Correlations between psychostimulant and CART peptide effects.

    PubMed

    Job, Martin O; Kuhar, Michael J

    2017-02-16

    In this study, we reexamined the effect of Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART) peptide on psychostimulant (PS)-induced locomotor activity (LMA) in individual rats. The Methods utilized were as previously published. The PS-induced LMA was defined as the distance traveled after PS administration (intraperitoneal), and the CART peptide effect was defined as the change in the PS-induced activity after bilateral intra-NAc administration of CART peptide. The experiments included both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, and varying the CART peptide dose and the PS dose. While the average effect of CART peptide was to inhibit PS-induced LMA, the effect of CART peptide on individual PS-treated animals was not always inhibitory and sometimes even produced an increase or no change in PS-induced LMA. Upon further analysis, we observed a linear correlation, reported for the first time, between the magnitude of PS-induced LMA and the CART peptide effect. Because CART peptide inhibits PS-induced LMA when it is large, and increases PS-induced LMA when it is small, the peptide can be considered a homeostatic regulator of dopamine (DA)-induced LMA, which supports our earlier homeostatic hypothesis.

  3. Apricot and other seed stones: amygdalin content and the potential to obtain antioxidant, angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor and hypocholesterolemic peptides.

    PubMed

    García, M C; González-García, E; Vásquez-Villanueva, R; Marina, M L

    2016-11-09

    Stones from olives and Prunus genus fruits are cheap and sustainable sources of proteins and could be potential sources of bioactive peptides. The main limitation to the use of these seeds is the presence of amygdalin. This work proposes to determine amygdalin in olive and Prunus seeds and in protein isolates obtained from them. Moreover, antioxidant, angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, and hypocholesterolemic properties will be evaluated in hydrolysates obtained from these seeds. Despite some seeds contained amygdalin, all protein isolates were free of this substance. Two different procedures to obtain bioactive peptides from protein isolates were examined: gastrointestinal digestion and processing with Alcalase, Flavourzyme or Thermolysin. Higher antioxidant, ACE inhibitor and hypocholesterolemic activities were observed when proteins were processed with Alcalase, Flavourzyme or Thermolysin. The highest antioxidant and ACE inhibitor capacities were observed for the Prunus genus seed hydrolysates while the highest capacity to reduce micellar cholesterol solubility was observed for the apricot and olive seed hydrolysates.

  4. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from Jasminum azoricum and Jasminum grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Somanadhan, B; Smitt, U W; George, V; Pushpangadan, P; Rajasekharan, S; Duus, J O; Nyman, U; Olsen, C E; Jaroszewski, J W

    1998-04-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of extracts of the aerial parts of Jasminum azoricum var. travancorense, using an in vitro ACE inhibition assay, led to isolation of three oligomeric, iridoid-type compounds, which were named sambacein I-III. Their structures are based on spectroscopic and chemical evidence. Similarly, fractionation of extracts of aerial parts of J. grandiflorum resulted in the isolation of the previously reported ACE inhibitor, oleacein. The IC50 values of purified ACE inhibitors were 26-36 microM. Moreover, 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethanol, isoquercitrin and ursolic acid were isolated from J. grandiflorum. Sambaceins and oleacein are formed from genuine iridoid glucosides during processing of the plant material. NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the level of the ACE inhibitors in the traditional medicines prepared in Kerala from these Jasminum species.

  5. Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Measurements of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Chemistry and Long-Term Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Bernath, Peter; Boone, Chris; Nassar, Ray

    2007-01-01

    We highlight chemistry and trend measurement results from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) which is providing precise middle troposphere to the lower thermosphere measurements with a 0.02/cm resolution Fourier transform spectrometer covering 750-4400/cm

  6. Optimization of Bromelain-Aided Production of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Hydrolysates from Stone Fish Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Muhammad Auwal, Shehu; Zarei, Mohammad; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Saari, Nazamid

    2017-03-31

    The stone fish is an under-utilized sea cucumber with many nutritional and ethno-medicinal values. This study aimed to establish the conditions for its optimum hydrolysis with bromelain to generate angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory hydrolysates. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on a central composite design was used to model and optimize the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and ACE-inhibitory activity. Process conditions including pH (4-7), temperature (40-70 °C), enzyme/substrate (E/S) ratio (0.5%-2%) and time (30-360 min) were used. A pH of 7.0, temperature of 40 °C, E/S ratio of 2% and time of 240 min were determined using a response surface model as the optimum levels to obtain the maximum ACE-inhibitory activity of 84.26% at 44.59% degree of hydrolysis. Hence, RSM can serve as an effective approach in the design of experiments to improve the antihypertensive effect of stone fish hydrolysates, which can thus be used as a value-added ingredient for various applications in the functional foods industries.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  8. Single and combined influence of ACE and ACTN3 genotypes on muscle phenotypes in octogenarians.

    PubMed

    Garatachea, Nuria; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Torres-Luque, Gema; Yvert, Thomas; Santiago, Catalina; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Lucia, Alejandro

    2012-07-01

    We studied the single and combined influence of the ACE I/D and the ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms on muscle phenotypes (thigh muscles' cross-sectional area assessed with magnetic resonance imaging) and strength (maximal handgrip, 30-s chair stand test), functional ability during activities of daily living (Barthel index) and bone mineral density (proximal femur) in Caucasian (Spanish) community-dwelling old people [n = 81, 59 women; mean age 82.8 ± 4.8 years (range 71-93 years)]. We found no significantly differences in the aforementioned phenotypes across ACE and ACTN3 genotypes (all P > 0.05), except for handgrip in the ACE I/D recessive model (DD 19.5 ± 6.7 kg, ID 24.0 ± 9.1 kg, II 22.1 ± 7.9; P = 0.047), yet statistical significance disappeared after correction for multiple comparisons. Likewise, the analyses of the combined effects between genotypes did not yield any significant difference (all P > 0.05) between the two 'extreme' genotypes [theoretically 'power or muscularity oriented' [(ACTN3 RR + RX & ACE DD) versus 'non-power' (ACTN3 XX & ACE II + ID)]. The aforementioned analyses were adjusted by sex, age and physical activity levels as covariates. Logistic regression analysis revealed no significant association of single or combined effect of ACE and ACTN3 genotypes or genotype combination group (ACE + ACTN3) with sarcopenia (i.e. being in the lowest 25th sex-specific percentile for a combined score of the muscle and functional phenotypes we measured). Though ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms are candidates to modulate exercise-related phenotypes in adults, our data suggest that they do not exert a major influence in the muscle phenotypes of old people. More studies with larger sample sizes are needed.

