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Sample records for ace solar occultation

  1. First Measurements of the HCFC-142b Trend from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Solar Occultation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Boone,Chris; Bernath, Peter; Mahieu, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    The first measurement of the HCFC-142b (CH3CClF2) trend near the tropopause has been derived from volume mixing ratio (VMR) measurements at northern and southern hemisphere mid-latitudes for the 2004-2008 time period from spaceborne solar occultation observations recorded at 0.02/cm resolution with the ACE (atmospheric chemistry experiment) Fourier transform spectrometer. The HCFC-142b molecule is currently the third most abundant HCFC (hydrochlorofluorocarbon) in the atmosphere and ACE measurements over this time span show a continuous rise in its volume mixing ratio. Monthly average measurements at northern and southern hemisphere midlatitudes have similar increase rates that are consistent with surface trend measurements for a similar time span. A mean northern hemisphere profile for the time span shows a near constant VMR at 8-20km altitude range, consistent on average for the same time span with in situ results. The nearly constant vertical VMR profile also agrees with model predictions of a long lifetime in the lower atmosphere.

  2. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Retrievals from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Solar Occultation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment ACE satellite (SCISAT-1) was launched into an inclined orbit on 12 August 2003 and is now recording high signal-to-noise 0.02 per centimeter resolution solar absorption spectra covering 750-4400 per centimeter (2.3-13 micrometers). A procedure has been developed for retrieving average dry air CO2 mole fractions (X(sub CO2)) in the altitude range 7-10 kilometers from the SCISAT-1 spectra. Using the N2 continuum absorption in a window region near 2500 per centimeter, altitude shifts are applied to the tangent heights retrieved in version 2.2 SCISAT-1 processing, while cloudy or aerosol-impacted measurements are eliminated. Monthly-mean XCO2 covering 60 S to 60 N latitude for February 2004 to March 2008 has been analyzed with consistent trends inferred in both hemispheres. The ACE XCO2 time series have been compared with previously-reported surface network measurements, predictions based on upper tropospheric aircraft measurements, and space-based measurements. The retrieved X(sub CO2) from the ACE-FTS spectra are higher on average by a factor of 1.07 plus or minus 0.025 in the northern hemisphere and by a factor of 1.09 plus or minus 0.019 on average in the southern hemisphere compared to surface station measurements covering the same time span. The ACE derived trend is approximately 0.2% per year higher than measured at surface stations during the same observation period.

  3. Methane Cross-Validation Between Spaceborne Solar Occultation Observations from ACE-FTS, Spaceborne Nadir Sounding from Gosat, and Ground-Based Solar Absorption Measurements, at a High Arctic Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S. A.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing observations of methane profiles in the Canadian High Arctic. Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas on Earth, and second only to carbon dioxide in its contribution to anthropogenic global warming. Accurate and precise observations of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. The Arctic is a particular region of concern, as melting permafrost and disappearing sea ice might lead to accelerated release of methane into the atmosphere. Global observations require spaceborne instruments, in particular in the Arctic, where surface measurements are sparse and expensive to perform. Satellite-based remote sensing is an underconstrained problem, and specific validation under Arctic circumstances is required. Here, we show a cross-validation between two spaceborne instruments and ground-based measurements, all Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS). We consider the Canadian SCISAT ACE-FTS, a solar occultation spectrometer operating since 2004, and the Japanese GOSAT TANSO-FTS, a nadir-pointing FTS operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environmental and Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W) since 2006. Measurements are collocated considering temporal, spatial, and geophysical criteria and regridded to a common vertical grid. We perform smoothing on the higher-resolution instrument results to account for different vertical resolutions. Then, profiles of differences for each pair of instruments are examined. Any bias between instruments, or any accuracy that is worse than expected, needs to be understood prior to using the data. The results of the study will serve as a guideline on how to use the vertically resolved methane products from ACE and

  4. Stellar Occultation Studies of the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Earth-based observations of stellar occultations provide extremely high spatial resolution for bodies in the outer solar system, about 10,000 times better than that of traditional imaging observations. Stellar occultation data can be used to establish the structure of atmospheres and rings of solar system bodies at high spatial resolution. Airborne occultation observations are particularly effective, since the controlled mobility of the observing platform allows the observer to fly within the optimum part of the occultation shadow for most events that are visible from Earth. Airborne observations are carried out above any clouds and are nearly free of scintillation noise from the Earth's atmosphere. KAO occultation observations resulted in the first detection of gravity waves in the Martian atmosphere, discovery of the Uranian rings, the first detection of Pluto's atmosphere, the first Earth-based investigations of Triton's atmosphere, and the discovery of narrow jets from Chiron's nucleus. The first SOFIA occultation opportunity will be an investigation of Pluto's atmospheric structure in November, 2002, and will resolve a problem that has lingered since the KAO discovery observation fourteen years earlier. We plan to continue our successful airborne occultation program with the greatly enhanced capability provided by SOFIA. We propose here to replace our KAO occultation photometer with one having twice the throughput, half the noise, a somewhat wider wavelength range, four times the field of view, and ten times the frame rate to optimize its performance and to capitalize on the larger collecting area offered by SOFIA. It will also allow for simultaneous visible and IR occultation observations, greatly enriching the results that we can obtain from occultations. We call this new imaging occultation photometer HOPI (High-speed Occultation Photometer and Imager). HOPI will provide a signal-to-noise ratio two to four times that of our present photometer for a given

  5. Nh and CH in the Ace Satellite Solar Spectrumtitle of your Abstract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.; Ram, R. S.; Colin, R.

    2010-06-01

    The Canadian ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) mission has a high resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) in low earth orbit. The primary ACE mission goal is the study ozone chemistry in the stratosphere although it is making a wide range of other measurements, for example, of organic molecules in the troposphere. In the normal operating mode, the ACE-FTS measures a sequence of atmospheric absorption spectra during sunrise and sunset (``solar occultation''). As part of the measurement sequence about 16 high sun exoatmospheric spectra are recorded for each occultation to serve as reference spectra. We have co-added 224782 pure solar spectra to produce the ACE solar atlas in the 750--4400 cm-1 spectral region [Hase et al., JQSRT 111, 521 (2010), see http://www.ace.uwaterloo.ca/solaratlas.html]. The ACE solar spectrum displays prominent vibration-rotation bands of CO, OH, NH and CH, and pure rotational lines of OH and NH. An improved spectroscopic analysis for OH has already been published [Bernath and Colin, JMS 257, 20 (2009)] and we now report on similar work for NH and CH. The vibration-rotation spectra of NH have been reinvestigated using laboratory spectra and infrared solar spectra recorded from orbit by the ACE and ATMOS instruments. In addition to identifying the previously unobserved 6-5 vibration-rotation band in the laboratory spectra, many additional high N rotational lines have been observed. By combining the new observations with the previously published data and recent far infrared data, an improved set of molecular constants and term values have been derived for the NH X^3Σ^- and A^3Π states. Vibration-rotation spectra of the CH X^2Π ground state have also been re-analyzed based on laboratory spectra, the ACE solar spectrum and published data. The previously unobserved 5-4 band has been measured and the other four bands (1-0 to 4-3) have been extended to higher J values. TEXT OF YOUR ABSTRACT

  6. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University install solar array panels on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. The panel on which they are working is identical to the panel (one of four) seen in the foreground on the ACE spacecraft. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low- energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles for a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  7. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory Engineer Cliff Willey (kneeling) and Engineering Assistant Jim Hutcheson from Johns Hopkins University install solar array panels on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles for a better understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun. The collecting power of instrumentation aboard ACE is at least 100 times more sensitive than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  8. The solar array is installed on ACE in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Applied Physics Laboratory engineers and technicians from Johns Hopkins University assist in guiding the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) as it is hoisted over a platform for solar array installation in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II. Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The ACE observatory will contribute to the understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system as well as the astrophysical processes involved. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  9. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  10. Cosmic Ray Helium Intensities over the Solar Cycle from ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeNolfo, G. A.; Yanasak, N. E.; Binns, W. R.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink. P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Lave, K.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Ogliore, R.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenback, M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of cosmic-ray helium energy spectra provide important constraints on cosmic ray origin and propagation. However, helium intensities measured at Earth are affected by solar modulation, especially below several GeV/nucleon. Observations of helium intensities over a solar cycle are important for understanding how solar modulation affects galactic cosmic ray intensities and for separating the contributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays. The Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on ACE has been measuring cosmic ray isotopes, including helium, since 1997 with high statistical precision. We present helium elemental intensities between approx. 10 to approx. 100 MeV/nucleon from the Solar Isotope Spectrometer (SIS) and CRIS observations over a solar cycle and compare these results with the observations from other satellite and balloon-borne instruments, and with GCR transport and solar modulation models.

  11. The Solar Package on ISS: SOL-ACES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienhold, F. G.; Anders, J.; Galuska, B.; Klocke, U.; Knothe, M.; Neske, E.; Riedel, W. J.; Schmidtke, G.; Singler, R.; Ulmer, U.; Wolf, H.

    The "solar package" comprises the experiments SOLSPEC (UV/Vis to IR spectral range), SOVIM (total solar radiation) and SOL-ACES to be installed on a Coarse Pointing Device (CPD) of the International Space Station for a 1.5 year mission launched in 2003. The CPD allows for measuring periods of at least fifteen minutes per orbit totaling approximately 600 hours per year of solar observations. The Solar Auto Calibrating EUV/UV Spectrometers (SOL-ACES) are currently developed to measure the solar radiation (full disk) in the 17 nm to 220 nm spectral range with four grazing-incidence grating spectrometers. To obtain high radiometric accuracy of better than 10 %, a double ionization chamber is assigned to each of the spectrometers as a primary detector standard. Optical bandpass filters are mounted on a filter wheel to be placed at the entrance apertures of the spectrometers and ionization chambers and thereby will establish the radiometric link between these devices. The spectrometers are designed as scanning monochromators operating at fixed incidence angles. The deflected radiation is monitored by rotating an assembly containing a parabolic mirror, an exit slit and a channel electron multiplier around the grating center. The optical length of the ionization chamber of 0.5 m is divided into two identical electrode sections. In addition, the transmitted radiation is measured by a silicon diode detector located at the end of the absorption path. Detector and electrode signals are recorded as a function of the gas pressure in the chamber, which is increased from zero to a few hectopascal during a single measurement. These data permit the absolute quantification of the radiant solar flux in the wavelength interval transmitted by the bandpass filter and the correction for secondary effects, such as ionization caused by photoelectrons. With these measurements the spectrometer efficiencies at the filter bandpass wavelengths can be recalibrated as required during the mission.

  12. Digital solar edge tracker for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E., III; Moore, A. S.; Stump, C. W.; Mayo, L. S.

    1987-01-01

    The optical and electronic design of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (Haloe) elevation sun sensor is described. The Haloe instrument is a gas-correlation radiometer now being developed at NASA Langley for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The system uses a Galilean telescope to form a solar image on a linear silicon photodiode array. The array is a self-scanned monolithic CCD. The addresses of both solar edges imaged on the array are used by the control/pointing system to scan the Haloe science instantaneous field of view (IFOV) across the vertical solar diameter during instrument calibration and then to maintain the science IFOV 4 arcmin below the top edge during the science data occultation event. Vertical resolution of 16 arcsec and a radiometric dynamic range of 100 are achieved at the 700-nm operating wavelength. The design provides for loss of individual photodiode elements without loss of angular tracking capability.

  13. The Potential for Solar Occultation Studies of the Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, L.; Drummond, J. R.; Walker, K. A.; Bernath, P.; Giroux, J.; Moreaux, L.

    2008-12-01

    Solar occultation infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy has been successfully applied to the study of the composition of the Earth's atmosphere by many instruments including the free-flying Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the shuttle-based Atmospheric Trace MOlecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS). However, looking beyond the Earth it is possible, with surprisingly few instrumental changes, to consider probing the atmosphere of other planets such as Mars. Elucidation of the present composition and isotopic nature of the atmosphere of Mars is relevant to studies of the planet, past and present; to the landing of future missions through better understanding of the atmosphere that these landers must pass through; and to the question of the presence of life on the planet, either now or at some time in the past. This paper will discuss the instrument and mission requirements as well as the science goals for an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer for investigating the atmospheric composition of Mars.

  14. Extension of the ACE solar panels is tested in SAEF-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the solar panels is tested on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II (SAEF-II). Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  15. Titan's haze as seen by VIMS during solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Ken; Xu, Fang; West, Robert; Brown, Robert; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger; Micholson, Phil

    2016-06-01

    This study describe solar occultation observations of Titan's atmosphere by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. These observations include two recent observations made in the last few months. The solar occultation observations have been made at different latitudes and seasons, which allows us to investigate the variability of the density profile of aerosols. We present the line curves in the different atmospheric windows, and the data processing and the inversion method to retrieve vertical density profile. This unique data set provides information on Titan's opacity in the atmospheric windows, which is important to retrieve the surface properties. It also provides information on the cross-subsection of the aerosols as a function of wavelength in the wavelength range 1 to 5 micron.

  16. The 1973 solar occultation of the Crab Nebula pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisberg, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The mean electron density of the solar corona was determined by measuring the dispersion of radiofrequency pulses from pulsar NP 0532 during the June 1973 solar occultation. Trends continued which were noticed in 1971 as solar activity declined. Model fitting results suggest that the corona continued to become even more concentrated toward the equator in 1973 than in 1971. The number density of electrons in most regions decreased. The best model of the distribution of corona electrons is suggested to be one with zero density at the poles. K-corona isophotes and contours of equal path-integrated density are presented for several models. Electron density versus date and position in the corona are tabulated. It is seen that there is no simple relationship between the onset of major solar activity and density or scattering enhancements.

  17. A Solar Electron Burst Spanning a Stream Interface: ACE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.; McComas, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Where coronal hole fast wind runs into slow wind ahead, a compression region forms. The boundary between the compressed slow and fast wind is referred to as the stream interface (SI). Ideally, if the coronal source regions of slow and fast wind are distinct and stationary, and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) foot point locations are fixed, the SI is a discontinuous plasma boundary for both solar wind ions and 100eV-1keV suprathermal electrons which stream out from the sun through the ions along the IMF. In the ideal case, IMF lines do not cross the SI. However, field line crossing of the SI may result from IMF foot point motion during the time required for solar wind ions to travel from the sun to 1 AU. On January 29, 2005 ACE encountered a stream interface within a CIR at the leading edge of a coronal hole fast stream. A solar electron burst was observed from 11-15 UT at 0.5-1.3 keV energies. The burst was observed across the SI, indicating magnetic connection to the electron burst source region on both sides of the SI. This could indicate that the electron burst source region spanned a coronal hole boundary. A more likely alternative is that field lines on opposite sides of the SI at 1 AU were no longer connected to different sides of a coronal hole boundary. Instead, footpoint motion occurred during solar wind ion transit to 1 AU, so that field lines on both sides of the SI were connected to a single coronal electron burst source region.

  18. Cassini-VIMS at Jupiter: Solar occultation measurements using Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Bellucci, G.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report unusual and somewhat unexpected observations of the jovian satellite Io, showing strong methane absorption bands. These observations were made by the Cassini VIMS experiment during the Jupiter flyby of December/January 2000/2001. The explanation is straightforward: Entering or exiting from Jupiter's shadow during an eclipse, Io is illuminated by solar light which has transited the atmosphere of Jupiter. This light, therefore becomes imprinted with the spectral signature of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, which includes strong atmospheric methane absorption bands. Intercepting solar light refracted by the jovian atmosphere, Io essentially becomes a "miffor" for solar occultation events of Jupiter. The thickness of the layer where refracted solar light is observed is so large (more than 3000 km at Io's orbit), that we can foresee a nearly continuous multi-year period of similar events at Saturn, utilizing the large and bright ring system. During Cassini's 4-year nominal mission, this probing tecnique should reveal information of Saturn's atmosphere over a large range of southern latitudes and times. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Case studies of the impact of orbital sampling on stratospheric trend detection and derivation of tropical vertical velocities: solar occultation vs. limb emission sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, Luis F.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.; Neu, Jessica L.; Manney, Gloria L.; Fuller, Ryan A.

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the representativeness of two types of orbital sampling applied to stratospheric temperature and trace gas fields. Model fields are sampled using real sampling patterns from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). The MLS sampling acts as a proxy for a dense uniform sampling pattern typical of limb emission sounders, while HALOE and ACE-FTS represent coarse nonuniform sampling patterns characteristic of solar occultation instruments. First, this study revisits the impact of sampling patterns in terms of the sampling bias, as previous studies have done. Then, it quantifies the impact of different sampling patterns on the estimation of trends and their associated detectability. In general, we find that coarse nonuniform sampling patterns may introduce non-negligible errors in the inferred magnitude of temperature and trace gas trends and necessitate considerably longer records for their definitive detection. Lastly, we explore the impact of these sampling patterns on tropical vertical velocities derived from stratospheric water vapor measurements. We find that coarse nonuniform sampling may lead to a biased depiction of the tropical vertical velocities and, hence, to a biased estimation of the impact of the mechanisms that modulate these velocities. These case studies suggest that dense uniform sampling such as that available from limb emission sounders provides much greater fidelity in detecting signals of stratospheric change (for example, fingerprints of greenhouse gas warming and stratospheric ozone recovery) than coarse nonuniform sampling such as that of solar occultation instruments.

  20. HITRAN spectroscopy evaluation using solar occultation FTIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, Geoffrey C.; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Sung, Keeyoon; Rothman, Laurence S.; E. Gordon, Iouli

    2016-10-01

    High resolution FTIR solar occultation spectra, acquired by the JPL MkIV Fourier transform spectrometer from balloon, covering 650-5650 cm-1 at 0.01 cm-1 resolution, are systematically analyzed using the last four versions of the HITRAN linelist (2000, 2004, 2008, 2012). The rms spectral fitting residuals are used to assess the quality and adequacy of the linelists as a function of wavenumber and altitude. Although there have been substantial overall improvements with each successive version of HITRAN, there are nevertheless a few spectral regions where the latest HITRAN version (2012) has regressed, or produces residuals that far exceed the noise level. A few of these instances are investigated further and their causes identified. We emphasize that fitting atmospheric spectra, in addition to laboratory spectra, should be part of the quality assurance for any new linelist before public release.

  1. Lessons from Thirty Years of Solar Occultation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, L.; McCormick, M. P.; Zawodny, J. M.; Burton, S.

    Solar occultation measurements from space began with the launch of the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) aboard the Apollo Soyuz in 1975 and SAM II aboard Nimbus 7 in 1978. These instruments have been followed by a number of instrument using the solar occultation method including most notably the nearly 20-year mission of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) launched aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and continues to function to the present time. In this presentation, we will focus on the SAGE series of instruments including the recent SAGE III that has been in operation since 2002 and highlight some of the notable accomplishments of these missions. These include influential work in the describing the morphology of polar stratospheric cloud occurrences, ozone trends, and the effects of volcanic eruptions on stratospheric aerosol loading and its concomitant effect on chemistry and climate. We will also discuss evolutionary understanding of the handling of data from these instruments including developments that have lead to the recent series of releases of the SAGE II data set (6.0 through 6.2) and have provoked the need to reprocess archived data sets like SAM II and SAGE I. The new versions have been based on improved techniques for handling spacecraft ephemeris, more robust transmission algorithms, and learning how to deal with issues that arise when instruments far outlive their design lifetimes. We also discuss on going research that promises to significantly improve the current data sets including techniques to account for in-atmosphere changes of exo-atmospheric normalization data.

  2. Probing the Fundamental Physics of the Solar Corona with Lunar Solar Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, S. Rifai; Morgan, H.; Druckmüller, M.; Ding, A.; Cooper, J. F.; Daw, A.; Sittler, E. C.

    2013-07-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy of the solar corona, coupled with polarimetry, are the only tools available at present to capture signatures of physical processes responsible for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration within the first few solar radii above the solar limb. With the recent advent of improved detector technology and image processing techniques, broad-band white light and narrow-band multi-wavelength observations of coronal forbidden lines, made during total solar eclipses, have started to yield new views about the thermodynamic and magnetic properties of coronal structures. This paper outlines these unique capabilities, which until present, have been feasible primarily with observations during natural total solar eclipses. This work also draws attention to the exciting possibility of greatly increasing the frequency and duration of solar eclipse observations with Moon orbiting observatories utilizing lunar limb occultation of the solar disk for coronal measurements.

  3. SOLAR OCCULTATION BY TITAN MEASURED BY CASSINI/UVIS

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Benilan, Yves; Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Sandel, Bill R.; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; McClintock, William E.

    2013-04-01

    We present the first published analysis of a solar occultation by Titan's atmosphere measured by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on board Cassini. The data were measured during flyby T53 in 2009 April and correspond to latitudes between 21 Degree-Sign and 28 Degree-Sign south. The analysis utilizes the absorption of two solar emission lines (584 A and 630 A) in the ionization continuum of the N{sub 2} absorption cross section and solar emission lines around 1085 A where absorption is due to CH{sub 4}. The measured transmission at these wavelengths provides a direct estimate of the N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} column densities along the line of sight from the spacecraft to the Sun, which we inverted to obtain the number densities. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the data allowed us to retrieve density profiles in the altitude range 1120-1400 km for nitrogen and 850-1300 km for methane. We find an N{sub 2} scale height of {approx}76 km and a temperature of {approx}153 K. Our results are in general agreement with those from previous work, although there are some differences. Particularly, our profiles agree, considering uncertainties, with the density profiles derived from the Voyager 1 Ultraviolet Spectrograph data, and with in situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer with revised calibration.

  4. Retrieval of upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles from high resolution solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Park, J. H.; Namkung, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure-temperature profiles over the 18 to 75 km altitude range were retrieved from 0.01 cm(-1) resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the solar occultation mode during the Spacelab 3 shuttle mission (April 30 to May 1, 1985). The analysis method is described and preliminary results deduced for five occultation events are compared to correlative pressure-temperature measurments.

  5. James Webb Space Telescope Observations of Stellar Occultations by Solar System Bodies and Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos-Sanz, P.; French, R. G.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Stansberry, J.; Lin, Z-Y.; Zhang, Z-W.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, Th.; Ortiz, J. L.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Bosh, A.; Duffard, R.; Lellouch, E.; Tancredi, G.; Young, Leslie; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of Solar System bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun–Earth Lagrange point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a byproduct of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  6. [Stellar Occultation Studies of Small Bodies in the Outer Solar System: Accomplishments, Status, and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, James

    2005-01-01

    Bodies residing in the outer solar system exhibit unique physical processes, and some of the lessons learned from them can be applied to understanding what occurred in the outer solar system during its formation and early evolution. Pluto, the largest known Kuiper Belt object (KBO), and its near twin Triton--an ex-KBO that has been captured by Neptune--have nitrogen atmospheres that are in vapor-pressure equilibrium with surface ice. These atmospheres are most sensitively probed from Earth by the technique of Stellar occultations, which can provide the temperature and pressure profiles of these atmospheres at a spatial resolution of a few kilometers. Recent results from occultations show that the surface pressure of Triton's atmosphere has been increasing and that the shape of the atmosphere deviates from its expected spherical figure. With the occultation technique we can also learn the sizes of smaller bodies that have formed in the outer solar system: Charon, the Centaurs, and KBOs. Our proposed program involves identifying occultation candidates, predicting occultations, observing occultations, analysis of the data, and synthesis of the occultation results with other data. The main goals for our proposed work are to (i) further observe occultations by Triton with the objectives of understanding its pressure changes, distortion, and enigmatic thermal structure (ii) determine whether the abrupt drop in Pluto's stellar occultation light curve is caused by a sharp thermal gradient near its surface or by atmospheric haze, (iii) further observations to characterize the potential collapse of Pluto's atmosphere as it recedes from the sun (information that should be of interest to the Pluto-Kuiper Express), ( iv ) determine Charon's radius more accurately than can be done with the mutual events to derive a better estimate of Charon's density, and ( v ) directly determine the size (and albedo) of Centaurs with the goal of more accurately estimating the sizes of KBOS.

  7. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.

    2017-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), also called SCISAT, is a Canadian-led small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere. ACE was launched into a low Earth circular orbit by NASA on August 12, 2003 and it continues to function nominally. The ACE instruments are a high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2.2 to 13.3 μm (750-4400 cm-1), a spectrophotometer known as Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (MAESTRO) with wavelength coverage of 285-1020 nm and two filtered detector arrays to image the Sun at 0.525 and 1.02 μm. ACE operates in solar occultation mode to provide altitude profiles of temperature, pressure, atmospheric extinction and the volume mixing ratios (VMRs) for several dozen molecules and related isotopologues. This paper presents a mission overview and a summary of selected scientific results.

  8. Diffraction effects in a giant saw-toothed edge externally occulted solar coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verroi, E.; Frassetto, F.; Naletto, G.

    2008-07-01

    Typical diffraction and vignetting effects associated to the use of both externally and internally occulted coronagraphs make the innermost solar corona quite unobserved. However, by increasing the distance between the coronagraph telescope and the external occulter to hundred of meters, it is possible to observe the solar corona down to 1.01 solar radii without vignetting. This is the case of ASPIICS (Association de Satellites Pour l'Imagerie et l'Interférométrie Coronographique Solaire), a mission proposed to ESA for the PROBA3 program for formation flying. ASPIICS foresees two satellites: the external occulter is located on one spacecraft, and the telescope on the other. In this work we present the results obtained by a theoretical analysis of the apodization of the external occulter. This technique allows the reduction of the diffracted light contribution. We have developed a code that can simulates the effects of the giant external occulter (1 m diameter) on the photospheric light, and calculates the intensity of the diffracted light on the coronagraph entrance aperture. It is possible, in this way, to analyze various shapes of the occulter edge. In particular, we have focused our attention in the case of the serrated disc with variable number of teeth of different length. We considered the simple occurrence of a point-like monochromatic source at infinity. The results show that, employing a toothed disc, improvement of the S/N ratio of many order of magnitude (whit respect to a simple circular flat disc) can be obtained.

  9. Optimization of the occulter for the Solar Orbiter/METIS coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, Federico; Vivès, Sébastien; Romoli, Marco; Guillon, Christophe; Pancrazzi, Maurizio; Escolle, Clement; Focardi, Mauro; Antonucci, Ester; Fineschi, Silvano; Naletto, Giampiero; Nicolini, Gianalfredo; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Spadaro, Daniele

    2012-09-01

    METIS (Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy investigation), selected to fly aboard the Solar Orbiter ESA/NASA mission, is conceived to perform imaging (in visible, UV and EUV) and spectroscopy (in EUV) of the solar corona, by means of an integrated instrument suite located on a single optical bench and sharing the same aperture on the satellite heat shield. As every coronagraph, METIS is highly demanding in terms of stray light suppression. Coronagraphs history teaches that a particular attention must be dedicated to the occulter optimization. The METIS occulting system is of particular interest due to its innovative concept. In order to meet the strict thermal requirements of Solar Orbiter, METIS optical design has been optimized by moving the entrance pupil at the level of the external occulter on the S/C thermal shield, thus reducing the size of the external aperture. The scheme is based on an inverted external-occulter (IEO). The IEO consists of a circular aperture on the Solar Orbiter thermal shield. A spherical mirror rejects back the disk-light through the IEO. A breadboard of the occulting assembly (BOA) has been manufactured in order to perform stray light tests in front of two solar simulators (in Marseille, France and in Torino, Italy). A first measurement campaign has been carried on at the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. In this paper we describe the BOA design, the laboratory set-up and the preliminary results.

  10. Orbit dynamics and geographical coverage capabilities of satellite-based solar occultation experiments for global monitoring of stratospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Orbit dynamics of the solar occultation technique for satellite measurements of the Earth's atmosphere are described. A one-year mission is simulated and the orbit and mission design implications are discussed in detail. Geographical coverage capabilities are examined parametrically for a range of orbit conditions. The hypothetical mission is used to produce a simulated one-year data base of solar occultation measurements; each occultation event is assumed to produce a single number, or 'measurement' and some statistical properties of the data set are examined. A simple model is fitted to the data to demonstrate a procedure for examining global distributions of atmospheric constitutents with the solar occultation technique.

  11. Performance of the hybrid externally occulted Lyot solar coronagraph. Application to ASPIICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougeot, R.; Flamary, R.; Galano, D.; Aime, C.

    2017-02-01

    Context. High-contrast hybrid coronagraphs, which combine an external occulter and a Lyot-style coronagraph became a reality in recent years, despite the lack of analytic and numerical end-to-end performance studies. The solar coronagraph ASPIICS which will fly on the future ESA Formation Flying mission Proba-3 is a good example of such a hybrid coronograph. Aims: We aim to provide a numerical model to compute theoretical performance of the hybrid externally occulted Lyot-style coronagraph, which we then aim to compare to the performance of the classical Lyot coronagraph and the externally occulted solar coronagraph. We will provide the level and intensity distribution of the stray light, when the Sun is considered as an extended source. We also investigate the effect of different sizes for the internal occulter and Lyot stop. Methods: First, we have built on a recently published approach, to express the diffracted wave front from Fresnel diffraction produced by an external occulter at the entrance aperture of the coronagraph. Second, we computed the coherent propagation of the wave front coming from a given point of the Sun through the instrument. This is performed in three steps: from the aperture to the image of the external occulter, where the internal occulter is set, from this plane to the image of the entrance aperture, where the Lyot stop is set, and from there to the final image plane. Making use of the axis-symmetry, we considered wave fronts originating from one radius of the Sun and we circularly average the intensities. Our numerical computation used the parameters of ASPIICS. Results: The hybrid externally occulted Lyot coronagraph rejects sunlight below 10-8B⊙ from 1.3 R⊙ - in the particular configuration of ASPIICS. The Lyot coronagraph effectively complements the external occultation. We show that reducing the Lyot stop allows a clear gain in rejection, being even better than oversizing the internal occulter, that tends to exclude observations

  12. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  13. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): MLT Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, Peter

    2010-05-01

    ACE (also known as SCISAT) is making a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of numerous trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The primary instrument is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-1). ACE was launched by NASA on 12 August 2003 for a nominal 2-year mission; after 6 years on orbit the ACE-FTS performance is still excellent. The first results of ACE have been presented in a special issue of Geophysics Research Letters (http://www.agu.org/journals/ss/ACECHEM1/) in 2005 and recently a special issue on ACE validation has been prepared for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/special_issue114.html) by K. Walker and K. Strong; more information can be found at http://www.ace.uwaterloo.ca. The ACE mission goals were initially focussed mainly on polar ozone chemistry, and more recently have shifted more to the troposphere where organic pollutants such as methanol and formaldehyde have been detected. ACE makes limb observations from about 5 km (cloud free scenes) up to nearly 150 km in the lower thermosphere, where CO2 absorption is still weakly detectable. This talk will review ACE-FTS results in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Topics covered will include the mesospheric descent of NOx in the polar winter, spectra of polar mesospheric clouds, concentration profiles of CO2 (which do not match model predictions), and combined Odin-Osiris/ACE-FTS observations.

  14. Badhwar-O'Neil 2007 Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model Using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Measurements for Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite measurements of the galactic cosmic ray flux and correlation with the Climax Neutron Monitor count over Solar Cycle 23 are used to update the Badhwar O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model.

  15. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2014-07-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s{sup –1}, we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s{sup –1}, Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  16. Technical Note: A Time-Dependent I(sub 0) Correction for Solar Occultation Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Solar occultation has proven to be a reliable technique for the measurement of atmospheric constituents in the stratosphere. NASA's Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE, SAGE II, and SAGE III) together have provided over 25 years of quality solar occultation data, a data record which has been an important resource for the scientific exploration of atmospheric composition and climate change. Herein, we describe an improvement to the processing of SAGE data that corrects for a previously uncorrected short-term timedependence in the calibration function. The variability relates to the apparent rotation of the scanning track with respect to the face of the sun due to the motion of the satellite. Correcting for this effect results in a decrease in the measurement noise in the Level 1 line-of-sight optical depth measurements of approximately 40% in the middle and upper stratospheric SAGE II and III where it has been applied. The technique is potentially useful for any scanning solar occultation instrument, and suggests further improvement for future occultation measurements if a full disk imaging system can be included.

  17. Intercalibration and Cross-Correlation of Ace and Wind Solar Wind Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This report covers activities funded from October 1, 1998 through September 30, 2002. Two yearly status reports have been filed on this grant, and they are included as Appendix 1. The purpose of this grant was to compare ACE and Wind solar wind parameters when the two spacecraft were near to one another and then to use the intercalibrated parameters to carry out scientific investigations. In September, 2001 a request for a one-year, no-cost extension until September 30, 2002 was submitted and approved. The statement of work for that extension included adjustment of ACE densities below wind speeds of 350 km/s, a study of shock normal orientations using travel time delays between the two spacecraft, comparison of density jumps at shocks, and a study of temperature anisotropies and double streaming to see if such features evolved between the spacecraft.

  18. Application of a silicon photodiode array for solar edge tracking in the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E., III; Moore, A. S.; Stump, C. S.; Mayo, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    The optical and electronic design of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) elevation sunsensor is described. This system uses a Galilean telescope to form a solar image on a linear silicon photodiode array. The array is a self-scanned, monolithic charge coupled device. The addresses of both solar edges imaged on the array are used by the control/pointing system to scan the HALOE science instantaneous-field-of-view (IFOV) across the vertical solar diameter during instrument calibration, and then maintain the science IFOV four arcmin below the top edge during the science data occultation event. Vertical resolution of 16 arcsec and a radiometric dynamic range of 100 are achieved at the 0.7 micrometer operating wavelength. The design provides for loss of individual photodiode elements without loss of angular tracking capability. The HALOE instrument is a gas correlation radiometer that is now being developed by NASA Langley Research Center for the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite.

  19. New Estimates of Inferred Ionic Charge States for Solar Energetic Particle Events with ACE and STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrador, A. W.; Sollitt, L. S.; Cohen, C. M.; Cummings, A. C.; Leske, R. A.; Mason, G. M.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) mean ionic charge states can depend on source temperatures and populations (e.g. seed populations) and conditions during acceleration and transport such as stripping. Multi-spacecraft observations of charge states from widely separated spacecraft may reveal evidence for seed populations that vary with longitude. In this presentation, we report new estimates of inferred high energy ionic charge states using the Sollitt et al. (2008) method that fits SEP energy-dependent decay times for SEP event elements to derive mean charge states. In the method, intensity decay times during SEP events are fitted for each element for various energies, and then the energy dependence of the decay times is fitted for each element. Finally, charge-to-mass ratios relative to that of a calibration element (carbon in this case) are obtained, and when Q(C)=5.9 is assumed for calibration, mean charge states for other elements can be inferred. Previously, ACE/SIS and ACE/ULEIS data were applied to three SEP events (Nov. 6, 1997; Nov. 4, 2001; Apr. 21, 2002) with this method, and last year, we reported new results for the Dec. 6, 2006 SEP event compatible with SAMPEX/MAST results. Additional work continues to generalize and extend the software to use publicly available online data from ACE and the two STEREO spacecraft. Energy ranges are those covered by the instruments on ACE (e.g. reference element C at <.1 MeV/nuc from ULEIS to ~64 MeV/nuc from SIS) and on STEREO (e.g. C at 3.2 - 33 MeV/nuc from LET). Initial candidate SEP events for multi-spacecraft charge state estimates are those of Mar. 8, 2011, Mar. 21, 2011, Jan. 24, 2012, and Mar. 4, 2012. Results from events observed by single spacecraft may also be reported.

  20. On the use of Cherenkov Telescopes for outer Solar system body occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.

    2014-12-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) are arrays of very large optical telescopes that are well-suited for rapid photometry of bright sources. I investigate their potential in observing stellar occultations by small objects in the outer Solar system, Transjovian Objects (TJOs). These occultations cast diffraction patterns on the Earth. Current IACT arrays are capable of detecting objects smaller than 100 m in radius in the Kuiper Belt and 1 km radius out to 5000 au. The future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will have even greater capabilities. Because the arrays include several telescopes, they can potentially measure the speeds of TJOs without degeneracies, and the sizes of the TJOs and background stars. I estimate the achievable precision using a Fisher matrix analysis. With CTA, the precisions of these parameter estimations will be as good as a few per cent. I consider how often detectable occultations occur by members of different TJO populations, including Centaurs, Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), Oort Cloud objects, and satellites and Trojans of Uranus and Neptune. The great sensitivity of IACT arrays means that they likely detect KBO occultations once every O(10) hours when looking near the ecliptic. IACTs can also set useful limits on many other TJO populations.

  1. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for nadir and solar occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter E NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for nadir and solar occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C. R.; Rodriguez-Gomez, J.

    2013-09-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite was selected as part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 μm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations.

  2. Titan's Surface Composition from Cassini VIMS Solar Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, Thomas; Hayne, Paul; Sotin, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Titan's surface is obscured by a thick absorbing and scattering atmosphere, allowing direct observation of the surface within only a few spectral win-dows in the near-infrared, complicating efforts to identify and map geologi-cally important materials using remote sensing IR spectroscopy. We there-fore investigate the atmosphere's infrared transmission with direct measure-ments using Titan's occultation of the Sun as well as Titan's reflectance measured at differing illumination and observation angles observed by Cas-sini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). We use two im-portant spectral windows: the 2.7-2.8-mm "double window" and the broad 5-mm window. By estimating atmospheric attenuation within these windows, we seek an empirical correction factor that can be applied to VIMS meas-urements to estimate the true surface reflectance and map inferred composi-tional variations. Applying the empirical corrections, we correct the VIMS data for the viewing geometry-dependent atmospheric effects to derive the 5-µm reflectance and 2.8/2.7-µm reflectance ratio. We then compare the cor-rected reflectances to compounds proposed to exist on Titan's surface. We propose a simple correction to VIMS Titan data to account for atmospheric attenuation and diffuse scattering in the 5-mm and 2.7-2.8 mm windows, generally applicable for airmass < 3.0. We propose a simple correction to VIMS Titan data to account for atmospheric attenuation and diffuse scatter-ing in the 5-mm and 2.7-2.8 mm windows, generally applicable for airmass < 3.0. The narrow 2.75-mm absorption feature, dividing the window into two sub-windows, present in all on-planet measurements is not present in the occultation data, and its strength is reduced at the cloud tops, suggesting the responsible molecule is concentrated in the lower troposphere or on the sur-face. Our empirical correction to Titan's surface reflectance yields properties shifted closer to water ice for the majority of the low

  3. TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE FROM CASSINI/UVIS SOLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Bénilan, Yves; Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T.

    2015-12-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is composed mainly of molecular nitrogen, methane being the principal trace gas. From the analysis of 8 solar occultations measured by the Extreme Ultraviolet channel of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board Cassini, we derived vertical profiles of N{sub 2} in the range 1100–1600 km and vertical profiles of CH{sub 4} in the range 850–1300 km. The correction of instrument effects and observational effects applied to the data are described. We present CH{sub 4} mole fractions, and average temperatures for the upper atmosphere obtained from the N{sub 2} profiles. The occultations correspond to different times and locations, and an analysis of variability of density and temperature is presented. The temperatures were analyzed as a function of geographical and temporal variables, without finding a clear correlation with any of them, although a trend of decreasing temperature toward the north pole was observed. The globally averaged temperature obtained is (150 ± 1) K. We compared our results from solar occultations with those derived from other UVIS observations, as well as studies performed with other instruments. The observational data we present confirm the atmospheric variability previously observed, add new information to the global picture of Titan’s upper atmosphere composition, variability, and dynamics, and provide new constraints to photochemical models.

  4. Heliophysics from and of the Moon - the Solar Occultation Explorer (SOX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Daw, Adrian N.; Habal, Shadia R.; Sittler, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental processes of the inner corona of the Sun at 1.1 to 3 solar radii can occasionally be investigated in detail by ground-based solar eclipse observations at quasi-yearly intervals. The combination of portable ground-based telescopes and the distant occulting edge provided by the lunar limb allows imaging of coronal structure and ion excitation emission lines at the highest available spatial and spectral resolution. These observations are limited to the visible eastern and western coronal regions and cannot view the intervening region over the central disk in the hemisphere towards Earth. A comparable configuration for continuous coronal observations from a spacecraft, e.g. with an external occulter disk on a 100-meter boom, is conceivable and could generate 3-D data models of the corona via tomographic reconstruction from time series measurements but may not now be technically or economically feasible. The faster and cheaper approach would be to make high cadence eclipse observations from one or more small satellites in lunar orbit. The Solar Occultation Explorer (SOX) is suggested as an explorer-class NASA mission that would conduct eclipse observations at daily to hourly cadence depending on the orbit. This smallsat would carry two principal instrument suites: (1 ) spectroscopic imaging telescope with sub-nm resolution for selected coronal emission lines diagnostic of coronal plasma charge state, denSity, and temperature, and (2) in-situ field & particle instrument suite for measurements of the solar wind and local lunar environments. The most comparable flight heritage instrument, the LASCO C1 spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission, did achieve high visible-band spectral resolution with a Fabry-Perot interferometer but was limited in brightness sensitivity by usage of an internal occulter system and has not been operational since June 1998 The SOX mission concept is undergoing initial study by the Lunar Solar Origins

  5. Occultations of stars by solar system objects. V - A photographic search for occultations by selected asteroids in 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Franz, O. G.; Bowell, E.; Klemola, A.

    1984-01-01

    Photographic plates taken with the 0.5-m Carnegie double astrograph have been used to identify upcoming asteroid occultations not found in earlier star catalog searches. Twenty-six occultations involving the minor planets 1 Ceres, 10 Hygiea, 52 Europa, 65 Cybele, 451 Patientia, 511 Davida, and 704 Interamnia were found in this search. Of particular interest is the occultation of BD + 8 deg 471 by 1 Ceres on November 13, 1984, which is predicted to be observable throughout much of Mexico and, perhaps, in the southern United States.

  6. RECON - A new system for probing the outer solar system with stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, M. W.; Keller, J. M.; Wasserman, L. H.

    2015-10-01

    The Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network (RECON) is a new system for coordinated occultation observations of outer solar system objects. Occultations by objects in the outer solar system are more difficult to predict due to their large distance and limited duration of the astrometric data used to determine their orbits and positions. This project brings together the research and educational community into a unique citizen-science partnership to overcome the difficulties of observing these distant objects. The goal of the project is to get sizes and shapes for TNOs with diameters larger than 100 km. As a result of the system design it will also serve as a probe for binary systems with spatial separations too small to be resolved directly. Our system takes the new approach of setting up a large number of fixed observing stations and letting the shadows come to the network. The nominal spacing of the stations is 50 km. The spread of the network is roughly 2000 km along a roughly north-south line in the western United States. The network contains 56 stations that are committed to the project and we get additional ad hoc support from the International Occultation Timing Association. At our minimum size, two stations will record an event while the other stations will be probing for secondary events. Larger objects will get more chords and will allow determination of shape profiles. The stations are almost exclusively sited and associated with schools, usually at the 9-12 grade level. We have successfully completed our first TNO observation which is presented in the compainion paper by G. Rossi et al (this conference).

  7. Coating and surface finishing definition for the Solar Orbiter/METIS inverted external occulter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, Federico; Romoli, Marco; Vives, Sebastien; Baccani, Cristian; Escolle, Clement; Pancrazzi, Maurizio; Focardi, Mauro; Da Deppo, Vania; Moses, John D.; Fineschi, Silvano

    2014-07-01

    The METIS coronagraph aboard the Solar Orbiter mission will undergo extreme environmental conditions (e.g., a thermal excursion of about 350 degrees throughout the various mission phases), due to the peculiar spacecraft trajectory that will reach a perihelion of 0.28 AUs. METIS is characterized by an innovative design for the occultation system that allows to halve the thermal load inside the instrument while guaranteeing the stray light reduction that is required for a solar coronagraph. The Inverted External Occulter (IEO) concept revolutionizes the classical scheme, by exchanging the usual positions of the entrance aperture (that is now the outermost element of the instrument facing the Sun) with the actual occulter (that is a spherical mirror inside the coronagraph boom). The chosen material for the IEO manufacturing is Titanium, as a trade o_ between light weight, strength and low thermal expansion coefficient. A 2 years long test campaign has been run to define the IEO geometry, and its results are addressed in previous dedicated papers. This work describes the results of a further campaign aimed at defining the IEO surface and edge finishing, the support flange geometry and the Titanium coating. Various edge finishing were installed on a prototype of the instrument occulting system and their performance in stray light reduction were compared. The support flange geometry was designed in order to reduce the overall weight, to control the thermal load and to accentuate its stray light suppression performance. The coating is a particularly delicate issue. A black coating is necessary in order to assess the stray light issues, typically critical for visible coronagraphs. Black coating of Titanium is not a standard process, thus several space qualified black coatings were experimented on Titanium and characterized. The impact of the IEO coatings was evaluated, the reflectivity and the BRDFs were measured and are addressed in the paper.

  8. Stratospheric constituent measurements using UV solar occultation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, D. G.; Gillis, J.; Goldman, A.; Kosters, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The photochemistry of the stratospheric ozone layer was studied as the result of predictions that trace amounts of pollutants can significantly affect the layer. One of the key species in the determination of the effects of these pollutants is the OH radical. A balloon flight was made to determine whether data on atmospheric OH could be obtained from lower resolution solar spectra obtained from high altitude during sunset.

  9. ACE-FTS Observation of a Young Biomass Burning Plume: First Reported Measurements of C2H4, C3H6O, H2CO and PAN by Infrared Occultation from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coheur, Pierre-Francois; Herbin, Herve; Clerbaux, Cathy; Hurtmans, Daniel; Wespes, Catherine; Carleer, Michel; Turquety, Solene; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Remedios, John; Hauglustaine, Didier; Boone, Chris D.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    In the course of our study of the upper tropospheric composition with the infrared 35 Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE FTS), we 36 found an occultation sequence that on 8 October 2005, sampled a remarkable plume near the 37 east coast of Tanzania. Model simulations of the CO distribution in the Southern hemisphere 38 are performed for this period and they demonstrate that the emissions for this event originated 39 from a nearby forest fire, after which the plume was transported from the source region to the 40 upper troposphere. Taking advantage of the very high signal-to-noise ratio of the ACE FTS 41 spectra over a wide wavenumber range (750-4400 cm(exp -1), we present in-depth analyses of the 42 chemical composition of this plume in the middle and upper troposphere, focusing on the 43 measurements of weakly absorbing pollutants. For this specific biomass burning event, we 44 report simultaneous observations of an unprecedented number of organic species. 45 Measurements of C2H4 (ethene), C3H4 (propyne), H2CO (formaldehyde), C3H6O (acetone) 46 and CH3COO2NO2 (perxoxyacetylnitrate, abbreviated as PAN) are the first reported 47 detections using infrared occultation spectroscopy from satellites. Based on the lifetime of the 48 emitted species, we discuss the photochemical age of the plume and also report, whenever 49 possible, the enhancement ratios relative to CO.

  10. The Composition and Structure of Enceladus' Plume from a Cassini UVIS Observation of a Solar Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Shemansky, D. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, I.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed an occultation of the sun by Enceladus’ water vapor plume on May 18, 2010. UVIS used its extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channel for this new observation, to detect absorptions in the wavelength range 55 to 110 nm. Molecular nitrogen and water vapor have absorptions in this range. The N2 b(3,0) line is at 97.2 nm, extinguishing the solar H Lyman gamma emission. Cassini’s Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) detected a species with an atomic mass of 28 amu, which could be CO, C2H4 or N2 [1, 2]. Definitive UVIS detection of N2 was important to clear up this ambiguity, and this was an important goal of the observation, as the presence or lack of N2 is key to models of the geochemistry in the interior [3, 4, 5]. UVIS did not detect N2 and we set an upper limit for the column density of 3 x 10^13 cm^-2. The absorption features in the spectrum are best fit by a water vapor column density of 0.9 x 10^16 cm^-2. This column density is in family with previous UVIS measurements from stellar occultations in 2005 and 2007 at far ultraviolet wavelengths, suggesting that Enceladus’ activity has been stable for the last 5 years [6, 7]. We used fluctuations in the signal to probe the structure of the gas jets again, as was analyzed in the 2007 occultation of zeta Orionis [7]. Gas jets are correlated to the dust jets detected by Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem [8]. The path of the sun cut through the jets horizontally at an altitude above the limb of ~15 km at the closest point. The resolution of the solar occultation is higher than the stellar occultation, and collimation of the gas jets observed in the solar occultation is greater than estimated in 2007. The observed collimation allows us to derive a mach number of ~4 for the ratio of the vertical velocity in the jet to the thermal velocity of the plume gas. The new opportunity afforded by this solar occultation is used to further model the structure and

  11. ACE/SWICS OBSERVATIONS OF HEAVY ION DROPOUTS WITHIN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Weberg, Micah J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Lepri, Susan T. E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

    2012-11-20

    We present the first in situ observations of heavy ion dropouts within the slow solar wind, observed for select elements ranging from helium to iron. For iron, these dropouts manifest themselves as depletions of the Fe/H ratio by factors up to {approx}25. The events often exhibit mass-dependent fractionation and are contained in slow, unsteady wind found within a few days from known stream interfaces. We propose that such dropouts are evidence of gravitational settling within large coronal loops, which later undergo interchange reconnection and become source regions of slow, unsteady wind. Previously, spectroscopic studies by Raymond et al. in 1997 (and later Feldman et al. in 1999) have yielded strong evidence for gravitational settling within these loops. However, their expected in situ signature plasma with heavy elements fractionated by mass was not observed prior to this study. Using data from the SWICS instrument on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we investigate the composition of the solar wind within these dropouts and explore long term trends over most of a solar cycle.

  12. Solar Occultation Constellation for Retrieving Aerosols and Trace Element Species (SOCRATES) Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Fish, C. S.; Gordley, L. L.; Fromm, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of SOCRATES is to quantify the critical role of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) in the climate system. The mission would provide, for the first time, the suite of measurements required to quantify stratosphere/troposphere exchange (STE) pathways and their contribution to UTLS composition, and to evaluate the radiative forcing implications of potential changes in STE pathways with climate change. The discrimination and quantification of STE pathways requires simultaneous measurement of several key trace gases and aerosols with high precision, accuracy, and vertical resolution. Furthermore, aerosol and clouds, often present in the UTLS, complicate the measurement of trace gases. The SOCRATES sensor is a 23-channel Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR), referred to as GLO (GFCR Limb solar Occultation), with heritage from HALOE on UARS, and SOFIE on AIM. GLO measures aerosol extinction from 0.45 to 3.88 μm, important radiatively active gases in the UTLS (H2O, O3, CH4, N2O), key tracers of STE (HCN, CO, HDO), gases important in stratospheric O3 chemistry (HCl and HF), and temperature from cloud top to 50 km at a vertical resolution of 1 km. Improved pointing knowledge will provide dramatically better retrieval precision in the UTLS, even in the presence of aerosols, than possible with HALOE. In addition, the GLO form factor is only a few percent of that of HALOE, and costs for a constellation of GLO sensors is within the cost cap of a NASA Venture mission. The SOCRATES mission concept is an 8-element constellation of autonomous CubeSats, each mated with a GLO sensor, deployed from a single launch vehicle. The SOCRATES/GLO approach reaps the advantages of solar occultation: high precision and accuracy; robust calibration; and high vertical resolution, while mitigating the sparse coverage of a single solar occultation sensor. We present the SOCRATES science case, and key elements of the SOCRATES mission and GLO instrument concepts.

  13. Solar Occultation Constellation for Retrieving Aerosols and Trace Element Species (SOCRATES): Proposed Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, L. L.; Bailey, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of SOCRATES is to resolve the critical but underexplored role of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) in climate change. The mission would provide the suite of measurements required to quantify UTLS transport pathways and their contribution to UTLS composition, and to evaluate the radiative forcing implications of changes in UTLS composition forced by expected changes in these pathways as the climate evolves. The discrimination and quantification of UTLS transport pathways requires simultaneous measurement of several key trace gases and aerosols with high precision, accuracy, and vertical resolution. Furthermore, aerosols and clouds, often present in the UTLS, complicate the measurement of trace gases. The SOCRATES sensor is a 23-channel Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR), referred to as GLO (GFCR Limb solar Occultation), with heritage from HALOE on UARS, and SOFIE on AIM. GLO measures aerosol extinction from 0.45 to 3.88 μm, important radiatively active gases in the UTLS (H2O, O3, CH4, N2O), key tracers of UTLS transport (HCN, CO, HDO), gases important in stratospheric O3 chemistry (HCl and HF), and temperature from cloud top to 50 km at a vertical resolution of < 1 km. Improved pointing knowledge will provide dramatically better retrieval precision in the UTLS, even in the presence of aerosols, than possible with HALOE. In addition, the GLO form factor is only of order 10% of that of HALOE, and costs for a constellation of GLO sensors is within the cost cap of a NASA Earth Venture mission. The SOCRATES mission concept is a 6-element constellation of autonomous small satellites, each mated with a GLO sensor, and deployed from a single launch vehicle. The SOCRATES/GLO approach reaps the advantages of solar occultation: high precision and accuracy; robust calibration; and high vertical resolution, while mitigating the sparse coverage of a single solar occultation sensor. We present the SOCRATES science case, and key elements of the

  14. A study on characterization of stratospheric aerosol and gas parameters with the spacecraft solar occultation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    Spacecraft remote sensing of stratospheric aerosol and ozone vertical profiles using the solar occultation experiment has been analyzed. A computer algorithm has been developed in which a two step inversion of the simulated data can be performed. The radiometric data are first inverted into a vertical extinction profile using a linear inversion algorithm. Then the multiwavelength extinction profiles are solved with a nonlinear least square algorithm to produce aerosol and ozone vertical profiles. Examples of inversion results are shown illustrating the resolution and noise sensitivity of the inversion algorithms.

  15. Constraining the extension of a possible gamma-ray halo of 3C 279 from 2008-2014 solar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikov, Egor; Rubtsov, Grigory; Troitsky, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    The angular extension of the gamma-ray image of 3C 279 may be constrained by studying its solar occultations as suggested by Fairbairn et al. We perform this kind of analysis for seven occultations observed by Fermi-LAT in 2008-2014, using the Fermi-LAT SOLAR SYSTEM TOOLS. The results are interpreted in terms of models with extended gamma-ray halo of 3C 279; first constraints on the size and the flux of the halo are reported.

  16. The effect of solar radio bursts on the GNSS radio occultation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S.; Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Zhao, Biqiang; Wan, Weixing; Ren, Zhipeng; Liu, Libo; Wei, Yong; Lei, Jiuhou; Solomon, Stan; Rocken, Christian

    2013-09-01

    radio burst (SRB) is the radio wave emission after a solar flare, covering a broad frequency range, originated from the Sun's atmosphere. During the SRB occurrence, some specific frequency radio wave could interfere with the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and therefore disturb the received signals. In this study, the low Earth orbit- (LEO-) based high-resolution GNSS radio occultation (RO) signals from multiple satellites (COSMIC, CHAMP, GRACE, SAC-C, Metop-A, and TerraSAR-X) processed in University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) were first used to evaluate the effect of SRB on the RO technique. The radio solar telescope network (RSTN) observed radio flux was used to represent SRB occurrence. An extreme case during 6 December 2006 and statistical analysis during April 2006 to September 2012 were studied. The LEO RO signals show frequent loss of lock (LOL), simultaneous decrease on L1 and L2 signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) globally during daytime, small-scale perturbations of SNR, and decreased successful retrieval percentage (SRP) for both ionospheric and atmospheric occultations during SRB occurrence. A potential harmonic band interference was identified. Either decreased data volume or data quality will influence weather prediction, climate study, and space weather monitoring by using RO data during SRB time. Statistically, the SRP of ionospheric and atmospheric occultation retrieval shows ~4% and ~13% decrease, respectively, while the SNR of L1 and L2 show ~5.7% and ~11.7% decrease, respectively. A threshold value of ~1807 SFU of 1415 MHz frequency, which can result in observable GNSS SNR decrease, was derived based on our statistical analysis.

  17. Coronal Alfven waves detected by radio sounding during the solar occultations of the HELIOS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, M. K.; Volland, H.; Efimov, A. I.; Levy, G. S.; Seidel, B. L.; Stelzried, C. T.

    The two Helios spacecraft underwent regular solar occultations during their extended missions from Dec 1974-Feb 1986 (Helios 1) and Jan 1976-Mar 1980 (Helios 2) thereby providing many opportunities for radio propagation experiments in the solar corona. On certain rare occasions over the course of these investigations, Faraday rotation measurements of the linearly polarized Helios signals could be recorded simultaneously at two widely-spaced ground stations. Many of these two-station measurement intervals display clear evidence of wave-like structures with quasi-periods of the order of a few minutes to a few hours. These structures are attributed to coronal Alfven waves. The radial propagation direction and velocity of these waves are estimated from a cross-correlation analysis of the data between the two stations. The majority of the waves appear to propagate away from the Sun, but about 30 percent of the cases indicate a propagation direction toward the Sun.

  18. Position and radius of the Sun determined by solar eclipses in combination with lunar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yoshio

    1993-12-01

    The observation data of four total solar eclipses in 1970, 1973, 1980, and 1991 were analyzed by putting all the data together to obtain accurate coordinates and semidiameter of the Sun relative to those of the Moon. With the position and figure of the Moon rectified by lunar occultation data, a constant correction to the coordinates of the Sun tabulated in the current ephemeris is found as follows: delta lambda (Sun) = -0 sec .04 +/- 0 sec .005, delta beta (Sun) = +0 sec .01 +/- 0 sec .008. Also, the following values for the semidiameter of the Sun were obtained: sigma(Sun) 70 = 959 sec .74 +/- 0 sec .008, sigma(Sun) 73 = 959 sec .84 +/- 0 sec .015, sigma(Sun) 80 959 sec .84 +/- 0 sec .012, sigma(Sun) 91 = 959 sec .88 +/- 0 sec .008 (4615 A) respectively for the 1970, 1973, 1980, and 1991 eclipses, giving an obvious evidence for the change in the solar radius.

  19. Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rabbette, M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redermann, J.; Higurashi, A.; Nakajima, T.; Quinn, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the upward and downward spectral solar radiant fluxes were measured with the Spectral Solar Flux Radiometer (SSFR), and the aerosol optical depth was measured with the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) aboard the Center for INterdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. IN this paper, we examine the data obtained for two cases: a moderately thick aerosol layer, 12 April, and a relatively thin aerosol case, 16 April 2001. ON both days, the Twin Otter flew vertical profiles in the Korean Strait southeast of Gosan Island. For both days we determine the aerosol spectral absorption of the layer and estimate the spectral aerosol absorption optical depth and single-scattering albedo. The results for 12 April show that the single-scattering albedo increases with wavelength from 0.8 at 400 nm to 0.95 at 900 nm and remains essentially constant from 950 to 1700 nm. On 16 April the amount of aerosol absorption was very low; however, the aerosol single-scattering albedo appears to decrease slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing aerosol species observed during the ACE-asia study: mineral dust and black carbon. The results for 12 April are indicative of a mineral dust-black carbon mixture. The 16 April results are possibly caused by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate the relative contributions of the black carbon particles and the mineral dust particles. We compare our results with other estimates of the aerosol properties from a Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite analysis and aerosol measurements made aboard the Twin Otter, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ronald H Brown ship, and at ground sites in Gosan and Japan. The results indicate a relatively complicated aerosol

  20. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Walker, K.; McLeod, S.; Nassar, R.

    2003-12-01

    The ACE mission goals are: (1) to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region; (2) to explore the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and climate change; (3) to study the effects of biomass burning in the free troposphere; (4) to measure aerosol number density, size distribution and composition in order to reduce the uncertainties in their effects on the global energy balance. ACE will make a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols, and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The solar occultation advantages are high sensitivity and self-calibration. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4100 cm-1) will measure the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. The ACE concept is derived from the now-retired ATMOS FTS instrument, which flew on the Space Shuttle in 1985, 1992, 1993, 1994. Climate-chemistry coupling may lead to the formation of an Arctic ozone hole. ACE will provide high quality data to confront these model predictions and will monitor polar chemistry as chlorine levels decline. The ACE-FTS can measure water vapor and HDO in the tropical tropopause region to study dehydration and strat-trop exchange. The molecular signatures of massive forest fires will evident in the ACE infrared spectra. The CO2 in our spectra can be used to either retrieve atmospheric pressure or (if the instrument pointing knowledge proves to be satisfactory) for an independent retrieval of a CO2 profile for carbon cycle science. Aerosols and clouds will be monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at

  1. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P.

