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Sample records for ace-asia intensive observation

  1. Comparison of Observed and Modeled Regional Scale Aerosol Characteristics for ACE-ASIA and TRACE-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A.; Carmichael, G.; Tang, Y.; McNaughton, C.

    2002-12-01

    During spring of 2001 we measured aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties for Asian aerosol with our similar instrument sets [University of Hawaii] from two aircraft - the NASA P3-B (TRACE-P) and NSF C-130 (ACE-ASIA). Observed aerosol characteristics included aerosol number concentration, measured with Ultrafine Condensation Nuclei counter (UCN) and CN counters; size distributions, obtained from a radial differential mobility analyzer (RDMA), a laser optical particle counter (OPC), aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and wing mounted probes; aerosol light scattering and absorption obtained from nephelometers and a Particle Soot Absorption Photometers (PSAP). On the C-130 a dry and humidified nephelometer was operated to measure humidity dependence of aerosol light scattering, f(RH). Size distributions and number concentrations were measured with thermal aerosol volatilization to infer particles volatility and refractory properties linked to dust and soot aerosol components. Here we compare these observations to results from the University of Iowa CFORS/STEM model of related aerosol characteristics during these measurement periods. This model includes a wide variety of aerosol chemical and optical properties - black and organic carbon (BC and OC), dust, sulfate concentrations and calculated aerosol optical depth. This comparison is based not only on case studies bur also on regional scale air mass characterization. To facilitate this comparison a set of scatter "signature" plots of measured aerosol parameters like f(RH) vs. fractional submicron aerosol surface area or submicron refractory volume vs. total aerosol absorption is used. This approach generates clusters of data characteristics for different air masses. The model shows a high degree of consistency in identifying the main features of biomass burning, urban/industrial pollution, and dust events. This combination of measured and modeled aerosol parameters is shown to be valuable in quantifying the

  2. Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

  3. A Global Aerosol Model Forecast for the ACE-Asia Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Lucchesi, Robert; Huebert, Barry; Weber, Rodney; Anderson, Tad; Masonis, Sarah; Blomquist, Byron; Bandy, Alan; Thornton, Donald

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of aerosol forecast during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) field experiment in spring 2001, using the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model and the meteorological forecast fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The aerosol model forecast provides direct information on aerosol optical thickness and concentrations, enabling effective flight planning, while feedbacks from measurements constantly evaluate the model, making successful model improvements. We verify the model forecast skill by comparing model predicted total aerosol extinction, dust, sulfate, and SO2 concentrations with those quantities measured by the C-130 aircraft during the ACE-Asia intensive operation period. The GEOS DAS meteorological forecast system shows excellent skills in predicting winds, relative humidity, and temperature for the ACE-Asia experiment area as well as for each individual flight, with skill scores usually above 0.7. The model is also skillful in forecast of pollution aerosols, with most scores above 0.5. The model correctly predicted the dust outbreak events and their trans-Pacific transport, but it constantly missed the high dust concentrations observed in the boundary layer. We attribute this missing dust source to the desertification regions in the Inner Mongolia Province in China, which have developed in recent years but were not included in the model during forecasting. After incorporating the desertification sources, the model is able to reproduce the observed high dust concentrations at low altitudes over the Yellow Sea. Two key elements for a successful aerosol model forecast are correct source locations that determine where the emissions take place, and realistic forecast winds and convection that determine where the aerosols are transported. We demonstrate that our global model can not only account for the large

  4. Transport of Aerosols from Asia and Their Radiative Effects Over the Western Pacific: A 3-D Model Study for ACE-Asia Experiment During Spring 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Flatau, Piotr; Anderson, Tad; Masonis, Sarah; Russell, Phil; Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John; Redemann, Jens; Kahn, Ralph; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) took place in Spring 2001 in the East Asia-West Pacific Ocean. During the ACE-Asia intensive field operation period, high concentrations of dust and anthropogenic aerosols were observed over the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan, which were transported out from the Asian continent, with the plume often extending to 6-8 km altitude. The multi-component aerosols originated from Asia are expected to exert a significant radiative forcing over the Pacific region. We present here results from the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model of aerosol transport and radiative forcing in the context of ACE-Asia. The model calculated aerosol concentrations, extinctions, optical thickness, size distributions, and vertical profiles are compared with the aircraft and ship measurements, and the distributions of aerosols are compared with satellite data. The model will be used to understand the origins of the aerosols observed in ACE-Asia, estimate the contributions from anthropogenic and natural aerosols to the total aerosol optical thickness, investigate the effects of humidification and clouds on aerosol properties, and assess the radiative forcing of Asian aerosols over the Pacific region and in the northern hemisphere.

  5. Comparison of In Situ Aerosol Data from the ACE-Asia 2001 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Pietras, C.; Miller, M. A.; Reynolds, R. M.; Frouin, R.; Quinn, P. K.; Deschamps, P. Y.; Werdell, P. J.; Fargion, G. S.

    2002-05-01

    The Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) is an international, multidisciplinary project to further knowledge about atmospheric aerosols. ACE-Asia included an intensive field measurement campaign during the spring of 2001 off the coasts of China, Japan and Korea. The Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project participated in the ACE-Asia cruise of the R/V Ronald H. Brown, which departed from Hawaii on 2001/03/15, sailed west to the Sea of Japan, and finished in Yokosuka, Japan on 2001/04/19. The SIMBIOS Project compares and merges data projects from multiple ocean color missions. As In Situ data are essential for merger and comparison of satellite ocean color measurements, the Project is interested in instrumentation devopment and data base building. The SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS) is the database used and maintained by the SIMBIOS project. The ACE-Asia cruise was an excellent opportunity to compare data from a variety of maritime sun photometers, as several aerosol conditions were experienced. These included low Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) maritime conditions near Hawaii and extremely high AOT dust conditions in the Sea of Japan. Concurrant measurements were made with the PREDE POM-01 Mark II radiometer, a Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD, a Laboratorie d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD-a, two Solar Light, Inc. Microtops II's, and Brookhaven National Laboratory's Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (FRSR). In addition, a Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) was deployed that provides vertical aerosol distributions. Data were processed utilizing new algorithms to screen errors due to improper pointing at the sun, a problem previously recognized for the Microtops II. Comparisons of AOT at 500nm and Angstrom Exponent were made for all the instruments. The hand held, direct solar sun photometers (Microtops II, SIMBAD and SIMBADa

  6. Environmental Snapshots for Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Retrieval Validation During the ACE-Asia Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Anderson, Jim; Anderson, Theodore L.; Bates, Tim; Brechtel, Fred; Clarke, Antony; Dutton, Ellsworth; Flagan, Richard; Fouin, Robert; Fukushima, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    On five occasions spanning the ACE-Asia field experiment in spring 2001, the multi-angle imaging MISR instrument, flying aboard the NASA Earth Observing System s Terra satellite, took quarter-kilometer data over a 400-km-wide swath, coincident with high-quality observations by multiple instruments on two or more participating surface and airborne platforms. The cases capture a range of clean, polluted, and dusty aerosol conditions. They represent some of the best opportunities during ACE- Asia for comparative studies among intensive and extensive aerosol observations in their environmental context. We inter-compare related measurements and discuss the implications of apparent discrepancies for each case, at a level of detail appropriate to the analysis of satellite observations. With a three-stage optical modeling process, we synthesize data from multiple sources into layer-by-layer snapshots that summarize what we know about the state of the atmosphere and surface at key locations during each event, to be used for satellite vicarious calibration and aerosol retrieval validation. Aerosols within a few kilometers of the surface were composed primarily of pollution and Asian dust mixtures, as expected. Accumulation and coarse-mode particle size distributions varied little among the events studied, but column aerosol optical depth changed by more than a factor of four, and the near-surface proportion of dust ranged from about 25% to 50%. The amount of absorbing material in the sub-micron fraction was highest when near-surface winds crossed Beijing and the Korean Peninsula, and was considerably lower for all other cases. Ambiguities remain in segregating size distributions by composition; having simultaneous single scattering albedo measurements at more than a single wavelength would significantly reduce the resulting optical model uncertainties, as would integral constraints from surface and atmospheric radiative flux observations. The consistency of component

  7. Aerosols, Chemistry, and Radiative Forcing: A 3-D Model Analysis of Satellite and ACE-Asia data (ACMAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Zhao, Xue-Peng

    2005-01-01

    We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into the multi-national Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) mission. Our objectives are (1) to understand the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols and the processes that control those properties over the Asian-Pacific region, (2) to investigate the interaction between aerosols and tropospheric chemistry, and (3) to determine the aerosol radiative forcing over the Asia-Pacific region. We will use the Georgia TecWGoddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to link satellite observations and the ACE-Asia measurements. First, we will use the GOCART model to simulate aerosols and related species, and evaluate the model with satellite and in-situ observations. Second, the model generated aerosol vertical profiles and compositions will be used to validate the satellite products; and the satellite data will be used for during- and post- mission analysis. Third, we will use the model to analyze and interpret both satellite and ACE- Asia field campaign data and investigate the aerosol-chemistry interactions. Finally, we will calculate aerosol radiative forcing over the Asian-Pacific region, and assess the influence of Asian pollution in the global atmosphere. We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into

  8. Aerosol Optical Properties and Component Extinction from Measurements on the Ronald H. Brown During ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Coffman, D.; Miller, T.; Anderson, J.

    2002-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties were made onboard the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown during the ACE-Asia Intensive Field Program to characterize Asian aerosol as it was transported across the Pacific Ocean. The ship traveled across the Pacific from Hawaii to Japan and into the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan. Based on trajectory analysis, the aerosol has been categorized as remote marine, volcanic from the Miyakejima volcano, polluted from Korea and Japan, polluted from Beijing, polluted mixed with dust during post frontal conditions, and polluted mixed with dust from Shanghai and Korea. Presented here, for these different categories, are aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom Exponent, and aerosol optical depth), mass fractions of the major chemical components, and mass extinction efficiencies and extinction coefficients for individual aerosol components. Lowest scattering and absorption coefficients and highest single scattering albedos were measured in marine air masses encountered as the ship transited from Hawaii toward Japan (mean SSA = 0.97). Lowest SSA were measured in polluted air masses from Korea and Japan (mean SSA = 0.90). With dust mixed into the polluted air masses, SSA increased due to the high scattering levels associated with the dust (mean SSA ranged from 0.92 to 0.96 for different pollution/dust mixtures). These SSA are for the sub-10 micron aerosol at 55 percent RH. They were 1 to 4 percent lower for the sub-1 micron aerosol. Unique to the ACE Asia aerosol was the observation of significant absorption at 550 nm by supermicron aerosol. A correlation between supermicron elemental carbon concentrations and the ratio of absorption by sub-1 um aerosol to absorption by sub-10 um aerosol suggests that supermicron EC is responsible. As the mean concentration of supermicron EC increased from the marine to polluted to polluted with dust cases, the ratio

  9. ACE-Asia: Size/Time/Compositionally Resolved Aerosols During ACE-Asia Using Continuously Sampling DRUM Technology and Synchrotron-XRF Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, T. A.; Cliff, S. S.; Jimenez-Cruz, M.; Perry, K. D.

    2001-12-01

    The adaptation of focused beam technology to continuously sampling drum impactors (DRUMs) has allowed for an unprecedented number of size/time/compositional analyses of aerosols during the Spring, 2001 ACE-Asia study and a summer follow-on. While continuously sampling and sizing inertial drum impactors have been available for aerosol monitoring and research for the past 30 years, cost and sensitivity considerations have generally limited their use, even in research studies. These constraints have been greatly relaxed by our application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (S-XRF) analysis for elemental analysis of aerosols, both increasing sensitivity and decreasing cost. The intense polarized x-ray beams of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source (ALS) allows us to eliminate 99% of all the background normally present in x-ray analysis while matching the x-ray beam spot to the 0.2 mm "footprint" of our DRUM impactors. This combination allows non-destructive analyses of elements from sodium to uranium (with some minor elements masked by interferences) with a time resolution set during analysis, not during sampling. The DELTA Group and its many collaborators executed a 21 site network of continuously sampling 3 and 8 stage DRUM impactors for the 6 weeks of ACE-Asia. Fewer than 5% of the potential 80,000 samples were lost due to sampling problems. During S-XRF analysis, a nominal time resolution of 6 hrs was chosen, with 2 hrs available as needed during aerosol episodes. The 168 mm drum strips were mounted in frames and exposed to the "white" polarized x-ray beam of ALS Beam Line 10.3.1 for 30 seconds, yielding quantitative elemental determinations from sodium through molybdenum plus heavy elements, certified by 80 analytical standards and NIST SRMs. Minimum detectable limits ranged from 0.1 ng/m3 for sulfur to 0.005 ng/m3 for transition metals such as zinc, allowing scores of positive elemental determinations in each spectrum. During ACE-Asia

  10. Airborne Sunphotometry of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Eilers, J. A.; Ramirez, S. A.; Kahn, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During the Intensive Field Campaign (IFC) of the Aerosol Characterization Experiment - Asia (ACE-Asia), March-May 2001, the 6-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated during 15 of the 19 research flights aboard the NCAR C- 130, while its 14-channel counterpart (AATS- 14) was flown successfully on all 18 research flights of a Twin Otter aircraft operated by the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS), Monterey, CA. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of aerosol characterization experiments and focused on aerosol outflow from the Asian continent to the Pacific basin. Each ACE was designed to integrate suborbital and satellite measurements and models so as to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosols. The Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometers measured solar beam transmission at 6 (380-1021 nm, AATS-6) and 14 wavelengths (353-1558 nm, AATS-14) respectively, yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and column water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol extinction and water vapor concentration. The wavelength dependence of AOD and extinction indicates that supermicron dust was often a major component of the aerosol. Frequently this dust-containing aerosol extended to high altitudes. For example, in data flights analyzed to date 34 +/- 13% of full-column AOD(525 nm) was above 3 km. In contrast, only 10 +/- 4% of CWV was above 3 km. In this paper, we will show first sunphotometer-derived results regarding the spatial variation of AOD and CWV, as well as the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction and water vapor concentration. Preliminary comparison studies between our AOD/aerosol extinction data and results from: (1) extinction products derived using in situ measurements and (2) AOD retrievals using the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) aboard the TERRA satellite will also be presented.

  11. Characterization of Dust Properties during ACE-Asia and PRIDE: A Column Satellite-Surface Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor); Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Herman, Jay R.; Ji, Q. Jack

    2002-01-01

    Many recent field experiments are designed to study the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of both pollution-derived and naturally occurring aerosols, which often exist in high concentration over particular pathways around the globe. For example, the ACE-Asia (Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia) was conducted from March-May 2001 in the vicinity of the Taklimakan and Gobi deserts, East Coast of China, Yellow Sea, Korea, and Japan, along the pathway of Kosa (severe events that blanket East Asia with yellow desert dust, peaked in the Spring season). The PRIDE (Puerto RIco Dust Experiment, July 2000) was designed to measure the properties of Saharan dust transported across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean. Dust particles typically originate in desert areas far from polluted urban regions. During transport, dust layers can interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols from heavily polluted urban areas. Added to the complex effects of clouds and natural marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from the source. Thus, understanding the unique temporal and spatial variations of dust aerosols is of special importance in regional-to-global climate issues such as radiative forcing, the hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in the ocean. During ACE-Asia and PRIDE we had measured aerosol physical/optical/radiative properties, column precipitable water amount, and surface reflectivity over homogeneous areas from ground-based remote sensing. The inclusion of flux measurements permits the determination of aerosol radiative flux in addition to measurements of loading and optical depth. At the time of the Terra/MODIS, SeaWiFS, TOMS and other satellite overpasses, these ground-based observations can provide valuable data to compare with satellite retrievals over land. We will present the results and discuss their implications in regional climatic effects.

  12. Characterization of Dust Properties at the Source Region During ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Lau, William (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    ACE (Aerosol Characterization Experiment)-Asia is designed to study the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of both pollution-derived and naturally-occurring aerosols, which often exist in high concentrations over eastern Asia and along the rim of the western Pacific. The phase-I of ACE-Asia was conducted from March-May 2001 in the vicinity of the Gobi desert, east coast of China, Yellow Sea, Korea, and Japan, along the pathway of Kosa (severe events that blanket East Asia with yellow desert dust, peaked in the Spring season). Asian dust typically originates in desert areas far from polluted urban regions. During transport, dust layers can interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols from heavily polluted urban areas. Added to the complex effects of clouds and natural marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from the source. Thus, understanding the unique temporal and spatial variations of Asian dust is of special importance in regional-to-global climate issues such as radiative forcing, the hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in the mid-Pacific Ocean. During ACE-Asia we have measured continuously aerosol optical/radiative properties, column precipitable water amount, and surface reflectivity over homogeneous areas from surface. The inclusion of flux measurements permits the determination of dust aerosol radiative flux in addition to measurements of loading and optical thickness. At the time of the Terra/MODIS overpass, these ground-based observations can provide valuable data to compare with MODIS retrievals over land. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed their implications in regional climatic effects.

  13. Aerosol Optical Properties and Chemical Composition Measured on the Ronald H. Brown During ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Miller, T. L.; Coffman, D.

    2001-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties were made onboard the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown during the ACE-Asia Intensive Field Program to characterize Asian aerosol as it was transported across the Pacific Ocean. The ship traveled across the Pacific from Hawaii to Japan and into the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan. Trajectories indicate that remote marine air masses were sampled on the transit to Japan. In the ACE-Asia study region air masses from Japan, China, Mongolia, and the Korea Peninsula were sampled. A variety of aerosol types were encountered including those of marine, volcanic, crustal, and industrial origin. Presented here, for the different air masses encountered, are aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom Exponent, and aerosol optical depth) and chemical composition (major ions, total organic and black carbon, and trace elements). Scattering by submicron aerosol (55 % RH and 550 nm) was less than 20 1/Mm during the transit from Hawaii to Japan. In continental air masses, values ranged from 60 to 320 1/Mm with the highest submicron scattering coefficients occurring during prefrontal conditions with a low marine boundary layer height and trajectories from Japan. For the continental air masses, the ratio of scattering by submicron to sub-10 micron aerosol during polluted conditions averaged 0.8 and during a dust event 0.41. Aerosol optical depth (500 nm) ranged from 0.08 during the Pacific transit to 1.3 in the prefrontal conditions described above. Optical depths during dust events ranged from 0.2 to 0.6. Submicron non-sea salt (nss) sulfate concentrations ranged from 0.5 ug/m-3 during the Pacific transit to near 30 ug/m-3 during the prefrontal conditions described above. Black carbon to total carbon mass ratios in air masses from Asia averaged 0.18 with highest values (0.32) corresponding to trajectories crossing the Yangtze River valley.

  14. Evaluation of Aerosol Properties over Ocean from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Knobelspiesse, K.; Chern, J.-D.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P. B.; Xiong, X.; Ridgway, W.