  9. ACES II Seat Roller Study: Findings of Detrimental Friction under High Windblast or Adverse Flight Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-12

    seat rollers with modern industrial “cam rollers” (or similar load-rated roll-and-thrust bearing wheel system), and (2) insure that no future ejection...of 1500 lbf. 15. SUBJECT TERMS ACES-II, Ejection, Seat, Cam, Roller, Bearing , Friction, CKU-5, Rocket, Catapult, ROCAT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...ACES-II Seat Roller Design, Installation, and Use ................................ 16 Figure 7 – Images of some Typical Cam Rollers and Bearings

  10. Antagonism of angiotensin 1–7 prevents the therapeutic effects of recombinant human ACE2

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaibhav B.; Takawale, Abhijit; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Das, Subhash K.; Basu, Ratnadeep; Grant, Maria B.; Hall, David A.; Kassiri, Zamaneh

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin 1–7/Mas receptor (MasR) axis counteracts angiotensin II (Ang II)-mediated cardiovascular disease. Recombinant human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (rhACE2) generates Ang 1–7 from Ang II. We hypothesized that the therapeutic effects of rhACE2 are dependent on Ang 1–7 action. Wild type male C57BL/6 mice (10–12 weeks old) were infused with Ang II (1.5 mg/kg/d) and treated with rhACE2 (2 mg/kg/d). The Ang 1–7 antagonist, A779 (200 ng/kg/min), was administered to a parallel group of mice. rhACE2 prevented Ang II-induced hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction while A779 prevented these beneficial effects and precipitated systolic dysfunction. rhACE2 effectively antagonized Ang II-mediated myocardial fibrosis which was dependent on the action of Ang 1–7. Myocardial oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinase 2 activity was further increased by Ang 1–7 inhibition even in the presence of rhACE2. Activation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by rhACE2 were suppressed by the antagonism of Ang 1–7 while the activation of pathological signaling pathways was maintained. Blocking Ang 1–7 action prevents the therapeutic effects of rhACE2 in the setting of elevated Ang II culminating in systolic dysfunction. These results highlight a key cardioprotective role of Ang 1–7, and increased Ang 1–7 action represents a potential therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25874965

  11. A prospective study of frequency and characteristics of cough during ACE inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa; Fukuda, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are reportedly effective, and positively indicated in patients with chronic heart failure with decreased contractility, after myocardial infarction, after cerebrovascular disorders, and in those with chronic kidney disease. However, the biggest challenge to continuous use of ACE inhibitors is the adverse reaction of cough. Accordingly, in the present study, we investigated the present state and characteristics of ACE inhibitor-induced cough in patients with essential hypertension currently being treated with an ACE inhibitor for an average of 18 months, who could be regularly checked for cough. Subjects in this study were 176 patients overall (mean age 67 ± 11 years old), 90 men and 86 women. The adverse reaction of cough was observed in 20% of patients, and more frequently in women than in men. However, in 26 of the patients with cough, the cough either resolved naturally or completely disappeared while the treatment continued, after which patients could continue taking the medication. Specifically, ACE inhibitor treatment was eventually discontinued due to cough in 5.1% of patients. Cough occurred less frequently with concomitant calcium antagonists or diuretics than with ACE inhibitor monotherapy. Cough as an adverse reaction occurred at a low frequency when medication was taken at bedtime. We considered a number of measures to counteract cough, then in addition to starting the ACE inhibitor treatment as early as possible, it is important to devise ways for the ACE inhibitor treatment to be continued for as long as possible, through the adept use of these measures.

  12. Operation Heli-STAR - Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE). Volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Operation Heli-STAR (Helicopter Short-Haul Transportation and Aviation Research) was established and operated in Atlanta, Georgia, during the period of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Heli-STAR had three major thrusts: (1) the establishment and operation of a helicopter-based cargo transportation system, (2) the management of low-altitude air traffic in the airspace of an urban area, and (3) the collection and analysis of research and development data associated with items 1 and 2. Heli-STAR was a cooperative industry/government program that included parcel package shippers and couriers in the Atlanta area, the helicopter industry, aviation electronics manufacturers, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and support contractors. Several detailed reports have been produced as a result of Operation Heli-STAR. These include four reports on acoustic measurements and associated analyses, and reports on the Heli-STAR tracking data including the data processing and retrieval system, the Heli-STAR cargo simulation, and the community response system. In addition, NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) program has produced a report describing the Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE) which produced the avionics and ground equipment using automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology. This latter report is restricted to organizations belonging to NASA's AGATE industry consortium. A complete list of these reports is shown on the following page.

  13. ACE-Asia: Asian Aerosol Transport Into Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, C. F.; Perry, K. D.; Cliff, S. S.; Jimenez-Cruz, M. P.; Cahill, T. A.

    2001-12-01

    Adak Island, one of the southernmost Aleutian Islands, and the Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR), approximately 30 miles north of Fairbanks, Alaska, both experienced Asian dust transport during the ACE-Asia campaign in March/April 2001. The Asian soil reaching both Adak and PFRR appeared in both the sub-micron (0.07-0.34 and 0.34-1.15 micron) and super-micron (1.15-2.5 micron) stages of the 3-stage DRUM aerosol impactor. This contrasts with the 'typical Arctic haze' event observed at PFRR in which the aerosol is predominantly sub-micron. Although Asian soil and anthropogenic emissions reaching PFRR caused a significant deterioration in local visibility, the models and satellites did not show the dust reaching PFRR. However, back-trajectory modeling does point to Asia as the origin of the aerosol at PFRR. In contrast to PFRR, the soil reaching Adak was predicted by models, visible to satellites, concentrated enough to set off volcanic ash alarms in the Aleutians, and caused 'brown snow' near Valdez, Alaska. In addition to the dust, a suite of typically anthropogenic fine metals were seen during the six week experiment, confirming the back-trajectory indications of an Asian source. The study also provided additional information on the optically important sub-micron component of sea salt aerosols for comparison to similar observations with DRUM technology at the Mace Head Research Facility on the western coast of Ireland.

  14. ACE inhibitors could be therapeutic for antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hobgood, Donna K

    2013-11-01

    Antisocial personality traits are an important topic for research. The societal cost of these behaviors encourages efforts at a better understanding of central nervous system causes. Catecholamine genes are being studied to facilitate this understanding, and some tentative findings are being reached about several of these genes. It seems that many genes play a role to produce antisocial behaviors so complexity of elucidating each gene is obvious. One conclusion that could be drawn from the current research findings is that DA2 like receptors (DRD2, DRD3, DRD4) with alleles that decrease neurotransmission are facilitatory of antisocial behaviors. DA2 like receptors cause neuronal firing to inhibit many peripheral functions through adenylyl cyclase inhibition. When these receptors are less active by genetically decreased density, lower affinity, or by low dopamine levels as final common pathways then inhibition is released and a state of disinhibition can be said to describe this state. Peripheral metabolism is increased and behavioral activation is noted. Renin is disinhibited in this setting thus allowing sympathetic nervous system activation. The fight or flight behaviors thus produced, in the extreme, would be the setting of antisocial behavior. Research validates this hypothesis. Understanding this final common pathway toward antisocial behavior should lead to better treatment for individuals with this pattern of behavior before they have caused harm to themselves and others. ACE inhibitors are well tolerated drugs used in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure and would also treat antisocial behavior disorders.