    2003-04-01

    The ACE mission goals are: (1) to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region; (2) to explore the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and climate change; (3) to study the effects of biomass burning in the free troposphere; (4) to measure aerosol number density, size distribution and composition in order to reduce the uncertainties in their effects on the global energy balance. ACE will make a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols, and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) will give ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The solar occultation advantages are high sensitivity and self-calibration. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4100 cm-1) will measure the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. The ACE concept is derived from the now-retired ATMOS FTS instrument, which flew on the Space Shuttle in 1985, 1992, 1993, 1994. Climate-chemistry coupling may lead to the formation of an Arctic ozone hole. ACE will provide high quality data to confront these model predictions and will monitor polar chemistry as chlorine levels decline. The ACE-FTS can measure water vapor and HDO in the tropical tropopause region to study dehydration and strat-trop exchange. The molecular signatures of massive forest fires will evident in the ACE infrared spectra. The CO_2 in our spectra can be used to either retrieve atmospheric pressure or (if the instrument pointing knowledge proves to be satisfactory) for an independent retrieval of a CO_2 profile for carbon cycle science. Aerosols and clouds will be monitored using the extinction of solar

  2. Vertical profiling of SO 2 and SO above Venus' clouds by SPICAV/SOIR solar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Denis A.; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Mahieux, Arnaud; Fedorova, Anna A.; Korablev, Oleg I.; Marcq, Emmanuel; Yung, Yuk L.; Zhang, Xi

    2012-02-01

    New measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and monoxide (SO) in the atmosphere of Venus by SPICAV/SOIR instrument onboard Venus Express orbiter provide ample statistics to study the behavior of these gases above Venus' clouds. The instrument (a set of three spectrometers) is capable to sound atmospheric structure above the clouds in several observation modes (nadir, solar and stellar occultations) either in the UV or in the near IR spectral ranges. We present the results from solar occultations in the absorption ranges of SO 2 (190-230 nm, and at 4 μm) and SO (190-230 nm). The dioxide was detected by the SOIR spectrometer at the altitudes of 65-80 km in the IR and by the SPICAV spectrometer at 85-105 km in the UV. The monoxide's absorption was measured only by SPICAV at 85-105 km. We analyzed 39 sessions of solar occultation, where boresights of both spectrometers are oriented identically, to provide complete vertical profiling of SO 2 of the Venus' mesosphere (65-105 km). Here we report the first firm detection and measurements of two SO 2 layers. In the lower layer SO 2 mixing ratio is within 0.02-0.5 ppmv. The upper layer, also conceivable from microwave measurements by Sandor et al. (Sandor, B.J., Todd Clancy, R., Moriarty-Schieven, G., Mills, F.P. [2010]. Icarus 208, 49-60) is characterized by SO 2 increasing with the altitude from 0.05 to 2 ppmv, and the [SO 2]/[SO] ratio varying from 1 to 5. The presence of the high-altitude SO x species could be explained by H 2SO 4 photodissociation under somewhat warmer temperature conditions in Venus mesosphere. At 90-100 km the content of the sulfur dioxide correlates with temperature increasing from 0.1 ppmv at 165-170 K to 0.5-1 ppmv at 190-192 K. It supports the hypothesis of SO 2 production by the evaporation of H 2SO 4 from droplets and its subsequent photolysis at around 100 km.

  3. Solar Occultation Satellite Data and Derived Meteorological Products: Sampling Issues and Comparisons with Aura MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria; Daffer, William H.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Bernath, Peter F.; Hoppel, Karl W.; Walker, Kaley A.; Knosp, Brian W.; Boone, Chris; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Santee, Michelle L.; Harvey, V. Lynn; Pawson, Steven; Jackson, David R.; Deaver, Lance; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Lambert, Alyn; Schwartz, Michael J.; Froidevaux, Lucien; McLeod, Sean; Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max J.; Trepte, Charles R.; Livesey, Nathaniel; Harwood, Robert S.; Waters, Joe W.

    2007-01-01

    Derived Meteorological Products (DMPs, including potential temperature (theta), potential vorticity, equivalent latitude (EqL), horizontal winds and tropopause locations) have been produced for the locations and times of measurements by several solar occultation (SO) instruments and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). DMPs are calculated from several meteorological analyses for the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer, Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and III, Halogen Occultation Experiment, and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement II and III SO instruments and MLS. Time-series comparisons of MLS version 1.5 and SO data using DMPs show good qualitative agreement in time evolution of O3, N2O, H20, CO, HNO3, HCl and temperature; quantitative agreement is good in most cases. EqL-coordinate comparisons of MLS version 2.2 and SO data show good quantitative agreement throughout the stratosphere for most of these species, with significant biases for a few species in localized regions. Comparisons in EqL coordinates of MLS and SO data, and of SO data with geographically coincident MLS data provide insight into where and how sampling effects are important in interpretation of the sparse SO data, thus assisting in fully utilizing the SO data in scientific studies and comparisons with other sparse datasets. The DMPs are valuable for scientific studies and to facilitate validation of non-coincident measurements.

  4. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; López-Moreno, J. J.; Patel, M. R.; Bellucci, G.; Daerden, F.; Drummond, R.; Neefs, E.; Rodriguez Gomez, J.

    2011-10-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite has been selected by ESA and NASA to be part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 μm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. The nadir mode will provide detailed trace gas mapping. (see also Daerden et al., same session)

  5. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO(2) absorption.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Russell Iii, J M; Drayson, S R

    1979-06-15

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occultation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO(2) (e.g., 2.0 microm, 2.7 microm, or 4.3 microm), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy.

  6. Stratospheric H2O and HNO3 profiles derived from solar occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, H.; Fergg, F.; Rabus, D.; Burkert, P.

    1985-04-01

    Compact two-channel radiometers for solar occultation experiments have been constructed in order to measure stratospheric trace gases. The instruments can be used as filter- or correlation-type radiometers, depending on the trace gas under investigation. Within the LIMS correlative measurement program, balloon flights were performed with a payload of up to four of these two-channel radiometers. From the filter-type measurements, profiles of the trace gases H2O and HNO3 are inferred for the height region between the tropopause and the balloon float level. The data evaluation also includes a comprehensive analysis of the error sources and their effect on the accuracy of the trace gas profiles. The derived H2O and HNO3 profiles are assessed against the observations of other authors and are discussed in the light of the trace gas distributions calcualted from photochemical models.

  7. Characteristics of Titan's haze derived from solar occultation observations in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Marmuse, Florian; Xu, Feng; West, Robert; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has acquired 14 solar occultation observations between January 2006 and April 2016. The observations span a large range of latitude and seasons, allowing us to witness atmospheric variability. We use only the infrared channel of the VIMS instrument between 884- and 5108-nm. The observations are first processed to provide light curves which are the transmission through Titan's atmosphere as a function of the impact parameter. The transmission is calculated by dividing the signal by the solar spectrum obtained when the value of the impact parameter is much larger than the thickness of Titan's atmosphere, which makes it independent of the choice of the solar spectrum. The data set is composed of 14 3D arrays (transmission, wavelength, impact parameter). Errors are calculated using the SNR derived from the acquisition of the solar spectra and the value of transmission. The observations use a solar port which is aligned with the UVIS boresight in order to simultaneously record the atmospheric transmission in both UV and IR. For this purpose, VIMS has a solar port. However, one difficulty is to remove the additional light that often comes from the boresight. The technic will be described. In the seven infrared wavelengths where Titan's surface can be observed, the transmission is a direct measurement of the scattering by the aerosols. An inversion process has been set up to provide the density distribution of the aerosols as a function of altitude for each of these observations. The model is simple model with only one population of aerosols with a cross section that is wavelength-dependent. The model allows us to provide extinction curves at those wavelengths. The three observations obtained at the equator, close to where the Huygens probe landed, are compared with the DISR observations which have been recently revised (Doose et al., Icarus, 2016).This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California

  8. Validation of the Earth atmosphere models using the EUV solar occultation data from the CORONAS and PROBA 2 instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Kuzin, Sergey; Berghmans, David; Pertsov, Andrey; Dominique, Marie; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin

    Absorption in the atmosphere below 500 km results in attenuation of the solar EUV flux, variation of its spectra and distortion of solar images acquired by solar EUV instruments operating on LEO satellites even on solar synchronous orbits. Occultation measurements are important for planning of solar observations from these satellites, and can be used for monitoring the upper atmosphere as well as for studying its response to the solar activity. We present the results of the occultation measurements of the solar EUV radiation obtained by the CORONAS-F/SPIRIT telescope at high solar activity (2002), by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS telescope at low activity (2009), and by the SWAP telescope and LYRA radiometer onboard the PROBA 2 satellite at moderate activity (2010). The measured attenuation profiles and the retrieved linear extinction coefficients at the heights 200-500 km are compared with simulations by the NRLMSIS-00 and DTM2013 atmospheric models. It was shown that the results of simulations by the DTM2013 model are well agreed with the data of measurements at all stages of solar activity and in presence of the geomagnetic storm, whereas the results of the NRLMSISE-00 model significantly diverge from the measurements, in particular, at high and low activity. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration under Grant Agreement “eHeroes” (project № 284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  9. Titan solar occultation observations reveal transit spectra of a hazy world.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tyler D; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2014-06-24

    High-altitude clouds and hazes are integral to understanding exoplanet observations, and are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra. However, it is difficult to make inferences from these data because of the need to disentangle effects of gas absorption from haze extinction. Here, we turn to the quintessential hazy world, Titan, to clarify how high-altitude hazes influence transit spectra. We use solar occultation observations of Titan's atmosphere from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Data span 0.88-5 μm at a resolution of 12-18 nm, with uncertainties typically smaller than 1%. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum. Our spectra show strong methane-absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases. Most importantly, the data demonstrate that high-altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous-absorption features. These findings have important consequences for interpreting future exoplanet observations, including those from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope.

  10. Titan solar occultation observations reveal transit spectra of a hazy world

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude clouds and hazes are integral to understanding exoplanet observations, and are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra. However, it is difficult to make inferences from these data because of the need to disentangle effects of gas absorption from haze extinction. Here, we turn to the quintessential hazy world, Titan, to clarify how high-altitude hazes influence transit spectra. We use solar occultation observations of Titan’s atmosphere from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Data span 0.88–5 μm at a resolution of 12–18 nm, with uncertainties typically smaller than 1%. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan’s haze affects its transit spectrum. Our spectra show strong methane-absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases. Most importantly, the data demonstrate that high-altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding observations to pressures smaller than 0.1–10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous-absorption features. These findings have important consequences for interpreting future exoplanet observations, including those from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. PMID:24876272

  11. Stratospheric NO and NO2 Abundances from ATMOS Solar-Occultation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, M. J.; Allen, M.; Gunson, M. R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Collins, G. B.; Huston, K. H.; Abbas, M. M.; Abrams, M. C.; Chang, A. Y.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R. S.; Irion, F. W.; Lowenstein, M.; Manney, G. L.; Michelsen, H. A.; Podolske, J. R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    Using results from a time-dependent photochemical model to calculate the diurnal variation of NO and NO2, we have corrected Atmospheric Trace MOlecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) solar-occultation retrievals of the NO and NO2 abundances at 90' solar zenith angle. Neglecting to adjust for the rapid variation of these gases across the terminator results in potential errors in retrieved profiles of approximately 20% for NO2 and greater than 100% for NC at altitudes below 25 km. Sensitivity analysis indicates that knowledge of the local 03 and temperature profiles, rather than zonal mean or climatological conditions of these quantities, is required to obtain reliable retrievals of NO and NO2 in the lower stratosphere. Extremely inaccurate 03 or temperature values at 20 km can result in 50% errors in retrieved NO or NO2. Mixing ratios of NO in the mid-latitude, lower stratosphere measured by ATMOS during the November 1994 ATLAS-3 mission compare favorably with in situ ER-2 observations, providing strong corroboration of the reliability of the adjusted space-borne measurements.

  12. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Mayu; Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ∼30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ∼6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  13. Optical properties of Titan's aerosols: comparison between DISR/Huygens observations and VIMS/Cassini solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmuse, Florian; Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    Titan, the only satellite with a dense atmosphere, presents a hydrocarbon cycle that includes the formation and sedimentation of organic aerosols. The optical properties of Titan's haze inferred from measurement of the Huygens probe were recently revisited by Doose et al. (Icarus, 2016). The present study uses the solar occultation observations in equatorial regions of Titan that have been acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft to infer similar information in a broader wavelength range. Preliminary studies have proven the interest of those solar occultation data in the seven atmospheric windows to constrain the aerosol number density, but could not directly compare with the Descent Imager and Spectral Radiometer (DISR) data because models predict that the density profile vary with latitude. The present study compares the DISR measurements of aerosol extinction coefficients and the solar occultation data acquired by the VIMS instrument onboard Cassini. These sets of data differ in their acquisition method and time, spectral range, and altitude: the DISR measurements have been taken in 2005, along a vertical line of sight, in the visible spectral range (490-950nm) and under 140km of altitude. The relevant solar occultation data at equator have been acquired in 2009, along a horizontal line of sight, in the IR range (0.9-5.1µm), with sun light scanning all altitudes for a long enough wavelength, namely in the five-micron atmospheric window. These sets of data have been analyzed previously, separately and using different models. Here, we present a cross analysis of these sets of data, that allows us to test the different models describing the density profile of aerosols. In addition to providing wavelength dependence of the extinction coefficient, the comparison allows us to assess the impact of refraction in Titan's atmosphere. It also provides optical depth and scattering properties that are crucial information

  14. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; López-Moreno, J.-J.; Patel, M. R.; Bellucci, G.; Daerden, F.; Drummond, R.; Neefs, E.; Robert, S.; Rodriguez Gomez, J.

    2012-04-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite has been selected by ESA and NASA to be part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 μm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. The NOMAD instrument is composed of 3 channels: a solar occultation only channel (SO) operating in the infrared wavelength domain, a second infrared channel capable of doing nadir, but also solar occultation and limb observations (LNO), and an ultraviolet/visible channel (UVIS) that can work in all observation modes. The spectral resolution of SO and LNO surpasses previous surveys in the infrared by more than one order of magnitude. NOMAD offers an integrated instrument combination of a flight-proven concept (SO is a copy of SOIR on Venus Express), and innovations based on existing and proven instrumentation (LNO is based on SOIR/VEX and UVIS has heritage from the ExoMars lander), that will provide mapping and vertical profile information at high spatio-temporal resolution. The three channels have each their own ILS and optical bench, but share the same single interface to the S/C. We will present the instrument and its capabilities in term of detection of a broad suite of species, its possibilities to improve our knowledge on vertical structure of the atmosphere as well as its mapping possibilities.

  15. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Rachel; Robert, Severine; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Willame, Yannick; Lopez-Moreno, Jose Juan; Patel, Manish; Belluci, Giancarlo; Daerden, Frank; Neefs, Eddy; Rodriguez-Gomez, Julio

    2013-04-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite was selected as part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 µm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. The NOMAD instrument is composed of 3 channels: a solar occultation only channel (SO) operating in the infrared wavelength domain, a second infrared channel capable of doing nadir, but also solar occultation and limb observations (LNO), and an ultraviolet/visible channel (UVIS) that can work in all observation modes. The spectral resolution of SO and LNO surpasses previous surveys in the infrared by more than one order of magnitude. NOMAD offers an integrated instrument combination of a flight-proven concept (SO is a copy of SOIR on Venus Express), and innovations based on existing and proven instrumentation (LNO is based on SOIR/VEX and UVIS has heritage from the ExoMars lander), that will provide mapping and vertical profile information at high spatio-temporal resolution. The three channels have each their own ILS and optical bench, but share the same single interface to the S/C. We will present the instrument and its capabilities in term of detection of a broad suite of species, its possibilities to improve our knowledge on vertical structure of the atmosphere as well as its mapping possibilities. Since last year's abstract, much progress has been made on the instrument design and prototypes have been tested, especially concerning the very challenging thermal needs of the instrument. This paper will concentrate on the developments in the last year that prove NOMAD will be a very powerful, sensitive instrument.

  16. VARIATIONS IN SOLAR WIND FRACTIONATION AS SEEN BY ACE/SWICS AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR GENESIS MISSION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pilleri, P.; Wiens, R. C.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Lepri, S. T.; Shearer, P.; Gilbert, J. A.; Steiger, R. von

    2015-10-10

    We use Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) elemental composition data to compare the variations in solar wind (SW) fractionation as measured by SWICS during the last solar maximum (1999–2001), the solar minimum (2006–2009), and the period in which the Genesis spacecraft was collecting SW (late 2001—early 2004). We differentiate our analysis in terms of SW regimes (i.e., originating from interstream or coronal hole flows, or coronal mass ejecta). Abundances are normalized to the low-first ionization potential (low-FIP) ion magnesium to uncover correlations that are not apparent when normalizing to high-FIP ions. We find that relative to magnesium, the other low-FIP elements are measurably fractionated, but the degree of fractionation does not vary significantly over the solar cycle. For the high-FIP ions, variation in fractionation over the solar cycle is significant: greatest for Ne/Mg and C/Mg, less so for O/Mg, and the least for He/Mg. When abundance ratios are examined as a function of SW speed, we find a strong correlation, with the remarkable observation that the degree of fractionation follows a mass-dependent trend. We discuss the implications for correcting the Genesis sample return results to photospheric abundances.

  17. Stratospheric CH4 and CO2 profiles derived from SCIAMACHY solar occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, S.; Bramstedt, K.; Hilker, M.; Liebing, P.; Plieninger, J.; Reuter, M.; Rozanov, A.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    Stratospheric profiles of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) have been derived from solar occultation measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY). The retrieval is performed using a method called "Onion Peeling DOAS" (ONPD) which combines an onion peeling approach with a weighting function DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) fit. By use of updated pointing information and optimisation of the data selection and of the retrieval approach the altitude range for reasonable CH4 could be extended to about 17 to 45 km. Furthermore, the quality of the derived CO2 has been assessed such that now the first stratospheric profiles of CO2 from SCIAMACHY are available. Comparisons with independent data sets yield an estimated accuracy of the new SCIAMACHY stratospheric profiles of about 5-10 % for CH4 and 2-3 % for CO2. The accuracy of the products is currently mainly restricted by the appearance of unexpected vertical oscillations in the derived profiles which need further investigation. Using the improved ONPD retrieval, CH4 and CO2 stratospheric data sets covering the whole SCIAMACHY time series (August 2002-April 2012) and the latitudinal range between about 50 and 70° N have been derived. Based on these time series, CH4 and CO2 trends have been estimated, which are in reasonable agreement with total column trends for these gases. This shows that the new SCIAMACHY data sets can provide valuable information about the stratosphere.

  18. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  19. ACE infrared spectral atlases of the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Ryan; Bernath, Peter; Boone, Chris

    2014-11-01

    Five infrared atmospheric atlases are presented using solar occultation spectra from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) in low earth orbit. The spectral atlases were created for Arctic summer, Arctic winter, mid-latitude summer, mid-latitude winter and the tropics. Each covers the spectral range from 700 to 4400 cm-1 and consists of 31 spectra that span an altitude range of 6-126 km in 4-km altitude intervals. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, each spectrum in the atlas is an average of at least several hundred individual ACE-FTS limb transmission spectra. Representative plots in pdf format at 10 km (troposphere), 30 km (stratosphere), 70 km (mesosphere), and 110 km (lower thermosphere) are also available.

  20. Solar sensor subsystems alignment check using solar scans for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurczyk, S. G.; Moore, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    The alignment of a dual-axes sun sensor subsystem to a telescope having a multiple sensor subsystem is described. The sun sensor consists of two analog and one digital silicon detectors. The analog detectors are shadow mask type operating in the visible spectrum. The detectors are mounted for azimuth and elevation positioning of biaxial gimbals. The digital detector is a linear diode array that operates at a spectral position of 0.7 micron and is used for elevation positioning. The position signals correspond to relative angles between the sun sensor and the solar disk. These three detectors are aligned on an Invar structure which is mounted to a Cassegrain telescope. This telescope relays solar radiance to an eight channel detector subsystem operating in the infrared range from 2 to 10 microns. The test technique and results to check the boresight alignment of these two subsystems by scanning the solar disk will be reported. The boresight alignment for both the azimuth and elevation axes of the two detector subsystems is verified using this technique.

  1. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Resulting from Earth-Directed CMEs Using SOHO and ACE Combined Data During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paouris, Evangelos; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2017-02-01

    In this work a total of 266 interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (SOHO/LASCO) and then studied by in situ observations from Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft, are presented in a new catalog for the time interval 1996 - 2009 covering Solar Cycle 23. Specifically, we determine the characteristics of the CME which is responsible for the upcoming ICME and the associated solar flare, the initial/background solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions before the arrival of the CME, the conditions in the sheath of the ICME, the main part of the ICME, the geomagnetic conditions of the ICME's impact at Earth and finally we remark on the visual examination for each event. Interesting results revealed from this study include the high correlation coefficient values of the magnetic field Bz component against the Ap index (r = 0.84), as well as against the Dst index (r = 0.80) and of the effective acceleration against the CME linear speed (r = 0.98). We also identify a north-south asymmetry for X-class solar flares and an east-west asymmetry for CMEs associated with strong solar flares (magnitude ≥ M1.0) which finally triggered intense geomagnetic storms (with Ap ≥179). The majority of the geomagnetic storms are determined to be due to the ICME main part and not to the extreme conditions which dominate inside the sheath. For the intense geomagnetic storms the maximum value of the Ap index is observed almost 4 hours before the minimum Dst index. The amount of information makes this new catalog the most comprehensive ICME catalog for Solar Cycle 23.

  2. Stratospheric CH4 and CO2 profiles derived from SCIAMACHY solar occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Stefan; Bramstedt, Klaus; Hilker, Michael; Liebing, Patricia; Plieninger, Johannes; Reuter, Max; Rozanov, Alexei; Sioris, Christopher E.; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric profiles of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) have been derived from solar occultation measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY). The retrieval is performed using a method called onion peeling DOAS (ONPD), which combines an onion peeling approach with a weighting function DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) fit in the spectral region between 1559 and 1671 nm. By use of updated pointing information and optimisation of the data selection as well as of the retrieval approach, the altitude range for reasonable CH4 could be broadened from 20 to 40 km to about 17 to 45 km. Furthermore, the quality of the derived CO2 has been assessed such that now the first stratospheric profiles (17-45 km) of CO2 from SCIAMACHY are available. Comparisons with independent data sets yield an estimated accuracy of the new SCIAMACHY stratospheric profiles of about 5-10 % for CH4 and 2-3 % for CO2. The accuracy of the products is currently mainly restricted by the appearance of unexpected vertical oscillations in the derived profiles which need further investigation. Using the improved ONPD retrieval, CH4 and CO2 stratospheric data sets covering the whole SCIAMACHY time series (August 2002-April 2012) and the latitudinal range between about 50 and 70° N have been derived. Based on these time series, CH4 and CO2 trends have been estimated. CH4 trends above about 20 km are not significantly different from zero and the trend at 17 km is about 3 ppbv year-1. The derived CO2 trends show a general decrease with altitude with values of about 1.9 ppmv year-1 at 21 km and about 1.3 ppmv year-1 at 39 km. These results are in reasonable agreement with total column trends for these gases. This shows that the new SCIAMACHY data sets can provide valuable information about the stratosphere.

  3. Ionospheric ionization calculated from combined SolACES-SDO/EVE solar EUV spectra and comparison with global TEC at different time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Christoph; Unglaub, Claudia; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Schäfer, Robert; Brunner, Raimund; Woods, Tom; Jakowski, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Ionospheric response to solar EUV variability during 2012 - 2014 is shown by the EUV-TEC proxy based on primary ionization calculations using combined solar spectra from SDO/EVE and SolACES on board the ISS. The in flight calibrated SolACES spectra have been used to calibrate the continuous SDO/EVE measurements. The results are compared with global TEC analyses. We found that EUV describes TEC variability better than conventional indices, especially during periods of strong solar flare activity. At time scales of the solar rotation, there is a time lag between EUV and TEC variability of about one day, indicating dynamical processes in the ionosphere. This lag is not seen at shorter time scales.

  4. Poster 7: Could PAH or HAC explain the Titan's stratosphere absorption around 3.4 µm revealed by solar occultations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Daniel; Cours, Thibaud; Rey, Michael; Maltagliati, Luca; Seignovert, Benoit; Biennier, Ludovic

    2016-06-01

    In 2006, during Cassini's 10th flyby of Titan (T10), Bellucci et al. (2009) observed a solar occultation by Titan's atmosphere through the solar port of the Cassini/VIMS instrument. These authors noticed the existence of an unexplained additional absorption superimposed to the CH4 3.3 µm band. Because they were unable to model this absorption with gases, they attributed this intriguing feature to the signature of solid state organic components. Kim et al. (2011) revisited the data collected by Bellucci et al. (2009) and they considered the possible contribution of aerosols formed by hydrocarbon ices. They specifically took into account C2H6, CH4, CH3CN, C5H12 and C6H12 ices. More recently, Maltagliati et al. (2015) analyzed a set of four VIMS solar occultations, corresponding to flybys performed between January 2006 and September 2011 at different latitudes. They confirmed the presence of the 3.3 µm absorption in all occultations and underlined the possible importance of gaseous ethane, which has a strong plateau of absorption lines in that wavelength range.In this work, we show that neither hydrocarbon ices nor molecular C2H6 cannot satisfactorily explain the observed absorption. Our simulations speak in favor of an absorption due to the presence of PAH molecules or HAC in the stratosphere of Titan. PAH have been already considered by Lopes-Puertas et al. (2013) at altitudes larger than ˜900 km and tentatively identified in the stratosphere by Maltagliati et al. (2015); PAH and HAC are good candidates for Titan's aerosols precursors.

  5. Pressure Sounding of the Middle Atmosphere from ATMOS Solar Occultation Measurements of Atmospheric CO(sub 2) Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.; Gunson, M.; Lowes, L.; Rinsland, C.; Zander, R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for retrieving the atmospheric pressure corresponding to the tangent point of an infrared spectrum recorded in the solar occultation mode is described and applied to measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer. Tangent pressure values are inferred from measurements of isolated CO(sub 2) lines with temperature-insensitive intensities. Tangent pressures are determined with a spectroscopic precision of 1-3%, corresponding to a tangent point height precision, depending on the scale height, of 70-210 meters.

  6. Titan's surface composition and atmospheric transmission with solar occultation measurements by Cassini VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; McCord, Thomas B.; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    Solar occultation measurements by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) reveal the near-infrared transmission of Titan's atmosphere down to an altitude of ∼40 km. By combining these observations with VIMS reflectance measurements of Titan's surface and knowledge of haze and gas opacity profiles from the Huygens probe, we constrain a simple model for the transfer of radiation in Titan's atmosphere in order to derive surface reflectance in the methane windows used for compositional analysis. The advantages of this model are twofold: (1) it is accurate enough to yield useful results, yet simple enough to be implemented in just a few lines of code, and (2) the model parameters are directly constrained by the VIMS occultation and on-planet measurements. We focus on the 2.0, 2.7, 2.8 and 5.0 μm windows, where haze opacity is minimized, and diagnostic vibrational bands exist for water ice and other candidate surface species. A particularly important result is the strong atmospheric attenuation at 2.7 μm compared to 2.8 μm, resulting in a reversal of apparent spectral slope in a compositionally diagnostic wavelength range. These results show that Titan's surface reflectance is much "bluer" and more closely matched by water ice than the uncorrected spectra would indicate, although the majority of Titan's surface has a spectrum consistent with mixtures (either intimate or areal) of water ice and haze particles precipitated from the atmosphere. Compositions of geologic units can be accurately modeled as mixtures ranging from predominantly water ice (Sinlap crater ejecta and margins of dark equatorial terrain) to predominantly organic-rich (Tui Regio and Hotei Regio), with particles in the size range ∼10-20 μm. In distinguishing between hypothesized formation mechanisms for Tui and Hotei Regio, their organic-rich composition favors a process that concentrates precipitated haze particles, such as playa lake evaporite deposition (Barnes, J.W., Bow

  7. FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR Project Title:  FIRE III ACE Discipline:  ... Level:  L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Instrument:  Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer ... Info:  Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) Ship SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  8. Improved ACE-FTS observations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy; Chipperfield, Martyn; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), on board the SCISAT satellite, has been recording solar occultation spectra through the Earth's atmosphere since 2004 and continues to take measurements with only minor loss in performance. ACE-FTS time series are available for a range of chlorine 'source' gases, including CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3Cl and CCl4. Recently there has been much community interest in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a substance regulated by the Montreal Protocol because it leads to the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. Estimated sources and sinks of CCl4 remain inconsistent with observations of its abundance. Satellite observations of CCl4 in the stratosphere are particularly useful in validating stratospheric loss (photolysis) rates; in fact the atmospheric loss of CCl4 is essentially all due to photolysis in the stratosphere. However, the latest ACE-FTS v3.5 CCl4 retrieval is biased high by ˜ 20-30%. A new ACE-FTS retrieval scheme utilising new laboratory spectroscopic measurements of CCl4 and improved microwindow selection has recently been developed. This improves upon the v3.5 retrieval and resolves the issue of the high bias; this new scheme will form the basis for the upcoming v4 processing version of ACE-FTS data. This presentation will outline the improvements made in the retrieval, and a subset of data will be compared with modelled CCl4 distributions from SLIMCAT, a state-of-the-art three-dimensional chemical transport model. The use of ACE-FTS data to evaluate the modelled stratospheric loss rate of CCl4 will also be discussed. The evaluated model, which also includes a treatment of surface soil and ocean sinks, will then be used to quantify current uncertainties in the global budget of CCl4.

  9. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3μm at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8μm at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive

  10. Solar-cycle dependence of a model turbulence spectrum using IMP and ACE observations over 38 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, R. A.; Nel, A. E.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Ab initio modulation models require a number of turbulence quantities as input for any reasonable diffusion tensor. While turbulence transport models describe the radial evolution of such quantities, they in turn require observations in the inner heliosphere as input values. So far we have concentrated on solar minimum conditions (e.g. Engelbrecht and Burger 2013, ApJ), but are now looking at long-term modulation which requires turbulence data over at a least a solar magnetic cycle. As a start we analyzed 1-minute resolution data for the N-component of the magnetic field, from 1974 to 2012, covering about two solar magnetic cycles (initially using IMP and then ACE data). We assume a very simple three-stage power-law frequency spectrum, calculate the integral from the highest to the lowest frequency, and fit it to variances calculated with lags from 5 minutes to 80 hours. From the fit we then obtain not only the asymptotic variance at large lags, but also the spectral index of the inertial and the energy, as well as the breakpoint between the inertial and energy range (bendover scale) and between the energy and cutoff range (cutoff scale). All values given here are preliminary. The cutoff range is a constraint imposed in order to ensure a finite energy density; the spectrum is forced to be either flat or to decrease with decreasing frequency in this range. Given that cosmic rays sample magnetic fluctuations over long periods in their transport through the heliosphere, we average the spectra over at least 27 days. We find that the variance of the N-component has a clear solar cycle dependence, with smaller values (~6 nT2) during solar minimum and larger during solar maximum periods (~17 nT2), well correlated with the magnetic field magnitude (e.g. Smith et al. 2006, ApJ). Whereas the inertial range spectral index (-1.65 ± 0.06) does not show a significant solar cycle variation, the energy range index (-1.1 ± 0.3) seems to be anti-correlated with the variance

  11. LONGITUDINAL AND RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE PEAK INTENSITIES: STEREO, ACE, SOHO, GOES, AND MESSENGER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lario, D.; Ho, G. C.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Aran, A.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Dresing, N.; Heber, B.

    2013-04-10

    Simultaneous measurements of solar energetic particle (SEP) events by two or more of the spacecraft located near 1 AU during the rising phase of solar cycle 24 (i.e., STEREO-A, STEREO-B, and near-Earth spacecraft such as ACE, SOHO, and GOES) are used to determine the longitudinal dependence of 71-112 keV electron, 0.7-3 MeV electron, 15-40 MeV proton, and 25-53 MeV proton peak intensities measured in the prompt component of SEP events. Distributions of the peak intensities for the selected 35 events with identifiable solar origin are approximated by the form exp [ - ({phi} - {phi}{sub 0}){sup 2}/2{sigma}{sup 2}], where {phi} is the longitudinal separation between the parent active region and the footpoint of the nominal interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line connecting each spacecraft with the Sun, {phi}{sub 0} is the distribution centroid, and {sigma} determines the longitudinal gradient. The MESSENGER spacecraft, at helioradii R < 1 AU, allows us to determine a lower limit to the radial dependence of the 71-112 keV electron peak intensities measured along IMF lines. We find five events for which the nominal magnetic footpoint of MESSENGER was less than 20 Degree-Sign apart from the nominal footpoint of a spacecraft near 1 AU. Although the expected theoretical radial dependence for the peak intensity of the events observed along the same field line can be approximated by a functional form R {sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} < 3, we find two events for which {alpha} > 3. These two cases correspond to SEP events occurring in a complex interplanetary medium that favored the enhancement of peak intensities near Mercury but hindered the SEP transport to 1 AU.

  12. Global model of the F2 layer peak height for low solar activity based on GPS radio-occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubin, V. N.; Karpachev, A. T.; Tsybulya, K. G.

    2013-11-01

    We propose a global median model SMF2 (Satellite Model of the F2 layer) of the ionospheric F2-layer height maximum (hmF2), based on GPS radio-occultation data for low solar activity periods (F10.7A<80). The model utilizes data provided by GPS receivers onboard satellites CHAMP (~100,000 hmF2 values), GRACE (~70,000) and COSMIC (~2,000,000). The data were preprocessed to remove cases where the absolute maximum of the electron density lies outside the F2 region. Ground-based ionospheric sounding data were used for comparison and validation. Spatial dependence of hmF2 is modeled by a Legendre-function expansion. Temporal dependence, as a function of Universal Time (UT), is described by a Fourier expansion. Inputs of the model are: geographical coordinates, month and F10.7A solar activity index. The model is designed for quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kр=1-2), typical for low solar activity. SMF2 agrees well with the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI) in those regions, where the ground-based ionosonde network is dense. Maximal difference between the models is found in the equatorial belt, over the oceans and the polar caps. Standard deviations of the radio-occultation and Digisonde data from the predicted SMF2 median are 10-16 km for all seasons, against 13-29 km for IRI-2012. Average relative deviations are 3-4 times less than for IRI, 3-4% against 9-12%. Therefore, the proposed hmF2 model is more accurate than IRI-2012.

  13. KBO Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijsdijk, C.

    2016-12-01

    A recommendation to astronomers to observe an occultation by the Kuiper Belt Object KBO 2014MU69. Its first predicted stellar occultation, in early June 2017, of a 15th magnitude star, will be visible from Southern Africa.

  14. Ionospheric electron density retrieval from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC occultation data for a period of more than half a Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limberger, Marco; Hernandez-Pajarez, Manuel; García Rigo, Alberto; Schmidt, Michael; Hugentobler, Urs

    2014-05-01

    of the vertical dependency. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC has been commissioned in 2006 with a configuration of six satellites deployed on separate orbital planes in around 800 km altitude. The availability of associated occultation measurements for more than half a Solar Cycle and with a global coverage thus yields an excellent opportunity to validate (against ionosonde data) and characterize the ionospheric electron density.

  15. Time delay occultation data of the Helios spacecraft for probing the electron density distribution in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edenhofer, P.; Lueneburg, E.; Esposito, P. B.; Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Hansen, R. T.; Hansen, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    S-band time delay measurements were collected from the spacecraft Helios A and B during three solar occultations in 1975/76 within heliocentric distances of about 3 and 215 earth radius in terms of range, Doppler frequency shift, and electron content. Characteristic features of measurement and data processing are described. Typical data sets are discussed to probe the electron density distribution near the sun (west and east limb as well) including the outer and extended corona. Steady-state and dynamical aspects of the solar corona are presented and compared with earth-bound-K-coronagraph measurements. Using a weighted least squares estimation, parameters of an average coronal electron density profile are derived in a preliminary analysis to yield electron densities at r = 3, 65, 215 earth radius. Transient phenomena are discussed and a velocity of propagation v is nearly equal to 900 km/s is determined for plasma ejecta from a solar flare observed during an extraordinary set of Helios B electron content measurements.

  16. A complete climatology of the aerosol vertical distribution on Mars from MEx/SPICAM UV solar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttänen, Anni; Listowski, Constantino; Montmessin, Franck; Maltagliati, Luca; Reberac, Aurélie; Joly, Lilian; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2013-04-01

    We present the first results on solar occultations performed with the UV channel of SPICAM, on board Mars Express. From the dataset of over 900 occultations (performed between April 2004 and October 2011), about 640 atmospheric profiles of the martian atmosphere were derived. This dataset, spanning four martian years, allows characterization of the seasonal evolution and inter-annual comparisons of ozone and suspended particles. The dataset also includes observations of the Mars Year (MY) 28 global dust storm. In this paper the aforementioned data are analyzed with a focus on the aerosol profiles. We have mapped the seasonal behavior of the near-surface haze, revealing the typical behavior of the martian aerosol cycle, where the season most prone to develop dust storms (southern summer) shows aerosols lofted high in the atmosphere, whereas in the polar regions the aerosols are confined near the surface. More generally, aerosols seem to remain in the lower atmosphere at high latitudes and progressively penetrate to higher altitudes towards the tropics. This prevailing trend is probably related to enhanced atmospheric circulation at tropical regions due to high insolation and/or to higher cloud formation level in a warmer atmosphere. The dataset reveals frequent aerosol layers, found above or within the persistent near-surface haze. We have observed single and multiple layers (up to three layers in one profile) and we have mapped their properties. The highest layer altitudes observed during the global dust storm in the southern hemisphere, where thick layers form high above the abundant lower atmosphere dust haze. We present results on the analyzed Ångström coefficient α and its vertical variations. We also discuss the conversion of α into particle effective radius and present some examples of the effective radius vertical behavior.

  17. Effects of the ionosphere and solar activity on radio occultation signals: Application to CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, A. G.; Liou, Y. A.; Wickert, J.; Schmidt, T.; Pavelyev, A. A.; Liu, S. F.

    2007-06-01

    We analyze the ionospheric effect on the phase and amplitude of radio occultation (RO) signal. The introduced theoretical model predicts a correlation between the phase acceleration and intensity variations of RO signal and opens a way to locate layered structures in the propagation medium, in particular, in trans-ionospheric satellite-to-satellite links. For considered CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) RO events, the locations of the inclined plasma layers in the lower ionosphere are estimated, and the electron density distribution is retrieved. By analysis of the CHAMP RO data, we reveal the dependence of the intensity variations of RO signal on sharp changes in the DST index and on the local time. Maps of the seasonal, geographical, and temporal distributions of the CHAMP RO events with amplitude scintillations, having high S4 index values, and observed during the years 2001-2004 indicate dependence on solar activity. As follows from this analysis, the GPS signals in the trans-ionospheric links can be used for investigating the location and parameters of inclined plasma layers and monitoring the influence of solar activity on the ionosphere with global coverage.

  18. All about Occultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2001-01-01

    Describes occultation events involving the moon, when the moon blocks the view of planets or stars. Describes other events such as a partial solar eclipse, a penumbral lunar eclipse, meteor showers, and moon phases. Provides a list of internet resources related to these events. (DLH)

  19. Temperature and pressure retrievals from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): a new technique and comparison with COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Kevin; Strong, Kimberly; Toon, Geoff; Boone, Chris

    We present results of a new technique to retrieve temperature and pressure profiles from satellite remote sensing spectra collected by the Canadian Space Agency's (CSA) Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), which recently celebrated its tenth year in orbit. ACE utilizes a high-resolution (0.02 cm (-1) ) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating between 750-4400 cm (-1) in limb-scanning mode using the sun as a light source (solar occultation). This technique benefits from high signal strength, high resolution, and self calibration. The CSA and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a proposal to send a similar instrument to Mars: the Mars Atmospheric Trace Molecule Occultation Spectrometer (MATMOS, later canceled). To support this we have developed a new set of retrieval algorithms based on GGG used by the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and have applied these algorithms to ACE-FTS data. When performing temperature retrievals, the current approach of the ACE team is to fix the volume mixing ratio of CO_2 and carry out spectral fitting, varying temperature. While this method works very well and has been well validated, it relies on several assumptions, emph{a priori} knowledge, and data from models. Operating at another planet, these emph{a priori} are unknown and the models have not been developed to a suitable level. We demonstrate that by analyzing vibration-rotation bands of CO_2, we can retrieve vertical profiles of both temperature and pressure. Our retrieved temperature profiles are compared to those from ACE and the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC), and are used to retrieve volume mixing ratio vertical profiles for several gases, such as methane. The effects that variability in temperature and pressure have on retrieved VMR profiles is shown and retrieved VMR profiles are compared with those from ACE.

  20. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin; Kuzin, Sergey; Pertsov, Andrey; Berghmans, David; Dominique, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth's upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO) satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA) and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the extinction coefficients

  1. On the Response of Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) Stratospheric Oxone and Temperature to the 11-yr Solar Cycle Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented on responses in 14-yr time series of stratospheric ozone and temperature from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) to a solar cycle (SC-like) variation. The ozone time series are for ten, 20-degree wide, latitude bins from 45S to 45N and for thirteen "half-Umkehr" layers of about 2.5 km thickness and extending from 63 hPa to 0.7 hPa. The temperature time series analyses were restricted to pressure levels in the range of 2 hPa to 0.7 hPa. Multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques were applied to each of the 130 time series of zonally-averaged, sunrise plus sunset ozone points over that latitude/pressure domain. A simple, 11-yr periodic term and a linear trend term were added to the final MLR models after their seasonal and interannual terms had been determined. Where the amplitudes of the 11-yr terms were significant, they were in-phase with those of the more standard proxies for the solar uv-flux. The max minus min response for ozone is of order 2 to 3% from about 2 to 5 hPa and for the latitudes of 45S to 45N. There is also a significant max minus min response of order 1 K for temperature between 15S and 15N and from 2 to 0.7 hPa. The associated linear trends for ozone are near zero in the upper stratosphere. Negative ozone trends of 4 to 6%/decade were found at 10 to 20 hPa across the low to middle latitudes of both hemispheres. It is concluded that the analyzed responses from the HALOE data are of good quality and can be used to evaluate the responses of climate/chemistry models to a solar cycle forcing.

  2. Faraday rotation fluctutation spectra observed during solar occultation of the Helios spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V.; Efimov, A. I.; Samoznaev, L.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Faraday rotation (FR) measurements using linearly polarized radio signals from the two Helios spacecraft were carried out during the period from 1975 to 1984. This paper presents the results of a spectral analysis of the Helios S-band FR fluctuations observed at heliocentric distances from 2.6 to 15 solar radii during the superior conjunctions 1975-1983. The mean intensity of the FR fluctuations does not exceed the noise level for solar offsets greater than ca. 15 solar radii. The rms FR fluctuation amplitude increases rapidly as the radio ray path approaches the Sun, varying according to a power law (exponent: 2.85 +/- 0.15) at solar distances 4-12 solar radii. At distances inside 4 solar radii the increase is even steeper (exponent: 5.6 +/- 0.2). The equivalent two-dimensional FR fluctuation spectrum is well modeled by a single power-law over the frequency range from 5 to 50 mHz. For heliocentric distances larger than 4 solar radii the spectral index varies between 1.1 and 1.6 with a mean value of 1.4 +/- 0.2, corresponding to a 3-D spectral index p = 2.4. FR fluctuations thus display a somwhat lower spectral index compared with phase and amplitude fluctuations. Surprisingly high values of the spectral index were found for measurements inside 4 solar radii (p = 2.9 +/- 0.2). This may arise from the increasingly dominant effect of the magnetic field on radio wave propagation at small solar offsets. Finally, a quasiperiodic component, believed to be associated with Alfven waves, was discovered in some (but not all!) fluctuation spectra observed simultaneously at two ground stations. Characteristic periods and bulk velocities of this component were 240 +/- 30 sec and 300 +/- 60 km/s, respectively.

  3. Pressure sounding of the middle atmosphere from ATMOS solar occultation measurements of atmospheric CO(2) absorption lines.

    PubMed

    Abrams, M C; Gunson, M R; Lowes, L L; Rinsland, C P; Zander, R

    1996-06-01

    A method for retrieving the atmospheric pressure corresponding to the tangent point of an infrared spectrum recorded in the solar occultation mode is described and applied to measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier-transform spectrometer. Tangent pressure values are inferred from measurements of isolated CO(2) lines with temperature-insensitive strengths by measuring the slant-column CO(2) amount and by adjusting the viewing geometry until the calculated column matches the observed column. Tangent pressures are determined with a spectroscopic precision of l%-3%, corresponding to a tangent-point height precision of 70-210 m. The total uncertainty is limited primarily by the quality of the spectra and ranges between 4% and 6% (280-420 m) for spectra with signal-to-noise ratios of 300:1 and between 4% and 10% for spectra with signal-to-noise ratios of 100:1. The retrieval of atmospheric pressure increases the accuracy of the retrieved-gas concentrations by minimizing the effect of systematic errors introduced by climatological pressure data, ephemeris parameters, and the uncertainties in instrumental pointing.

  4. Trends and Solar Cycle Effects in Temperature Versus Altitude From the Halogen Occultation Experiment for the Mesosphere and Upper Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, Ellis E.

    2009-01-01

    Fourteen-year time series of mesospheric and upper stratospheric temperatures from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) are analyzed and reported. The data have been binned according to ten-degree wide latitude zones from 40S to 40N and at 10 altitudes from 43 to 80 km-a total of 90 separate time series. Multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis techniques have been applied to those time series. This study focuses on resolving their 11-yr solar cycle (or SC-like) responses and their linear trend terms. Findings for T(z) from HALOE are compared directly with published results from ground-based Rayleigh lidar and rocketsonde measurements. SC-like responses from HALOE compare well with those from lidar station data at low latitudes. The cooling trends from HALOE also agree reasonably well with those from the lidar data for the concurrent decade. Cooling trends of the lower mesosphere from HALOE are not as large as those from rocketsondes and from lidar station time series of the previous two decades, presumably because the changes in the upper stratospheric ozone were near zero during the HALOE time period and did not affect those trends.

  5. Occultation by (136199) Eris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Gillon, M.; Hutsemekers, D.; Magain, P.

    2010-11-01

    E. Jehin, J. Manfroid, M. Gillon, D. Hutsemekers, and P. Magain report that they observed an occultation of a star of magnitude I about 15.2 by the dwarf planet Eris (then at V about 18.7) on Nov. 6 using the new telescope TRAPPIST at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla). A series of 3-s exposures of a field of size 3' x 3' (1".3/pixel) were secured in fast-readout mode (with a deadtime of 1.5 s), starting at 01h50m UT for one hour. Seven frames centered at 02h19m34s UT allowed them to derive the start of the occultation as 02h19m16s.75 +/- 0s.75 and the end as 02h19m47s.6 +/- 0s.2, for a total occultation time of 30.4 +/- 1.0 seconds. The predictions (see above) made by the Rio de Janeiro group (Assafin et al., Nov. 5) and by J. L. Ortiz estimated the time of the occultation around 02h18m UT for Chile, in good agreement with the observations. During the occultation, a point source is detected with a magnitude corresponding to that of Eris. A small flux increase was also seen at the middle of the occultation, which might result from refraction in Eris' atmosphere (Elliot and Olkin 1996, Ann. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 24, 89). Eris is by far the most-remote solar-system object observed to date via stellar occultation, with a geocentric distance of about 96 AU. TRAPPIST is a project driven by the University of Liege, in close collaboration with the Observatory of Geneva, supported by the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research and the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  6. LADEE UVS Observations of Solar Occultation by Exospheric Dust Above the Lunar Limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Cook, A. M.; Colaprete, A.; Shirley, M. H.; Vargo, K. E.; Elphic, R. C.; Stubbs, T. J.; Glenar, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a lunar orbiter launched in September 2012 that investigates the composition and temporal variation of the tenuous lunar exosphere and dust environment. The primary goals of the mission are to characterize the pristine gas and dust exosphere prior to future lunar exploration activities, which may alter the lunar environment. To address this goal, the LADEE instrument suite includes an Ultraviolet/ Visible Spectrometer (UVS), which searches for dust, Na, K, and trace gases such as OH, H2O, Si, Al, Mg, Ca, Ti, Fe, as well as other previously undetected species. UVS has two sets of optics: a limb-viewing telescope, and a solar viewing telescope. The solar viewer is equipped with a diffuser (see Figure 1a) that allows UVS to stare directly at the solar disk as the Sun starts to set (or rise from) behind the lunar limb. Solar viewer measurements generally have very high signal to noise (SNR greater than 500) for 20-30 ms integration times. The 1-degree solar viewer field of view subtends a diameter of approximately 8 km at a distance of 400-450 km.

  7. Preliminary analysis of coronal electron content measurements from spacecraft Helios A around first solar occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edenhofer, P.; Esposito, P. B.; Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Hansen, R. T.; Hansen, S. F.; Lueneburg, E.

    1977-01-01

    Steady-state and dynamical features of the electron density distribution in the solar corona emerge from a preliminary analysis of Helios A electron content measurements. There are strong indications that correlations can be established with earth-bound K-coronagraph measurements.

  8. Profiles of Stratospheric Chlorine Nitrate from ATMOS/ATLAS 1 Infrared Solar Occultation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Abrams, M. C.; Zander, R.; Mahieu, E.; Goldman, A.; Ko, M. K. W.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Sze, N. D.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric volume mixing ration profiles of chlorine nitrate have been retrieved from 0.01-cm(sub -1) resolution infrared solar occutation spectra recorded at latitudes between 14 degrees N and 54 degrees S by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer during the ATLAS 1 shuttle mission (March 24 to April 2, 1992).

  9. The Absolute Solar Irradiance Spectrum at Solar Minimum Activity Measured by the SOLSPEC and SOL-ACES Spectrometers from 17 to 3000 nm Placed on Board the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gerard; Bolsee, David; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Schmutz, Werner; Shapiro, Alexander; Nikutowski, Bernd

    Two instruments placed on the COLOMBUS laboratory on the International Space Station constitute a payload named SOLAR measuring the spectral solar irradiance from 17 to 3000 nm for solar, atmospheric and climatology physics for which the sun-climate connection also re-quires the precise and absolute knowledge of the solar spectral irradiance. Given the significant improvements in atmosphere, climate and solar modelling, accurate data are needed. SOL-SPEC primary objectives are the measurement of the Sun absolute spectral irradiance and its variability from 165 to 3080 nm. SOLSPEC has been developed by LATMOS (France), Institut d'Aéronomie Spatiale (Belgique), and Landessternwarte (Germany). It has been calibrated in the absolute scale by using the blackbody of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig. SOL-ACES primary objectives are the measurements of the Sun absolute spec-tral irradiance from 17 to 140 nm. This instrument as developed by the Fraunhofer Institute (Freiburg, Germany) uses three-current ionisation chambers repeatedly filled with different gases to re-calibrate the three spectrometers, which are changing their efficiencies e.g. by the interaction with solar radiation. We present a composite solar spectrum for the July 2008 period, at a very low solar as occurred at the end of solar cycle 23. It has been built using SOLSPEC, SOL-ACES and TIMED SEE data. Comparison with data obtained during the ATLAS 3 period (November 1994), SORCE measurements and theoretical modelling using the COSI code will be presented. Differences will be commented (difference of the two activity levels, accuracy).

  10. Concentrations of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in the free upper troposphere and lower stratosphere deduced from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results on the volume mixing ratio profiles of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, deduced from the spectroscopic analysis of IR solar absorption spectra obtained in the occultation mode with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during its mission aboard Spacelab 3. A comparison of the ATMOS measurements for both northern and southern latitudes with previous field investigations at low midlatitudes shows a relatively good agreement. Southern Hemisphere volume mixing ratio profiles for both molecules were obtained for the first time, as were the profiles for the Northern Hemisphere covering the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere simultaneously.

  11. ACE--Some Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Annie, Ed.; Curtin, Penelope, Ed.

    This publication contains four papers that identify issues within the adult and community education (ACE) sector. "Overview" (Annie Campbell, Peter Thomson) considers what defines ACE; who offers ACE programs; who participates in ACE programs and who does not participate; what are the barriers to participation; who is responsible for…

  12. ACE and ACE2 in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizuiri, Sonoo; Ohashi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) activation has a significant influence on renal disease progression. The classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-angiotensin II (Ang II)-Ang II type 1 (AT1) axis is considered to control the effects of RAS activation on renal disease. However, since its discovery in 2000 ACE2 has also been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the RAS. The synthesis and catabolism of Ang II are regulated via a complex series of interactions, which involve ACE and ACE2. In the kidneys, ACE2 is expressed in the proximal tubules and less strongly in the glomeruli. The synthesis of inactive Ang 1-9 from Ang I and the catabolism of Ang II to produce Ang 1-7 are the main functions of ACE2. Ang 1-7 reduces vasoconstriction, water retention, salt intake, cell proliferation, and reactive oxygen stress, and also has a renoprotective effect. Thus, in the non-classical RAS the ACE2-Ang 1-7-Mas axis counteracts the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. This review examines recent human and animal studies about renal ACE and ACE2. PMID:25664248

  13. Chemical Data Assimilation: A Case Study of Solar Occultation Data From the Atlas 1 Mission of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Khattatov, B.; Mussa, H.

    2003-01-01

    A key advantage of using data assimilation is the propagation of information from data-rich regions to data-poor regions, which is particularly relevant to the use of solar occultation data such as from ATMOS. For the first time an in depth uncertainty analyses is included in a photochemical model-data intercomparison including observation, representativeness, and theoretical uncertainty. Chemical data assimilation of solar occultation measurements can be used to reconstruct full diurnal cycles and to evaluate their chemical self-consistency. This paper considers as an example the measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Experiment (ATMOS) instrument Atlas-1 during March 1992 for a vertical profile flow tracking coordinates at an equivalent PV latitude of 38 S. ATMOS was chosen because it simultaneously observes several species. This equivalent PV latitude was chosen as it was where ATMOS n observed the atmosphere's composition over the largest range of altitudes. A single vertical profile was used so that the detailed diurnal information that assimilation utilizes could be highlighted. There is generally good self-consistency between the ATMOS Atlas-1 observations and photochemical theory.

  14. Grazing Occultations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Doug; Hlynialuk, John

    1983-01-01

    A "grazing occultation" occurs when a star or other astronomical body is covered up by the extreme northern or southern limb of the moon in its easterly motion about the earth. Graze phenomena, organizing a graze expedition, and the scientific/educational value of observing grazes are among the topics discussed. (JN)

  15. HDO measurements from ACE-FTS and Odin/SMR: Validation comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kaley; Dupuy, Eric; Urban, Joachim; Boone, Chris; Kasai, Yasuko; Baron, Philippe; Bernath, Peter; Murtagh, Donal P.

    Understanding the trend in atmospheric water vapor (H2 O) is of critical importance for predicting climate change and ozone layer evolution. Accurate measurements of H2 O isotopologues, such as HDO, can contribute to a better understanding of water vapor distribution. Therefore, recent satellite missions have included measurements of H2 O isotopologues. A key step in the development of these data products is quality evaluation or validation. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a Canadian-led satellite mission launched on 12 August 2003 in a 74° -inclination orbit at an altitude of 650 km. The primary instrument on-board ACE is an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) operating in the spectral range 750-4400 cm-1 at high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1 ). ACE-FTS uses the solar occultation technique to measure atmospheric absorption spectra. Vertical profiles of trace constituent abundances, temperature and pressure are provided over altitudes ranging from 5 km to the lower thermosphere. Odin is a Swedish-led international satellite mission launched on 20 February 2001 in a sunsynchronous polar orbit (inclination 98° ) at an altitude of ˜600 km. The Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) is one of two instruments aboard the platform. It performs limb-sounding measurements of thermal emission from molecular species in the frequency range 486 to 581 GHz. Volume mixing ratio profiles of the target molecules are retrieved mainly in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Deuterated water or HDO is one of the isotopologues of water vapor measured by both instruments. This paper will present the joint effort aiming at a comprehensive validation of the HDO products retrieved from the ACE-FTS and Odin/SMR observations. The first conclusions regarding the quality assessment of both HDO products will be given.

  16. Seasonal variability of upper tropospheric acetone using ACE-FTS observations and LMDz-INCA model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Gaëlle; Harrison, Jeremy; Szopa, Sophie; Bernath, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The vertically-resolved distributions of oxygenated organic compounds (oVOCs) are mainly inferred from surface and airborne measurements with limited spatial and temporal coverage. This results in a limited understanding of the atmospheric budget of these compounds and of their impact on the upper tropospheric chemistry. In the last decade, satellite observations which complement in-situ measurements have become available, providing global distributions of several oVOCs. For example, Scisat-1, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) has measured several oVOCs including methanol and formaldehyde. ACE is a Canadian-led satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere that has been in operation since 2004. The primary instrument on board is a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) featuring broad spectral coverage in the infrared (750-4400 cm-1) with high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1). The FTS instrument can measure down to 5 km altitude with a high signal-to-noise ratio using solar occultation. The ACE-FTS has the ability to measure seasonal and height-resolved distributions of minor tropospheric constituents on a near-global scale and provides the opportunity to evaluate our understanding of important atmospheric oxygenated organic species. ACE-FTS acetone retrievals will be presented. The spatial distribution and seasonal variability of acetone will be described and compared to LMDz-INCA model simulations.

  17. Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances

  18. Atmospheric temperature and pressure measurements from the ACE-MAESTRO space instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlan, Caroline Rebecca

    A method is developed and tested for determining atmospheric pressure and temperature from space using spectral absorption by the A and B bands of molecular oxygen as measured by the MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) space instrument in solar occultation mode. MAESTRO is the UV-visible-near-infrared dual grating spectrometer component of the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) scientific payload, and was launched in August 2003 on the SciSat satellite to investigate atmospheric processes affecting the stratospheric ozone distribution. On-orbit measurements of pressure and temperature are desirable for accurate retrievals of other atmospheric constituents from the instrument, and as independent data products. The constant mixing ratio of molecular oxygen is exploited in these retrievals to derive atmospheric density profiles from oxygen absorption, and the density profiles are then converted to pressure and temperature using hydrostatic balance and the ideal gas taw. A highly accurate fast forward model is developed using a fast-line-by-line approach for modelling the high spectral resolution oxygen absorption lines, and a correlated-k technique is used to calculate analytic weighting functions for the retrieval of density. A global fitting algorithm is developed to simultaneously fit all spectra from one occultation. Retrieval characterization shows a small amount of information is added by the inclusion of the weaker B band to a retrieval using the strong A band absorption, and tests with real data show the B band retrievals alone are less sensitive to instrument characterization uncertainties and perform better than A band retrievals at altitudes below 30 km. The new algorithm is applied to 230 occultation observations collected in the Arctic winter, Arctic spring, and tropical regions, and during the Eureka 2004 and 2005 ACE validation campaigns in the high Arctic. Comparisons with

  19. First observation of 628 CO 2 isotopologue band at 3.3 μm in the atmosphere of Venus by solar occultation from Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Wilquet, Valérie; Montmessin, F.; Dahoo, R.; Villard, E.; Korablev, O.; Fedorova, A.

    2008-05-01

    The new ESA Venus Express orbiter is the first mission applying the probing technique of solar and stellar occultation to the atmosphere of Venus, with the SPICAV/SOIR instrument. SOIR is a new type of spectrometer used for solar occultations in the range 2.2-4.3 μm. Thanks to a high spectral resolving power R˜15,000-20,000 (unprecedented in planetary space exploration), a new gaseous absorption band was soon detected in the atmospheric transmission spectra around 2982 cm -1, showing a structure resembling an unresolved Q branch and a number of isolated lines with a regular wave number pattern. This absorption could not be matched to any species contained in HITRAN or GEISA databases, but was found very similar to an absorption pattern observed by a US team in the spectrum of solar light reflected by the ground of Mars [Villanueva, G.L., Mumma, M.J., Novak, R.E., Hewagama, T., 2008. Icarus 195 (1), 34-44]. This team then suggested to us that the absorption was due to an uncatalogued transition of the 16O 12C 18O molecule. The possible existence of this band was soon confirmed from theoretical considerations by Perevalov and Tashkun. Some SOIR observations of the atmospheric transmission are presented around 2982 cm -1, and rough calculations of line strengths of the Q branch are produced, based on the isotopic ratio measured earlier in the lower atmosphere of Venus. This discovery emphasizes the role of isotopologues of CO 2 (as well as H 2O and HDO) as important greenhouse gases in the atmosphere of Venus.

  20. Comprehensive Database Service : ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, Morio; Abe, Tetsuya

    The Data base, ACE commercialized by Chunichi Shimbun in Feb. 1986, aims at covering not only newspaper articles but also the other information which composes different data bases. This paper introduces newspaper articles, new material information and character information which are included in ACE. The content of ACE, how to use the online service, and future subjects are described.

  1. On the Assessment and Uncertainty of Atmospheric Trace Gas Burden Measurements with High Resolution Infrared Solar Occultation Spectra from Space by the ATMOS Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. C.; Chang, A. Y.; Gunson, M. R.; Abbas, M. M.; Goldman, A.; Irion, F. W.; Michelsen, H. A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Stiller, G. P.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument is a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer that measures atmospheric composition from low Earth orbit with infrared solar occultation sounding in the limb geometry. Following an initial flight in 1985, ATMOS participated in the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1, 2, and 3 Space Shuttle missions in 1992, 1993, and 1994 yielding a total of 440 occultation measurements over a nine year period. The suite of more than thirty atmospheric trace gases profiled includes CO2, O3, N2O, CH4, H2O, NO, NO2, HNO3, HCl, HF, ClONO2, CCl3F, CCl2F2, CHF2Cl, and N2O5. The analysis method has been revised throughout the mission years culminating in the 'version 2' data set. The spectroscopic error analysis is described in the context of supporting the precision estimates reported with the profiles; in addition, systematic uncertainties assessed from the quality of the spectroscopic database are described and tabulated for comparisons with other experiments.