    2005-01-01

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) was conducted in March-May 2001 in the western North Pacific in order to characterize the complex mix of dust, smoke, urban/industrial pollution, and background marine aerosol that is observed in that region in springtime. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provides a large-scale regional view of the aerosol during the ACE-Asia time period. Focusing only on aerosol retrievals over ocean, MODIS data show latitudinal and longitudinal variation in the aerosol characteristics. Typically, aerosol optical depth (tau(sub a)) values at 0.55 micrometers are highest in the 30 deg. - 50 deg. latitude band associated with dust outbreaks. Monthly mean tau(sub a) in this band ranges approx. 0.40-70, although large differences between monthly mean and median values indicate the periodic nature of these dust outbreaks. The size parameters, fine mode fraction (eta), and effective radius (r(sub eff)) vary between monthly mean values of eta = 0.47 and r(sub eff)= 0.75 micrometers in the cleanest regions far offshore to approximately eta = 0.85 and r(sub eff) =.30 micrometers in near-shore regions dominated by biomass burning smoke. The collocated MODIS retrievals with airborne, ship-based, and ground-based radiometers measurements suggest that MODIS retrievals of spectral optical depth fall well within expected error (DELTA tau(sub a) = plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau(sub a)) except in situations dominated by dust, in which cases MODIS overestimate both the aerosol loading and the aerosol spectral dependence. Such behavior is consistent with issues related to particle nonsphericity. Comparisons of MODIS-derived r(sub eff) with AERONET retrievals at the few occurrences of collocations show MODIS systematically underestimates particle size by 0.2 micrometers. Multiple-year analysis of MODIS aerosol size parameters suggests systematic differences between the year 2001 and the years 2000 and 2002

  15. Desert Dust Layers Over Polluted Marine Boundary Layers: ACE-2 Measurements and ACE-Asia Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosols in ACE-Asia are expected to have some commonalties with those in ACE-2, along with important differences. Among the commonalities are occurrences of desert dust layers over polluted marine boundary layers. Differences include the nature of the dust (yellowish in the East Asia desert outflow, vs. reddish-brown in the Sahara Outflow measured in ACE-2) and the composition of boundary-layer aerosols (e.g., more absorbing, soot and organic aerosol in-the Asian plume, caused by coal and biomass burning, with limited controls). In this paper we present ACE-2 measurements and analyses as a guide to our plans for ACE-2 Asia. The measurements include: (1) Vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth and extinction (380-1558 nm), and of water vapor column and concentration, from the surface through the elevated desert dust, measured by the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14); (2) Comparisons of airborne and shipborne sunphotometer optical depths to satellite-retrieved values, with and without desert dust; (3) Comparisons between airborne Sunphotometer optical depth and extinction spectra and those derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption; (4) Comparisons between size distributions measured in situ and retrieved from sunphotometer optical depth spectra; (5) Comparisons between aerosol single scattering albedo values obtained by several techniques, using various combinations of measurements of backscatter, extinction, size distribution, scattering, absorption, and radiative flux. We show how analyses of these data can be used to address questions important to ACE-Asia, such as: (1) How do dust and other absorbing aerosols affect the accuracy of satellite optical depth retrievals? How important are asphericity effects? (2) How important are supermicron dust and seasalt aerosols to overall aerosol optical depth and radiative forcing? How well are these aerosols sampled by aircraft

  16. Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rabbette, M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redermann, J.; Higurashi, A.; Nakajima, T.; Quinn, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the upward and downward spectral solar radiant fluxes were measured with the Spectral Solar Flux Radiometer (SSFR), and the aerosol optical depth was measured with the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) aboard the Center for INterdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. IN this paper, we examine the data obtained for two cases: a moderately thick aerosol layer, 12 April, and a relatively thin aerosol case, 16 April 2001. ON both days, the Twin Otter flew vertical profiles in the Korean Strait southeast of Gosan Island. For both days we determine the aerosol spectral absorption of the layer and estimate the spectral aerosol absorption optical depth and single-scattering albedo. The results for 12 April show that the single-scattering albedo increases with wavelength from 0.8 at 400 nm to 0.95 at 900 nm and remains essentially constant from 950 to 1700 nm. On 16 April the amount of aerosol absorption was very low; however, the aerosol single-scattering albedo appears to decrease slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing aerosol species observed during the ACE-asia study: mineral dust and black carbon. The results for 12 April are indicative of a mineral dust-black carbon mixture. The 16 April results are possibly caused by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate the relative contributions of the black carbon particles and the mineral dust particles. We compare our results with other estimates of the aerosol properties from a Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite analysis and aerosol measurements made aboard the Twin Otter, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ronald H Brown ship, and at ground sites in Gosan and Japan. The results indicate a relatively complicated aerosol

  17. Mass concentration and mineralogical characteristics of aerosol particles collected at Dunhuang during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. X.; Cao, J. J.; Li, X. X.; Okuda, T.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2006-03-01

    Measurements were performed in spring 2001 and 2002 to determine the characteristics of soil dust in the Chinese desert region of Dunhuang, one of the ground sites of the Asia-Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The mean mass concentrations of total suspended particle matter during the spring of 2001 and 2002 were 317 mu g m(-3) and 307 mu g m(-3) respectively. Eleven dust storm events were observed with a mean aerosol concentration of 1095 mu g m(-3), while the non-dusty days with calm or weak wind speed had a background aerosol loading of 196 mu g m(-3) on average in the springtime. The main minerals detected in the aerosol samples by X-ray diffraction were illite, kaolinite, chlorite, quartz, feldspar, calcite and dolomite. Gypsum, halite and amphibole were also detected in a few samples. The mineralogical data also show that Asian dust is characterized by a kaolinite to chlorite (K/C) ratio lower than 1 whereas Saharan dust exhibits a K/C ratio larger than 2. Air mass back- trajectory analysis show that three families of pathways are associated with the aerosol particle transport to Dunhuang, but these have similar K/C ratios, which further demonstrates that the mineralogical characteristics of Asian dust are different from African dust.

  18. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  19. Molecular composition of the water-soluble fraction of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols collected during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, B. T.; Yu, J. Z.; Xu, J. H.; Li, Q. F.; Wu, W. S.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2004-03-01

    During the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), samples of carbonaceous aerosols were collected on board the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft. The samples were analyzed to determine their total carbon (TC) and water-soluble organic compound (WSOC) contents as well as to identify the individual compounds comprising the WSOC fraction of the aerosol. The TC concentrations varied from 3.5 to 14.3 μg C m-3; the highest TC levels were observed for samples collected in pollution layers that originated over mainland China. WSOC concentrations ranged from 0.54 to 7.2 μg C m-3, with the WSOC fraction contributing from 10 to 50% of the carbon mass. About 50% of the carbonaceous aerosol mass in pollution layers could be attributed to WSOC. For samples collected in dust layers the WSOC fraction of TC was much lower than that observed in pollution layers. The sum of all the detected organic ions accounted for 6.9-19% of the WSOC. In the six samples collected by the Twin Otter during ACE-Asia, of the organic ions identified in the WSOC fraction, oxalate had the highest concentration. Samples collected from pollution layers exhibited a slightly higher ratio of formate to oxalate as compared to the other samples. Two samples had a relatively high ratio of lactate to oxalate, which might be a signature of some currently unidentified source of carbonaceous aerosol. The sum of the masses of sulfate and nitrate ions exceeded the sum of the masses of the identified organic ions by a factor of 9 to 17. The chemical levoglucosan, a tracer for biomass burning, comprised from 0.1 to 0.4% of TC mass. Comparing this ratio to the ratio measured directly in wood-burning studies it was determined that biomass burning may have represented from ≈2 to 10% of the carbonaceous aerosol collected during ACE-Asia.

  20. Characterization of Asian Dust Properties Near Source Region During ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; King, Michael D.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Herman, Jay R.

    2004-01-01

    Asian dust typically originates in desert areas far from polluted urban regions. During transport, dust layers can interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols from heavily polluted urban areas. Added to the complex effects of clouds and natural marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from the source. Thus, understanding the unique temporal and spatial variations of Asian aerosols is of special importance in regional-to-global climate issues such as radiative forcing, the hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in the mid-Pacific Ocean. During ACE-Asia campaign, we have acquired ground- based (temporal) and satellite (spatial) measurements to infer aerosol physical/optical/radiative properties, column precipitable water amount, and surface reflectivity over this region. The inclusion of flux measurements permits the determination of aerosol radiative flux in addition to measurements of loading and optical depth. At the time of the Terra/MODIS, SeaWiFS, TOMS and other satellite overpasses, these ground-based observations can provide valuable data to compare with satellite retrievals over land. In this paper, we will demonstrate new capability of the Deep Blue algorithm to track the evolution of the Asian dust storm from sources to sinks. Although there are large areas often covered by clouds in the dust season in East Asia, this algorithm is able to distinguish heavy dust from clouds over the entire regions. Examination of the retrieved daily maps of dust plumes over East Asia clearly identifies the sources contributing to the dust loading in the atmosphe. We have compared the satellite retrieved aerosol optical thickness to the ground-based measurements and obtained a reasonable agreement between these two. Our results also indicate that there is a large difference in the retrieved value of spectral single scattering albedo of windblown dust between different

  1. Characterization of Dust Properties Near Source Region During ACE-Asia: A Column Satellite-Surface Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, S. -C.; Ji, Q.; Chu, A.; Hsu, C.; Holben, B.; Campbell, J.; Welton, E. J.; Shu, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    Many recent field experiments are designed to study the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of both pollution-derived and naturally occurring aerosols, which often exist in high concentrations over eastern/southeastern Asia and along the rim of the western Pacific. For example, the ACE-Asia was conducted from March-May 2001 in the vicinity of the Taklimakan and Gobi deserts, East Coast of China, Yellow Sea, Korea, and Japan, along the pathway of Kosa (severe events that blanket East Asia with yellow desert dust, peaked in the Spring season). Asian dust typically originates in desert areas far from polluted urban regions. During transport, dust layers can interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols from heavily polluted urban areas. Added to the complex effects of clouds and natural marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from the source. Thus, understanding the unique temporal and spatial variations of Asian aerosols is of special importance in regional-to-global climate issues such as radiative forcing, the hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in the mid-Pacific Ocean. During ACE-Asia we have measured continuously aerosol physical/optical/radiative properties, column precipitable water amount, and surface reflectivity over homogeneous areas from surface. The inclusion of flux measurements permits the determination of aerosol radiative flux in addition to measurements of loading and optical depth. At the time of the Terra/MODIS, SeaWiFS, TOMS and other satellite overpasses, these ground-based observations can provide valuable data to compare with satellite retrievals over land. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed their implications in regional climatic effects.

  2. Aerosol Forcing During INDOEX and ACE-Asia as Determined From Aircraft and Grou nd Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, D. C.; Valero, F. P.; Bush, B. C.; Pope, S. K.; Leitner, A. S.

    2002-12-01

    A suite of radiometers was flown on the NCAR C-130 aircraft throughout the INDOEX and ACE-Asia experiments to measure broadband and spectral irradiances. Identical instruments were placed in the zenith and nadir positions, allowing net flux and optical depth to be determined. The radiative forcing efficiency (aerosol forcing per unit optical depth) was determined below the aerosol layer, i.e. at an altitude of about 40 meters. This was measured in the spectral range s 220 to 3910 nm (total solar forcing) and 680 to 3300 nm (near infrared) and in seven spectral channels covering contiguously the visible range from 400 to 700 nm. Surface measurements of solar insolation as well as aerosol column optical depth were made at Kaashidoo, Maldives (INDOEX) and at Cheju Island, South Korea (ACE-Asia). These measurements, in conjunction with aerosol-free model simulations, are used to determine the radiative forcing at the surface for the visible, near-infrared, and total solar spectral bandpasses. During INDOEX the diurnally averaged broadband surface aerosol radiative forcing was -72.2+/- 5.5 W m-2 per unit optical depth at 500 nm with roughly half being contributed from the visible (-38.5+/- 4.0 W m-2). The corresponding results during ACE-Asia were: broadband -73.1+/- 9.7 W m-2, visible -41.7+/- 4.7 W m-2, and near infrared -36.3+/- -5.6 W m-2.

  3. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  4. Organic and elemental carbon measurements during ACE-Asia suggest a longer atmospheric lifetime for elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Lim, H J; Turpin, B J; Russell, L M; Bates, T S

    2003-07-15

    During the ACE-Asia intensive field campaign (March 14-April 20, 2001), PM1.0 organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations were measured onboard the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown over the Northwest Pacific Ocean using a semi-continuous automated carbon analyzer downstream of a carbon-impregnated filter denuder. This OC and EC measurement achieved a mean time resolution of about 200 min over the Pacific Ocean, substantially lower than that achieved previously (24 h). The semi-continuous measurements, in which the adsorption artifact was substantially reduced using the denuder, showed good agreement with integrated artifact-corrected measurements made without a denuder. Mean particulate OC and EC concentrations were 0.21 and 0.09, 0.70 and 0.29, 1.00 and 0.27, and 2.43 and 0.66 microg of C m(-3) over the background Pacific Ocean, Asian-influenced Pacific Ocean, offshore of Japan, and Sea of Japan, respectively. On April 11, 90-min average OC and EC concentrations peaked at 4.0 and 1.3 microg of C m(-3), respectively, offshore of Korea over the Sea of Japan. The OC/EC ratio of 3.7 over the Sea of Japan and offshore of Japan was substantially higher than that of 2.5 over the Asian-influenced Pacific Ocean, even though backward air mass trajectories put the "Asian-influenced Pacific Ocean" sample downwind. The OC/EC ratio decreased with increasing time since the air mass encountered the source regions of China, Japan, and Korea. This suggests a longer atmospheric residence time for EC than for OC.

  5. Analysis of Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties on the Coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango peninsula) during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohno, S.; Hoeller, R.; Ito, K.; Onishi, Y.; Ma, C. J.; Kasahara, M.; Cahill, T. A.; Cliff, S.

    2001-12-01

    During springtime the Japanese archipelago is periodically influenced by haze events originating from the Asian continent. The sources of these materials include both anthropogenic and natural aerosol, including the well-known yellow sand (Kosa) events, which can be recognized at places as far as Hawaii and the west coast of the United States. But there is also strong evidenced, which we want to support in this study, that these Kosa events are accompanied by strongly absorbing material as well as sulfates and organics. The springtime of 2001 was characterized by several strong dust events, which happened to be during the international ACE-Asia campaign. We participated in the ACE observation network by setting up a monitoring station during the period March 19 to April 6, 2001 for the measurement of aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties as well as observations of sky radiation. The measurement site is located on the coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango Peninsula, Kyoto Prefecture). Tango was chosen as an observation site, since it is relatively unpolluted and can therefore serve as a background site for studies of the direct impact of the mainland Asian outflow on the western Pacific area. The purpose of this work is to perform local and column closure experiments on aerosol properties, and to distinguish the anthropogenic part of the aerosol from the natural one. For this purpose, backward air-mass trajectories are calculated to identify potential sources of the observed aerosol. For measurements of aerosol mass-size distributions we used 12-stage low-pressure impactors, which were subsequently analyzed for elemental and ionic concentrations by PIXE, and Ion-chromatography, respectively. In addition, to get both the necessary time- and size-resolution, a DRUM sampler was operated with continuous collection and analysis for mass and optical transmission from 320 nm to 850 nm. Analysis is scheduled by synchrotron-XRF to < 0.1 ng/m3 for trace elemental

  6. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations On Aerosol-Radiation Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Flatau, P. J.; Valero, F. P. J.; Nakajima, T.; Holben, B.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergin, M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Vogelmann, A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    ACE-Asia's extensive measurements from land, ocean, air and space quantified aerosol-radiation interactions. Results from each platform type, plus satellite-suborbital combinations, include: 1. Time series of multiwavelength aerosol optical depth (ADD), Angstrom exponent (alpha), single-scattering albedo (SSA), and size distribution from AERONET radiometry at 13 stations. In China and Korea AOD and alpha were strongly anticorrelated (reflecting transient dust events); dust volume-size modes peaked near 8 microns diameter; and SSA(dust) greater than SSA(pollution). 2. Calculations and measurements of photosynthetically active radiation and aerosols in China yield 24-h average downward surface radiative forcing per AOD(500 nm) of -27 W/sq m (400-700 nm). 3. The Hawaii-Japan cruise sampled a gradient with AOD(500 nm) extremes of 0.1 and 1.1. Shipboard measurements showed that adding dust to pollution increased SSA(550 nm, 55% RH), typically from -0.91 to approx. 0.97. Downwelling 8-12 micron radiances showed aerosol effects, especially in the major April dust event, with longwave forcing estimated at -5 to 15 W/sq m. 4. Extinction profiles from airborne sunphotometry and total-direct-diffuse radiometry show wavelength dependence often varying strongly with height, reflecting layering of dust-dominated over pollution-dominated aerosols. Comparing sunphotometric extinction profiles to those from in situ measurements (number and composition vs size, or scattering and absorption) shows layer heights agree, but extinction sometimes differs. 5. Airborne solar spectral flux radiometry yields absorption spectra for layers. Combining with AOD spectra yields best-fit aerosol single scattering albedo spectra. 6. Visible, NIR and total solar fluxes combined with AOD give radiative forcing efficiencies at surface and aloft.

  7. ACE-Asia Aerosol Optical Depth and Water Vapor Measured by Airborne Sunphotometers and Related to Other Measurements and Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J. A.; Ramirez, S. A.; Kahn, R.; Hegg, D.; Pilewskie, P.; Anderson, T.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the Spring 2001 phase of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the 6-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated on 15 of the 19 research flights of the NCAR C-130, while its 14-channel counterpart (AATS- 14) flew successfully on all 18 research flights of the CIRPAS Twin Otter. ACE-Asia studied aerosol outflow from the Asian continent to the Pacific basin. It was designed to integrate suborbital and satellite measurements and models so as to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosols. AATS-6 and AATS-14 measured solar beam transmission at 6 and 14 wavelengths (380-1021 and 354-1558 nm, respectively), yielding aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and column water vapor (CWV). Vertical differentiation in profiles yielded aerosol extinction spectra and water vapor concentration. The wavelength dependence of these AOD and extinction spectra indicates that supermicron dust was often a major component of the ACE-Asia aerosol. Frequently this dust-containing aerosol extended to high altitudes. For example, in AATS- 14 profiles analyzed to date, 36% of full-column AOD at 525 nm was above 3 km. In contrast, only 10% of CWV was above 3 km. Analyses and applications of AATS-6 and AATS-14 data to date include comparisons to (i) extinction products derived using in situ measurements, (ii) extinction profiles derived from lidar measurements, and (iii) AOD retrievals from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) aboard the TERRA satellite. Other planned collaborative studies include comparisons to results from size spectrometers, chemical measurements, other satellite sensors, flux radiometers, and chemical transport models. Early results of these studies will be presented.

  8. Optical Aerosol Properties Over the Asian Pacific Ocean during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, M. J.; Carrico, C. M.; Kus, P.

    2001-12-01

    The effect of aerosol particles on the atmospheric radiative-energy balance at critical locations around the globe is an area or research that to be better characterized. This research has allowed shipboard measurements of climatically relevant ambient-aerosol optical properties between Hawaii and the coast of China to characterize "clean marine conditions" and then along the coast of China to characterize "polluted conditions" and "mineral dust conditions." Aerosol light scattering properties and in particular the increase in light scattering coefficient with increasing controlled relative humidity (f(RH)) during ACE-Asia showed a wider diversity of profiles than during ACE-1, ACE-2 or at a U.S. continental site. During the Pacific crossing, the signature was clearly marine-seasalt dominated (very hygroscopic with large magnitude growth with a clear deliquescent/crystallization hysteresis loop) and quite similar to the background marine conditions of Cape Grim during ACE-1. Other times when flow was off the Asian continent, the dependence of scattering on controlled RH was quite similar to results obtained in Sagres Portugal during outflow of European air masses (ACE-2, hygroscopic with smoother changes in scattering with increasing RH conditions though some deliquescent/crystallization features). When the aerosol consisted of a large part mineral dust species, the hygroscopic growth in light scattering was quite suppressed. Mineral dust dominated aerosols showed very little growth in light scattering as a function of RH and at times was nearly hygrophobic. However, along with the suppressed hygroscopic growth, deliquescent (step-change) features were often more pronounced than the cases of the more hygroscopic urban-industrial influenced aerosols. These results will also be integrated with laboratory light scattering measurements and field absorption measurements for comparison of light scattering and albedo measurements made by other independent techniques

  9. Providing Size-Resolved Mixing State Inputs to Improve Aerosol Optics Models: Comparison of ACE-Asia Aerosol Chemical Measurements for Different Source Regions With Simultaneous Optical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Poon, G.; Guazzotti, S.; Sodeman, D.; Holecek, J.; Spencer, M.; Prather, K.

    2005-12-01

    processes that could account for the observed differences in particle chemistry. Finally, our size-resolved single-particle mixing state results for ACE-Asia will be compared to those obtained during other several other marine field campaigns.

  10. Composition and major sources of organic compounds of aerosol particulate matter sampled during the ACE-Asia campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Kobayashi, Minoru; Mochida, Michihiro; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Lee, Meehye; Lim, Ho-Jin; Turpin, Barbara J.; Komazaki, Yuichi

    2004-10-01

    The organic compound tracers of atmospheric particulate matter, as well as organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), have been characterized for samples acquired during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) from Gosan, Jeju Island, Korea, from Sapporo, Japan, and from Chichi-jima Island in the western North Pacific, as well as on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration R/V Ronald H. Brown. Total extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine both polar and aliphatic compounds. Total particles, organic matter, and lipid and saccharide compounds were high during the Asian dust episode (early April 2001) compared to levels at other times. The organic matter can be apportioned to seven emission sources and to significant oxidation-producing secondary products during long-range transport. Terrestrial natural background compounds are vascular plant wax lipids derived from direct emission and as part of desert sand dust. Fossil fuel utilization is obvious and derives from petroleum product and coal combustion emissions. Saccharides are a major polar (water-soluble) carbonaceous fraction derived from soil resuspension (agricultural activities). Biomass-burning smoke is evident in all samples and seasons. It contributes up to 13% of the total compound mass as water-soluble constituents. Burning of refuse is another source of organic particles. Varying levels of marine-derived lipids are superimposed during aerosol transport over the ocean. Secondary oxidation products increase with increasing transport distance and time. The ACE-Asia aerosols are composed not only of desert dust but also of soil dust, smoke from biomass and refuse burning, and emissions from fossil fuel use in urban areas.