  15. Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

  16. Exercise manual for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) software

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, P.R.; Widney, T.W.; Goolsby, P.T.; Nelson, J.D.; Evanko, D.A.

    1997-09-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspected Party and the Inspection Team. Current training techniques include table-top inspections and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT has been designed to provide training for a hypothetical challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); however, this training tool can be modified for other inspection regimes. Although ACE-IT provides training from notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities, the primary emphasis of ACE-IT is in the inspection itself--particularly with the concept of managed access. ACE-IT also demonstrates how inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information. The Exercise Manual supplements the ACE-IT software by providing general information on on-site inspections and detailed information for the CWC challenge inspection exercise. The detailed information includes the pre-inspection briefing, maps, list of sensitive items, medical records, and shipping records.

  17. Spatial characteristics of professional tennis serves with implications for serving aces: A machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, David; Reid, Machar

    2017-04-01

    This study sought to determine the features of an ideal serve in men's professional tennis. A total of 25,680 first serves executed by 151 male tennis players during Australian Open competition were classified as either aces or returned into play. Spatiotemporal (impact location, speed, projection angles, landing location and relative player locations) and contextual (score) features of each serve were extracted from Hawk-Eye data and used to construct a classification tree model (with decision rules) that predicted serve outcome. k-means clustering was applied to the landing locations to quantify optimal landing locations for aces. The classification tree revealed that (1) serve directionality, relative to the returner; (2) the ball's landing proximity to the nearest service box line and (3) serve speed classified aces with an accuracy of 87.02%. Hitting aces appeared more contingent on accuracy than speed, with serves directed >5.88° from the returner and landing <15.27 cm from a service box line most indicative of an ace. k-means clustering revealed four distinct locations (≈0.73 m wide × 2.35 m deep) in the corners of the service box that corresponded to aces. These landing locations provide empirically derived target locations for players to adhere to during practice and competition.

  18. Novel natural peptide substrates for endopeptidase 24.15, neurolysin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Rioli, Vanessa; Gozzo, Fabio C; Heimann, Andrea S; Linardi, Alessandra; Krieger, José E; Shida, Cláudio S; Almeida, Paulo C; Hyslop, Stephen; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ferro, Emer S

    2003-03-07

    Endopeptidase 24.15 (EC; ep24.15), neurolysin (EC; ep24.16), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC; ACE) are metallopeptidases involved in neuropeptide metabolism in vertebrates. Using catalytically inactive forms of ep24.15 and ep24.16, we have identified new peptide substrates for these enzymes. The enzymatic activity of ep24.15 and ep24.16 was inactivated by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues within their conserved HEXXH motifs, without disturbing their secondary structure or peptide binding ability, as shown by circular dichroism and binding assays. Fifteen of the peptides isolated were sequenced by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and shared homology with fragments of intracellular proteins such as hemoglobin. Three of these peptides (PVNFKFLSH, VVYPWTQRY, and LVVYPWTQRY) were synthesized and shown to interact with ep24.15, ep24.16, and ACE, with K(i) values ranging from 1.86 to 27.76 microm. The hemoglobin alpha-chain fragment PVNFKFLSH, which we have named hemopressin, produced dose-dependent hypotension in anesthetized rats, starting at 0.001 microg/kg. The hypotensive effect of the peptide was potentiated by enalapril only at the lowest peptide dose. These results suggest a role for hemopressin as a vasoactive substance in vivo. The identification of these putative intracellular substrates for ep24.15 and ep24.16 is an important step toward the elucidation of the role of these enzymes within cells.

  19. Cysteine racemization during the Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis of the Nav1.7-selective peptide--protoxin II.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae H; Carlin, Kevin P; Wu, Gang; Ilyin, Victor I; Kyle, Donald J

    2012-07-01

    Protoxin II is biologically active peptide containing the inhibitory cystine knot motif. A synthetic version of the toxin was generated with standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis. If N-methylmorpholine was used as a base during synthesis of the linear protoxin II, it was found that a significant amount of racemization (approximately 50%) was observed during the process of cysteine residue coupling. This racemization could be suppressed by substituting N-methylmorpholine with 2,4,6-collidine. The crude linear toxin was then air oxidized and purified. Electrophysiological assessment of the synthesized protoxin II confirmed its previously described interactions with voltage-gated sodium channels. Eight other naturally occurring inhibitory knot peptides were also synthesized using this same methodology. The inhibitory potencies of these synthesized toxins on Nav1.7 and Nav1.2 channels are summarized.

  20. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity in Mexican Fresco cheese.

    PubMed

    Torres-Llanez, M J; González-Córdova, A F; Hernandez-Mendoza, A; Garcia, H S; Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if Mexican Fresco cheese manufactured with specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB) presented angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACEI) activity. Water-soluble extracts (3 kDa) obtained from Mexican Fresco cheese prepared with specific LAB (Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, and mixtures: Lactococcus-Lactobacillus and Lactococcus-Enterococcus) were evaluated for ACEI activity. Specific peptide fractions with high ACEI were analyzed using reverse phase-HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry for determination of amino acid sequence. Cheese containing Enterococcus faecium or a Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis-Enterococcus faecium mixture showed the largest number of fractions with ACEI activity and the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50); <10 μg/mL). Various ACEI peptides derived from β-casein [(f(193-205), f(193-207), and f(193-209)] and α(S1)-casein [f(1-15), f(1-22), f(14-23), and f(24-34)] were found. The Mexican Fresco cheese manufactured with specific LAB strains produced peptides with potential antihypertensive activity.