  2. Zonal Winds Between 25 and 120 Km Retrieved from Solar Occultation Spectra. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancleef, Garrett Warren; Shaw, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric winds at heights between 25 and 120 km have been retrieved with precisions of 5/ms from the Doppler shifts of atmospheric absorption lines measured from a satellite-borne instrument. Lines of the upsilon 3 CO2 and upsilon 2 H2O rotation-vibration bands caused by gases in the instrument allowed the instrumental frequency scale to be absolutely calibrated so that accurate relative speeds could be obtained. By comparing the positions of both sets of instrumental lines the calibration of the frequency scale was determined to be stable to a precision of less than 2 x 10(-5) cm during the course of each occultation. It was found that the instrumental resolution of 0.015 cm after apodization, the signal to noise ratio of about 100 and stable calibration allowed relative speeds to be determined to a precision of 5 ms or better by using small numbers of absorption lines between 1600 and 3200 cm. Absolute absorption line positions were simultaneously recovered to precisions of 5 x 10(-5) cm or better. The wind speed profiles determined from four sunset occultations and one sunrise occultation show remarkable similarities in the magnitudes and directions of the zonal wind velocities as functions of height. These wind profiles appear to be manifestations of atmospheric tides.

  3. Determination of hydrocarbon abundances and the strength of eddy mixing in the stratosphere of Neptune: Analysis of UVS solar occultation lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James

    1995-01-01

    Work on completing our analysis of the Voyager UVS solar occultation data acquired during Neptune encounter is essentially complete, as testified by the attached poster materials. The photochemical modeling addresses the recent revision in branching ratios for radical production in the photolysis of methane at H Lyman alpha implied by the lab measurements of Mordaunt et al. (1993). The software generated in this effort has been useful for checking the degree to which photochemical models addressing other datasets (mainly infrared) are consistent with the UVS data. This work complements the UVS modeling results in that the IR data refer to deeper pressure levels; as regards the modeling of UVS data, the most significant result is the convincing support for the presence of a stagnant lower stratosphere. Evidence for strong dynamical (mixing) transport of minor constituents at shallower pressures is provided by the UVS data analysis.

  4. Identification of the HNO3 3 nu(sub 9) - nu(sub 9) band Q branch in stratospheric solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, A.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Goldman, A.; Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The spectroscopic identification for the HNO3 3 nu(sub 9) - nu(sub 9) band Q branch at 830.4/cm is reported based on 0.01/cm resolution solar occultation spectra of the lower stratosphere recorded by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer and a recent analysis of this band. Least-squares fits to 0.0025/cm resolution laboratory spectra in the Q branch region indicate an integrated intensity of 0.529 x 10(exp -18)/cm/mol/sq cm at 296 K for this weak band. Stratospheric HNO3 retrievals derived from the ATMOS data are consistent with this value within its estimated uncertainty of about +/- 30%. A set of spectroscopic line parameters suitable for atmospheric studies has been generated.

  5. Profiles of stratospheric chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) from atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Abrams, M. C.; Zander, R.; Mahieu, E.; Goldman, A.; Ko, M. K. W.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Sze, N. D.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric volume mixing ratio profiles of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) have been retrieved from 0.01/cm resolution infrared solar occultation spectra recorded at latitudes between 14 deg N and 54 deg S by the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy Fourier transform spectrometer during the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1 shuttle mission (March 24 to April 2, 1992). The results were obtained from nonlinear least squares fittings of the ClONO2 nu(sub 4) band Q branch at 780.21/cm with improved spectroscopic parameters generated on the basis of recent laboratory work. The individual profiles, which have an accuracy of about +/- 20%, are compared with previous observations and model calculations.

  6. The Influence of Pickup Protons, from Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen, on the Propagation of Interplanetary Shocks from the Halloween 2003 Solar Events to ACE and Ulysses: A 3-D MHD Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detman, T. R.; Intriligator, D. S.; Dryer, M.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Intriligator, J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe our 3-D, time ]dependent, MHD solar wind model that we recently modified to include the physics of pickup protons from interstellar neutral hydrogen. The model has a time-dependent lower boundary condition, at 0.1 AU, that is driven by source surface map files through an empirical interface module. We describe the empirical interface and its parameter tuning to maximize model agreement with background (quiet) solar wind observations at ACE. We then give results of a simulation study of the famous Halloween 2003 series of solar events. We began with shock inputs from the Fearless Forecast real ]time shock arrival prediction study, and then we iteratively adjusted input shock speeds to obtain agreement between observed and simulated shock arrival times at ACE. We then extended the model grid to 5.5 AU and compared those simulation results with Ulysses observations at 5.2 AU. Next we undertook the more difficult tuning of shock speeds and locations to get matching shock arrival times at both ACE and Ulysses. Then we ran this last case again with neutral hydrogen density set to zero, to identify the effect of pickup ions. We show that the speed of interplanetary shocks propagating from the Sun to Ulysses is reduced by the effects of pickup protons. We plan to make further improvements to the model as we continue our benchmarking process to 10 AU, comparing our results with Cassini observations, and eventually on to 100 AU, comparing our results with Voyager 1 and 2 observations.

  7. New and Improved Infrared Spectroscopy of Halogen-Containing Species for ACE-FTS Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2014-06-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), onboard the SCISAT-1 satellite, is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) instrument covering the 750-4400 cm-1 spectral region in solar occultation mode. Launched in August 2003, the ACE-FTS has been taking atmospheric measurements for over ten years. With long atmospheric pathlengths (˜300 km) and the sun as a radiation source, the ACE-FTS provides a low detection threshold for trace species in the atmosphere. In fact, it measures the vertical profiles of more molecules in the atmosphere than any other satellite instrument.

    Fluorine- and chlorine-containing molecules in the atmosphere are very strong greenhouse gases, meaning that even small amounts of these gases contribute significantly to the radiative forcing of climate. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) are regulated by the 1987 Montreal Protocol because they deplete the ozone layer. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which do not deplete the ozone layer and are not regulated by the Montreal Protocol, have been introduced as replacements for CFCs and HCFCs. HFCs have global-warming potentials many times greater than carbon dioxide, and are increasing in the atmosphere at a very fast rate. The quantification of the atmospheric abundances of such molecules from measurements taken by the ACE-FTS and other satellite instruments crucially requires accurate quantitative infrared spectroscopy. HITRAN contains absorption cross section datasets for a number of these species, but many of them have minor deficiencies that introduce systematic errors into satellite retrievals. This talk will focus on new and improved laboratory measurements for a number of important halogenated species.

  8. Zernike moments as a useful tool for ACE imager aerological data retrieval (stratospheric temperature and cloud product)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodion, Jan; Fussen, Didier; Filip, Vanhellemont; Mateshvili, Nina; Christine, Bingen; Maxime, Stapelle; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Gilbert, Kathy; Walker, Kaley; Bernath, Peter

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) was launched in August 2003 aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT-I, and is at present fully operational. ACE circles the Earth at an altitude of 650 km with an orbital inclination of 74° . Solar occultation is the primary observation technique used by the on board instruments, which consist of a high resolution Fourier Transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), a dual optical spectrophotometer (MAESTRO) and two filtered imagers, subject of this presentation. While the Sun is setting below or rising from behind the Earth's horizon, at every timestamp, the imagers capture a snapshot of the Sun as seen through the atmosphere. On these pictures, the apparent Sun width is about 25 km at the tangent point and the apparent Sun height varies from almost 0.7 km in the optically thick, lower troposphere where the Sun image is highly flattened by the refraction to its maximum (about 25 km at the tangent point) where refractive effects are negligible. Used in image processing, image moments are certain particular weighted averages (moments) of the image pixel's intensities, or functions of those moments, usually chosen to have some attractive property on interpretation. Zernike moments were first introduced by Teague (1980) based on the complex, orthogonal functions called Zernike polynomials. Though computationally very complex compared to geometric and Legendre moments, Zernike moments have proved to be superior in terms of their feature representation capability and low noise sensitivity. Also, the construction of different moment invariants makes them well suited for our research. A detailed image analysis of ACE imager data using Zernike moments provides us the necessary information for the retrieval of temperature profiles from a series of distorted images of an object of known shape such as the Sun. These temperature profiles are validated with ACE-FTS data. Besides, a preliminary cloud product could be derived and, in addition, a

  9. Stratospheric HNO3 measurements from 0.002/cm resolution solar occultation spectra and improved spectroscopic line parameters in the 5.8-micron region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    1992-02-01

    Very-high-resolution FWHM solar-occultation spectra are investigated with a balloon-borne interferometer using revised spectroscopic line parameters for HNO3, O3, and H2O. The O3 and H2O data are evaluated to determine their capacity for interference in the HNO3 line which is studied in the nu sub 2 band at 5.8 microns. The line parameters developed with the stratospheric data are compared to data based on a HITRAN compilation as well as laboratory spectra with a 0.002/cm resolution. The line list is calculated and shown to include J and Ka transitions which improve the line parameters for HNO3 by accounting for the weaker absorption features in the stratospheric spectra. The stratospheric HNO3 profile developed analytically is compared to those based on reported measurements, and the one developed with the stratospheric solar spectra is found to be consistent with the measurements and confirm inherent measurement biases.

  10. Stratospheric HNO3 measurements from 0.002/cm resolution solar occultation spectra and improved spectroscopic line parameters in the 5.8-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    1992-01-01

    Very-high-resolution FWHM solar-occultation spectra are investigated with a balloon-borne interferometer using revised spectroscopic line parameters for HNO3, O3, and H2O. The O3 and H2O data are evaluated to determine their capacity for interference in the HNO3 line which is studied in the nu sub 2 band at 5.8 microns. The line parameters developed with the stratospheric data are compared to data based on a HITRAN compilation as well as laboratory spectra with a 0.002/cm resolution. The line list is calculated and shown to include J and Ka transitions which improve the line parameters for HNO3 by accounting for the weaker absorption features in the stratospheric spectra. The stratospheric HNO3 profile developed analytically is compared to those based on reported measurements, and the one developed with the stratospheric solar spectra is found to be consistent with the measurements and confirm inherent measurement biases.

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Lower Stratospheric Trend Measurements: Approach and Preliminary Results based on Comparisons with ATMOS Midlatitude Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Bernath, P. F.; McLeod, S.; Boone, C.; McHugh, M.; Walker, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) was successfully launched on August 12, 2003, into a 73.9 degree inclined orbit at an altitude of 650 km onboard a U.S.-supplied Pegasus XL vehicle. The primary goal of the ACE mission is to measure solar occultation spectra from the UV to mid-infrared for a minimum of two years to determine whether or not the stratospheric ozone layer will begin to recover now that chlorofluorocarbon emissions have been banned. Among the instruments carried by the small Canadian-built satellite is a compact Fourier transform spectrometer designed to measure in the 750-4100 cm-1 region at 0.02 cm-1 spectral resolution. The measurements will provide an opportunity to determine lower stratospheric trends at midlatitudes by comparison of ACE measurements with measurements recorded by the Atmospheric Trace MOlecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectometer at 0.01-cm-1 resolution during its first shuttle flight in 1985. We describe the approach to be used for trend determination, the status of the investigation, and the other data relevant for comparisons.

  12. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  13. The Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Park, Jae H.; Drayson, S. R.; Hesketh, W. D.; Cicerone, Ralph J.; Tuck, Adrian F.; Frederick, John E.; Harries, John E.; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) uses solar occultation to measure vertical profiles of O3, HCl, HF, CH4, H2O, NO, NO2, aerosol extinction, and temperature versus pressure with an instantaneous vertical field of view of 1.6 km at the earth limb. Latitudinal coverage is from 80 deg S to 80 deg N over the course of 1 year and includes extensive observations of the Antarctic region during spring. The altitude range of the measurements extends from about 15 km to about 60-130 km, depending on channel. Experiment operations have been essentially flawless, and all performance criteria either meet or exceed specifications. Internal data consistency checks, comparisons with correlative measurements, and qualitative comparisons with 1985 atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) results are in good agreement. Examples of pressure versus latitude cross sections and a global orthographic projection for the September 21 to October 15, 1992, period show the utility of CH4, HF, and H2O as tracers, the occurrence of dehydration in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, the presence of the water vapor hygropause in the tropics, evidence of Antarctic air in the tropics, the influence of Hadley tropical upwelling, and the first global distribution of HCl, HF, and NO throughout the stratosphere. Nitric oxide measurements extend through the lower thermosphere.

  14. Tangent height registration method for the Version 1.4 data retrieval algorithm of the solar occultation sensor ILAS-II.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomoaki; Nakajima, Hideaki; Sugita, Takafumi; Ejiri, Mitsumu K; Irie, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Naoko; Terao, Yukio; Kawasaki, Hiroyuki; Usami, Masatoshi; Yokota, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    2007-10-10

    The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer-II (ILAS-II) is a satellite-borne solar occultation sensor onboard the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-II (ADEOS-II). The ILAS-II succeeded the ILAS. The ILAS-II used four grating spectrometers to observe vertical profiles of gas volume mixing ratios of trace constituents and was also equipped with a Sun-edge sensor to determine tangent heights geometrically with high precision. The accuracy of gas volume mixing ratios depends on the accuracy of the tangent height determination. The combination method is a tangent height registration method that was developed to give appropriate tangent heights for the ILAS-II Version 1.4 data retrieval algorithm. This study describes the method used in the ILAS-II Version 1.4 retrieval algorithm to register tangent heights. The root-sum-square total random error is estimated to be 30 m, and the total systematic error is 180 m at an altitude of 30 km. The influence of the tangent height errors on the vertical profiles of gas volume mixing ratios in ILAS-II Version 1.4 is estimated by using the relative difference. The relative difference for each species is within 7% (20%) for an altitude shift of +/-100 m(+/-300 m).

  15. Line mixing effects in solar occultation spectra of the lower stratosphere: measurements and comparisons with calculations for the 1932-cm(-1) CO(2) Q branch.

    PubMed

    Rinsland, C P; Strow, L L

    1989-02-01

    Line mixing effects have been observed in a CO(2)Q branch recorded in 0.01-cm(-1) resolution IR solar occultation spectra of the lower stratosphere. The spectral data were obtained by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Fourier transform spectrometer during the Spacelab 3 shuttle mission in the spring of 1985. Analysis of the 1932.47-cm(-1) (11102)?(00001) band Q branch of (12)C(16)O(2) shows absorption coefficients below the band origin approximately 0.62 times those calculated using a standard Voigt line shape function. Calculations of line mixing using the Lorentz halfwidths of the lines and a simple energy gap scaling law to parametrize rotational energy transfer reproduce the observed absorption coefficients to ~10%. The present results provide the first quantitative information on air-broadened line mixing effects in a Q branch at low temperatures (~210 K) and show that these effects are significant even at the low pressures of the lower stratosphere (~100 mbar).

  16. Coronal Radio Occultation Experiments with the Helios Solar Probes: Correlation/Spectral Analysis of Faraday Rotation Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Rogashkova, A. I.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2015-09-01

    The coronal Faraday rotation (FR) experiments using the linearly polarized signals of the Helios-1 and Helios-2 interplanetary probes remain a unique investigation of the magnetic field of the solar corona and its aperiodic and quasi-periodic variations. The unexpectedly long lifetime of these spacecraft (1974 - 1986) enabled studies from very deep solar-activity minimum (1975 - 1976) into the strong activity maximum (1979). Important experimental data were also obtained for the rising (1977 - 1978) and declining (1980 - 1984) branches of the solar-activity cycle. Previous publications have presented results of the initial experimental data only for coronal-sounding experiments performed during individual solar-conjunction opportunities. This report is a more detailed analysis of the Helios FR measurements for the entire period 1975 - 1984. Radial profiles of the FR fluctuation (FRF) intensity recorded during the deepest solar-activity minimum in 1975 - 1976 are shown to differ distinctly from those during the strong solar-activity maximum in 1979. In particular, the decrease of the FRF intensity with solar-offset distance is substantially steeper in 1979 than in 1975/1976. In all cases, however, the FR data reveal quasi-periodic wave-like fluctuations in addition to the random background with a power-law spectrum. The dominant period of these fluctuations, recorded during 35 % of the total measurement time, is found to be close to five minutes. Large-scale FR variations at considerably longer periods (1.1 - 2.7 hours) were observed during 20 % of the measurement time. Knowing the intrinsic motion of the radio ray path from spacecraft to Earth and making a reasonable assumption about the solar-wind velocity, FRF observations at widely spaced ground stations have been used to estimate the velocity of coronal Alfvén waves. The velocity values range between 290 and 550 km s-1 at heliocentric distances between 3.5 and 4.5 R⊙ and are marginally lower (150 - 450 km s

  17. Titan's atmosphere as observed by Cassini/VIMS solar occultations: CH4, CO and evidence for C2H6 absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Bézard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Hedman, Matthew M.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe; de Kok, Remco J.; Sicardy, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the VIMS solar occultations dataset, which allows us to extract vertically resolved information on the characteristics of Titan's atmosphere between ∼100 and 700 km with a vertical resolution of ∼10 km. After a series of data treatment procedures to correct problems in pointing stability and parasitic light, 4 occultations out of 10 are retained. This sample covers different seasons and latitudes of Titan. The transmittances show clearly the evolution of the haze, with the detection of the detached layer at ∼310 km in September 2011 at mid-northern latitudes. Through the inversion of the transmission spectra with a line-by-line radiative transfer code we retrieve the vertical distribution of CH4 and CO mixing ratio. For methane inversion we use its 1.4, 1.7 and 2.3 μm bands. The first two bands are always in good agreement and yield an average stratospheric abundance of 1.28 ± 0.08%, after correcting for forward-scattering effects, with no significant differences between the occultations. This is significantly less than the value of 1.48% obtained by the GCMS/Huygens instrument. We find that the 2.3 μm band cannot be used for the extraction of methane abundance because it is blended with other absorptions, not included in our atmospheric model. The analysis of the residual spectra after the inversion shows that such additional absorptions are present through a great part of the VIMS wavelength range. We attribute many of these bands, including the one at 2.3 μm, to gaseous ethane, whose near-infrared spectrum is not well modeled yet. Ethane also contributes significantly to the strong absorption at 3.2-3.5 μm that was previously attributed only to C-H stretching bands from aerosols. Ethane bands may affect the surface windows too, especially at 2.7 μm. Other residual bands are generated by stretching modes of C-H, C-C and C-N bonds. In addition to the C-H stretch from aliphatic hydrocarbons at 3.4 μm, we detect a strong and

  18. Arctic Collaborative Environment (ACE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    distribution is unlimited. Key Data Requirements • Sea Ice – Location: Area, Onset, Growth, Drift, and Decay – Characterization: % Coverage, Thickness...Cloud ACE Developmental Server hosted at UAHuntsville ACE User Community Public Internet Tailored Ice Product Generation (NIC) Arctic Research...distribution is unlimited. Arctic Map 26 July 2012 13 Multi-sensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent; National Data Buoy Center DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A

  19. Earth rotation derived from occultation records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sôma, Mitsuru; Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    2016-04-01

    We determined the values of the Earth's rotation parameter, ΔT = T T - UT, around AD 500 after confirming that the value of the tidal acceleration, dot{n}, of the lunar motion remained unchanged during the period between ancient times and the present. For determining of ΔT, we used contemporaneous occultations of planets by the Moon. In general, occultation records are not useful. However, there are some records that give us a stringent condition for the range of ΔT. Records of the lunar occultations in AD 503 and AD 513 are such examples. In order to assure the usefulness of this occultation data, we used contemporaneous annular and total solar eclipses, which have not been used in the preceding work. This is the first work in which the lunar occultation data have been used as primary data to determine the value of ΔT together with auxiliary contemporaneous annular and total solar eclipses. Our ΔT value is less than a smoothed value (Stephenson 1997) by at least 450 s. The result is consistent with our earlier results obtained from solar eclipses.

  20. The Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Validation Project: Overview and results from ten years of ACE operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kaley; Strong, Kimberly

    2014-05-01

    As of February 2014, the Canadian-led Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite mission has been making measurements of the Earth's atmosphere for ten years. As ACE operations have extended beyond the initial two-year mission, there is a continuing need to validate the trace gas data products from the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instruments. Ground-based measurements provide critical data for the validation of satellite retrievals of trace gases and for the assessment of long-term stability of these measurements. In particular, validation comparisons are needed for ACE during Arctic springtime to understand better the measurements of species involved in stratospheric ozone chemistry. To this end, eleven Canadian Arctic Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Validation Campaigns have been conducted during the spring period (February - April in 2004 - 2014) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W). This period coincides with the most chemically active time of year in the Arctic, as well as a significant number of satellite overpasses. A suite of as many as 12 ground-based instruments, as well as frequent balloon-borne ozonesonde and radiosonde launches, have been used in each campaign. These instruments include: a ground-based version of the ACE-FTS (PARIS - Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer), a terrestrial version of the ACE-MAESTRO, a SunPhotoSpectrometer, two zenith-viewing UV-visible grating spectrometers, a Bomem DA8 Fourier transform spectrometer, a Bruker 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer, a Systeme d'Analyse par Observations Zenithales (SAOZ) instrument, and several Brewer spectrophotometers. In the past several years, these results have been used to validate the measurements by the ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO instruments on SCISAT as well

  1. UMBRAS: a matched occulter and telescope for imaging extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Alfred B.; Jordan, Ian J.; Kochte, Mark; Fraquelli, Dorothy A.; Bruhweiler, Fred; Hollis, Jan M.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; DiSanti, Mike A.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Leitner, Jesse; Burns, Richard D.; Starin, Scott R.; Rodrigue, Melodi; Fadali, M. S.; Skelton, Dennis L.; Hart, Helen M.; Hamilton, Forrest C.; Cheng, Kwang-Ping

    2003-02-01

    We describe a 1-meter space telescope plus free-flying occulter craft mission that would provide direct imaging and spectroscopic observations of Jovian and Uranus-sized planets about nearby stars not detectable by Doppler techniques. The Doppler technique is most sensitive for the detection of massive, close-in extrasolar planets while the use of a free-flying occulter would make it possible to image and study stellar systems with planets comparable to our own Solar System. Such a mission with a larger telescope has the potential to detect earth-like planets. Previous studies of free-flying occulters reported advantages in having the occulting spot outside the telescope compared to a classical coronagraph onboard a space telescope. Using an external occulter means light scatter within the telescope is reduced due to fewer internal obstructions and less light entering the telescope and the polishing tolerances of the primary mirror and the supporting optics can be less stringent, thereby providing higher contrast and fainter detection limits. In this concept, the occulting spot is positioned over the star by translating the occulter craft, at distances of 1,000 to 15,000 kms from the telescope, on the sky instead of by moving the telescope. Any source within the telescope field-of-view can be occulted without moving the telescope. In this paper, we present our current concept for a 1-m space telescope matched to a free-flying occulter, the Umbral Missions Blocking Radiating Astronomical Sources (UMBRAS) space mission. An UMBRAS space mission consists of a Solar Powered Ion Driven Eclipsing Rover (SPIDER) occulter craft and a matched (apodized) telescope. The occulter spacecraft would be semi-autonomous, with its own propulsion systems, internal power (solar cells), communications, and navigation capability. Spacecraft rendezvous and formation flying would be achieved with the aid of telescope imaging, RF or laser ranging, celestial navigation inputs, and formation

  2. Methane cross-validation between three Fourier transform spectrometers: SCISAT ACE-FTS, GOSAT TANSO-FTS, and ground-based FTS measurements in the Canadian high Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Gerrit; Walker, Kaley A.; Conway, Stephanie; Saitoh, Naoko; Boone, Chris D.; Strong, Kimberly; Drummond, James R.

    2016-05-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing measurements of methane profiles in the Canadian high Arctic. Accurate and precise measurements of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. Here, we show a cross-validation between three data sets: two from spaceborne instruments and one from a ground-based instrument. All are Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs). We consider the Canadian SCISAT Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)-FTS, a solar occultation infrared spectrometer operating since 2004, and the thermal infrared band of the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO)-FTS, a nadir/off-nadir scanning FTS instrument operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) Ridge Laboratory at Eureka, Nunavut (80° N, 86° W) since 2006. For each pair of instruments, measurements are collocated within 500 km and 24 h. An additional collocation criterion based on potential vorticity values was found not to significantly affect differences between measurements. Profiles are regridded to a common vertical grid for each comparison set. To account for differing vertical resolutions, ACE-FTS measurements are smoothed to the resolution of either PEARL-FTS or TANSO-FTS, and PEARL-FTS measurements are smoothed to the TANSO-FTS resolution. Differences for each pair are examined in terms of profile and partial columns. During the period considered, the number of collocations for each pair is large enough to obtain a good sample size (from several hundred to tens of thousands depending on pair and configuration). Considering full profiles, the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are between 0.2 and 0.7 for TANSO-FTS and

  3. Methane cross-validation between three Fourier Transform Spectrometers: SCISAT ACE-FTS, GOSAT TANSO-FTS, and ground-based FTS measurements in the Canadian high Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing measurements of methane profiles in the Canadian high Arctic. Accurate and precise measurements of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. Here, we show a cross-validation between three datasets: two from spaceborne instruments and one from a ground-based instrument. All are Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTSs). We consider the Canadian SCISAT Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)-FTS, a solar occultation infrared spectrometer operating since 2004, and the thermal infrared band of the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO)-FTS, a nadir/off-nadir scanning FTS instrument operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker 125HR Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) Ridge Lab at Eureka, Nunavut (80° N, 86° W) since 2006. For each pair of instruments, measurements are collocated within 500 km and 24 h. An additional criterion based on potential vorticity values was found not to significantly affect differences between measurements. Profiles are regridded to a common vertical grid for each comparison set. To account for differing vertical resolutions, ACE-FTS measurements are smoothed to the resolution of either PEARL-FTS or TANSO-FTS, and PEARL-FTS measurements are smoothed to the TANSO-FTS resolution. Differences for each pair are examined in terms of profile and partial columns. During the period considered, the number of collocations for each pair is large enough to obtain a good sample size (from several hundred to tens of thousands depending on pair and configuration). Considering full profiles, the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are between 0.2 and 0.7 for TANSO-FTS and between 1.5 and 3

  4. Deep shadow occulter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for occulting light. The occulter shape suppresses diffraction at any given size or angle and is practical to build because it can be made binary to avoid scatter. Binary structures may be fully opaque or fully transmitting at specific points. The diffraction suppression is spectrally broad so that it may be used with incoherent white light. An occulter may also include substantially opaque inner portion and an at least partially transparent outer portion. Such occulters may be used on the ground to create a deep shadow in a short distance, or may be used in space to suppress starlight and reveal exoplanets.

  5. The CU mobile Solar Occultation Flux instrument: structure functions and emission rates of NH3, NO2 and C2H6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kille, Natalie; Baidar, Sunil; Handley, Philip; Ortega, Ivan; Sinreich, Roman; Cooper, Owen R.; Hase, Frank; Hannigan, James W.; Pfister, Gabriele; Volkamer, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    We describe the University of Colorado mobile Solar Occultation Flux instrument (CU mobile SOF). The instrument consists of a digital mobile solar tracker that is coupled to a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) of 0.5 cm-1 resolution and a UV-visible spectrometer (UV-vis) of 0.55 nm resolution. The instrument is used to simultaneously measure the absorption of ammonia (NH3), ethane (C2H6) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) along the direct solar beam from a moving laboratory. These direct-sun observations provide high photon flux and enable measurements of vertical column densities (VCDs) with geometric air mass factors, high temporal resolution of 2 s and spatial resolution of 5-19 m. It is shown that the instrument line shape (ILS) of the FTS is independent of the azimuth and elevation angle pointing of the solar tracker. Further, collocated measurements next to a high-resolution FTS at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HR-NCAR-FTS) show that the CU mobile SOF measurements of NH3 and C2H6 are precise and accurate; the VCD error at high signal to noise ratio is 2-7 %. During the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) from 21 July to 3 September 2014 in Colorado, the CU mobile SOF instrument measured median (minimum, maximum) VCDs of 4.3 (0.5, 45) × 1016 molecules cm-2 NH3, 0.30 (0.06, 2.23) × 1016 molecules cm-2 NO2 and 3.5 (1.5, 7.7) × 1016 molecules cm-2 C2H6. All gases were detected in larger 95 % of the spectra recorded in urban, semi-polluted rural and remote rural areas of the Colorado Front Range. We calculate structure functions based on VCDs, which describe the variability of a gas column over distance, and find the largest variability for NH3. The structure functions suggest that currently available satellites resolve about 10 % of the observed NH3 and NO2 VCD variability in the study area. We further quantify the trace gas emission fluxes of NH3 and C2H6 and production rates of NO2 from concentrated animal feeding

  6. ACES--Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Presents text of Presidential Address delivered March 24, 1991, at the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) luncheon, part of the American Association for Counseling and Development Convention held in Reno, Nevada. Comments on past, present, and future of ACES, particularly on future challenges and role of ACES. (ABL)

  7. Extinction coefficient (1 micrometer) properties of high-altitude clouds from solar occultation measurements (1985-1990): Evidence of volcanic aerosol effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Minnis, Patrick; Yue, Glenn K.

    1995-01-01

    extinction-coefficient values, opposite the effect observed by SAGE 2 and SAM 2. This work further illustrates the capability of the solar occultation satellite sensor to provide particulate extinction-coefficient measurements important to the study of the aerosol-cloud interactions. It is important to examine the variations of the extinction coefficient of these two high-altitude cloud systems for the posteruption years of the Pinatubo volcanic event for further evidence of the impact of volcanic aerosols on high-altitude clouds.

  8. Chiron stellar occultation candidates: 1993-1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bus, S. J.; Wasserman, L. H.; Elliot, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A photographic search was conducted for stars that may be occulted by the unusual solar system object (2060) Chiron during the period from fall 1993 through summer 1996. 44 candidates were identified to a limiting V magnitude of 16, and for which the minimum appulse separation with Chiron is predicted to be less than 2.5 arcsec. The successful observation of a stellar occultation by Chiron would give a direct measure of its diameter (currently estimated to be between 60 and 300 km), and would help considerably in constraining Chiron's surface properties and volatile makeup. If at the time of the occultation, Chiron exhibits a significant coma, there is also the potential for measuring the optical-depth profile of the dust in its inner coma.

  9. APL workers install CRIS on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Workers from the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) install the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). From left, are Al Sadilek, Marcos Gonzalez and Cliff Willey. CRIS is one of nine instruments on ACE, which will investigate the origin and evolution of solar phenomenon, the formation of the solar corona, solar flares and the acceleration of the solar wind. ACE was developed for NASA by the APL. The spacecraft is scheduled to be launched Aug. 21 aboard a two-stage Delta II 7920-8 rocket from Space Launch Complex 17, Pad A.

  10. Upper troposphere and stratosphere distribution of hydrocarbon species in ACE-FTS measurements and GEOS-Chem simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Walker, Kaley A.; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Jones, Ashley; Sheese, Patrick E.; Boone, Chris D.; Bernath, Peter F.; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of carbon-containing species, referred to herein as "hydrocarbons", are important components needed for describing and understanding the influence of natural and anthropogenic emissions on atmospheric chemistry. Analysis of the global pattern of hydrocarbons contributes to our understanding of the influence of regional and seasonal variation in air pollution and natural fire events. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) has monitored trace gases in the upper troposphere and stratosphere based on solar occultation measurements for more than ten years. In this study, we investigate the global pattern of seven "hydrocarbon" species (CO, C2H6, C2H2, HCN, H2CO, CH3OH, and HCOOH) and OCS using the ACE-FTS version 3.5 dataset from 2004 to 2013. All hydrocarbons show strong seasonal variation and regional differences, but the detailed pattern differs according to the speciation of the hydrocarbons. For example, in the Northern Hemisphere, CO, C2H6, and C2H2 show the highest mixing ratios in winter, but high CH3OH and HCOOH appear in summer. In the Southern hemisphere, H2CO, HCN, and HCOOH show high mixing ratios in springtime. These patterns indicate the impact of different emission sources including fuel combustion, wildfire emission, and chemical production. By calculating correlations with CO, these results can provide useful information to characterize each hydrocarbon emission. The ACE-FTS measurements have also been compared with GEOS-Chem output to examine the model performance and spatiotemporal patterns in the simulations.

  11. Occulter Starshade Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisman, P. D.; Thomson, M.; Kissil, A.; Walkemeyer, P.; Polanco, O.

    2010-10-01

    Imaging Earth-like exoplanets with a free flying occulter requires developing a large, lightweight, flower-shaped, deployable structure with precisely controlled edge position and profile. In-plane tolerance requirements are considerably tighter than heritage antenna systems, but the more difficult to control out-of-plane tolerances are actually much looser. This paper presents a novel occulter mechanical design that delivers the required performance with a highly reliable deployment scheme. A very compact stowed volume is an added benefit that enables launching the occulter together with a 1 to 2m class telescope, using a single, currently available launch vehicle. Demonstrating the petal deployment function and compliance with key tolerance specifications is the focus of current technology efforts. A series of prototype models of increasing fidelity are planned, starting with a proof of concept model that is currently in fabrication. The occulter design and current development status is presented herein.

  12. Precise Astrometry for Predicting Kuiper Belt Object Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott; Person, Michael; Zuluaga, Carlos; Bosh, Amanda

    2011-08-01

    Occultations by Kuiper Belt objects remain elusive events, requiring precision astrometry for these faint bodies in the outer solar system. Monthly astrometry provides data that are crucial for our KBO ephemeris correction models, which then allow accurate shadow track predictions. Through the occultation events the diameters, possible companions and tenuous atmospheres around these objects will be explored by examining how the light from the star varies as the KBO passes in front of it. This promises to be a powerful way of exploring the KBOs. We propose to obtain very precise astrometry on 20 of the brightest known KBOs to determine more accurate orbits and thus reliable occultation predictions.

  13. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  14. David Levy's Guide to Eclipses, Transits, and Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, David H.

    2010-08-01

    Introduction; Part I. The Magic and History of Eclipses: 1. Shakespeare, King Lear, and the Great Eclipse of 1605; 2. Three centuries later: Einstein, relativity, and the solar eclipse of 1919; 3. What causes solar and lunar eclipses; Part II. Observing Solar Eclipses: 4. Safety considerations; 5. What to expect during a partial eclipse; 6. Annular eclipses and what to see in them; 7. Total eclipse of the Sun: introduction to the magic; 8. The onset: temperature drop, Baily's Beads, Diamond Ring; 9. Totality: Corona, Prominences, Chromosphere, and surrounding area; 10. Photographing and imaging a solar eclipse; Part III. Observing Lunar Eclipses: 11. Don't forget the penumbral eclipses!; 12. Partial lunar eclipses; 13. Total lunar eclipses; 14. Photographing and imaging lunar eclipses; Part IV. Occultations: 15. When the Moon occults a star; Part V. Transits: 16. When planets cross the Sun; Part VI. My Favorite Eclipses: 17. A personal canon of eclipses, occultations, and transits I have seen; Appendices; Index.

  15. Long-term trends in the concentrations of SF6, CHClF2, and COF2 in the lower stratosphere from analysis of high-resolution infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Kosters, J. J.

    1990-09-01

    Long-term trends in the concentrations of SF6, CHClF2 in the lower stratosphere are derived using results from analyses of the 1980 and of several more recently obtained IR solar occultation spectra. Results show that the increase rates of SF6 and CHClF2 were about 7.4/yr and 9.4/yr, respectively, which correspond to cumulative increases by factors of about 1.7 and 2.0 in the concentrations of these gases over the 7.2 yr measurement period. The average increase rate for COF2 was 10.3/yr over the same time period. The present results are compared with previously reported observations and trends and with one-dimensional model calculations.

  16. Balloon-based infrared solar occultation measurements of stratospheric O/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O, HNO/sub 3/ and CF/sub 2/Cl(sub 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Weinreb, M.P.; Chang, I.L.

    1987-09-01

    In July 1985 an infrared solar occultation experiment was performed with a balloon-borne, non-scanning, multi-detector grating spectrometer. From the data were retrieved simultaneous mixing ratio profiles of ozone, water vapor, nitric acid, and CFC-12 between 12 and 35 km. The retrieved ozone and water vapor profiles were compared with concurrent in-situ measurements with electrochemical concentration cells (ECCs) and frost-point hygrometers, respectively. The retrieved ozone profile was in good agreement with the correlative data. The retrieved values of water vapor mixing ratio, while close in magnitude to the correlative measurements, differed in their altitude dependence. Although there was no concurrent in-situ data for nitric acid and CFC-12, the retrieved profiles were consistent with measurements in the literature.

  17. Balloon-based infrared solar-occultation measurements of stratospheric O/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O, HNO/sub 3/, and CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weinreb, M.P.; Chang, I.L.

    1987-09-01

    In July 1985 the authors performed an infrared solar-occultation experiment with a balloon-borne, non-scanning, multi-detector grating spectrometer. From the data, the authors retrieved simultaneous mixing-ratio profiles of ozone, water vapor, nitric acid, and CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ between 12 and 35 km. The retrieved ozone and water-vapor profiles were compared with concurrent in-situ measurements with electrochemical concentration cells (ECC's) and frost-point hygrometers, respectively. The retrieved-ozone profile was in good agreement with the correlative data. The retrieved values of water-vapor-mixing ratio, while close in magnitude to the correlative measurements, differed in their altitude dependence. Although the authors had no concurrent in-situ data for nitric acid and CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/, the retrieved profiles were consistent with measurements in the literature.

  18. KUIPER BELT OBJECT OCCULTATIONS: EXPECTED RATES, FALSE POSITIVES, AND SURVEY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Bickerton, S. J.; Welch, D. L.; Kavelaars, J. J. E-mail: welch@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2009-05-15

    A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu{sup -1}, corresponding to 40 s{sup -1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt asteroids will produce occultations light curves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116{sup 0} {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 125 deg., or 131 deg. {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 141 deg., and (4) genuine KBO occultations are likely to be so rare that a detection threshold of {approx}>7-8{sigma} should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

  19. Cassini Radio Occultation by Enceladus Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, A.; Armstrong, J.; Flasar, F.; French, R.; Marouf, E.; Nagy, A.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Asmar, S.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Goltz, G.; Aguilar, R.; Rochblatt, D.

    2006-12-01

    A fortuitous Cassini radio occultation by Enceladus plume occurs on September 15, 2006. The occultation track (the spacecraft trajectory in the plane of the sky as viewed from the Earth) has been designed to pass behind the plume (to pass above the south polar region of Enceladus) in a roughly symmetrical geometry centered on a minimum altitude above the surface of about 20 km. The minimum altitude was selected primarily to ensure probing much of the plume with good confidence given the uncertainty in the spacecraft trajectory. Three nearly-pure sinusoidal signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm-wavelength (Ka-, X-, and S-band, respectively) are simultaneously transmitted from Cassini and are monitored at two 34-m Earth receiving stations of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in Madrid, Spain (DSS-55 and DSS-65). The occultation of the visible plume is extremely fast, lasting less than about two minutes. The actual observation time extends over a much longer time interval, however, to provide a good reference baseline for potential detection of signal perturbations introduced by the tenuous neutral and ionized plume environment. Given the likely very small fraction of optical depth due to neutral particles of sizes larger than about 1 mm, detectable changes in signal intensity is perhaps unlikely. Detection of plume plasma along the radio path as perturbations in the signals frequency/phase is more likely and the magnitude will depend on the electron columnar density probed. The occultation time occurs not far from solar conjunction time (Sun-Earth-probe angle of about 33 degrees), causing phase scintillations due to the solar wind to be the primary limiting noise source. We estimate a delectability limit of about 1 to 3E16 electrons per square meter columnar density assuming about 100 seconds integration time. Potential measurement of the profile of electron columnar density along the occultation track is an exciting prospect at this time.

  20. ACES's Challenges: Past Presidents Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeley, Vernon Lee

    1990-01-01

    Recognizes the golden anniversary of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) and presents the statements of 15 past presidents of the association. Presidential leaders briefly review the association's past and suggest opportunities to help create a promising future for ACES. Outlines nine challenges which confront members of…

  1. FIRE_ACE_UTRECHT_TOWER

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    FIRE_ACE_UTRECHT_TOWER Project Title:  FIRE II ACE Discipline:  ... L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Site; Meteorological tower Instrument:  Eppley precision pyrgeometers Meteorological tower Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  2. Measurements of the O2A- and B-bands for determining temperature and pressure profiles from ACE MAESTRO: Forward model and retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlan, C. R.; McElroy, C. T.; Drummond, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    The ACE-MAESTRO (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) instrument on the SCISAT satellite is able to measure solar occultation absorption in the A- and B-bands of molecular oxygen with a spectral resolution of 2 nm. Profiles of total atmospheric density are derived by exploiting the constant and known mixing ratio of O2, and are used to determine profiles of pressure and temperature using hydrostatic balance and the ideal gas law. A highly accurate combined fast-line-by-line and extended correlated-k technique is implemented to fast forward model MAESTRO's O2 absorption measurements, which ensures that errors in pressure and temperature resulting from the forward model approximation are essentially negligible. Estimated errors in pressure and temperature are determined for the A-, B-, and combined A B-band retrievals for a typical retrieval, and demonstrate that pressure profiles should be derivable to within 1% and temperature to within 2 K over most altitudes using a combined A B retrieval. The combined retrieval provides an improvement of up to 0.25% in pressure and 0.5 K in temperature over the A-band retrieval alone. The B-band could also be used alone below about 50 km, where its independent retrieval produces error estimates of 1 1.5% in pressure and 2 3 K in temperature.

  3. Satellite Occultation Measurements-Contributions to Middle Atmosphere Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    2003-12-01

    Solar occultation measurements from earth-orbit began with two orbits of data from aboard Apollo during the Apollo-Soyuz test project flight in 1975. The instrument was called SAM for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement. It was a simple proof-of-principle, one-spectral channel experiment that led to the long-duration occultation measurement series beginning in 1978 with the launch of SAM II aboard Nimbus 7. SAGE I, II, and III followed with increasing instrument complexity and capability. SAGE II and III are presently in orbit providing excellent high vertically-resolved measurements of aerosol, ozone, and other constituents. Other occultation sensors for long-duration measurements were launched in the 1990s including HALOE and POAM. This paper will present a historical overview of satellite occultation missions from 1975 to the present. The fundamentals of the occultation technique will be presented along with its advantages and comparison with other remote sensors. The occultation sensors, to-date, have produced exceedingly important measurements that have contributed to atmospheric and climate science. These have included such measurements as: the naming and characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds; aerosol and ozone associated with the wintertime polar vortex phenomena; ozone, HCl and HF trends associated with the effects of CFCs; the impact of volcanic aerosols; and aerosol and cirrus cloud distributions and trends. As the lead-off paper in this session, examples of the above data will be presented. Finally, some "lessons-learned" from these occultation missions will be discussed.

  4. A Digital Video System for Observing and Recording Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, M. A. Tony; Gault, Dave; Pavlov, Hristo; Hanna, William; McEwan, Alistair; Filipović, Miroslav D.

    2015-09-01

    Stellar occultations by asteroids and outer solar system bodies can offer ground based observers with modest telescopes and camera equipment the opportunity to probe the shape, size, atmosphere, and attendant moons or rings of these distant objects. The essential requirements of the camera and recording equipment are: good quantum efficiency and low noise; minimal dead time between images; good horological faithfulness of the image timestamps; robustness of the recording to unexpected failure; and low cost. We describe an occultation observing and recording system which attempts to fulfil these requirements and compare the system with other reported camera and recorder systems. Five systems have been built, deployed, and tested over the past three years, and we report on three representative occultation observations: one being a 9 ± 1.5 s occultation of the trans-Neptunian object 28978 Ixion (m v =15.2) at 3 seconds per frame; one being a 1.51 ± 0.017 s occultation of Deimos, the 12 km diameter satellite of Mars, at 30 frames per second; and one being a 11.04 ± 0.4 s occultation, recorded at 7.5 frames per second, of the main belt asteroid 361 Havnia, representing a low magnitude drop (Δm v = ~0.4) occultation.

  5. Occultations, past and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.

    Techniques and limitations of photoelectric observations of occultations are discussed. Methods are described for allowing for fringe effects which arise from real world deviations from a uniform limb, and for using the limb measurements to derive ephemerides for the moon. Procedures employed to identify and separate out the components of multiple star systems are reviewed, and techniques are presented for improving the acuity of photoelectric angular size measurements that are complementary to interferometric measurements. Finally, sample data are provided to illustrate anomalies observed in photoelectric occultation observations of Antares and Aldebaran.

  6. Occult fractures of extremities.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Mo; El-Khoury, Georges Y

    2007-05-01

    Recent advances in cross-sectional imaging, particularly in CT and MR imaging, have given these modalities a prominent role in the diagnosis of fractures of the extremities. This article describes the clinical application and imaging features of cross-sectional imaging (CT and MR imaging) in the evaluation of patients who have occult fractures of the extremities. Although CT or MR imaging is not typically required for evaluation of acute fractures, these modalities could be helpful in the evaluation of the occult osseous injuries in which radiographic findings are equivocal or inconclusive.

  7. Development of a micro-satellite compatible FTS sounder for sun-occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaccari, Philippe; Moreau, Louis M.; Giroux, Jacques G.; Soucy, Marc-André

    2009-09-01

    The SciSat/ACE mission provided, and still provides, high quality and high spectral resolution measurements of the atmosphere with a FTS sounder in sun-occultation configuration. Based on the comprehensive results and models of SciSat/ACE it is foreseen that most of the desired information can also be retrieved from lower spectral resolution measurements with higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and appropriate data treatment. With the Canadian Space Agency under the Space Technologies Development Program, ABB Analytical developed a small size sun-occultation sounder compatible with a micro-satellite platform that has identical throughput, spectral bandwidth and vertical resolution as ACE. The spectral resolution is decreased by a factor 25 (0.6 cm-1 instead of 0.024 cm-1 for ACE) whereas the SNR performance is highly increased with an equal factor (target of 2500 instead of 100 for ACE over most of the spectral bandwidth between 750 and 4000 cm-1).A prototype of the sun-occultation sounder was built, tested under various thermal conditions and subjected to vibrations similar to those expected at launch. An outdoor experiment was also conducted to test the instrument in sun-occultation conditions. The good behavior of the instrument indicates interesting opportunities for such small footprint sounder on a low-cost micro-satellite mission and potentially good earth coverage if several of such instruments are used in coordination. Depending on the scientific needs, it is possible to adapt the proposed instrument to increase the vertical resolution and/or to extend the measurements on lower altitudes due to the higher SNR performances.

  8. Precise Astrometry for Predicting Kuiper Belt Object Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott; Person, Michael; Zuluaga, Carlos; Bosh, Amanda

    2012-08-01

    Occultations by Kuiper Belt objects remain elusive events, requiring precision astrometry for these faint bodies in the outer solar system. Routine astrometry provides data that are crucial for our KBO ephemeris correction models, which then allow accurate shadow track predictions. Through the occultation events the diameters, possible companions and tenuous atmospheres around these objects will be explored by examining how the light from the star varies as the KBO passes in front of it. This is a powerful way to determine the physical characteristics of the KBOs. We propose to obtain very precise astrometry on 20 of the brightest known KBOs to determine more accurate orbits and thus reliable occultation predictions. We also require telescope time to obtain precise astrometry on possible stars that will be occulted by a KBO in the future.

  9. Precise Astrometry for Predicting Kuiper Belt Object Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott; Person, Michael; Zuluaga, Carlos; Bosh, Amanda

    2013-02-01

    Occultations by Kuiper Belt objects remain elusive events, requiring precision astrometry for these faint bodies in the outer solar system. Routine astrometry provides data that are crucial for our KBO ephemeris correction models, which then allow accurate shadow track predictions. Through the occultation events the diameters, possible companions and tenuous atmospheres around these objects will be explored by examining how the light from the star varies as the KBO passes in front of it. This is a powerful way to determine the physical characteristics of the KBOs. We propose to obtain very precise astrometry on 10 of the brightest known KBOs to determine more accurate orbits and thus reliable occultation predictions. We also require telescope time to obtain precise astrometry on possible stars that will be occulted by a KBO in the future.

  10. Forthcoming Occultations of Astrometric Radio Sources by Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    L'vov, Victor; Malkin, Zinovy; Tsekmeister, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Astrometric observations of radio source occultations by solar system bodies may be of large interest for testing gravity theories, dynamical astronomy, and planetary physics. In this paper, we present an updated list of the occultations of astrometric radio sources by planets expected in the coming years. Such events, like solar eclipses, generally speaking can only be observed in a limited region. A map of the shadow path is provided for the events that will occurr in regions with several VLBI stations and hence will be the most interesting for radio astronomy experiments.

  11. [ACE inhibitors and the kidney].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment with ACE inhibitors results in kidney protection due to reduction of systemic blood pressure, intraglomerular pressure, an antiproliferative effect, reduction of proteinuria and a lipid-lowering effect in proteinuric patients (secondary due to reduction of protein excretion). Elderly patients with diabetes melitus, coronary heart disease or peripheral vascular occlusion are at risk for deterioration of kidney function due to a high frequency of renal artery stenosis in these patients. In patients with renal insufficiency dose reduction of ACE inhibitors is necessary (exception: fosinopril) but more important is the risk for development of hyperkalemia. Patients at risk for renal artery stenosis and patients pretreated with diuretics should receive a low ACE inhibitor dosage initially ("start low - go slow"). For compliance reasons once daily ACE inhibitor dosage is recommended.

  12. Atmospheric Constituent Explorer System (ACES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrach, M. R.; Madzunkov, S.; Neidholdt, E.; Simcic, J.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the Atmospheric Constituent Explorer System (ACES), a mass spectrometer based instrument for atmospheric probe missions (e.g. Venus and ice giant) that can determine abundances and isotopic ratios of the noble-gases and trace species.

  13. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The page information was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  14. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Biomonitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The page information was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  15. Solar Cycle comparison of Nitric Oxide in the lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, P. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Thurairajah, B.; Yonker, J. D.; Venkataramani, K.; Russell, J. M.; Hervig, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    represent the previous solar minimum between the solar cycles 22 and 23 following Jian et al 2010. We will use the data from HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment instrument), ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) and SOFIE for our analysis. We will also discuss the factors influencing the changes seen in our analysis. We show no significant change in the concentration of NO at the equator, but a significant change at higher latitudes.

  16. Diverse Applications of Occultation Data in Ozone Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Uttley, P.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone profiles from solar occultation instruments provide invaluable information that can be used to evaluate the quality of assimilated ozone fields, from case studies to long-term phenomena. Occultation data can also be applied to include physical constraints while developing components of an assimilation system. Conversely, assimilation of occultation data can help in their validation, and it provides a framework for evaluation of the impact of occultation data on constraining global ozone fields within models. We illustrate these diverse applications by a series of examples using the ozone assimilation system at NASA/Goddard. In a case study, low ozone in the lower stratosphere due to transport of air from the Tropics to northern high latitudes that was captured by assimilation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) data, was found to agree with SAGE III data. For long-term monitoring, the quality of a multi-year SBUV-only assimilation was evaluated using monthly-mean time series of POAM, HALOE, and SAGE I1 data. We found realism in the representation of the annual cycle in ozone and in some aspects of interannual variability. Assimilation of POAM data was shown to improve the representation of lower stratospheric ozone, especially over Antarctica. More recently, we assimilated ILAS II ozone data in order to help in their validation. Solar occultation data are used to estimate parameters in a new model for forecast error variances that is being developed. These examples demonstrate the importance of occultation data for ozone assimilation, and potential of assimilation to increase the impact and the value of occultation data.

  17. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G.; Jenke, P.; Chaplin, V.; Cherry, M.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M.; Haynes, R. H.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J.

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/ soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels.

  18. Study of transneptunian objects through stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Sicardy, B.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2014-07-01

    The physical parameters of the transneptunian objects (TNO's) such as size, shape, density, presence of atmosphere, provide important information on their formation and evolution. At more than 30 astronomical units (au) from the Sun, those objects receive low solar radiation and have low mutual collisions so they can be considered as remnants of the primordial outer Solar System. Besides that, information on TNO's is of great relevance when trying to establish a general formation scenario for the recently discovered planetary systems. The problem is that such bodies have a diameter smaller than 2300 km (Eris, one of the largest TNO, has 2326 km) and, when viewed from Earth, they subtend angles smaller than 50 milli-arcseconds, a fact that makes their resolution very poor with current imaging systems. One method to obtain very accurate information on the TNO's is the stellar-occultation technique. Sizes at kilometer accuracies and pressure at nanobar levels can be achieved with this method. Shape, mass, density and other physical parameters can also be derived using this technique. Since 2010, we observed stellar occultations of several TNO's (Varuna in 2010 and 2013; Eris in 2010; 2003 AZ_{84} in 2010 and 2011; Makemake in 2011; Quaoar in 2011 and two in 2012; 2002 KX_{14} in 2013; and finally Sedna in 2013) besides some other occultations of the Pluto system and of the largest Centaurs. We also predicted future events in 2014 and 2015 for the largest 40 TNO's and Centaurs. In this work, we will present new results obtained from recent stellar occultations of TNO's.

  19. An analysis of the Voyager 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer occultation data at Uranus - Inferring heat sources and model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Herbert, Floyd

    1993-01-01

    Heat source information is derived here from the Voyager 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer occultation data of Uranus. Analytic functions for the local heat dependence on altitude are used to obtain a temperature profile by solving the heat equation. The stellar entrance and exit occultation and a solar occultation are used to infer the thermal and density structure of the atmosphere. The least squares fit solution to the solar occultation data gives one source located at 1.8 x 10 exp -5 microbar with a strength of 0.056 +/- 0.01 erg/sq cm/s. Latitudinal temperature gradients are obtained.

  20. Characterization and evolution of distant planetary atmospheres using stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, L. A.

    2008-09-01

    Ground-based or near-Earth (e.g., HST) stellar occultations of every atmosphere in our solar system has been observed: Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, Uranus, Neptune, Triton, and Pluto [1]. These observations probe the atmospheres at roughly 0.1 to 100 microbar. I will talk about three aspects of stellar occultations: one-dimensional vertical profiles of the atmosphere, two- or three-dimensional atmospheric states, and the time evolution of atmosphere. In all three, I will draw on recent observations, with an emphasis on Pluto. Occultations are particularly important for the study of Pluto's atmosphere, which is impossible to study with imaging, and extremely difficult to study with spectroscopy. It was discovered by stellar occultation in 1988 [2]. No subsequent Pluto occultations were observed until two events in 2002 [3]. Pluto is now crossing the galactic plane, and there have been several additional occultations observed since 2006. These include a high signal-to-noise observation from the Anglo Australian Observatory in 2006 [4] (Fig 1), densely spaced visible and infrared observations of Pluto's upper atmosphere from telescopes in the US and Mexico in March, 2007 [5] (Fig. 2), and a dualwavelength central flash observation from Mt. John in July, 2007 [6] (Fig 3). The flux from a star occulted by an atmosphere diminishes primarily due to the increase in refraction with depth in the atmosphere, defocusing the starlight, although absorption and tangential focusing can also contribute. Because the atmospheric density, to first order, follows an exponential, it is feasible to derive a characteristic pressure and temperature from isothermal fits to even low-quality occultation light curves. Higher quality light curves allow fits with more flexible models, or light curve inversions that derive temperatures limited by the resolution of the data. These allow the derivation of one-dimensional profiles of temperature and pressure vs. altitude, which are critical

  1. Saturn's variable thermosphere from Cassini/UVIS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Sandel, B. R.; Yelle, R. V.; Strobel, D. F.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Erwin, J. T.

    2015-11-01

    We retrieved the density and temperature profiles in Saturn's thermosphere from 26 stellar occultations observed by the Cassini/UVIS instrument. These results expand upon and complement the previous analysis of 15 Cassini/UVIS solar occultations by Saturn's upper thermosphere. We find that the exospheric temperatures based on the stellar occultations agree with the solar occultations and range from 380 K to 590 K. These temperatures are also consistent with the recent re-analysis of the Voyager/UVS occultations. The retrieved density profiles support our earlier inference that the shape of the atmosphere at low pressures is consistent with a meridional trend of increasing temperatures with absolute latitude. This implies a high-latitude heat source, such as auroral heating, although the existing circulation models that include auroral heating still underestimate the equatorial temperatures by overestimating the meridional temperature gradient. This suggests either that the circulation models are somehow incomplete or there is some other heat source at low to mid latitudes that is relatively less efficient than high-latitude heating. We also find evidence for the expansion of the exobase by about 500 km between 2006 and 2011 near the equator, followed by possible contraction after 2011. The expansion appears to be caused by significant warming of the lower thermosphere that anti-correlates with solar activity and may be connected to changes in global circulation. Lastly, we note that our density profiles are in good general agreement with the Voyager/UVS data. In particular, the Voyager density profiles are most consistent with the Cassini/UVIS stellar occultations from late 2008 and early 2009 that roughly coincide in season with the Voyager flybys.

  2. A search for stellar occultations by Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and their satellites: 1990-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mink, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    A search for occultations of stars by Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto between 1990 and 1999 was carried out by combining ephemeris information and star positions using very accurate occultation modeling software. Stars from both the Space Telescope Guide Catalog and photographic plates taken by Arnold Klemola at Lick Observatory were compared with planet positions from the JPL DE-130 ephemeris, with local modifications for Pluto and Charon. Some 666 possible occultations by the Uranian ring, 143 possible occultations by Neptune, and 40 possible occultations by Pluto and/or Charon were found among stars with visual magnitudes as faint as 16. Before the star positions could be obtained, the occultation prediction software was used to aid many observers in observing the occultation of 28 Sagitarii by Saturn in July 1989. As a test on other outer solar system objects, 17 possible occultations were found in a search of the Guide Star Catalog for occultations by 2060 Chiron, and interesting object between Saturn and Uranus which shows both cometary and asteroidal properties.

  3. Preparing GMAT for Operational Maneuver Planning of the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qureshi, Rizwan Hamid; Hughes, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) is an open-source space mission design, analysis and trajectory optimization tool. GMAT is developed by a team of NASA, private industry, public and private contributors. GMAT is designed to model, optimize and estimate spacecraft trajectories in flight regimes ranging from low Earth orbit to lunar applications, interplanetary trajectories and other deep space missions. GMAT has also been flight qualified to support operational maneuver planning for the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission. ACE was launched in August, 1997 and is orbiting the Sun-Earth L1 libration point. The primary science objective of ACE is to study the composition of both the solar wind and the galactic cosmic rays. Operational orbit determination, maneuver operations and product generation for ACE are conducted by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF). This paper discusses the entire engineering lifecycle and major operational certification milestones that GMAT successfully completed to obtain operational certification for the ACE mission. Operational certification milestones such as gathering of the requirements for ACE operational maneuver planning, gap analysis, test plans and procedures development, system design, pre-shadow operations, training to FDF ACE maneuver planners, shadow operations, Test Readiness Review (TRR) and finally Operational Readiness Review (ORR) are discussed. These efforts have demonstrated that GMAT is flight quality software ready to support ACE mission operations in the FDF.

  4. Pinhole Occulter Facility. [for X ray observations of sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabbs, J. R.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E. A.; Routh, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Pinhole Occulter Facility (POF) is designed for X-ray observations of solar activity, coronal structure and solar wind generation, and coronal transients. The four telescopes or positioning counters, the self-deployable 32-m boom, and the pointing-control actuator of the POF are described. The development of the facility is discussed. The configuration of the POF and means of maintaining its attitude control are examined.

  5. Photoelectric observations of lunar occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, F. C.; Montemayor, T. J.; Barnes, T. G., III; Moffett, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of 13 lunar occultation disappearances during a March 1979 Hyades passage are reported. Three double stars (SAO 93925 = Fin 342 = 70 Tau, SAO 93961 = ADS 3248, and SAO 95419 = Kui 24) and one possible double (SAO 93950 = 75 Tau) were detected. A brief description is given of the Purdue University pulse-counting photometer as modified for occultation observations.

  6. The first stage of the Delta II for ACE is erected at LC 17A, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The first stage of the Delta II rocket which will to be used to launch the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft is erected at Launch Complex 17A at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Scheduled for launch on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The ACE observatory will be placed into an orbit almost a million miles (1.5 million kilometers) away from the Earth, about 1/100 the distance from the Earth to the Sun.

  7. Stellar Occultation Studies of Pluto, Triton, Charon, and Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2002-01-01

    Bodies inhabiting the outer solar system are of interest because, due to the colder conditions, they exhibit unique physical processes. Also, some of the lessons learned from them can be applied to understanding what occurred in the outer solar system during its formation and early evolution. The thin atmospheres of Pluto and Triton have structure that is not yet understood, and they have been predicted to undergo cataclysmic seasonal changes. Charon may have an atmosphere - we don't know. Chiron exhibits cometary activity so far from the sun (much further than most comets), so that H2O sublimation cannot be the driving mechanism. Probing these bodies from Earth with a spatial resolution of a few kilometers can be accomplished only with the stellar occultation technique. In this program we find and predict stellar occultation events by small outer-solar system bodies and then attempt observations of the ones that can potentially answer interesting questions. We also develop new methods of data analysis for occultations and secure other observations that are necessary for interpretation of the occultation data.