  11. Regional aerosol properties: Comparisons of boundary layer measurements from ACE 1, ACE 2, Aerosols99, INDOEX, ACE Asia, TARFOX, and NEAQS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2005-07-01

    Means and variability of aerosol chemical composition and optical properties are compared for the first and second Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE 1 and ACE 2), a cruise across the Atlantic (Aerosols99), the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), the Asian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE Asia), the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX), and the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS). These experiments were focused either on the remote marine atmosphere (ACE 1) or areas downwind of continental aerosol source regions including western Europe, North America, Africa, India, and Asia. Presented here are size-segregated concentrations of aerosol mass, sea salt, non-sea-salt (nss) SO4=, NH4+, NO3-, dust, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and nss K+, as well as mass ratios that are commonly used to identify aerosol sources and to assess aerosol processing (Cl- to Na+, OC to nss SO4=, EC to total carbon (TC), EC to nss SO4=, nss K+ to EC, Fe to Al, and Si to Al). Optical properties that are compared include size-segregated scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients, and single-scattering albedo at 550 nm. Size-segregated mass scattering and mass absorption efficiencies for the total aerosol and mass extinction efficiencies for the dominant chemical components also are compared. In addition, we present the contribution to light extinction by the dominant chemical components for each region. All data are based on shipboard measurements performed at a relative humidity of 55 ± 5%. Scattering coefficients and single-scattering albedos also are reported at ambient relative humidity (RH) using published values of f(RH). Finally, aerosol optical depths from each region are compared. Identical sampling protocols were used in all experiments in order to eliminate sampling biases and to make the data directly comparable. Major findings include (1) nss SO4= makes up only 16 to 46% of the submicron aerosol mass

  12. Intercomparisons of airborne measurements of aerosol ionic chemical composition during TRACE-P and ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Weber, R. J.; Maxwell-Meier, K.; Orsini, D. A.; Lee, Y.-N.; Huebert, B. J.; Howell, S. G.; Bertram, T.; Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E.

    2004-08-01

    As part of the two field studies, Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) and the Asian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the inorganic chemical composition of tropospheric aerosols was measured over the western Pacific from three separate aircraft using various methods. Comparisons are made between the rapid online techniques of the particle into liquid sampler (PILS) for measurement of a suite of fine particle a mist chamber/ion chromatograph (MC/IC) measurement of fine sulfate, and the longer time-integrated filter and micro-orifice impactor (MOI) measurements. Comparisons between identical PILS on two separate aircraft flying in formation showed that they were highly correlated (e.g., sulfate r2 of 0.95), but were systematically different by 10 ± 5% (linear regression slope and 95% confidence bounds), and had generally higher concentrations on the aircraft with a low-turbulence inlet and shorter inlet-to-instrument transmission tubing. Comparisons of PILS and mist chamber measurements of fine sulfate on two different aircraft during formation flying had an r2 of 0.78 and a relative difference of 39% ± 5%. MOI ionic data integrated to the PILS upper measurement size of 1.3 μm sampling from separate inlets on the same aircraft showed that for sulfate, PILS and MOI were within 14% ± 6% and correlated with an r2 of 0.87. Most ionic compounds were within ±30%, which is in the range of differences reported between PILS and integrated samplers from ground-based comparisons. In many cases, direct intercomparison between the various instruments is difficult due to differences in upper-size detection limits. However, for this study, the results suggest that the fine particle mass composition measured from aircraft agree to within 30-40%.

  13. Molecular composition of PM 2.5 organic aerosol measured at an urban site of Korea during the ACE-Asia campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung Shik; Bae, Min-Suk; Schauer, James J.; Kim, Young J.; Yong Cho, Sung; Jai Kim, Seung

    Daily fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) samples were collected at Gwangju, Korea, during the ACE-Asia campaign between 26 March and 4 May 2001, to characterize individual organic compounds. Daily air volumes per sample (˜24 m 3) were too low for detailed organic analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), so were grouped based on their air mass trajectories. A total of 9 composites (Groups A-I), seven containing 4-6 daily samples and two containing 2 daily samples, were analyzed to determine the n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, dicarboxylic acids, aromatic acids, resin acids, PAHs, oxy-PAHs, and levoglucosan, etc. Two-day composite samples were formed during the Asian dust storm events (10-13 April) due to the high PM 2.5 mass concentration. The concentrations of n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids were highly elevated when air masses are transported through Korean peninsula (Group B), local anthropogenic pollution strongly impacted on the measurement site (Group C), or when a biomass burning event had occurred (Group H). Of the n-alkanoic acids, octadecanoic acid (C 18) was the most abundant species in most of the composite samples, followed by hexadecanoic acid (C 16), but with lower concentrations for the higher molecular weight acids (⩾C 20), suggesting a greater contribution from petroleum-based emission sources, such as gasoline and diesel vehicles, fuel oil combustion, etc. Also, the concentrations of resin acids were enriched in Groups B and C. A high levoglucosan concentration was observed in the Group H, in which a biomass-burning plume passing through Korean peninsula was transported to the sampling region. For the periods with Asian dust events (Groups D and E), most of the organic species were less abundant than in the other composite sample groups. Additionally, two 12-h PM 2.5 ambient samples, collected nearby an agricultural land during agricultural waste burning episode, were used to analyze individual organic species and examine the

  14. Column Closure Studies of Lower Tropospheric Aerosol and Water Vapor During ACE-Asia Using Airborne Sunphotometer, Airborne In-Situ and Ship-Based Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Hegg, A.; Wang, J.; Bates, D.; Redemann, J.; Russells, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Welton, E. J.; Seinfield, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    We assess the consistency (closure) between solar beam attenuation by aerosols and water vapor measured by airborne sunphotometry and derived from airborne in-situ, and ship-based lidar measurements during the April 2001 Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The airborne data presented here were obtained aboard the Twin Otter aircraft. Comparing aerosol extinction o(550 nm) from four different techniques shows good agreement for the vertical distribution of aerosol layers. However, the level of agreement in absolute magnitude of the derived aerosol extinction varied among the aerosol layers sampled. The sigma(550 nm) computed from airborne in-situ size distribution and composition measurements shows good agreement with airborne sunphotometry in the marine boundary layer but is considerably lower in layers dominated by dust if the particles are assumed to be spherical. The sigma(550 nm) from airborne in-situ scattering and absorption measurements are about approx. 13% lower than those obtained from airborne sunphotometry during 14 vertical profiles. Combining lidar and the airborne sunphotometer measurements reveals the prevalence of dust layers at altitudes up to 10 km with layer aerosol optical depth (from 3.5 to 10 km altitude) of approx. 0.1 to 0.2 (500 nm) and extinction-to-backscatter ratios of 59-71 sr (523 nm). The airborne sunphotometer aboard the Twin Otter reveals a relatively dry atmosphere during ACE- Asia with all water vapor columns less than 1.5 cm and water vapor densities w less than 12 g/cu m. Comparing layer water vapor amounts and w from the airborne sunphotometer to the same quantities measured with aircraft in-situ sensors leads to a high correlation (r(sup 3)=0.96) but the sunphotometer tends to underestimate w by 7%.

  15. Chemical properties and outflow patterns of anthropogenic and dust particles on Rishiri Island during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Uyama, Yukiko; Hayano, Teruaki; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Uno, Itsushi; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of chemical properties and transport mechanisms of continental aerosols are necessary for estimating their influences on global radiative budget and on the global material cycle. Intensive measurements of atmospheric aerosols and the associated species on Rishiri Island, near the northern tip of Japan, were conducted from March to May 2001, in order to understand the chemical properties, source regions, transport pathways, and transport patterns of anthropogenic and mineral aerosols over the east Asian Pacific Rim region during the spring. Mean concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-Ca2+ in aerosols were 2.48, 0.64, 0.72, and 0.17 μg m-3, respectively. Elemental carbon and organic carbon in fine particles (d < 2.5 μm) yielded mean concentrations of 0.25 and 0.80 μg m-3, respectively. The concentrations of these species frequently increased to higher values because of outbreaks of continental polluted air masses, whereas under background conditions, they decreased to lower values similar to those observed over the remote ocean. Our results demonstrate that nss-SO42- and NH4+ coexist in fine particles, that NO3- and nss-Ca2+ coexist in coarse particles, and that each set is transported in an alternate manner. Continentally derived NO3- is transported as coarse particle to the east Asian Pacific Rim region. Anthropogenic pollutants and dust particles are not necessarily transported together. It was often found that anthropogenic fine particles containing abundant nss-SO42- appeared first and were then followed by large mineral particles that had absorbed NO3-. Short-term intrusion of the air masses containing abundant particulate carbonaceous compounds, probably due to the influence of biomass burning, also often occurred during the outflow events of continental air masses. Atmospheric behaviors of sulfate, nitrate, and carbonaceous species are different from one another, although they are all derived mainly from combustion processes.

  16. Observed emotion frequency versus intensity as predictors of socioemotional maladjustment.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Maciel M; Eisenberg, Nancy; Valiente, Carlos; Spinrad, Tracy L; VanSchyndel, Sarah K; Diaz, Anjolii; Berger, Rebecca H; Silva, Kassondra M; Southworth, Jody; Piña, Armando A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether observed emotional frequency (the proportion of instances an emotion was observed) and intensity (the strength of an emotion when it was observed) uniquely predicted kindergartners' (N = 301) internalizing and externalizing problems. Analyses were tested in a structural equation modeling (SEM) framework with data from multireporters (reports of problem behaviors from teachers and parents) and naturalistic observations of emotion in the fall semester. For observed positive emotion, both frequency and intensity negatively predicted parent- or teacher-reported internalizing symptoms. Anger frequency positively predicted parent- and teacher-reported externalizing symptoms, whereas anger intensity positively predicted parent- and teacher-reported externalizing and parent-reported internalizing symptoms. The findings support the importance of examining both aspects of emotion when predicting maladjustment.

  17. Observational tests of hurricane intensity estimations using GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, Panagiotis; Luo, Zhengzhao Johnny; Emanuel, Kerry; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-02-01

    This study presents a novel approach to estimating the intensity of hurricanes using temperature profiles from Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPSRO) measurements. Previous research has shown that the temperature difference between the ocean surface and the eyewall outflow region defines hurricanes' thermodynamic efficiency, which is directly proportional to the storm's intensity. Outflow temperatures in the eyewall region of 27 hurricanes in 2004-2011 were obtained from GPSRO observations. These observations, along with ocean surface temperatures from NASA Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, made it possible to estimate hurricane intensities using a simplified hurricane model. Our preliminary results are quantitatively consistent with best-track values from the National Hurricane Center within 9.4%. As a by-product of our study, we present for the first time GPSRO vertical temperature profiles in the vicinity of the eyewall region of hurricanes, which we compared with collocated temperature profiles from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reanalysis Interim (ERA-Interim). Some of the GPSRO data sets reveal a double tropopause in the vicinity of the eyewall—a characteristic that we do not see in ERA-Interim. We conclude that GPSRO observations can be of supplementary assistance in augmenting existing data sets used in hurricane intensity estimation. GPSROs' cloud-penetrating capability and high vertical resolution can be useful in providing soundings in the area close to the eyewall region of hurricanes revealing detailed information about their thermal structure, potentially advancing our current knowledge of their dynamics, evolution, and physics.

  18. Aerosol classification using EARLINET measurements for an intensive observational period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Mona, Lucia; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network) organized an intensive observation period during summer 2012. This campaign aimed at the provision of advanced observations of physical and chemical aerosol properties, at the delivery of information about the 3D distribution of European atmospheric aerosols, and at the monitoring of Saharan dust intrusions events. EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) participated in the ACTRIS campaign through the addition of measurements according to the EARLINET schedule as well as daily lidar-profiling measurements around sunset by 11 selected lidar stations for the period from 8 June - 17 July. EARLINET observations during this almost two-month period are used to characterize the optical properties and vertical distribution of long-range transported aerosol over the broader area of Mediterranean basin. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, Angstrom exponents) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on EARLINET observations of frequently observed aerosol types is used to classify aerosols into seven separate types. The summertime Mediterranean basin is prone to African dust aerosols. Two major dust events were studied. The first episode occurred from the 18 to 21 of the June and the second one lasted from 28 June to 6 July. The lidar ratio within the dust layer was found to be wavelength independent with mean values of 58±14 sr at 355 nm and 57±11 sr at 532 nm. For the particle linear depolarization ratio, mean values of 0.27±0.04 at 532 nm have been found. Acknowledgements. The financial support for EARLINET in the ACTRIS Research Infrastructure Project by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 654169 and previously under grant agreement no. 262254 in the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Observational challenges in Lyα intensity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comaschi, P.; Yue, B.; Ferrara, A.

    2016-09-01

    Intensity mapping (IM) is sensitive to the cumulative line emission of galaxies. As such it represents a promising technique for statistical studies of galaxies fainter than the limiting magnitude of traditional galaxy surveys. The strong hydrogen Lyα line is the primary target for such an experiment, as its intensity is linked to star formation activity and the physical state of the interstellar (ISM) and intergalactic (IGM) medium. However, to extract the meaningful information one has to solve the confusion problems caused by interloping lines from foreground galaxies. We discuss here the challenges for a Lyα IM experiment targeting z > 4 sources. We find that the Lyα power spectrum can be in principle easily (marginally) obtained with a 40 cm space telescope in a few days of observing time up to z ≲ 8 (z ˜ 10) assuming that the interloping lines (e.g. Hα, [O II], [O III] lines) can be efficiently removed. We show that interlopers can be removed by using an ancillary photometric galaxy survey with limiting AB mag ˜26 in the NIR bands (Y, J, H, or K). This would enable detection of the Lyα signal from 5 < z < 9 faint sources. However, if a [C II] IM experiment is feasible, by cross-correlating the Lyα with the [C II] signal the required depth of the galaxy survey can be decreased to AB mag ˜24. This would bring the detection at reach of future facilities working in close synergy.

  20. Evaluating rainfall kinetic energy - intensity relationships with observed disdrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo-Martinez, Marta; Begueria, Santiago; Latorre, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall kinetic energy is required for determining erosivity, the ability of rainfall to detach soil particles and initiate erosion. Its determination relay on the use of disdrometers, i.e. devices capable of measuring the drop size distribution and velocity of falling raindrops. In the absence of such devices, rainfall kinetic energy is usually estimated with empirical expressions relating rainfall energy and intensity. We evaluated the performance of 14 rainfall energy equations in estimating one-minute rainfall energy and event total energy, in comparison with observed data from 821 rainfall episodes (more than 100 thousand one-minute observations) by means of an optical disdrometer. In addition, two sources of bias when using such relationships were evaluated: i) the influence of using theoretical terminal raindrop fall velocities instead of measured values; and ii) the influence of time aggregation (rainfall intensity data every 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-minutes). Empirical relationships did a relatively good job when complete events were considered (R2 > 0.82), but offered poorer results for within-event (one-minute resolution) variation. Also, systematic biases where large for many equations. When raindrop size distribution was known, estimating the terminal fall velocities by empirical laws produced good results even at fine time resolution. The influence of time aggregation was very high in the estimated kinetic energy, although linear scaling may allow empirical correction. This results stress the importance of considering all these effects when rainfall energy needs to be estimated from more standard precipitation records. , and recommends the use of disdrometer data to locally determine rainfall kinetic energy.

  1. Extremely intense ELF magnetosonic waves: A survey of polar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Falkowski, Barbara J.; Pickett, Jolene S.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Santolik, Ondrej; Lakhina, Gurbax S.

    2014-02-01

    A Polar magnetosonic wave (MSW) study was conducted using 1 year of 1996-1997 data (during solar minimum). Waves at and inside the plasmasphere were detected at all local times with a slight preference for occurrence in the midnight-postmidnight sector. Wave occurrence (and intensities) peaked within~±5° of the magnetic equator, with half maxima at ~±10°. However, MSWs were also detected as far from the equator as +20° and 60° MLAT but with lower intensities. An extreme MSW intensity event of amplitude Bw = ~± 1 nT and Ew = ~± 25 mV/m was detected. This event occurred near local midnight, at the plasmapause, at the magnetic equator, during an intense substorm event, e.g., a perfect occurrence. These results support the idea of generation by protons injected from the plasma sheet into the midnight sector magnetosphere by substorm electric fields. MSWs were also detected near noon (1259 MLT) during relative geomagnetic quiet (low AE). A possible generation mechanism is a recovering/expanding plasmasphere engulfing preexisting energetic ions, in turn leading to ion instability. The wave magnetic field components are aligned along the ambient magnetic field direction, with the wave electric components orthogonal, indicating linear wave polarization. The MSW amplitudes decreased at locations further from the magnetic equator, while transverse whistler mode wave amplitudes (hiss) increased. We argue that intense MSWs are always present somewhere in the magnetosphere during strong substorm/convection events. We thus suggest that modelers use dynamic particle tracing codes and the maximum (rather than average) wave amplitudes to simulate wave-particle interactions.

  2. SAS 3 observations of Cygnus X-1 - The intensity dips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Canizares, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    In general, the dips are observed to occur near superior conjunctions of the X-ray source, but one pair of 2-minute dips occurs when the X-ray source is closer to the observer than is the supergiant companion. The dips are analyzed spectrally with the aid of seven energy channels in the range 1.2-50 keV. Essentially, there is no change in the spectral index during the dips. Reductions in the count rates are observed at energies exceeding 6 keV for some of the dips, but the dip amplitude is always significantly greater in the 1.2-3 keV band. It is believed that absorption by partially ionized gas may best explain these results, since the observations of Pravdo et al. (1980) rule out absorption by unionized material. Estimates for the intervening gas density, extent, and distance from the X-ray source are presented. Attention is also given to the problems confronting the models for the injection of gas through the line of sight, believed to be inclined by approximately 30 deg from the binary pole.

  3. SOLAR H{alpha} OSCILLATIONS FROM INTENSITY AND DOPPLER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2013-03-01

    Chromospheric wave activity around flares and filaments has been a research focus for years, and could provide indirect measurements of local conditions that are not otherwise accessible. One interesting observed phenomenon is oscillations in filaments, activated by distant flares and the large-scale waves they produce. Characteristics of these oscillations, such as periods, amplitudes, and lifetimes, can provide unique information about the filament. We measure oscillation properties in flares and filaments from H{alpha} chromospheric data using a new method that provides important spatial and frequency content of the dynamics. We apply the method to two flare events where filaments are observed to oscillate and determine their properties. We find strong oscillatory signal in flaring active regions in the chromosphere over a range of frequencies. Two filaments are found to oscillate without any detectable chromospheric wave acting as an activation mechanism. We find that filaments oscillate with periods of tens of minutes, but variations are significant at small spatial scales along the filamentary region. The results suggest that there is a frequency dependence of the oscillation amplitude, as well as a spatial dependence along single filaments that is more difficult to quantify. It also appears that the strength of the oscillations does not necessarily depend on the strength of the trigger, although there are other possible effects that make this conclusion preliminary. Applications of this technique to other events and different data sets will provide important new insights into the local energy densities and magnetic fields associated with dynamic chromospheric structures.

  4. Calculation of intensity of high energy muon groups observed deep underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavilov, Y. N.; Dedenko, L. G.

    1985-01-01

    The intensity of narrow muon groups observed in Kolar Gold Field (KGF) at the depth of 3375 m.w.e. was calculated in terms of quark-gluon strings model for high energy hadron - air nuclei interactions by the method of direct modeling of nuclear cascade in the air and muon propagation in the ground for normal primary cosmic ray composition. The calculated intensity has been found to be approx. 10 to the 4 times less than one observed experimentally.