  2. Identification of a Novel Inhibitory Allosteric Site in p38α

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Campos, Pedro M.; Vega, Miguel; Perez, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report the discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitory site for p38α, a subclass of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) family. The putative site was discovered after inspection of the crystallographic structure of the p38α-MK2 complex. MK2 (MAPK-activated protein kinase 2) is an interesting protein playing a dual role as modulator and substrate of p38α. This intriguing behavior is due to the ability of the two proteins to form distinctive heterodimers when p38α is phosphorylated or not. We hypothesized that the regulatory action of MK2 is due to its capability to keep p38α in an inactive conformation and consequently, we investigated the atomic structure of the p38α-MK2 complex to understand such regulatory behavior at the molecular level. After inspection of the complex structure, two peptides designed from the MK2 regulatory loop in contact with p38α with sequences Tyr1-Ser2-Asn3-His4-Gly5-Leu6 (peptide-1) and [Phe0]-peptide-1 (peptide-2) in their zwitterionic form were investigated for their phosphorylation inhibitory capability in vitro. Since both peptides exhibited inhibitory capability of the p38α kinase mediated phosphorylation of MEF2A, in a subsequent step we pursued the discovery of small molecule peptidomimetics. For this purpose we characterized in detail the peptide-p38α interaction using molecular dynamics simulations, leading to the definition of a pharmacophore for the peptide-protein interaction. This hypothesis was used as query for a in silico screening, leading to the discovery of a fused ring compound with micromolar inhibitory activity. Site-directed mutagenesis studies support that the compound binds to the putative novel allosteric site in p38α. PMID:27898710

  3. Identification of new polymorphisms of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, and study of their relationship to plasma ACE levels by two-QTL segregation-linkage analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Villard, E.; Tiret, L.; Visvikis, S.; Rakotovao, R.; Cambien, F.; Soubrier, F.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels are highly genetically determined. A previous segregation-linkage analysis suggested the existence of a functional mutation located within or close to the ACE locus, in almost complete linkage desequilibrium (LD) with the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and accounting for half the ACE variance. In order to identify the functional variant at the molecular level, we compared ACE gene sequences between four subjects selected for having contrasted ACE levels and I/D genotypes. We identified 10 new polymorphisms, among which 8 were genotyped in 95 healthy nuclear families, in addition to the I/D polymorphism. These polymorphisms could be divided into two groups: five polymorphisms in the 5' region and three in the coding sequence and the 3' UTR. Within each group, polymorphisms were in nearly complete association, whereas polymorphisms from the two groups were in strong negative LD. After adjustment for the I/D polymorphism, all polymorphisms of the 5' group remained significantly associated with ACE levels, which suggests the existence of two quantitative trait loci (QTL) acting additively on ACE levels. Segregation-linkage analyses including one or two ACE-linked QTLs in LD with two ACE markers were performed to test this hypothesis. The two QTLs and the two markers were assumed to be in complete LD. Results supported the existence of two ACE-linked QTLs, which would explain 38% and 49% of the ACE variance in parents and offspring, respectively. One of these QTLs might be the I/D polymorphism itself or the newly characterized 4656(CT)2/3 polymorphism. The second QTL would have a frequency of approximately .20, which is incompatible with any of the yet-identified polymorphisms. More extensive sequencing and extended analyses in larger samples and in other populations will be necessary to characterize definitely the functional variants. PMID:8651305

  4. A Solar Electron Burst Spanning a Stream Interface: ACE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.; McComas, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Where coronal hole fast wind runs into slow wind ahead, a compression region forms. The boundary between the compressed slow and fast wind is referred to as the stream interface (SI). Ideally, if the coronal source regions of slow and fast wind are distinct and stationary, and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) foot point locations are fixed, the SI is a discontinuous plasma boundary for both solar wind ions and 100eV-1keV suprathermal electrons which stream out from the sun through the ions along the IMF. In the ideal case, IMF lines do not cross the SI. However, field line crossing of the SI may result from IMF foot point motion during the time required for solar wind ions to travel from the sun to 1 AU. On January 29, 2005 ACE encountered a stream interface within a CIR at the leading edge of a coronal hole fast stream. A solar electron burst was observed from 11-15 UT at 0.5-1.3 keV energies. The burst was observed across the SI, indicating magnetic connection to the electron burst source region on both sides of the SI. This could indicate that the electron burst source region spanned a coronal hole boundary. A more likely alternative is that field lines on opposite sides of the SI at 1 AU were no longer connected to different sides of a coronal hole boundary. Instead, footpoint motion occurred during solar wind ion transit to 1 AU, so that field lines on both sides of the SI were connected to a single coronal electron burst source region.

  5. Shipboard Measurements During ACE-Asia: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Uematsu, M.; Miura, K.

    2001-12-01

    Shipboard measurements of aerosol properties and related parameters were conducted from the US NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown and the Japanese R/V Mirai (MR01-K02) during the ACE-Asia Intensive Field Program (http://saga.pmel.noaa.gov/aceasia/). The R/V Brown cruise (14 March - 20 April 2001), with scientists from 22 research institutions, included measurements across the Pacific Ocean from Hawaii to Japan, in the East China Sea and in the Sea of Japan. Measurements were coordinated with the US NSF/NCAR C-130, US CIRPAS Twin Otter, and the Australian ARA King Air Aircraft, Terra and SeaWiFS satellite overpasses, and the ground station at Hachijo, Japan. Distinct aerosol and trace gas signatures were observed from the Miyakejima volcano, the deserts of China and Mongolia, the Chang Jiang Basin, the Korean Peninsula and the islands of Japan. The R/V Mirai cruise (14 - 28 May 2001), with scientists from 10 research institutions, focused on the region east of Japan along 146.5 E from 30 N to 38 N. Enhanced concentrations of radon and super-micron aerosol were measured in a post-frontal air mass along the 146.5 E transect. Observations from a Kytoon and the NIES two-wavelength (1064 nm and 532 nm) dual-polarization lidar detected dust and sulfate aerosol plumes from the Asian continent. The vertical distribution patterns of the dust and sulfate aerosols qualitatively agreed with the model prediction by the Chemical Weather Forecasting System (CFORS).

  6. A sex-linked Ace gene, not linked to insensitive acetylcholinesterase-mediated insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, C A; Bourguet, D; Ascolillo, A; Rooker, S J; Garvey, C F; Hall, L M; Pasteur, N; Raymond, M

    1998-05-01

    An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene, Ace.x, showing 93% identity of deduced amino acid sequence to Anopheles stephensi Ace has been cloned from a Culex pipiens strain homozygous for insensitive AChE (iAChE) mediated insecticide resistance. DNA sequence of genomic DNA clones identified exons 2-5. RFLP of six clones indicated four possible alleles. Linkage analysis located Ace.x to chromosome I, less than 0.8 centimorgans from the sex locus, whereas the locus conferring resistance was 2.0 centimorgans from plum-eye on chromosome II. Ace.1 coding for AChE1, which is associated with resistance, is therefore autosomal. We propose that Ace.x is the recently postulated Ace.2 coding for the biochemically distinct AChE2, which is not associated with resistance.