  8. The occult urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Ragonese, Mauro; Racioppi, Marco; D'Agostino, Daniele; Di Gianfrancesco, Luca; Lenci, Niccolò; Bientinesi, Riccardo; Palermo, Giuseppe; Sacco, Emilio; Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, Pier Francesco

    2016-05-24

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the tumor that most frequently affects the urinary tract. The most common location is in the bladder; the diagnosis, as the follow-up, is based on urine cytology, endoscopic, and radiological examinations. Urinary cytology is an important non invasive tool used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with TCC. A positive urine cytology result is highly predictive of the presence of TCC, even in the presence of normal cystoscopy, because malignant cells may appear in the urine long time before any cystoscopically visible lesion becomes apparent. The presence of a positive urinary cytology, in the absence of clinical or endoscopic evidence of a TCC, can identify an occult urothelial cancer, located in any site of the urinary tract (upper urinary tract, bladder, prostatic urethra). Most of the urothelial tumors of the renal pelvis and ureters are diagnosed by radiological examinations, but we can observe a high rate of false negatives. In order to improve the diagnostic role of urinary cytology and other conventional examinations, numerous molecular markers have been identified; however, the real clinical application remains unclear. Photodynamic diagnosis and narrow band imaging (NBI) cystoscopy increase the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic examinations in the presence of lesions not easily detectable. The aim of this review is to analyze the current diagnostic standards in the presence of occult urothelial cancer.

  9. Stellar Occultations from Airborne Platforms: 1988 to 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, Amanda S.; Dunham, Edward W.; Zuluaga, Carlos; Levine, Stephen; Person, Michael J.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E.

    2016-10-01

    Observing a stellar occultation by a solar system body with an airborne telescope requires precise positioning of the observer within the shadow cast onto the Earth. For small bodies like Pluto and Kuiper Belt objects, smaller than the Earth, the challenge is particularly intense, with the accuracy of the astrometric and flight planning determining whether the observation succeeds or fails. From our first airborne occultation by Pluto in 1988 aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), to our most recent event by Pluto in 2015 aboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), we have refined our astrometric and flight planning systems to the point where we can now place an airborne observer into the small central flash zone. We will discuss the history of airborne observation of occultations while detailing the improvements in the astrometric processes. Support for this work was provided by NASA SSO grant NNX15AJ82G to Lowell Observatory.

  10. Limb profiles of the Moon from grazing occultation observations collected at RGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, Mitsuru; Kato, Yuji

    2002-09-01

    From lunar grazing occultation observations it is shown that the present lunar limb profile data have sometimes large errors, and therefore it is apparent that they need to be modified. For that purpose observations of grazing occultations collected at the Royal Greenwich Observatory until 1980 were analyzed and lunar limb profile data were obtained. As a result the number of the luanr limb profile data obtained from grazing occultations was almost doubled. These profile data are being used for the predictions of lunar grazing occultations in order to locate observers at better positions, so that they can also get good grazing occultation data to improve the lunar limb profiles. These profile data will be used in the future analyses of solar eclipse observations and of the possible errors of the Hipparcos proper motion system.

  11. Search for serendipitous Oort cloud object occultation in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jie-Rou; Liu, Chih-Yuan; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Serendipitous occultation search is a way to study small objects in the outer Solar system like trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) by extracting and analyzing the diffraction pattern in the occultation lights. There are already some reported detections in both optical and X-ray bands in this kind of search. Except for KBOs, this method also has the potential to extend the search to a distance as far away as the Oort cloud region (beyond a few thousands AU). As the distance is larger, a shorter wavelength is needed to have a smaller Fresnel scale, with which occultation may be more easily detected. Here we introduce the serendipitous occultation method we used in searching Oort cloud objects occultation, and present the results of using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array data of Sco X-1 taken from 1996 February to 2012 January.

  12. CO emission and export from Asia: an analysis combining complementary satellite measurements (MOPITT, SCIAMACHY and ACE-FTS) with global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turquety, S.; Clerbaux, C.; Law, K.; Coheur, P.-F.; Cozic, A.; Szopa, S.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Gloudemans, A. M. S.; Schrijver, H.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.; Edwards, D. P.

    2008-09-01

    This study presents the complementary picture of the pollution outflow provided by several satellite observations of carbon monoxide (CO), based on different observation techniques. This is illustrated by an analysis of the Asian outflow during the spring of 2005, through comparisons with simulations by the LMDz-INCA global chemistry transport model. The CO observations from the MOPITT and SCIAMACHY nadir sounders, which provide vertically integrated information with excellent horizontal sampling, and from the ACE-FTS solar occultation instrument, which has limited spatial coverage but allows the retrieval of vertical profiles, are used. Combining observations from MOPITT (mainly sensitive to the free troposphere) and SCIAMACHY (sensitive to the full column) allows a qualitative evaluation of the boundary layer CO. The model tends to underestimate this residual compared to the observations, suggesting underestimated emissions, especially in eastern Asia. However, a better understanding of the consistency and possible biases between the MOPITT and SCIAMACHY CO is necessary for a quantitative evaluation. Underestimated emissions, and possibly too low lofting and underestimated chemical production in the model, lead to an underestimate of the export to the free troposphere, as highlighted by comparisons with MOPITT and ACE-FTS. Both instruments observe large trans-Pacific transport extending from ~20° N to ~60° N, with high upper tropospheric CO observed by ACE-FTS above the eastern Pacific (with values of up to 300 ppbv around 50° N at 500 hPa and up to ~200 ppbv around 30° N at 300 hPa). The low vertical and horizontal resolutions of the global model do not allow the simulation of the strong enhancements in the observed plumes. However, the transport patterns are well captured, and are mainly attributed to export from eastern Asia, with increasing contributions from South Asia and Indonesia towards the tropics. Additional measurements of C2H2, C2H6 and HCN by

  13. Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiller, G. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Lowes, L. L.; Abrams, M. C.; Raper, O. F.; Farmer, C. B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

  14. Occult Fungal Scleritis

    PubMed Central

    Jeang, Lauren J.; Davis, Aaron; Madow, Brian; Espana, Edgar M.; Margo, Curtis E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To heighten awareness of occult fungal scleritis. Method Case report and review of the literature. Results A 73-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was diagnosed for 3 months with immune-mediated scleritis and subsequently treated with corticosteroids. On referral, the patient had a scleral nodule with contiguous corneal infiltrate and hypopyon. Culture grew Fusarium species not further classified. The infection could not be controlled with antifungal therapy, and the eye was removed. No exogenous or endogenous source for the infection could be identified by clinical history or examination. Conclusion Fungal scleritis can develop in persons without a history of foreign body injury, minor trauma, or evidence of endogenous fungemia. A high index of suspicion for infectious scleritis must be maintained in persons with presumed immune-mediated scleritis who fail to respond to conventional therapy, particularly if they present with decreased visual acuity. PMID:28275602

  15. Pinhole occulter experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, Jeff; Pflug, John

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs and charts from a briefing summarize the accomplishments, results, conclusions, and recommendations of a feasibility study using the Pinhole Occulter Facility (POF). Accomplishments for 1986 include: (1) improved IPS Gimbal Model; (2) improved Crew Motion Disturbance Model; (3) use of existing shuttle on-orbit simulation to study the effects of orbiter attitude deadband size on POF performance; (4) increased understanding of maximum performance expected from current actuator/sensor set; (5) use of TREETOPS nonlinear time domain program to obtain system dynamics describing the complex multibody flexible structures; (6) use of HONEY-X design tool to design and evaluate multivariable compensator for stability, robustness, and performance; (7) application of state-of-the-art compensator design methodology Linear Quadratic Gaussian/Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR); and (8) examination of tolerance required on knowledge of the POF boom flexible mode frequencies to insure stability, using structure uncertainty analysis.

  16. KPNO LUNAR OCCULTATION SUMMARY. III

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtke, P. C.; Africano, J. L.

    2011-01-15

    The results for 251 lunar occultation events recorded at Kitt Peak National Observatory are presented, including 20 observations of known or suspected double stars and five measurements of stars with resolved angular diameters.

  17. The Structure of Enceladus' Plume from Cassini Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Esposito, L. W.; Buffington, B. B.; Colwell, J.; Hendrix, A. R.; Meinke, B. K.; Shemansky, D. E.; Stewart, I.; West, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed 2 stellar and one solar occultation by Enceladus' water vapor plume. These observations have established that water is the primary constituent of the plume, allowed us to calculate the flux of water coming from the plume, and detected super-sonic jets of gas imbedded within the plume [1]. On 19 October 2011 two stars (epsilon and zeta Orionis) will simultaneously be occulted by the plume, and the signal of the two will be in separate pixels on the detector. This is a tangential occultation that will provide a horizontal cut through the plume at two altitudes. The two stars are separated by 24 mrad, or ~20 km, with the lower altitude star 18 km above the limb at its closest point. The groundtrack is similar to the 2010 solar occultation, but viewed from the other side of the plume. Results from this new data set with implications for the vertical structure of the plume and jets will be presented.

  18. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  19. Search for serendipitous TNO occultation events in X-rays with Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Liu, Chih-Yuan; Shang, Jie-Rou

    2015-09-01

    Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs), which include Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and yet-to-discover Oort Cloud Objects, are an important population of members of the solar system. Its population properties, such as size distribution, carry information imprinted during the early epoch of the solar system formation. TNOs smaller than about ten kilometers are not directly observable. Their existence, however, may be detected through occultation events of background targets that they cause. Search for such serendipitous occultation events have been conducted in optical and X-ray bands. Since the Fresnel scale is about 30 times smaller in X-rays, using X-ray occultation events one may explore TNOs smaller than that can be done in optical bands. Here I will report X-ray sources suitable for such a study with Athena observations. The estimated Athena detection rate of occultation events, based on different model assumptions of TNO size distribution, will also be presented.

  20. [Occult hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Carreño García, Vicente; Nebreda, Javier Bartolomé; Aguilar, Inmaculada Castillo; Quiroga Estévez, Juan Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by the detection of HCV-RNA in liver in the absence of anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA determined by conventional techniques. The development of a new enzyme immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against a conserved epitope in the HCV core protein, together with the detection of HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in serum after concentrating the viral particles by ultracentrifugation, allow diagnosis of more than 90% of patients with occult HCV without the need to perform a liver biopsy. Histological damage in occult HCV infection ranges from minimal changes to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, although in general this disease is less severe than classical chronic hepatitis C. A significant prevalence of occult HCV infection has been identified in risk groups such as hemodialysis patients and the family members of patients with occult hepatitis C. This occult HCV infection can also be found in subjects without clinical or biochemical evidence of liver disease.

  1. The Research and Education Collaborative Occultation Network: A System for Coordinated TNO Occultation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Keller, John M.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a new system and method for collecting coordinated occultation observations of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). Occultations by objects in the outer solar system are more difficult to predict due to their large distance and limited span of the astrometric data used to determine their orbits and positions. This project brings together the research and educational community into a unique citizen-science partnership to overcome the difficulties of observing these distant objects. The goal of the project is to get sizes and shapes for TNOs with diameters larger than 100 km. As a result of the system design it will also serve as a probe for binary systems with spatial separations as small as contact systems. Traditional occultation efforts strive to get a prediction sufficiently good to place mobile ground stations in the shadow track. Our system takes a new approach of setting up a large number of fixed observing stations and letting the shadows come to the network. The nominal spacing of the stations is 50 km so that we ensure two chords at our limiting size. The spread of the network is roughly 2000 km along a roughly north-south line in the western United States. The network contains 56 stations that are committed to the project and we get additional ad hoc support from International Occultation Timing Association members. At our minimum size, two stations will record an event while the other stations will be probing the inner regions for secondary events. Larger objects will get more chords and will allow determination of shape profiles. The stations are almost exclusively sited and associated with schools, usually at the 9-12 grade level. We present a full description of the system we have developed for the continued exploration of the Kuiper Belt.

  2. ACE2 alterations in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler, María José; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase that degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7). ACE2 is highly expressed within the kidneys, it is largely localized in tubular epithelial cells and less prominently in glomerular epithelial cells and in the renal vasculature. ACE2 activity has been shown to be altered in diabetic kidney disease, hypertensive renal disease and in different models of kidney injury. There is often a dissociation between tubular and glomerular ACE2 expression, particularly in diabetic kidney disease where ACE2 expression is increased at the tubular level but decreased at the glomerular level. In this review, we will discuss alterations in circulating and renal ACE2 recently described in different renal pathologies and disease models as well as their possible significance. PMID:23956234

  3. Antarctic Stratospheric Ozone from the Assimilation of Occultation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Wargan, Krzysztof

    2004-01-01

    Ozone data from the solar occultation Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III instrument are included in the ozone assimilation system at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, which uses Solar Backscatter UItraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument data. Even though POAM data are available at only one latitude in the southern hemisphere on each day, their assimilation leads to more realistic ozone distribution throughout the Antarctic region, especially inside the polar vortex. Impacts of POAM data were evaluated by comparisons of assimilated ozone profiles with independent ozone sondes. Major improvements in ozone representation are seen in the Antarctic lower stratosphere during austral Winter and spring in 1998. Limitations of assimilation of sparse occultation data are illustrated by an example.

  4. Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) optical filter characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.

    1989-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) is a solar occultation experiment that will fly on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite to measure mixing ratio profiles of O3, H2O, NO2, NO, CH4, HCl, and HF. The inversion of the HALOE data will be critically dependent on a detailed knowledge of eight optical filters. A filter characterization program was undertaken to measure in-band transmissions, out-of-band transmissions, in-band transmission shifts with temperature, reflectivities, and age stability. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometers were used to perform measurements over the spectral interval 400/cm to 6300/cm (25 micrometers to 1.6 micrometers). Very high precision (0.1 percent T) in-band measurements and very high resolution (0.0001 percent T) out-of-band measurements have been made. The measurements revealed several conventional leaks at 0.01 percent transmission and greatly enhanced (1,000) leaks to the 2-element filters when placed in a Fabry-Perot cavity. Filter throughput changes by 5 percent for a 25 C change in filter temperature.

  5. Characterization of ACE and ACE2 Expression within Different Organs of the NOD Mouse.

    PubMed

    Roca-Ho, Heleia; Riera, Marta; Palau, Vanesa; Pascual, Julio; Soler, Maria Jose

    2017-03-05

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is known to play a key role in several diseases such as diabetes, and renal and cardiovascular pathologies. Its blockade has been demonstrated to delay chronic kidney disease progression and cardiovascular damage in diabetic patients. In this sense, since local RAS has been described, the aim of this study is to characterize angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 activities, as well as protein expression, in several tissues of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. After 21 or 40 days of diabetes onset, mouse serums and tissues were analyzed for ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities and protein expression. ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities were detected in different tissues. Their expressions vary depending on the studied tissue. Thus, whereas ACE activity was highly expressed in lungs, ACE2 activity was highly expressed in pancreas among the studied tissues. Interestingly, we also observed that diabetes up-regulates ACE mainly in serum, lung, heart, and liver, and ACE2 mainly in serum, liver, and pancreas. In conclusion, we found a marked serum and pulmonary alteration in ACE activity of diabetic mice, suggesting a common regulation. The increase of ACE2 activity within the circulation in diabetic mice may be ascribed to a compensatory mechanism of RAS.

  6. Characterization of ACE and ACE2 Expression within Different Organs of the NOD Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Ho, Heleia; Riera, Marta; Palau, Vanesa; Pascual, Julio; Soler, Maria Jose

    2017-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is known to play a key role in several diseases such as diabetes, and renal and cardiovascular pathologies. Its blockade has been demonstrated to delay chronic kidney disease progression and cardiovascular damage in diabetic patients. In this sense, since local RAS has been described, the aim of this study is to characterize angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 activities, as well as protein expression, in several tissues of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. After 21 or 40 days of diabetes onset, mouse serums and tissues were analyzed for ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities and protein expression. ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities were detected in different tissues. Their expressions vary depending on the studied tissue. Thus, whereas ACE activity was highly expressed in lungs, ACE2 activity was highly expressed in pancreas among the studied tissues. Interestingly, we also observed that diabetes up-regulates ACE mainly in serum, lung, heart, and liver, and ACE2 mainly in serum, liver, and pancreas. In conclusion, we found a marked serum and pulmonary alteration in ACE activity of diabetic mice, suggesting a common regulation. The increase of ACE2 activity within the circulation in diabetic mice may be ascribed to a compensatory mechanism of RAS. PMID:28273875

  7. The 2010, February 19 stellar occultation by Varuna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Colas, F.; Maquet, L.; Vachier, F.; Doressoundiram, A.; Roques, F.; Widemann, T.; Ortiz, J.; Assafin, M.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Andrei, A.; da Silva Neto, D.; Behrend, R.; Hund, F.; Hauser, M.; Wagner, S.; Slotegraaf, A.; Willasch, D.; Costa, M. de Jesus; Melo Sousa, P.; Faustino, E.; Prazeres, A.; Machado, S.; Dias do Nascimento, J.; Souza Barreto, E.; Amorim, A.; da Rocha Poppe, P.; Pereira, M. Geraldete; Jacques, C.; Loureiro Giacchini, B.; Collucci, A.; Ferreira da Costa, W.; Martins de Morais, V.

    2010-10-01

    On 2010, February 19, Varuna occulted UCAC2 star 41014042, as seen from regions in southern Africa and north-eastern Brazil. No occultation was observed neither from the station deployed in South Africa, nor from three other stations in Namibia. Out of twelve stations deployed in Brazil, seven had clouds or instrument malfunctions. Three were negative, one possibly positive (visual) is still being analyzed, and one is definitely positive from Sao Luis (CCD). This makes Varuna the most remote solar system object observed to date through a stellar occultation, with a geocentric distance of 6.4 billions km. The Sao Luis occultation has a duration of 52.5 +/- 0.5 sec, corresponding to a chord length of 1003 +/- 9 km projected in the plane of the sky. No atmospheric signature is apparent in the light curve. Since the closest observation to Sao Luis is negative at a transversal distance of 225 km (Quixada, CCD), a significantly elongated shape is required for Varuna. We will discuss our results in view of current independent estimations of Varuna's diameter combining IR thermal and visible data, with a typical value of 1050 km +/- 200 km (Lellouch et al. 2002, Stansberry et al., 2008). We will also discuss the fact that the occultation occurred near Varuna's maximum brightness along its 6.4 hr rotational (0.4-mag amplitude) light curve. Thus Varuna was observed at maximum apparent surface area, which also corresponds to maximum apparent oblateness for an ellipsoidal shape. Lellouch et al, Astron. Astrophys. 391, 1133-1139 (2002). Stansberry et al., in The Solar System beyond Neptune (eds Barucci, M. A.,Boehnhardt, H., Cruikshank, D. P. & Morbidelli, A.) 161-179 (Univ. Arizona Press, 2008). This work is partially supported by french ANR 08-BLAN-0177 "Beyond Neptune".

  8. The Canadian Arctic ACE/OSIRIS Validation Project at PEARL: Validating Satellite Observations Over the High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kaley A.; Strong, Kimberly; Fogal, Pierre F.; Drummond, James R.

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based measurements provide critical data for the validation of satellite retrievals of atmospheric trace gases and for the assessment of long-term stability of these measurements. As of February 2016, the Canadian-led Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite mission has been making measurements of the Earth's atmosphere for nearly twelve years and Canada's Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite has been operating for fourteen years. As ACE and OSIRIS operations have extended beyond their planned two-year missions, there is an ongoing need to validate the trace gas data profiles from the ACE-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) and OSIRIS. In particular, validation comparisons are needed during Arctic springtime to understand better the measurements of species involved in stratospheric ozone chemistry. To this end, thirteen Canadian Arctic ACE/OSIRIS Validation Campaigns have been conducted during the spring period (February - April in 2004 - 2016) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut (80N, 86W). For the past decade, these campaigns have been undertaken in collaboration with the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The spring period coincides with the most chemically active time of year in the Arctic, as well as a significant number of satellite overpasses. A suite of as many as 12 ground-based instruments, as well as frequent balloon-borne ozonesonde and radiosonde launches, have been used in each campaign. These instruments include: a ground-based version of the ACE-FTS (PARIS - Portable Atmospheric Research Interferometric Spectrometer), a terrestrial version of the ACE-MAESTRO, a SunPhotoSpectrometer, two CANDAC zenith-viewing UV-visible grating spectrometers, a Bomem DA8 Fourier transform spectrometer

  9. The Effect of Diurnal Variations on Ionospheric Radio Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi; Withers, Paul; Schinder, Paul J.; Moses, Julianne I.; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Radio occultations are a powerful technique for the study of atmospheres and ionospheres by planetary spacecraft. For missions to the outer solar system, the occultations always probe the terminator region of the planet. The analysis of radio occultations typically assumes symmetry along the ray path in the horizontal direction about the tangent point. While this is an excellent assumption for the neutral atmosphere where the scale length of horizontal gradients is large, it is suspect for the ionosphere where electron densities decrease rapidly from day to night. Diurnal variations in peak electron density are often several orders of magnitude and may occur over a region of a few degrees. We investigate the consequences of diurnal variations on ionospheric occultations with a ray tracing calculation for the angular deflection and frequency residual of the radio wave. The calculations are based on photochemical/diffusion models for the ionospheres of Saturn and Titan. Differences from analysis based on the assumption of horizontal symmetry are most pronounced in the bottom side ionosphere where chemical time constants are short.

  10. Stellar Occultations by Trans-Neptunian Objects and Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Juergen

    2015-10-01

    Our solar system beyond Neptune's orbit is populated with numerous small objects, referred to as Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs). About 1400 TNOs are known today ranging in size from the most prominent one, Pluto (2370 km diameter), down to a few tens of kilometers. Most diameters have been determined by radiometric methods in the IR/FIR (SPITZER, HERSCHEL) with uncertainties in the 20% range. Only for Pluto and about 12 other objects have the projected diameters been measured more accurately by stellar occultations. A group of objects lingering between the orbits of Jupiter and Neptune, the Centaurs, are believed to have originated from TNOs. Two of them, Chariklo and Chiron, have recently drawn attention, as stellar occultations have revealed rings around them. Our proposed occultation observations with SOFIA shall add to the sparse knowledge on TNOs and Centaurs by determining more projected diameters and albedos. They have the potential of detecting moons, rings and atmospheres. We will use SOFIA's demonstrated capability of measuring occultations (Pluto 2011 & 2015) with its Focal Plane Imager (FPI) to observe up to five events on flight legs of approximately 30 min each. As most of these events cannot be predicted accurately enough more than a few months or weeks ahead of time, we propose these as targets of opportunity.

  11. Testing for Occult Heartworm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stogdale, L.

    1984-01-01

    Heartworm infection in dogs is endemic in southern Ontario but occurs only sporadically throughout the remainder of Canada. The disease may either be associated with microfilariae in the patient's blood, a patent infection, or it may be occult. This paper describes a case of occult dirofilariasis in a dog, with emphasis on the diagnosis. A patent infection could be missed if the clinician tests an insufficient amount of blood. He should perform multiple concentration tests using either the modified Knott's technique or a filtration method. Occult infections occur in prepatent or unisexual infections, when the worms become sterile following therapy, or when the host produces antibodies that result in the destruction of the microfilariae. The recent release of a kit which detects the presence of antibodies to the adult heartworms now enables veterinarians to make an accurate diagnosis in the vast majority of dogs. PMID:17422386

  12. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G.; Chaplin, V.; Cherry, M.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M.; Jenke, P.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. New sources are added to our catalog as they become active or upon request. In addition to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results will be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation.

  13. ACE program/UNIX user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Feng-Berman, S.K.

    1993-01-12

    This report the following: How to use the ace program?; Introduction to the ace program; Online command; Define a macro file; Macro commands; Counters and MCA; Counters usage; Counters database; Feedback Counter Database; MCA functions and macro command; X window Interclient Communication; and How to get around in UNIX?

  14. ACE program/UNIX user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Feng-Berman, S.K.

    1993-01-12

    This report the following: How to use the ace program ; Introduction to the ace program; Online command; Define a macro file; Macro commands; Counters and MCA; Counters usage; Counters database; Feedback Counter Database; MCA functions and macro command; X window Interclient Communication; and How to get around in UNIX

  15. The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Remer, L.; Kahn, R.; Starr, D.; Hildebrand, P.; Colarco, P.; Diner, D.; Vane, D.; Im, E.; Behrenfeld, M.; Stephens, G.; Maring, H.; Bontempi, P.; Martins, J. V.

    2008-12-01

    The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission is a second tier Decadal Survey mission designed to characterize the role of aerosols in climate forcing, especially their impact on precipitation and cloud formation. ACE also includes ocean biosphere measurements (chlorophyll and dissolved organic materials) which will be greatly improved by simultaneous measurements of aerosols. The nominal ACE payload includes lidar and multiangle spectropolarimetric polarimetric measurements of aerosols, radar measurements of clouds and multi-band spectrometer for the measurement of ocean ecosystems. An enhancement to ACE payload under consideration includes µ-wave radiometer measurements of cloud ice and water outside the nadir path of the radar/lidar beams. This talk will cover ACE instrument and science options, updates on the science team definition activity and science potential.

  16. High-order ionospheric effects on electron density estimation from Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junhai; Jin, Shuanggen

    2017-03-01

    GPS radio occultation can estimate ionospheric electron density and total electron content (TEC) with high spatial resolution, e.g., China's recent Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation. However, high-order ionospheric delays are normally ignored. In this paper, the high-order ionospheric effects on electron density estimation from the Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation data are estimated and investigated using the NeQuick2 ionosphere model and the IGRF12 (International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 12th generation) geomagnetic model. Results show that the high-order ionospheric delays have large effects on electron density estimation with up to 800 el cm-3, which should be corrected in high-precision ionospheric density estimation and applications. The second-order ionospheric effects are more significant, particularly at 250-300 km, while third-order ionospheric effects are much smaller. Furthermore, the high-order ionospheric effects are related to the location, the local time, the radio occultation azimuth and the solar activity. The large high-order ionospheric effects are found in the low-latitude area and in the daytime as well as during strong solar activities. The second-order ionospheric effects have a maximum positive value when the radio occultation azimuth is around 0-20°, and a maximum negative value when the radio occultation azimuth is around -180 to -160°. Moreover, the geomagnetic storm also affects the high-order ionospheric delay, which should be carefully corrected.

  17. Absent or occult pulmonary artery.

    PubMed Central

    Presbitero, P; Bull, C; Haworth, S G; de Leval, M R

    1984-01-01

    Of 12 patients with angiographically absent pulmonary artery, 11 were investigated surgically. The previously occult pulmonary artery was found in 10 patients, in five of whom a vestige of an intrapericardial artery was present and in five the artery was patent only at the hilus, a gap existing between the main pulmonary artery and the hilar vessel, and no artery was found in one. All patients with an intrapericardial artery had right ventricular outflow tract obstruction and a ductus descending vertically from underneath the aortic arch. In those without an intrapericardial vessel the occult artery was on the side opposite the aortic arch, and there was evidence of a ductus coming from the innominate artery on the side of the interruption. The occult pulmonary artery, where identified at operation, was usually joined initially to the systemic circulation. Ultimately, continuity between the hilar and main pulmonary artery may be established surgically. Where no intrapericardial vessel exists, however, a conduit may be required to bridge the gap. It seems advisable to search for the occult artery as early in life as is feasible in the hope that providing a blood supply will ensure development of the vessel and normal lung growth. Images PMID:6743435

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) dimerization is the initial step in the ACE inhibitor-induced ACE signaling cascade in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Friedrich, Matthias; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2006-05-01

    The binding of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to ACE initiates a signaling cascade that involves the phosphorylation of the enzyme on Ser1270 as well as activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and leads to alterations in gene expression. To clarify how ACE inhibitors activate this pathway, we determined their effect on the ability of the enzyme to dimerize and the role of ACE dimerization in the initiation of the ACE signaling cascade. In endothelial cells, ACE was detected as a monomer as well as a dimer in native gel electrophoresis and dimerization/oligomerization was confirmed using the split-ubiquitin assay in yeast. ACE inhibitors elicited a rapid, concentration-dependent increase in the dimer/monomer ratio that correlated with that of the ACE inhibitorinduced phosphorylation of ACE. Cell treatment with galactose and glucose to prevent the putative lectin-mediated self-association of ACE or with specific antibodies shielding the N terminus of ACE failed to affect either the basal or the ACE inhibitor-induced dimerization of the enzyme. In ACE-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells, ACE inhibitors elicited ACE dimerization and phosphorylation as well as the activation of JNK with similar kinetics to those observed in endothelial cells. However, these effects were prevented by the mutation of the essential Zn2+-complexing histidines in the C-terminal active site of the enzyme. Mutation of the N-terminal active site of ACE was without effect. Together, our data suggest that ACE inhibitors can initiate the ACE signaling pathway by inducing ACE dimerization, most probably via the C-terminal active site of the enzyme.

  19. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  20. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test. (a) Identification. An occult blood test is a device used to detect occult blood in urine or feces. (Occult blood...

  1. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test. (a) Identification. An occult blood test is a device used to detect occult blood in urine or feces. (Occult blood...

  2. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test. (a) Identification. An occult blood test is a device used to detect occult blood in urine or feces. (Occult blood...

  3. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test. (a) Identification. An occult blood test is a device used to detect occult blood in urine or feces. (Occult blood...

  4. 21 CFR 864.6550 - Occult blood test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Occult blood test. 864.6550 Section 864.6550 Food... DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6550 Occult blood test. (a) Identification. An occult blood test is a device used to detect occult blood in urine or feces. (Occult blood...

  5. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Environments and Contaminants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The information on this page was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  6. FIRE_ACE_ER2_MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) NASA ER-2 Moderate Resolution Imaging ... SSFR Location:  Northern Alaska Arctic Ocean Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  7. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Special Features

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The page information was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  8. ACE-FTS measurements of HCFC-22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Strahan, S.; McLinden, C. A.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.; Bernath, P. F.

    2012-04-01

    In the 1980s scientists discovered an annual springtime minimum in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic. It was determined that the decline in ozone concentration was primarily caused by catalytic reactions of ozone and chlorine. The emissions of anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were determined to be major sources of the chlorine. The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (with its subsequent amendments) restricts the emissions of ozone depleting substances. To fulfill the need for safe, stable replacements of CFCs, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were developed. The use of HCFC-22 as a replacement has led to an increase in its atmospheric abundance. This is of concern due to its ozone depletion potential and its global warming potential. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT. The primary instrument on SCISAT is a high-resolution infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). With its wide spectral range, the ACE-FTS is capable of measuring an extensive range of gases including key CFC and HCFC species. The altitude distribution from the ACE-FTS profiles provides information that is complementary to the ground-based measurements that have been used to monitor these species. The global distribution of HCFC-22 has been computed from measurements by ACE-FTS. Both seasonal variations and an inter-hemispheric difference are observed. Additionally, a rapid increase in the global concentration of HCFC-22 has been observed since the start of the ACE mission in 2004. Comparisons to ground-based and air-borne measurements show good agreement with the ACE-FTS measurements. The global distributions of HCFC-22 have also been compared to a chemistry and transport model (CTM), the Global Modelling Initiative Combined Stratospheric-Tropospheric Model. There are distinct differences between the model results and ACE-FTS measurements. The causes and

  9. The Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The goals and measurement strategy of the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE) are described. ACE will help to answer fundamental science questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and global ocean ecosystems. Specifically, the goals of ACE are: 1) to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions and to assess the impact of aerosols on the hydrological cycle and 2) determine Ocean Carbon Cycling and other ocean biological processes. It is expected that ACE will: narrow the uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction and quantify the role of aerosols in climate change; measure the ocean ecosystem changes and precisely quantify ocean carbon uptake; and, improve air quality forecasting by determining the height and type of aerosols being transported long distances. Overviews are provided of the aerosol-cloud community measurement strategy, aerosol and cloud observations over South Asia, and ocean biology research goals. Instruments used in the measurement strategy of the ACE mission are also highlighted, including: multi-beam lidar, multiwavelength high spectra resolution lidar, the ocean color instrument (ORCA)--a spectroradiometer for ocean remote sensing, dual frequency cloud radar and high- and low-frequency micron-wave radiometer. Future steps for the ACE mission include refining measurement requirements and carrying out additional instrument and payload studies.

  10. Magnetization of the ionospheres of Venus and Mars: Results from radio occultation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, R.; Kliore, A.J. )

    1991-07-01

    In situ measurements by the Pioneer Venus orbiting spacecraft, conducted during solar maximum only, have shown that magnetization (permeation of large-scale magnetic fields) of the ionosphere of Venus occurs under high solar wind dynamic pressure and that this takes place most frequently near the subsolar region. In this paper, the authors use remote sensing radio occultation measurements to study magnetization of the ionospheres of Venus and Mars based on these characteristics. For Venus they take advantage of the unique data set consisting of 148 electron density profiles deduced from Pioneer Venus radio occultation measurements. They demonstrate that radio occultation measurements yield results on frequency of occurrence of magnetization during solar maximum that are similar to those obtained from the Pioneer Venus in situ magnetic field measurements. During solar minimum, for which direct ionospheric measurements have never been made, they find that magnetization of the Venus ionosphere is more pervasive than at solar maximum. Magnetization extends to higher solar zenith angles (SZA) and appears stronger than at solar maximum. These results confirm that during solar minimum, the high solar wind dynamic pressure state is more prevalent at Venus because the ionospheric plasma pressure is weaker than at solar maximum. Comparison of a large number of electron density profiles of Mars (deduced from radio occultation measurements by the Viking 1 and 2 and Mariner 9 spacecraft for SZA > 46{degrees}) with those of Venus shows an absence of the ledge and disturbed topside plasma observed in the Venus profiles. These results, however, do not constitute evidence against magnetization of the ionosphere of Mars, as Shinagawa and Cravens (1989) have shown on their one-dimensional MHD models that, even when the ionosphere of Mars is highly magnetized, the magnetic structure differs from that at Venus, and a ledge does not form in its electron density profiles.

  11. Triton stellar occultation candidates - 1992-1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    A search for Triton stellar occultation candidates for the period 1992-1994 has been completed with CCD strip-scanning observations. The search reached an R magnitude of about 17.4 and found 129 candidates within 1.5 arcsec of Triton's ephemeris during this period. Of these events, around 30 occultations are expected to be visible from the earth, indicating that a number of Triton occultation events should be visible from major observatories. Even the faintest of the present candidate events could produce useful occultation data if observed with a large enough telescope. The present astrometric accuracy is inadequate to identify which of these appulse events will produce occultations on the earth; further astrometry is needed to refine the predictions for positive occultation identification. To aid in selecting candidates for additional astrometric and photometric studies, finder charts and earth-based visibility charts for each event are included.

  12. IUVS/MAVEN Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröller, Hannes; Yelle, Roger; Montmessin, Franck; Lacombe, Gaetan; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Nakagawa, Hiromu; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    We present the latest results from stellar occultations observed with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument on board of Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. So far 9 campaigns have been executed on average every two months since MAVEN began orbiting Mars. Approximately 50 occultations are recorded in each campaign. The IUVS instrument observes in two spectral regions, the far- and mid-UV. The FUV channel covers wavelengths from 110 to 190 nm and the MUV channel from 170 to 350 nm. By combining those two channels we cover the whole altitude range starting from around 30 km to 150 km. We present the geometric dependent CO2, O2, and O3 number densities from these occultations. The derived O2 mixing ratio varies between 1.5 × 10-3 and 5 × 10-3. In some of the MUV occultations we also can see aerosol extinction. In addition we present temperatures derived from the CO2 densities assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. We retrieved mean temperatures of around 180 K at lower altitudes, which decreasing with altitudes down to a mean of around 130 K at higher altitudes. We see a constantly cold layer with temperatures of 105 - 120 K at a pressure level at roughly 7 × 10-6 Pa, equivalent to an altitude of around 140 km. We also discuss possible wave structures with amplitudes between 5 and 15 K and wavelengths between 10 and 15 km in the obtained temperature profiles. The temperature profiles, retrieved with the IUVS instrument, are mostly in agreement with predicted values from the Mars Climate Database model, except where we see the cold layer around 140 km.

  13. Revisiting the 1988 Pluto Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, Amanda S.; Dunham, Edward W.; Young, Leslie A.; Slivan, Steve; Barba née Cordella, Linda L.; Millis, Robert L.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Nye, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    In 1988, Pluto's atmosphere was surmised to exist because of the surface ices that had been detected through spectroscopy, but it had not yet been directly detected in a definitive manner. The key to making such a detection was the stellar occultation method, used so successfully for the discovery of the Uranian rings in 1977 (Elliot et al. 1989; Millis et al. 1993) and before that for studies of the atmospheres of other planets.On 9 June 1988, Pluto occulted a star, with its shadow falling over the South Pacific Ocean region. One team of observers recorded this event from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, while other teams captured the event from various locations in Australia and New Zealand. Preceding this event, extensive astrometric observations of Pluto and the star were collected in order to refine the prediction.We will recount the investigations that led up to this important Pluto occultation, discuss the unexpected atmospheric results, and compare the 1988 event to the recent 2015 event whose shadow followed a similar track through New Zealand and Australia.

  14. Scaling Relation for Occulter Manufacturing Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    An external occulter is a spacecraft own along the line-of-sight of a space telescope to suppress starlight and enable high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. The shape of an external occulter must be specially designed to optimally suppress starlight and deviations from the ideal shape due to manufacturing errors can result loss of suppression in the shadow. Due to the long separation distances and large dimensions involved for a space occulter, laboratory testing is conducted with scaled versions of occulters etched on silicon wafers. Using numerical simulations for a flight Fresnel occulter design, we show how the suppression performance of an occulter mask scales with the available propagation distance for expected random manufacturing defects along the edge of the occulter petal. We derive an analytical model for predicting performance due to such manufacturing defects across the petal edges of an occulter mask and compare this with the numerical simulations. We discuss the scaling of an extended occulter test-bed.

  15. Thermal design, analysis and testing of the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, Richard A.; Smith, Dewey M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and describes the thermal requirements in some detail. The thermal design of the HALOE is described, together with the design process and the analytical techniques used to arrive at this design. The flight hardware has undergone environmental testing in a thermal vacuum chamber to validate the thermal design. The HALOE is a unique problem in thermal control due to its variable solar loading, its extremely sensitive optical components and the high degree of pointing accuracy required. This paper describes the flight hardware, the design process and its verification.

  16. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  17. A search for stellar occultations by Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and their satellites: 1990-1999. Final Report, 1 Jan. 1989 - 31 Dec. 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    A search for occultations of stars by Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto between 1990 and 1999 was carried out by combining ephemeris information and star positions using very accurate occultation modeling software. Stars from both the Space Telescope Guide Catalog and photographic plates taken by Arnold Klemola at Lick Observatory were compared with planet positions from the JPL DE-130 ephemeris, with local modifications for Pluto and Charon. Some 666 possible occultations by the Uranian ring, 143 possible occultations by Neptune, and 40 possible occultations by Pluto and/or Charon were found among stars with visual magnitudes as faint as 16. Before the star positions could be obtained, the occultation prediction software was used to aid many observers in observing the occultation of 28 Sagitarii by Saturn in July 1989. As a test on other outer solar system objects, 17 possible occultations were found in a search of the Guide Star Catalog for occultations by 2060 Chiron, and interesting object between Saturn and Uranus which shows both cometary and asteroidal properties.

  18. Oh Glorious Geometry: Eclipses, Transits, and Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomical objects are like a grand clockwork in the sky; they follow steady patterns in time. However, these bright objects we see are not just points of light but have finite dimensions and thus can get in each other's way. As a result, some stars puzzle us by brightening or dimming, or the Sun can frighten us by going out unexpectedly when something else blocks its light. There is nothing unusual about these eclipses, occultations, or transits—they are demonstrations of simple physics—and we take some for granted, like the rotation of Earth moving us into darkness each night. The periodic dimming of a bright star worried mankind for millennia and helped give astronomy a shove. And unexpected events, like a solar or lunar eclipse, can inspire awe and change the course of history. Now that we can observe through telescopes and travel by proxy throughout the solar system, we find the universe is rife with shadow and light shows. Those taking place within our solar system have been useful to astronomy (like the recent transits of Venus or the ever-present eclipses of the Jovian satellites), and were of considerable popular interest, allowing us to think beyond the confines of Earth. Now we detect distant exoplanets transiting their parent stars, announcing the presence of other solar systems in our corner of the Galaxy and changing the discussion about life elsewhere in the universe from mere speculation to plausible possibility. Distant galaxies can make visible ever-further galaxies by forming Einstein rings, allowing us to see behind them and make the structure of the universe more evident. This paper will discuss these phenomena, from those visible easily on Earth to those that can now be seen for the first time from probes in space. We will also discuss how this has expanded popular knowledge of the universe we live in. This paper is illustrated by a number of examples ranging from eclipses and transits throughout the solar system and the nearby stars to

  19. Illinois occultation summary. II - 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radick, R.; Lien, D.

    1982-01-01

    Lunar occultation records are presented for the third year of a continuing program. Included are 17 observations of stars brighter than seventh magnitude, 13 reappearances, four angular diameter measurements, and seven observations of stars that are either binary or may be double. The observations were made with Stromgren y filter, the u or b filter, or the FI filter described in the first paper of this series (Radick and Lien, 1980). Five observations, including four of Aldebaran, were made with two filters centered on or near H-alpha.

  20. Stiffening of the ACES deployable space boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidwell, Vince

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this design project was to design an active planar stiffening device for the existing ACES (Acoustic Containerless Experiment System) structure. the ACES structure was modeled using simple beam theory. Various concepts were generated about how the stiffening device should be configured in order to perform at an optimum level. The optimum configuration was selected to be a single set of spreaders located approximately 63% of the distance down the beam. Actuation was to be provided by a DC electric motor. From the test results, the design group was able to draw conclusions and make recommendations about the utility of further research into this area.

  1. Long Term Missions at the Sun-Earth Libration Point L1: ACE, SOHO, and WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig E.

    2011-01-01

    Three heliophysics missions -- the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Global Geoscience WIND -- have been orbiting the Sun-Earth interior libration point L1 continuously since 1997, 1996, and 2004, respectively. ACE and WIND (both NASA missions) and SOHO (an ESA-NASA joint mission) are all operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). While ACE and SOHO have been dedicated libration point orbiters since their launches, WIND has had also a remarkable 10-year career flying a deep-space, multiple lunar-flyby trajectory prior to 2004. That era featured 36 targeted lunar flybys with excursions to both L1 and L2 before its final insertion in L1 orbit. A figure depicts the orbits of the three spacecraft, showing projections of the orbits onto the orthographic planes of a solar rotating ecliptic frame of reference. The SOHO orbit is a quasi-periodic halo orbit, where the frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are practically equal. Such an orbit is seen to repeat itself with a period of approximately 178 days. For ACE and WIND, the frequencies of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are unequal, giving rise to the characteristic Lissajous motion. ACE's orbit is of moderately small amplitude, whereas WIND's orbit is a large-amplitude Lissajous of dimensions close to those of the SOHO halo orbit. As motion about the collinear points is inherently unstable, stationkeeping maneuvers are necessary to prevent orbital decay and eventual escape from the L1 region. Though the three spacecraft are dissimilar (SOHO is a 3-axis stabilized Sun pointer, WIND is a spin-stabilized ecliptic pole pointer, and ACE is also spin-stabilized with its spin axis maintained between 4 and 20 degrees of the Sun), the stationkeeping technique for the three is fundamentally the same. The technique consists of correcting the energy of the orbit via a delta-V directed parallel or anti-parallel to the Spacecraft-to-Sun line. SOHO

  2. Occult Carcinoma of the Bronchus

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, F. G.; Thompson, D. W.

    1966-01-01

    The term “occult carcinoma” is applied to those patients with carcinoma of the bronchus at an in situ or early invasive stage who have carcinoma cells in their sputum but have no recognizable evidence of tumour in the chest radiograph. In eight such patients at the Toronto General Hospital, the lesion was localized and treatment instituted. Our experience with these eight patients can be compared with that of 27 patients described in two similar studies. The lesions were commonly symptomatic. Localization, although sometimes difficult, was accomplished using information obtained during bronchoscopy and bronchography. The prognosis following adequate resection appeared excellent. No patient died of carcinoma during the post-treatment follow-up period, which was continued for a minimum of 18 months. Pathological evidence indicates that bronchial carcinoma at this occult stage can be diagnosed cytologically, is rarely multifocal and, as a localized neoplasm, is amenable to curative therapy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13 PMID:5929532

  3. Comparing different Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation observations using modeling of water vapor jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Hansen, Candice; Aye, Klaus-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Motivation: On March 11, 2016 the Cassini UVIS observed its 6th star occultation by Enceladus' plume. This observation was aimed to determine variability in the total gas flux from the Enceladus' southern polar region. The analysis of the received data suggests that the total gas flux is moderately increased comparing to the average gas flux observed by UVIS from 2005 to 2011 [1]. However, UVIS detected variability in individual jets. In particular, Baghdad 1 is more collimated in 2016 than in 2005, meaning its gas escapes at higher velocity.Model and fits: We use 3D DSMC model for water vapor jets to compare different UVIS occultation observations from 2005 to 2016. The model traces test articles from jets' sources [2] into space and results in coordinates and velocities for a set of test particles. We convert particle positions into the particle number density and integrate along UVIS line of sight (LoS) for each time step of the UVIS observation using precise observational geometry derived from SPICE [3]. We integrate all jets that are crossed by the LoS and perform constrained least-squares fit of resulting modeled opacities to the observed data to solved for relative strengths of jets. The geometry of each occultation is specific, for example, during solar occultation in 2010 UVIS LoS was almost parallel to tiger stripes, which made it possible to distinguish jets venting from different tiger stripes. In 2011 Eps Orionis occultation LoS was perpendicular to tiger stripes and thus many of the jets were geometrically overlapping. Solar occultation provided us with the largest inventory of active jets - our model fit detects at least 43 non-zero jet contributions. Stellar occultations generally have lower temporal resolution and observe only a sub-set of these jets: 2011 Eps Orionis needs minimum 25 non-zero jets to fit UVIS data. We will discuss different occultations and models fits, including the most recent Epsilon Orionis occultation of 2016.[1] Hansen et al

  4. Search for serendipitous trans-Neptunian object occultation in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Liu, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Kuan-Ting

    2013-02-01

    To study the population properties of small, remote objects beyond Neptune's orbit in the outer Solar system, of kilometre size or smaller, serendipitous occultation search is so far the only way. For hectometre-sized trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs), optical shadows actually disappear because of diffraction. Observations at shorter wavelengths are needed. Here, we report the effort of TNO occultation search in X-rays using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array data of Sco X-1 taken from 2007 June to 2011 October. No definite TNO occultation events were found in the 334-ks data. We investigate the detection efficiency dependence on the TNO size to better define the sensible size range of our approach and suggest upper limits to the TNO size distribution in the size range from 30 to 300 m. A list of X-ray sources suitable for future larger facilities to observe is proposed.

  5. Fabrication of Soft-Edged Occulting Masks for Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Aziz, M. J.; Raja, S.

    2009-01-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets is important for determining the properties of individual planets and to study multi-planet systems. Obtaining spectra of extra-solar planets enables us to constrain the composition of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, their climates, their evolution, and their rotation periods. The Lyot coronagraph is one of the important techniques to acquire these spectra. In its simplest design it consists of a telescope, an occulter mask in the first focal plane, a Lyot stop in the following pupil plane, and the detector in the final focal plane. The goal of ongoing research is to achieve the best possible performance from a Lyot coronagraph. Among the study objects is the occulter mask. We are studying a new manufacturing method to overcome the main problems of occulter masks: undesired chromatic effects and intolerable phase distortions. Our method utilizes substrates covered with highly absorbing dye mixtures (optical density of 1 per micron) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling of the mask profiles into these dyes. By combining several dyes with pre-determined mixing ratios, we are able to control the chromaticity of the mask from decreasing to flat to increasing absorptivity with wavelengths. Phase effects occur in these masks only at the transition from the dye to its surrounding medium. The idea is to control these phase effects by embedding the masks in clear, phase-matching glass. This poster will present the progress we made in finding and characterizing suitable materials and the results of first optical tests of FIB machined mask-like structures in dye-doped PMMA. This work was supported by NASA through grant NNG04GC57G and NSF through grant AST-0750222, through SAO IR&D funding and by Harvard University. Central facilities were provided by Harvard's Center for Nanoscale Systems.

  6. Targeting ACE and ECE with dual acting inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hanessian, Stephen; Guesné, Sébastien; Riber, Ludivine; Marin, Julien; Benoist, Alain; Mennecier, Philippe; Rupin, Alain; Verbeuren, Tony J; De Nanteuil, Guillaume

    2008-02-01

    A series of urea analogues related to SA6817 and a GSK phosphonic acid with reported ACE inhibitory activity were prepared and tested for dual ACE and ECE activities. Although excellent ACE and NEP inhibition was achieved, only modest ECE inhibition was observed with one analogue.

  7. Geometry of the Saturn system from the 3 July 1989 occultation of 28 Sgr and Voyager observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Richard G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Elliot, J. L.; Matthews, Keith; Perkovic, Olga; Tollestrup, Eric; Harvey, Paul; Chanover, Nancy J.; Clark, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    The pole direction and radius scale for the ring system of Saturn are presently determined by combining the July 3, 1989 observations of 28 Sgr's occultation by Saturn with Voyager 1 and 2 photopolarimeter occultation measurements. The computation of ring-orbit models is separately conducted via a sky-plane method and a solar system barycentric vector approach; the results obtained by both methods are in excellent agreement. If Voyager trajectory uncertainties are assumed to be negligible, these observations can be used to determine the precession rate of the pole of Saturn about the solar system's invariable pole.

  8. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  9. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  10. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  11. Ace the Verbal on the SAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meierding, Loren

    2005-01-01

    Many students are not accepted in to certain colleges and universities because of low SAT scores. Loren Meierding has written Ace the Verbal on the SAT to help students with minimal preparation do well by improving their vocabulary and use better techniques for finding the answers to the questions. This book provides strategies needed to score…

  12. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Richard S.

    2007-09-01

    The hard X-ray sky has tremendous potential for future discoveries and is one of the last electromagnetic regimes without a sensitive all-sky survey. A new approach to such a survey is to utilize the Moon as an occulting disk. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) mission concept, based on this Lunar Occultation Technique (LOT) and incorporating advanced inorganic scintillators as a detection medium, represents a sensitive and cost effective option for NASA's Beyond Einstein Black Hole Finder Probe or a future Explorer-class mission. We present the motivating factors for the LOT, outline developmental details and simulation results, as well as give preliminary estimates for source detection sensitivity.

  13. Future Nanosatellite Constellation for Radio Occultation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallet, C.; Mahfouf, J. F.; Hauchechrne, A.; Mathieu, R.; Martin, T.; Capet, N.; Mandea, M.

    2016-08-01

    The future nanosatellite constellation for radio occultation measurements aims to provide 10000 occultations per day (horizon 2020). The radio occultation technique based on the refraction of an electromagnetic signal between a GNSS satellite (Global Navigation Satellite System) and a receiver satellite located o a low orbit provides a way to observe the Earth's atmosphere, especially its temperature, pressure and water vapor, but also the ionosphere. This technique is now considered a mature concept, the benefits clearly recognized by the communities of weather prediction, climatology and space weather. Activities are underway at CNES to define a low cost system and instrumental concept to satisfy the specifications of the different communities.

  14. Sun sensor boresight alignment testing for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. S.; Laney, V. S.; Mauldin, L. E., III

    1987-01-01

    The boresight alignment testing for the sun sensor assembly on the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) is described. The sun sensor assembly consists of three sensors that provide feedback signals for controlling dual axes gimbals. Two energy balancing silicon detectors are operated as wideband sensors in the azimuth and elevation axes. The third sensor is a silicon photodiode array operated as a narrow-band sensor in the elevation axis. These sensors are mounted on a common Invar structure which is mounted to the HALOE telescope. A blackbody was used as the stimulating source to perform the initial boresight alignment and this was checked with a heliostat solar look and a direct solar look. These tests are explained with a comparison between each source used.

  15. Triple ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition in heart failure: a comparison with ACE and dual ECE-NEP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mellin, Virginie; Jeng, Arco Y; Monteil, Christelle; Renet, Sylvanie; Henry, Jean Paul; Thuillez, Christian; Mulder, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Mortality remains high in chronic heart failure (CHF) because under ACE inhibitor treatment other neurohumoral systems remain/become (de)activated, such as the endothelin and atrial natriuretic peptide pathways. Dual endothelin-converting enzyme-neutral endopeptidase (ECE-NEP) inhibition exerts beneficial effects in experimental CHF, but whether "triple" ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition is superior to ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition is unknown. We compared, in rats with CHF, ACE-ECE-NEP to ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition in terms of left ventricular (LV) hemodynamics and remodeling. Benazepril (2 mg/kg/d) or the ECE-NEP inhibitor CGS26303 (10 mg/kg/d) were administered alone or in combination (subcutaneously for 28 days starting 7 days after coronary ligation). ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition reduced blood pressure more markedly than ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition. All treatments increased cardiac output to the same extent, but ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition reduced LV diameter and LV end-diastolic pressure more markedly than ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition. The reduction of LV weight and collagen accumulation in the "viable" myocardium was most pronounced after ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition. These results, obtained in experimental CHF, illustrate a further improvement of LV hemodynamics and structure after ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition compared with either ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition, but whether this is associated with a further improvement of exercise tolerance and/or survival remains to be determined.

  16. Reflective Occultation Mask for Evaluation of Occulter Designs for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Lyon, Richard; Shiri, Shahram; Roman, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Advanced formation flying occulter designs utilize a large occulter mask flying in formation with an imaging telescope to block and null starlight to allow imaging of faint planets in exosolar systems. A paper describes the utilization of subscale reflective occultation masks to evaluate formation flying occulter designs. The use of a reflective mask allows mounting of the occulter by conventional means and simplifies the test configuration. The innovation alters the test set-up to allow mounting of the mask using standard techniques to eliminate the problems associated with a standard configuration. The modified configuration uses a reflective set-up whereby the star simulator reflects off of a reflective occulting mask and into an evaluation telescope. Since the mask is sized to capture all rays required for the imaging test, it can be mounted directly to a supporting fixture without interfering with the beam. Functionally, the reflective occultation mask reflects light from the star simulator instead of transmitting it, with a highly absorptive carbon nanotube layer simulating the occulter blocking mask. A subscale telescope images the star source and companion dim source that represents a planet. The primary advantage of this is that the occulter can be mounted conventionally instead of using diffractive wires or magnetic levitation.

  17. Triton stellar occultation candidates: 1995-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    We have completed a search for candidates for stellar occultations by Triton over the years 1995-1999. CCd strip scan images provided star positions in the relevant sky area to a depth of about 17.5 R magnitude. Over this time period, we find that Triton passes within 1.0 arcsec of 75 stars. Appulses with geocentric minimum separations of less than 0.35 arcsec will result in stellar occultations, but further astrometry and photometry is necessary to refine individual predictions for identification of actual occultations. Finder charts are included to aid in further studies and prediction refinement. The two most promising potential occultations, Tr176 and Tr180, occur in 1997.

  18. McDonald's and the Occult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Barry

    1979-01-01

    Discusses "occult" and "paranormal" literature which is often mistaken for nonfiction. Suggests that most publishers are unwilling to publish scientific perspectives on the paranormal because such writings would be unmarketable. Journal availability: see SO 507 190. (KC)

  19. Scaling Relation for Occulter Manufacturing Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For directly imaging exoplanets, NASA is considering space mission designs that use an external occulter as the principal starlight suppression system. These occulter designs range in diameter from 16 to 40 meters and separation distance from 8,000 to 60,000 kilometers for telescopes with primary diameters of 0.5 to 4 meters. Occulter shapes are solutions to an optimization problem which seeks to maximize suppression in the shadow subject to constraints such as size, separation, and wavelengths. These designs are based on scalar diffraction theory and must be verified experimentally to demonstrate predicted on-orbit performance. Due to the large sizes and separations involved the experiment must be scaled to lab size. We are currently expanding the existing experimental test-bed at Princeton to enable scaling of occulters operating at flight Fresnel sizes. Here we examine the effect on suppression performance of edge defects and their scaling to test-bed size.

  20. Radio occultation measurements of the lunar ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Maccaferri, G.; Cassaro, P.

    Radio occultation measurements by using interplanetary probes is a well known technique to obtain information on planetary atmospheres. To further understand the morphology of the lunar ionosphere we performed radio occultation experiments by using the radio sounding technique. This method mainly consists in the analisys of the effects produced on the radio wave transmitted from the spacecraft to the Earth when it crosses the atmosphere. The wave amplitude and phase undergo modifications that are correlated to the physical parameters - i.e. electron density - of the crossed medium. The first data set was obtained during the lunar occultations of the European probe SMART-1 shortly before impacting the lunar soil on September 3rd, 2006. During this experiment several radio occultation measurements of the signal transmitted by the spacecraft were performed in S and X band by using the 32 meters radiotelescopes (at Medicina and Noto) of the Istituto di Radioastronomia - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica. Further experiments were performed during lunar occultations of Saturn and Venus. On May 22nd and June 18th 2007 the Cassini spacecraft, orbiting Saturn, and the Venus Express spacecraft, orbiting Venus, respectively were occulted by the Moon. The variation of the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured by our instruments (˜ 1013 el/m2) on this occasion is in agreement with values of the electron number density acquired by in situ measuments of the US Apollo missions and the USSR Luna 19 and 22 probes.

  1. Method of Modeling and Simulation of Shaped External Occulters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G. (Inventor); Clampin, Mark (Inventor); Petrone, Peter, III (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to modeling an external occulter including: providing at least one processor executing program code to implement a simulation system, the program code including: providing an external occulter having a plurality of petals, the occulter being coupled to a telescope; and propagating light from the occulter to a telescope aperture of the telescope by scalar Fresnel propagation, by: obtaining an incident field strength at a predetermined wavelength at an occulter surface; obtaining a field propagation from the occulter to the telescope aperture using a Fresnel integral; modeling a celestial object at differing field angles by shifting a location of a shadow cast by the occulter on the telescope aperture; calculating an intensity of the occulter shadow on the telescope aperture; and applying a telescope aperture mask to a field of the occulter shadow, and propagating the light to a focal plane of the telescope via FFT techniques.

  2. Interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with membrane-bound carboxypeptidase M (CPM) - a new function of ACE.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoou; Wiesner, Burkhard; Lorenz, Dorothea; Papsdorf, Gisela; Pankow, Kristin; Wang, Po; Dietrich, Nils; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Maul, Björn

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) demonstrates, besides its typical dipeptidyl-carboxypeptidase activity, several unusual functions. Here, we demonstrate with molecular, biochemical, and cellular techniques that the somatic wild-type murine ACE (mACE), stably transfected in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, interacts with endogenous membranal co-localized carboxypeptidase M (CPM). CPM belongs to the group of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Here we report that ACE, completely independent of its known dipeptidase activities, has GPI-targeted properties. Our results indicate that the spatial proximity between mACE and the endogenous CPM enables an ACE-evoked release of CPM. These results are discussed with respect to the recently proposed GPI-ase activity and function of sperm-bound ACE.

  3. Chasing shadows in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Federica

    The characteristics of the populations of objects that inhabit the outer solar system carry the fingerprint of the processes that governed the formation and evolution of the solar system. Occultation surveys push the limit of observation into the very small and distant outer solar system objects, allowing us to set constraints on the structure of the Kuiper belt, Scattered disk and Sedna populations. I collected, reduced, and analyzed vast datasets looking for occultations of stars by outer solar system objects, both working with the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS) collaboration and leading the MMT/Megacam occultation effort. Having found no such events in my data, I was able to place upper limits on the Kuiper belt, scattered disk and Sedna population. These limits and their derivation are described here.

  4. The ionosphere of Europa from Galileo radio occultations.

    PubMed

    Kliore, A J; Hinson, D P; Flasar, F M; Nagy, A F; Cravens, T E

    1997-07-18

    The Galileo spacecraft performed six radio occultation observations of Jupiter's Galilean satellite Europa during its tour of the jovian system. In five of the six instances, these occultations revealed the presence of a tenuous ionosphere on Europa, with an average maximum electron density of nearly 10(4) per cubic centimeter near the surface and a plasma scale height of about 240 +/- 40 kilometers from the surface to 300 kilometers and of 440 +/- 60 kilometers above 300 kilometers. Such an ionosphere could be produced by solar photoionization and jovian magnetospheric particle impact in an atmosphere having a surface density of about 10(8) electrons per cubic centimeter. If this atmosphere is composed primarily of O2, then the principal ion is O2+ and the neutral atmosphere temperature implied by the 240-kilometer scale height is about 600 kelvin. If it is composed of H2O, the principal ion is H3O+ and the neutral temperature is about 340 kelvin. In either case, these temperatures are much higher than those observed on Europa's surface, and an external heating source from the jovian magnetosphere is required.