  5. Key Issues in Teaching EFL/ESL Intensive Reading: A Videotaped Self-Observation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widodo, Handoyo Puji

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a videotaped self-observation of a 47 minute ESL reading lesson. The focus of the lesson was on intensive reading. The entire teaching session was videotaped; the videotaped data were analyzed using (a) ethnographic microanalysis, (b) selective verbatim transcripts, (c) Seating Chart Observation REcord (SCORE), (d)…

  6. Can magnetotail reconnection produce the auroral intensities observed in the conjugate ionosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østgaard, N.; Snekvik, K.; Borg, A. L.; Åsnes, A.; Pedersen, A.; Øieroset, M.; Phan, T.; Haaland, S. E.

    2009-06-01

    In a recent case study, Borg et al. (2007) reported that an inverted V structure, caused by a field-aligned potential drop of 30 kV producing very strong X-ray aurora, was found in connection with tail reconnection. However, the in situ particle measurements indicated clearly that the particles responsible for the X-ray aurora were not accelerated by the reconnection process. In this article, we report the predicted auroral intensities of thirteen reconnection events where Cluster passed through the reconnection region. For six of the events, global auroral imaging data were available and the predicted auroral intensities could be compared with the observed intensities. Our main findings are as follows: (1) Acceleration in the reconnection region is generally not sufficient to account for the observed auroral intensities. (2) Additional acceleration between the reconnection region and the ionosphere is needed to explain the auroral intensities. Although we see signatures that point toward potential drops at the flanks of bursty bulk flows (BBFs), we also find signatures of Alfvén wave accelerated electrons at 700 km and we are not able to determine the most likely acceleration mechanism. (3) The reconnection events are observed 2-14 min after substorm onset and indicate that reconnection is an expanding process observed along the poleward boundary of the aurora.

  7. Intensities and spatiotemporal variability of equatorial noise emissions observed by the Cluster spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Santolík, O.; Hrbáčková, Z.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2015-03-01

    Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic waves observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency. We present the analysis of 2229 EN events identified in the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment data of the Cluster spacecraft during the years 2001-2010. EN emissions are distinguished using the polarization analysis, and their intensity is determined based on the evaluation of the Poynting flux rather than on the evaluation of only the electric/magnetic field intensity. The intensity of EN events is analyzed as a function of the frequency, the position of the spacecraft inside/outside the plasmasphere, magnetic local time, and the geomagnetic activity. The emissions have higher frequencies and are more intense in the plasma trough than in the plasmasphere. EN events observed in the plasma trough are most intense close to the local noon, while EN events observed in the plasmasphere are nearly independent on magnetic local time (MLT). The intensity of EN events is enhanced during disturbed periods, both inside the plasmasphere and in the plasma trough. Observations of the same events by several Cluster spacecraft allow us to estimate their spatiotemporal variability. EN emissions observed in the plasmasphere do not change on the analyzed spatial scales (ΔMLT<0.2h, Δr<0.2 RE), but they change significantly on time scales of about an hour. The same appears to be the case also for EN events observed in the plasma trough, although the plasma trough dependencies are less clear.

  8. Observations of intense ULF pulsation activity near the geomagnetic equator during quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Acuna, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper analyzes observations, made by particle and field instruments on the AMPTE CCE satellite, of intense ULF pulsations in the earth's magnetosphere near the geomagnetic equator. These pulsations were observed during magnetically quiet periods in regions characterized by intense fluxes of warm strongly trapped light ions, predominantly H(+), and often with streaming low-energy plasma. The strong latitudinal localization of these pulsations is interpreted to be due to equatorial mass loading or to partial reflection of Alfven wave energy by latitudinal gradients in plasma density. Possible sources of wave energy for these events are discussed.

  9. Space-Borne Observations of Intense Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Above Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2011-01-01

    Intense millisecond flashes of MeV photons have been observed with space-borne detectors. These terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma- Ray Observatory (CGRO) in the early 1990s. They are now being observed with several other instruments, including the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detectors on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Although Fermi-GBM was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for these TGF observations. On several occasions, intense beams of high-energy electrons and positrons have been observed at the geomagnetic conjugate points of TGFs.

  10. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities and Ion Plasma Parameters in the Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.; Lemon, C.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Schulz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current and plasma sheet modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport and magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. Models with and without self-consistency can lead to significantly different magnitudes and spatial distributions of plasma pressure and magnetic intensity during disturbed times. In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities (GOES and Polar/MFE) and ion densities (LANL/MPA and Polar/CAMMICE) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet for conditions corresponding to the 11 August 2000 storm using the self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a constant magnetopause location. Using the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 RE as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The simulated ion densities at different magnetic local times agree fairly well with those from the re-analysis model of LANL/MPA densities of O’Brien and Lemon [Space Weather, 2007]. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 RE) and on the Polar satellite. Agreement between the simulated and observed magnetic intensities tends to agree better on the nightside than on the dayside in the inner magnetosphere. In particular, the model cannot account for observed drops in the dayside magnetic intensity during decreases in the solar wind pressure. We will modify the RCM-E to include a time-varying magnetopause location to simulate compressions and expansions associated with variations in the solar wind pressure. We investigate whether this will lead to improved agreement between the simulated and model magnetic intensities.

  11. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  12. Observations of secondary emission chamber degradation from very high intensity proton beams at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Chiang, I.H.; Pendzick, A.; Tallerico, T.

    1997-08-01

    Degradation of Secondary Emission Chamber (SEC) efficiencies has been seen in the past. As a result, instruments in use today are built to minimize any such effects. With beam intensities as high as 6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse incident on these devices the authors are again observing significant degradation in SEC efficiencies. In this report the authors will present observations of these effects and methods they have developed to cope with them.

  13. Does Velocity Redistribution Really Enhance the HE 304 A Line to Observed Intensities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Stuart; Andretta, Vincenzo; Garcia, Adriana; Brosius, Jeffrey; Behring, William

    1999-01-01

    Previous work by this group has demonstrated that small-scale nonthermal velocities probably play a significant role in enhancing the intensity of the He II 304 A line above values predicted by the static atmosphere NLTE theories, and more in conformity with Skylab and SOHO observations. This presentation briefly summarizes the evidence for this conclusion, emphasizing SOHO and correlated groundbased observations, of which examples are presented. However, in contrast to the previous studies, the tact taken here is more critical, asking the question "Can velocity redistribution fully explain the observations of the 304 A line, and what counter-indications and problems remain?" The conclusion reached is that, while velocity redistribution plays a significant role in the intensity enhancement, it may not be the whole story. Some other mechanism, associated with velocity filtration, may be at work.

  14. Empirical relationships between instrumental ground motions and observed intensities for two great Chilean subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilia, M. G.; Baker, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    We determine empirical relationships between instrumental peak ground motions and observed intensities for two great Chilean subduction earthquakes: the 2010 Mw8.8 Maule earthquake and the 2014 Mw8.2 Iquique earthquake. Both occurred immediately offshore on the primary plate boundary interface between the Nazca and South America plates. They are among the largest earthquakes to be instrumentally recorded; the 2010 Maule event is the second largest earthquake to produce strong motion recordings. Ground motion to intensity conversion equations (GMICEs) are used to reconstruct the distribution of shaking for historical earthquakes by using intensities estimated from contemporary accounts. Most great (M>8) earthquakes, like these, occur within subduction zones, yet few GMICEs exist for subduction earthquakes. It is unclear whether GMICEs developed for active crustal regions, such as California, can be scaled up to the large M of subduction zone events, or if new data sets must be analyzed to develop separate subduction GMICEs. To address this question, we pair instrumental peak ground motions, both acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV), with intensities derived from onsite surveys of earthquake damage made in the weeks after the events and internet-derived felt reports. We fit a linear predictive equation between the geometric mean of the maximum PGA or PGV of the two horizontal components and intensity, using linear least squares. We use a weighting scheme to express the uncertainty of the pairings based on a station's proximity to the nearest intensity observation. The intensity data derived from the onsite surveys is a complete, high-quality investigation of the earthquake damage. We perform the computations using both the survey data and community decimal intensities (CDI) calculated from felt reports volunteered by citizens (USGS "Did You Feel It", DYFI) and compare the results. We compare the GMICEs we developed to the most widely used GMICEs from California and

  15. Intense sub-kilometer-scale boundary layer rolls observed in hurricane fran

    PubMed

    Wurman; Winslow

    1998-04-24

    High-resolution observations obtained with the Doppler On Wheels (DOW) mobile weather radar near the point of landfall of hurricane Fran (1996) revealed the existence of intense, sub-kilometer-scale, boundary layer rolls that strongly modulated the near-surface wind speed. It is proposed that these structures are one cause of geographically varying surface damage patterns that have been observed after some landfalling hurricanes and that they cause much of the observed gustiness, bringing high-velocity air from aloft to the lowest observable levels. High-resolution DOW radar observations are contrasted with lower-resolution observations obtained with an operational weather radar, which underestimated peak low-level wind speeds.

  16. Observation of Relativistic Electron Microbursts in Conjunction with Intense Radiation Belt Whistler-Mode Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kersten, K.; Cattell, C. A.; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Wilson, L. B., III; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Roth, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present multi-satellite observations of large amplitude radiation belt whistler-mode waves and relativistic electron precipitation. On separate occasions during the Wind petal orbits and STEREO phasing orbits, Wind and STEREO recorded intense whistler-mode waves in the outer nightside equatorial radiation belt with peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 300 mV/m. During these intervals of intense wave activity, SAMPEX recorded relativistic electron microbursts in near magnetic conjunction with Wind and STEREO. This evidence of microburst precipitation occurring at the same time and at nearly the same magnetic local time and L-shell with a bursty temporal structure similar to that of the observed large amplitude wave packets suggests a causal connection between the two phenomena. Simulation studies corroborate this idea, showing that nonlinear wave.particle interactions may result in rapid energization and scattering on timescales comparable to those of the impulsive relativistic electron precipitation.

  17. Interfacial ion-transfer mechanism for the intense luminescence observed when opening self-seal envelopes.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Andrew J

    2012-09-18

    The unusually intense luminescence (commonly called triboluminescence) observed when opening self-seal envelopes has been studied using spectroscopy. Emissions from gas-phase species due to electrical discharge were observed, which in the case of air consists of vibronic transitions of N(2)(C(3)Π(u)-B(3)Π(g)) in the ultraviolet (UV) region (280-400 nm). However, the major cause of the intense blue luminescence (around 435 nm) is attributed to optical brightening agents added to the white paper. The results suggest that the emission from the brightening agents may be caused by two mechanisms: (i) fluorescence due to excitation by the UV light from the gas discharge and (ii) nonoptically, by electron transfer. The electrical discharge results from contact electrification; we propose a mechanism for the charge transfer involving a net migration of hydroxide anions out of the paper into the wet latex-adhesive during drying. PMID:22924818

  18. Space-Borne Observations of Intense Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Above Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    Intense millisecond flashes of MeV photons are being observed with space-borne detectors. These terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in the early 1990s. They are now being observed with several other instruments, including the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detectors on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Although Fermi-GBM was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for TGF observations. The TGFs usually have extremely hard continuous spectra, typical of highly-Comptonized bremsstrahlung radiation. These spectral are harder than those of GRBs, with photons extending to over 40 MeV. The most likely origin of these high-energy photons is bremsstrahlung radiation produced by a relativistic runaway avalanche electron beam. Such a beam is expected to be produced in an extended, intense electric field in or above thunderstorm regions. The altitude of origin and beaming characteristics of the radiation are quite uncertain. These TGFs may produce an appreciable radiation dose to passengers and crew in nearby aircraft. They have generated considerable observational and theoretical interest in recent years. Instruments are being designed specifically for TGF observations from new spacecraft as well as from airborne platforms.

  19. Observations of angular distributions of low energy electron intensities over the auroral zones with Ariel 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    The electron intensities considered are within the energy range from 244 eV to 10.8 keV. The measurements were made at an altitude of about 570 km over the local-evening sector of the auroral zone. Aspects of instrumentation are discussed along with details regarding the observations, energy-time spectrograms, the signature of the plasma sheet, and inverted V events. The initial results reported provide new information concerning auroral acceleration mechanisms.

  20. Intense Particulate Pollution Events Observed with Lidar over the Paris Megalopolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, Patrick; Royer, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The great particulate pollution event that affected the Paris Megalopolis in March 2014 was due to long-range transport from the northern-northeastern Europe. Although this phenomenon has appeared as exceptional in the media, this is not an exception and similar events have already been observed by lidar measurements. Here we will briefly describe and illustrate the origin of this intense pollution obviously harmful to health.

  1. Kinesonde observations of ionosphere modification by intense electromagnetic fields from Platteville, Colorado.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Observations by the Kinesonde (a multifrequency, spaced antenna, digitized complex-amplitude radio sounding system) of ionospheric responses to excitation by the high-power transmitter at Platteville, Colo., are described. Increases of echo scintillation rate and intensity at frequencies reflected near and far from the excitation level are shown. Significant onset delays of these responses suggest disturbance propagation velocities of a few kilometers per second. Calculated echolocations show a time-dependent development toward the excitation region, again with a delayed response. Comments are offered regarding the relative utility of ionogram and Kinesonde observations for study of these phenomena.

  2. High-intensity geomagnetic field 'spike' observed at ca. 3000 cal BP in Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Mark D.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Waters, Michael R.; Lundelius, Ernest; Forman, Steven L.

    2016-05-01

    By observing the fluctuations in direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field through time, we increase our understanding of the fluid motions of the Earth's outer core that sustain the geomagnetic field, the geodynamo. Recent archaeomagnetic studies in the Near East have found extremely rapid increases - 'spikes' - in geomagnetic field intensity at ca. 3000 yr cal BP. These observations have proved problematic for our current understanding of core-flow. However, until now, these geomagnetic spikes had not been observed outside of the Near East, where they have been preserved in metallurgical slag and fired, mud brick walls. We present a new, fully oriented, geomagnetic secular variation and relative palaeointensity (RPI) record for the last 17,000 yr from Hall's Cave, Texas, whose complete, >3.8 m thick sedimentary sequence spans from the present to 16 , 850 ± 110 RC yr BP (Modern to 20,600 cal BP). Within the stable, cool climate of the cave, pedogenic and bioturbation processes are negligible to non-existent, thereby limiting post-depositional physical and geochemical alteration of the magnetic record. The sub-aerial and subterranean setting of the sedimentary sequence in Hall's Cave enabled us to collect oriented palaeomagnetic cubes from a previously excavated stratigraphic section. The palaeomagnetic samples yielded high-quality vectors. An age model for the sequence, determined using 15 AMS 14C-dates on individual bones from microvertebrates, was combined with the palaeomagnetic data to construct a secular variation record. The record is in broad agreement with predictions by Holocene field models for the site's location. However, starting ca. 3000 yr ago, the RPI data indicate an almost four-fold increase in geomagnetic field intensity lasting several hundred years. This record presents well-dated evidence, obtained using conventional techniques, for the existence of a geomagnetic intensity spike in North America that is contemporaneous with the

  3. Multi-satellite observations of energy transport during an intense geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Ma, Yuduan; Duan, Aiying; Dunlop, M. W.

    2016-05-01

    Energy transport during a geomagnetic substorm is a very important process for solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling and the energy cycle in the magnetotail. In this paper, we use magnetotail data from the five THEMIS probes and two Cluster satellites on the dayside to investigate the energy transport of one intense storm during the period from 08 March to 11 March 2008 at large spatial-temporal scales. Simultaneous observations of the five THEMIS probes indicate that there is a stronger and earlier duskward energy flux density in the near-Earth magnetotail than that in the mid-tail in the initial phase. Low energy particles inject earthward from the dusk flank. Stronger and more variable earthward energy flux density is observed in the mid-tail compared to that near Earth in the main phase; mainly caused by high-speed flow. Tailward energy flux was observed in the near-Earth and mid-tail regions during the recovery phase. Dayside data observed by two Cluster satellites show that the duskward energy flux may be related to stable solar wind input. Tailward energy flux on the dayside should experience some energy conversion process in the magnetotail before it can provide the earthward energy flux in the magnetotail for this intense storm. The strongest energy transport observed by the nightside probes occurs in the main phase. However, the strongest energy measured by the dayside satellites is in the recovery phase without intense activities, two hours later. Different features of the energy transport in the three phases of the storm may be closely related to the different physical processes such as the energy entry, westward drift, particle injection or other potential mechanisms.

  4. Observing ground surface change series at active volcanoes in Indonesia using backscattering intensity of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Trianaputri, Mila Olivia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia contains 27 active volcanoes passing the West through the East part. Therefore, Indonesia is the most hazard front due to the volcanic activities. To obtain the new precursory signals leading to the eruptions, we applied remote sensing technique to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes. Sinabung volcano is located at Karo Region, North Sumatra Province. This volcano is a strato volcano type which is re-activated in August 2010. The eruption continues to the later years by ejecting volcanic products such as lava, pyroclastic flow, and ash fall deposits. This study is targeted to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung volcano since 2007 to 2011. In addition, we also compared the summit ground surface changes after the eruptions of Kelud volcano in 2007. Kelud volcano is also strato volcano type which is located at East Java, Indonesia. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remotely sensed technology makes possible to observe rapidly a wide ground surface changes related to ground surface roughness. Detection series were performed by extracting the backscattering intensity of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The intensity values were then calculated using a Normalized Radar Cross-Section (NRCS). Based on surface roughness criterion at the summit of Sinabung volcano, we could observe the ground surface changes prior to the early eruption in August 2010. The continuous increment of NRCS values showed clearly at window size 3×3 pixel of the summit of Sinabung volcano. The same phenomenon was also detected at the summit of Kelud volcano after the 2007 eruptions. The detected ground surface changes were validated using optical Landsat-8, backscattering intensity ratio for volcanic products detection, and radial component of a tilt-meter data.

  5. Constraining snow model choices in a transitional snow environment with intensive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayand, N. E.; Massmann, A.; Clark, M. P.; Lundquist, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of existing energy balance snow models exhibits a large spread in the simulated snow water equivalent, snow depth, albedo, and surface temperature. Indentifying poor model representations of physical processes within intercomparison studies is difficult due to multiple differences between models as well as non-orthogonal metrics used. Efforts to overcome these obstacles for model development have focused on a modeling framework that allows multiple representations of each physical process within one structure. However, there still exists a need for snow study sites within complex terrain that observe enough model states and fluxes to constrain model choices. In this study we focus on an intensive snow observational site located in the maritime-transitional snow climate of Snoqualmie Pass WA (Figure 1). The transitional zone has been previously identified as a difficult climate to simulate snow processes; therefore, it represents an ideal model-vetting site. From two water years of intensive observational data, we have learned that a more honest comparison with observations requires that the modeled states or fluxes be as similar to the spatial and temporal domain of the instrument, even if it means changing the model to match what is being observed. For example, 24-hour snow board observations do not capture compaction of the underlying snow; therefore, a modeled "snow board" was created that only includes new snow accumulation and new snow compaction. We extend this method of selective model validation to all available Snoqualmie observations to constrain model choices within the Structure for Understanding Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA) framework. Our end goal is to provide a more rigorous and systematic method for diagnosing problems within snow models at a site given numerous snow observations.

  6. Signal-to-noise enhancement in ground-based intensity observations of solar p modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Marvin E.

    1995-01-01

    Intensity observations of solar p modes are needed to form a complete picture of wave propagation in the photosphere. Ground-based intensity observations are severely hampered by terrestrial atmospheric noise. Partial cancellation of the noise power can be achieved if two spectra having disparate signal-to- noise ratios, and based on time series acquired simultaneously at the same site, are combined. A method of combining the spectra is suggested in which one amplitude is scaled and subtracted from the other. The result is squared yielding a positive-definite power density. To test the method, the intensity of light scattered by the Earth's atmnosphere was recorded at fifteen- second intervals in two narrow bands centered on 0.5 microns and 1.6 microns. When the two resulting spectra were combined, the noise power was attenuated by a factor of 2.7. The scale factor was varied about its optimum value, revealing that noise peaks have a different siganture than signal peaks, and opening up the possibility of a new tool in discrimination against noise peaks. Maxima at symmetry-allowed frequencies and minima at symmetry- forbidden frequencies indicate that the possibility that these results are obtained by chance is only 6.1 x 10(exp -4). The positions of these maxima and minima also support the solar-cycle dependent frequency shifts found by Palle, Regulo, and Roca Cortes.