  7. A phase 1 study of ACE-536, a regulator of erythroid differentiation, in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Attie, Kenneth M; Allison, Mark J; McClure, Ty; Boyd, Ingrid E; Wilson, Dawn M; Pearsall, Amelia E; Sherman, Matthew L

    2014-07-01

    ACE-536, a recombinant protein containing a modified activin receptor type IIB, is being developed for the treatment of anemias caused by ineffective erythropoiesis, such as thalassemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. ACE-536 acts through a mechanism distinct from erythropoiesis-stimulating agents to promote late-stage erythroid differentiation by binding to transforming growth factor-β superfamily ligands and inhibiting signaling through transcription factors Smad 2/3. The goal of this Phase 1 study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic effects of ascending dose levels of ACE-536 in healthy volunteers. Thirty-two postmenopausal women were randomized in sequential cohorts of eight subjects each to receive up to two doses of either ACE-536 (0.0625-0.25 mg/kg) or placebo (3:1 randomization) given subcutaneously every 2 weeks. Mean baseline age was 59.4 years, and hemoglobin was 13.2 g/dL. ACE-536 was well tolerated at dose levels up to 0.25 mg/kg over the 1-month treatment period. There were no serious or severe adverse events, nor clinically meaningful changes in safety laboratory measures or vital signs. Mean ACE-536 AUC0-14d and Cmax increased proportionally after first dose; mean t½ was 15-16 days. Dose-dependent increases in hemoglobin concentration were observed, beginning 7 days after initiation of treatment and maintained for several weeks following treatment. The proportion of subjects with a hemoglobin increase ≥1.0 g/dL increased in a dose-dependent manner to 83.3% of subjects in the highest dose group, 0.25 mg/kg. ACE-536 was well tolerated and resulted in sustained increases in hemoglobin levels in healthy postmenopausal women.

  8. The sweeter side of ACE2: physiological evidence for a role in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bindom, Sharell M; Lazartigues, Eric

    2009-04-29

    Diabetes mellitus is a growing problem in all parts of the world. Both clinical trials and animal models of type I and type II diabetes have shown that hyperactivity of angiotensin-II (Ang-II) signaling pathways contribute to the development of diabetes and diabetic complications. Of clinical relevance, blockade of the renin-angiotensin system prevents new-onset diabetes and reduces the risk of diabetic complications. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2 is a recently discovered mono-carboxypeptidase and the first homolog of ACE. It is thought to inhibit Ang-II signaling cascades mostly by cleaving Ang-II to generate Ang-(1-7), which effects oppose Ang-II and are mediated by the Mas receptor. The enzyme is present in the kidney, liver, adipose tissue and pancreas. Its expression is elevated in the endocrine pancreas in diabetes and in the early phase during diabetic nephropathy. ACE2 is hypothesized to act in a compensatory manner in both diabetes and diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we have shown the presence of the Mas receptor in the mouse pancreas and observed a reduction in Mas receptor immuno-reactivity as well as higher fasting blood glucose levels in ACE2 knockout mice, indicating that these mice may be a new model to study the role of ACE2 in diabetes. In this review we will examine the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the physiopathology and treatment of diabetes and highlight the potential benefits of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis, focusing on recent data about ACE2.

  9. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  10. Association of Increased Serum ACE Activity with Logical Memory Ability in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sai; Han, Jing; Huang, Rong; Xia, Wenqing; Sun, Jie; Cai, Rongrong; Dong, Xue; Shen, Yanjue; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is involved in the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease. This study aimed to assess the pathogenetic roles of ACE and the genetic predisposition of its insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among T2DM patients. Methods: A total of 210 T2DM patients were enrolled. Among these patients, 116 satisfied the MCI diagnostic criteria and 94 exhibited healthy cognition. The cognitive functions of the patients were extensively assessed. The serum level and activity of ACE were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and ultraviolet spectrophotography. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms of I/D gene of ACE were analyzed. Results: The serum level and activity of ACE in diabetic MCI patients (p = 0.022 and p = 0.008, respectively) were both significantly higher than those in the healthy controls. A significant negative correlation was found between their ACE activity and logical memory test score (LMT) (p = 0.002). Multiple stepwise regression iterated the negative correlation between ACE activity and LMT score (p = 0.035). Although no significant difference was found in the genotype or allele distribution of ACE I/D polymorphism between the groups, the serum levels and activity of ACE were higher in the DD group than in the ID and II groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Serum ACE activity could better predict logical memory in T2DM patients than ACE level. Further investigations on a large population size are necessary to test whether the D-allele of the ACE gene polymorphism is susceptible to memory deterioration.

  11. Association of Increased Serum ACE Activity with Logical Memory Ability in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Sai; Han, Jing; Huang, Rong; Xia, Wenqing; Sun, Jie; Cai, Rongrong; Dong, Xue; Shen, Yanjue; Wang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is involved in the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease. This study aimed to assess the pathogenetic roles of ACE and the genetic predisposition of its insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among T2DM patients. Methods: A total of 210 T2DM patients were enrolled. Among these patients, 116 satisfied the MCI diagnostic criteria and 94 exhibited healthy cognition. The cognitive functions of the patients were extensively assessed. The serum level and activity of ACE were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and ultraviolet spectrophotography. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms of I/D gene of ACE were analyzed. Results: The serum level and activity of ACE in diabetic MCI patients (p = 0.022 and p = 0.008, respectively) were both significantly higher than those in the healthy controls. A significant negative correlation was found between their ACE activity and logical memory test score (LMT) (p = 0.002). Multiple stepwise regression iterated the negative correlation between ACE activity and LMT score (p = 0.035). Although no significant difference was found in the genotype or allele distribution of ACE I/D polymorphism between the groups, the serum levels and activity of ACE were higher in the DD group than in the ID and II groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Serum ACE activity could better predict logical memory in T2DM patients than ACE level. Further investigations on a large population size are necessary to test whether the D-allele of the ACE gene polymorphism is susceptible to memory deterioration. PMID:28066203

  12. Hemopressin: a novel bioactive peptide derived from the alpha1-chain of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Dale, Camila Squarzoni; Pagano, Rosana de Lima; Rioli, Vanessa

    2005-03-01

    Hemopressin (PVNFKFLSH), a novel bioactive peptide derived from the alpha1-chain of hemoglobin, was originally isolated from rat brain homogenates. Hemopressin causes hypotension in anesthetized rats and is metabolized in vivo and in vitro by endopeptidase 24.15 (EP24.15), neurolysin (EP24.16), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Hemopressin also exerts an antinociceptive action in experimental inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by carrageenin or bradykinin via a mechanism that is independent of opioids. These findings suggest that this peptide may have important regulatory physiological actions in vivo.