  5. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  6. Sporadic E Morphology from GPS-CHAMP Radio Occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Ao, Chi O.; Hajj, George A.; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    The scintillations of phase and amplitude in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the GPS radio occultation signal are caused by thin ionization layers. These thin irregular electron density layers in the E region ionosphere are often called sporadic E (Es). For a monthly retrieval of Es morphology we use the variances of the phase and SNR fluctuations of worldwide 6000 GPS/CHAMP occultations in the E region. The Es climatology is studied globally with the SNR and phase variances in terms of monthly zonal means, seasonal maps, and diurnal and long-term variations. The zonal mean variances reveal strong, extended Es activities at summertime midlatitudes but weak, confined activities in wintertime high latitudes, peaking at 105 km. Global maps at 105-km altitude show clear dependence of Es activities on the geomagnetic dip angle, where the summertime midlatitude Es occurs mostly at dip angles of 30 deg. - 60 deg. and the wintertime high-latitude enhancement occurs mostly at dip angles greater than 80 deg. The midlatitude Es variances exhibit a strong semidiurnal variation with peak hours near 0800 1000 and 2000 local solar time, respectively. The peak hours are delayed slightly with decreasing height, suggesting influences from the semidiurnal tide. To provide more insights on the observed SNR and phase variances, we model radio wave propagation for the CHAMP observing geometry under several perturbed cases in the E region ionosphere. The model simulations indicate that the SNR variance has the maximum response to Es perturbations at vertical wavelengths of 1.2 km, whereas the phase response maximizes at 2 km (for the 1-s variance analysis). The characteristic scale depends little on the truncation time used in the SNR variance analysis, but it increases with the truncation time for the phase variances. Initial studies show that reasonable global Es morphology can be produced on a monthly and seasonal basis with the CHAMP one-antenna occultations. Better results

  7. Pluto and Beyond: Stellar-Occultation Web Pages for Education and Observation Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Brown, M. E.; Person, M. J.; Tam, Y. H. Ng

    2010-10-01

    The method of stellar occultation is a powerful way to investigate objects in the outer solar system, including their sizes, their shapes, their atmospheres, and, when present, rings. Following series of observations of outer-solar-system objects, including the dwarf planets Pluto and Haumea, satellites Charon and Nix, additional Kuiper-belt object 55636, and Triton, we have prepared web pages at Williams College describing the results and linking published papers and meeting abstracts as well as light curves, images, and expedition photographs. Brown's pages at Caltech (www.gps.caltech.edu/ mbrown/2003EL61/) discuss the mutual occultation and transit events of Haumea and its moon Namaka, showing predictions over the last couple of years, though no observations of the mutual events (from the Hale 5-m telescope at the Palomar Observatory on down) have yet been successful. This paper will include Haumea/Namaka predictions for the coming observation season. The MIT Planetary Astronomy Lab's web pages (occult.mit.edu) are more technical in nature, providing information useful for planning observations, which are usually made simultaneously with multiple telescopes to provide a variety of chords across the objects. For overall access to our occultation information, go to http://www.stellaroccultations.info or http://www.williams.edu/Astronomy/research/occultations. Observations have been supported in part by grants NNX08AO50G to Williams College, NNX10AB27G to MIT, and NNG05GI02G to Caltech from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Division. Student participation was supported in part by NASA's Massachusetts Space Grant.

  8. Oligometastasis as a predictor for occult disease.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Wayne S

    2014-05-01

    Oligometastasis can be defined as a state of limited metastases that is potentially amenable to ablative local therapy; the success of such therapy depends on whether or not additional occult metastases exist. A model is presented here to predict occult metastases given detectable oligometastases. Predictions were based on Bayes' theorem, in conjunction with descriptions of the statistical distributions for the sizes and numbers of hematogenous metastases. The background probability for occult metastases in individuals with oligometastases increased markedly with relatively minor increases in metastatic potential. With each additional metastasis detected the chance of further occult metastases increased. These latter increases were incremental and proportionately smaller with the more metastatic tumors. Long disease free intervals had a major effect to decrease in the probability of further occult disease. Demonstration of oligometastases depends heavily upon the sensitivity of radiological imaging techniques, where the proportion of detectable metastases relates to the position of the distribution of metastasis growth times with respect to the detection threshold. Given the limitations of radiological methods, and the possibility that the oligometastases detected may be the only disease, an aggressive approach appears indicated.

  9. First Stellar Occultation Observation with SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Edward W.; Bida, T.; Bosh, A.; Collins, P.; Levine, S.; Person, M.; Pfueller, E.; Roeser, H.; Taylor, B.; Wiedemann, M.; Wolf, J.; Zuluaga, C.

    2012-01-01

    We successfully observed the 2011 June 23 UT stellar occultation by Pluto with the High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO) instrument from Lowell Observatory and the Fast Diagnostic Camera (FDC) from the Deutches SOFIA Institut (DSI) mounted on the SOFIA telescope. A major prediction astrometry effort focused at MIT combined with the willingness of the SOFIA project to entertain the idea of an in-flight change to the flight plan allowed us to target the center of the occultation shadow. This was accomplished by means of an in-flight prediction update by satellite telephone and a real-time onboard flight plan modification to accommodate the prediction update. We obtained excellent results with both channels of HIPO and the FDC with each light curve showing a small, extended brightening while the star was occulted. We will discuss analysis results as well as SOFIA's considerable potential for future occultation work. We thank the SOFIA program for its willingness to attempt this challenging observation at such an early stage of SOFIA science operations. Lowell's SOFIA work was supported by a grant from USRA, MIT's prediction work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program and the National Science Foundation, and the FDC work was supported by the DSI. We thank the US Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station for allowing us to use their facilities to obtain our prediction astrometry observations.

  10. Tissue-Specific Expression of Transgenic Secreted ACE in Vasculature Can Restore Normal Kidney Functions, but Not Blood Pressure, of Ace-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Kessler, Sean P.; Colucci, Juliana Almada; Yamashita, Michifumi; Senanayake, Preenie deS; Sen, Ganes C.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) regulates normal blood pressure and fluid homeostasis through its action in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS). Ace-/- mice are smaller in size, have low blood pressure and defective kidney structure and functions. All of these defects are cured by transgenic expression of somatic ACE (sACE) in vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice. sACE is expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells and undergoes a natural cleavage secretion process to generate a soluble form in the body fluids. Both the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE are enzymatically active, and generate the vasoactive octapeptide Angiotensin II (Ang II) with equal efficiency. To assess the relative physiological roles of the secreted and the cell-bound forms of ACE, we expressed, in the vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice, the ectodomain of sACE, which corresponded to only the secreted form of ACE. Our results demonstrated that the secreted form of ACE could normalize kidney functions and RAS integrity, growth and development of Ace-/- mice, but not their blood pressure. This study clearly demonstrates that the secreted form of ACE cannot replace the tissue-bound ACE for maintaining normal blood pressure; a suitable balance between the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE is essential for maintaining all physiological functions of ACE. PMID:24475296

  11. Regulation of urinary ACE2 in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Jan; Garcia-Halpin, Laura; Ye, Minghao; Maier, Christoph; Sowers, Kurt; Burns, Kevin D; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) enhances the degradation of ANG II and its expression is altered in diabetic kidneys, but the regulation of this enzyme in the urine is unknown. Urinary ACE2 was studied in the db/db model of type 2 diabetes and stretozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes during several physiological and pharmacological interventions. ACE2 activity in db/db mice was increased in the serum and to a much greater extent in the urine compared with db/m controls. Neither a specific ANG II blocker, telmisartan, nor an ACE inhibitor, captopril, altered the levels of urinary ACE2 in db/db or db/m control mice. High-salt diet (8%) increased whereas low-salt diet (0.1%) decreased urinary ACE2 activity in the urine of db/db mice. In STZ mice, urinary ACE2 was also increased, and insulin decreased it partly but significantly after several weeks of administration. The increase in urinary ACE2 activity in db/db mice reflected an increase in enzymatically active protein with two bands identified of molecular size at 110 and 75 kDa and was associated with an increase in kidney cortex ACE2 protein at 110 kDa but not at 75 kDa. ACE2 activity was increased in isolated tubular preparations but not in glomeruli from db/db mice. Administration of soluble recombinant ACE2 to db/m and db/db mice resulted in a marked increase in serum ACE2 activity, but no gain in ACE2 activity was detectable in the urine, further demonstrating that urinary ACE2 is of kidney origin. Increased urinary ACE2 was associated with more efficient degradation of exogenous ANG II (10(-9) M) in urine from db/db compared with that from db/m mice. Urinary ACE2 could be a potential biomarker of increased metabolism of ANG II in diabetic kidney disease.

  12. Image Analysis of the 2012 Pluto (Near) Occultation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Image Analysis of the 2012 Pluto (Near) Occultation Keith T. Knox Air Force Research Laboratory ABSTRACT Imagery was gathered at the AMOS...observatory on the 3.6-meter telescope for the expected occultation of a star by the dwarf planet, Pluto , on 29 June 2012. The imagery was taken at...5 Hz for 40 minutes before and after the expected time of occultation. The initial analysis of the photometry indicated that Pluto did not occult

  13. Occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Sun; Kim, Yoon Jun

    2014-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) refers to the presence of HBV DNA in the absence of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen. Since OBI was first described in the late 1970s, there has been increasing interest in this topic. The prevalence of OBI varies according to the different endemicity of HBV infection, cohort characteristics, and sensitivity and specificity of the methods used for detection. Although the exact mechanism of OBI has not been proved, intra-hepatic persistence of viral covalently closed circular DNA under the host’s strong immune suppression of HBV replication and gene expression seems to be a cause. OBI has important clinical significance in several conditions. First, OBI can be transmitted through transfusion, organ transplantation including orthotopic liver transplantation, or hemodialysis. Donor screening before blood transfusion, prophylaxis for high-risk organ transplantation recipients, and dialysis-specific infection-control programs should be considered to reduce the risk of transmission. Second, OBI may reactivate and cause acute hepatitis in immunocompromised patients or those receiving chemotherapy. Close HBV DNA monitoring and timely antiviral treatment can prevent HBV reactivation and consequent clinical deterioration. Third, OBI may contribute to the progression of hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease including hepatitis C. Finally, OBI seems to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma by its direct proto-oncogenic effect and by indirectly causing persistent hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. However, this needs further investigation. We review published reports in the literature to gain an overview of the status of OBI and emphasize the clinical importance of OBI. PMID:25544873

  14. An overview of the halogen occultation experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James M., III

    1991-01-01

    The HALOE experiment will fly on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in the last quarter of 1991. The experiment uses the solar occultation limb sounding approach, in combination with gas filter and broadband radiometry to provide measurements of temperature profiles and key gases in the ClO(y), NO(y), and HO(y) chemical families of the middle atmosphere. The instrument has been characterized in great detail to determine gains, spectral response, noise, crosstalk, field-of-view, and thermal drift characteristics. A final end-to-end test using a gas cell to simulate the atmosphere demonstrated measurement repeatability to about 1 percent and agreement between measured and calculated signals to within about 1 percent to 3 percent. This latter agreement provides confidence in knowledge of both the hardware as well as the software.

  15. Data inversion algorithm development for the hologen occultation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordley, Larry L.; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    1986-01-01

    The successful retrieval of atmospheric parameters from radiometric measurement requires not only the ability to do ideal radiometric calculations, but also a detailed understanding of instrument characteristics. Therefore a considerable amount of time was spent in instrument characterization in the form of test data analysis and mathematical formulation. Analyses of solar-to-reference interference (electrical cross-talk), detector nonuniformity, instrument balance error, electronic filter time-constants and noise character were conducted. A second area of effort was the development of techniques for the ideal radiometric calculations required for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) data reduction. The computer code for these calculations must be extremely complex and fast. A scheme for meeting these requirements was defined and the algorithms needed form implementation are currently under development. A third area of work included consulting on the implementation of the Emissivity Growth Approximation (EGA) method of absorption calculation into a HALOE broadband radiometer channel retrieval algorithm.

  16. A FOURIER OPTICS METHOD FOR CALCULATING STELLAR OCCULTATION LIGHT CURVES BY OBJECTS WITH THIN ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Young, E. F.

    2012-08-15

    A stellar occultation occurs when a solar system object passes in front of a distant star. The light curves resulting from stellar occultations can reveal many aspects of the obscuring object. For airless bodies, the diffraction light curve specifies the object's size, distance and, if several chords are observed, shape. Occultation light curves are especially sensitive to the presence of atmospheres; the refraction light curve is a function of the atmosphere's density, pressure, and temperature profiles. The goal of this paper is to develop a practical algorithm to model the simultaneous effects of diffraction and refraction for objects in which both phenomena are observable. The algorithm we present is flexible: it can be used to calculate light curves by objects with arbitrary shapes and arbitrary atmospheres (including the presence of opacity sources such as hazes), provided that the atmosphere can be represented by a thin screen with a phase delay and an opacity defined at each location in the screen. Because the algorithm is limited at present to thin atmospheres (in which rays from a star are bent but undergo virtually no translation as they pass through an atmosphere), the gas giants, Earth, Mars, and Venus are not treated. Examples of stellar occultations are presented for round or irregularly shaped objects having thin atmospheres of various column densities.

  17. Occult primary, version 3.2014.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, David S; Handorf, Charles R; Agulnik, Mark; Bowles, Daniel W; Cates, Justin M; Cristea, Mihaela; Dotan, Efrat; Eaton, Keith D; Fidias, Panagiotis M; Gierada, David; Gilcrease, G Weldon; Godby, Kelly; Iyer, Renuka; Lenzi, Renato; Phay, John; Rashid, Asif; Saltz, Leonard; Schwab, Richard B; Shulman, Lawrence N; Smerage, Jeffrey B; Stevenson, Marvaretta M; Varadhachary, Gauri R; Zager, Jonathan S; Zhen, Weining Ken; Bergman, Mary Anne; Freedman-Cass, Deborah A

    2014-07-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Occult Primary tumors provide recommendations for the evaluation, workup, management, and follow-up of patients with occult primary tumors (cancers of unknown primary). These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2014 NCCN Occult Primary panel meeting. The panel discussed gene expression profiling (GEP) for the identification of the tissue of origin and concluded that, although GEP has a diagnostic benefit, a clinical benefit has not been demonstrated. The panel recommends against GEP as standard management, although 20% of the panel believes the diagnostic benefit of GEP warrants its routine use. In addition, the panel discussed testing for actionable mutations (eg, ALK) to help guide choice of therapy, but declined to add this recommendation.

  18. Multiphysics Applications of ACE3P

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Lee, C. Ko, Z. Li, C.-K. Ng, L. Xiao, G. Cheng, H. Wang

    2012-07-01

    The TEM3P module of ACE3P, a parallel finite-element electromagnetic code suite from SLAC, focuses on the multiphysics simulation capabilities, including thermal and mechanical analysis for accelerator applications. In this pa- per, thermal analysis of coupler feedthroughs to supercon- ducting rf (SRF) cavities will be presented. For the realistic simulation, internal boundary condition is implemented to capture RF heating effects on the surface shared by a di- electric and a conductor. The multiphysics simulation with TEM3P matched the measurement within 0.4%.

  19. Occultation evidence for an atmosphere on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Hunten, D. M.; Dieters, S. W.; Hill, K. M.; Watson, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Observations from different sources of Pluto occulting a 12th-magnitude star indicate an extended atmosphere around the planet. Here, data obtained from the 1 m telescope at the University of Tasmania, Hobart are interpreted in terms of a theory for occultation by an atmosphere whose thickness is comparable to the planetary radius. The data can be satisfactorily fitted with a methane atmosphere at plausible pressures and temperatures. The surface pressures inferred from this single chord are uncertain by an order of magnitude, but are consistent with spectroscopic constraints.

  20. The Radio Occultation Processing Package ROPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culverwell, I. D.; Lewis, H. W.; Offiler, D.; Marquardt, C.; Burrows, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the Radio Occultation Processing Package, ROPP, a product of the EUMETSAT Radio Occultation Meteorology Satellite Application Facility (ROM SAF) developed by a large number of scientists over many years. A brief review of the concepts, functionality and structure of ROPP is followed by more detailed descriptions of its key capabilities. Example results from a full chain of processing using some of the ROPP tools are presented. Some current and prospective uses of ROPP are given. Instructions on how to access the code and its supporting documentation are provided.

  1. The Radio Occultation Processing Package, ROPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culverwell, I. D.; Lewis, H. W.; Offiler, D.; Marquardt, C.; Burrows, C. P.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the Radio Occultation Processing Package, ROPP, a product of the EUMETSAT Radio Occultation Meteorology Satellite Application Facility (ROM SAF) developed by a large number of scientists over many years. A brief review of the concepts, functionality and structure of ROPP is followed by more detailed descriptions of its key capabilities. Example results from a full chain of processing using some of the ROPP tools are presented. Some current and prospective uses of ROPP are given. Instructions on how to access the code and its supporting documentation are provided.

  2. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  3. [Diagnosis difficulty in occult constrictive pericarditis].

    PubMed

    Massoure, P L; le Bouffos, V; Roubertie, F; Lafitte, S; Roudaut, R

    2005-10-01

    We report the case of a 42 years woman known to have a cardiac heart failure attributed to restrictive cardiomyopathy for want of any other plausible diagnosis. Evolution and repeted investigations finally permitted to rectify the diagnosis by revealing a constrictive pericarditis, remained occult 9 years during. The differentiation of restrictive cardiomyopathy and constrictive pericarditis has been a perennial problem in clinical cardiology. Diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is based on associated signs sometimes too poor to go straight to thoracotomy. We discuss the mean to approach more precisely this uncommon pattern named occult constrictive pericarditis.

  4. The ACES Mission: System Tests Results and Development Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciapuoti, Luigi

    Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) testing fundamental laws of physics with high-performance atomic clocks1 . Operated on-board the International Space Station, the ACES payload will distribute a clock signal with fractional frequency instability and inaccuracy of 1·10-16 . This frequency reference is resulting from the medium-term stability of an active hydrogen maser (SHM) and the long-term stability and accuracy of a primary standard based on samples of laser cooled Cs atoms (PHARAO). The ACES clocks are combined by two servo-loops, the first stabilizing the PHARAO local oscillator on SHM, the second controlling the long-term instabilities of SHM using the error signal generated by the PHARAO Cesium resonator. A link in the microwave domain (MWL) and an optical link (ELT) will make the ACES clock signal available to ground laboratories equipped with atomic clocks, connecting them in a worldwide network. Space-to-ground and ground-to-ground comparisons of atomic frequency standards will be used to test Einstein's theory of general relativity including a precision measurement of the gravitational red-shift, a search for time variations of fundamental constants, and Lorentz Invariance tests. Applications in geodesy, optical time transfer, and ranging will also be supported. The ACES main instruments and subsystems have now reached an advanced status of devel-opment, demonstrated by the completion and the successful test of their engineering models. In particular, a dedicated test campaign has recently verified the performance of the ACES system, where PHARAO and SHM, locked together via the ACES servo loops, are operated as a unique oscillator to generate the ACES frequency reference. The test campaign conducted 1 Luigi Cacciapuoti and Christophe Salomon, Space Clocks and Fundamental Tests: The ACES Experiment, EPJ Special topics 172, 57 (2009). at CNES premises in Toulouse between July and November 2009 concluded

  5. Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J.; Yuen, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Air Force goal is to develop vibration control techniques for large flexible spacecraft by addressing sensor, actuator, and control hardware and dynamic testing. The Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) program will address the Air Force goal by looking at two leading control techniques and implementing them on a structural model of a flexible spacecraft under laboratory testing. The first phase in the ACES program is to review and to assess the High Authority Control/Low Authority Control (HAC/LAC) and Filter accomodated Model Error Sensitivity Suppression (FAMESS) control techniques for testing on the modified VCOSS structure. Appropriate sensors and actuators will be available for use with both techniques; locations will be the same for both techniques. The control actuators will be positioned at the midpoint and free end of the structure. The laser source for the optical sensor is mounted on the feed mast. The beam will be reflected from a mirror on the offset antenna onto the detectors mounted above the shaker table bay. The next phase is to develop an analysis simulation with the control algorithms implemented for dynamics verification. The third phase is to convert the control laws into high level computer language and test them in the NASA-MSFC facility. The final phase is to compile all analytical and test results for performance comparisons.

  6. ACE: Detecting Volatile Organic Compounds from Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.; Allen, Nicholas D. C.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution infrared absorption cross sections for ethane, propane (both in the 3 μm region) and acetone (in the 3 μm and 5-8 μm regions) have been determined from spectra recorded using a high-resolution FTIR spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125/HR). Data are presented for mixtures with dry synthetic air at 0.015 cm-1 resolution (calculated as 0.9/MOPD using the Bruker definition of resolution), at a number of temperatures and pressures appropriate for atmospheric conditions. Intensities were calibrated using spectra taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database. Methane measurements are currently being performed in the 3 μm region in order to retrieve line mixing parameters, which will be used in an improved ACE forward model to minimize CH4 residuals in the retrievals of organic species. Preliminary retrievals of acetone from ACE spectra using a microwindow from 1364.7 to 1367.1 cm-1 have been performed.

  7. Compact sources of suprathermal microwave emission detected in quiescent active regions during lunar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, E.; Kaufmann, P.; Strauss, F. M.

    1992-04-01

    Solar quiescent active regions are known to exhibit radio emission from discrete structures. The knowledge of their dimensions and brightness temperatures is essential for understanding the physics of quiescent, confined plasma regions. Solar eclipses of 10 August, 1980 and 26 January, 1990, observed with high sensitivity and high time resolution at 22 GHz, allowed an unprecedented opportunity to identify Fresnel diffraction effects during lunar occultations of active regions. The results indicate the presence of quiescent discrete sources smaller than one arcsec in one dimension. Assuming symmetrical sources, their brightness temperatures were larger than 2 x 10 exp 7 K and 8 x 10 exp 7 K, for the 1980 and 1990 observations, respectively.

  8. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion.

  9. Photoelectric observations of lunar occultations. XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. A.; Evans, D. S.; Fekel, F. C.; Smith, B. W.

    1980-04-01

    Occultation observations of 466 events are presented. These include diameter measures of Aldebaran under very bad conditions and a good diameter measure of 82 Vir. The list includes 91 reappearances and observations of 34 double or multiple stars, both new and previously known. The inconsistencies of the observations of Kui 88 are discussed. Further observations are most desirable.

  10. Stellar angular diameters from occultation observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, B.-C.

    This paper reviews the history of measuring stellar angular diameters from lunar occultation observations and the techniques of data analysis. Several effects which can affect the results of measurement are discussed. The author finds that there may be systematic errors in angular diameters measured by various observatories for Aldebaran.

  11. Occult carcinoma of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Arellano, L; Ibarra, A

    1984-09-01

    Ten occult carcinomas of the thyroid gland were found in 274 unselected autopsies at the Pathology Service, Hospital José Joaquín Aguirre, between December 1980 and March 1983. This is the lowest incidence among the most recent published series. The present results suggest that environmental factors play an important role in the etiology of this type of carcinoma.

  12. Photon counts from stellar occultation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, James J.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using stars as radiation sources for Earth atmospheric occultation experiments is investigated. Exoatmospheric photon counts of the order of 10 to the 6th power photons/sq cm/sec are realized for the 15 visually brightest stars. Most photon counts appear to be marginally detectable unless photomultiplier or cascade detection devices can be used.

  13. Illinois occultation summary, 1. 1977 - 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radick, R.; Lien, D.

    1980-01-01

    Instrumentation and data acquisition techniques used to record lunar occultations at the University of Illinois Prairie Observatory are described. Tables and graphs summarize data from 64 events which include 30 observations of stars brighter than 7th magnitude, 40 reappearances, 4 angular diameter measurements, 8 observations of binary stars, and 6 observations which may indicate multiplicity.

  14. Desert Dust Layers Over Polluted Marine Boundary Layers: ACE-2 Measurements and ACE-Asia Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosols in ACE-Asia are expected to have some commonalties with those in ACE-2, along with important differences. Among the commonalities are occurrences of desert dust layers over polluted marine boundary layers. Differences include the nature of the dust (yellowish in the East Asia desert outflow, vs. reddish-brown in the Sahara Outflow measured in ACE-2) and the composition of boundary-layer aerosols (e.g., more absorbing, soot and organic aerosol in-the Asian plume, caused by coal and biomass burning, with limited controls). In this paper we present ACE-2 measurements and analyses as a guide to our plans for ACE-2 Asia. The measurements include: (1) Vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth and extinction (380-1558 nm), and of water vapor column and concentration, from the surface through the elevated desert dust, measured by the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14); (2) Comparisons of airborne and shipborne sunphotometer optical depths to satellite-retrieved values, with and without desert dust; (3) Comparisons between airborne Sunphotometer optical depth and extinction spectra and those derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption; (4) Comparisons between size distributions measured in situ and retrieved from sunphotometer optical depth spectra; (5) Comparisons between aerosol single scattering albedo values obtained by several techniques, using various combinations of measurements of backscatter, extinction, size distribution, scattering, absorption, and radiative flux. We show how analyses of these data can be used to address questions important to ACE-Asia, such as: (1) How do dust and other absorbing aerosols affect the accuracy of satellite optical depth retrievals? How important are asphericity effects? (2) How important are supermicron dust and seasalt aerosols to overall aerosol optical depth and radiative forcing? How well are these aerosols sampled by aircraft

  15. Lysozyme and bilirubin bind to ACE and regulate its conformation and shedding

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Sergei M.; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Akinbi, Henry T.; Nesterovitch, Andrew B.; Epshtein, Yuliya; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Kryukova, Olga V.; Piegeler, Tobias; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Kost, Olga A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) hydrolyzes numerous peptides and is a critical participant in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. Elevated tissue ACE levels are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Blood ACE concentrations are determined by proteolytic cleavage of ACE from the endothelial cell surface, a process that remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified a novel ACE gene mutation (Arg532Trp substitution in the N domain of somatic ACE) that increases blood ACE activity 7-fold and interrogated the mechanism by which this mutation significantly increases blood ACE levels. We hypothesized that this ACE mutation disrupts the binding site for blood components which may stabilize ACE conformation and diminish ACE shedding. We identified the ACE-binding protein in the blood as lysozyme and also a Low Molecular Weight (LMW) ACE effector, bilirubin, which act in concert to regulate ACE conformation and thereby influence ACE shedding. These results provide mechanistic insight into the elevated blood level of ACE observed in patients on ACE inhibitor therapy and elevated blood lysozyme and ACE levels in sarcoidosis patients. PMID:27734897

  16. ACE2 and Microbiota: Emerging Targets for Cardiopulmonary Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Jeffrey, Colleen T; Liu, Meng; Katovich, Michael J; Raizada, Mohan K; Shenoy, Vinayak

    2015-01-01

    The health of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is inextricably linked to the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Physiologically speaking, a balance between the vasodeleterious (ACE/Ang II/AT1R) and vasoprotective (ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/MasR) components of the RAS is critical for cardiopulmonary homeostasis. Upregulation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis shifts the system toward vasoconstriction, proliferation, hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, all factors that contribute to the development and progression of cardiopulmonary diseases. Conversely, stimulation of the vasoprotective ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/MasR axis produces a counter-regulatory response that promotes cardiovascular health. Current research is investigating novel strategies to augment actions of the vasoprotective RAS components, particularly ACE2, in order to treat various pathologies. While multiple approaches to increase the activity of ACE2 have displayed beneficial effects against experimental disease models, the mechanisms behind its protective actions remain incompletely understood. Recent work demonstrating a non-catalytic role for ACE2 in amino acid transport in the gut has led us to speculate that the therapeutic effects of ACE2 can be mediated, in part, by its actions on the gastrointestinal tract and/or gut microbiome. This is consistent with emerging data which suggests that dysbiosis of the gut and lung microbiomes is associated with cardiopulmonary disease. This review highlights new developments in the protective actions of ACE2 against cardiopulmonary disorders, discusses innovative approaches to targeting ACE2 for therapy, and explores an evolving role for gut and lung microbiota in cardiopulmonary health. PMID:26322922

  17. ACE2 and Microbiota: Emerging Targets for Cardiopulmonary Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cole-Jeffrey, Colleen T; Liu, Meng; Katovich, Michael J; Raizada, Mohan K; Shenoy, Vinayak

    2015-12-01

    The health of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is inextricably linked to the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Physiologically speaking, a balance between the vasodeleterious (Angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE]/Angiotensin II [Ang II]/Ang II type 1 receptor [AT1R]) and vasoprotective (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 [ACE2]/Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor [MasR]) components of the RAS is critical for cardiopulmonary homeostasis. Upregulation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis shifts the system toward vasoconstriction, proliferation, hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, all factors that contribute to the development and progression of cardiopulmonary diseases. Conversely, stimulation of the vasoprotective ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR axis produces a counter-regulatory response that promotes cardiovascular health. Current research is investigating novel strategies to augment actions of the vasoprotective RAS components, particularly ACE2, in order to treat various pathologies. Although multiple approaches to increase the activity of ACE2 have displayed beneficial effects against experimental disease models, the mechanisms behind its protective actions remain incompletely understood. Recent work demonstrating a non-catalytic role for ACE2 in amino acid transport in the gut has led us to speculate that the therapeutic effects of ACE2 can be mediated, in part, by its actions on the gastrointestinal tract and/or gut microbiome. This is consistent with emerging data which suggest that dysbiosis of the gut and lung microbiomes is associated with cardiopulmonary disease. This review highlights new developments in the protective actions of ACE2 against cardiopulmonary disorders, discusses innovative approaches to targeting ACE2 for therapy, and explores an evolving role for gut and lung microbiota in cardiopulmonary health.

  18. Heavy Ion Flux Comparison of MARIE and ACE/CRIS Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Andersen, V.; Atwell, W.; Cleghorn, T.; Cucinotta, F.; Pinsky, L.; Saganti, P.; Turner, R.; Zeitlin, C.

    2003-01-01

    The charged particle spectrum for nuclei from protons to neon, (charge Z=10) has been observed during the cruise phase and in orbit around Mars by the MARIE charge particle spectrometer aboard the Odyssey spacecraft. The cruise data was taken between April 23, 2001 and August 11, 2001. The Mars orbit data was taken from March 5, 2002 through December 2002. Both the cruise data set and the orbital data set are compared with the simultaneous observations made by the CRIS instrument aboard the ACE space-craft, located at L1. Any detectable differences between the two spacecraft data sets could lead to the understanding of the radial dependence of solar modulation.

  19. Active Control Technique Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-16

    Due to Test Results 3-9 3.5 Representative Data 3-11 3.6 Control Model 3-21 4.0 Simulation 4-1 5.0 HAC/LAC 5-1 5.1 Theory 5-1...5.1.1 HAC Theory 5-1 5.1.2 LAC Theory 5-4 5.1.3 HAC/LAC Combined Control 5-6 5.1.4 HAC/LAC Applied to ACES 5-7 5.2 Model Selection and...5-39 5-50 6.0 Positivity 6-1 6-1 6-9 6-9 6-17 6-31 5.4 Observation 5.5 Test Results 5.6 Conclusions 6.1 Theory 6.2 Model

  20. Origins of the Slow and the Ubiquitous Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korendyke, Noci C.; Habbal, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    We present in this letter the first coordinated radio occultation measurements and ultraviolet observations of the inner corona below 5.5 Rs, obtained during the Galileo solar conjunction in January 1997, to establish the origin of the slow wind.

  1. The Use of Stellar Occultations to Study Trans-Neptunian Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ROSSI, GUSTAVO B.; Sicardy, Bruno; Braga-Ribas, Felipe; Vieira Martins, Roberto; Camargo, Julio; Assafin, Marcelo

    2014-11-01

    The physical parameters of the Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNO's) such as size, shape, density, presence of atmosphere, and rings, provide important information on their formation and evolution. At more than 30 Astronomical Units (AU) from the Sun, those objects receive low solar radiation and have low mutual collisions velocities so they can be considered as remnants of the primordial outer Solar System. Besides that, information on TNO's is of great relevance when trying to establish a general formation scenario for the recently discovered planetary systems.The problem is that such bodies have a diameter smaller than 2300 km (Eris, one of the largest TNO, has 2326 km) and, when viewed from Earth, they usually subtend angles smaller than 50 milli-arcseconds, preventing direct imaging. One method to obtain very accurate information on the TNO's is the stellar occultation technique. Sizes at kilometer accuracies and pressure at nanobar levels can be achieved with this method, as well as detection of ring systems. Shape, density, albedo and other physical parameters can also be derived from this technique.Since 2010, we observed stellar occultations of several TNO's (Eris, Makemake, 2003VS2, Quaoar, Ixion, Varuna, 2002KX14, and 2003AZ84) besides some other occultations by Pluto and Charon, and by the largest Centaur known to date, Chariklo. We also predicted future events in 2014 and 2015 for 40 TNO's and Centaurs. On this work, we present the process of our campains - predictions, follow ups, world wide cooperation, post-occutation data analysis -, the new results obtained from recent stellar occultations of TNO's, and the expectations of improvements after GAIA.

  2. Saturn's upper atmosphere during the Voyager era: Reanalysis and modeling of the UVS occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervack, Ronald J.; Moses, Julianne I.

    2015-09-01

    The Voyager 1 and 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) solar and stellar occultation dataset represents one of the primary, pre-Cassini sources of information that we have on the neutral upper atmosphere of Saturn. Despite its importance, however, the full set of occultations has never received a consistent, nor complete, analysis, and the results derived from the initial analyses over thirty years ago left questions about the temperature and density profiles unanswered. We have reanalyzed all six of the UVS occultations (three solar and three stellar) to provide an up-to-date, pre-Cassini view of Saturn's upper atmosphere. From the Voyager UVS data, we have determined vertical profiles for H2, H, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6, as well as temperature. Our analysis also provides explanations for the two different thermospheric temperatures derived in earlier analyses (400-450 K versus 800 K) and for the unusual shape of the total density profile noted by Hubbard et al. (1997). Aside from inverting the occultation data to retrieve densities and temperatures, we have investigated the atmospheric structure through a series of photochemical models to infer the strength of atmospheric mixing and other physical and chemical properties of Saturn's mesopause region during the Voyager flybys. We find that the data exhibit considerable variability in the vertical profiles for methane, suggesting variations in vertical winds or the eddy diffusion coefficient as a function of latitude and/or time in Saturn's upper atmosphere. The results of our reanalysis will provide a useful baseline for interpreting new data from Cassini, particularly in the context of change over the past three decades.

  3. Lidar and Occultation Remote Sensing Applied to Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.

    2008-05-01

    The use of lidar began in the early 1960s soon after a laboratory laser was shown to Q-switch and emit short pulses of light. The lidar technique makes measurements typically through backscattering, fluorescence, attenuation and absorption, and has become more and more sophisticated over the years, being used at ground stations and aboard airplanes and spacecraft. Routine measurements of aerosols, clouds, ozone, and atmospheric constituents like wind speeds and direction are being made. The passive technique of solar, lunar and stellar occultation has been used aboard balloons, aircraft and spacecraft also beginning in the 1960s, and since 1975, aboard spacecraft. It is a technique that, like lidar, is capable of vertical profiling, and has produced global measurements of stratospheric aerosols and ozone on a routine basis since about 1978. This talk will present a walk through the history of the author's involvement in the development of and measurements using these two techniques. Record-setting data sets on stratospheric aerosols from a ground-based lidar and satellite measurements of global aerosols and ozone (SAM~II and SAGE series) will be presented. The naming and characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds will be described in the context of the ozone hole. Aircraft lidar campaigns to study the impact of volcanic aerosols will be described, as well as the use of airborne lidar to validate satellite occultation measurements. Finally, the proof-of-principle LITE Space Shuttle lidar experiment and the long duration unmanned CALIPSO lidar mission presently in orbit will be discussed along with example results. A look-back at these contributions will be followed by a look into the future.

  4. Human ACE gene polymorphism and distilled water induced cough

    PubMed Central

    Morice, A. H.; Turley, A. J.; Linton, T. K.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) cause a non-productive cough. The insertion/deletion polymorphism of ACE was used as a genetic marker to investigate the relationship between ACE genotype and cough sensitivity. METHODS: A double blind cough challenge was performed in 66 normotensive subjects (34 men) of mean age 34.8 years (range 18-80) using aerosols of distilled water. The number of coughs during the one minute exposure to water was recorded. DNA samples from venous blood were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and resolved on a 1% agarose gel. They were analysed for the presence of a polymorphism in intron 16 of the ACE gene consisting of an insertion (I) or deletion (D) of an Alu repetitive sequence 287 base pairs long. RESULTS: The distribution of genotypes was 20 II, 26 ID, and 20 DD. The cough response was significantly (p < 0.01) related to the ACE genotype, the mean number of coughs being 15.8, 11.3, and 9.6, respectively, in subjects with the II, ID, and DD genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: The observation that cough challenge is dependent on ACE genotype in normal subjects is evidence of a link between ACE activity and the cough reflex. 


 PMID:9059468

  5. Stellar Occultation Probe of Triton's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this research were (i) to better characterize Triton's atmospheric structure by probing a region not well investigated by Voyager and (ii) to begin acquiring baseline data for an investigation of the time evolution of the atmosphere which will set limits on the thermal conductivity of the surface and the total mass of N2 in the atmosphere. Our approach was to use observations (with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory) of a stellar occultation by Triton that was predicted to occur on 1993 July 10. As described in the attached reprint, we achieved these objectives through observation of this occultation and a subsequent one with the KAO in 1995. We found new results about Triton's atmospheric structure from the analysis of the two occultations observed with the KAO and ground-based data. These stellar occultation observations made both in the visible and infrared, have good spatial coverage of Triton including the first Triton central-flash observations, and are the first data to probe the 20-100 km altitude level on Triton. The small-planet light curve model of Elliot and Young (AJ 103, 991-1015) was generalized to include stellar flux refracted by the far limb, and then fitted to the data. Values of the pressure, derived from separate immersion and emersion chords, show no significant trends with latitude indicating that Triton's atmosphere is spherically symmetric at approximately 50 km altitude to within the error of the measurements. However, asymmetry observed in the central flash indicates the atmosphere is not homogeneous at the lowest levels probed (approximately 20 km altitude). From the average of the 1995 occultation data, the equivalent-isothermal temperature of the atmosphere is 47 +/- 1 K and the atmospheric pressure at 1400 km radius (approximately 50 km altitude) is 1.4 +/- 0.1 microbar. Both of these are not consistent with a model based on Voyager UVS and RSS observations in 1989 (Strobel et al, Icarus 120, 266-289). The atmospheric

  6. Occultation Modeling for Radiation Obstruction Effects on Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Carufel, Guy; Li, Zu Qun; Harvey, Jason; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A geometric occultation model has been developed to determine line-of-sight obstruction of radiation sources expected for different NASA space exploration mission designs. Example applications includes fidelity improvements for surface lighting conditions, radiation pressure, thermal and power subsystem modeling. The model makes use of geometric two dimensional shape primitives to most effectively model space vehicles. A set of these primitives is used to represent three dimensional obstructing objects as a two dimensional outline from the perspective of an observing point of interest. Radiation sources, such as the Sun or a Moon's albedo is represented as a collection of points, each of which is assigned a flux value to represent a section of the radiation source. Planetary bodies, such as a Martian moon, is represented as a collection of triangular facets which are distributed in spherical height fields for optimization. These design aspects and the overall model architecture will be presented. Specific uses to be presented includes a study of the lighting condition on Phobos for a possible future surface mission, and computing the incident flux on a spacecraft's solar panels and radiators from direct and reflected solar radiation subject to self-shadowing or shadowing by third bodies.

  7. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  8. ACE--Alliance for Clinical Enhancement: a collaborative model.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, G P; Granger, M; Todaro, M

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces an innovative collaborative model developed by nursing educators and practitioners, the Alliance for Clinical Enhancement Program (ACE), that combines components of traditional internship and extender programs. The goals of ACE are opportunities for role socialization, role transition, and role modeling for nursing students; enhancing clinical competence and provision of financial assistance to the students; increased recruitment of RN graduates by the involved hospital; and decreased RN time spent on non-nursing tasks by hospital RNs. The total development, implementation, and analysis of ACE Program is discussed.

  9. The main layers of the ionosphere of Venus as seen by Pioneer Venus Orbiter radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Jacob; Withers, Paul; Vogt, Marissa F.

    2016-10-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) performed numerous atmospheric experiments from 1978 to 1992. Radio occultation measurements were used to create vertical ionospheric electron density profiles extending as low as 100 km altitude; yielding data coverage across the V1 and V2 layers of the Venusian ionosphere, 125 and 140 km respectively. The PVO data give us a unique look at the ionosphere during solar maximum compared to later Venus missions. However, none of these ionospheric profiles were archived at the PDS nor have been available for comparison to Venus Express observations. We have extracted 120 PVO radio occultation profiles from published papers using a program to digitally read data from graphical images. Additionally, the NSSDC had 94 profiles, 63 of which were added to our dataset. The data from both sources were used in conjunction to analyze trends between solar activity and the characteristics of the V1 and V2 layers. The V1 layer, created by soft x-rays, should react more to changes in solar activity than the EUV created V2 layer. We intend to archive this data at the PDS so that the community can easily access digital measurements of the Venusian ionosphere at solar maximum.

  10. Current methods of radio occultation data inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliore, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    The methods of Abel integral transform and ray-tracing inversion have been applied to data received from radio occultation experiments as a means of obtaining refractive index profiles of the ionospheres and atmospheres of Mars and Venus. In the case of Mars, certain simplifications are introduced by the assumption of small refractive bending in the atmosphere. General inversion methods, independent of the thin atmosphere approximation, have been used to invert the data obtained from the radio occultation of Mariner 5 by Venus; similar methods will be used to analyze data obtained from Jupiter with Pioneers F and G, as well as from the other outer planets in the Outer Planet Grand Tour Missions.

  11. [Chronic hepatitis and occult HCV infection].

    PubMed

    Kowala-Piaskowska, Arleta; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Pham, Tram N Q; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered in 1989. HCV is a positive single-strand RNA. We all have thought, that HCV can replicate only in liver tissue, but now we know, that HCV can replicate in extrahepatic tissue as well. In about 48-86% of HCV infected patients, chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been noticed and eventually, after tens of years, liver insufficiency, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The current recommended treatment for CHC is a combination of pegylated-interferon alpha and Ribavirin. Presently it is known, that HCV infection can persist as an occult infection. RNA HCV can be detected in patients after successful treatment for CHC or spontaneous elimination. Persistent HCV replication in hepatocytes or lymphoid cells would likely lead to continuous antigenic stimulation of the immune system. This prolonged replication may contribute to the immune tolerance of HCV, impairment of immune response and even further virus persistence. This occult infection grows more important in transplantation.

  12. CASSINI UVIS STELLAR OCCULTATION OBSERVATIONS OF SATURN's RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. G.; Pettis, D.; Bradley, E. T.; Esposito, L. W.; Sremcevic, M.

    2010-12-15

    The Cassini spacecraft's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) includes a high-speed photometer (HSP) that has observed more than 100 stellar occultations by Saturn's rings. Here, we document a standardized technique applied to the UVIS-HSP ring occultation datasets delivered to the Planetary Data System as higher level data products. These observations provide measurements of ring structure that approaches the scale of the largest common ring particles ({approx}5 m). The combination of multiple occultations at different viewing geometries enables reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure of the rings. This inversion of the occultation data depends on accurate calibration of the data so that occultations of different stars taken at different times and under different viewing conditions can be combined to retrieve ring structure. We provide examples of the structure of the rings as seen from several occultations at different incidence angles to the rings, illustrating changes in the apparent structure with viewing geometry.

  13. Potential KBO Stellar Occultations: 2011-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, Amanda; Zuluaga, C. A.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Person, M. J.; Bosh, A. S.

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of an occultation candidate search of the UCAC2 catalog for over 30 Kuiper Belt Objects and Centaurs [not including (134340) Pluto]. KBOs were selected based on absolute magnitude, distance from the sun and the number of oppositions observed. This search identified occultation candidate stars within 2.5 arcseconds of each minor planet's path from 2011-2015. As typical UCAC2 catalog uncertainties ranged from 0.05 to 0.5 arcseconds, and KBO ephemeris uncertainties for a well-observed object ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 arcseconds, this study seeks to identify the most promising potential occultations for further astrometric follow-up. Additional observations of stars and the potentially occulting body help determine the necessary star offsets and ephemeris corrections. Events have been grouped into the following categories: near-geocentric (any brightness), near-misses, stars of magnitude 13 or brighter (the dimmest star feasible with a large portable telescope), slow events, and events observable from telescope-rich regions of the Earth. These categories allow for planning campaigns involving wide-spread portable and fixed telescopes, or an airborne telescope (such as SOFIA). The two most promising events are an encounter of (28978) Ixion with a 10.63 magnitude star on 2012-04-16 and (84922) 2003 VS2 with a 14.83 magnitude star on 2011-11-01. KBOs such as (50000) Quaoar, (28978) Ixion, (55638) 2002 VE95, and (84922) 2003 VS2 encounter over 50 UCAC2 stars in the next five years and should be most carefully monitored. This work was supported, in part by NASA Grant NNX10AB27G.

  14. The JWST/NIRCam Coronagraph Flight Occulters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, John E.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Muller, Richard E.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Beichman, Charles A.; Serabyn, Eugene; Mao, Yalan; Echternach, Pierre M.; Trauger, John T.; Liewer, Kurt M.

    2010-01-01

    The NIRCam instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope will have a Lyot coronagraph for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets and circumstellar disks at lambda = 2 - 5 micrometers. Half-tone patterns are used to create graded-transmission image plane masks. These are generated using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching of a metal layer on an antireflection coated sapphire substrate. We report here on the manufacture and evaluation of the flight occulters.

  15. Asteroidal occultation timed by four UK observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, H.

    2000-04-01

    The occultation of a 9th magnitude star by the minor planet (49) Pales at 01.00 on Monday January 17 was the first such event to be timed by more than one observer at different locations on the track in the UK (see Figure 1). It was also seen from Hungary, and by three sets of observers in Canada and the USA, but unfortunately heavy cloud prevented observation across most of Europe.

  16. ACE-Asia Chemical Transport Modeling Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    UNO, I.; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Ginoux, P.; Rasch, P.; Carmichael, G. R.; Yienger, J. J.

    2001-12-01

    ACE-Asia (Asia Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment) was designed to increase our understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth?s climate system. The intensive observation period was carried out during March to May, 2001, and more than 100 researchers from several countries (United States, Japan, Korea, China, and many other Asian countries) participated using aircraft, a research vessel, surface stations and numerical models. Aerosol transport forecast activities played an important role during the ACE-Asia intensive observation period. Three independent modeling groups operated chemical transport models in forecast mode and participated in flight planning activities at the operations center. These models were: MATCH (Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry; Rasch and Collins); GOCART (Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model; Chin and Ginour) and CFORS (Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University + University of Iowa - Chemical weather FORecast System; Uno, Carmichael and Yienger). The MATCH model used in ACE-Asia was a transport model applied for the Asia region, driven by NCEP forecast meteorology. A unique feature of this model was that it assimilated satellite derived optical depths into its forecast algorithm. The GOCART model provided global aerosol forecast using forecast meteorological fields provided by the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The CFORS model provided regional forecasts using a limited area transport model coupled with Regional Meteorological Modeling System (RAMS), initialized by NCEP and JMA forecasts. All models produced 3-d aerosol forecast products consisting of aerosol mass distributions and optical depths for sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt, and dust. In the field these model products were made available to all participating scientists via the Web, and were also presented during the

  17. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Young; Park, Eui Ju

    2013-09-01

    Occult HBV infection is defined as the presence of HBV DNA in the liver (with or without detectable or undetectable HBV DNA in the serum) of individuals testing negative for HBsAg. Studies on occult HBV infection in hepatitis C patients have reported highly variable prevalence, because the prevalence of occult HBV infection varies depending on the hepatitis B risk factors and methodological approaches. The most reliable diagnostic approach for detecting occult HBV detection is through examination of liver DNA extracts. HCV has been suspected to strongly suppress HBV replication up to the point where it may be directly responsible for occult HBV infection development. However, more data are needed to arrive at a definitive conclusion regarding the role of HCV in inducing occult HBV infection. Occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients is a complex biological entity with possible relevant clinical implications. Influence of occult HBV infection on the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis C may be considered negative. However, recent studies have shown that occult HBV infection could be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and contribute to the worsening of the course of chronic liver disease over time in chronic hepatitis C patients. Nevertheless, the possible role of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C is still unresolved and no firm conclusion has been made up until now. It still remains unclear how occult HBV infection affects the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Therefore, in order to resolve current controversies and understand the pathogenic role and clinical impacts of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients, well-designed clinical studies are needed.

  18. Coordinated Observations of Energetic Particles from 3He-rich Events by STEREO and ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Mason, G. M.; Cohen, C. M.; Nitta, N. V.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Haggerty, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    The two STEREOs, together with ACE and other near-Earth spacecraft, have produced data sets that are well suited for investigating how 3He-rich energetic particles that are accelerated in reconnection events on the Sun get distributed in heliographic longitude. Our earlier study[1] of one such 3He-rich event (7 February 2010), which was detected at ACE and both STEREOs when they spanned 136o, showed that accelerated particles can be distributed over a wide range of longitudes even when they originate from a localized solar source. In addition, the particle fluences were found to decrease strongly with increasing distance from the longitude having the best magnetic connection to the source region. Based on data from the first four years of the STEREO mission, when solar activity was very low, we have used additional 3He-rich events detected by one or both of the STEREO/LET instruments and, in some cases also by ACE/ULEIS and/or SIS, to investigate the conditions under which the accelerated particles can gain access to a wide range of heliographic longitudes and to determine the longitudinal dependences of particle fluences in such events. During 2011 and 2012, when the level of solar activity has been significantly greater than in the preceding four years, unambiguous association of events detected at different spacecraft has been hampered by the possibility of chance coincidences between detections of particles from separate solar events as well as by the increased energetic particle background levels. We have investigated the possibility that event characteristics such as composition can be use to confirm that some events detected at widely spaced locations are associated with the same injection at the Sun. Such associations have the potential to extend the longitude range over which 3He-rich events can be studied and also to investigate the solar-cycle dependence of longitudinal spreading. We will report results from the statistical study of events that occurred

  19. Io hot spots - Infrared photometry of satellite occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, J. D.; Matson, D. L.; Sinton, W. M.; Howell, R. R.; Dyck, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Io's active hot spots, which are presently mapped on the basis of IR photometry of this moon's occultation by other Gallilean satellites, are obtained with greatest spatial resolution near the sub-earth point. A model is developed for the occultation lightcurves, and its fitting to the data defines the apparent path of the occulting satellite relative to Io; the mean error in apparent relative position of occulting satellites is of the order of 178 km. A heretofore unknown, 20-km diameter hot spot is noted on Io's leading hemisphere.

  20. The Northrop Grumman External Occulter Testbed: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Amy; Glassman, T.; Lillie, C.

    2007-05-01

    We have built a subscale testbed to demonstrate and validate the performance of the New Worlds Observer (NWO), a terrestrial planet finder external-occulter mission concept. The external occulter concept allows observations of nearby exo-Earths using two spacecraft: one carrying an occulter that is tens of meters in diameter and the other carrying a generic space telescope. The occulter is completely opaque, resembling a flower, with petals having a hypergaussian profile that enable 10-10 intensity suppression of stars that potentially harbor terrestrial planets. The baseline flight NWO system has a 30 meter occulter flying 30,000 km in front of a 4 meter class telescope. Testing the flight configuration on the ground is not feasible, so we have matched the Fresnel number of the flight configuration ( 10) using a subscale occulter. Our testbed consists of an 80 meter length evacuated tube, with a high precision occulter in the center of the tube. The occulter is 4 cm in diameter, manufactured with ¼ micron metrological accuracy and less than 2 micron tip truncation. This mimics a 30 meter occulter with millimeter figure accuracy and less than centimeter tip truncation. Our testbed is an evolving experiment, and we report here the first, preliminary, results using a single wavelength laser (532 nm) as the source.

  1. Several Well-observed Asteroidal Occultations in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timerson, Brad; Durech, J.; Abramson, H.; Brooks, J.; Caton, D.; Clark, D.; Conard, S.; Cooke, B.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J.; Edberg, S.; Ellington, C.; Faircloth, J.; Herchak, S.; Iverson, E.; Jones, R.; Lucas, G.; Lyzenga, G.; Maley, P.; Martinez, L.; Menke, J.; Mroz, G.; Nolan, P.; Peterson, R.; Preston, S.; Rattley, G.; Ray, J.; Scheck, A.; Stamm, J.; Stanton, R.; Suggs, R.; Tatum, R.; Thomas, W.

    2011-10-01

    During 2010 IOTA observers in North America reported about 190 positive observations for 106 asteroid occultation events. For several asteroids, this included observations with multiple chords. For two events, an inversion model was available. An occultation by 16 Psyche on 2010 August 21 yielded a best-fit ellipse of 235.4 x 230.4 km. On 2010 December 24, an occultation by 93 Minerva produced a best-fit ellipse of 179.4 x 133.4 km. An occultation by 96 Aegle on 2010 October 29 yielded a best-fit ellipse of 124.9 x 88.0 km. An occultation by 105 Artemis on 2010 June 24 showed a best-fit ellipse of 125.0 x 92.0 km. An occultation by 375 Ursula on 2010 December 4 produced a best-fit ellipse of 125.0 km x 135.0 km. Of note are two events not summarized in this article. On 2010 August 31, an occultation by 695 Bella yielded a new double star. That event will be summarized in the JDSO. Finally, on 2010 April 6, an occultation of zeta Ophiuchi by 824 Anastasia was observed by 65 observers at 69 locations. Unfortunately a large shift in the path yielded only 4 chords. Results of that event, and all the events mentioned here, can be found on the North American Asteroidal Occultation Results web page.

  2. Aircraft Command in Emergency Situations (ACES). Phase 1. Concept. Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    63 6-3 Schematic Layout of the York Fiber- Optic DTS System... optic thermal detection system. XS Federal Aviation Administration Aircraft Command in Emergency Situations (ACES) Final Report II N ’(0) 1 ( .i...fiber optic (York) 2.1 (OBECTIVES OF STUDY S;ivo n Imoli.0it ,moke, fire emergency: The oh1cctivc tf the ACES study was to develop two system concepts

  3. FIRE_ACE_C130_RAMS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... NCAR C-130 Instrument:  Radiation Measurement System Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the ... Parameters:  Upwelling and Downwelling Total Solar Flux Infrared Flux and Narrowband Flux Order Data:  ...

  4. The Louisiana ACES Student-built BalloonSat Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, B.; Giammanco, J.; Guzik, T. G.; Johnson, K.; Wefel, J. P.

    The Aerospace Catalyst Experiences for Students (ACES) pilot project was funded at Louisiana State University by NASA's National Space Grant College and Fellowship program during the 2002-2003 academic year with the primary goal of giving students a true hands-on experience with project management, life-cycle, experiment construction, data collection, analysis and interpretation. In this project students design, build, fly and analyze the data returned from small payloads (typical dimensions 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm, typical weight ˜ 500 grams) carried up to ˜ 100,000 feet by a helium-filled latex sounding balloon. During the pilot project the 13 students that participated in the program, grouped in 4 teams, built payloads that included studies in atmospheric science, cosmic rays and remote sensing. These payloads were then launched from the NASA National Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas on May 21, 2003. Most recently, the LaACES (Louisiana ACES) program has been selected for funding by NASA. During LaACES we will expand the pilot program to institutions across the state including developing student training materials, holding a workshop for institution representatives, awarding payload development grants to student teams, monitoring the progress of these teams and supporting the balloon flight of the completed payloads. Here we describe the ACES pilot, the outcomes, and plans for La ACES.

  5. An Investigation of the Seasonal Changes of Neptune's Atmosphere via a July 2008 Stellar Occultation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckert, Kyle; Chanover, N.; Miller, C.; Olkin, C.; Young, L.; Hammel, H.; Bauer, J.

    2012-10-01

    We extract physical atmospheric parameters from a July 23, 2008 single-chord stellar occultation of the star USNO-B1.0 0759-0739128 by Neptune using both light curve model fitting and numerical inversion techniques. We observed the occultation event using the Agile CCD camera mounted on the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We acquired a series of 13,340 0.5 second images from approximately 07:14 to 09:05 UT. Neptune was observed through an airmass ranging from 1.57 to 1.46, with atmospheric seeing of approximately 0.6" throughout the event. We used the Johnson I-band filter, which was chosen to reduce the contribution of scattered light from Neptune. Methane absorption at 0.89 μm in Neptune’s upper stratosphere causes Neptune to appear darker at this bandpass, reducing the amount of scattered light in the image. A 0.5 second integration time with negligible frame-transfer provides an atmospheric sampling at the microbar pressure level of approximately 4 samples per scale height. Stellar occultations of Neptune were observed extensively in the 1980's to search for evidence of a ring system around the planet prior to the arrival of Voyager 2. No new occultations of Neptune have been published since 1990, due in part to the diffuse star field the planet has been traveling though. We compare the stratospheric temperature derived from the 2008 occultation to published temperatures of Neptune at similar atmospheric pressures derived from previous stellar occultations and from mid-IR spectral data collected within the last decade. The two leading hypotheses for explaining the observed temperature variations of Neptune are seasonal variability and variations in the Lyman-alpha flux received at Neptune due to the 11-year solar cycle. We investigate the effect each of these mechanisms may have on the gradual changes of Neptune’s average stratospheric temperature. This work is supported by funds from NASA grant NAG5-1247.

  6. A single sub-kilometre Kuiper belt object from a stellar occultation in archival data.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, H E; Ofek, E O; Wenz, M; Sari, R; Gal-Yam, A; Livio, M; Nelan, E; Zucker, S

    2009-12-17

    The Kuiper belt is a remnant of the primordial Solar System. Measurements of its size distribution constrain its accretion and collisional history, and the importance of material strength of Kuiper belt objects. Small, sub-kilometre-sized, Kuiper belt objects elude direct detection, but the signature of their occultations of background stars should be detectable. Observations at both optical and X-ray wavelengths claim to have detected such occultations, but their implied abundances are inconsistent with each other and far exceed theoretical expectations. Here we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an occultation by a body with an approximately 500-metre radius at a distance of 45 astronomical units. The probability of this event arising from random statistical fluctuations within our data set is about two per cent. Our survey yields a surface density of Kuiper belt objects with radii exceeding 250 metres of 2.1(-1.7)(+4.8) x 10(7) deg(-2), ruling out inferred surface densities from previous claimed detections by more than 5sigma. The detection of only one event reveals a deficit of sub-kilometre-sized Kuiper belt objects compared to a population extrapolated from objects with radii exceeding 50 kilometres. This implies that sub-kilometre-sized objects are undergoing collisional erosion, just like debris disks observed around other stars.

  7. Dst Prediction from CIR Events During 2008 Using Synthesized Signals Derived From SOHO, STEREO, and ACE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, E. A.; Andriyas, T.; Mays, M. L.; Sojka, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Observations from SOHO, STEREO, and ACE during the declining phase of the deep solar minimum in 2008 are analyzed in order to synthesize signals of the IMF Bz, solar wind velocity vx, and solar wind proton density Np at 1 AU. These synthesized signals are used as a substitute for ACE measurements to represent solar wind forcing due to coronal hole driven CIR events occuring during multiple Bartel rotations (BR 2381 - BR 2393). The signals drive a low order physics based model of the magnetosphere called WINDMI, one of whose outputs is the ground based measurement of the Dst index. Estimating the arrival of CIR events for future rotations using ACE and SOHO data during BR 2381 produced what we referred to as an uncalibrated yearly prediction. We proceeded to generate a video calibrated (VC) estimate of the arrival times of CIR events in addition to information from BR 2381 using SOHO and STEREO images of the Sun in order to produce a simulated 3.5 day ahead prediction of possible geomagnetic activity. The time of arrival of CIR events is taken to be the travel time of compressions as seen in a non-inertial frame according to a radial solar wind speed of 500 km/s and a distance of 1 AU. We found that we were able to predict the timing of CIR induced geomagnetic activity quite accurately by using the expected recurrence of the events through multiple Bartel rotations, and further improve it through SOHO and STEREO coronal hole sightings made 3.5 days before every event. The uncertainty in the IMF Bz led to predictions of levels of geomagnetic activity on an ensemble basis, yielding a distribution of different possible Dst signatures.

  8. SolACES - Auto-calibrating EUV/UV spectrometers for measurements onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Raimund; Schmidtke, Gerhard; Brunner, Raimund; Konz, Werner; Nikutowski, Bernd

    In the field of terrestrial climatology the most important goal is the quasi-continuous measurement of the solar irradiance with highest possible accuracy within the ISS (ESA) SOLAR mission. SolACES as a part of it will contribute to the solar EUV/UV irradiance aspects. These data will be provided to investigate further the impact of the solar irradiance variability on the Earth's climate changes as well as the thermospheric/ionospheric interactions that are pursued in the TIGER program, too. The four grating spectrometers of SolACES cover the wavelength range from 16 nm to 220 nm. 42 band pass filters are used to select EUV photon fluxes within wavelength subranges in order to determine their irradiances within three-signal recording ionisation chambers that are considered as primary detector standards. . Since spectrometers are not stable with respect to radiometric efficiency, re-measuring the filter transmissions and repeat the determination of the spectrometer efficiencies allow very accurate irradiance observations (2 The concept has been successfully tested with line emissions in the laboratory. Further, broadband as well as monochromatic synchrotron radiation has been used in the PTB laboratory of BESSY II electron synchrotron. There is good agreement with the BESSY II intercomparison. Still, the necessity to apply a re-calibration device showed up strongly. After the successful launch with the shuttle mission STS-122 on February 7th 2008 and the planned activation and commissioning of SolACES at the end of February 2008 we will extensively test all spectrometers and ionization chambers, i.e., we will repeatedly determine all filter transmissions and spectrometer efficiencies in the new environment and compare the results of the laboratory and BESSY II measurements. Additionally, a compare with SOVIM and SOL- SPEC of the SOLAR payload on the Columbus laboratory will help to perform measurements of high quality. First results of the EUV irradiance

  9. Molecular and recombinational mapping of mutations in the Ace locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Nagoshi, R.N.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-11-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region with which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace/sup -/ phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/ is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region.