  7. Unusual Galactic Cosmic Ray Intensity and Spectral Changes Observed by V1 Near The Heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, W. R.; Quenby, J. J.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss here two unusual increases of cosmic ray intensity that were observed by V1 in the last 1.1 AU before it crossed the heliopause in 2012 August, at 121.5 AU. These two increases are roughly similar in amplitude and result in a total increase in ˜1 GV cosmic ray nuclei of over 50% and 0.01 GV electrons of a factor ˜2. During the first increase the changes in the B field are small. After the first increase the B field changes become large and during the second increase the B field variations and cosmic ray changes are correlated to within ± one day. During these time intervals, the rigidity dependence of the increases of GCR H and He nuclei from 100-600 MeV/nuc resemble those used to describe the solar modulation near the Earth during a large transient decrease but the ratio between the intensity changes of H, He, and electrons are different. The magnitude of these increases at Voyager is ˜1/3 of the modulation that is required to produce the total modulation of protons, helium nuclei, and electrons between the local interstellar intensities and those observed at the Earth at the 2009 sunspot minima. This may imply that a significant part of the residual solar modulation at times of sunspot minima occurs near the heliopause itself.

  8. Retrieval of Intensive Aerosol Properties from MFRSR observations: Partly Cloudy Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

    2010-09-30

    An approach for the obtaining column intensive aerosol properties, namely the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP), from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) spectral observations under partly cloudy conditions is described. The approach involves the MFRSR-based aerosol retrieval for clear-sky periods and an interpolation of the retrieved column aerosol properties for cloudy periods. The observed weak diurnal variability of SSA and ASP at the surface and the close association of the surface intensive aerosol properties with their column counterparts form the basis of such interpolation. The approach is evaluated by calculating the corresponding clear-sky total, direct and diffuse fluxes at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870 nm) and compare them with the observed fluxes. The aerosol properties provided by this approach are applied for (i) an examination of the statistical relationship between spectral (visible spectral range) and broadband values of the total normalized cloud radiative forcing and (ii) an estimation of the fractional sky cover. Data collected during 13 days with single-layer cumulus clouds observed at U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during summer 2007 are applied to illustrate the performance and application of this approach.

  9. Spatial correlations in intense ionospheric scintillations - comparison between numerical computation and observation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, H.

    1987-06-01

    The spatial correlations in intense ionospheric scintillations were analyzed by comparing numerical results with observational ones. The observational results were obtained by spaced-receiver scintillation measurements of VHF satellite radiowave. The numerical computation was made by using the fourth-order moment equation with fairly realistic ionospheric irregularity models, in which power-law irregularities with spectral index 4, both thin and thick slabs, and both isotropic and anisotropic irregularities, were considered. Evolution of the S(4) index and the transverse correlation function was computed. The numerical result that the transverse correlation distance decreases with the increase in S(4) was consistent with that obtained in the observation, suggesting that multiple scattering plays an important role in the intense scintillations observed. The anisotropy of irregularities proved to act as if the density fluctuation increased. This effect, as well as the effect of slab thickness, was evaluated by the total phase fluctuations that the radiowave experienced in the slab. On the basis of the comparison, the irregularity height and electron-density fluctuation which is necessary to produce a particular strength of scintillation were estimated. 30 references.

  10. Retrieval of intensive aerosol properties from MFRSR observations: partly cloudy cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor; Long, Charles

    2010-10-01

    An approach for the obtaining column intensive aerosol properties, namely the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP), from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) spectral observations under partly cloudy conditions is described. The approach involves the MFRSR-based aerosol retrieval for clear-sky periods and an interpolation of the retrieved column aerosol properties for cloudy periods. The observed weak diurnal variability of SSA and ASP at the surface and the close association of the surface intensive aerosol properties with their column counterparts form the basis of such interpolation. The approach is evaluated by calculating the corresponding clear-sky total, direct and diffuse fluxes at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870 nm) and compare them with the observed fluxes. The aerosol properties provided by this approach are applied for (i) an examination of the statistical relationship between spectral (visible range) and broadband values of the total normalized cloud radiative forcing and (ii) an estimation of the fractional sky cover. Data collected during 13 days with single-layer cumulus clouds observed at U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during summer 2007 are applied to illustrate the performance and application of this approach.

  11. Observations of intense velocity shear and associated electrostatic waves near an auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Carlson, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of energetic particles and ac electric fields made by the javelin sounding rocket NASA 8:56 during the late expansion phase of a magnetic storm have revealed an intense shear in plasma flow of magnitude 20 (m/s)/m at the edge of an auroral arc. Structure with two characteristic scales sizes is displayed in the region of shear. Larger structures are of the order of several kilometers in size. Intense irregularities with characteristic wavelengths smaller than the scale size of the shear have also been detected. The large-scale changes in the orientation of the charge sheet at the edge of the arc may be due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz branch; shorter-wavelength modes may be related to the shear driven resistive drift wave. Observations are consistent with the suggestion that velocity shear instabilities may play a role in the formation of high-latitude irregularities.

  12. Anomalous low level of cosmic ray intensity decreases observed during 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. K.; Pandey, P. K.; Agrawal, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Past studies have revealed solar cycle changes in the sunspot activity, as well as in many other solar parameters, such as, solar flares and solar coronal holes. These solar features in turn produce the observed cyclic variations in the interplanetary plasma and fields. Both the cosmic ray intensity as well as the intensity of geomagnetic disturbances are affected by the interplanetary changes and produce 11/22 year periodicity. An anomalous situation has been noticed during the year 1980 (period of high sunspot activity), when both the geomagnetic disturbance index Ap, as well as the magnitude and number of Forbush decreases as small. Such an anomaly occurs, in spite of the fact that both the sunspot numbers and the energetic solar flares are almost maximum during the present solar cycle.

  13. Observation of intense terahertz-wave coherent synchrotron radiation at LEBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Norihiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Ken; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Nakao, Keisuke; Sakai, Takeshi; Nogami, Kyoko; Inagaki, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    We observed intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz region using an S-band linac at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application at Nihon University. The evolution of the CSR power was measured, and the CSR reflected in the vacuum chamber of the bending magnet could be extracted through the quartz window for a few tens of picoseconds. The long wave packet of the delayed CSR in the autocorrelation suggests that the delayed CSR was the non-resonant ring-down of the vacuum chamber of the bending magnet. To design a high-energy accelerator, it is necessary to decrease high-energy photons resulting from Compton backscattering with intense CSR.

  14. `An observational report of intensive robotic and manual gait training in sub-acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of automated electromechanical devices for gait training in neurological patients is increasing, yet the functional outcomes of well-defined training programs using these devices and the characteristics of patients that would most benefit are seldom reported in the literature. In an observational study of functional outcomes, we aimed to provide a benchmark for expected change in gait function in early stroke patients, from an intensive inpatient rehabilitation program including both robotic and manual gait training. Methods We followed 103 sub-acute stroke patients who met the clinical inclusion criteria for Body Weight Supported Robotic Gait Training (BWSRGT). Patients completed an intensive 8-week gait-training program comprising robotic gait training (weeks 0-4) followed by manual gait training (weeks 4-8). A change in clinical function was determined by the following assessments taken at 0, 4 and 8 weeks (baseline, mid-point and end-point respectively): Functional Ambulatory Categories (FAC), 10 m Walking Test (10 MWT), and Tinetti Gait and Balance Scales. Results Over half of the patients made a clinically meaningful improvement on the Tinetti Gait Scale (> 3 points) and Tinetti Balance Scale (> 5 points), while over 80% of the patients increased at least 1 point on the FAC scale (0-5) and improved walking speed by more than 0.2 m/s. Patients responded positively in gait function regardless of variables gender, age, aetiology (hemorrhagic/ischemic), and affected hemisphere. The most robust and significant change was observed for patients in the FAC categories two and three. The therapy was well tolerated and no patients withdrew for factors related to the type or intensity of training. Conclusions Eight-weeks of intensive rehabilitation including robotic and manual gait training was well tolerated by early stroke patients, and was associated with significant gains in function. Patients with mid-level gait dysfunction showed the most robust

  15. The Intensity Distribution for Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Paciesas, William S.; Briggs, Michael S.; Preece, Robert D.; Koshut, Tom M.; Horack, John M.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Hakkila, Jon; Kouveliotou, Cryssa

    1996-01-01

    The intensity distributions of gamma-ray bursts observed by BATSE from 19 April 1991 to 19 September 1994 are presented. For this data set, (V/V(sub max)) is 0.329 +/- 0.011, which is 15.5 sigma away from the value of 0.5 expected for a homogeneous distribution. Standard cosmological model parameters are obtained by fitting the differentially binned peak flux distribution expressed in units of photons cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) in the energy range 50-300 keV. The value of z calculated for a peak flux of 1 photon cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) is 0.8 +/- 0.33. The procedures used to produce the peak flux data and C(sub p)/C(sub lim) data are presented. The differences between the two representations of burst intensity are emphasized so that researchers can determine which type of data is most appropriate for their studies. The sky sensitivity correction as a function of intensity for the peak flux data is also described.

  16. Correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio of late-stage pancreatic carcinoma in HIFU therapy: dynamic observation on ultrasound reflection intensity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma.

  17. Observing and estimating of intensive triad interaction occurrence in very shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudof, Seyed Masoud; Badiei, Peyman; Siadatmousavi, Seyed Mostafa; Chegini, Vahid

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a series of field measurements were carried out to investigate triad interactions of spectral peak in near shore. The water level fluctuations were recorded at 5 stations with depths varying from 0.8 to 5 m along a shore-perpendicular transect at sandy coasts of Nowshahr, located in the southern Caspian Sea coast. Two storms with significant wave height of approximately 1.4 m were observed during the measurement period. Using bispectral analysis, a new quantitative index is proposed to investigate temporal and spatial intensity of nonlinear interaction between spectral peak and other harmonics. The proposed index was evaluated for time series of water level data and compared with the bicoherence value of self-spectral peak triad interaction (SSPT); b2 (fp ,fp) . Comparing to SSPT, the proposed new index includes all positive and negative triad interactions with spectral peak. The relative depth, kp d , of non-breaking waves varied from 0.25 to 2.00 along the transect during the study period, where kp is the wave-number and d is the water depth. In general, SSPT increased by decreasing kp d ; however, the results showed that in two shallow stations the maximum SSPT did not correspond to the lowest values of kp d . A considerable time lag was observed between occurrence of the most intensive triad interactions and termination of wave breaking in post storm condition. Furthermore, the intensive triad interactions happened several hours after the largest Ursell numbers of non-breaking waves.

  18. Observation of non-drifting radio emissions associated with the intense solar activity in March 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    Three very unusual radio bursts, separated in time by 4 hours and 35 minute-intervals were observed on March 28, 1991 by the radio and plasma wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft. Although they are preceded by drifting type III bursts at high frequencies, they show no frequency drift at frequencies from 52 kHz down to 16 kHz. In addition, they have extraordinary sawtooth-like profiles; they have a very rapid exponential rise of about 20 minutes independent of frequency and a much longer nonexponential decay which increases with decreasing frequency. The bursts are interpreted as due to synchrotron emission, which seems to fit many of their characteristics. This radio emission appears to be associated with an expanding source region. However, the observed intensity may be somewhat higher than expected and the possible role of the precursor type III radio bursts in triggering the low frequency non-drifting remains unanswered.

  19. An Intense Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash Observed at Ground Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, J. E.; Phlips, B. F.; Wulf, E. A.; Hutcheson, A. L.; Mitchell, L. J.; Woolf, R. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Schaal, M.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D.; Hare, B.; Rassoul, H.; Bozarth, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report on an intense gamma-ray flash observed at ground level in August 2014 at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, Camp Blanding, Florida, that occurred 13 ms after the initiation of the first stroke of an altitude-triggered lightning discharge. The measurements were made with an array of 78 plastic, liquid, and fast inorganic scintillators for robust spectroscopy of high-rate transients. The gamma-ray spectrum, time-intensity profile, and luminosity at the putative source altitude are consistent with those of a Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF). The fluence of >100 keV gamma rays at ground level in the ~200 μs flash was in excess of 10 photons / cm2, an order of magnitude brighter than typical TGFs observed from low-Earth orbit. The proximity of the TGF to our large scintillator array allows these to be the most detailed gamma-ray measurements ever made of a TGF. Work at NRL was sponsored by the Chief of Naval Research.

  20. Forecasting probabilistic seismic shaking for greater Tokyo from 400 years of intensity observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bozkurt, S.B.; Stein, R.S.; Toda, S.

    2007-01-01

    The long recorded history of earthquakes in Japan affords an opportunity to forecast seismic shaking exclusively from past shaking. We calculate the time-averaged (Poisson) probability of severe shaking by using more than 10,000 intensity observations recorded since AD 1600 in a 350 km-wide box centered on Tokyo. Unlike other hazard-assessment methods, source and site effects are included without modeling, and we do not need to know the size or location of any earthquake nor the location and slip rate of any fault. The two key assumptions are that the slope of the observed frequency-intensity relation at every site is the same, and that the 400-year record is long enough to encompass the full range of seismic behavior. Tests we conduct here suggest that both assumptions are sound. The resulting 30-year probability of IJMA ??? 6 shaking (??? PGA ??? 0.4 g or MMI ??? IX) is 30%-40% in Tokyo, Kawasaki, and Yokohama, and 10% 15% in Chiba and Tsukuba. This result means that there is a 30% chance that 4 million people will be subjected to IJMA ??? 6 shaking during an average 30-year period. We also produce exceedance maps of PGA for building-code regulations, and calculate short-term hazard associated with a hypothetical catastrophe bond. Our results resemble an independent assessment developed from conventional seismic hazard analysis for greater Tokyo. ?? 2007, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  1. Differences of the Solar Magnetic Activity Signature in Velocity and Intensity Helioseismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.

    2013-12-01

    The high-quality, full-disk helioseismic observations continuously collected by the spectrophotometer GOLF and the three photometers VIRGO/SPMs onboard the SoHO spacecraft for 17 years now (since April 11, 1996, apart from the SoHO “vacations”) are absolutely unique for the study of the interior of the Sun and its variability with magnetic activity. Here, we look at the differences in the low-degree oscillation p-mode frequencies between radial velocity and intensity measurements taking into account all the known features of the p-mode profiles (e.g., the opposite peak asymmetry), and of the power spectrum (e.g., the presence of the higher degrees ℓ = 4 and 5 in the signal). We show that the intensity frequencies are higher than the velocity frequencies during the solar cycle with a clear temporal dependence. The response between the individual angular degrees is also different. Time delays are observed between the temporal variations in GOLF and VIRGO frequencies. Such analysis is important in order to put new constraints and to better understand the mechanisms responsible for the temporal variations of the oscillation frequencies with the solar magnetic activity as well as their height dependences in the solar atmosphere. It is also important for the study of the stellar magnetic activity using asteroseismic data.

  2. Observation of saturable absorption of Sn metal film with intense EUV laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, H.; Inubushi, Y.; Sato, F.; Morimoto, S.; Kumagaya, T.; Nagasono, M.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Ohashi, H.; Kimura, H.; Togashi, T.; Kodama, R.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we report observation of ultra-fast switching of vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) light caused by saturable absorption by a solid metal foil. A sub-picosecond VUV pulse from a free-electron laser located in SPring-8 is focused on a metal target and transmission is measured as a function of input energy, thickness of the absorbing layer, and VUV laser wavelength. As is well known, metals have a strong linear free electron response associated with the plasma oscillation and collisional absorption (high-frequency resistivity). Due to the plasma screening and strong absorption, it is difficult to use bulk metals for optical components. However, above the plasma frequency as in our experiments, a metal can transmit light and shows phenomena related to the band gap structure, similar to the optical properties observed in transparent materials for visible and infrared light. We observe a strong gating of Sn transmission at energy fluences above 6J/cm2 at wavelength of 51nm. The ratio of the transmission at high intensity to low intensity is typically greater than 100:1. The estimated saturated transmittance is about 0.25. The mechanism of the switching phenomena is partially explained by the shift of Sn N shell band edge, however, more details should be investigated with more exact physical models and precise measurements. We think this is the first observation of such a strong nonlinear phenomena for VUV light and this result will promote the development of new nonlinear photonic devices such as auto-correlator and pulse slicer for the VUV region.

  3. Quantifying and monitoring convection intensity from mm-wave sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Ziad S.; Sawaya, Randy S.; Kacimi, Sahra; Sy, Ousmane O.; Steward, Jeffrey L.

    2016-05-01

    Few systematic attempts to interpret the measurements of mm-wave radiometers over clouds and precipitation have been made to date because the scattering signatures of hydrometeors at these frequencies are very difficult to model. The few algorithms that have been developed try to retrieve surface precipitation, to which the observations are partially correlated but not directly sensitive. In fact, over deep clouds, mm-wave radiometers are most sensitive to the scattering from solid hydrometeors within the upper levels of the cloud. In addition, mm-wave radiometers have a definite advantage over the lower-frequency window-channel radiometers in that they have finer resolution and can therefore explicitly resolve deep convection. Preliminary analyses (in particular of NOAA's MHS brightness temperatures, as well as Megha-Tropiques's SAPHIR observations) indicate that the measurements are indeed very sensitive to the depth and intensity of convection. The challenge is to derive a robust approach to make quantitative estimates of the convection, for example the height and depth of the condensed water, directly from the mm-wave observations, as a function of horizontal location. To avoid having to rely on a specific set of microphysical assumptions, this analysis exploits the substantial amount of nearly- simultaneous coincident observations by mm-wave radiometers and orbiting atmospheric profiling radars in order to enforce unbiased consistency between the calculated brightness temperatures and the radar and radiometer observations.

  4. Identification of possible intense historical geomagnetic storms using combined sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, D. M.; Armstrong, G. M.; Ault, C. E.; Stephenson, F. R.

    2005-03-01

    Comprehensive catalogues of ancient sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia are used to identify possible intense historical geomagnetic storms in the interval 210 BC-AD 1918. There are about 270 entries in the sunspot catalogue and about 1150 entries in the auroral catalogue. Special databases have been constructed in which the scientific information in these two catalogues is placed in specified fields. For the purposes of this study, an historical geomagnetic storm is defined in terms of an auroral observation that is apparently associated with a particular sunspot observation, in the sense that the auroral observation occurred within several days of the sunspot observation. More precisely, a selection criterion is formulated for the automatic identification of such geomagnetic storms, using the oriental records stored in the sunspot and auroral databases. The selection criterion is based on specific assumptions about the duration of sunspot visibility with the unaided eye, the likely range of heliographic longitudes of an energetic solar feature, and the likely range of transit times for ejected solar plasma to travel from the Sun to the Earth. This selection criterion results in the identification of nineteen putative historical geomagnetic storms, although two of these storms are spurious in the sense that there are two examples of a single sunspot observation being associated with two different auroral observations separated by more than half a (synodic) solar rotation period. The literary and scientific reliabilities of the East Asian sunspot and auroral records that define the nineteen historical geomagnetic storms are discussed in detail in a set of appendices. A possible time sequence of events is presented for each geomagnetic storm, including possible dates for both the central meridian passage of the sunspot and the occurrence of the energetic solar feature, as well as likely transit times for the ejected solar plasma. European telescopic

  5. Characterisation of sleep in intensive care using 24-hour polysomnography: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many intensive care patients experience sleep disruption potentially related to noise, light and treatment interventions. The purpose of this study was to characterise, in terms of quantity and quality, the sleep of intensive care patients, taking into account the impact of environmental factors. Methods This observational study was conducted in the adult ICU of a tertiary referral hospital in Australia, enrolling 57 patients. Polysomnography (PSG) was performed over a 24-hour period to assess the quantity (total sleep time: hh:mm) and quality (percentage per stage, duration of sleep episode) of patients' sleep while in ICU. Rechtschaffen and Kales criteria were used to categorise sleep. Interrater checks were performed. Sound pressure and illuminance levels and care events were simultaneously recorded. Patients reported on their sleep quality in ICU using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire and the Sleep in Intensive Care Questionnaire. Data were summarised using frequencies and proportions or measures of central tendency and dispersion as appropriate and Cohen's Kappa statistic was used for interrater reliability of the sleep data analysis. Results Patients' median total sleep time was 05:00 (IQR: 02:52 to 07:14). The majority of sleep was stage 1 and 2 (medians: 19 and 73%) with scant slow wave and REM sleep. The median duration of sleep without waking was 00:03. Sound levels were high (mean Leq 53.95 dB(A) during the day and 50.20 dB(A) at night) and illuminance levels were appropriate at night (median <2 lux) but low during the day (median: 74.20 lux). There was a median 1.7 care events/h. Patients' mean self-reported sleep quality was poor. Interrater reliability of sleep staging was highest for slow wave sleep and lowest for stage 1 sleep. Conclusions The quantity and quality of sleep in intensive care patients are poor and may be related to noise, critical illness itself and treatment events that disturb sleep. The study highlights the

  6. Probabilistic tail dependence of intense precipitation on spatiotemporal scale in observations, reanalyses, and GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Nicholas R.; Gershunov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Daily precipitation variability as observed from weather stations is heavy tailed at most locations around the world. It is thought that diversity in precipitation-causing weather events is fundamental in producing heavy-tailed distributions, and it arises from theory that at least one of the precipitation types contributing to a heavy-tailed climatological record must also be heavy-tailed. Precipitation is a multi-scale phenomenon with a rich spatial structure and short decorrelation length and timescales; the spatiotemporal scale at which precipitation is observed is thus an important factor when considering its statistics and extremes. In this study, we examine the spatiotemporal scaling behavior of intense precipitation from point-scale to large grid cells and from 1 day to 4 weeks over the entire globe. We go on to validate the current generation of historically-forced climate models and reanalyses against observational data at consistent spatial scales. Our results demonstrate that the prevalence and magnitude of heavy tails in observations decrease when moving to lower spatiotemporal resolutions, as is consistent with stochastic theory. Reanalyses and climate models generally reproduce large, synoptic scale distribution classifications, but struggle to reproduce the statistics in regions that are strongly affected by mesoscale phenomena. We discuss these results in relation to physically consistent atmospheric regimes. We conclude with a global view of precipitation distribution type at daily resolution as calculated from the best-performing reanalysis, the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis.