  13. ACE2 Deficiency Worsens Epicardial Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Cardiac Dysfunction in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaibhav B.; Mori, Jun; McLean, Brent A.; Basu, Ratnadeep; Das, Subhash K.; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Parajuli, Nirmal; Penninger, Josef M.; Grant, Maria B.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. We studied the role of ACE2 in obesity-mediated cardiac dysfunction. ACE2 null (ACE2KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control diet and studied at 6 months of age. Loss of ACE2 resulted in decreased weight gain but increased glucose intolerance, epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) inflammation, and polarization of macrophages into a proinflammatory phenotype in response to HFD. Similarly, human EAT in patients with obesity and heart failure displayed a proinflammatory macrophage phenotype. Exacerbated EAT inflammation in ACE2KO-HFD mice was associated with decreased myocardial adiponectin, decreased phosphorylation of AMPK, increased cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, and myocardial insulin resistance, which worsened heart function. Ang 1-7 (24 µg/kg/h) administered to ACE2KO-HFD mice resulted in ameliorated EAT inflammation and reduced cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, resulting in normalization of heart failure. In conclusion, ACE2 plays a novel role in heart disease associated with obesity wherein ACE2 negatively regulates obesity-induced EAT inflammation and cardiac insulin resistance. PMID:26224885

  14. Polymorphisms of ACE2 gene are associated with essential hypertension and antihypertensive effects of Captopril in women.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Wang, Y; Sun, K; Zhang, W; Yang, X; Wang, S; Zhen, Y; Wang, J; Li, W; Han, Y; Liu, T; Wang, X; Chen, J; Wu, H; Hui, R

    2007-08-01

    ACE2 appears to counterbalance the vasopressor effect of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) in the reninangiotensin system. We hypothesized that ACE2 polymorphisms could confer a high risk of hypertension and have an impact on the antihypertensive response to ACE inhibitors. The hypothesis was tested in two casecontrol studies and a clinical trial of 3,408 untreated hypertensive patients randomized to Atenolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Captopril, or Nifedipine treatments for 4 weeks. ACE2 rs2106809 T allele was found to confer a 1.6-fold risk for hypertension in women (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.132.06), whereas when combined with the effect of the ACE DD genotype, the risk was 2.34-fold (95% CI, 1.754.85) in two independent samples. The adjusted diastolic blood pressure response to Captopril was 3.3 mm Hg lower in ACE2 T allele carriers than in CC genotype carriers (P=0.019) in women. We conclude that the ACE2 T allele confers a high risk for hypertension and reduced antihypertensive response to ACE inhibitors.

  15. Evolutionary origin of the structure and function of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone: insights from lampreys.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Daukss, Dana; Gazda, Kristen; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Kosugi, Takayoshi; Nozaki, Masumi; Sower, Stacia A; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Gonadotropin (GTH)-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that inhibits GTH secretion in mammals and birds by acting on gonadotropes and GnRH neurons within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnIH and its orthologs that have an LPXRFamide (X = L or Q) motif at the C terminus (LPXRFamide peptides) have been identified in representative species of gnathostomes. However, the identity of an LPXRFamide peptide had yet to be identified in agnathans, the most ancient lineage of vertebrates, leaving open the question of the evolutionary origin of GnIH and its ancestral function(s). In this study, we identified an LPXRFamide peptide gene encoding three peptides (LPXRFa-1a, LPXRFa-1b, and LPXRFa-2) from the brain of sea lamprey by synteny analysis and cDNA cloning, and the mature peptides by immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry. The expression of lamprey LPXRFamide peptide precursor mRNA was localized in the brain and gonad by RT-PCR and in the hypothalamus by in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry showed appositions of lamprey LPXRFamide peptide immunoreactive fibers in close proximity to GnRH-III neurons, suggesting that lamprey LPXRFamide peptides act on GnRH-III neurons. In addition, lamprey LPXRFa-2 stimulated the expression of lamprey GnRH-III protein in the hypothalamus and GTHβ mRNA expression in the pituitary. Synteny and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the LPXRFamide peptide gene diverged from a common ancestral gene likely through gene duplication in the basal vertebrates. These results suggest that one ancestral function of LPXRFamide peptides may be stimulatory compared with the inhibitory function seen in later-evolved vertebrates (birds and mammals).

  16. Bioactive proteins and peptides in foods.

    PubMed

    Walther, Barbara; Sieber, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Increasing amounts of data demonstrate a bioactive role of proteins and peptides above and beyond their nutritional impact. The focus of the investigations has mainly been on vitamin- and mineral-binding proteins, on antimicrobial, immunosuppressing/-modulatory proteins, and on proteins with enzyme inhibitory activity as well as on hormones and growth factors from different food proteins; most research has been performed on milk proteins. Because of their molecular size, intact absorption of proteins in the human gastrointestinal tract is limited. Therefore, most of the proteins with biological functions show physiological activity in the gastrointestinal tract by enhancing nutrient absorption, inhibiting enzymes, and modulating the immune system to defend against pathogens. Peptides are released during fermentation or digestion from food proteins by proteolytic enzymes; such peptides have been found mainly in milk. Some of these released peptides exert biological activities such as opiate-like, antihypertensive, mineral-binding, antioxidative, antimicrobial, immuno-, and cytomodulating activity. Intact absorption of these smaller peptides is more likely than that of the larger proteins. Consequently, other organs than the gastrointestinal tract are possible targets for their biological functions. Bioactive proteins as well as bioactive peptides are part of a balanced diet. It is possible to accumulate bioactive peptides in food, for example by using specific microorganisms in fermented dairy products. Although bioactive peptides have been the subject of several studies in vitro and in vivo, their health potential is still under investigation. Up to now, the Commission of European Communities has not (yet) authorized any health claims for bioactive proteins and peptides from food.

  17. High resolution critical habitat mapping and classification of tidal freshwater wetlands in the ACE Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Melissa Anne

    In collaboration with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve (ACE Basin NERR), the tidal freshwater ecosystems along the South Edisto River in the ACE Basin are being accurately mapped and classified using a LIDAR-Remote Sensing Fusion technique that integrates LAS LIDAR data into texture images and then merges the elevation textures and multispectral imagery for very high resolution mapping. This project discusses the development and refinement of an ArcGIS Toolbox capable of automating protocols and procedures for marsh delineation and microhabitat identification. The result is a high resolution habitat and land use map used for the identification of threatened habitat. Tidal freshwater wetlands are also a critical habitat for colonial wading birds and an accurate assessment of community diversity and acreage of this habitat type in the ACE Basin will support SCDNR's conservation and protection efforts. The maps developed by this study will be used to better monitor the freshwater/saltwater interface and establish a baseline for an ACE NERR monitoring program to track the rates and extent of alterations due to projected environmental stressors. Preliminary ground-truthing in the field will provide information about the accuracy of the mapping tool.