  10. Molecular and Recombinational Mapping of Mutations in the Ace Locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nagoshi, Rodney N.; Gelbart, William M.

    1987-01-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region within which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace- phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)AceHD1, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)AceHD1 is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region. PMID:2826288

  11. New perspectives in occult hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Vicente; Bartolomé, Javier; Castillo, Inmaculada; Quiroga, Juan Antonio

    2012-06-21

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, defined as the presence of HCV RNA in liver and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the absence of detectable viral RNA in serum by standard assays, can be found in anti-HCV positive patients with normal serum levels of liver enzymes and in anti-HCV negative patients with persistently elevated liver enzymes of unknown etiology. Occult HCV infection is distributed worldwide and all HCV genotypes seem to be involved in this infection. Occult hepatitis C has been found not only in anti-HCV positive subjects with normal values of liver enzymes or in chronic hepatitis of unknown origin but also in several groups at risk for HCV infection such as hemodialysis patients or family members of patients with occult HCV. This occult infection has been reported also in healthy populations without evidence of liver disease. Occult HCV infection seems to be less aggressive than chronic hepatitis C although patients affected by occult HCV may develop liver cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, anti-HCV negative patients with occult HCV may benefit from antiviral therapy with pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin. The persistence of very low levels of HCV RNA in serum and in PBMCs, along with the maintenance of specific T-cell responses against HCV-antigens observed during a long-term follow-up of patients with occult hepatitis C, indicate that occult HCV is a persistent infection that is not spontaneously eradicated. This is an updated report on diagnosis, epidemiology and clinical implications of occult HCV with special emphasis on anti-HCV negative cases.

  12. An exploration of the trans-Neptunian region through stellar occultations and MIOSOTYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doressoundiram, Alain; Maquet, Lucie; Roques, françoise; Liu, Chih-Yuan; Miosotys Team

    2016-10-01

    As the Kuiper belt is located far from the sun, it is difficult to observe the small objects that are composing it. To understand how the Kuiper belt was formed , we need to study the size distribution of its objects. We have to be able to detect sub-kilometric objects . This is possible only by random stellar occultations. In order to perform those observations, we have an instrument called MIOSOTYS.MIOSOTYS (Multi-object Instrument for Occultations in the SOlar system and TransitorY Systems) is a fibre-based, high speed photometer which is designed mainly for serendipitously monitoring the occultation events caused by small Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) located at the distance of 40 AU and beyond from the Sun, the so-called Kuiper Belt. Because of the small angular size of the star, the passing TNO through the line of sight of the star will produce a diffraction-dominated phenomena.This is a visitor instrument mounted on the 193 cm telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, France and on the 123 cm telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. Our immediate goal is to characterize the spatial distribution and extension of the Kuiper Belt, and the physical size distribution of TNOs. We present the observation campaigns during 2010-2014, objectives and observing strategy. We report the detection of potential candidates for occultation events of TNOs. We will discuss more specifically the method used to process the data and the modelling of diffraction patterns. We, finally present the results obtained concerning the distribution of sub-kilometer TNOs in the Kuiper Belt.

  13. Application of the Langley plot for calibration of sun sensors for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Mauldin, L. ED, III; Stump, Charles W.; Reagan, John A.; Fabert, Milton G.

    1989-01-01

    The calibration of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) sun sensor is described. This system consists of two energy-balancing silicon detectors which provide coarse azimuth and elevation control signals and a silicon photodiode array which provides top and bottom solar edge data for fine elevation control. All three detectors were calibrated on a mountaintop near Tucson, Ariz., using the Langley plot technique. The conventional Langley plot technique was modified to allow calibration of the two coarse detectors, which operate wideband. A brief description of the test setup is given. The HALOE instrument is a gas correlation radiometer that is now being developed for the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite.

  14. Cromolyn sodium for ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Allen, T L; Gora-Harper, M L

    1997-06-01

    There are several theories on the cause of ACE inhibitor-induced cough, but the exact mechanism is not known. In many patients, if cough develops, the ACE inhibitor can be discontinued and a drug in another therapeutic class used in its place. However, in patients with CHF, diabetic nephropathy, and patients who have experienced a myocardial infarction, discontinuing the ACE inhibitor may not be in the best interest of the patient. In this patient population it would be reasonable to try cromolyn sodium to treat cough, while continuing the ACE inhibitor. Data are not available to support the efficacy of cromolyn sodium to treat cough in patients with diabetic nephropathy, but these patients clearly benefit from the use of an ACE inhibitor. Other factors not addressed in the case reports and the clinical trial such as patient adherence, cost, and quality of life should also play a role in the decision to use cromolyn sodium. Cromolyn sodium has been effective for the treatment of ACE inhibitor-induced cough in many case reports and has had mild success in one small clinical trial. Although none of the reports adequately assessed adverse effects, studies examining cromolyn for other indications have demonstrated a relatively benign adverse effect profile. It is difficult to recommend an exact dose to use because of the dosing variability in the case reports. The majority of the case reports and the one clinical trial used dosages similar to recommendations for bronchial asthma (i.e., 2 puffs [1.6 mg] 4 times daily via MDI or 20-mg capsules 4 times daily via breath-activated inhalation). At this time, the use of cromolyn sodium is a viable option, but more controlled studies are needed to fully elucidate its role in the treatment of ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

  15. Retrieval Algorithms for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert E.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2009-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) provided high quality measurements of key middle atmosphere constituents, aerosol characteristics, and temperature for 14 years (1991-2005). This report is an outline of the Level 2 retrieval algorithms, and it also describes the great care that was taken in characterizing the instrument prior to launch and throughout its mission life. It represents an historical record of the techniques used to analyze the data and of the steps that must be considered for the development of a similar experiment for future satellite missions.

  16. Precise Astrometry for Predicting Kuiper Belt Object Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott; Elliot, James; Kern, Susan; Zuluaga, Carlos; Gulbis, Amanda

    2010-02-01

    In order to observe an occultation of a bright star by a Kuiper Belt object the event must first be predicted as to where and when it will happen. These predictions require precise astrometry every few months of the largest Kuiper Belt objects. Through the occultation events the diameters, possible companions and possible tenuous atmospheres around these objects will be explored by examining how the light from the star varies as the KBO passes in front of it. This promises to be a completely new and powerful way of exploring the KBOs. We propose to continue to obtain very precise astrometry on the known brightest KBOs to determine more accurate orbits and thus reliable occultation predictions. In addition, we must also obtain accurate astrometry on faint field stars that the KBOs of interest may occult. On October 9, 2009 we predict KBO 55636 will occult a 13th magnitude star and this will be our first attempt to observe such an event.

  17. Scientific tradeoffs in pinhole/occulter facility accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1988-01-01

    The Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) consists of state-of-the-art instruments for the study of particle acceleration in the solar corona, and uses a large structure to obtain very high angular resolution. P/OF has been studied in the past as an attached payload for the Space Shuttle, and has been the subject of study by a NASA Science Working Group (P/OFSWG). Appendix A lists various technical studies and reports carried out under the auspices of P/OFSWG and the Program Development Office of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Under the rationalization of NASA flight opportunities following the Challenger disaster, and the beginning of the Space Station Freedom program, the sortie-mode deployment of P/OF seemed less efficient and desirable. Thus, NASA decided to reconsider P/OF for deployment on the Space Station Freedom. The technical studies for this deployment continue at the present and will evolve as our knowledge of Space Station architecture and capabilities increase. MSFC contracted with Teledyne Brown Engineering for these technical studies.

  18. Radio occultation experiments with INAF-IRA radiotelescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.

    The Radio Occultation research program performed at the Medicina and Noto Radioastronomical Stations of the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF) - Istituto di Radioastronomia (IRA) includes observations of spacecraft by satellite and satellite by satellite events. The Lunar Radio Occultation (LRO) part of the program consists in collecting data of the lunar Total Electron Content (TEC), at different limb longitudes and at different time, in order to study long term variation of the Moon's ionosphere. The LRO program started at Medicina in September 2006 with the observation of the European probe SMART-1 during its impact on the lunar soil. It proceeded in 2007 with the observation of the lunar occultations of Saturn and Venus, and with the observation of Mars in 2008. On this occasion the probes Cassini, Venus Express, Mars Express, Mars Reconaissance Orbiter and Mars Odissey were respectively occulted by the moon. On Dec 1st 2008 a Venus lunar occultation occurred. On that occasion we performed the first Italian-VLBI (I-VLBI) tracking experiment by detecting the carrier signals coming from the Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft with both the IRA radiotelescopes together with the Matera antenna of the Italian Space Agency. The second part of the radio occultation program includes the observation of satellite by satellite occultation events, as well as mutual occultations of Jupiter satellites. These events are referred to as mutual phenomena (PHEMU). These observations are aimed to measure the radio flux variation during the occultation and to derive surface spatial characteristics such as Io's hot spots. In this work preliminary results of the Radio Occultation program will be presented.

  19. Contemplating Synergistic Algorithms for the NASA ACE Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Starr, David O.; Marchand, Roger; Ackerman, Steven A.; Platnick, Steven E.; Fridlind, Ann; Cooper, Steven; Vane, Deborah G.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2013-01-01

    ACE is a proposed Tier 2 NASA Decadal Survey mission that will focus on clouds, aerosols, and precipitation as well as ocean ecosystems. The primary objective of the clouds component of this mission is to advance our ability to predict changes to the Earth's hydrological cycle and energy balance in response to climate forcings by generating observational constraints on future science questions, especially those associated with the effects of aerosol on clouds and precipitation. ACE will continue and extend the measurement heritage that began with the A-Train and that will continue through Earthcare. ACE planning efforts have identified several data streams that can contribute significantly to characterizing the properties of clouds and precipitation and the physical processes that force these properties. These include dual frequency Doppler radar, high spectral resolution lidar, polarimetric visible imagers, passive microwave and submillimeter wave radiometry. While all these data streams are technologically feasible, their total cost is substantial and likely prohibitive. It is, therefore, necessary to critically evaluate their contributions to the ACE science goals. We have begun developing algorithms to explore this trade space. Specifically, we will describe our early exploratory algorithms that take as input the set of potential ACE-like data streams and evaluate critically to what extent each data stream influences the error in a specific cloud quantity retrieval.

  20. The absence of intrarenal ACE protects against hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Janjoulia, Tea; Fletcher, Nicholas K.; Giani, Jorge F.; Nguyen, Mien T.X.; Riquier-Brison, Anne D.; Seth, Dale M.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Eladari, Dominique; Picard, Nicolas; Bachmann, Sebastian; Delpire, Eric; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Navar, L. Gabriel; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; McDonough, Alicia A.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) can elicit hypertension independently from the systemic RAS. However, the precise mechanisms by which intrarenal Ang II increases blood pressure have never been identified. To this end, we studied the responses of mice specifically lacking kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) to experimental hypertension. Here, we show that the absence of kidney ACE substantially blunts the hypertension induced by Ang II infusion (a model of high serum Ang II) or by nitric oxide synthesis inhibition (a model of low serum Ang II). Moreover, the renal responses to high serum Ang II observed in wild-type mice, including intrarenal Ang II accumulation, sodium and water retention, and activation of ion transporters in the loop of Henle (NKCC2) and distal nephron (NCC, ENaC, and pendrin) as well as the transporter activating kinases SPAK and OSR1, were effectively prevented in mice that lack kidney ACE. These findings demonstrate that ACE metabolism plays a fundamental role in the responses of the kidney to hypertensive stimuli. In particular, renal ACE activity is required to increase local Ang II, to stimulate sodium transport in loop of Henle and the distal nephron, and to induce hypertension. PMID:23619363

  1. The absence of intrarenal ACE protects against hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Janjoulia, Tea; Fletcher, Nicholas K; Giani, Jorge F; Nguyen, Mien T X; Riquier-Brison, Anne D; Seth, Dale M; Fuchs, Sebastien; Eladari, Dominique; Picard, Nicolas; Bachmann, Sebastian; Delpire, Eric; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Navar, L Gabriel; Bernstein, Kenneth E; McDonough, Alicia A

    2013-05-01

    Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) can elicit hypertension independently from the systemic RAS. However, the precise mechanisms by which intrarenal Ang II increases blood pressure have never been identified. To this end, we studied the responses of mice specifically lacking kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) to experimental hypertension. Here, we show that the absence of kidney ACE substantially blunts the hypertension induced by Ang II infusion (a model of high serum Ang II) or by nitric oxide synthesis inhibition (a model of low serum Ang II). Moreover, the renal responses to high serum Ang II observed in wild-type mice, including intrarenal Ang II accumulation, sodium and water retention, and activation of ion transporters in the loop of Henle (NKCC2) and distal nephron (NCC, ENaC, and pendrin) as well as the transporter activating kinases SPAK and OSR1, were effectively prevented in mice that lack kidney ACE. These findings demonstrate that ACE metabolism plays a fundamental role in the responses of the kidney to hypertensive stimuli. In particular, renal ACE activity is required to increase local Ang II, to stimulate sodium transport in loop of Henle and the distal nephron, and to induce hypertension.

  2. Science and software support for spacecraft solar occultation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hessameddin, G.; Becher, J.

    1982-01-01

    The temperature dependence of absorption coefficients of ozone was studied between 7567 A and 3630 A. When the gas was cooled from room temperature to -108 C, an overall increase in the absorption coefficients was noticed. The maximum increase of 5% occurred at lambda = 6020 A. In general, the absorption is linearly dependent on temperature.

  3. Air-cooling mathematical analysis as inferred from the air-temperature observation during the 1st total occultation of the Sun of the 21st century at Lusaka, Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.; Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze mathematically air temperature measurements made near the ground by the Williams College expedition to observe the first total occultation of the Sun [TOS (commonly known as a total solar eclipse)] of the 21st century in Lusaka, Zambia, in the afternoon of June 21, 2001. To do so, we have revisited some earlier and contemporary methods to test their usefulness for this analysis. Two of these methods, based on a radiative scheme for solar radiation modeling and that has been originally applied to a morning occultation, have successfully been combined to obtain the delay function for an afternoon occultation, via derivation of the so-called instantaneous temperature profiles. For this purpose, we have followed the suggestion given by the third of these previously applied methods to calculate this function, although by itself it failed to do so at least for this occultation. The analysis has taken into account the limb-darkening, occultation and obscuration functions. The delay function obtained describes quite fairly the lag between the solar radiation variation and the delayed air temperature measured. Also, in this investigation, a statistical study has been carried out to get information on the convection activity produced during this event. For that purpose, the fluctuations generated by turbulence has been studied by analyzing variance and residuals. The results, indicating an irreversible steady decrease of this activity, are consistent with those published by other studies. Finally, the air temperature drop due to this event is well estimated by applying the empirical scheme given by the fourth of the previously applied methods, based on the daily temperature amplitude and the standardized middle time of the occultation. It is demonstrated then that by using a simple set of air temperature measurements obtained during solar occultations, along with some supplementary data, a simple mathematical analysis can be achieved by applying of the four

  4. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    accessible with the availability of the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) on ISS. To meet these goals, the ACE experiment is being built-up in stages, with the availability of confocal microscopy being the ultimate objective. Supported by NASAs Physical Sciences Research Program, ESAESTEC, and the authors respective governments.

  5. AKR occultation observed by KAGUYA (SELENE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Kumamoto, A.; Kasahara, Y.; Ono, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2008-12-01

    KAGUYA (SELENE) is a Japanese lunar orbiter launched on September 14, 2007. The Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) is one of the scientific instruments on board KAGUYA. It consists of three subsystems: the sounder observation (SDR), the natural plasma wave receiver (NPW), and the wave form capture (WFC). The WFC measures two components of electric wave signals detected by the two orthogonal 30 m tip-to-tip antennas from 100Hz to 1MHz. WFC-H [1] observes plasma wave spectra in 1-1000kHz and AKR (auroral kilometric radiation) is often observed. Occultation of AKR occurs when the satellite goes behind the moon. Its frequency dependence and effects of the relative positions of the earth, the moon with the satellite will be evaluated. How the occultation is useful for the source estimation of AKR will be examined. Effects of a single rounded obstacle on diffraction [2] will also be examined. Background AKR emissions will be evaluated by Geotail observation if possible. Acknowledgments: The SELENE project has been organized by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The authors express their thanks to all members of the SELENE project team. References [1] Y. Kasahara, Y. Goto, K. Hashimoto, T. Imachi, A. Kumamoto, T. Ono, and H. Matsumoto, Plasma Wave Observation Using Waveform Capture in the Lunar Radar Sounder on board the SELENE Spacecraft, Earth, Planets and Space, 60, 341-351, 2008. [2] Recommendation ITU-R P.526-8, Propagation by diffraction, ITU, 2003.

  6. Faster Processing for Inverting GPS Occultation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ao, Chi

    2004-01-01

    A document outlines a computational method that can be incorporated into two prior methods used to invert Global Positioning System (GPS) occultation data [signal data acquired by a low-Earth-orbiting satellite as either this or the GPS satellite rises above or falls below the horizon] to obtain information on altitude-dependent properties of the atmosphere. The two prior inversion methods, known as back propagation and canonical transform, are computationally expensive because for each occultation, they involve numerical evaluation of a large number of diffraction-like spatial integrals. The present method involves an angular-spectrum-based phase-extrapolation approximation in which each data point is associated with a plane-wave component that propagates in a unique direction from the orbit of the receiving satellite to intersect a straight line tangent to the orbit at a nearby point. This approximation enables the use of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs), which apply only to data collected along a straight-line trajectory. The computation of the diffraction-like integrals in the angular-spectrum domain by use of FFTs takes only seconds, whereas previously, it took minutes.

  7. Processing GPS Occultation Data To Characterize Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George; Kursinski, Emil; Leroy, Stephen; Lijima, Byron; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Romans, Larry; Ao, Chi

    2005-01-01

    GOAS [Global Positioning System (GPS) Occultation Analysis System] is a computer program that accepts signal-occultation data from GPS receivers aboard low-Earth-orbiting satellites and processes the data to characterize the terrestrial atmosphere and, in somewhat less comprehensive fashion, the ionosphere. GOAS is very robust and can be run in an unattended semi-operational processing mode. It features sophisticated retrieval algorithms that utilize the amplitudes and phases of the GPS signals. It incorporates a module that, using an assumed atmospheric refractivity profile, simulates the effects of the retrieval processing system, including the GPS receiver. GOAS utilizes the GIPSY software for precise determination of orbits as needed for calibration. The GOAS output for the Earth s troposphere and mid-to-lower stratosphere consists of high-resolution (<1 km) profiles of density, temperature, pressure, atmospheric refractivity, bending angles of signals, and water-vapor content versus altitude from the Earth s surface to an altitude of 30 km. The GOAS output for the ionosphere consists of electron-density profiles from an altitude of about 50 km to the altitude of a satellite, plus parameters related to the rapidly varying structure of the electron density, particularly in the E layer of the ionosphere.

  8. [Job satisfaction among the professionals of AceS Baixo Vouga II].

    PubMed

    Santana, Silvina; Cerdeira, José

    2011-12-01

    Job satisfaction is a measure of quality of life at work and is related to emotional states. The interest for this theme is increasing and, in the last years, many studies have attempted to demonstrate its relation with professional performance. Primary care professionals are in the first line of the Serviço Nacional de Saúde (SNS). Therefore, it is necessary that they feel satisfaction with their jobs, in order to perform the tasks with the quality required. Several factors seem to have impact in the satisfaction of these professionals, such as payment, promotion, recognition from supervisors and peers, physical conditions at work and available resources, opportunities for personal development, among others. Insatisfaction may lead to absentism and in the limit to job quit. The main objective of this work is to study job satisfaction among the professionals working at the health centers of ACeS Baixo Vouga II, namely, the relationship between job characteristics and job satisfaction and between job characteristics and considering job quit as a serious option. All the professionals working in the four health centers were inquired. Results show that job characteristics are defined by six dimensions: leadership and supervision, task characteristics and autonomy, payment, personal and professional development and promotion, peers and relations inside the organization and work environment. Globally, payment and opportunities for personal and professional development and promotion are perceived at low level by all the professional groups. Results also show that there are differences by gender and professional groups regarding job satisfaction and the will to quit job. Considering the specificity of the tasks performed by these professionals, measures should be taken in order to improve job satisfaction in the Portuguese health centers.

  9. The GENESIS Mission Solar Wind Samples: Collection Times, Estimated Fluences, and Solar-Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Wiens, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Steinberg, J. E.; Dekoning, C.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-03-01

    We have correlated the GENESIS sample collection times for the different solar-wind regimes with compositional data from GENESIS/GIM and ACE/SWICS instruments. We discuss GENESIS regime selection and new results in solar-wind elemental fractionation.

  10. Bioactive peptides: are there more antihypertensive mechanisms beyond ACE inhibition?

    PubMed

    Marques, Claudia; Amorim, Maria Manuela; Pereira, Joana Odila; Pintado, Manuela Estevez; Moura, Daniel; Calhau, Conceicao; Pinheiro, Helder

    2012-01-01

    Diet has a high relevance in health. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and has an important impact on public health, and consequently on countries economy. Scientific research gathered strong evidence about the role of several dietary factors either in etiology or in treatment/prevention of these diseases. Peptides from different food matrices have been studied, and indicated as compounds with particular interest in the context of hypertension. The classical approach involves the identification of peptides with an in vitro ACE inhibitory activity and the assumption that the observed in vivo effects are due to this enzyme blockade. However, in some cases the potency of ACE blockade does not correlate with the antihypertensive activity in vivo. This paper reviews the current literature that identifies mechanisms of action, other than ACE inhibition, that might explain antihypertensive effects of biologically active peptides from different food sources.

  11. Insulin treatment attenuates renal ADAM17 and ACE2 shedding in diabetic Akita mice.

    PubMed

    Salem, Esam S B; Grobe, Nadja; Elased, Khalid M

    2014-03-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is located in several tissues and is highly expressed in renal proximal tubules, where it degrades the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG II) to ANG-(1-7). Accumulating evidence supports protective roles of ACE2 in several disease states, including diabetic nephropathy. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 17 is involved in the shedding of several transmembrane proteins, including ACE2. Our previous studies showed increased renal ACE2, ADAM17 expression, and urinary ACE2 in type 2 diabetic mice (Chodavarapu H, Grobe N, Somineni HK, Salem ES, Madhu M, Elased KM. PLoS One 8: e62833, 2013). The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of insulin on ACE2 shedding and ADAM17 in type 1 diabetic Akita mice. Results demonstrate increased renal ACE2 and ADAM17 expression and increased urinary ACE2 fragments (≈70 kDa) and albumin excretion in diabetic Akita mice. Immunostaining revealed colocalization of ACE2 with ADAM17 in renal tubules. Renal proximal tubular cells treated with ADAM17 inhibitor showed reduced ACE2 shedding into the media, confirming ADAM17-mediated shedding of ACE2. Treatment of Akita mice with insulin implants for 20 wk normalized hyperglycemia and decreased urinary ACE2 and albumin excretion. Insulin also normalized renal ACE2 and ADAM17 but had no effect on tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) protein expression. There was a positive linear correlation between urinary ACE2 and albuminuria, blood glucose, plasma creatinine, glucagon, and triglycerides. This is the first report showing an association between hyperglycemia, cardiovascular risk factors, and increased shedding of urinary ACE2 in diabetic Akita mice. Urinary ACE2 could be used as a biomarker for diabetic nephropathy and as an index of intrarenal ACE2 status.

  12. Vascular Wall ACE is not required for Atherogenesis in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Daiana; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Adams, Jonathan; Synetos, Andreas; Taylor, W. Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that elements of the renin angiotensin system expressed in the arterial wall are critical for the development of atherosclerosis. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is highly expressed by the endothelium and is responsible for a critical enzymatic step in the generation of angiotensin II. However, the functional contribution of ACE expression in the vascular wall in atherogenesis is unknown. Therefore, we made use of unique genetic models in which mice without expression of ACE in the vascular wall were crossed with apoE-/- mice in order to determine the contribution of tissue ACE expression to atherosclerotic lesion formation. Methods and Results Mice expressing either a soluble form of ACE (ACE 2/2) or mice with somatic ACE expression restricted to the liver and kidney (ACE 3/3) on an ApoE-/- background were placed on a standard chow or Western diet for 6 months. Atherosclerotic lesion area in the ACE 2/2 mice was significantly lower than that seen in the ACE 3/3 mice. However, these animals also had significantly lower blood pressure and reduced plasma ACE activity which precluded establishing a specific causal relationship between absent tissue ACE activity and decreased atherosclerotic lesion extent. Therefore, we studied the ACE 3/3 mice which are normotensive and lack vascular ACE expression. In the ACE 3/3 animals, atherosclerotic lesion area was no different from wild type controls despite reduced plasma ACE activity. Conclusions We concluded that under these experimental conditions, expression of ACE in the arterial wall is not required for atherosclerotic lesion formation. PMID:19880118

  13. Advanced Crew Escape Suits (ACES): Particle Impact Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility to assist in determining the effects of impaired anodization on aluminum parts in advanced crew escape suits (ACES). Initial investigation indicated poor anodization could lead to an increased risk of particle impact ignition, and a lack of data was prevalent for particle impact of bare (unanodized) aluminum; therefore, particle impact tests were performed. A total of 179 subsonic and 60 supersonic tests were performed with no ignition of the aluminum targets. Based on the resulting test data, WSTF found no increased particle impact hazard was present in the ACES equipment.

  14. Defective intestinal amino acid absorption in Ace2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Singer, Dustin; Camargo, Simone M R; Ramadan, Tamara; Schäfer, Matthias; Mariotta, Luca; Herzog, Brigitte; Huggel, Katja; Wolfer, David; Werner, Sabine; Penninger, Josef M; Verrey, François

    2012-09-15

    Mutations in the main intestinal and kidney luminal neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (Slc6a19) lead to Hartnup disorder, a condition that is characterized by neutral aminoaciduria and in some cases pellagra-like symptoms. These latter symptoms caused by low-niacin are thought to result from defective intestinal absorption of its precursor L-tryptophan. Since Ace2 is necessary for intestinal B(0)AT1 expression, we tested the impact of intestinal B(0)AT1 absence in ace2 null mice. Their weight gain following weaning was decreased, and Na(+)-dependent uptake of B(0)AT1 substrates measured in everted intestinal rings was defective. Additionally, high-affinity Na(+)-dependent transport of L-proline, presumably via SIT1 (Slc6a20), was absent, whereas glucose uptake via SGLT1 (Slc5a1) was not affected. Measurements of small intestine luminal amino acid content following gavage showed that more L-tryptophan than other B(0)AT1 substrates reach the ileum in wild-type mice, which is in line with its known lower apparent affinity. In ace2 null mice, the absorption defect was confirmed by a severalfold increase of L-tryptophan and of other neutral amino acids reaching the ileum lumen. Furthermore, plasma and muscle levels of glycine and L-tryptophan were significantly decreased in ace2 null mice, with other neutral amino acids displaying a similar trend. A low-protein/low-niacin diet challenge led to differential changes in plasma amino acid levels in both wild-type and ace2 null mice, but only in ace2 null mice to a stop in weight gain. Despite the combination of low-niacin with a low-protein diet, plasma niacin concentrations remained normal in ace2 null mice and no pellagra symptoms, such as photosensitive skin rash or ataxia, were observed. In summary, mice lacking Ace2-dependent intestinal amino acid transport display no total niacin deficiency nor clear pellagra symptoms, even under a low-protein and low-niacin diet, despite gross amino acid homeostasis alterations.

  15. Performance Enhancement of the Automated Concrete Evaluation System (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart,C.W.; Cave,S.P.; Linder,K.E.

    2002-02-14

    The objective of this proposed research is to improve and expand the detection and analysis capabilities of the automated, concrete evaluation (ACE) system. MoDOT and Honeywell jointly developed this system. The focus of this proposed research will be on the following: Coordination of concrete imaging efforts with other states, Validation and testing of the ACE system on a broad range of concrete samples, and Identification and development of software and hardware enhancements. These enhancements will meet the needs of diverse users in the field of concrete materials, construction, and research.

  16. Occult hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Vicente; Bartolomé, Javier; Castillo, Inmaculada; Quiroga, Juan Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Occult HBV infection is a well-recognised clinical entity characterised by the detection of HBV-DNA in serum and/or in liver in the absence of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult HBV infection has been described not only in patients who have resolved an acute or chronic HBV infection but also in patients without any serological markers of a past HBV infection. Occult HBV infection in patients with chronic HCV infection may induce more severe liver disease and lower response rate to interferon treatment. The existence of occult HCV infections has been also reported more recently. Occult HCV infection is characterised by the presence of HCV-RNA in liver and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the absence of detectable serum HCV-RNA. Occult HCV infection may occur under two different clinical situations: in hepatitis C antibody-(anti-HCV) negative and serum HCV-RNA-negative patients with abnormal liver function tests and in anti-HCV-positive patients who have no detectable serum HCV-RNA and who have normal liver enzymes. The clinical relevance of occult HCV infections is still under investigation.

  17. Review: Occult hepatitis C virus infection: still remains a controversy.

    PubMed

    Vidimliski, Pavlina Dzekova; Nikolov, Igor; Geshkovska, Nadica Matevska; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Rostaing, Lionel; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2014-09-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by the presence of HCV RNA in the liver cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the patients whose serum samples test negative for HCV RNA, with or without presence of HCV antibodies. The present study reviews the existing literature on the persistence of occult hepatitis C virus infection, with description of the clinical characteristics and methods for identification of occult hepatitis C. Occult hepatitis C virus infection was detected in patients with abnormal results of liver function tests of unknown origin, with HCV antibodies and HCV RNA negativity in serum, and also in patients with spontaneous or treatment-induced recovery from hepatitis C. The viral replication in the liver cells and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells was present in all clinical presentations of occult hepatitis C. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells represent an extra-hepatic site of HCV replication. The reason why HCV RNA was not detectable in the serum of patients with occult hepatitis C, could be the low number of circulating viral particles not detectable by the diagnostic tests with low sensitivity. It is uncertain whether occult hepatitis C is a different clinical entity or just a form of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Data accumulated over the last decade demonstrated that an effective approach to the diagnosis of HCV infection would be the implementation of more sensitive HCV RNA diagnostic assays, and also, examination of the presence of viral particles in the cells of the immune system.

  18. Occult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, a Thickened Pituitary Stalk and Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Michael S; Gordon, Murray B

    2016-01-01

    Etiologies of a thickened stalk include inflammatory, neoplastic, and idiopathic origins, and the underlying diagnosis may remain occult. We report a patient with a thickened pituitary stalk (TPS) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) whose diagnosis remained obscure until a skin lesion appeared. The patient presented with PTC, status postthyroidectomy, and I(131) therapy. PTC molecular testing revealed BRAF mutant (V600E, GTC>GAG). She had a 5-year history of polyuria/polydipsia. Overnight dehydration study confirmed diabetes insipidus (DI). MRI revealed TPS with loss of the posterior pituitary bright spot. Evaluation showed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and low IGF-1. Chest X-ray and ACE levels were normal. Radiographs to evaluate for extrapituitary sites of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) were unremarkable. Germinoma studies were negative: normal serum and CSF beta-hCG, alpha-fetoprotein, and CEA. Three years later, the patient developed vulvar labial lesions followed by inguinal region skin lesions, biopsy of which revealed LCH. Reanalysis of thyroid pathology was consistent with concurrent LCH, PTC, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis within the thyroid. This case illustrates that one must be vigilant for extrapituitary manifestations of systemic diseases to diagnose the etiology of TPS. An activating mutation of the protooncogene BRAF is a potential unifying etiology of both PTC and LCH.

  19. Stellar occultation studies of Saturn's rings with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, Amanda Sachie

    We present a solution for Saturn's pole and radius scale using the following occultation data: (1) the 1991 occultation of GSC6323-01396, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope; (2) the 1989 occultation of 28 Sgr, observed from 11 Earth-based sites; (3) the 1981 occultation of delta Sco, observed with the photopolarimeter on Voyager 2; and (4) the 1980 occultation of the Voyager 1 radio science signal, received at Earth. To these data, we fit a solar-system barycentric vector geometric model that includes in-track errors for Voyager (in the form of clock offsets), general relativistic bending by an oblate planet, and pole precession. Since the magnitude of errors in ring-plane radii calculated from this geometric model varies significantly across features, we employ a weighting scheme that assigns higher weights to those features with lower rms residuals. We search for inclined rings and find none that are statistically significant. We also find one new feature that is probably non-circular: the inner edge of the C ring, feature 44. This feature appears to be freely precessing (due to Saturn's non-spherical gravity field). In modeling previously determined non-circular features, we find that models for the Titan and Maxwell ringlets agree well with previous models. The center and inner edge of the 1.470 RS ringlet appear circular, while the outer edge is best fit by a Prometheus 2:1 Lindblad resonant model. The outer edge of the 1.495 RS ringlet is described by a superposition of Mimas 3:1 Lindblad resonance model and a freely precessing model. These two ringlets were previously thought to be purely freely precessing, but now it appears that this is not the case. Despite the proximity of the inner edge of the 1.990 RS ringlet to the Pandora 9:7 inner Lindblad resonance, this features appears to be freely precessing. We find that both ring edges fit best to a superposition of resonant and freely precessing models. However, residuals are still much larger than for

  20. Small particles and self-gravity wakes in Saturn's rings from UVIS and VIMS stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerousek, Richard G.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2016-11-01

    , consistent with previous differential optical depth studies at radio wavelengths (Zebker et al. [1985] Icarus, 64, 531-548), measurements of diffraction in stellar occultations at the ring edges (Becker et al. [2015] Icarus), and measurements from VIMS solar occultations (Harbison et al. [2013] Icarus, 226, 1225-1240). This may be due to greater erosion of weakly bound particle aggregates by interparticle collisions in regions where satellite perturbations are strong.

  1. Charon's radius and atmospheric constraints from observations of a stellar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbis, A. A. S.; Elliot, J. L.; Person, M. J.; Adams, E. R.; Babcock, B. A.; Emilio, M.; Gangestad, J. W.; Kern, S. D.; Kramer, E. A.; Osip, D. J.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Souza, S. P.; Tuvikene, T.

    2006-01-01

    The physical characteristics of Pluto and its moon, Charon, provide insight into the evolution of the outer Solar System. Although previous measurements have constrained the masses of these bodies, their radii and densities have remained uncertain. The observation of a stellar occultation by Charon in 1980 established a lower limit on its radius of 600km (ref. 3) (later refined to 601.5km ref. 4) and suggested a possible atmosphere. Subsequent, mutual event modelling yielded a range of 600-650km (ref. 5), corresponding to a density of 1.56 +/- 0.22gcm-3 (refs 2, 5). Here we report multiple-station observations of a stellar occultation by Charon. From these data, we find a mean radius of 606 +/- 8km, a bulk density of 1.72 +/- 0.15gcm-3, and rock-mass fraction 0.63 +/- 0.05. We do not detect a significant atmosphere and place 3σ upper limits on atmospheric number densities for candidate gases. These results seem to be consistent with collisional formation for the Pluto-Charon system in which the precursor objects may have been differentiated, and they leave open the possibility of atmospheric retention by the largest objects in the outer Solar System.

  2. Charon's radius and atmospheric constraints from observations of a stellar occultation.

    PubMed

    Gulbis, A A S; Elliot, J L; Person, M J; Adams, E R; Babcock, B A; Emilio, M; Gangestad, J W; Kern, S D; Kramer, E A; Osip, D J; Pasachoff, J M; Souza, S P; Tuvikene, T

    2006-01-05

    The physical characteristics of Pluto and its moon, Charon, provide insight into the evolution of the outer Solar System. Although previous measurements have constrained the masses of these bodies, their radii and densities have remained uncertain. The observation of a stellar occultation by Charon in 1980 established a lower limit on its radius of 600 km (ref. 3) (later refined to 601.5 km; ref. 4) and suggested a possible atmosphere. Subsequent, mutual event modelling yielded a range of 600-650 km (ref. 5), corresponding to a density of 1.56 +/- 0.22 g cm(-3) (refs 2, 5). Here we report multiple-station observations of a stellar occultation by Charon. From these data, we find a mean radius of 606 +/- 8 km, a bulk density of 1.72 +/- 0.15 g cm(-3), and rock-mass fraction 0.63 +/- 0.05. We do not detect a significant atmosphere and place 3sigma upper limits on atmospheric number densities for candidate gases. These results seem to be consistent with collisional formation for the Pluto-Charon system in which the precursor objects may have been differentiated, and they leave open the possibility of atmospheric retention by the largest objects in the outer Solar System.

  3. The occultation of Kappa Geminorum by Eros. [stellar occultation observed for asteroid size and shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleary, B.; Marsden, B. G.; Dragon, R.; Hauser, E.; Mcgrath, M.; Backus, P.; Robkoff, H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses predictions and observations of the occultation of Kappa Gem by (433) Eros on January 24, 1975. Several positive and negative observations made in western New England are described. Local circumstances for the occultation are reconstructed, and the size and shape of Eros are determined analytically as well as graphically. The calculations yield two extremes for the cross section: a circle 23 km in diameter or a somewhat irregular figure 20 km by 6 or 7 km. Arguments based on the expected albedo of the asteroid suggest that the circle should be warped into an ellipse 21 by 13 km or that the irregular figure might be one component of a dumbbell-like profile.

  4. ACE-Asia: Ground Stations Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Sugimoto, N.; Shimizu, A.; Kim, J.; Oh, S.; Kang, C.; Asia Science Team; Murayama, T.; Delta Group; Zhang, X.; Kim, Y.; VMAP Group

    2001-12-01

    Observations of aerosol properties made at a network of ground stations were an integral part of ACE-Asia. During an intensive observation period (IOP, March - May 2001), high dust loadings were observed at many stations. At Zhenbeitai, China mass loadings well above average (260 μ g m-3) were observed during eleven dust storms, and ˜82% of the total particle mass at the site could be attributed to Asian dust. Daily bulk dust concentrations at Kosan, Korea ranged from 130 to 350 μ g m-3 from April 10 - 13. Important sub-micron dust signatures were obtained during this storm, coincident with highly absorbing ultra-fine (< 0.24 μ m) soot and other anthropogenic materials. PM2.5 aerosol concentrations at Kosan varied from 15.7 to 92.6 μ g m-3 during the IOP. Comparisons with prior data show some evidence for a decrease in the relative amount of nitrate vs. sulfate. An Asian dust storm with peak PM10 concentrations of about 200 μ g m-3 was observed over Taiwan on April 12 - 13. While most of the PM10 was dust, significant levels (up to about 30%) of pollutants also were found. Analysis of this and previous events indicates that the concentrations of pollutants over Taiwan during Asian dust storms are controlled more by long-range transport than local sources. Measurements of aerosols and associated species on four Japanese islands showed clear intermittent transport of continental aerosols, especially at Rishiri. A Mie and Raman lidar system with auxiliary instruments, including a sun photometer, operated at Tokyo during the IOP; some of these data were used for C-130 flight planning. From combined Raman lidar observations of dust at Tokyo, a typical extinction-to-backscatter ratio was found to be ˜40 sr, ranging from 30 and 70 sr and tending to increase with Angstrom exponent. A lidar intercomparison with C-130 flight observations on April 23 showed widely distributed dust and non-dust aerosols up to 8 km. A multi-channel backscatter lidar system operating at

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and ACE2) imbalance correlates with the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixia; Qi, Haiyu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Cui, Lijian; Wen, Yan; Yin, Chenghong

    2014-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and its effector peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades Ang II to angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] and has recently been described to have an antagonistic effect on ACE signalling. However, the specific underlying role of ACE2 in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is unclear. In the present study, the local imbalance of ACE and ACE2, as well as Ang II and Ang-(1-7) expression, was compared in wild-type (WT) and ACE2 knock-out (KO) or ACE2 transgenic (TG) mice subjected to cerulein-induced SAP. Serum amylase, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 levels and histological morphometry were used to determine the severity of pancreatitis. In WT mice, pancreatic ACE and Ang II and serum Ang II expression increased (P < 0.05), while pancreatic ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) and serum Ang-(1-7) levels were also significantly elevated (P < 0.05) from 2 to 72 h after the onset of SAP. However, the ratio of pancreatic ACE2 to ACE expression was significantly reduced (from 1.46 ± 0.09 to 0.27 ± 0.05, P < 0.001) and paralleled the severity of pancreatitis. The Ace2 KO mice exhibited increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, multifocal coagulative necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate, and lower levels of serum IL-10 and pancreatic Ang-(1-7) (4.70 ± 2.13 versus 10.87 ± 2.51, P < 0.001) compared with cerulein-treated WT mice at the same time point. Conversely, Ace2 TG mice with normal ACE expression were more resistant to SAP challenge as evidenced by a decreased inflammatory response, attenuated pathological changes and increased survival rates. These data suggest that the ACE2-ACE imbalance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP and that pancreatic ACE2 is an important factor in determining the severity of SAP.

  6. 77 FR 48527 - National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Simplified Entry: Modification of Participant Selection Criteria and... (NCAP) test concerning the simplified entry functionality in the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...) National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) test concerning Automated Commercial Environment...

  7. Occultations by Pluto and Charon - 1990-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mink, Douglas J.; Klemola, Arnold R.; Buie, Marc W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a photographic plate search for stars as faint as V = 16 which may be occulted by Pluto or Charon between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 1999 are presented. Circumstances for the closest approach of Pluto to 32 stars and Charon to 28 stars are presented. Photometric information is given for some of the brightest stars found in a search of the Space Telescope Guide Star Catalog for Pluto occultations. Finding charts from Space Telescope Guide Star plates are provided for some of the best events. The brightest star (V = 12.7) may be occulted by both Pluto and Charon on September 26, 1999.

  8. Bone scanning in the detection of occult fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Batillas, J.; Vasilas, A.; Pizzi, W.F.; Gokcebay, T.

    1981-07-01

    The potential role of bone scanning in the early detection of occult fractures following acute trauma was investigated. Technetium 99m pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained in patients with major clinical findings and negative or equivocal roentgenograms following trauma. Bone scanning facilitated the prompt diagnosis of occult fractures in the hip, knee, wrist, ribs and costochondral junctions, sternum, vertebrae, sacrum, and coccyx. Several illustrative cases are presented. Roentgenographic confirmation occurred following a delay of days to weeks and, in some instances, the roentgenographic findings were subtle and could be easily overlooked. This study demonstrates bone scanning to be invaluable and definitive in the prompt detection of occult fractures.

  9. Out of the blue finger ischaemia and occult colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami

    2017-03-08

    A woman aged 66 years with a history of unprovoked deep venous thrombosis (DVT) presented with persistent digital ischaemic changes of 2 of her right hand fingers. Physical examination was otherwise normal and extensive laboratory and imaging studies were unremarkable. A history of unprovoked DVT and the current episode of digital ischaemia prompted concern for underlying occult malignancy. Repeated history-taking revealed a strongly positive family history suggesting an occult colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy with biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma of the colon has rarely been associated with paraneoplastic acral vascular syndrome. This report suggests that occult malignancy needs to be considered in patients with focal digital ischaemia as this association is poorly unrecognised.

  10. Pluto Stellar Occultation on 2008 Aug 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Young, L. A.; Young, E. F.; Olkin, C. B.; Terrell, D.; Parker, J. W.; Durda, D.; Stansberry, J. A.; Reitsema, H.; French, R. G.; Shoemaker, K.; Brown, M. E.; Schaller, E. L.; Bauer, J. M.; Young, J. W.; Wasserman, L. H.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Lust, N.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Dellinger, J. A.; Garossino, P. G. A.; Grigsby, B.; Stone, R. P. S.; Dillon, W. G.; Mezzalira, F.; Ryan, E. V.; Ryan, W.; Souza, S. P.; Williams, R.; Sexton, C.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a successful occultation of a star by Pluto that was observable over much of the south and western United States. The centerline was close to WIRO. We will present seven complete lightcurves from Crossley/Lick, WIRO, SBO/CU, Palomar, JPL/TMO, Sierra Stars Obs., and Magdalena Ridge Observatory. We have 2 partial lightcurves from Lowell Obs. and McDonald Obs. where data loss was caused by clouds. There were attempts at the Steward 90", George Observatory, and New Mexico Skies that were clouded out. The UCF station near Orlando was clearly an appulse. A number of other amateurs also succeeded in collecting data. Our presentation will provide a final geometric solution for the event as well as baseline fits to the atmospheric structure. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy grants NNX08AO626 and NNX08AO50G.

  11. Halogen occultation experiment intergrated test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E., III; Butterfield, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    The test program plan is presented for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument, which is being developed in-house at the Langley Research Center for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). This comprehensive test program was developed to demonstrate that the HALOE instrument meets its performance requirements and maintains integrity through UARS flight environments. Each component, subsystem, and system level test is described in sufficient detail to allow development of the necessary test setups and test procedures. Additionally, the management system for implementing this test program is given. The HALOE instrument is a gas correlation radiometer that measures vertical distribution of eight upper atmospheric constituents: O3, HC1, HF, NO, CH4, H2O, NO2, and CO2.

  12. What can the occult do for you?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Keel, W. C.

    2017-03-01

    Interstellar dust is still a dominant uncertainty in Astronomy, limiting precision in e.g., cosmological distance estimates and models of how light is re-processed within a galaxy. When a foreground galaxy serendipitously overlaps a more distant one, the latter backlights the dusty structures in the nearer foreground galaxy. Such an overlapping or occulting galaxy pair can be used to measure the distribution of dust in the closest galaxy with great accuracy. The STARSMOG program uses Hubble to map the distribution of dust in foreground galaxies in fine (<100 pc) detail. Integral Field Unit (IFU) observations will map the effective extinction curve, disentangling the role of fine-scale geometry and grain composition on the path of light through a galaxy. The overlapping galaxy technique promises to deliver a clear understanding of the dust in galaxies: geometry, a probability function of dimming as a function of galaxy mass and radius, and its dependence on wavelength.

  13. Scaling An External Occulter Coronagraph Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noecker, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    An excellent candidate for the Terrestrial Planet Finder mission is an external occulter coronagraph like New Worlds Observer, in which the glare of the host star is blocked by an opaque starshade located between the star and the telescope which observes it. It has proven difficult to visualize and manage the interplay between starshade size and distance, telescope size, optical wavelength, and the depth of stellar suppression. The traditional method is to choose some parameters, calculate the stellar suppression, and iterate. This paper presents an alternate approach which exploits scaling relationships, allowing quick calculation of each new case and better visualization of the ramifications of a modest departure from that case. I apply this method to illustrate the pros and cons of a few different cases at different scales.

  14. The clinical significance of occult HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Squadrito, Giovanni; Spinella, Rosaria; Raimondo, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative individuals is defined as occult HBV infection (OBI). OBI is related in some cases to infection with variant viruses (S-escape mutants) undetectable by HBsAg commercial kits. More frequently, however, it is due to infection with wild-type viruses that are strongly suppressed in their replication activity. OBI may be involved in different clinical contexts, including the transmission of the infection by blood transfusion or liver transplantation and its acute reactivation when an immunosuppressive status occurs. Moreover, much evidence suggests that it may contribute to the development of cirrhosis and may have an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24714731

  15. Validation of ACE-FTS measurements of CFC-11, CFC-12, and HCFC-22 using ground-based FTIR spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K. A.; Mahieu, E.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Conway, S. A.; Dan, L.; Griffin, D.; Harrett, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kagawa, A.; Lindenmaier, R.; Strong, K.; Whaley, C.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite datasets can be an effective global monitoring tool for long-lived compounds in the atmosphere. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT-1. The primary instrument on SCISAT-1 is a high-resolution infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) which is capable of measuring a range of gases including key chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) species. These families of species are of interest because of their significant contribution to anthropogenic ozone depletion and to global warming. To assess the quality of data derived from satellite measurements, validation using other data sources is essential. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers are particularly useful for this purpose. In this study, five FTIR spectrometers located at four sites around the world are used to validate the CFC-11 (CCl3F), CFC-12 (CCl2F2), and HCFC-22 (CHClF2) retrieved profiles from ACE-FTS measurements. These species are related because HCFC-22 was the primary replacement for CFC-11 and CFC-12 in refrigerant and propellant applications. The FTIR spectrometers used in this study record solar absorption spectra at Eureka (Canada), Jungfraujoch (Switzerland), Poker Flat (USA), and Toronto (Canada). The retrieval of CFC-11, CFC-12, and HCFC-22 are not standard products for many of these instruments, and as such, a harmonization of retrieval parameters between the sites has been conducted. The retrievals of these species from the FTIR spectra are sensitive from the surface to approximately 20 km, while the ACE-FTS profiles extend from approximately 6 to 30 km. For each site, partial column comparisons between coincident measurements of the three species and a validation of the observed trends will be discussed.

  16. Pluto's Lower Atmosphere from Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Leslie; Buie, M. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, E. F.; French, R. G.; Howell, R. R.

    2008-09-01

    Ever since the Pluto occultation of 1988, the nature of Pluto's lower atmosphere has been a mystery: the lightcurve shows a difference between the upper and lower atmosphere, but it has been unclear whether this is due to hazes, a steep thermal gradient, or a combination of the two (Elliot & Young, 1992 AJ 103, 991; Hubbard et al. 1990, Icarus, 84, 1) Recent high-quality lightcurves allow us to place limits on the haze in Pluto's atmosphere. Especially important is the dual-wavelength (0.5 and 0.8 micron) occultation observed from Mount John Observatory in New Zealand on 2007 July 31. This site was 60 ± 4 km from the central track of the shadow, and the lightcurves clearly show a central flash, or a brightening due to strong lateral refocusing and the convergence of multiple images around the limb of an elliptical atmosphere. These lightcurves constrain the structure of the lower atmosphere in three ways. First, the surface-grazing ray must have a large enough bending angle to reach the center of the shadow. Second, haze of sufficient optical depth to affect the main drop in the lightcurve will also decrease the height of the central flash. The height and location of the central flash can be well modeled with a clear atmosphere. Third, hazes of the size expected at Pluto will have a wavelength-dependent absorption, but the red and blue channels of the Mount John lightcurves show no variation with wavelength. We will discuss limits on the hazes, and place these limits in the context of Triton hazes, heating by dust, and New Horizons detection limits.

  17. 76 FR 69755 - National Customs Automation Program Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... Commercial Environment (ACE) Simplified Entry AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... Commercial Environment (ACE) entry capability. This new capability will include functionality specific to the... was on trade compliance and the development of the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE), the...

  18. ACE TECH: The Fourth Year of CTE and Academic Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Eileen Quinn; Donahue, John; Knight, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    It only takes an hour or two of roaming the halls of Architecture, Construction and Engineering (ACE) Tech Charter High School to detect an enduring attitude of accomplishment from both the teachers and the students. This atmosphere is intentional. The school, located in Chicago, was created specifically to hone the skills of individuals choosing…

  19. Hyperspectral Detection and Discrimination Using the ACE Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-08

    08-2011 Proceedings AUG 2011 - SEPT 2011 Hyperspectral Detection and Discrimination Using the ACE Algorithm FA8720-05-C-0002 M. L. Pieper , D...relative to the background. If an object spectrum has a close resemblance to its surroundings, it will Correspondence to M. L. Pieper E-mail: mpieper

  20. Linkages between ACE Vocational Provision and Mainstream VET.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, John

    A study investigated linkages between adult community education (ACE) and mainstream vocational education and training (VET) in Australia, which enable people to move between the two sectors in their pursuit of vocational learning, and the ways in which linkages might be improved or new ones developed. The data from the study were derived from 69…

  1. Applying computationally efficient schemes for biogeochemical cycles (ACES4BGC)

    SciTech Connect

    Vertenstein, Mariana

    2016-01-11

    NCAR contributed to the ACES4BGC project through software engineering work on aerosol model implementation, build system and script changes, coupler enhancements for biogeochemical tracers, improvements to the Community Land Model (CLM) code and testing infrastructure, and coordinating and integrating code changes from the various project participants.

  2. Comparative study on the clinical and virological characteristics among patients with single occult hepatitis B virus (HBV), single occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) and occult HBV and HCV dual infection.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; López-Alcorocho, Juan Manuel; Bartolomé, Javier; Pardo, Margarita; Carreño, Vicente

    2007-03-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) and occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are two recently described different forms of HBV and HCV infections. This work compares the clinical, virologic, and histologic characteristics of patients with occult dual infection to those of patients with single occult HBV or HCV infection. Seventy-six patients with abnormal liver function tests of unknown etiology (serum HBsAg, anti-HCV, HBV-DNA, and HCV-RNA negative) were included in the study. Viral genomes were tested in liver by real-time PCR and confirmed by in situ hybridization. Of the 76 patients, 17 had occult HBV infection (intrahepatic HBV-DNA positive, HCV-RNA negative), 35 had occult HCV infection (intrahepatic HCV-RNA positive, HBV-DNA negative) and 24 occult dual infection (intrahepatic HCV-RNA and HBV-DNA). No differences among the three groups were found regarding clinical and epidemiologic data. The median load of intrahepatic genomic and antigenomic HCV-RNA strands was similar between single occult HCV infection and occult HBV and HCV dual infection. The percentage of HCV-infected hepatocytes did not differ between these groups. In occult single HBV infection, intrahepatic levels of HBV-DNA and percentage of HBV-infected hepatocytes were similar to the group of patients with occult dual infection. Finally, no differences were found in histological liver damage among the three groups. In conclusion, liver disease in patients with occult dual infection was not more severe than in patients with single occult HBV or occult HCV infection. Moreover, in occult dual infection there is no a reciprocal inhibition of the viral genomes.

  3. The Mariner Jupiter/Saturn ring occultation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, V. R.

    1974-01-01

    Radio occultation measurements of Saturn's rings as measured by the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn radio science experiment are reported. These signal measurements provide information on size, distribution, and density of particle material found in the rings.

  4. Precise Astrometry for Predicting Kuiper Belt Object Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Scott; Elliot, James; Kern, Susan; Zuluaga, Carlos; Gulbis, Amanda

    2008-08-01

    In order to observe an occultation of a bright star by a Kuiper Belt object the event must first be predicted as to where and when it will happen. These predictions require precise astrometry every few months of the largest Kuiper Belt objects. Through the occultation events the diameters, possible companions and possible tenuous atmospheres around these objects will be explored by examining how the light from the star varies as the KBO passes in front of it. This promises to be a completely new and powerful way of exploring the KBOs. We propose to continue to obtain very precise astrometry on the known brightest KBOs to determine more accurate orbits and thus reliable occultation predictions. In addition, we must also obtain accurate astrometry on faint field stars that the KBOs of interest may occult.

  5. Radio occultation based on BeiDou satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hu; Hu, Haiying; Shen, Xue-min; Gong, Wenbin; Zhang, Yonghe

    2014-11-01

    With the development of GNSS systems, it has become a tendency that radio occultation is used to sense the Earth's atmosphere. By this means, the moisture, temperature, pressure, and total electron content can be derived. Based on the sensing results, more complicated models for atmosphere might come into being. Meteorology well benefits from this technology. As scheduled, the BD satellite navigation system will have a worldwide coverage by the end of 2020. Radio occultation studies in China have been highlighted in the recent decade. More and more feasibilities reports have been published in either domestic or international journals. Herein, some scenarios are proposed to assess the coverage of radio occultation based on two different phases of BD satellite navigation system. Phase one for BD is composed of GEO,IGSO and several MEO satellites. Phase two for BD consists mostly of 24 MEO satellites, some GEO and IGSO satellites. The characteristics of radio occultation based on these two phases are presented respectively.

  6. AceDRG: a stereochemical description generator for ligands

    PubMed Central

    Emsley, Paul; Gražulis, Saulius; Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas

    2017-01-01

    The program AceDRG is designed for the derivation of stereochemical information about small molecules. It uses local chemical and topological environment-based atom typing to derive and organize bond lengths and angles from a small-molecule database: the Crystallography Open Database (COD). Information about the hybridization states of atoms, whether they belong to small rings (up to seven-membered rings), ring aromaticity and nearest-neighbour information is encoded in the atom types. All atoms from the COD have been classified according to the generated atom types. All bonds and angles have also been classified according to the atom types and, in a certain sense, bond types. Derived data are tabulated in a machine-readable form that is freely available from CCP4. AceDRG can also generate stereochemical information, provided that the basic bonding pattern of a ligand is known. The basic bonding pattern is perceived from one of the computational chemistry file formats, including SMILES, mmCIF, SDF MOL and SYBYL MOL2 files. Using the bonding chemistry, atom types, and bond and angle tables generated from the COD, AceDRG derives the ‘ideal’ bond lengths, angles, plane groups, aromatic rings and chirality information, and writes them to an mmCIF file that can be used by the refinement program REFMAC5 and the model-building program Coot. Other refinement and model-building programs such as PHENIX and BUSTER can also use these files. AceDRG also generates one or more coordinate sets corresponding to the most favourable conformation(s) of a given ligand. AceDRG employs RDKit for chemistry perception and for initial conformation generation, as well as for the interpretation of SMILES strings, SDF MOL and SYBYL MOL2 files. PMID:28177307

  7. AceDRG: a stereochemical description generator for ligands.

    PubMed

    Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A; Emsley, Paul; Graǽulis, Saulius; Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas; Murshudov, Garib N

    2017-02-01

    The program AceDRG is designed for the derivation of stereochemical information about small molecules. It uses local chemical and topological environment-based atom typing to derive and organize bond lengths and angles from a small-molecule database: the Crystallography Open Database (COD). Information about the hybridization states of atoms, whether they belong to small rings (up to seven-membered rings), ring aromaticity and nearest-neighbour information is encoded in the atom types. All atoms from the COD have been classified according to the generated atom types. All bonds and angles have also been classified according to the atom types and, in a certain sense, bond types. Derived data are tabulated in a machine-readable form that is freely available from CCP4. AceDRG can also generate stereochemical information, provided that the basic bonding pattern of a ligand is known. The basic bonding pattern is perceived from one of the computational chemistry file formats, including SMILES, mmCIF, SDF MOL and SYBYL MOL2 files. Using the bonding chemistry, atom types, and bond and angle tables generated from the COD, AceDRG derives the `ideal' bond lengths, angles, plane groups, aromatic rings and chirality information, and writes them to an mmCIF file that can be used by the refinement program REFMAC5 and the model-building program Coot. Other refinement and model-building programs such as PHENIX and BUSTER can also use these files. AceDRG also generates one or more coordinate sets corresponding to the most favourable conformation(s) of a given ligand. AceDRG employs RDKit for chemistry perception and for initial conformation generation, as well as for the interpretation of SMILES strings, SDF MOL and SYBYL MOL2 files.

  8. Association between ACE D allele and elite short distance swimming.

    PubMed

    Costa, Aldo Matos; Silva, António José; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; Louro, Hugo; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Breitenfeld, Luiza

    2009-08-01

    The influence of ACE gene on athletic performance has been widely explored, and most of the published data refers to an I/D polymorphism leading to the presence (I allele) or absence (D allele) of a 287-bp sequence in intron 16, determining ACE activity in serum and tissues. A higher I allele frequency has been reported among elite endurance athletes, while the D allele was more frequent among those engaged in more power-orientated sports. However, on competitive swimming, the reproducibility of such associations is controversial. We thus compared the ACE genotype of elite swimmers with that of non-elite swimming cohort and of healthy control subjects. We thus sought an association of the ACE genotype of elite swimmers with their competitive distance. 39 Portuguese Olympic swimming candidates were classified as: short (<200 m) and middle (400-1,500 m) distance swimmers, respectively. A group of 32 non-elite swimmers were studied and classified as well, and a control group (n = 100) was selected from the Portuguese population. Chelex 100 was used for DNA extraction and genotype was determined by PCR-RFLP methods. We found that ACE genotype distribution and allelic frequency differs significantly by event distance only among elite swimmers (P < or = 0.05). Moreover, the allelic frequency of the elite short distance swimmers differed significantly from that of the controls (P = 0.021). No associations were found between middle distance swimmers and controls. Our results seem to support an association between the D allele and elite short distance swimming.

  9. First Results From The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z; Bianco, F B; Lehner, M J; Coehlo, N K; Wang, J; Mondal, S; Alcock, C; Axelrod, T; Byun, Y; Chen, W P; Cook, K H; Dave, R; de Pater, I; Porrata, R; Kim, D; King, S; Lee, T; Lin, H; Lissauer, J J; Marshall, S L; Protopapas, P; Rice, J A; Schwamb, M E; Wang, S; Wen, C

    2008-08-22

    Results from the first two years of data from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) are presented. Stars have been monitored photometrically at 4 Hz or 5 Hz to search for occultations by small ({approx}3 km) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). No statistically significant events were found, allowing us to present an upper bound to the size distribution of KBOs with diameters 0.5 km < D < 28 km.

  10. The rings of Uranus - Occultation profiles from three observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, J. H.; Frogel, J. A.; French, R. G.; Matthews, K.; Meech, K. J.; Mink, D. J.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sicardy, B.; Liller, W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Occultation profiles for the nine confirmed Uranian rings obtained from Las Campanas, the European Southern Observatory, and Cerro Tololo on 15-16 August 1980 are compared. The alpha ring shows a 'double-dip' structure; the eta ring shows a broad and narrow component (similar to Saturn's F ring); and the epsilon ring shows six features that appear in the data from all three observatories. Diffraction fringes appear at the edges of several of the occultation profiles.