  7. Comparing USGS national seismic hazard maps with internet-based macroseismic intensity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Sum; Schorlemmer, Danijel

    2016-04-01

    Verifying a nationwide seismic hazard assessment using data collected after the assessment has been made (i.e., prospective data) is a direct consistency check of the assessment. We directly compared the predicted rate of ground motion exceedance by the four available versions of the USGS national seismic hazard map (NSHMP, 1996, 2002, 2008, 2014) with the actual observed rate during 2000-2013. The data were prospective to the two earlier versions of NSHMP. We used two sets of somewhat independent data, namely 1) the USGS "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) intensity reports, 2) instrumental ground motion records extracted from ShakeMap stations. Although both are observed data, they come in different degrees of accuracy. Our results indicated that for California, the predicted and observed hazards were very comparable. The two sets of data gave consistent results, implying robustness. The consistency also encourages the use of DYFI data for hazard verification in the Central and Eastern US (CEUS), where instrumental records are lacking. The result showed that the observed ground-motion exceedance was also consistent with the predicted in CEUS. The primary value of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of DYFI data, originally designed for community communication instead of scientific analysis, for the purpose of hazard verification.

  8. Progresses on the Intensive Observation Period of Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Li, Xiaowen; Li, Zengyuan; Ma, Mingguo; Wang, Jian; Liu, Qiang; Xiao, Qing; Chen, Erxue; Che, Tao; Hu, Zeyong

    2010-05-01

    The Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (WATER) is an intensively simultaneous airborne, satellite-borne and ground based remote sensing experiment aiming to improve the observability, understanding, and predictability of hydrological and related ecological processes at catchment scale. It was taken place in the Heihe River Basin, the second largest inland river basin in the arid regions of northwest China. WATER consists of the cold region, forest, and arid region hydrological experiments as well as a hydrometeorology experiment. It was divided into 4 phases, namely, the experiment planning period, pre-observation period, intensive observation period (IOP) and persistent observation period. The field campaigns have been completed, with the IOP lasting from March 7 to April 12, May 15 to July 22, and August 23 to September 5, 2008, in total, 120 days, more than 280 individuals of scientists, engineers, students, and aircrews from 28 different institutes and universities were involved in. A total of 26 airborne missions, about 110 hours were flown. Airborne sensors including microwave radiometers at L, K and Ka bands, imaging spectrometer, thermal imager, CCD and LIDAR were used. Ground measurements were carried out concurrently with the airborne and space-borne remote sensing at four scales, i.e., key experimental area, foci experimental area, experiment site and elementary sampling plot. A network of hydro meteorological and flux observations was established in the upper and middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin. The network was composed of 12 super Automatic Meteorological Stations (AMS), 6 Eddy Covariance (EC) systems, 2 Large Aperture Scintillometers (LAS), and plenty of China Meteorological Administration (CMA) operational meteorological and hydrological stations. Additionally, we also used ground-based remote sensing instruments, such as Doppler Radar, ground based microwave radiometer and truck-mounted scatterometer and lots of auto

  9. Diffuse gamma radiation. [intensity, energy spectrum and spatial distribution from SAS 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma radiation detected by SAS 2 away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV. The gamma-ray data are compared with relevant data obtained at other wavelengths, including 21-cm emission, radio continuum radiation, and the limited UV and radio information on local molecular hydrogen. It is found that there are two quite distinct components to the diffuse radiation, one of which shows a good correlation with the galactic matter distribution and continuum radiation, while the other has a much steeper energy spectrum and appears to be isotropic at least on a coarse scale. The galactic component is interpreted in terms of its implications for both local and more distant regions of the Galaxy. The apparently isotropic radiation is discussed partly with regard to the constraints placed on possible models by the steep energy spectrum, the observed intensity, and an upper limit on the anisotropy.

  10. Detection of short period coronal intensity oscillations and observing programme during 1998 and 1999 eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagdev

    An experiment to search for short-period intensity oscillations in the solar corona was conducted during the total solar eclipse of 1995 October 24 at Kalpi (26^ circ 08^' ' N, 79^' ' 45^' ' E), India. The analysis of the data shows that measured coronal intensity in the continuum, centered around 5500 AA with a pass-band of about 240 AA, recorded at 20 hertz using a thermoelectric-water cooled phtomultiplier varied with time during the eclipse. The power spectrum analysis of the data reveals that most of the power is contained in 6 frequencies below 0.2 Hz. A least square analysis gives the period of the 6 frequency components to be 56.5, 19.5, 13.5, 8.0, 6.1 and 5.3 s. These oscillations are found to be sinusoidal and their amplitude are found to lie in the range of 0.2 - 1.3% of the coronal brightness. The verification and determination of the oscillation scale length and changes in these oscillations with solar radii will help in understanding the heating of solar corona. The details of the experiment to be conducted during the total solar eclipses of 1998 and 1999 to study these oscillations as a function of solar radius will be discussed. It is planned to develop a multi-channel photometer using R647 Hamamatsu photomultiplier tubes to observe the corona at 6 different locations at the solar corona.

  11. Space-Borne Observations of Intense Gamma-Ray Flashes Above Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    Intense millisecond flashes of MeV photons were discovered with the space-borne detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). These flashes originate at altitudes above at least 30 km, in order to be observable by the orbiting detectors. Over the entire CGRO mission, from 1991 until 2000, about 70 of these events were observed. Nearly all TGFs had short (millisecond) durations and sub-ms rise-times and fall-times, however a small fraction of them had longer timescales associated with them. Most were single pulses, but about a dozen had double pulses and a few had more than two pulses. The TGFs are observed in a photon-by-photon recording mode, with each photon from eight independent detectors being tagged to the nearest two microseconds in four energy channels. The TGFs show very hard spectra, in most cases there are more photons recorded above 300 keV than below. Several of the TGFs were also recorded by the thicker (but smaller area) spectroscopy detectors that provided improved spectral resolution than the large area detectors. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the events and the capabilities of the detectors will be described in more detail than the in the original paper. The association of TGFs with thunderstorms is primarily statistical; the TGFs show a strong correlation with the global distribution of lightning, as observed with recent satellites. There has also been an association based upon coincidences with spheric events, however, this association is debatable due to the high spherics rate and the non-directionality of the detectors. This talk gives an update of the BATSE observations of TGFs were published by the BATSE instrument team over ten years ago.

  12. Assessing the ability of climate models to simulate the observed sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzo, Sarah

    This series of studies evaluates the ability of global climate models (GCMs) to simulate the observed relationship between the upper limit of tropical cyclone (TC) intensity and sea surface temperature (SST). Previous studies addressed whether GCMs are capable of reproducing observed TC frequency and intensity distributions. This research builds upon these earlier studies by examining how well GCMs capture physically relevant relationships that are important for understanding the impacts of climate change on TC intensity. The research presented here aims to 1) quantify differences between the observed and simulated sensitivity of TC limiting intensity to SST, and 2) explore possible explanations for any differences that exist. Observed TC data are compared to simulated TCs from four different GCMs---the FSU-COAPS, GFDL-HiRAM, MRI-AGCM, and NCAR-CAM. Model horizontal grid spacing ranges from ~100 km for the FSU-COAPS to ~20 km for the MRI-AGCM. An additional comparison is made for TCs generated through a statistical-deterministic downscaling technique. This research uses a spatial tessellation approach that spatially bins North Atlantic TC and SST data into equal-area hexagon regions. For each region, the statistical upper limit of observed and simulated TC intensity (i.e., limiting intensity) is estimated using extreme value theory. For comparison with the statistical limiting intensity, reanalysis and model field data are employed to approximate observed and simulated potential intensity, respectively. Results reveal that the current suite of GCMs do not capture the observed sensitivity of TC limiting intensity to SST. While a 1° C increase in SST corresponds to a 7.9 +/- -1.19 m/s increase in observed limiting intensity, the same 1° C increase in SST is not associated with a statistically significant increase in simulated TC limiting intensity. This is found to be true both for relatively coarse resolution GCMs that do not generate TCs with intensities

  13. Antithrombin III in patients admitted to intensive care units: a multicenter observational study

    PubMed Central

    Messori, Andrea; Vacca, Franca; Vaiani, Monica; Trippoli, Sabrina

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The administration of antithrombin III (ATIII) is useful in patients with congenital deficiency, but evidence for the other therapeutic indications of this drug is still uncertain. In Italy, the use of ATIII is very common in intensive care units (ICUs). For this reason we undertook an observational study to determine the pattern of use of ATIII in ICUs and to assess the outcome of patients given this treatment. Methods From 20 May to 20 July 2001 all consecutive patients admitted to ICUs in 20 Italian hospitals and treated with ATIII were enrolled. The following information was recorded from each patient: congenital deficiency, indication for use of ATIII, daily dose and duration of ATIII treatment, outcome of hospitalization (alive or dead). The outcome data of our observational study were compared with those reported in previously published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Results Two hundred and sixteen patients were enrolled in the study. The clinical indications for using ATIII were sepsis (25.9%), disseminated intravascular coagulation (23.1%), and other clinical conditions (46.8%). At the end of the study, 65.3% of the patients were alive, 24.5% died and 10.2% were still in the hospital. Among the patients with sepsis (n = 56), 19 died during the observation period (33.9%; 95% confidence interval 22.1–47.5%). Discussion Our study described the pattern of use of ATIII in Italian hospitals and provided information on the outcome of the subgroup treated with sepsis. A meta-analysis of current data from RCTs, together with our findings, indicates that there is no sound basis for using this drug in ICU patients with sepsis. PMID:12398786

  14. Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Measurements During The Fall 1997 ARM Intensive Observation Period: Optical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Michalsky, J.; Slater, D.; Barnard, J.; Halthore, R.; Liljegren, J.; Holben, B.; Eck, T.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1997 the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program conducted an intensive Observation Period (IOP) to study water vapor at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Among the large number of instruments, four sun-tracking radiometers were present to measure the columnar water vapor (CWV). All four solar radiometers retrieve CWV by measuring solar transmittance in the 0.94-micrometer water vapor absorption band. As one of the steps in the CWV retrievals the aerosol component is subtracted from the total transmittance, in the 0.94-micrometer band. The aerosol optical depth comparisons among the same four radiometers are presented elsewhere. We have used three different methods to retrieve CWV. Without attempting to standardize on the same radiative transfer model and its underlying water vapor spectroscopy we found the CWV to agree within 0.13 cm (rms) for CWV values ranging from 1 to 5 cm. Preliminary results obtained when using the same updated radiative transfer model with updated spectroscopy for all instruments will also be shown. Comparisons to the microwave radiometer results will be included in the comparisons.

  15. Direct spectroscopic observation of multiple-charged-ion acceleration by an intense femtosecond-pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, A G; Sasaki, A; Tajima, T; Auguste, T; D'Olivera, P; Hulin, S; Monot, P; Faenov, A Y; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Y

    1999-09-01

    We have observed evidence of the emission of energetic He-and H-like ions of fluorine more than 1 MeV produced via the optical field ionization (OFI) from a solid target irradiated by an intense I=(2-4)x10(18) W/cm(2) (60 fs, lambda=800 nm), obliquely incident p-polarized pulse laser. The measured blue wing of He(alpha), He(beta), and Ly(alpha) lines of fluorine shows a feature of the Doppler-shifted spectrum due to the self-similar ion expansion dominated by superthermal electrons with the temperature T(h) approximately 100 keV. Using a collisional particle-in-cell simulation, which incorporates the nonlocal-thermodynamic-equilibrium ionization including OFI, we have obtained the plasma temperature, line shape, and maximal energy of accelerated ions, which agree well with those determined from the experimental spectra. The red wing of ion spectra gives the temperature of bulk plasma electrons.

  16. An Update on Global Observations of Intense Surface Plankton Blooms and Floating Vegetation Using MERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephanie A.; Gower, Jim

    2010-12-01

    We continue to use MERIS data to compute MCI (Maximum Chlorophyll Index), which measures the radiance peak at 709 nm in water-leaving radiance, indicating the presence of a high surface concentration of chlorophyll a against a scattering background. The index is high in "red tide" conditions (intense, visible, surface, plankton blooms) and also when the blooms give rise to buoyant slicks, or when aquatic vegetation is present, leading to a "red edge" step increase in radiance. As presently configured the G-POD system provides daily global composites of MCI values at 5 km spatial resolution. We have used the global MCI composites to study the location, extent and interannual variability of several types of high chlorophyll events including plankton blooms, pelagic Sargassum, Antarctic superblooms and Trichodesmium. We are able to validate many events with the help of local observers, but in other cases the sporadic and short time scales make confirmation and identification difficult. This paper gives a summary of some recent global MERIS MCI results.

  17. "Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the ARM 2003 Aerosol Intensive Observation Period"

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Michalsky, G. P. Anderson, J. Barnard, J. Delamere, C. Gueymard, S. Kato, P. Kiedron, A. McComiskey, and P. Ricchiazzi

    2006-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large intensive observation period (IOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this IOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky periods on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are less than 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 2%.

  18. Asthma changes at a pediatric intensive care unit after 10 years: Observational study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eyadhy, Ayman A.; Temsah, Mohamad-Hani; Alhaboob, Ali A. N.; Aldubayan, Abdulmalik K.; Almousa, Nasser A.; Alsharidah, Abdulrahman M.; Alangari, Mohammed I.; Alshaya, Abdulrahman M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the change in the management, and outcome of children with acute severe asthma (ASA) admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at tertiary institute, as compared to previously published report in 2003. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study. All consecutive pediatric ASA patients who were admitted to PICU during the study period were included. The data were extracted from PICU database and medical records. The Cohort in this study (2013 Cohort) was compared with the Cohort of ASA, which was published in 2003 from the same institution (2003 Cohort). RESULTS: In comparison to previous 2003 Cohort, current Cohort (2013) revealed higher mean age (5.5 vs. 3.6 years; P ≤ 0.001), higher rate of PICU admission (20.3% vs. 3.6%; P ≤ 0.007), less patients who received maintenance inhaled steroids (43.3% vs. 62.4%; P ≤ 0.03), less patients with pH <7.3 (17.9% vs. 42.9%; P ≤ 0.001). There were more patients in 2013 Cohort who received: Inhaled Ipratropium bromide (97% vs. 68%; P ≤ 0.001), intravenous magnesium sulfate (68.2% vs. none), intravenous salbutamol (13.6% vs. 3.6%; P ≤ 0.015), and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) (35.8% vs. none) while no patients were treated with theophylline (none vs. 62.5%). The median length of stay (LOS) was 2 days while mean LOS was half a day longer in the 2013 Cohort. None of our patients required intubation, and there was no mortality. CONCLUSION: We observed slight shift toward older age, considerably increased the rate of PICU admission, increased utilization of Ipratropium bromide, magnesium sulfate, and NIV as important modalities of treatment. PMID:26664561

  19. Critical Illness Outcome Study: An Observational Study on Protocols and Mortality in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Naeem A.; Gutteridge, David; Shahul, Sajid; Checkley, William; Sevransky, Jonathan; Martin, Greg S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many individual Intensive Care Unit (ICU) characteristics have been associated with patient outcomes, including staffing, expertise, continuity and team structure. Separately, many aspects of clinical care in ICUs have been operationalized through the development of complex treatment protocols. The United State Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group-Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS) was designed to determine whether the extent of protocol availability and use in ICUs is associated with hospital survival in a large cohort of United States ICUs. Here, we describe the study protocol and analysis plan approved by the USCIITG-CIOS Steering Committee. Methods USCIITG-CIOS is a prospective, observational, ecological multi-centered “cohort” study of mixed ICUs in the U.S. The data collected include organizational information for the ICU (e.g., protocol availability and utilization, multi-disciplinary staffing assessment) and patient level information (e.g. demographics, acute and chronic medical conditions). The primary outcome is all-cause hospital mortality, with the objective being to determine whether there is an association between protocol number and hospital mortality for ICU patients. USCIITG-CIOS is powered to detect a 3% difference in crude hospital mortality between high and low protocol use ICUs, dichotomized according to protocol number at the median. The analysis will utilize regression modeling to adjust for outcome clustering by ICU, with secondary linear analysis of protocol number and mortality and a variety of a priori planned ancillary studies. There are presently 60 ICUs participating in USCIITG-CIOS to enroll approximately 6,000 study subjects. Conclusions USCIITG-CIOS is a large multicentric study examining the effect of ICU protocol use on patient outcomes. The primary results of this study will inform our understanding of the relationship between protocol availability, use, and patient outcomes in the ICU. Moreover

  20. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Holben, Brent; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Duncan, Bryan; Ginoux, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine what are the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption, and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  1. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Torres, Omar; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Ginoux, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET, satellite retrievals from the TOMS instrument, and field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption. and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  2. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Main; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Duncan, Bryan; Ginoux, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption, and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  3. Observations of a free-energy source for intense electrostatic waves. [in upper atmosphere near upper hybrid resonance frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1980-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in terms of the theory of multiharmonic cyclotron emission using a classical loss-cone distribution function as a model. Recent observations by Hawkeye 1 and GEOS 1 have verified the existence of loss-cone distributions in association with the intense electrostatic wave events, however, other observations by Hawkeye and ISEE have indicated that loss cones are not always observable during the wave events, and in fact other forms of free energy may also be responsible for the instability. Now, for the first time, a positively sloped feature in the perpendicular distribution function has been uniquely identified with intense electrostatic wave activity. Correspondingly, we suggest that the theory is flexible under substantial modifications of the model distribution function.