  18. Determination of association constants between steroid compounds and albumins by partial-filling ACE.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Lotta K; Sirén, Heli

    2007-10-01

    ACE is a popular technique for evaluating association constants between drugs and proteins. However, ACE has not previously been applied to study the association between electrically neutral biomolecules and plasma proteins. We studied the affinity between human and bovine serum albumins (HSA and BSA, respectively) and three neutral endogenous steroid hormones (testosterone, epitestosterone and androstenedione) and two synthetic analogues (methyltestosterone and fluoxymesterone) by applying the partial-filling technique in ACE (PF-ACE). From the endocrinological point of view, the distribution of endogenous steroids among plasma components is of great interest. Strong interactions with albumins suppress the biological activity of steroids. Notable differences in the association constants were observed. In the case of the endogenous steroids, the interactions between testosterone and the albumins were strongest, and those between androstenedione and the albumins were substantially weaker. The association constants, K(b), for testosterone, epitestosterone and androstenedione and HSA at 37 degrees C were 32 100 +/- 3600, 21 600 +/- 1500 and 13 300 +/- 1300 M(-1), respectively, while the corresponding values for the steroids and BSA were 18 800 +/- 1500, 14 000 +/- 400 and 7800 +/- 900 M(-1). Methyltestosterone was bound even more strongly than testosterone, while fluoxymesterone was only weakly bound by the albumins. Finally, the steroids were separated by PF-ACE with HSA and BSA used as resolving components.

  19. ACE Reduces Metabolic Abnormalities in a High-Fat Diet Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Son, Chang-Gue; Im, Hwi-Jin; Jo, Hyun-Kyung; Yoo, Ho-Ryong; Kim, Yoon-Sik; Seol, In-Chan

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plants Artemisia iwayomogi (A. iwayomogi) and Curcuma longa (C. longa) radix have been used to treat metabolic abnormalities in traditional Korean medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TKM and TCM). In this study we evaluated the effect of the water extract of a mixture of A. iwayomogi and C. longa (ACE) on high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a mouse model. Four groups of C57BL/6N male mice (except for the naive group) were fed a high-fat diet freely for 10 weeks. Among these, three groups (except the control group) were administered a high-fat diet supplemented with ACE (100 or 200 mg/kg) or curcumin (50 mg/kg). Body weight, accumulation of adipose tissues in abdomen and size of adipocytes, serum lipid profiles, hepatic steatosis, and oxidative stress markers were analyzed. ACE significantly reduced the body and peritoneal adipose tissue weights, serum lipid profiles (total cholesterol and triglycerides), glucose levels, hepatic lipid accumulation, and oxidative stress markers. ACE normalized lipid synthesis-associated gene expressions (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ; fatty acid synthase, FAS; sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor-1c, SREBP-1c; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα). The results from this study suggest that ACE has the pharmaceutical potential reducing the metabolic abnormalities in an animal model. PMID:26508977

  20. Individual and combined influence of ACE and ACTN3 genes on muscle phenotypes in Polish athletes.

    PubMed

    Orysiak, Joanna; Mazur-Różycka, Joanna; Busko, Krzysztof; Gajewski, Jan; Szczepanska, Beata; Malczewska-Lenczowska, Jadwiga

    2017-02-08

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between ACE and ACTN3 genes, independently or in combination, and muscle strength and power in male and female athletes. The study involved 398 young male (n=266) and female (n=132) athletes representing various sport disciplines (ice hockey, canoeing, swimming, volleyball). All were Caucasians. The following measurements were taken: height of jump and mechanical power in countermovement jump (CMJ) and spike jump (SPJ), and muscle strength of 10 muscle groups (flexors and extensors of the elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and trunk). The ID polymorphism of ACE and the R577X polymorphism of ACTN3 were typed using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism), respectively. The genotype distribution of the ACE and ACTN3 genes did not differ significantly between groups of athletes for either sex. There was no association between ACE and ACTN3 genotypes (alone or in combination) and sum of muscle strength, height of jump or mechanical power in both jump tests (CMJ and SPJ) for male and female athletes. These findings do not support an influential role of the ACE and ACTN3 genes in determining power/strength performance of elite athletes.

  1. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Secreted Hookworm Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) that Interacts with the Human MIF Receptor CD74

    SciTech Connect

    Cho,Y.; Jones, B.; Vermeire, J.; Leng, L.; DiFedele, L.; Harrison, L.; Xiong, H.; Kwong, Y.; Chen, Y.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Hookworms, parasitic nematodes that infect nearly one billion people worldwide, are a major cause of anemia and malnutrition. We hypothesize that hookworms actively manipulate the host immune response through the production of specific molecules designed to facilitate infection by larval stages and adult worm survival within the intestine. A full-length cDNA encoding a secreted orthologue of the human cytokine, Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) has been cloned from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum. Elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structure of recombinant AceMIF (rAceMIF) revealed an overall structural homology with significant differences in the tautomerase sites of the human and hookworm proteins. The relative bioactivities of human and hookworm MIF proteins were compared using in vitro assays of tautomerase activity, macrophage migration, and binding to MIF receptor CD74. The activity of rAceMIF was not inhibited by the ligand ISO-1, which was previously determined to be an inhibitor of the catalytic site of human MIF. These data define unique immunological, structural, and functional characteristics of AceMIF, thereby establishing the potential for selectively inhibiting the hookworm cytokine as a means of reducing parasite survival and disease pathogenesis.

  2. Phage displayed peptide recognizing porcine aminopeptidase N is a potent small molecule inhibitor of PEDV entry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three phage-displayed peptides designated H, S and F that recognize porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN), the cellular receptor of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were able to inhibit cell infection by TGEV. These same peptides had no inhibitory effects on infection of Vero cells by po...

  3. Peptide Inhibitors of the amyloidogenesis of IAPP: verification of the hairpin-binding geometry hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sivanesam, Kalkena; Shu, Irene; Huggins, Kelly N L; Tatarek-Nossol, Marianna; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite; Andersen, Niels H

    2016-08-01

    Versions of a previously discovered β-hairpin peptide inhibitor of IAPP aggregation that are stabilized in that conformation, or even forced to remain in the hairpin conformation by a backbone cyclization constraint, display superior activity as inhibitors. The cyclized hairpin, cyclo-WW2, displays inhibitory activity at substoichiometric concentrations relative to this amyloidogenic peptide. The hairpin-binding hypothesis stands confirmed.