  11. Epitope mapping of mAbs to denatured human testicular ACE (CD143).

    PubMed

    Balyasnikova, I V; Metzger, R; Franke, F E; Conrad, N; Towbin, H; Schwartz, D E; Sturrock, E D; Danilov, S M

    2008-10-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE; CD143) has two homologous enzymatically active domains (N and C) and plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. A wide spectrum of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to different epitopes on the N and C domains of human ACE have been used to study different aspects of ACE biology. In this study, we characterized a set of nine mAbs, developed against the C domain of human ACE, which recognize the denatured forms of ACE and thus are suitable for the detection and quantification of somatic ACE (sACE) and testicular ACE (tACE) using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded human tissues. The epitopes for these mAbs were defined using species cross-reactivity, phage display library screening, Western blotting and ACE mutagenesis. Most of the mAbs recognized common/overlapping region(s) on both somatic and testicular forms of human ACE, whereas mAb 4E10 was relatively specific for the testicular isoform and mAb 5B9 mainly recognized the glycan attached to Asn 731. This set of mAbs is useful for identifying even subtle changes in human ACE conformation because of denaturation. These mAbs are also sensitive tools for the detection of human sACE and tACE in biological fluids and tissues using proteomic approaches. Their high reactivity in paraffin-embedded tissues provides opportunities to study changes in the pattern of ACE expression and glycosylation (particularly with mAb 5B9) in different tissues and cells.

  12. Design and performance of the halogen occultation experiment (HALOE) remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, R. L.; Mauldin, L. E., III; Russell, J. M., III

    1986-01-01

    HALOE is an optical remote sensor that measures extinction of solar radiation caused by the earth's atmosphere in eight channels, ranging in wavelength from 2.5 to 10.1 microns. These measurements, which occur twice each satellite orbit during solar occultation, are inverted to yield vertical distributions of middle atmosphere ozone (O3), water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and methane. A channel located in the 2.7 region is used to infer the tangent point pressure by measuring carbon dioxide absorption. The HALOE instrument consists of a two-axis gimbal system, telescope, spectral discrimination optics and a 12-bit data system. The gimbal system tracks the solar radiometric centroid in the azimuthal plane and tracks the solar limb in the elevation plane, placing the instrument's instantaneous field-of-view 4 arcmin down from the solar top edge. The instrument gathers data for tangent altitudes ranging from 150 km to the earth's horizon. Prior to an orbital sunset and after an orbital sunrise, HALOE automatically performs calibration sequences to enhance data interpretation. The instrument is presently being tested at the NASA Langley Research Center in preparation for launch on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite near the end of this decade. This paper describes the instrumenmt design, operation, and functional performance.

  13. Possible occultation by Pluto from US East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-06-01

    We have been asked to help disseminate the news of a possible occultation by Pluto visible to observers on the US East coast. Although the AAVSO does not ordinarily issue announcements of upcoming occultations, in this case the object is Pluto and the NASA New Horizons mission (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html) will be visiting Pluto in 2015. The information below has been supplied by Dr. Leslie Young (Southwest Research Institute), who is coordinating this observing campaign on Pluto. Dr. Young is also Deputy Project Scientist for the New Horizons mission. ALERT: Possible Pluto occultation Wednesday night (2012/06/14 03:28 UT) from US East coast. CONTACT: Leslie Young (layoung@boulder.swri.edu; work: 303-546-6057; skype: drpluto). Also see our planning pages in progress at http://wiki.boulder.swri.edu/mediawiki/index.php/2012-06-14_Pluto_occultation. Pluto's thin, nitrogen atmosphere is in vapor-pressure equilibrium with the surface ice, and changes seasonally. We've seen it double since 1988, and now we measure its pressure once or twice a year. The technique we use is stellar occultation, when a star passes behind Pluto's atmosphere. The atmosphere defocuses the starlight. By the timing of the fading of the star, we measure the pressure and temperature in Pluto's atmosphere at ~10 km resolution. MORE INFORMATION: See http://wiki.boulder.swri.edu/mediawiki/index.php/2012-06-14_Pluto_occultation.

  14. Earth Occultation Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT). Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors for daily monitoring. Light curves, updated daily, are available on our website http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm. Our software is also capable of performing the Earth occultation monitoring using up to 128 energy bands, or any combination of those bands, using our 128-channel, 4-s CSPEC data. The GBM BGO detectors, sensitive from about 200 keV to 40 keV, can also be used with this technique. In our standard application of the EOT, we use a catalog of sources to drive the measurements. To ensure that our catalog is complete, our team has developed an Earth occultation imaging method. In this talk, I will describe both techniques and the current data products available. I will highlight recent and important results from the GBM EOT, including the current status of our observations of hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula.

  15. Occult hepatitis C virus infection among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Barril, Guillermina; Castillo, Inmaculada; Arenas, María Dolores; Espinosa, Mario; Garcia-Valdecasas, Juan; Garcia-Fernández, Nuria; González-Parra, Emilio; Alcazar, José María; Sánchez, Carmen; Diez-Baylón, José Carlos; Martinez, Pilar; Bartolomé, Javier; Carreño, Vicente

    2008-12-01

    Occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (i.e., detectable HCV-RNA in the liver or peripheral blood mononuclear cells) in the absence of both serum HCV-RNA and anti-HCV antibodies has not been investigated in hemodialysis patients. In this study, real-time PCR and in situ hybridization was used to test for the presence of genomic and antigenomic HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 109 hemodialysis patients with abnormal levels of liver enzymes. Occult HCV infection, determined by the presence of genomic HCV-RNA, was found in 45% of the patients; 53% of these patients had ongoing HCV replication, indicated by the presence of antigenomic HCV-RNA. Patients with occult HCV infection had spent a significantly longer time on hemodialysis and had significantly higher mean alanine aminotransferase levels during the 6 mo before study entry. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality was associated with age >60 yr (odds ratio 3.30; 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 10.33) and the presence of occult HCV infection (odds ratio 3.84; 95% confidence interval 1.29 to 11.43). In conclusion, the prevalence of occult HCV infection is high among hemodialysis patients with persistently abnormal values of liver enzymes of unknown cause. The clinical significance of occult HCV infection in these patients requires further study.

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2): comparative modeling of the active site, specificity requirements, and chloride dependence.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie L; Jackson, Richard M; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2003-11-18

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, represents a new and potentially important target in cardio-renal disease. A model of the active site of ACE2, based on the crystal structure of testicular ACE, has been developed and indicates that the catalytic mechanism of ACE2 resembles that of ACE. Structural differences exist between the active site of ACE (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase) and ACE2 (carboxypeptidase) that are responsible for the differences in specificity. The main differences occur in the ligand-binding pockets, particularly at the S2' subsite and in the binding of the peptide carboxy-terminus. The model explains why the classical ACE inhibitor lisinopril is unable to bind to ACE2. On the basis of the ability of ACE2 to cleave a variety of biologically active peptides, a consensus sequence of Pro-X-Pro-hydrophobic/basic for the protease specificity of ACE2 has been defined that is supported by the ACE2 model. The dipeptide, Pro-Phe, completely inhibits ACE2 activity at 180 microM with angiotensin II as the substrate. As with ACE, the chloride dependence of ACE2 is substrate-specific such that the hydrolysis of angiotensin I and the synthetic peptide substrate, Mca-APK(Dnp), are activated in the presence of chloride ions, whereas the cleavage of angiotensin II is inhibited. The ACE2 model is also suggestive of a possible mechanism for chloride activation. The structural insights provided by these analyses for the differences in inhibition pattern and substrate specificity among ACE and its homologue ACE2 and for the chloride dependence of ACE/ACE2 activity are valuable in understanding the function and regulation of ACE2.

  17. Modulation of the renal response to ACE inhibition by ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism during hyperglycemia in normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Weekers, Laurent; Bouhanick, Béatrice; Hadjadj, Samy; Gallois, Yves; Roussel, Ronen; Pean, Franck; Ankotche, Amos; Chatellier, Gilles; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Lefebvre, Pierre J; Marre, Michel

    2005-10-01

    ACE inhibition protects kidney function, but ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism affects renal prognosis in type 1 diabetic patients. ACE genotype may influence the renal benefits of ACE inhibition. We studied the impact of ACE I/D polymorphism on the renal hemodynamic changes induced by ACE inhibition in type 1 diabetes. We studied renal hemodynamics (glomerular filtration rate [GFR], effective renal plasma flow [ERPF], filtration fraction [GFR/ERPF], mean arterial pressure [MAP], and total renal resistances [MAP/ERPF]) repeatedly during normoglycemia and then hyperglycemia in 12 normotensive, normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes and the II genotype (associated with nephroprotection) versus 22 age- and sex-matched subjects with the ACE D allele after three randomly allocated 2- to 6-week periods on placebo, 1.25 mg/day ramipril, and 5 mg/day ramipril in a double-blind, cross-over study. During normoglycemia, the hemodynamic changes induced by ramipril were similar in both genotypes. During hyperglycemia, the changes induced by ramipril were accentuated in the II genotype group and attenuated dose dependently in the D allele group (treatment-genotype interaction P values for ERPF, 0.018; MAP, 0.018; and total renal resistances, 0.055). These results provide a basis to different renal responses to ACE inhibition according to ACE genotype in type 1 diabetes.

  18. A Discussion of Aerodynamic Control Effectors (ACEs) for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    A Reynolds number based, unmanned air vehicle classification structure has been developed which identifies four classes of unmanned air vehicle concepts. The four unmanned air vehicle (UAV) classes are; Micro UAV, Meso UAV, Macro UAV, and Mega UAV. In a similar fashion a labeling scheme for aerodynamic control effectors (ACE) was developed and eleven types of ACE concepts were identified. These eleven types of ACEs were laid out in a five (5) layer scheme. The final section of the paper correlated the various ACE concepts to the four UAV classes and ACE recommendations are offered for future design activities.

  19. ACE gene titration in mice uncovers a new mechanism for ACE on the control of body weight.

    PubMed

    Heimann, A S; Favarato, M H; Gozzo, F C; Rioli, V; Carreño, F R; Eberlin, M N; Ferro, E S; Krege, J H; Krieger, J E

    2005-01-20

    Mice harboring 1, 2, or 3 copies of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene were used to evaluate the quantitative role of the ACE locus on obesity. Three-copy mice fed with a high-fat diet had lower body weight and peri-epididymal adipose tissue than did 1- and 2-copy mice (P < 0.05). On regular diet, 3-copy mice had to eat more to maintain the same body weight; on a high-fat diet, they ate the same but weighed less than 1- and 2-copy mice (P < 0.05), indicating a higher metabolic rate in 3-copy mice that was not affected by ANG II AT(1) blocker treatment. A catalytically inactive form of thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15; EP24.15) was used to isolate ACE substrates from adipose tissue. Liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) identified 162 peptide peaks; 16 peptides were present in both groups (1- and 3-copy mice fed with a high-fat diet), whereas 58 of the 72 unique peptides were found only in the 3-copy mice. Peptide size distribution was shifted to lower molecular weight in 3-copy mice. Two of the identified peptides, LVVYPWTQRY and VVYPWTQRY, which are ACE substrates, inhibited in vitro protein kinase C phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16; EP24.16) activity was lower in fat tissue from 3- vs. 1-copy mice (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results provide evidence that ACE is associated with body weight and peri-epididymal fat accumulation. This response may involve the generation of oligopeptides that inhibit the activity of EP24.16 and other oligopeptidases within the adipose tissue.

  20. A technique for routinely updating the ITU-R database using radio occultation electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, Claudio; Azpilicueta, Francisco; Nava, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Well credited and widely used ionospheric models, such as the International Reference Ionosphere or NeQuick, describe the variation of the electron density with height by means of a piecewise profile tied to the F2-peak parameters: the electron density,, and the height, . Accurate values of these parameters are crucial for retrieving reliable electron density estimations from those models. When direct measurements of these parameters are not available, the models compute the parameters using the so-called ITU-R database, which was established in the early 1960s. This paper presents a technique aimed at routinely updating the ITU-R database using radio occultation electron density profiles derived from GPS measurements gathered from low Earth orbit satellites. Before being used, these radio occultation profiles are validated by fitting to them an electron density model. A re-weighted Least Squares algorithm is used for down-weighting unreliable measurements (occasionally, entire profiles) and to retrieve and values—together with their error estimates—from the profiles. These values are used to monthly update the database, which consists of two sets of ITU-R-like coefficients that could easily be implemented in the IRI or NeQuick models. The technique was tested with radio occultation electron density profiles that are delivered to the community by the COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 mission team. Tests were performed for solstices and equinoxes seasons in high and low-solar activity conditions. The global mean error of the resulting maps—estimated by the Least Squares technique—is between and elec/m for the F2-peak electron density (which is equivalent to 7 % of the value of the estimated parameter) and from 2.0 to 5.6 km for the height (2 %).

  1. Femto-Satellite system for radio-occultation study of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savio Bradford, Brandon; Gutierrez Cabello, Jordi

    This research project proposes the use of (a swarm of) Femto-Satellites in the study of Ionospheric properties using \\underline{Radio-Occultation} techniques. It makes use of GPS signals, a computing system, tiny on-board components and a data transfer module. This project is being done as a cheaper and lightweight alternative proposal to the higher cost, already running COSMIC program and other programs which use larger satellites to perform Radio-Occultation study of the Ionosphere. Being that these femto-satellites are capable of acting as a constellation, they will be able to provide higher accuracy radio-occultation readings of the Ionosphere due to the close proximity between each satellite positioned in low earth orbit. Important parameters attempted for this system include a weight of 100 grams per satellite system and an innovative power source using solar sails. The sails also serve to provide an anti-debris system of redundancy to make sure these tiny satellites don't add to the already alarming amount of space debris, in the event of a malfunction. Ultimately, having a large amount of tiny satellites serving to study the ionosphere at closer proximities and obtain more accurate results will give the scientific community a better understanding of the constant changes in the space environment at a given altitude. This could help humanity combat adverse changes in climate, which heavily affects some regions of agriculture. This could also help advance the scientific campaign against global warming, by providing real-time readings from different regions of the ionosphere.

  2. Astr 101 Students' Attitudes Towards Essays On Transits, Eclipses And Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.

    2012-05-01

    Joliet Junior College, Joliet, IL offers a one semester introductory astronomy course each semester. We teach over 110 primarily non-science major students each semester. We use proven active learning strategies such lecture tutorials, think-pair-share questions and small group discussions to help these students develop and retain a good understanding of astrophysical concepts. Occasionally, we offer projects that allow students to explore course topics beyond the classroom. We hope that such projects will increase students' interest in astronomy. We also hope that these assignments will help students to improve their critical thinking and writing skills. In Spring 12, we are offering three short individual essay assignments in our face-to-face sections. The essays focus on transits, eclipses and occultations to highlight the 2012 transit of Venus. For the first essay, students will find images of transit and occultation events using the Astronomy Picture of the Day website and describe their chosen events. In addition, students will predict how variations in certain physical and orbital parameters would alter their particular events. The second essay involves transits, eclipses and occultations observed by spacecraft. Students will describe their transit event, their spacecraft's mission, orbital path, how the orbital path was achieved, etc. The third essay deals with transiting exoplanets. Students will choose at least two exoplanets from an exoplanet database, one of which has been discovered through the transit method. This essay will enable students to learn about detecting exoplanets and how they compare with our solar system. Details of the essay assignments and students' reactions to them will be presented at the meeting.

  3. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) questionnaire and Adult Attachment Interview (AAI): implications for parent child relationships.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Anne; Steele, Miriam; Dube, Shanta Rishi; Bate, Jordan; Bonuck, Karen; Meissner, Paul; Goldman, Hannah; Steele, Howard

    2014-02-01

    Although Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are linked to increased health problems and risk behaviors in adulthood, there are no studies on the association between ACEs and adults' states of mind regarding their early childhood attachments, loss, and trauma experiences. To validate the ACEs questions, we analyzed the association between ACEs and emotional support indicators and Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) classifications in terms of unresolved mourning regarding past loss or trauma and discordant states of mind in cannot classify (U/CC) interviews. Seventy-five urban women (41 clinical and 34 community) completed a questionnaire on ACEs, which included 10 categories of abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction, in addition to emotional support. Internal psychological processes or states of mind concerning attachment were assessed using the AAI. ACE responses were internally consistent (Cronbach's α=.88). In the clinical sample, 84% reported≥4 ACEs compared to 27% among the community sample. AAIs judged U/CC occurred in 76% of the clinical sample compared to 9% in the community sample. When ACEs were≥4, 65% of AAIs were classified U/CC. Absence of emotional support in the ACEs questionnaire was associated with 72% of AAIs being classified U/CC. As the number of ACEs and the lack of emotional support increases so too does the probability of AAIs being classified as U/CC. Findings provide rationale for including ACEs questions in pediatric screening protocols to identify and offer treatment reducing the intergenerational transmission of risk associated with problematic parenting.

  4. Comparison of nitric oxide measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from ACE-FTS, MIPAS, SCIAMACHY, and SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, S.; Sinnhuber, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G.; Funke, B.; López-Puertas, M.; Urban, J.; Pérot, K.; Walker, K. A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    We compare the nitric oxide measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (60 to 150 km) from four instruments: ACE-FTS, MIPAS, SCIAMACHY, and SMR. We use the daily zonal mean data in that altitude range for the years 2004-2010 (ACE-FTS), 2005-2012 (MIPAS), 2008-2012 (SCIAMACHY), and 2003-2012 (SMR). We first compare the data qualitatively with respect to the morphology, focussing on the major features, and then compare the time series directly and quantitatively. In three geographical regions, we compare the vertical density profiles on coincident measurement days. Since none of the instruments delivers continuous daily measurements in this altitude region, we carried out a multi-linear regression analysis. This regression analysis considers annual and semi-annual variability in form of harmonic terms and inter-annual variability by responding linearly to the solar Lyman-α radiation index and the geomagnetic Kp index. This analysis helps to find similarities and differences in the individual data sets with respect to the inter-annual variations caused by geomagnetic and solar variability. We find that the data sets are consistent and that they only disagree on minor aspects. SMR and ACE-FTS deliver the longest time series in the mesosphere and they both agree remarkably well. The shorter time series from MIPAS and SCIAMACHY also agree with them where they overlap. The data agree within ten to twenty percent when the number densities are large, but they can differ by 50 to 100% in some cases.

  5. Comparison of nitric oxide measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from ACE-FTS, MIPAS, SCIAMACHY, and SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, S.; Sinnhuber, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G.; Funke, B.; López-Puertas, M.; Urban, J.; Pérot, K.; Walker, K. A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    We compare the nitric oxide measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (60 to 150 km) from four instruments: the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY), and the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR). We use the daily zonal mean data in that altitude range for the years 2004-2010 (ACE-FTS), 2005-2012 (MIPAS), 2008-2012 (SCIAMACHY), and 2003-2012 (SMR). We first compare the data qualitatively with respect to the morphology, focussing on the major features, and then compare the time series directly and quantitatively. In three geographical regions, we compare the vertical density profiles on coincident measurement days. Since none of the instruments delivers continuous daily measurements in this altitude region, we carried out a multi-linear regression analysis. This regression analysis considers annual and semi-annual variability in the form of harmonic terms and inter-annual variability by responding linearly to the solar Lyman-α radiation index and the geomagnetic Kp index. This analysis helps to find similarities and differences in the individual data sets with respect to the inter-annual variations caused by geomagnetic and solar variability. We find that the data sets are consistent and that they only disagree on minor aspects. SMR and ACE-FTS deliver the longest time series in the mesosphere, and they agree with each other remarkably well. The shorter time series from MIPAS and SCIAMACHY also agree with them where they overlap. The data agree within 30 % when the number densities are large, but they can differ by 50 to 100 % in some cases.

  6. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  7. Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) accommodations requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Results of an accommodations analysis for the Advanced Solar Observatory on Space Station Freedom are reported. Concepts for the High Resolution Telescope Cluster, Pinhole/Occulter Facility, and High Energy Cluster were developed which can be accommodated on Space Station Freedom. It is shown that workable accommodations concepts are possible. Areas of emphasis for the next stage of engineering development are identified.

  8. Progress in extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in extra-solar planet detection is reviewed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the definition of a planet; (2) the weakness of planet signals; (3) direct techniques - imaging and spectral detection; and (4) indirect techniques - reflex motion and occultations.

  9. Statistical bounds and maximum likelihood performance for shot noise limited knife-edge modeled stellar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholl, Patrick J.; Crabtree, Peter N.

    2014-09-01

    Applications of stellar occultation by solar system objects have a long history for determining universal time, detecting binary stars, and providing estimates of sizes of asteroids and minor planets. More recently, extension of this last application has been proposed as a technique to provide information (if not complete shadow images) of geosynchronous satellites. Diffraction has long been recognized as a source of distortion for such occultation measurements, and models subsequently developed to compensate for this degradation. Typically these models employ a knife-edge assumption for the obscuring body. In this preliminary study, we report on the fundamental limitations of knife-edge position estimates due to shot noise in an otherwise idealized measurement. In particular, we address the statistical bounds, both Cramér- Rao and Hammersley-Chapman-Robbins, on the uncertainty in the knife-edge position measurement, as well as the performance of the maximum-likelihood estimator. Results are presented as a function of both stellar magnitude and sensor passband; the limiting case of infinite resolving power is also explored.

  10. Vertical structure of the ionosphere and upper neutral atmosphere of saturn from the pioneer radio occultation.

    PubMed

    Kliore, A J; Lindal, G F; Patel, I R; Sweetnam, D N; Hotz, H B; McDonough, T R

    1980-01-25

    Radio occultation measurements at S band (2.293 gigahertz) of the ionosphere and upper neutral atmosphere of Saturn were obtained during the flyby of the Pioneer 11 Saturn spacecraft on 5 September 1979. Preliminary analysis of the occultation exit data taken at a latitude of 9.5 degrees S and a solar zenith angle of 90.6 degrees revealed the presence of a rather thin ionosphere, having a main peak electron density of about 9.4 x 10/(3) per cubic centimeter at an altitude of about 2800 above the level of a neutral number density of 10(19) per cubic centimeter and a lower peak of about 7 x 10(3) per cubic centimeter at 2200 kilometers. Data in the neutral atmosphere were obtained to a pressure level of about 120 millibars. The temperature structure derived from these data is consistent with the results of the Pioneer 11 Saturn infrared radiometer experiment (for a helium fraction of 15 percent) and with models derived from Earth-based observations for a helium fraction by number of about 4 to 10 percent. The helium fraction will be further defined by mutual iteration with the infrared radiometer team.

  11. Starshade Design for Occulter Based Exoplanet Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Mark W.; Lisman, P. Douglas; Helms, Richard; Walkemeyer, Phil; Kissil, Andrew; Polanco, Otto; Lee, Siu-Chun

    2010-01-01

    We present a lightweight starshade design that delivers the requisite profile figure accuracy with a compact stowed volume that permits launching both the occulter system (starshade and spacecraft) and a 1 to 2m-class telescope system on a single existing launch vehicle. Optimal figure stability is achieved with a very stiff and mass-efficient deployable structure design that has a novel configuration. The reference design is matched to a 1.1m telescope and consists of a 15m diameter inner disc and 24 flower-like petals with 7.5m length. The total tip-to-tip diameter of 30m provides an inner working angle of 75 mas. The design is scalable to accommodate larger telescopes and several options have been assessed. A proof of concept petal is now in production at JPL for deployment demonstrations and as a testbed for developing additional elements of the design. Future plans include developing breadboard and prototype hardware of increasing fidelity for use in demonstrating critical performance capabilities such as deployed optical edge profile figure tolerances and stability thereof.

  12. Starshade design for occulter based exoplanet missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Mark W.; Lisman, P. Douglas; Helms, Richard; Walkemeyer, Phil; Kissil, Andrew; Polanco, Otto; Lee, Siu-Chun

    2010-07-01

    We present a lightweight starshade design that delivers the requisite profile figure accuracy with a compact stowed volume that permits launching both the occulter system (starshade and spacecraft) and a 1 to 2m-class telescope system on a single existing launch vehicle. Optimal figure stability is achieved with a very stiff and mass-efficient deployable structure design that has a novel configuration. The reference design is matched to a 1.1m telescope and consists of a 15m diameter inner disc and 24 flower-like petals with 7.5m length. The total tip-to-tip diameter of 30m provides an inner working angle of 75 mas. The design is scalable to accommodate larger telescopes and several options have been assessed. A proof of concept petal is now in production at JPL for deployment demonstrations and as a testbed for developing additional elements of the design. Future plans include developing breadboard and prototype hardware of increasing fidelity for use in demonstrating critical performance capabilities such as deployed optical edge profile figure tolerances and stability thereof.

  13. Gravity wave detection by GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Arras, Christina; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role for the general atmospheric circulation due to the related transport of energy and momentum between different regions of the atmosphere. The momentum mostly generated in the troposphere is transported to upper atmospheric levels where GWs break or dissipate and transfer their momentum to the background wind (GW drag). The deposit of GW momentum can occur in the complete altitude range from the upper troposphere-stratosphere, the mesosphere, and even in the thermosphere. A global observation of GW parameters (e.g. potential energy and vertical flux of absolute horizontal momentum) is only possible with satellite data. The radio occultation (RO) technique uses GPS signals received aboard low Earth orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Atmospheric temperature profiles in the troposphere/stratosphere and ionospheric electron densities are derived with high vertical resolution. The GPS RO technique is sensitive to GWs with small ratios of vertical to horizontal wavelengths. In this presentation we give an overview about the derivation of GW parameters from RO temperature profiles, review some results of GW detection with RO data, and discuss the limitations of the RO technique. The focus of the presented results is (1) global GW activity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for different seasons, (2) influence of the topography on GW activity from the troposphere to the ionosphere in the Andean region of South America, and (3) the variation of ionospheric sporadic E layers.

  14. Occult Hepatitis B (OBH) in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Miri, Seyed Mohammad; Hollinger, F. Blaine; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Context Occult hepatitis B (OHB), or persistent HBV DNA in patients who are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative, is a recently recognized entity. In an attempt to summarize the issues, this review presents an overview of the current proposed hypothesis on the clinical relevance and also updates the knowledge on the classification of OHB in different clinical settings. Evidence Acquisition OHB could be found in different population and clinical backgrounds including: viral co-infections (with either human immunodeficiency or hepatitis C viruses), HBV chronic carriers, dialysis patients, transplantation settings and certain clinical situations (named in here: special clinical settings) with no apparent distinguishable clinical parameters. Results The exact magnitude, pathogenesis, and clinical relevance of OHB are unclear. Even the possible role exerted by this cryptic infection on liver disease outcome, and hepatocellular carcinoma development remains unknown. Conclusions Monitoring of Individuals with positive anti-HBc, mass immunization programs and improvement in diagnostic tools seem to be important to control the probability of transmission of HBV through cryptic HBV infection. PMID:23087749

  15. Parallel Signal Processing and System Simulation using aCe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular for both signal processing and system simulation. A new language is ideally suited for parallel signal processing applications and system simulation since it allows the programmer to explicitly express the computations that can be performed concurrently. In addition, the new C based parallel language (ace C) for architecture-adaptive programming allows programmers to implement algorithms and system simulation applications on parallel architectures by providing them with the assurance that future parallel architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of ace C and present a signal processing application (FFT).

  16. The impact of spherical symmetry assumption on radio occultation data inversion in the ionosphere: An assessment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, M. M.; Notarpietro, R.; Nava, B.

    2014-02-01

    'Onion-peeling' is a very common technique used to invert Radio Occultation (RO) data in the ionosphere. Because of the implicit assumption of spherical symmetry for the electron density (N(e)) distribution in the ionosphere, the standard Onion-peeling algorithm could give erroneous concentration values in the retrieved electron density profile. In particular, this happens when strong horizontal ionospheric electron density gradients are present, like for example in the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) region during high solar activity periods. In this work, using simulated RO Total Electron Content (TEC) data computed by means of the NeQuick2 ionospheric electron density model and ideal RO geometries, we tried to formulate and evaluate an asymmetry level index for quasi-horizontal TEC observations. The asymmetry index is based on the electron density variation that a signal may experience along its path (satellite to satellite link) in a RO event and is strictly dependent on the occultation geometry (e.g. azimuth of the occultation plane). A very good correlation has been found between the asymmetry index and errors related to the inversion products, in particular those concerning the peak electron density NmF2 estimate and the Vertical TEC (VTEC) evaluation.

  17. A SEARCH FOR OCCULTATIONS OF BRIGHT STARS BY SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS USING MEGACAM ON THE MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, F. B.; Lehner, M. J.; Protopapas, P.; McLeod, B. A.; Alcock, C. R.; Holman, M. J.

    2009-08-15

    We conducted a search for occultations of bright stars by Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) to estimate the density of subkilometer KBOs in the sky. We report here the first results of this occultation survey of the outer solar system conducted in 2007 June and 2008 June/July at the MMT Observatory using Megacam, the large MMT optical imager. We used Megacam in a novel shutterless continuous-readout mode to achieve high-precision photometry at 200 Hz, which with point-spread function convolution results in an effective sampling of {approx}30 Hz. We present an analysis of 220 star hours of data at a signal-to-noise ratio of 25 or greater, taken from images of fields within 3 deg. of the ecliptic plane. The survey efficiency is greater than 10% for occultations by KBOs of diameter d {>=} 0.7 km, and we report no detections in our data set. We set a new 95% confidence level upper limit for the surface density {sigma} {sub N}(d) of KBOs larger than 1 km: {sigma} {sub N}(d {>=} 1 km) {<=} 2.0 x 10{sup 8} deg{sup -2}, and for KBOs larger than 0.7 km {sigma} {sub N}(d {>=} 0.7 km) {<=} 4.8 x 10{sup 8} deg{sup -2}.

  18. Space clocks to test relativiy: ACES and SAGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Peter; Salomon, Christophe; Reynaud, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Atomic clocks are an outstanding tool for the experimental verification of general relativity and more generally for fundamental astronomy (VLBI, pulsar timing, navigation, etc). Recent years have seen a rapid improvement in the performance of such clocks, promising new improved tests of relativity, in particular onboard terrestrial and interplanetary space missions. We present the scientific motivations of such tests taking the ACES Salomon et al. and SAGAS Wolf et al. (2009) projects as particular examples.

  19. [ACE inhibitors from the viewpoint of the clinical pharmacologist].

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, G

    1996-01-01

    For treatment of hypertension drugs are desirable which exert a 24 hours lasting blood pressure control. Among the ACE-inhibitors some drugs exist which have this action. The elimination pathway plays a minor role in this respect. Not only the inhibition of Angiotensin II generation but also the decreased inhibition of bradykinin-degeneration plays a crucial role with regard to several endothelial functions controlling the so called remodeling of the cardiovascular system.

  20. ACES: An Enabling Technology for Next Generation Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Wuerl, Adam M.; Andrews, Jason E.; Andrews, Dana G.

    2004-02-01

    Andrews Space has developed the ``Alchemist'' Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES), a dual-mode propulsion system that enables safe, economical launch systems that take off and land horizontally. Alchemist generates liquid oxygen through separation of atmospheric air using the refrigeration capacity of liquid hydrogen. The key benefit of Alchemist is that it minimizes vehicle takeoff weight. All internal and NASA-funded activities have shown that ACES, previously proposed for hypersonic combined cycle RLVs, is a higher payoff, lower-risk technology if LOX generation is performed while the vehicle cruises subsonically. Andrews Space has developed the Alchemist concept from a small system study to viable Next Generation launch system technology, conducting not only feasibility studies but also related hardware tests, and it has planned a detailed risk reduction program which employs an experienced, proven contractor team. Andrews also has participated in preliminary studies of an evolvable Next Generation vehicle architecture-enabled by Alchemist ACES-which could meet civil, military, and commercial space requirements within two decades.

  1. The Louisiana ACES student-built BalloonSat program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Brad; Giammanco, James; Guzik, T. Gregory; Johnson, Karen; Wefel, John P.

    2006-01-01

    A major concern of many aerospace industries and space agencies worldwide is the continuing decrease in undergraduate student enrollment and graduation from aerospace and closely related degree programs. With a decreasing number of new aerospace workforce candidates, expanding or sustaining our exploration of the universe over the coming decades could be at risk. In Louisiana, we have developed the Aerospace Catalyst Experiences for Students (ACES) program to address this issue by attracting new students to aerospace-related programs and providing interdisciplinary training on how to design, build, and manage aerospace payloads. Based upon the National Space Grant Student Satellite Program "Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly!" methodology, ACES closely ties cross-discipline content knowledge with extensive hands-on experiences to instill skills that are then applied by the students to design, document, build, test, and operate a small balloon-borne scientific payload. The ACES concept was initially piloted during 2002-2003 and now includes a semi-formal "Student Ballooning Course", five Louisiana institutions and serves ˜45 students.

  2. Titania's radius and an upper limit on its atmosphere from the September 8, 2001 stellar occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widemann, T.; Sicardy, B.; Dusser, R.; Martinez, C.; Beisker, W.; Bredner, E.; Dunham, D.; Maley, P.; Lellouch, E.; Arlot, J.-E.; Berthier, J.; Colas, F.; Hubbard, W. B.; Hill, R.; Lecacheux, J.; Lecampion, J.-F.; Pau, S.; Rapaport, M.; Roques, F.; Thuillot, W.; Hills, C. R.; Elliott, A. J.; Miles, R.; Platt, T.; Cremaschini, C.; Dubreuil, P.; Cavadore, C.; Demeautis, C.; Henriquet, P.; Labrevoir, O.; Rau, G.; Coliac, J.-F.; Piraux, J.; Marlot, Ch.; Marlot, C.; Gorry, F.; Sire, C.; Bayle, B.; Simian, E.; Blommers, A. M.; Fulgence, J.; Leyrat, C.; Sauzeaud, C.; Stephanus, B.; Rafaelli, T.; Buil, C.; Delmas, R.; Desnoux, V.; Jasinski, C.; Klotz, A.; Marchais, D.; Rieugnié, M.; Bouderand, G.; Cazard, J.-P.; Lambin, C.; Pujat, P.-O.; Schwartz, F.; Burlot, P.; Langlais, P.; Rivaud, S.; Brochard, E.; Dupouy, Ph.; Lavayssière, M.; Chaptal, O.; Daiffallah, K.; Clarasso-Llauger, C.; Aloy Doménech, J.; Gabaldá-Sánchez, M.; Otazu-Porter, X.; Fernández, D.; Masana, E.; Ardanuy, A.; Casas, R.; Ros, J. A.; Casarramona, F.; Schnabel, C.; Roca, A.; Labordena, C.; Canales-Moreno, O.; Ferrer, V.; Rivas, L.; Ortiz, J. L.; Fernández-Arozena, J.; Martín-Rodríguez, L. L.; Cidadão, A.; Coelho, P.; Figuereido, P.; Gonçalves, R.; Marciano, C.; Nunes, R.; Ré, P.; Saraiva, C.; Tonel, F.; Clérigo, J.; Oliveira, C.; Reis, C.; Ewen-Smith, B. M.; Ward, S.; Ford, D.; Gonçalves, J.; Porto, J.; Laurindo Sobrinho, J.; Teodoro de Gois, F.; Joaquim, M.; Afonso da Silva Mendes, J.; van Ballegoij, E.; Jones, R.; Callender, H.; Sutherland, W.; Bumgarner, S.; Imbert, M.; Mitchell, B.; Lockhart, J.; Barrow, W.; Cornwall, D.; Arnal, A.; Eleizalde, G.; Valencia, A.; Ladino, V.; Lizardo, T.; Guillén, C.; Sánchez, G.; Peña, A.; Radaelli, S.; Santiago, J.; Vieira, K.; Mendt, H.; Rosenzweig, P.; Naranjo, O.; Contreras, O.; Díaz, F.; Guzmán, E.; Moreno, F.; Omar Porras, L.; Recalde, E.; Mascaró, M.; Birnbaum, C.; Cósias, R.; López, E.; Pallo, E.; Percz, R.; Pulupa, D.; Simbaña, X.; Yajamín, A.; Rodas, P.; Denzau, H.; Kretlow, M.; Valdés Sada, P.; Hernández, R.; Hernández, A.; Wilson, B.; Castro, E.; Winkel, J. M.

    2009-02-01

    On September 8, 2001 around 2 h UT, the largest uranian moon, Titania, occulted Hipparcos star 106829 (alias SAO 164538, a V=7.2, K0 III star). This was the first-ever observed occultation by this satellite, a rare event as Titania subtends only 0.11 arcsec on the sky. The star's unusual brightness allowed many observers, both amateurs or professionals, to monitor this unique event, providing fifty-seven occultations chords over three continents, all reported here. Selecting the best 27 occultation chords, and assuming a circular limb, we derive Titania's radius: R=788.4±0.6km ( 1-σ error bar). This implies a density of ρ=1.711±0.005gcm using the value GM=(2.343±0.006)×10ms derived by Taylor [Taylor, D.B., 1998. Astron. Astrophys. 330, 362-374]. We do not detect any significant difference between equatorial and polar radii, in the limit r-r=-1.3±2.1km, in agreement with Voyager limb image retrieval during the 1986 flyby. Titania's offset with respect to the DE405 + URA027 (based on GUST86 theory) ephemeris is derived: Δαcos(δ)=-108±13 mas and Δδ=-62±7 mas (ICRF J2000.0 system). Most of this offset is attributable to a Uranus' barycentric offset with respect to DE405, that we estimate to be: Δαcos(δ)=-100±25mas and Δδ=-85±25 mas at the moment of occultation. This offset is confirmed by another Titania stellar occultation observed on August 1st, 2003, which provides an offset of Δαcos(δ)=-127±20 mas and Δδ=-97±13 mas for the satellite. The combined ingress and egress data do not show any significant hint for atmospheric refraction, allowing us to set surface pressure limits at the level of 10-20 nbar. More specifically, we find an upper limit of 13 nbar ( 1-σ level) at 70 K and 17 nbar at 80 K, for a putative isothermal CO 2 atmosphere. We also provide an upper limit of 8 nbar for a possible CH 4 atmosphere, and 22 nbar for pure N 2, again at the 1-σ level. We finally constrain the stellar size using the time-resolved star disappearance

  3. [Occultism, parapsychology and the esoteric from the perspective of psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Scharfetter, C

    1998-10-01

    The concepts and main themes of occultism, parapsychology and esoterics are set in comparison to religion, spirituality, mysticism. The cultural relativity of these concepts is emphasised. Occultism means dealing with phenomena, processes, and/or powers which are not accessible to "normal perception". The manipulation of such powers is effected via (white, black, grey) magic. Parapsychology, in its popular sense, deals with occult phenomena, whereas scientific parapsychology investigates them empirically. Esoterics is a complex of beliefs within a hermetic tradition about occult processes and about desting after death. Transpersonal psychology deals with these issues while calling them "spiritual". Effects of paranormal experiences and actions on the side of the actor as well as the adept are discussed: personality types, interpersonal effects, crises and psychoses (mediumistic psychoses). The concept of dissociation of subpersonalities (subselves) appears to be a viable perspective to explain these phenomena. In mediumistic psychoses, the splitting of non-ego parts of the psyche leads to a manifestation of schizophrenic symptoms. Dangers for mental health are an ego inflation by self-attribution of "superhuman" power. A personality disposition for parapsychological perception and/or action may be seen in schizotypia and similar near-psychotic "personalities up the border". Adepts of occultism may present with a "false self" in the sense of Winnicott.

  4. Radio Occultation Measurements of Pluto's Atmosphere with New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinson, D. P.; Linscott, I.; Tyler, G. L.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Strobel, D. F.; Summers, M. E.; Woods, W. W.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T.; Kammer, J.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. W.; Retherford, K. D.; Schindhelm, E.; Singer, K. N.; Steffl, A.; Tsang, C.; Versteeg, M.

    2015-12-01

    The reconnaissance of the Pluto System by New Horizons included radio occultations at both Pluto and Charon. This talk will present the latest results from the Pluto occultation. The REX instrument onboard New Horizons received and recorded uplink signals from two 70-m antennas and two 34-m antennas of the NASA Deep Space Network - each transmitting 20 kW at 4.2-cm wavelength - during a diametric occultation by Pluto. At the time this was written only a short segment of data at occultation entry (193°E, 17°S) was available for analysis. The REX measurements extend unequivocally to the surface, providing the first direct measure of the surface pressure and the temperature structure in Pluto's lower atmosphere. Preliminary analysis yields a surface pressure of about 10 microbars, smaller than expected. Data from occultation exit (16°E, 15°N) are scheduled to arrive on the ground in late August 2015. Those observations will yield an improved estimate of the surface pressure, a second temperature profile, and a measure of the diameter of Pluto with a precision of a few hundred meters.

  5. Crosslink Radio Occultation for the Remote Sensing of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Ao, C. O.; Asmar, S.; Edwards, C. D.; Kahan, D. S.; Paik, M.; Pi, X.; Williamson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Radio occultation utilizing deep space telecommunication signals has been used with great success in the profiling of planetary atmospheres and ionospheres since the 1960s. A shortcoming of this technique, however, is the limited temporal and spatial sampling that it provides. We consider a different approach where radio occultation measurements are taken between two spacecraft orbiting an extra-terrestrial body. Such "crosslink" radio occultations between the Global Positioning System satellites and low-earth orbiting spacecraft have been routinely acquired to provide global observations of the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere that are used for weather forecast, climate analysis, and space weather applications. The feasibility of applying this concept to other planets has recently been demonstrated for the first time, where crosslink occultation measurements have been acquired between the Mars Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. These measurements leverage the proximity link telecommunication payloads on each orbiter, which are nominally used to provide relay communication and navigation services to Mars landers and rovers. In this presentation, we will describe the Mars crosslink experiments and the corresponding data analysis in detail. In addition, we will discuss how the crosslink occultation concepts can be effectively applied in future space exploration missions.

  6. VO2 max is associated with ACE genotype in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, J M; Ferrell, R E; McCole, S D; Wilund, K R; Moore, G E

    1998-11-01

    Relationships have frequently been found between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype and various pathological and physiological cardiovascular outcomes and functions. Thus we sought to determine whether ACE genotype affected maximal O2 consumption (VO2 max) and maximal exercise hemodynamics in postmenopausal women with different habitual physical activity levels. Age, body composition, and habitual physical activity levels did not differ among ACE genotype groups. However, ACE insertion/insertion (II) genotype carriers had a 6.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1 higher VO2 max (P < 0.05) than the ACE deletion/deletion (DD) genotype group after accounting for the effect of physical activity levels. The ACE II genotype group also had a 3.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1 higher VO2 max (P < 0.05) than the ACE insertion/deletion (ID) genotype group. The ACE ID group tended to have a higher VO2 max than the DD genotype group, but the difference was not significant. ACE genotype accounted for 12% of the variation in VO2 max among women after accounting for the effect of habitual physical activity levels. The entire difference in VO2 max among ACE genotype groups was the result of differences in maximal arteriovenous O2 difference (a-vDO2). ACE genotype accounted for 17% of the variation in maximal a-vDO2 in these women. Maximal cardiac output index did not differ whatsoever among ACE genotype groups. Thus it appears that ACE genotype accounts for a significant portion of the interindividual differences in VO2 max among these women. However, this difference is the result of genotype-dependent differences in maximal a-vDO2 and not of maximal stroke volume and maximal cardiac output.

  7. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) -- A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new γ-ray astrophysics mission concept expected to have unprecedented sensitivity in the nuclear regime. Operating in lunar orbit, LOCO will utilize lunar occultation imaging to survey and probe the cosmos.

  8. Auto-Calibration of SOL-ACES in the EUV Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Brunner, R.; Eberhard, D.; Hofmann, A.; Klocke, U.; Knothe, M.; Konz, W.; Riedel, W.-J.; Wolf, H.

    The Sol-ACES (SOLAR Auto-Calibrating EUV/UV Spectrometers) experiment is prepared to be flown with the ESA SOLAR payload to the International Space Station as planned for the Shuttle mission E1 in August 2006. Four grazing incidence spectrometers of planar geometry cover the wavelength range from 16-220 nm with a spectral resolution from 0.5-2.3 nm. These high-efficiency spectrometers will be re-calibrated by two three-signal ionization chambers to be operated with 44 band pass filters on routine during the mission. Re-measuring the filter transmissions with the spectrometers also allows a very accurate determination of the changing second (optical) order efficiencies of the spectrometers as well as the stray light contributions to the spectral recording in different wavelength ranges. In this context the primary requirements for measurements of high radiometric accuracy will be discussed in detail. - The absorption gases of the ionization chambers are neon, xenon and a mixture of 10 % nitric oxide and 90 % xenon. As the laboratory measurements show that by this method secondary effects can be determined to a high degree resulting in very accurate irradiance measurements that is ranging from 5 to 3 % in absolute terms depending on the wavelegth range.

  9. Observations of the solar chromosphere in Kunming

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.; Li, Q.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the process of the solar total eclipse of February 16, 1980 in the chromospheric layers observed in Kunming, China. It also provides the moments of occultations of various active objects (including sunspots, flocculi, filaments and prominences) by the shadow of the Moon. They are important clues for the analyses of radio-astronomical, ionospheric, and various optical observations of the solar eclipse.

  10. Observations of the solar chromosphere in Kunming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Li, Q.

    1986-11-01

    The paper gives an account of the process of the solar total eclipse of February 16, 1980 in the chromospheric layers observed in Kunming, China. It also provides the moments of occultations of various active objects (including sunspots, flocculi, filaments and prominences) by the shadow of the moon. They are important clues for the analyses of radio-astronomical, ionospheric, and various optical observations of the solar eclipse.

  11. Observation and Interpretation of Lunar Occultations. Ph.D. Thesis; [Uranus and beta Capricorni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radick, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    The importance of timings and high resolution astrometry in occultation observations is discussed as well as the occultation process itself. The design and operation of the telescope, photodetector, and data acquisition systems are described. Methods are presented for data analysis and model fitting. Observations of beta Capricorni and Uranus occultations are examined. General conclusions concerning occultation observations are explored and future activities at Prairie Observatory are discussed.

  12. The occultation of HIP 106829 by Titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicardy, B.; Widemann, T.; Colas, F.; Lecacheux, J.; Pau, S.; Thuillot, W.; Beisker, W.; Birnbaum, C.; Hubbard, W. B.; Hill, R. E.; Porto, J.; López, E.; Cósias, R.; Pallo, Edgar; Percz, R.; Pulupa, D.; Simbaña, X.; Yajamín, A.; Recalde, E.

    2001-11-01

    The occultation of the bright star HIP 106829 (V= 7.2, type K0III, distance 170 pc) by the largest Uranian satellite Titania was successfully observed from Europe, several Atlantic and Caribbean islands, and from Southern America, around 2 UT, September 8, 2001. We report here preliminary results obtained from France (80-cm tel. Haute Provence, 100-cm tel. Pic du Midi), Aruba Island (20-cm tel.) and Ecuador (two 20-cm tel. and one 25-cm tel.), using CCD or video recordings, at repetition rates of several images per second. Various other observations, either visual or recorded, by amateurs from Great Britain, Spain, Portugal, Azores, Venezuela and Tobago are still being compiled at the submission date of this abstract. Preliminary examination of the data indicates that no atmosphere at the microbar level is detected near Titania's surface. A detailed analysis is still necessary, however, in order to detect (or put an upper limit on) a hypothetical atmosphere at the 0.1 microbar level or less. The timings of the event at various sites provide the position of Titania with respect to HIP 106829. This will yield the observed-calculated (O-C) shift to apply to Titania position (using the URA027+DE405 ephemeris) in the ICRF/J2000 system. Finally, the finite duration of the immersion and emersion of the star behind Titania will be used to constrain the physical size of this red giant star. Supports from the Programme National de Planétologie (France), Paris Observatory and the NASA Planetary Astronomy grant NAG5-4214 are acknowledged.

  13. Update on occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Makvandi, Manoochehr

    2016-01-01

    The event of mutations in the surface antigen gene of hepatitis B virus (HBV) results in undetectable hepatitis B surface antigen with positive/negative anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc) antibody status in serum and this phenomenon is named occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). The presence of anti-HBc antibody in serum is an important key for OBI tracking, although about 20% of OBI cases are negative for anti-HBc antibody. The diagnosis of OBI is mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR assays. However, real-time PCR is a more reliable method than PCR. OBI is a great issue for the public health problem and a challenge for the clinical entity worldwide. The persistence of OBI may lead to the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. With regard to OBI complications, the screening of HBV DNA by the highly sensitive molecular means should be implemented for: (1) patients with a previous history of chronic or acute HBV infection; (2) patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus; (3) patients undergoing chemotherapy or anti-CD20 therapy; (4) recipients of organ transplant; (5) blood donors; (6) organ transplant donors; (7) thalassemia and hemophilia patients; (8) health care workers; (9) patients with liver related disease (cryptogenic); (10) hemodialysis patients; (11) patients undergoing lamivudine or interferon therapy; and (12) children in time of HBV vaccination especially in highly endemic areas of HBV. Active HBV vaccination should be implemented for the close relatives of patients who are negative for OBI markers. Thus, the goal of this review is to evaluate the rate of OBI with a focus on status of high risk groups in different regions of the world. PMID:27818588

  14. Tropical Tropopause Structure and Processes as Observed with GPS Radio Occultation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delaTorre Juarez, Manuel; Schroder, Thomas M.; Ao, Chi O.

    2004-01-01

    The vertical temperature structure of the tropical atmosphere has been explained as controlled by the combined effect of three green house gases: water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone. Absorption by water vapor of the light reflected off the Earth's surface would determine the temperature lapse rate in the lower troposphere up to the bottom of the Tropical Transition Layer (TTL); radiative absorption by carbon dioxide would dominate the temperature lapse rate between the bottom of the TTL and the coldest point in the upper-troposphere, the cold point tropopause (CPT), and; absorption of incoming solar radiation by ozone would control the temperature above the CPT. The TTL region can thus be very sensitive to changes in the relative abundances of these greenhouse gases. In this contribution we describe the seasonal evolution of temperature profiles in the TTL and their longitudinal structure using GPS radio occultation.

  15. New orbits of irregular satellites designed for the predictions of stellar occultations up to 2020, based on thousands of new observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Assafin, M.; Beauvalet, L.; Desmars, J.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Morgado, B. E.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2016-10-01

    Gomes-Júnior et al. published 3613 positions for the eight largest irregular satellites of Jupiter and 1787 positions for the largest irregular satellite of Saturn, Phoebe. These observations were made between 1995 and 2014 and have an estimated error of about 60-80 mas. Based on this set of positions, we derived new orbits for the eight largest irregular satellites of Jupiter: Himalia, Elara, Pasiphae, Carme, Lysithea, Sinope, Ananke and Leda. For Phoebe we updated the ephemeris from Desmars et al. using 75 per cent more positions than the previous one. Because of their orbital characteristics, it is common belief that the irregular satellites were captured by the giant planets in the early Solar system, but there is no consensus for a single model explaining where they were formed. Size, shape, albedo and composition would help to trace back their true origin, but these physical parameters are yet poorly known for irregular satellites. The observation of stellar occultations would allow for the determination of such parameters. Indeed Jupiter will cross the galactic plane in 2019-2020 and Saturn in 2018, improving a lot the chances of observing such events in the near future. Using the derived ephemerides and the UCAC4 catalogue we managed to identify 5442 candidate stellar occultations between 2016 January and 2020 December for the nine satellites studied here. We discussed how the successful observation of a stellar occultation by these objects is possible and present some potential occultations.

  16. Detection of occult metastasis in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hawes, D; Neville, A M; Cote, R J

    2001-06-01

    The most important factor affecting the outcome of patients with invasive cancer is whether the tumor has spread, either regionally (to regional lymph nodes) or systemically. However, a proportion of patients with no evidence of systemic dissemination will develop recurrent disease after primary "curative" therapy. Clearly, these patients had occult systemic spread of disease that was undetectable by routinely employed methods (careful pathological, clinical, biochemical, and radiological evaluation). In addition, the success of adjuvant therapy is assumed to stem from its ability to eradicate occult metastases before they become clinically evident. Therefore, methods for the detection of occult metastases in patients with the earliest stage of cancer, i.e., prior to detection of metastases by any other clinical or pathological analysis, have received a great deal of attention.

  17. Benefits and harms of detecting clinically occult breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Amir, Eitan; Bedard, Philippe L; Ocaña, Alberto; Seruga, Bostjan

    2012-10-17

    Over the last few decades there has been an increase in the use of strategies to detect clinically occult breast cancer with the aim of achieving diagnosis at an earlier stage when prognosis may be improved. Such strategies include screening mammography in healthy women, diagnostic imaging and axillary staging in those diagnosed with breast cancer, and the use of follow-up imaging for the early detection of recurrent or metastatic disease. Some of these strategies are established, whereas for others there are inconsistent supportive data. Although the potential benefit of early detection of clinically occult breast cancer seems intuitive, use of such strategies can also be associated with harm. In this commentary, we provide an extended discussion on the potential benefits and harms of the routine and frequent use of screening interventions to detect clinically occult breast cancer and question whether we may be causing more harm than good.

  18. Designing asymmetric and branched petals for planet-finding occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric; Kasdin, N J; Shaklan, Stuart

    2010-01-18

    One of the proposed methods for finding small extrasolar planets is through use of an occulter, a spacecraft which flies in formation with a space-based telescope to block the light from a star, while leaving nearby planets unaffected. This is accomplished by placing the occulter far enough from the telescope to give it a small angular size, and by carefully choosing the shape to strongly suppress the starlight at the telescope aperture. For most designs, this shape takes the form of a number of bilaterally-symmetric structures called petals, arrayed about a circular central disk. In this paper, we show that the necessary number of petals may be reduced by the introduction of an asymmetry in the petal shape, and describe a a general procedure for producing such a shape by optimization for any occulter with petals. In addition, we show that permitting openings within each petal allows a number of additional modifications to be made without affecting the suppression.

  19. Scintillations during occultations by planets. 1. An approximate theory. [fresnel region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1975-01-01

    Scintillations observed during occultations of both stars and spacecraft by planetary atmospheres are discussed theoretically. The effects of severe flattening of the Fresnel zone or source image by defocusing on occultations are presented, along with temporal power spectra. Other topics discussed include atmospheric turbulence, saturation of scintillation, effects of saturation on occultation curves, and some methods for a more accurate determination of atmospheric structure.

  20. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment Earth Occultation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.; Finger, M. H.; Koshut, T. M.; McCollough, M. L.; Robinson, C. R.; Rubin, B. C.

    2002-01-01

    An Earth orbiting detector sensitive to gamma-ray photons will see step-like occultation features in its count rate when a gamma-ray point source crosses the Earth's limb. This is due to the change in atmospheric attenuation of the gamma rays along the line of sight. In an uncollimated detector, these occultation features can be used to locate and monitor astrophysical sources provided their signals can be individually separated from the detector background. We show that the Earth occultation technique applied to the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) is a viable and flexible all-sky monitor in the low-energy gamma-ray and hard X-ray energy range (20 keV-1 MeV). The method is an alternative to more sophisticated photon imaging devices for astronomy and can serve well as a cost-effective science capability for monitoring the high energy sky. Here we describe the Earth occultation technique for locating new sources and for measuring source intensity and spectra without the use of complex background models. Examples of transform imaging, step searches, spectra, and light curves are presented. Systematic uncertainties due to source confusion, detector response, and contamination from rapid background fluctuations are discussed and analyzed for their effect on intensity measurements. A sky location-dependent average systematic error is derived as a function of Galactic coordinates. The sensitivity of the technique is derived as a function of incident photon energy and also as a function of angle between the source and the normal to the detector entrance window. Occultations of the Crab Nebula by the Moon are used to calibrate Earth occultation flux measurements independent of possible atmospheric scattering effects.

  1. Detection of Small Kuiper Belt Objects by Stellar Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgevits, George

    2006-09-01

    We present here the results for the first attempt to survey the sub-kilometre radius KBO population by stellar occultation. Using the unique capabilities of the 1.2m UK Schmidt Telescope (Anglo Australian Observatory, Australia), in conjunction with the 6df Spectrograph, by simultaneously monitoring 100 suitably selected stars, we were able to embark upon an occultation observation program which yielded 7,000 hours of stellar light curves, with 10 millisecond resolution. Initial data reduction indicates that we have captured many events which resemble occultation events, in so far as the light curves of recorded events typically match that which may be expected when a small KBO occults a distant star. Logged events are spread over many pixels, with 10 pixels (corresponding to 100 milliseconds) being the typical event duration. By simultaneously monitoring many stars in the same field, false events are eliminated. Most runs monitored blue stars located at 2kpcs. As a sanity check, one night's observing monitored close F and G class stars in the same field. The event statistics for the distant and the close star cases are consistent with occultations caused by KBO's. As an additional confirmation, it was found that the observation results at 30o and 60o past opposition give the expected 50% fall in event rate due to the change in observing geometry. It is estimated that many of the events logged correspond to occultations which would be caused by objects down to 300m radius. As the next step, it is hoped to construct a purpose-built 2,000 fibre instrument and to conduct a complete survey of the Kuiper Belt. We wish to express our thanks to the Anglo Australian Observatory for their technical assistance and telescope time.

  2. Constraints on Pluto's Hazes from 2-Color Occultation Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, Kara; Barry, T.; Carriazo, C. Y.; Cole, A.; Gault, D.; Giles, B.; Giles, D.; Hill, K. M.; Howell, R. R.; Hudson, G.; Loader, B.; Mackie, J. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Rannou, P.; Regester, J.; Resnick, A.; Rodgers, T.; Sicardy, B.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Wasserman, L. H.; Watson, C. R.; Young, E. F.; Young, L. A.; Buie, M. W.; Nelson, M.

    2015-11-01

    The controversial question of aerosols in Pluto's atmosphere first arose in 1988, when features in a Pluto occultation lightcurve were alternately attributed to haze opacity (Elliot et al. 1989) or a thermal inversion (Eshleman 1989). A stellar occultation by Pluto in 2002 was observed from several telescopes on Mauna Kea in wavelengths ranging from R- to K-bands (Elliot et al. 2003). This event provided compelling evidence for haze on Pluto, since the mid-event baseline levels were systematically higher at longer wavelengths (as expected if there were an opacity source that scattered more effectively at shorter wavelengths). However, subsequent occultations in 2007 and 2011 showed no significant differences between visible and IR lightcurves (Young et al. 2011).The question of haze on Pluto was definitively answered by direct imaging of forward-scattering aerosols by the New Horizons spacecraft on 14-JUL-2015. We report on results of a bright stellar occultation which we observed on 29-JUN-2015 in B- and H-bands from both grazing and central sites. As in 2007 and 2011, we see no evidence for wavelength-dependent extinction. We will present an analysis of haze parameters (particle sizes, number density profiles, and fractal aggregations), constraining models of haze distribution to those consistent with and to those ruled out by the occultation lightcurves and the New Horizons imaging.References:Elliot, J.L., et al., "Pluto's Atmosphere." Icarus 77, 148-170 (1989)Eshleman, V.R., "Pluto's Atmosphere: Models based on refraction, inversion, and vapor pressure equilibrium." Icarus 80 439-443 (1989)Elliot, J.L., et al., "The recent expansion of Pluto's atmosphere." Nature 424 165-168 (2003)Young, E.F., et al., "Search for Pluto's aerosols: simultaneous IR and visible stellar occultation observations." EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011, held 2-7 October 2011 in Nantes, France (2011)

  3. Deriving Saturn's Zonal Winds from Cassini Radio Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Schinder, Paul J.

    2015-11-01

    Tracking cloud features from visible images have provided detailed maps of the meridional variation of the mean zonal winds on the giant planets, including Saturn. Filters at different wavelengths can provide information on the vertical structure of the zonal winds, but that is approximate, and the altitudes of winds observed with a given filter generally vary with location, because cloud heights do. Radio occultations provide vertical profiles of refractivity, pressure, and temperature vs. altitude. Zonal winds can be derived from the assumption of gradient wind balance, which relates the zonal wind to the change of geopotential height with latitude along an isobar. Occultations have the advantage that vertical profiles of winds can be obtained in the troposphere and stratosphere. There are, however, complicating factors. In general, the meridional distribution of occultation soundings is limited and unevenly distributed. Moreover, one needs to know the geometry of the occulting atmosphere to correctly account for the path of the refracted radio signal. The zonal winds matter, because they distort isobaric surfaces. For example, an inversion that includes Saturn's oblateness from uniform rotation, based on the Voyager System III period, would yield equatorial temperature profiles that are shifted by ~ 2 K relative to one that also includes the differential rotation associated with the cloud-tracked zonal winds. In retrieving vertical profiles of atmospheric variables from occultation soundings, one also needs an additional symmetry assumption to make the inversions tractable. Typically one uses the zonal winds based on cloud-tracking studies, and assumes they are axisymmetric and barotropic, so that both the gravitational and centrifugal forces are derivable from a potential, and the surfaces of constant geopotential height, pressure, and temperature coincide. This forms the basis for an iterative approach. The pressures and temperatures so retrieved from the

  4. GRAS radio occultation on-board of Metop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Engeln, A.; Andres, Y.; Marquardt, C.; Sancho, F.