  4. Characterization of intense aerosol episodes in the Mediterranean basin from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The properties and distribution of aerosols over the broader Mediterranean region are complex since particles of different nature are either produced within its boundaries or transported from other regions. Thus, coarse dust aerosols are transported primarily from Sahara and secondarily from Middle East, while fine polluted aerosols are either produced locally from anthropogenic activities or they are transported from neighbouring or remote European areas. Also during summer biomass aerosols are transported towards the Mediterranean, originating from massive and extended fires occurring in northern Balkans and Eastern Europe and favoured by the prevailing synoptic conditions. In addition, sea-salt aerosols originate from the Mediterranean Sea or the Atlantic Ocean. Occasionally, aerosols are encountered at very high concentrations (aerosol episodes or events) significantly affecting atmospheric dynamics and climate as well as human health. Given the coexistence of different aerosols as internal and external mixtures characterizing and discriminating between the different types of aerosol episodes is a big challenge. A characterization and classification of intense aerosol episodes in the Mediterranean basin (March 2000 - February 2007) is attempted in the present study. This is achieved by implementing an objective and dynamic algorithm which uses daily aerosol optical properties derived from satellite measurements, namely MODIS-Terra, Earth Probe (EP)-TOMS and OMI-Aura. The aerosol episodes are first classified into strong and extreme ones, according to their intensity, by means of aerosol optical depth at 550nm (AOD550nm). Subsequently, they are discriminated into the following aerosol types: (i) biomass/urban-industrial (BU), (ii) desert dust (DD), (iii) sea-salt like (SS), (iv) mixed (MX) and (v) undetermined (UN). The classification is based on aerosol optical properties accounting for the particles' size (Ångström exponent, Effective radius), the

  5. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Loporto, Michela; Holmes, Paul S; Wright, David J; McAllister, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP) to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold) or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP) influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the neural

  6. The big comet crash of 1994. Intensive observational campaign at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronomers all over the world are preparing themselves for observations of a most unique event: during a period of six days in July 1994, at least 21 fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 will collide with giant planet Jupiter. At the European Southern Observatory, an intensive observational campaign with most of the major telescopes at La Silla is being organized with the participation of a dozen international teams of astronomers. This is the first time ever that it has been possible to predict such a collision. Although it is difficult to make accurate estimates, it is likely that there will be important, observable effects in the Jovian atmosphere. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE COMET ? Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 is the ninth short-period comet discovered by Gene and Carolyn Shoemaker and David Levy. It was first seen on a photographic plate obtained on 18 March 1993 with the 18-inch Schmidt telescope at the Mount Palomar Observatory, California. It was close in the sky to Jupiter and orbital calculations soon showed that it moves in a very unusual orbit. While other comets revolve around the Sun, this one moves in an elongated orbit around Jupiter. It is obvious that it must have been ``captured'' rather recently by the gravitational field of the planet. It was also found that Shoemaker-Levy 9 consists of several individual bodies which move like ``pearls on a string'' in a majestic procession. It was later determined that this is because the comet suffered a dramatic break-up due to the strong attraction of Jupiter at the time of an earlier close passage to this planet in July 1992. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images have shown the existence of up to 21 individual fragments (termed ``nuclei''), whose diameters probably range between a few kilometres and a few hundred meters. There is also much cometary dust visible around the nuclei; it is probably a mixture of grains of different sizes, from sub-millimetre sand up to metre-sized boulders. No outgassing has so

  7. Observations and modelling of line intensity ratios of OV multiplet lines for ? - ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Rachlew-Källne, E.; Hörling, P.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    1996-09-01

    Line intensity ratios of OV multiplet lines for the 0953-4075/29/18/019/img3 (J = 2,1,0) transitions are studied using a collisional radiative model and the results are compared with measurements from the reversed field pinch experiments Extrap T1 and T2 at KTH. The measured line intensity ratios deviate from the predictions of the model and the possible causes for the discrepancy are discussed with regard to errors in rate coefficients and non-quasi-steady state.

  8. The big comet crash of 1994. Intensive observational campaign at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronomers all over the world are preparing themselves for observations of a most unique event: during a period of six days in July 1994, at least 21 fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 will collide with giant planet Jupiter. At the European Southern Observatory, an intensive observational campaign with most of the major telescopes at La Silla is being organized with the participation of a dozen international teams of astronomers. This is the first time ever that it has been possible to predict such a collision. Although it is difficult to make accurate estimates, it is likely that there will be important, observable effects in the Jovian atmosphere. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE COMET ? Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 is the ninth short-period comet discovered by Gene and Carolyn Shoemaker and David Levy. It was first seen on a photographic plate obtained on 18 March 1993 with the 18-inch Schmidt telescope at the Mount Palomar Observatory, California. It was close in the sky to Jupiter and orbital calculations soon showed that it moves in a very unusual orbit. While other comets revolve around the Sun, this one moves in an elongated orbit around Jupiter. It is obvious that it must have been ``captured'' rather recently by the gravitational field of the planet. It was also found that Shoemaker-Levy 9 consists of several individual bodies which move like ``pearls on a string'' in a majestic procession. It was later determined that this is because the comet suffered a dramatic break-up due to the strong attraction of Jupiter at the time of an earlier close passage to this planet in July 1992. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images have shown the existence of up to 21 individual fragments (termed ``nuclei''), whose diameters probably range between a few kilometres and a few hundred meters. There is also much cometary dust visible around the nuclei; it is probably a mixture of grains of different sizes, from sub-millimetre sand up to metre-sized boulders. No outgassing has so

  9. Outer coronal structure and relative intensity distribution observed during the total solar eclipse on March 9, 1997 in Mohe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiusha; Zhang, Bairong

    With a simple video-collecting system, the total solar eclipse on March 9, 1997 has been observed by using Panasonic NV-S88OEN video camera in Mohe. After analyzing the yellow (by adding a GG11 filter) and white coronal observation data, the outer coronal structure and relative intensity distribution outside 1.5 Rsun have been found during the solar minima.

  10. Observation of Correlated Emission Intensity and Polarization Fluctuations in Single CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved single-nanoparticle spectroscopy has been carried out to examine the luminescence characteristics of individual CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots. In particular, the possible correlations between emission intensity, lifetime, spectrum, and polarization fluctuations have been investigated. The emission polarization was found to be correlated with the luminescence intensity in a nonlinear way. The low-emissive states were found to correlate with red-shifted spectrum, increased nonradiative decay, and low degree of emission polarization. The observations are consistent with the model that charged quantum dots can be emissive. PMID:18693717

  11. Relativistic Electrons Observed at UARS and the Interpretation of their Storm-Associated Intensity Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Chenette, D. L.; Gaines, E. E.

    1999-01-01

    The High Energy Particle Spectrometer (HEPS) instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) provides a database of electron intensities well resolved in energy and pitch-angle. Because of its 57 deg. orbital inclination, UARS encounters with magnetic shells L greater than 2 occur quite far off-equator (B/B (sub 0) greater than 9), corresponding to equatorial pitch angle alpha (sub 0) greater than 20 deg. Data acquired by HEPS (October 1991 through September 1994) span the declining phase of Solar Cycle 22. To reveal the storm-associated time dependence of relativistic electron intensities over the wide range of energies (50 keV to 5 MeV) covered by HEPS, we divide the daily average of the measured spectrum at a given L value (bin width = 0.25) by the corresponding 500-day average and plot the results with a color scale that spans only 2.5 decades. The data show that our off-equatorial electron intensities typically increase with time after the end of recovery phase (not during main phase or recovery phase) of each geomagnetic storm. The delay in off-equatorial energetic electron response and the subsequent lifetime of the corresponding electron flux enhancement seem to increase with particle energy above 300 keV. The trend below 300 keV seems to be opposite, such that the delay varies inversely with electron energy. Our working hypothesis for interpretation is that stormtime radial transport tends to increase the phase-space densities of trapped relativistic electrons but typically leads to a flux increases at specified energies only as the current (as indicated by Dst) decays. Flux enhancements in early recovery phase are greatest for equatorially mirroring electrons, and to pitch-angle anisotropies are initially large. Subsequent pitch-angle diffusion broadens the flux enhancement to particles that mirror off equator, thus gradually increasing low-altitude electron intensities (as detected by HEPS/UARS) on time scales equal to about 20% of

  12. Daytime Raman lidar measurements of water vapor during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Goldsmith, J.E.M.

    1998-04-01

    Because of the importance of water vapor, the ARM program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its CART (Cloud And Radiation Testbed) site. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. These IOPs provided an excellent opportunity to compare measurements from other systems with those made by the CART Raman lidar. This paper addresses primarily the daytime water vapor measurements made by the lidar system during the second of these IOPs.

  13. An Intercomparison of Cloud-Resolving Models with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Summer 1997 Intensive Observation Period Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kuan-Man; Cederwall, Richard T.; Donner, Leo J.; Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Guichard, Francoise; Johnson, Daniel E.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Krueger, Steven K.; Petch, Jon C.; Randall, David A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports an intercomparison study of midlatitude continental cumulus convection simulated by eight two-dimensional and two three-dimensional cloud-resolving models (CRMs), driven by observed large-scale advective temperature and moisture tendencies, surface turbulent fluxes, and radiative-heating profiles during three sub-periods of the summer 1997 Intensive Observation Period of the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Each sub-period includes two or three precipitation events of various intensities over a span of 4 or 5 days. The results can be summarized as follows. CRMs can reasonably simulate midlatitude continental summer convection observed at the ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in terms of the intensity of convective activity, and the temperature and specific-humidity evolution. Delayed occurrences of the initial precipitation events are a common feature for all three sub-cases among the models. Cloud mass fluxes, condensate mixing ratios and hydrometeor fractions produced by all CRMs are similar. Some of the simulated cloud properties such as cloud liquid-water path and hydrometeor fraction are rather similar to available observations. All CRMs produce large downdraught mass fluxes with magnitudes similar to those of updraughts, in contrast to CRM results for tropical convection. Some inter-model differences in cloud properties are likely to be related to those in the parametrizations of microphysical processes. There is generally a good agreement between the CRMs and observations with CRMs being significantly better than single-column models (SCMs), suggesting that current results are suitable for use in improving parametrizations in SCMs. However, improvements can still be made in the CRM simulations; these include the proper initialization of the CRMs and a more proper method of diagnosing cloud boundaries in model outputs for comparison with satellite and radar cloud observations.

  14. Prescription of antibiotics in intensive care units in Latin America: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Curcio, D; Alí, A; Duarte, A; Defilippi Pauta, A; Ibáñez-Guzmán, C; Chung Sang, M; Valencia, E; Plano, F; Paredes Oña, F; Arancibia, F; Montufar Andrade, F; Morales Alava, F; Cañarte Bermudez, G; La Fuente Zerain, G; Alanis Mirones, V; Rojas Suarez, J; Guzmán Torrico, J; Silva, J; Vergara Centeno, J; Medina, J C; Marín, K; Caero, L A; Durán Crespo, L; Gómez Duque, M; Játiva, M; Belloni, R; Romero, R; Aguilera Perrogón, R; Camacho Alarcón, R; Camargo, R; Cevallos, S; Intriago Cedeño, V; Urbina Contreras, Z

    2009-11-01

    A one-day point prevalence study to investigate the patterns of antibiotic use was undertaken in 43 latin American (LA) intensive care units. Of 510 patients admitted, 231 received antibiotic treatment on the day of the study (45%); in 125 cases (54%) due to nosocomial-acquired infections. The most frequent infection reported was nosocomial pneumonia (43%). Only in 122 patients (53%) were cultures performed before starting antibiotic treatment. 33% of the isolated microorganisms were enterobacteriaceae (40% extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing), 23% methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and 17% carbapenems-resistant non-fermentative Gram-negatives. The antibiotics most frequently prescribed were carbapenems (99/231, 43%); alone (60/99, 60%) or in combination with vancomycin (39/99, 40%). "Restricted" antibiotics (carbapenems, vancomycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, broad-spectrum cephalosporins, tigecycline, polymixins and linezolid) were most frequently indicated in severely ill patients (APACHE II score at admission >15, p=0.0007 and, SOFA score at the beginning of the antibiotic treatment >3, p=0.0000). Only 36% of antibiotic treatments were cultured-directed.Our findings help explain the high rates of multidrug-resistant pathogens in LA settings (i.e. ESBL-producing Gram-negatives) and the severity of the registered patients illnesses.

  15. Refeeding syndrome influences outcome of anorexia nervosa patients in intensive care unit: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Data on the epidemiology and management of anorexia nervosa (AN) in the intensive care unit (ICU) are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and associated morbidity and mortality of AN in French ICUs. Methods We randomly selected 30 ICUs throughout France. Thereafter, we retrospectively analyzed all patients with AN admitted to any of these 30 ICUs between May 2006 and May 2008. We considered demographic data, diagnosis at admission and complications occurring during the stay, focusing on refeeding syndrome and management of refeeding. Results Eleven of the 30 ICUs participated in the retrospective study, featuring 68 patients, including 62 women. Average body mass index at the admission was 12 ± 3 kg/m2. Twenty one were mechanically ventilated, mainly for neurological reasons. The reported average calorie intake was 22.3 ± 13 kcal/kg/24 h. Major diagnoses at admission were metabolic problems, refeeding survey and voluntary drug intoxication and infection. The most common complications were metabolic, hematological, hepatic, and infectious events, of which 10% occurred during refeeding. Seven patients developed refeeding syndrome. At day one, the average calorie intake was higher for patients who developed refeeding syndrome (23.2 ± 5 Kcal/kg/j; n = 7) versus patients without refeeding syndrome (14.1 ± 3 Kcal/kg/j; n = 61) P = 0.02. Seven patients died, two from acute respiratory distress syndrome and five from multiorgan-failure associated with major hydroelectrolytic problems. Conclusions The frequency of AN in ICU patients is very low and the crude mortality in this group is about 10%. Prevention and early-detection of refeeding syndrome is the key point. PMID:20920160

  16. Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Whiteman, D.N.; Schwemmer, G.K.; Evans, K.D. |; Melfi, S.H.; Goldsmith, J.E.

    1998-04-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, as it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter of radiation, and it also plays an important role in energy transport and cloud formation. Accurate, high resolution measurements of this variable are critical in order to improve the understanding of these processes and thus their ability to model them. Because of the importance of water vapor, the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. The ARM CART site is the home of several different water vapor measurement systems. These systems include a Raman lidar, a microwave radiometer, a radiosonde launch site, and an instrumented tower. During these IOPs, additional instrumentation was brought to the site to augment the normal measurements in the attempt to characterize the CART instruments and to address the need to improve water vapor measurement capabilities. Some of the instruments brought to the CART site include a scanning Raman lidar system from NASA/GSFC, additional microwave radiometers from NOAA/ETL, a chilled mirror that was flown on a tethersonde and kite system, and dewpoint hygrometer instruments flow on the North Dakota Citation. This paper will focus on the Raman lidar intercomparisons from the second IOP.

  17. Modelling of catchment nitrogen concentrations response to observed varying fertilizer application intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Jiang, Sanyuan; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Rode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Eutrophication is a serious environmental problem. Despite numerous experimental and modelling efforts, understanding of the effect of land use and agriculture practices on in-stream nitrogen fluxes is still not fully achieved. This study combined intensive field monitoring and numerical modelling using 30 years of surface water quality data of a drinking water reservoir catchment in central Germany. The Weida catchment (99.5 km2) is part of the Elbe river basin and has a share of 67% of agricultural land use with significant changes in agricultural practices within the investigation period. The geology of the Weida catchment is characterized by clay schists and eruptive rocks, where rocks have low permeability. The semi-distributed hydrological water quality HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) model was used to reproduce the measured data. First, the model was calibrated for discharge and nitrate-N concentrations (NO3-N) during the period 1997-2000. Then, the HYPE model was validated successfully for three different periods 1983-1987, 1989-1996 and 2000-2003, which are charaterized by different fertilizer application rates (with lowest discharge prediction performance of NSE = 0.78 and PBIAS = 3.74%, considering calibration and validation periods). Results showed that the measured as well as simulated in-stream nitrate-N concentration respond quickly to fertilizer application changes (increase/decrease). This rapid response can be explained with short residence times of interflow and baseflow runoff components due to the hardrock geological properties of the catchment. Results revealed that the surface runoff and interflow are the most dominant runoff components. HYPE model could reproduce reasonably well the NO3-N daily loads for varying fertilizer application, when detailed input data in terms of crop management (field-specific survey) are considered.

  18. Van Allen Probes, NOAA, and Ground Observations of an Intense Pc 1 Wave Event Extending 12 Hours in MLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Lessard, M.; Horne, R. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Gkioulidou, M.; Fennell, J.; Oksavik, K.; Raita, T.

    2014-12-01

    On February 23, 2014 a Pc 1 wave event extending 8 hours in UT and 12 hours in MLT was observed at Halley, Antarctica and Ivalo, Finland in the dawn sector, and by both Van Allen Probes spacecraft from late morning through local noon. The wave activity was stimulated by a gradual 4-hour rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Intense hydrogen band, linearly polarized Pc 1 wave activity (up to 25 nT p-p) with very similar time variations also appeared for over 4 hours at both Van Allen Probes, located ~8 and ~9 hours east of Halley. Waves appeared when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. Ten passes of NOAA-POES and METOP satellites near the northern hemisphere footpoint of the Van Allen Probes (over Siberia) show the presence of 30-80 keV subauroral proton precipitation. This is the longest-duration and most intense Pc1 event we have yet observed with the Van Allen Probes. The combination of its duration, intensity, and large local time extent (from before 02 to nearly 14 hours MLT) suggests that it might have a significant effect on the ring current, and possibly even electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  19. A study of the relation between intensity oscillations and magnetic field parameters in a sunspot: Hinode observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja Bayanna, A.; Mathew, Shibu K.; Kumar, Brajesh; Louis, Rohan E.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present properties of intensity oscillations of a sunspot in the photosphere and chromosphere using G band and Ca II H filtergrams from Hinode. Intensity power maps as function of magnetic field strength and frequency reveal reduction of power in the G band with an increase in photospheric magnetic field strength at all frequencies. In Ca II H, however, stronger fields exhibit more power at high frequencies, particularly in the 4.5-8.0 mHz band. Power distributions in different locations of the active region show that the oscillations in Ca II H exhibit more power compared to that of the G band. We also relate the power in intensity oscillations with different components of the photospheric vector magnetic field using near simultaneous spectro-polarimetric observations of the sunspot from the Hinode spectropolarimeter. The photospheric umbral power is strongly anti-correlated with the magnetic field strength and its line-of-sight component but there is a good correlation with the transverse component. A reversal of this trend is observed in the chromosphere except at low frequencies (ν <= 1.5 mHz). The power in sunspot penumbrae is anti-correlated with the magnetic field parameters at all frequencies (1.0 <= ν <= 8.0 mHz) in both the photosphere and chromosphere, except that the chromospheric power shows a strong correlation in the frequency range 3-3.5 mHz.

  20. Intense transport of bed load - modeling based on experimentally observed flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, Václav

    2016-04-01

    A modeling approach is discussed which enables to predict characteristics of steady uniform open-channel flow carrying a large amount of sediment (bed load). The approach considers a layered structure of the sediment-laden flow and employs conditions at layer interfaces to evaluate the flow slope, depth, the thickness of the layers and flow rates of both the sediment and sediment-water mixture. It is based on experimental observations obtained for lightweight granular materials in a laboratory tilting flume. Besides visual observations of a development of the layered structure of the flow, detailed profiles of the longitudinal velocity were collected together with integral characteristics of the flow (depths and slopes, flow rates) in the flume. Values of the grain velocity and concentration at the interfaces were determined from the measurements and observations. In the upper plane bed regime of bed load transport, the flow structure appears to be composed of up to three distinct layers (water layer, linear collisional layer and dense sliding layer). Depending on a value of the bed Shields parameter (and associated flow conditions) the number of layers may change and the thicknesses of the particular layers vary. It appears that collisional layers in flows in which they dominate the flow depth (typically Shields bigger than 1) exhibit a virtually constant value of the collisional-layer Richardson number. Velocity and concentration profiles across the collisional layer can be considered linear. At the bottom of the flow, the Coulomb yield criterion with the assumption of the zero fluid contribution balances the bed shear stress applied by the flowing mixture of water and sediment. These features are employed in the discussed modeling approach and lead to a depth-averaged flow model composed of a set of balance and constitutive equations. A kinetic-theory based formula for granular shear stress at the bottom of the collisional layer is added to close the set of

  1. LONGITUDINAL AND RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE PEAK INTENSITIES: STEREO, ACE, SOHO, GOES, AND MESSENGER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lario, D.; Ho, G. C.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Aran, A.; Gomez-Herrero, R.; Dresing, N.; Heber, B.