  4. Inhibitory Control Predicts Grammatical Ability

    PubMed Central

    Ibbotson, Paul; Kearvell-White, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that individual variation in grammatical ability can be predicted by individual variation in inhibitory control. We tested 81 5-year-olds using two classic tests from linguistics and psychology (Past Tense and the Stroop). Inhibitory control was a better predicator of grammatical ability than either vocabulary or age. Our explanation is that giving the correct response in both tests requires using a common cognitive capacity to inhibit unwanted competition. The implications are that understanding the developmental trajectory of language acquisition can benefit from integrating the developmental trajectory of non-linguistic faculties, such as executive control. PMID:26659926

  5. Comparative study on the mechanism of bradykinin potentiation induced by bradykinin-potentiating peptide 9a, enalaprilat and kinin-potentiating peptide.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M S; Schaffel, R; Assreuy, J

    1992-06-17

    The action of a kinin-potentiating peptide (KPP) obtained from tryptic digestion of human serum proteins was compared with that of bradykinin-potentiating peptide 9a (BPP9a; obtained from snake venom) and enalaprilat (a synthetic inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme; ACE) as a means of understanding the mechanism of action of KPP on smooth muscle. KPP potentiated bradykinin-induced contractile effects in guinea-pig ileum and rat uterus, but not the bradykinin-induced relaxation of pre-contracted ileum, whereas BPP9a and enalaprilat potentiated both bradykinin effects. The receptor mediating both the contraction and the relaxation elicited by bradykinin in the ileum was found to be of the B2 type. KPP retained its potentiating effect in the presence of enalaprilat in the guinea-pig ileum and rat uterus, whereas the potentiation evoked by BPP9a was abolished. Enalaprilat inhibited the activity of purified ACE, whereas KPP was completely devoid of such an effect. The potentiating effect of KPP, but not that of BPP9a or enalaprilat, was blocked by compounds that inhibit phospholipase A2 and lipoxygenase activity but not by inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase or phosphodiesterases. The results suggest that the potentiating effect of KPP (i) does not involve inhibition of ACE; (ii) is not due to an increased affinity of the receptor for bradykinin, and (iii) probably involves post-receptor events linked to phospholipase A2 and to the lipoxygenase pathway.

  6. The Metalloprotease Neprilysin Degrades and Inactivates Apelin Peptides.

    PubMed

    McKinnie, Shaun M K; Fischer, Conrad; Tran, Kelvin M H; Wang, Wang; Mosquera, Fabricio; Oudit, Gavin Y; Vederas, John C

    2016-08-17

    The apelinergic system is a mammalian peptide hormone network with key physiological roles. Apelin isoforms and analogues are believed to be promising therapeutics for cardiovascular disease. Despite extensive studies on apelin-13 degradation patterns, only one protease, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), had been implicated in its physiological regulation. Through use of a peptide-based fluorescent probe, we identified the metalloprotease neprilysin (NEP, a target for Entresto used in treatment of heart failure) as an enzyme that cleaves apelin isoforms. In vitro NEP proteolysis generated fragments that lacked the ability to bind to the apelin receptor, thereby making NEP the first protease to fully inactivate apelin. The involvement of NEP in the apelinergic system contributes to the understanding of its role in cardiovascular physiology.

  7. Role of Serratia marcescens ACE2 on diesel degradation and its influence on corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Babu, Thambidurai Ganesh; Pandian, Shunmugiah Thevar Karutha; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Palaniswamy, Narayanan; Rajendran, Annamalai

    2007-09-01

    A facultative anaerobic species Serratia marcescens ACE2 isolated from the corrosion products of diesel transporting pipeline in North West, India was identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The role of Serratia marcesens ACE2 on biodegradation of diesel and its influence on the corrosion of API 5LX steel has been elucidated. The degrading strain ACE2 is involved in the process of corrosion of steel API 5LX and also utilizes the diesel as an organic source. The quantitative biodegradation efficiency (BE) of diesel was 58%, calculated by gas-chromatography-mass spectrum analysis. On the basis of gas-chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), the involvement of Serratia marcescens on degradation and corrosion has been investigated. This basic study will be useful for the development of new approaches for detection, monitoring and control of microbial corrosion.

  8. Distribution of ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in Iranian populations

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE; OMIM: 106180) has an important role in the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II and degradation of bradykinin. Genetic polymorphism I/D (rs4646994) in the gene encoding ACE has been well defined. To get more insight into the genetic structure of Iranian populations, the distribution of the ACE I/D polymorphism among Iranians was compared with each other and with other populations. Prevalence of the D allele was 0.5886 (95% CI: 0.5725-0.6047) in Iran. There was significant difference between Iranian populations (x2=27.7, df=6, P<0.001). The major part of this difference was due to difference between Zahedan study and the other populations, as by removing this population, the heterogeneity between populations, remarkably decreased (x2=10.15, df=5, P=0.071). The D allele showed high frequency in Iran which is similar to Caucasians. PMID:27843997

  9. Serum ACE Level in Sarcoidosis Patients with Typical and Atypical HRCT Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Kahkouee, Shahram; Samadi, Katayoon; Alai, Ali; Abedini, Atefeh; Rezaiian, Lida

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease that affects multiple organs. Before widespread use of computed tomography (CT), the severity of sarcoidosis was assessed based on chest X-ray abnormalities. HRCT can distinguish between active inflammatory changes and irreversible fibrosis. In this study, we analyzed different ACE levels in 148 patients diagnosed with sarcoidosis. Material/Methods We categorized these patients based on their HRCT results into four groups: 1) patients diagnosed with chronic disease; 2) patients diagnosed with non-chronic disease; 3) patients who exhibited typical HRCT changes; and 4) patients who exhibited atypical HRCT changes. Afterward the mean ACE level of each group was calculated and compared. Result The HRCT scans of chronic sarcoidosis patients tended to show more atypical sarcoidosis patterns. Moreover, there was a reverse correlation between chronicity and ACE level (P-value <0.05). Conclusions HRCT is another modality which would be useful when the diagnosis of sarcoidosis is not definite. PMID:27733890

  10. Translating the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study into public policy: progress and possibility in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Kagi, Ruth; Regala, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    On June 15, 2011, Washington became the first state in the United States to enact legislation aimed at preventing adverse childhood experiences (ACE), reducing their prevalence, and mitigating their effects. House Bill 1965 (HB 1965) was established on the understanding among legislators and Washington communities of the need for policies aimed at preventing child abuse, promoting healthy development of children, and building community capacity to improve public health. Empirical examples of integrating ACE-related research with public policy and programmatic design are chronicled. The legislators who developed HB 1965 lay out questions that, if answered, would further improve policymakers' ability to craft public policy and programs that prevent ACE, reduce their effects, and promote a healthier, safer future.

  11. High incidence of ace-1 duplicated haplotypes in resistant Culex pipiens mosquitoes from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Alout, Haoues; Labbé, Pi