    2011-01-01

    The GRAS radio occultation instrument is flying on Metop-A and belongs to the EPS (EUMETSAT Polar System). GRAS observes GPS satellites in occultation. Within this work, validation of GRAS closed-loop bending angle data against co-located ECMWF profiles extracted from model fields and occultations from the COSMIC constellation of radio occultation instruments is shown. Results confirm the high data quality and robustness, where GRAS shows lower bending angle noise against ECMWF than COSMIC and in terms of occultations per day, one GRAS ≈ two COSMIC satellites. This is partly due to the operational setup of EPS. For the investigation we focus on two observation periods where updates in the ECMWF (March 2009) and COSMIC processing (October 2009) have improved the statistics further. Bending angles biases agree to within 0.5% against ECMWF and to within 0.1% against COSMIC after the updates for altitudes between 8 and 40 km. In addition, we also analyze the impact of the Metop orbit processing on the derived GRAS bending angle data, where different GPS and Metop orbit solutions are analyzed. Results show that a batch based orbit processing would improve in particular the bending angle bias behavior at higher altitudes. Requirements for the operational processing of GRAS data are briefly outlined, options to ease the use of other positioning system satellites in the near future are discussed. A simplified analysis on the observation of several of these systems, e.g. GPS and Galileo, from one platform shows that about 16% of occultations are found within 300 km, ±3 h, thus providing similar information. A constellation of 2 GRAS like instruments would have only about 10% close-by.

  5. GOMOS: Gobal Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leppelmeier, G. W.; Kyrola, E.; Pellinen, R.; Merat, P.; Korpela, S.; Bertaux, J. L.; Chassefiere, E.; Dalaudier, F.; Megie, G.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on the progress and status of the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument, and imaging spectrometer under development for flight on the European Space Agency's Polar Orbiting Earth Mission (POEM-1) mission in 1998. Employing occultation of stars as a light probe of the Earth's atmosphere from a sun-sychronous polar orbit, the instrument will monitor ozone and other atmospheric trace gases over the entire globe. Atmospheric transmission resolution of approximately 1.7 km. When data are combined regionally, it will be possible to detect ozone concentration trends as small as 0.05 percent/year, depending on the degree of combination.

  6. The mermaid malformation: cloacal exstrophy and occult spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A R

    1991-06-01

    Five infants with cloacal exstrophy underwent neurological evaluation and radiographic examination of the caudal spine shortly after birth. Each was found to have occult spinal dysraphism. Four had terminal myelocystoceles, and one had a lipomyelomeningocele. Pathological anatomy was confirmed during surgery for the release of the tethered spinal cords. The striking association between cloacal exstrophy and occult spinal dysraphism suggests a common developmental defect in the caudal pole of the embryo. A hypothesis is offered to explain this association. Terminal myelocystocele and lipomyelomeningocele appear to be part of a continuum of lesions associated with skin-covered spina bifida.

  7. Cassini UVIS highest resolution occultations of Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Esposito, L. W.; Colwell, J.

    2013-10-01

    Since the beginning of the Cassini mission in 2004 the UVIS instrument has recorded >100 stellar occultations of Saturn's rings. Despite achieved radial resolutions of <1m true resolution is limited by the orbital motion of particles. These can move by almost 20m during a 1ms integration period, effectively smearing the ring profile. In order to achieve superior true resolution we designed a special type of observations, dubbed tracking occultations, where the spacecraft velocity projected onto the rings cancels the orbital motion of ring particles. The ring particles are thus nearly motionless in the field of view of UVIS instrument and essentially tracked. So far Cassini UVIS has recorded two "tracking" occultations of mid-A ring, one of the inner A ring, and one of the so called A ring ramp (a transition region between Cassini division and A ring). The occultations have at least 2m true resolution limited only by diffraction. The two mid-A ring occultations for the first time directly resolve the self-gravity (SG) Toomre like wakes. The SG wakes show as a train of opaque regions (tau>1.5) and nearly transparent gaps (tau<0.05). The observed opaque wakes can be as large as 200m, while transparent gaps are somewhat shorter (L<100m). The opaque and transparent regions are interspersed with material in an intermittent state (0.05occultation of the A ring ramp also reveals clear SG wakes. While the image is still of a chain of wakes and gaps, the wake region is not opaque nor is the transition between a gap and wake state as sharp. The structures are about 5 times smaller compared to mid-A ring, indicating a much smaller surface density. The inner A ring "tracking" occultation turns to be the most surprising since it doesn't show any clear SG wakes. While statistical and spectral analysis of the data show that some kind of structure is present there is no clear ubiquitous sign of classical SG wakes as in other 3 "tracking

  8. The occultation of AG+29 deg 398 by 98 Minerva

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Bowell, E.; Franz, O. G.; Nye, R.; Osborn, W.; Klemola, A.

    1984-01-01

    On 22 Nov. 1982, the asteroid 93 Minerva occulted AG-29 deg 398 (= SAO 76O17A), a seventh magnitude star of AO spectral type. The data were best fitted by a circular limb profile having a diameter of 170.8 + or - 1.4 km, a value that agrees well with the published radiometric diameter for this asteroid. However, evidence of significant departure from a spherical shape is found in the occultation observations and in photometric measurements of Minerva. Additional observations are required to specify difinitively the three dimensional figure of Minerva.

  9. The occultation of AG + 29 deg 398 by 93 Minerva

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Bowell, E.; Franz, O. G.; Nye, R.; Osborn, W.; Klemola, A.

    1985-01-01

    The occultation of AG + 29 deg 398 by 93 Minerva on 22 November 1982 was successfully observed at 10 sites. The data are best fitted by a circular limb profile having a diameter of 170.8 + or - 1.4 km, a value that agrees well with the published radiometric diameter for this asteroid. However, evidence of significant departure from a spherical shape is found in the occultation observations and in photometric measurements of Minerva made at Lowell Observatory over several months. Additional observations are needed to specify definitively the three-dimensional figure of Minerva.

  10. Cassini First Diametric Radio Occultation of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, E.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.; Kliore, A.; Flasar, M.; Nagy, A.; Ambrosini, R.; McGhee, C.; Schinder, P.; Anabtawi, A.; Barbinis, E.; Goltz, G.; Thomson, F.; Wong, K.

    2005-05-01

    We present preliminary results expected from the first planned Cassini radio occultation observation of Saturn's rings, to be conducted on May 3rd, 2005. The path of Cassini as seen from Earth (the occultation track) has been designed to cross the rings from the west to the east ansa almost diametrically, allowing for occultation of all major ring features at two widely separated longitudes (about 180 deg apart). The duration of the geometric occultation is about 1.5 hours on each side. During the occultation, Cassini transmits through the rings three coherent monochromatic radio signals of wavelength 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm (Ka-, X-, and S-band respectively), a capability unique to Cassini. The perturbed signals received at the Earth are recorded at the NASA DSN complexes at Goldstone and Canberra. Both direct and forward-scattered components of the signal may be identified in spectrograms of the received signals. The time history of the extinction of the direct signal is expected to yield high-spatial-resolution optical depth and phase shift profiles of ring structure. The timing of the occultation was optimized to allow probing the rings when the ring-opening-angle B (the angle between the line-of-sight and the ring plane) is relatively large (B = 23 deg), hence maximizing chances of measuring for the first time the structure of the relatively optically thick Ring B. In a similar experiment by Voyager in 1980, excessive signal attenuation along the long path within the nearly closed rings (B = 5.9 deg) limited the utility of the observations in relatively thick ring regions, in particular the main Ring B. For the Cassini optimized occultation geometry, a large B, slow radial velocity along the occultation track, and much improved phase stability of the reference ultrastable oscillator (USO) on board Cassini combine to promise achievable radial resolution approaching 100 m over a good fraction of the rings. Measurement of the amplitude and phase of the diffracted

  11. Structure of human ACE gives new insights into inhibitor binding and design.

    PubMed

    Brew, Keith

    2003-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a primary target of drugs used for controlling hypertension. A new X-ray crystallographic structure of the key catalytic domain of ACE provides detailed information about the structure of its active site, located in a deep channel, and its interactions with an inhibitor. Such information might facilitate the rational design of ACE inhibitors that are more potent and more selective and therefore of clinical use.

  12. Accessory cholera enterotoxin, Ace, from Vibrio cholerae: structure, unfolding, and virstatin binding.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Mukherjee, Debadrita; Dey, Sucharita; Pal, Aritrika; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2011-04-12

    Vibrio cholerae accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) is the third toxin, along with cholera toxin (CT) and zonula occludens toxin (Zot), that causes the endemic disease cholera. Structural characterization of Ace has been restricted because of the limited production of this toxic protein by V. cholerae. We have cloned, overexpressed, and purified Ace from V. cholerae strain O395 in Escherichia coli to homogeneity and determined its biological activity. The unfolding of the purified protein was investigated using circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Because Ace is predominantly a hydrophobic protein, the degree of exposure of hydrophobic regions was identified from the spectral changes of the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-binaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid (bis-ANS) that quenches the fluorescence of tryptophan residues of Ace in a concentration-dependent manner. Results showed that bis-ANS binds one monomeric unit of Ace with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a K' of 0.72 μM. Ace exists as a dimer, with higher oligomeric forms appearing upon glutaraldehyde cross-linking. This study also reports the binding of virstatin, a small molecule that inhibits virulence regulation in V. cholerae, to Ace. The binding constant (K=9×10(4) M(-1)) and the standard free energy change (ΔG°=-12 kcal mol(-1)) of Ace-virstatin interaction have been evaluated by the fluorescence quenching method. The binding does not affect the oligomeric status of Ace. A cell viability assay of the antibacterial activity of Ace has been performed using various microbial strains. A homology model of Ace, consistent with the experimental results, has been constructed.

  13. Brain ACE2 shedding contributes to the development of neurogenic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Lazartigues, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Over-activity of the brain Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a major contributor to neurogenic hypertension. While over-expression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) has been shown to be beneficial in reducing hypertension by transforming Angiotensin (Ang)-II into Ang-(1-7), several groups have reported decreased brain ACE2 expression and activity during the development of hypertension. Objective We hypothesized that ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding results in decreased membrane-bound ACE2 in the brain, thus promoting the development of neurogenic hypertension. Methods and Results To test this hypothesis, we used the DOCA-salt model of neurogenic hypertension in non-transgenic (NT) and syn-hACE2 mice over-expressing ACE2 in neurons. DOCA-salt treatment in NT mice led to significant increases in blood pressure, hypothalamic Ang-II levels, inflammation, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, autonomic dysfunction, as well as decreased hypothalamic ACE2 activity and expression, while these changes were blunted or prevented in syn-hACE2 mice. In addition, reduction of ACE2 expression and activity in the brain paralleled a rise in ACE2 activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of NT mice following DOCA-salt treatment and was accompanied by enhanced ADAM17 expression and activity in the hypothalamus. Chronic knockdown of ADAM17 in the brain blunted the development of hypertension and restored ACE2 activity and baroreflex function. Conclusions Our data provide the first evidence that ADAM17-mediated shedding impairs brain ACE2 compensatory activity, thus contributing to the development of neurogenic hypertension. PMID:24014829

  14. ACE-Asia Aerosol Optical Depth and Water Vapor Measured by Airborne Sunphotometers and Related to Other Measurements and Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J. A.; Ramirez, S. A.; Kahn, R.; Hegg, D.; Pilewskie, P.; Anderson, T.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the Spring 2001 phase of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the 6-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated on 15 of the 19 research flights of the NCAR C-130, while its 14-channel counterpart (AATS- 14) flew successfully on all 18 research flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter. ACE-Asia studied aerosol outflow from the Asian continent to the Pacific basin. It was designed to integrate suborbital and satellite measurements and models so as to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosols. AATS-6 and AATS-14 measured solar beam transmission at 6 and 14 wavelengths (380-1021 and 354-1558 nm, respectively), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and column water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol extinction spectra and water vapor concentration. The wavelength dependence of these AOD and extinction spectra indicates that supermicron dust was often a major component of the ACE-Asia aerosol. Frequently this dust-containing aerosol extended to high altitudes. For example, in AATS- 14 profiles analyzed to date, 36% of full-column AOD at 525 nm was above 3 km. In contrast, only 10% of CWV was above 3 km. Analyses and applications of AATS-6 and AATS-14 data to date include comparisons to (i) extinction products derived using in situ measurements, (ii) extinction profiles derived from lidar measurements, and (iii) AOD retrievals from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) aboard the TERRA satellite. Other planned collaborative studies include comparisons to results from size spectrometers, chemical measurements, other satellite sensors, flux radiometers, and chemical transport models. Early results of these studies will be presented.

  15. ACE2 orthologues in non-mammalian vertebrates (Danio, Gallus, Fugu, Tetraodon and Xenopus).

    PubMed

    Chou, Chih-Fong; Loh, Chay Boon; Foo, Yik Khoon; Shen, Shuo; Fielding, Burtram C; Tan, Timothy H P; Khan, Sehaam; Wang, Yue; Lim, Seng Gee; Hong, Wanjin; Tan, Yee-Joo; Fu, Jianlin

    2006-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a newly identified member in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), acts as a negative regulator of ACE. It is mainly expressed in cardiac blood vessels and the tubular epithelia of kidneys and abnormal expression has been implicated in diabetes, hypertension and heart failure. The mechanism and physiological function of this zinc metallopeptidase in mammals are not yet fully understood. Non-mammalian vertebrate models offer attractive and simple alternatives that could facilitate the exploration of ACE2 function. In this paper we report the in silico analysis of Ace2 genes from the Gallus (chicken), Xenopus (frog), Fugu and Tetraodon (pufferfish) genome assembly databases, and from the Danio (zebrafish) cDNA library. Exon ambiguities of Danio and Xenopus Ace2s were resolved by RT-PCR and 3'RACE. Analyses of the exon-intron structures, alignment, phylogeny and hydrophilicity plots, together with the conserved synteny among these vertebrates, support the orthologous relationship between mammalian and non-mammalian ACE2s. The putative promoters of Ace2 from human, Tetraodon and Xenopus tropicalis drove the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) specifically in the heart tissue of transgenic Xenopus thus making it a suitable model for future functional genomic studies. Additionally, the search for conserved cis-elements resulted in the discovery of WGATAR motifs in all the putative Ace2 promoters from 7 different animals, suggesting a possible role of GATA family transcriptional factors in regulating the expression of Ace2.

  16. CD36/Sirtuin 1 Axis Impairment Contributes to Hepatic Steatosis in ACE2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Penninger, Josef M.; Santos, Robson Augusto S.; Bader, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system. Since angiotensin peptides have been shown to be involved in hepatic steatosis, we aimed to evaluate the hepatic lipid profile in ACE2-deficient (ACE2−/y) mice. Methods. Male C57BL/6 and ACE2−/y mice were analyzed at the age of 3 and 6 months for alterations in the lipid profiles of plasma, faeces, and liver and for hepatic steatosis. Results. ACE2−/y mice showed lower body weight and white adipose tissue at all ages investigated. Moreover, these mice had lower levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids in plasma. Strikingly, ACE2−/y mice showed high deposition of lipids in the liver. Expression of CD36, a protein involved in the uptake of triglycerides in liver, was increased in ACE2−/y mice. Concurrently, these mice exhibited an increase in hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and expression of uncoupling protein 2, and downregulation of sirtuin 1. ACE2−/y mice also showed impairments in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the liver. Conclusions. Deletion of ACE2 causes CD36/sirtuin 1 axis impairment and thereby interferes with lipid homeostasis, leading to lipodystrophy and steatosis. PMID:28101297

  17. Calmodulin interacts with angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and inhibits shedding of its ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel W; Clarke, Nicola E; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2008-01-23

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is a regulatory protein of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and a receptor for the causative agent of severe-acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the SARS-coronavirus. We have previously shown that ACE2 can be shed from the cell surface in response to phorbol esters by a process involving TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE; ADAM17). In this study, we demonstrate that inhibitors of calmodulin also stimulate shedding of the ACE2 ectodomain, a process at least partially mediated by a metalloproteinase. We also show that calmodulin associates with ACE2 and that this interaction is decreased by calmodulin inhibitors.

  18. The Aspergillus fumigatus Transcription Factor Ace2 Governs Pigment Production, Conidiation and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ejzykowicz, Daniele E.; Cunha, Marcel M.; Rozental, Sonia; Solis, Norma V.; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Sheppard, Donald C.; Filler, Scott G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Aspergillus fumigatus causes serious and frequently fatal infections in immunocompromised patients. To investigate the regulation of virulence of this fungus, we constructed and analyzed an A. fumigatus mutant that lacked the transcription factor Ace2, which influences virulence in other fungi. The Δace2 mutant had dysmorphic conidiophores, reduced conidia production, and abnormal conidial cell wall architecture. This mutant produced an orange pigment when grown on solid media, although its conidia had normal pigmentation. Conidia of the Δace2 mutant were larger and had accelerated germination. The resulting germlings were resistant to hydrogen peroxide, but not other stressors. Non-neutropenic mice that were immunosuppressed with cortisone acetate and infected with the Δace2 mutant had accelerated mortality, greater pulmonary fungal burden, and increased pulmonary inflammatory responses compared to mice infected with the wild-type or Δace2∷ace2 complemented strains. The Δace2 mutant had reduced ppoC, ecm33, and ags3 mRNA expression. It is known that A. fumigatus mutants with absent or reduced expression of these genes have increased virulence in mice, as well as other phenotypic similarities to the Δace2 mutant. Therefore, reduced expression of these genes likely contributes to the increased virulence of the Δace2 mutant. PMID:19220748

  19. CD36/Sirtuin 1 Axis Impairment Contributes to Hepatic Steatosis in ACE2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Alenina, Natalia; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Penninger, Josef M; Santos, Robson Augusto S; Bader, Michael; Rabelo, Luiza A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system. Since angiotensin peptides have been shown to be involved in hepatic steatosis, we aimed to evaluate the hepatic lipid profile in ACE2-deficient (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Methods. Male C57BL/6 and ACE2(-/y) mice were analyzed at the age of 3 and 6 months for alterations in the lipid profiles of plasma, faeces, and liver and for hepatic steatosis. Results. ACE2(-/y) mice showed lower body weight and white adipose tissue at all ages investigated. Moreover, these mice had lower levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids in plasma. Strikingly, ACE2(-/y) mice showed high deposition of lipids in the liver. Expression of CD36, a protein involved in the uptake of triglycerides in liver, was increased in ACE2(-/y) mice. Concurrently, these mice exhibited an increase in hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and expression of uncoupling protein 2, and downregulation of sirtuin 1. ACE2(-/y) mice also showed impairments in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the liver. Conclusions. Deletion of ACE2 causes CD36/sirtuin 1 axis impairment and thereby interferes with lipid homeostasis, leading to lipodystrophy and steatosis.

  20. Rediscovering ACE: Novel insights into the many roles of the angiotensin-converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Janjulia, Tea; Taylor, Brian; Giani, Jorge F.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Shi, Peng D.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Bernstein, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is best known for the catalytic conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. However, the use of gene-targeting techniques has led to mouse models highlighting many other biochemical properties and actions of this enzyme. This review discusses recent studies examining the functional significance of ACE tissue-specific expression and the presence in ACE of two independent catalytic sites with distinct substrates and biological effects. It is these features which explain why ACE makes important contributions to many different physiological processes including renal development, blood pressure control, inflammation and immunity. PMID:23686164

  1. RNAi of ace1 and ace2 in Blattella germanica reveals their differential contribution to acetylcholinesterase activity and sensitivity to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, L; Piulachs, M D; Bellés, X; Castañera, P; Ortego, F; Díaz-Ruíz, J R; Hernández-Crespo, P; Tenllado, F

    2009-12-01

    Cyclorrhapha insect genomes contain a single acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene while other insects contain at least two ace genes (ace1 and ace2). In this study we tested the hypothesis that the two ace paralogous from Blattella germanica have different contributions to AChE activity, using RNA interference (RNAi) to knockdown each one individually. Paralogous-specific depletion of Bgace transcripts was evident in ganglia of injected cockroaches, although the effects at the protein level were less pronounced. Using spectrophotometric and zymogram measurements, we obtained evidence that BgAChE1 represents 65-75% of the total AChE activity in nerve tissue demonstrating that ace1 encodes a predominant AChE. A significant increase in sensitivity of Bgace1-interfered cockroaches was observed after 48 h of exposure to chlorpyrifos. In contrast, Bgace2 knockdown had a negligible effect on mortality to this organophosphate. These results point out a key role, qualitative and/or quantitative, of AChE1 as target of organophosphate insecticides in this species. Silencing the expression of Bgace1 but not Bgace2 also produced an increased mortality in insects when synergized with lambda-cyhalothrin, a situation which resembles the synergistic effects observed between organophosphates and pyrethroids. Gene silencing of ace genes by RNAi offers an exciting approach for examining a possible functional differentiation in ace paralogous.

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors modulate cellular retinol-binding protein 1 and adiponectin expression in adipocytes via the ACE-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Trouvain, Caroline; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fichtlscherer, Stephan; Fleming, Ingrid

    2009-03-01

    Inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) decrease angiotensin II production and activate an intracellular signaling cascade that affects gene expression in endothelial cells. Because ACE inhibitors have been reported to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, we determined ACE signaling-modulated gene expression in endothelial cells and adipocytes. Using differential gene expression analysis, several genes were identified that were 3-fold up- or down-regulated by ramiprilat in cells expressing wild-type ACE versus cells expressing a signaling-dead ACE mutant. One up-regulated gene was the cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1). In adipocytes, the overexpression of CRBP1 enhanced (4- to 5-fold) the activity of promoters containing response elements for retinol-dependent nuclear receptors [retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR)] or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). CRBP1 overexpression also enhanced the promoter activity (by 470 +/- 40%) and expression/release of the anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic adipokine adiponectin (cellular adiponectin by 196 +/- 24%, soluble adiponectin by 228 +/- 74%). Significantly increased adiponectin secretion was also observed after ACE inhibitor treatment of human preadipocytes, an effect prevented by small interfering RNA against CRBP1. Furthermore, in ob/ob mice, ramipril markedly potentiated both the basal (approximately 2-fold) and rosiglitazonestimulated circulating levels of adiponectin. In patients with coronary artery disease or type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibition also significantly increased plasma adiponectin levels (1.6- or 2.1-fold, respectively). In summary, ACE inhibitors affect adipocyte homeostasis via CRBP1 through the activation of RAR/RXR-PPAR signaling and up-regulation of adiponectin. The latter may contribute to the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors on the development of type 2 diabetes in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system.

  3. The electron thermal structure in the dayside Martian ionosphere implied by the MGS radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Zhang, S. J.; Vigren, E.; Zou, H.

    2015-02-01

    We propose a revised Chapman model for the ionosphere of Mars by allowing for vertical variation of electron temperature. An approximate energy balance between solar EUV heating and CO2 collisional cooling is applied in the dayside Martian ionosphere, analogous to the method recently proposed by Withers et al. (2014). The essence of the model is to separate the contributions of the neutral and electron thermal structures to the apparent width of the main ionospheric layer. Application of the model to the electron density profiles from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation measurements reveals a clear trend of elevated electron temperature with increasing solar zenith angle (SZA). It also reveals that the characteristic length scale for the change of electron temperature with altitude decreases with increasing SZA. These observations may imply enhanced topside heat influx near the terminator, presumably an outcome of the solar wind interactions with the Martian upper atmosphere. Our analysis also reveals a tentative asymmetry in electron temperature between the northern and southern hemispheres, consistent with the scenario of elevated electron temperature within minimagnetospheres.

  4. Helium at Interplanetary Discontinuities: ACE STEREO Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Allegrini, F.; Desai, M.; Klecker, B.; Popecki, M.; Farrugia, C.; Galvin, A.; Bochsler, P.; Karrer, R.; Opitz, A.; Simunac, K.

    2007-12-01

    ACE/SEPICA observations showed that, on average, energetic He+ is after H+ and He2+ the third most abundant energetic particle species in the heliosphere. Depending on the type of the energetic population the He+/He2+ ratio can reach unusually high values in the energy range 250 - 800keV/n ratios up to unity. As a major source of energetic He+ interplanetary pickup ions have been identified that are preferentially accelerated at co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), transient interaction regions (TIRs), and interplanetary traveling shocks. Most recent data from STEREO/PLASTIC in the energy range of 0.2-80keV/Q show clear evidence of abundant He+ at interplanetary discontinuities. Thus PLASTIC extends the energy range into injection region of the source. Furthermore, ACE/ULEIS and ACE/SEPICA measurements showed that very often 3He2+ and He+ are also accelerated simultaneously at CME-driven IP shocks. This is surprising because, these to species originate from different sources. However, this may indicate that the injection, or the acceleration efficiency of the accelerator for different source population may be similar. From observations, however, this cannot be differentiated easily. In numerical simulations this can be done because there is control over species and distribution functions. In a numerical study we applied test particle simulations and multi-dimensional hybrid simulations to address the contribution of source, injection and acceleration efficiency at shocks to the variability of the helium ratio. These, simulations with and without superimposed turbulence in the shock region will be compared with observations.

  5. GPS Radio Occultation With Champ: The First Year of The Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, J.; Beyerle, G.; Marquardt, C.; Schmidt, T.; Reigber, Ch.; König, R.; Grunwaldt, L.

    The GPS radio occultation experiment onboard the German CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) satellite was started on February 11, 2001. During an one hour measurement period seven occultation events were recorded. Already these first mea- surements indicated that in spite of the activated anti-spoofing (A/S) mode of the GPS the state-of-the-art GPS flight receiver combined with favorable antenna characteris- tics allows for global atmosphere sounding with high accuracy and vertical resolution. More than 50,000 occultations are expected as of April 2002. The first year of the CHAMP occultation experiment is reviewed. The occultation infrastructure at the Ge- oForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam and the operational occultation data processing is characterized. An overview of GFZSs operational data processing, the scientific data analysis and the results of the first year occultation experiment is given. The quality of CHAMPSs occultation data products (vertical atmospheric profiles) is evaluated. Re- sults of data analysis using wave optic methods are presented, e.g. contributions from signals, reflected from EarthSs surface, were found in the occultation data in about 20-30% of the measurements using a radio holographic analysis. Furthermore, the termination of the Selective Availability (SA) mode of the GPS made the application of less-than-double-differencing techniques for GPS occultation analysis feasible. Re- sults of occultation data processing using a space-based single differencing technique are compared with those generated by double differencing as a reference.

  6. Pluto-Charon stellar occultation candidates - 1990-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, E. W.; Mcdonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A search to identify stars that might be occulted by Pluto or Charon during the period 1990-1995 and part of 1996 is studied. This search was made with an unfiltered CCD camera operated in the strip scanning mode, and it reaches an R magnitude of approximately 17.5 - about 1.5 mag fainter than previous searches. Circumstances for each of the 162 potential occultations are given, including an approximate R magnitude of the star, which allows estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for observation of each occultation. The faintest stars in the list would yield an S/N of about 20 for a 1 s integration when observed with a CCD detector on an 8 m telescope under a dark sky. The astrometric precision (+/- 0.2 arcsec, with larger systematic errors possible for individual cases) is insufficient to serve as a final prediction for these potential occultations, but is sufficient to identify stars deserving of further, more accurate, astrometric observations. Statistically, about 32 of these events to be observable somewhere on earth are expected. The number of events actually observed will be substantially smaller because of clouds and the sparse distribution of large telescopes. Finder charts for each of the 91 stars involved are presented.

  7. Pluto-Charon Stellar Occultation Candidates: 1990-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, E. W.; McDonald, S. W.; Elliot, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    We have carried out a search to identify stars that might be occulted by Pluto or Charon during the period 1990-1995 and part of 1996. This search was made with an unfiltered CCD camera operated in the strip scanning mode, and it reaches an R magnitude of approximately 17.5-about 1.5 mag fainter than previous searches. Circumstances for each of the 162 potential occultations are given, including an approximate R magnitude of the star, which allows estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for observation of each occultation. The faintest stars in our list would yield an S/N of about 20 for a 1 S integration when observed with a CCD detector on an 8 m telescope under a dark sky. Our astrometric precision (+/- 0.2 arcsec, with larger systematic errors possible for individual cases) is insufficient to serve as a final prediction for these potential occultations, but is sufficient to identify stars deserving of further, more accurate, astrometric observations. Statistically, we expect about 32 of these events to be observable somewhere on Earth. The number of events actually observed will be substantially smaller because of clouds and the sparse distribution of large telescopes. Finder charts for each of the 91 stars involved are presented.

  8. Occult Dirofilariosis in Dogs of North Eastern Region in India

    PubMed Central

    Borthakur, Sonjoy Kumar; Deka, Dilip Kumar; Islam, Saidul; Sarmah, Prabhat Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Background: The North Eastern Region in India is endemic for canine heartworm disease but in clinics accurate diagnosis is some times difficult. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of occult infections for heartworm disease in canine in two geographical regions of North Eastern India. Methods: A total of 782 numbers of three categories of dogs namely, working dogs of military and paramilitary forces, pet dogs and stray dogs were screened for the presence of heartworm infection from August 2011 to July, 2012 in Guwahati (Assam) and Aizawl (Mizoram). Conventional, immunological and molecular techniques were followed for this epidemiological study. The criteria to determine the occult heartworm cases were based on the differences between heartworm positive cases in PCR test and antigen ELISA test. Results: The findings revealed an overall 22.69 percent occult case. The working dogs had highest prevalence (60%) followed by pet (29.16%) and stray dogs (17.75%). Conclusion: The highest percentage of occult heartworm infection was present in working dogs maintained under military or paramilitary forces. PMID:27047976

  9. A first demonstration of Mars crosslink occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, C. O.; Edwards, C. D.; Kahan, D. S.; Pi, X.; Asmar, S. W.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    A series of three crosslink occultation experiments have been acquired between the Mars Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft to probe the Martian atmosphere in 2007. While crosslink occultations between Earth-orbiting satellites have been used to profile the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere since 1995, this represents the first demonstration of crosslink occultation measurements at another planet. These measurements leverage the proximity link telecommunication payloads on each orbiter, which are nominally used to provide relay communication and navigation services to Mars landers and rovers. Analysis of the observed Doppler shift on each crosslink measurement reveals a clear signature of the Martian atmosphere, primarily the ionosphere. Inversion of the observed Doppler data yields vertical profiles of the Martian refractivity and electron density. The electron density profiles show the presence of two layers with peak densities and peak heights that are consistent with empirical model results. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and future potential of the crosslink radio occultation technique in the exploration of planetary atmospheres.

  10. Observational Results from the 2007 March 18 Pluto Stellar Occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Babcock, B. A.; Souza, S. P.; McKay, A. J.; Person, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.; Gulbis, A. A.; Zuluaga, C. A.; Hill, J. M.; Ryan, E. V.; Ryan, W. H.

    2007-10-01

    Our consortium observed the 5-minute occultation by Pluto of the star we call P445.3 (2UCAC 25823784, UCAC magnitude 15.3; McDonald and Elliot, 2000, AJ 120, 1599) from sites in the American southwest on 2007 March 17/18 (18 March, UT). Shadow velocity was 6.8 km/s. The 2007 occultation grazed the atmosphere. We were able to use one of the 8.4-m mirrors of the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, still in its engineering stage, though only with its facility guide camera and not with our Portable Occultation, Eclipse, and Transit System (POETS) CCD/GPS/computer instruments (Souza et al., 2006, PASP 118, 1550). Because of the accurate GPS timing, we were able to align the light curve obtained, which included only the second half of the occultation, with results from other telescopes, including the visible, beamsplit light curve obtained by our group with the 6.5-m MMT (Person et al., 2007, this meeting). We also used, with POETS, the 2.4-m Magdalena Ridge Observatory near Socorro, New Mexico; a partial light curve was obtained despite variable cloudiness throughout the 80 min observation. The location of this telescope was the farthest into the occultation path, and thus led to the deepest incursion into Pluto's atmosphere of the starlight of the major telescopes we used. Light curves were generated by frame-by-frame synthetic-aperture photometry. The large increase in atmospheric pressure we had earlier measured at the 2002 occultation compared with measurements at the first successful Pluto occultation, in 1988, has ceased, as shown by both the 2006 and the current, 2007 measurements. Acknowledgments: We thank Richard Green for granting Director's Discretionary time for the LBT observations. This work was partially funded by NASA Planetary Astronomy grants NNG05GG75G, NNG04GE48G, NNG04GF25G, and NNH04ZSS001N to Williams College and to MIT.

  11. Sensing Water Vapon via Spacecraft Radio Occultation Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kursinski, E. Robert; Hajj, George A.

    2000-01-01

    The radio occultation technique has been used to characterize planetary atmospheres since the 1960's spanning atmospheric pressures from 16 microbars to several bars. In 1988, the use of GPS signals to make occultation observations of Earth's atmosphere was realized by Tom Yunck and Gunnar Lindal at JPL. In the GPS to low-Earth-orbiter limb- viewing occultation geometry, Fresnel diffraction yield a unique combination of high vertical resolution of 100 m to 1 km at long wavelengths (approx. 20 cm) insensitive to particulate scattering which allows routine limb sounding from the lower mesosphere through the troposphere. A single orbiting GPS/GLONASS receiver can observe - 1000 to 1400 daily occultations providing as many daily, high vertical resolution soundings as the present global radiosonde network, but with far more evenly distributed, global coverage. The occultations yield profiles of refractivity as a function of height. In the cold, dry conditions of the upper troposphere and above (T less than 240 K), profiles of density, pressure (geopotential), and temperature can be derived. Given additional temperature information, water vapor can be derived in the midddle and lower troposphere with a unique combination of vertical resolution, global distribution and insensitivity to clouds and precipitation to an accuracy of approx. 0.2 g/kg. At low latitudes, moisture profiles will be accurate to 1-5% within the convective boundary layer and better than 20% below 6 to 7 km. Accuracies of climatological averages should be approx. 0. 1 g/kg limited by the biases in the temperature estimates. To use refractivity to constrain water vapor, knowledge of temperature is required. The simplest approach is to use the temperature field from an analysis such as the 6 hour ECMWF global analysis interpolated to the locations of each occultation. A better approach is to combine the temperature and moisture fields from such an analysis with the occultation refractivity in a weighting

  12. Characteristics of solar wind density depletions during solar cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Lee, J.; Oh, S.; Yi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Solar wind density depletions are generally believed to be caused by the interplanetary (IP) shocks. However, there are other cases that are hardly associated with IP shocks. To better understand the cause of the density depletions, we investigate the solar wind parameters and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data related to the solar wind density depletion events during the period from 1996 to 2013 that are obtained with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and the WIND satellite. As a result, we found that the solar wind density has an anti-correlation with IMF strength during all events of solar wind density depletion, regardless of the presence of IP shocks. We thus argue that IMF strength is an important factor in understanding the nature of solar wind density depletion. Since IMF strength varies with solar cycle, we also investigate the characteristics of solar wind density depletion events in different phases of solar cycle as an attempt to find its connection to the sun.

  13. Dynamics of ADAM17-Mediated Shedding of ACE2 Applied to Pancreatic Islets of Male db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Kim Brint; Chodavarapu, Harshita; Porretta, Constance; Robinson, Leonie K.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene therapy aimed at counteracting pancreatic ACE2 depletion improves glucose regulation in two diabetic mouse models: db/db mice and angiotensin II-infused mice. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) can cause shedding of ACE2 from the cell membrane. The aim of our studies was to determine whether ADAM17 depletes ACE2 levels in pancreatic islets and β-cells. Dynamics of ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding were investigated in 832/13 insulinoma cells. Within a wide range of ACE2 expression levels, including the level observed in mouse pancreatic islets, overexpression of ADAM17 increases shed ACE2 and decreases cellular ACE2 levels. We provide a mathematical description of shed and cellular ACE2 activities as a function of the ADAM17 activity. The effect of ADAM17 on the cellular ACE2 content was relatively modest with an absolute control strength value less than 0.25 and approaching 0 at low ADAM17 activities. Although we found that ADAM17 and ACE2 are both expressed in pancreatic islets, the β-cell is not the major cell type expressing ACE2 in islets. During diabetes progression in 8-, 12-, and 15-week-old db/db mice, ACE2 mRNA and ACE2 activity levels in pancreatic islets were not decreased over time nor significantly decreased compared with nondiabetic db/m mice. Levels of ADAM17 mRNA and ADAM17 activity were also not significantly changed. Inhibiting basal ADAM17 activity in mouse islets failed to affect ACE2 levels. We conclude that whereas ADAM17 has the ability to shed ACE2, ADAM17 does not deplete ACE2 from pancreatic islets in diabetic db/db mice. PMID:26441236

  14. Characterization of a double flux-rope magnetic cloud observed by ACE spacecraft on August 19-21, 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda González, A.; Mendes, O.; Domingues Oliveira, M.; Moestl, C.; Farrugia, C. J.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2013-05-01

    Investigations have studied MC cases of double flux rope configuration with apparent asymmetry. Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique allows deriving the local magnetic structure from data of a single spacecraft. The results obtained show two cylindrical flux ropes next to each other, where a single X point forms between them. In all possible combinations of two bipolar MCs, the magnetic field between them is antiparallel in eight cases SWN-SWN, SWN-SEN, SEN-SWN, SEN-SEN, NWS-NWS, NWS-NES, NES-NWS, NES-NWS. If clouds are under magnetic coupling, reconnection evidences are expected from the interaction between them. In this work, we examine the event that occurred at Aug. 19-21, 1998 using solar wind measurements collected by ACE. In Fig. 1 a) presents the recovered cross-section of the two bipolar MCs (SEN-SWN). The black contour lines show the transverse magnetic field lines (calculated as the contours of the magnetic potential function A(x,y)), and the colors show the axial magnetic field Bz distribution. The yellow arrows along y=0 denote measured transverse magnetic field vectors, direction and magnitude measurements at ACE utilized as initial input into the numerical solver. The green arrows are residual velocities in the deHoffmann-Teller frame at ACE. The spacecraft crosses the X point and observes the exact moment of the magnetic reconnection, from 0.13 to 0.15 AU in x axis. In the opposite corners of the X point, the magnetic fields are antiparallel (see yellow arrows in this region). The residual velocity (green arrow in y=0) in the deHoffmann-Teller frame at ACE is perpendicular to the magnetic field line in the reconnection region. In principle, it is possible to adjust a two-dimension model considering the most common separator reconnection, in which four separate magnetic domains exchange magnetic field lines. In Fig. 1 b), the cross-section through four magnetic domains undergoing separator reconnection is represented. The green array in the top

  15. OCCULTATION OBSERVATIONS OF SATURN'S B RING AND CASSINI DIVISION

    SciTech Connect

    French, Richard G.; McGhee, Colleen A.; Marouf, Essam A.; Rappaport, Nicole J.

    2010-04-15

    The outer edge of Saturn's B ring is strongly affected by the nearby 2:1 inner Lindblad resonance of Mimas and is distorted approximately into a centered elliptical shape, which at the time of the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters was oriented with its periapse toward Mimas. Subsequent observations have shown that the actual situation is considerably more complex. We present a complete set of historical occultation measurements of the B-ring edge, including the 1980 Voyager 1 and 1981 Voyager 2 radio and stellar occultations, the 1989 occultation of 28 Sgr, two independently analyzed occultations observed with the Hubble Space Telescope in 1991 and 1995, and a series of ring profiles from 12 diametric (ansa-to-ansa) occultations observed in 2005, using the Cassini Radio Science Subsystem (RSS). After making an approximate correction for systematic errors in the reconstructed spacecraft trajectories, we obtain orbit fits to features in the rings with rms residuals well under 1 km, in most cases. Fits to the B-ring edge in the RSS data reveal a systematic variation in the maximum optical depth at the very edge of the ring as a function of its orbital radius. We compare the B-ring measurements to an m = 2 distortion aligned with Mimas, and show that there have been substantial phase shifts over the past 25 years. Finally, we present freely precessing equatorial elliptical models for 16 features in the Cassini Division. The inner edges of the gaps are generally eccentric, whereas the outer edges are nearly circular, with ae < 0.5 km.

  16. Examining Pluto's atmosphere with SOFIA through stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, Michael

    2012-10-01

    We propose to use SOFIA with HIPO, FLITECAM (subject to availability), and the FDC to observe two pairs of Pluto stellar occultations (four total), attempting in each case to observe from the center of Pluto's shadow path. Only an airborne platform such as SOFIA can allow us to directly place the telescope in the shadow paths of these brief events while mitigating the possibility of missing time-sensitive observations due to unfortunate weather systems. Occultation predictions will be updated throughout the period preceding the observations with the goal of achieving sufficient prediction accuracy at the event time to place SOFIA directly in the path of Pluto's central flash. Successful central flash observations will give us unprecedented information regarding Pluto's lower atmospheric structure and global sphericity. The combination of HIPO, FLITECAM, and the FDC will allow us to make simultaneous visible and IR measurements of the occultation light curves in several wavelengths, which are needed to differentiate between two currently competing explanations for the deficiency in the observed light refracted from Pluto's lower atmosphere (strong thermal gradients versus variable particulate extinction). Finally, we propose for two pairs of events in order to investigate the temporal variability of Pluto's atmosphere on several timescales to measure its ongoing evolution due to Pluto's rotation, changing seasonal obliquity (and resulting ice migration), and recession from the sun. These SOFIA observations will all be combined with our ground-based observing program to provide calibrating geometric information to the SOFIA occultation chords, allowing us to precisely pinpoint the actual passage of SOFIA through the occultation shadow path. Given the upcoming New Horizons encounter with the Pluto system in 2015, now is a critical time to provide context and supporting atmospheric information to this NASA mission.

  17. ACE Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema following Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Hussam

    2017-01-01

    Angioedema is a well-known side effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi). However, ACE inhibitors induced angioedema after cervical surgery is a rare condition. They result in increased levels of circulating bradykinins. Rare cases of angioedema following local trauma in patients using ACE inhibitors have been published. We present such a case. A 54-year-old Caucasian female with a history significant for hypertension, controlled with lisinopril, was admitted for routine cervical spine surgery. She has severe degenerative cervical disc disease and was admitted to the hospital for an elective cervical diskectomy. The patient failed weaning off the ventilator on multiple attempts postoperatively. There were no observed symptoms of an allergic reaction. A CT scan of the neck showed extensive soft tissue edema at the level of the arytenoids. Dexamethasone was given to reduce the edema without successful resolution. On review of her medications, it was found that the patient was resumed on lisinopril following the procedure. It was subsequently discontinued. By the following day the patient had a positive leak around the ET tube cuff and patient was successfully extubated. PMID:28348897

  18. ACE: A distributed system to manage large data archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, Mike I.; Allen, Frank W.

    1993-01-01

    Competitive pressures in the oil and gas industry are requiring a much tighter integration of technical data into E and P business processes. The development of new systems to accommodate this business need must comprehend the significant numbers of large, complex data objects which the industry generates. The life cycle of the data objects is a four phase progression from data acquisition, to data processing, through data interpretation, and ending finally with data archival. In order to implement a cost effect system which provides an efficient conversion from data to information and allows effective use of this information, an organization must consider the technical data management requirements in all four phases. A set of technical issues which may differ in each phase must be addressed to insure an overall successful development strategy. The technical issues include standardized data formats and media for data acquisition, data management during processing, plus networks, applications software, and GUI's for interpretation of the processed data. Mass storage hardware and software is required to provide cost effective storage and retrieval during the latter three stages as well as long term archival. Mobil Oil Corporation's Exploration and Producing Technical Center (MEPTEC) has addressed the technical and cost issues of designing, building, and implementing an Advanced Computing Environment (ACE) to support the petroleum E and P function, which is critical to the corporation's continued success. Mobile views ACE as a cost effective solution which can give Mobile a competitive edge as well as a viable technical solution.

  19. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and ACE inhibitory peptides of salmon (Salmo salar) protein hydrolysates obtained by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-08-13

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  20. A Consolidation of ACE Research, 1990-2000. Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Barry; Davies, Merryn; Volkoff, Veronica

    The volume and scope of research into adult and community education (ACE) in Australia have increased significantly over the past decade. Studies designed to map, reevaluate, showcase, and promote ACE have been funded by Australia's federal and state governments and by bodies such as Adult Learning Australia. Practitioner-generated research has…

  1. Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in an Integrated Pediatric Care Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purewal, Sukhdip K.; Bucci, Monica; Wang, Lisa Gutiérrez; Koita, Kadiatou; Marques, Sara Silvério; Oh, Debora; Harris, Nadine Burke

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are stressful or traumatic events that place children at risk of negative health, mental health, and behavioral outcomes. The Center for Youth Wellness (CYW), working in partnership with the Bayview Child Health Center (BCHC), pioneered ACE screening for children and adolescents. This article describes the…

  2. 75 FR 64737 - Automated Commercial Environment (ACE): Announcement of a National Customs Automation Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Automated Commercial Environment (ACE): Announcement of a... required advance ocean and rail data through the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE). This notice... application period for participation, outlines the development and evaluation methodology to be used,...

  3. Isolation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting triterpenes from Schinus molle.

    PubMed

    Olafsson, K; Jaroszewski, J W; Smitt, U W; Nyman, U

    1997-08-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of extracts of Schinus molle leaves, using an in vitro assay, led to the isolation of ACE-inhibitory steroidal triterpenes of the euphane type, identified by means of NMR spectroscopic methods. One of the triterpenes was isolated as an equilibrium mixture of epimeric aldehydes. The triterpenes showed moderate ACE-inhibitory activity (IC(50) about 250 microM).

  4. Formative Evaluation of ACES Program: Findings from Surveys and Interviews Year One, Grades 11 and 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolanin, Natalie; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2015-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability (OSA) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) is conducting a multiyear evaluation of the Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success (ACES) program. The ACES program is a collaboration between MCPS, Montgomery College (MC), and the Universities at Shady Grove (USG) to create a seamless pathway…

  5. Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance Models in ACES: Design Implementation and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don; Satapathy, Goutam; Kumar, Anil; Khanna, Manu

    2006-01-01

    Presentation objectives include: a) Overview of the ACES/CNS System Models Design and Integration; b) Configuration Capabilities available for Models and Simulations using ACES with CNS Modeling; c) Descriptions of recently added, Enhanced CNS Simulation Capabilities; and d) General Concepts Ideas that Utilize CNS Modeling to Enhance Concept Evaluations.

  6. The Evolution of the Automated Continuous Evaluation System (ACES) for Personnel Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-12

    recession, which reduced funding across the government for research and development of efficiencies like ACES, the obvious promise of ACES continues. The...Approved for Public Distribution: Distribution Unlimited Defense Personnel and Security Research Center Defense Manpower Data Center Technical... Research Center Defense Manpower Data Center Defense Personnel and Security Research Center Defense Manpower Data Center 400 Gigling

  7. ACE expression in monocytes is induced by cytokines, phorbol ester and steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, D.; Lanzillo, J.; Fanburg, B. )

    1991-03-15

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels are elevated in the serum and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) of patients with granulomatous diseases. However, the role of ACE in (Mo) physiology and the regulation of the inflammatory response is not well understood. Since Mo can be stimulated to form giant cells using phorbol esters, glucocorticoids or certain inflammatory cytokines, the authors examined production of ACE protein by normal PBM, a Mo-like cell line, THP-1, and a macrophage-like cell line, U937 following stimulation with these agents. Using a sensitive ELISA assay, they found that in U937 cells, expression of ACE protein increased by 3.4 fold with dexamethasone, 3.7. fold with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA), and 5.8 fold with the two agents combined. The cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF substantially increased ACE expression, by 7.6 and 7.7 fold respectively, with maximal effect at 0.01 U/ml, while IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} had little effect. Similar results were found with PBM and THP-1 cells. The combination of dexamethasone and PMA also induced homotypic cluster formation in PBM, suggesting a correlation between cell adhesion and ACE production. The authors conclude that ACE expression in monocytes and macrophages is stimulated by low concentration of glucocorticoids and certain inflammatory cytokines. ACE may participate in the initiation and propagation of granulomatous inflammatory processes.

  8. ACE2 is augmented in dystrophic skeletal muscle and plays a role in decreasing associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cecilia; Acuña, María José; Torrejón, Javiera; Rebolledo, Daniela; Cabrera, Daniel; Santos, Robson A; Brandan, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common inherited neuromuscular disease and is characterized by absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, and fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that systemic infusion or oral administration of angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), a peptide with opposing effects to angiotensin II, normalized skeletal muscle architecture, decreased local fibrosis, and improved muscle function in mdx mice, a dystrophic model for DMD. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, and localization of ACE2, the enzyme responsible for Ang-(1-7) production, in wild type (wt) and mdx skeletal muscle and in a model of induced chronic damage in wt mice. All dystrophic muscles studied showed higher ACE2 activity than wt muscle. Immunolocalization studies indicated that ACE2 was localized mainly at the sarcolemma and, to a lesser extent, associated with interstitial cells. Similar results were observed in the model of chronic damage in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE2 overexpression in mdx TA muscle using an adenovirus containing human ACE2 sequence and showed that expression of ACE2 reduced the fibrosis associated with TA dystrophic muscles. Moreover, we observed fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating the mdx muscle. Finally, mdx gastrocnemius muscles from mice infused with Ang-(1-7), which decreases fibrosis, contain less ACE2 associated with the muscle. This is the first evidence supporting ACE2 as an important therapeutic target to improve the dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype.

  9. Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), Concept Simulations using Communication, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS) System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Greg; Vandrei, Don

    2006-01-01

    Project Objectives include: a) CNS Model Development; b Design/Integration of baseline set of CNS Models into ACES; c) Implement Enhanced Simulation Capabilities in ACES; d) Design and Integration of Enhanced (2nd set) CNS Models; and e) Continue with CNS Model Integration/Concept evaluations.

  10. Solar Energetic Particle Spectral Breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mewaldt, R.A.; Cohen, C.M.S.; Labrador, A.W.; Cummings, A.C.; Leske, R.A.; Stone, E.C.; Mason, G.M.; Desai, M.I.; Looper, M.L.; Mazur, J.E.; Haggerty, D.E.; Maclennan, C.G.; Li, G.; Wiedenbeck, M.E.

    2005-08-01

    The five large solar particle events during October-November 2003 presented an opportunity to test shock acceleration models with in-situ observations. We use solar particle spectra of H to Fe ions, measured by instruments on ACE, SAMPEX, and GOES-11, to investigate the Q/M-dependence of spectral breaks in the 28 October 2003 event. We find that the break energies scale as (Q/M)b with b {<=} 1.56 to 1.75, somewhat less than predicted. We also conclude that SEP spectra >100 MeV/nucleon are best fit by a double power-law shape.

  11. Observations of Suprathermal Power Law Tails with ACE, Ulysses, MESSENGER, and Voyager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    Observations of ubiquitous, suprathermal power law tails with the unique spectral index of -5 on the velocity distributions of solar wind and pickup ions raise important questions and have far reaching consequences. The question of how these tails are formed during quiet times, when no shocks are present, was previously addressed and is briefly reviewed here. One consequence of the existence of these tails during quiet times is that sufficiently energetic particles are always readily available for further acceleration by shocks. To study the evolution of suprathermal tails over a large range of heliocentric distances, we will use proton spectra measured with ACE, Ulysses and Voyager during quiet times as well as upstream and downstream of quasi-stationary and traveling shocks. To look for the first time at suprathermal tails at distances closer to the Sun than 1 AU, we will present our preliminary results from the FIPS instrument on the Mercury MESSENGER Mission. Applying thermodynamic constraints on non-adiabatic heating of upstream particles by a shock, we obtain the downstream -5 power law spectra that are observed and derive an expression for the tail pressure jump across the shock.

  12. SOL ACES: Auto-calibrating EUV/UV spectrometers for measurements onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Brunner, R.; Eberhard, D.; Halford, B.; Klocke, U.; Knothe, M.; Konz, W.; Riedel, W.-J.; Wolf, H.

    The SOL-ACES experiment is prepared to be flown with the ESA SOLAR payload to the International Space Station as planned for the Shuttle mission E1 (Columbus) in August 2006. Four grazing incidence spectrometers of planar geometry cover the wavelength range from 16 to 220 nm with a spectral resolution from 0.5 to 2.3 nm. These high-efficiency spectrometers will be re-calibrated by two three-signal ionization chambers to be operated with 42 band pass filters on routine during the mission. Re-measuring the filter transmissions with the spectrometers also allows a very accurate determination of the changing second order (optical) efficiencies of the spectrometers as well as the stray light contributions to the spectral recording in different wavelength ranges. In this context the primary requirements for measurements of low radiometric uncertainty are discussed in detail. The absorbing gases in the ionization chambers are neon, xenon and a mixture of 10% nitric oxide and 90% xenon. The laboratory measurements confirm very high count rates such that optical attenuators have to be applied. In addition, possible interfering contributions to the recorded data as generated by secondary effects can be determined to a high degree of accuracy by this method. Hence, very accurate irradiance measurements are expected in terms of relative standard uncertainties (RSU) ranging from 5% to 3% depending on the wavelength range.

  13. An ace-1 gene duplication resorbs the fitness cost associated with resistance in Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Assogba, Benoît S.; Djogbénou, Luc S.; Milesi, Pascal; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Perez, Julie; Ayala, Diego; Chandre, Fabrice; Makoutodé, Michel; Labbé, Pierrick; Weill, Mylène

    2015-01-01

    Widespread resistance to pyrethroids threatens malaria control in Africa. Consequently, several countries switched to carbamates and organophophates insecticides for indoor residual spraying. However, a mutation in the ace-1 gene conferring resistance to these compounds (ace-1R allele), is already present. Furthermore, a duplicated allele (ace-1D) recently appeared; characterizing its selective advantage is mandatory to evaluate the threat. Our data revealed that a unique duplication event, pairing a susceptible and a resistant copy of the ace-1 gene spread through West Africa. Further investigations revealed that, while ace-1D confers less resistance than ace-1R, the high fitness cost associated with ace-1R is almost completely suppressed by the duplication for all traits studied. ace-1 duplication thus represents a permanent heterozygote phenotype, selected, and thus spreading, due to the mosaic nature of mosquito control. It provides malaria mosquito with a new evolutionary path that could hamper resistance management. PMID:26434951

  14. ACE2 Inhibits Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, QingQing; Dong, XueFei; Chen, Xu; Yan, Feng; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Haishui; Dong, Bo

    2017-01-31

    Recent study have demonstrated that ACE2 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). But, little study was reported about the direct effect of ACE2 overexpression on the aneurysm. In this study, we hypothesize that overexpression of ACE2 may prevent the pathogenesis of aneurysm by decreasing RAS activation. Thirty-nine Mice were assigned to 3 groups randomly (n=13 in each group), ACE2 group, Ad.EGFP group and Control group. After 8-week treatment, abdominal aortas with AAA were obtained for HE staining, VVG, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The incidence and severity of AAA, macrophage infiltration and MMP protein expression were all detected. The results showed that ACE2 gene transfer significantly decreased the occurrence of AAA and inhibited AAA formation in ApoE-/- mice by inhibiting inflammatory response and MMP activation, the mechanisms may involve decreased ERK and AngII-NF-kB signaling pathways.

  15. Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors from Marine Resources: Prospects in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekara, Isuru; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1; ACE) plays an important physiological role in regulation of blood pressure by converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor. Therefore, the inhibition of ACE activity is a major target in the prevention of hypertension. Recently, the search for natural ACE inhibitors as alternatives to synthetic drugs is of great interest to prevent several side effects and a number of novel compounds such as bioactive peptides, chitooligosaccharide derivatives (COS) and phlorotannins have been derived from marine organisms as potential ACE inhibitors. These inhibitory derivatives can be developed as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals with potential to prevent hypertension. Hence, the aim of this review is to discuss the marine-derived ACE inhibitors and their future prospects as novel therapeutic drug candidates for treat hypertension. PMID:20479968

  16. Unique Kinase Catalytic Mechanism of AceK with a Single Magnesium Ion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quanjie; Zheng, Jimin; Tan, Hongwei; Li, Xichen; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2013-01-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase (AceK) is the founding member of the protein phosphorylation system in prokaryotes. Based on the novel and unique structural characteristics of AceK recently uncovered, we sought to understand its kinase reaction mechanism, along with other features involved in the phosphotransfer process. Herein we report density functional theory QM calculations of the mechanism of the phosphotransfer reaction catalysed by AceK. The transition states located by the QM calculations indicate that the phosphorylation reaction, catalysed by AceK, follows a dissociative mechanism with Asp457 serving as the catalytic base to accept the proton delivered by the substrate. Our results also revealed that AceK prefers a single Mg2+-containing active site in the phosphotransfer reaction. The catalytic roles of conserved residues in the active site are discussed. PMID:23977203

  17. The effect of saturation of ACE binding sites on the pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, J R; Meredith, P A; Hughes, D M; Elliott, H L

    1992-01-01

    1. Eight healthy male volunteers received oral enalapril, 10 mg, in the presence and absence of pretreatment with captopril, 50 mg, twice daily for 5 days. 2. Enalaprilat pharmacokinetics were characterised after both doses of enalapril to investigate the effect of saturating ACE binding sites by pretreatment with captopril. 3. The pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat were best described by a one compartment model with zero order input incorporating saturable binding to plasma and tissue ACE. 4. Values of AUC (0.72 h) for enalaprilat were 419 +/- 97 and 450 +/- 87 ng ml-1 h in the presence and absence of captopril, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant nor were there any other differences in model parameters. 5. Induction of ACE by captopril resulting in an increase in the number of ACE binding sites, may have obscured any effect of captopril on the occupancy of ACE binding sites by enalapril. PMID:1312853

  18. Wave optics-based LEO-LEO radio occultation retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the theory for performing retrieval of radio occultations that use probing frequencies in the XK and KM band. Normally, radio occultations use frequencies in the L band, and GPS satellites are used as the transmitting source, and the occultation signals are received by a GPS receiver on board a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite. The technique is based on the Doppler shift imposed, by the atmosphere, on the signal emitted from the GPS satellite. Two LEO satellites are assumed in the occultations discussed in this paper, and the retrieval is also dependent on the decrease in the signal amplitude caused by atmospheric absorption. The radio wave transmitter is placed on one of these satellites, while the receiver is placed on the other LEO satellite. One of the drawbacks of normal GPS-based radio occultations is that external information is needed to calculate some of the atmospheric products such as the correct water vapor content in the atmosphere. These limitations can be overcome when a proper selected range of high-frequency waves are used to probe the atmosphere. Probing frequencies close to the absorption line of water vapor have been included, thus allowing the retrieval of the water vapor content. Selecting the correct probing frequencies would make it possible to retrieve other information such as the content of ozone. The retrieval is performed through a number of processing steps which are based on the Full Spectrum Inversion (FSI) technique. The retrieval chain is therefore a wave optics-based retrieval chain, and it is therefore possible to process measurements that include multipath. In this paper simulated LEO to LEO radio occultations based on five different frequencies are used. The five frequencies are placed in the XK or KM frequency band. This new wave optics-based retrieval chain is used on a number of examples, and the retrieved atmospheric parameters are compared to the parameters from a global European Centre for Medium

  19. Visible spectral imager for occultation and nightglow (VISION) for the PICASSO Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Heikki; Näsilä, Antti; Holmlund, Christer; Mannila, Rami; Näkki, Ismo; Ojanen, Harri J.; Fussen, Didier; Pieroux, Didier; Demoulin, Philippe; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Vanhellemont, Filip

    2015-10-01

    PICASSO - A PICo-satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations is an ESA project led by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, in collaboration with VTT, Clyde Space Ltd. (UK), and the Centre Spatial de Liège (BE). VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. will deliver the Visible Spectral Imager for Occultation and Nightglow (VISION) for the PICASSO mission. The VISION targets primarily the observation of the Earth's atmospheric limb during orbital Sun occultation. By assessing the radiation absorption in the Chappuis band for different tangent altitudes, the vertical profile of the ozone is retrieved. A secondary objective is to measure the deformation of the solar disk so that stratospheric and mesospheric temperature profiles are retrieved by inversion of the refractive raytracing problem. Finally, occasional full spectral observations of polar auroras are also foreseen. The VISION design realized with commercial of the shelf (CoTS) parts is described. The VISION instrument is small, lightweight (~500 g), Piezo-actuated Fabry-Perot Interferometer (PFPI) tunable spectral imager operating in the visible and near-infrared (430 - 800 nm). The spectral resolution over the whole wavelength range will be better than 10 nm @ FWHM. VISION has is 2.5° x 2.5° total field of view and it delivers maximum 2048 x 2048 pixel spectral images. The sun image size is around 0.5° i.e. ~500 pixels. To enable fast spectral data image acquisition VISION can be operated with programmable image sizes. VTT has previously developed PFPI tunable filter based AaSI Spectral Imager for the Aalto-1 Finnish CubeSat. In VISION the requirements of the spectral resolution and stability are tighter than in AaSI. Therefore the optimization of the of the PFPI gap control loop for the operating temperature range and vacuum conditions has to be improved. VISION optical, mechanical and electrical design is described.

  20. Cosmic Rays below 1 GeV/nucleon: Results from 19 Years of Observations with the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer on ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H.; Labrador, A. W.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) instrument on NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer mission has been making high-precision measurements of cosmic-ray elemental and isotopic composition and energy spectra below 1 GeV/nucleon since August 1997. The long period of data collection, now in its 20th year, and the large geometrical acceptance ( 250 cm2sr) have made it possible to study very rare species, including including some primary radionuclides and a number of stable elements with Z >28. Using measurements of elemental spectra on time scales as short as a month, CRIS has been tracking the level of solar modulation over nearly two full solar cycles, including the lowest level encountered since the st