    2013-04-10

    Simultaneous measurements of solar energetic particle (SEP) events by two or more of the spacecraft located near 1 AU during the rising phase of solar cycle 24 (i.e., STEREO-A, STEREO-B, and near-Earth spacecraft such as ACE, SOHO, and GOES) are used to determine the longitudinal dependence of 71-112 keV electron, 0.7-3 MeV electron, 15-40 MeV proton, and 25-53 MeV proton peak intensities measured in the prompt component of SEP events. Distributions of the peak intensities for the selected 35 events with identifiable solar origin are approximated by the form exp [ - ({phi} - {phi}{sub 0}){sup 2}/2{sigma}{sup 2}], where {phi} is the longitudinal separation between the parent active region and the footpoint of the nominal interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line connecting each spacecraft with the Sun, {phi}{sub 0} is the distribution centroid, and {sigma} determines the longitudinal gradient. The MESSENGER spacecraft, at helioradii R < 1 AU, allows us to determine a lower limit to the radial dependence of the 71-112 keV electron peak intensities measured along IMF lines. We find five events for which the nominal magnetic footpoint of MESSENGER was less than 20 Degree-Sign apart from the nominal footpoint of a spacecraft near 1 AU. Although the expected theoretical radial dependence for the peak intensity of the events observed along the same field line can be approximated by a functional form R {sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} < 3, we find two events for which {alpha} > 3. These two cases correspond to SEP events occurring in a complex interplanetary medium that favored the enhancement of peak intensities near Mercury but hindered the SEP transport to 1 AU.

  2. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  3. Knowledge-intensive global optimization of Earth observing system architectures: a climate-centric case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selva, D.

    2014-10-01

    Requirements from the different disciplines of the Earth sciences on satellite missions have become considerably more stringent in the past decade, while budgets in space organizations have not increased to support the implementation of new systems meeting these requirements. At the same time, new technologies such as optical communications, electrical propulsion, nanosatellite technology, and new commercial agents and models such as hosted payloads are now available. The technical and programmatic environment is thus ideal to conduct architectural studies that look with renewed breadth and adequate depth to the myriad of new possible architectures for Earth Observing Systems. Such studies are challenging tasks, since they require formidable amounts of data and expert knowledge in order to be conducted. Indeed, trade-offs between hundreds or thousands of requirements from different disciplines need to be considered, and millions of combinations of instrument technologies and orbits are possible. This paper presents a framework and tool to support the exploration of such large architectural tradespaces. The framework can be seen as a model-based, executable science traceability matrix that can be used to compare the relative value of millions of different possible architectures. It is demonstrated with an operational climate-centric case study. Ultimately, this framework can be used to assess opportunities for international collaboration and look at architectures for a global Earth observing system, including space, air, and ground assets.

  4. Observation of muon intensity variations by season with the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; et al.

    2014-07-22

    A sample of 1.53$\\times$10$^{9}$ cosmic-ray-induced single muon events has been recorded at 225 meters-water-equivalent using the MINOS Near Detector. The underground muon rate is observed to be highly correlated with the effective atmospheric temperature. The coefficient $\\alpha_{T}$, relating the change in the muon rate to the change in the vertical effective temperature, is determined to be 0.428$\\pm$0.003(stat.)$\\pm$0.059(syst.). An alternative description is provided by the weighted effective temperature, introduced to account for the differences in the temperature profile and muon flux as a function of zenith angle. Using the latter estimation of temperature, the coefficient is determined to be 0.352$\\pm$0.003(stat.)$\\pm$0.046(syst.).

  5. Observed effects of soil organic matter content on the microwave intensity of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.

    1988-01-01

    In order to determine the significance of organic matter content on the microwave emissivity of soils when estimating soil moisture, field experiments were conducted in which 1.4 GHz microwave emissivity data were collected over test plots of sandy loam soil with different organic matter levels (1.8, 4.0, and 6.1 percent) for a range of soil moisture values. Analyses of the observed data show only minor variation in microwave emissivity due to a change in organic matter content at a given moisture level for soils with similar texture and structure. Predictions of microwave emissivity made using a dielectric model for aggregated soils exhibit the same trends and type of response as the measured data when appropriate values for the input parameters were utilized.

  6. The color ratio-intensity relation in the Jovian aurora: Hubble observations of auroral components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Bonfond, B.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.

    2016-10-01

    Spectral observations made with the long slit of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on board Hubble have been used to construct spectral maps of the FUV Jovian aurora. They reveal that the amount of absorption by overlying methane shows significant spatial variations. In this report, we examine the relationship between the auroral brightness of the unabsorbed H2 emission that is proportional to the precipitated electron energy flux, and the ultraviolet color ratio, a proxy of the mean electron energy. We find that it varies significantly between the different components of the aurora and in the polar region. Although no global dependence can be found, we show that the two quantities are better organized in some auroral components such as regions of the main aurororal emission. By contrast, the dependence of the electron characteristic energy in high-latitude and diffuse aurora regions on the auroral energy input is generally more scattered. We conclude that the various auroral components are associated with different electron acceleration processes, some of which are not governed by a simple relation linking the value of a field-aligned acceleration potential with the parallel currents flowing from the ionosphere.

  7. National Project for Intense Observations and Research in the High Strain Rate Zone of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enescu, B.; Obara, K.; Takeda, T.; Asano, Y.; Matsubara, M.

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms that control the occurrence of large intraplate earthquakes are still not well understood. Although physical models to explain their occurrence exist (e.g., Iio et al., 2004), more detailed geophysical observations are necessary to substantiate these models. The dense Global Positioning System (GPS) array developed by the Geographical Survey Institute of Japan (GEONET) has revealed the presence of a high strain rate zone northwest of central Honshu (Sagiya et al., 2000). Numerous large intraplate earthquakes have occurred in this region (e.g., the 1995 Kobe earthquake, Mw6.9). Thus, a detailed geophysical survey in the area could help to better understand the physical processes responsible for the occurrence of intraplate earthquakes. For this purpose, we are going to install 300 three-component seismometers in the region where two large earthquakes occurred recently (the 2004 Chuetsu, Mw6.6, earthquake and the 2007 Offshore Chuetsu, Mw6.6, earthquake). This temporary network, with an average spacing between stations of about 10 km, but significantly denser in the aftershock regions of the two large events (spacing of about 3 to 5 km) will complement the high-sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) of NIED, with a station spacing of about 20 km. The P- and S-wave arrival times of the earthquakes recorded by the combined temporary network and Hi-Net will be used in 3D tomographic inversions to obtain highly accurate hypocenter locations and a high-resolution velocity structure. Waveform cross-correlations will be used to improve the accuracy of arrival time picking. Moreover, we are planning to determine the focal mechanism solutions for the earthquakes recorded in the region and perform stress inversions to estimate the crustal stress field. At the meeting we will present a review of previous studies concerning the high-strain rate zone of Japan and an overview of this project.

  8. Very low frequency radio events with a reduced intensity observed by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Záhlava, J.; Němec, F.; Santolík, O.; Kolmašová, I.; Parrot, M.; Rodger, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of a systematic study of unusual very low frequency (VLF) radio events with a reduced intensity observed in the frequency-time spectrograms measured by the low-orbiting Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) spacecraft. They occur exclusively on the nightside. During these events, the intensity of fractional hop whistlers at specific frequencies is significantly reduced. These frequencies are usually above about 3.4 kHz (second Earth-ionosphere waveguide cutoff frequency), but about 20% of events extend down to about 1.7 kHz (first Earth-ionosphere waveguide cutoff frequency). The frequencies of a reduced intensity vary smoothly with time. We have inspected 6.5 years of DEMETER data, and we identified in total 1601 such events. We present a simple model of the event formation based on the wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We apply the model to two selected events, and we demonstrate that the model is able to reproduce both the minimum frequencies of the events and their approximate frequency-time shapes. The overall geographic distribution of the events is shifted by about 3000 km westward and slightly southward with respect to the areas with high long-term average lightning activity. We demonstrate that this shift is related to the specific DEMETER orbit, and we suggest its qualitative explanation by the east-west asymmetry of the wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide.

  9. Unexpected spatial intensity distributions and onset timing of solar electron events observed by closely spaced STEREO spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, A.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Müller-Mellin, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present multi-spacecraft observations of four solar electron events using measurements from the Solar Electron Proton Telescope (SEPT) and the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) on board the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, respectively, occurring between 11 October 2013 and 1 August 2014, during the approaching superior conjunction period of the two STEREO spacecraft. At this time the longitudinal separation angle between STEREO-A (STA) and STEREO-B (STB) was less than 72°. The parent particle sources (flares) of the four investigated events were situated close to, in between, or to the west of the STEREO's magnetic footpoints. The STEREO measurements revealed a strong difference in electron peak intensities (factor ≤12) showing unexpected intensity distributions at 1 AU, although the two spacecraft had nominally nearly the same angular magnetic footpoint separation from the flaring active region (AR) or their magnetic footpoints were both situated eastwards from the parent particle source. Furthermore, the events detected by the two STEREO imply a strongly unexpected onset timing with respect to each other: the spacecraft magnetically best connected to the flare detected a later arrival of electrons than the other one. This leads us to suggest the concept of a rippled peak intensity distribution at 1 AU formed by narrow peaks (fingers) superposed on a quasi-uniform Gaussian distribution. Additionally, two of the four investigated solar energetic particle (SEP) events show a so-called circumsolar distribution and their characteristics make it plausible to suggest a two-component particle injection scenario forming an unusual, non-uniform intensity distribution at 1 AU.

  10. Observations of an intense field-aligned thermal ion flow and associated intense narrow band electric field oscillations. [at auroral arc edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, E. A.; Kelley, M. C.; Mozer, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the conditions encountered during a Javelin sounding rocket experiment conducted on Apr. 3, 1970 at Fort Churchill, Canada. Evidence is presented that near the equatorward edge of the auroral arc an intense beam of cold plasma ions was flowing parallel to the earth's magnetic field. The beam was associated with intense narrow band electric field oscillations near the local ion gyrofrequency. The data support the hypothesis that intense electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were driven unstable by field-aligned currents.

  11. Preliminary analysis of the Intensive Observation Period events occurred in Italy during the HyMeX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Rossella

    2013-04-01

    HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean eXperiment) is a project aimed at a better understanding and quantification of the hydrological cycle and related processes in the Mediterranean. As a part of HyMeX, Special Observation Periods (SOPs) are dedicated to provide detailed and specific observations to study key processes leading to orographic precipitation (ORP), heavy precipitation events (HPEs), and flash flood events (FFEs) in certain Target Areas (TAs). Informed by numerical weather forecasts and standard observations, Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) are declared during the SOPs. Specific observations in the TAs are provided by operational measurements (ground meteorological networks, soundings, and remote-sensing instruments), coupled with specific measurements during IOPs from several instruments, such as disdrometers, sodars, lidars, research radars, extra soundings, etc. In this paper an overview is presented of the HyMeX IOPs in Italy during SOP1 (5 September - 6 November, 2012). The Hydro-Meteorological sites of interest were: Liguria-Tuscany (LT), northeastern Italy (NEI) and central Italy (CI). Typical situations encountered for HPEs in LT involved upper-level southwesterly flow with low-level moist southerly or southeasterly flow over the Tyrrhenian and the Ligurian Sea. Highlights include a measurement of 300 mm/24h of rain at the border between Liguria and Emilia on Sept. 26, 2012 during IOP7b. For NEI region, HPEs mainly occurred with upper level southwesterly flow ahead of advancing troughs with low-level moist southerly or southeasterly flow over the Adriatic Sea. Highlights include 120 mm/24h of rain in Friuli Venezia Giulia on Sept. 12, 2012 during IOP2. For CI region, HPEs and FFEs, a slowly propagating cut-off low centered over southern Italy was observed; the associated easterly flow on the north side of the cut-off low would frequently bring moisture into east central Italy from the Adriatic Sea. Highlights include an event with

  12. Observation of neutron spectrum from deuterated plastic irradiated by 100 picosecond and sub-picosecond ultra-intense laser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Miyoshi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Habara, H.; Kodama, R.; Sentoku, S.; Fujita, H.; Kitagawa, Y.; Katou, Y.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.

    1998-11-01

    For understanding of the fundamental physics of the fast ignition, it is crucial to investigate the fast ion production in a high density plasma irradiated by an ultra-intense laser. The energy spectrum of the neutrons produced in the deuterated target reflects the energy spectrum of fast deuterons accelerated in the interacting region. Due to high penetration ability of fast neutron, the neutron spectra directly bring out the information of the hot ions from the high density plasma. We have observed 10^6 of the DD neutrons produced in a deuterated polystyrene (C8D8)x target irradiated by the 500-fs intense laser (up to 10^19 W/cm^2). The fast neutron spectra were measured by multi-channel time-of-flight neutron spectrometer (MANDALA) at the GEKKO XII laser facility of Osaka University. The spectrometer has two sets of 421 channel detector arrays which were located at 90 and 54.7 degrees with respect to the irradiation axis. The observed spectral width of DD neutrons were 1.35 MeV in full width of half maximum. This spectrum result from the fusion reaction created by accelerated ions which have energy about 300 keV. We report the details of the experimental results and the quantitative analysis using particle in cell code.

  13. Intensity-dependent circular polarization and circumstellar magnetic fields from the observation of SiO masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A new aspect of the propagation of astrophysical maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field is described in which circular polarization is created. The resulting antisymmetric spectral line profile for this circular polarization resembles that produced by the ordinary Zeeman effect when the Zeeman splittings are much less than the spectral line breadth. It is caused by the change, with increasing maser intensity, in the axis of symmetry for the molecular quantum states from a direction that is parallel to the magnetic field to a direction that is parallel to the direction of propagation. When the maser is radiatively saturated, and the rate for stimulated emission is within an order of magnitude of the Zeeman splitting in frequency units, this 'intensity-dependent circular polarization' is greater than that due to the ordinary Zeeman effect by factors as large as 1000. The circular polarization that is observed in the spectra of circumstellar SiO (J = 1-0) masers associated with late-type giants and supergiants may then be caused by magnetic fields as weak as about 10 mG. With the standard Zeeman interpretation of the observations, magnetic fields of 10-100 G are indicated. The lower fields are similar to the limits obtained from the observation of the 22 GHz water masers which are typically somewhat further from the central star. The observed tendency for the fractional linear polarization of SiO masers to increase with increasing angular momentum of the molecular state is shown to be a likely result of anisotropic pumping. Errors are identified that invalidate a recent conflicting claim in the literature about the basic theory of maser polarization in the regime that is relevant here.

  14. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front.more » Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.« less

  15. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Spence, Harlan E.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  16. HIGH LATITUDE ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS OF THE H/HE INTENSITY RATIO UNDER SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    J. GOSLING; D. LARIO; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    We analyze measurements of the 0.5-1.0 MeV/nucleon H/He intensity ratio from the Ulysses spacecraft during its first (1992-94) and second (1999-2000) ascent to southern high latitude regions of the heliosphere. These cover a broad range of heliocentric distances (from 5.2 to 2.0 AU) and out-of-ecliptic latitudes (from 18{degree}S to 80{degree}S). During Ulysses' first southern pass, the HI-SCALE instrument measured a series of enhanced particle fluxes associated with the passage of a recurrent corotating interaction region (CIR). Low values ({approximately}6) of the H/He ratio were observed in these recurrent corotating events, with a clear minimum following the passage of the corotating reverse shock. When Ulysses reached high southern latitudes (>40{degree}S), the H/He ratio always remained below {approximately}10 except during two transient solar events that brought the ratio to high (>20) values. Ulysses' second southern pass was characterized by a higher average value of the H/He ratio. No recurrent pattern was observed in the energetic ion intensity which was dominated by the occurrence of transient events of solar origin. Numerous CIRs, many of which were bounded by forward and reverse shock pairs, were still observed in the solar wind and magnetic field data. The arrival of those CIRs at Ulysses did not always result in a decrease of the H/He ratio; on the contrary, many CIRs showed a higher H/He ratio than some transient events. Within a CIR, however, the H/He ratio usually increased around the forward shock and decreased towards the reverse shock. Throughout the second ascent to southern heliolatitudes, the H/He ratio seldom decreased below {approximately}10 even at high latitudes (>40{degree}S). We interpret these higher values of the H/He ratio in terms of the increasing level of solar activity together with the poor definition and short life that corotating solar wind structures have under solar maximum conditions. The global filling of the heliosphere

  17. A prospective observational study assessing the outcome of Sepsis in intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital, Peshawar

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Arslan Rahat; Hussain, Arshad; Ali, Iftikhar; Samad, Abdul; Ali Shah, Syed Tajammul; Yousef, Muhammad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The current study aims to explore the factors associated with outcome among patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the intensive care unit, Northwest General Hospital and Research Centre, Peshawar, Pakistan. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out at intensive care unit of our hospital from February 2014 to October 2015. Data was collected using a structured format and statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 20®. Regression model was applied to identify the factors contributing to the outcome of severe sepsis and septic shock. P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Majority of the patients meeting the criteria of this study were male 147 (54.9%) with a mean age of 54.8. The most common source of sepsis was lung infections (42.2%) followed by urinary tract infections (18.7%), soft tissue infections (6.3%) abdominal infections (6%) and in 6.3% patients the source remained unknown. Further analysis has revealed that increase in number of days of hospitalization was observed to be slightly associated with the outcome of the treatment (1.086 [1.002 – 1.178], 0.046). Moreover, the risk of mortality was the higher among the patients with septic shock 22.161[10.055 – 48.840], and having respiratory, kidney and central nervous system complications. Overall it is seen that septic shock alone was found responsible to cause death among 32.0% of the patients (Model 1: R2 0.32, p=0.000), and upon involvement of the organ complications the risk of mortality was observed to 42.0%. Conclusion: Chances of recovery were poor among the patients with septic shock. Moreover, those patients having respiratory and urinary tract infection are least likely to survive. PMID:27375715

  18. OH observations in a tropical rain forest environment using a chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique during GOAmazon intensive campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Seco, R.; Park, J. H.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Guenther, A. B.; Smith, J. N.; Liu, Y.; Bustillos, J. O. V.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Tota, J.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    We will present observed OH in the Amazon rain forest using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). The observation was conducted at the T3 site in Manacapuru, Amazonas Brazil. It had been accepted almost as an axiom that very low OH is expected in low NO environments such as a pristine rain forest. However, recent studies in the pristine rain forest environments consistently reported significantly higher than expected OH levels. This sparked extensive and intensive studies to explore any possibility of OH regeneration from isoprene photo-oxidation processes in the low NO condition. Four OH regeneration processes related with isoprene photochemistry have been proposed since 2008. However, the levels of the expected OH enhancement vary greatly among the proposed OH regeneration processes mediated by the isoprene oxidation processes. As all enhanced OH observations from the pristine areas with high isoprene conditions have used the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique, the possibilities of potential positive artifacts have also been explored. In this context, the first tropical forest CIMS OH dataset will be discussed in the context of 1) comparisons with previously reported OH using the LIF technique, 2) comparisons with box model calculated OH with different isoprene oxidation scenarios to reconcile measured and calculated OH, and 3) comparisons with regional model calculated OH. The CIMS observational dataset along with a comprehensive trace gas dataset provides a constraint to assess current uncertainty in oxidation capacity of the pristine forested region, which has tremendous implications towards global fates of short lived climate forcers.

  19. Intense Low-frequency Chorus Waves Observed by Van Allen Probes: Fine Structures and Potential Effect on Radiation Belt Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z.; Su, Z.; Zhu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus emission in the low-density plasmatrough contributes significantly to the radiation belt electron dynamics. Chorus was usually considered to occur in the frequency range 0.1-0.8 fce (with the equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce ). We here report an event of intense low-frequency chorus with nearly half of wave power distributed below 0.1 fce observed by the Van Allen Probes on 27 August 2014. This emission exhibited little discrete rising tones but mainly the hiss-like signatures, had the high ellipticity of ˜1 and propagated quasi-parallel to the magnetic field. Compared with the typical chorus, the low-frequency chorus can produce weaker (2 times at ~ MeV and even up to several orders of magnitude at ~0.1MeV) momentum diffusion of the near-equatorially trapped electrons, but much stronger (1-2 orders of magnitude) pitch-angle diffusion near the loss cone. The acceleration and particularly loss effect of such intense low-frequency chorus may need to be taken into account in future radiation belt models.

  20. OBSERVATIONS OF INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS ATTRIBUTED TO GRANULATION AND FACULAE ON SUN-LIKE STARS FROM THE KEPLER MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Karoff, C.; Campante, T. L.; Ballot, J.; Kallinger, T.; Gruberbauer, M.; Garcia, R. A.

    2013-04-10

    Sun-like stars show intensity fluctuations on a number of timescales due to various physical phenomena on their surfaces. These phenomena can convincingly be studied in the frequency spectra of these stars-while the strongest signatures usually originate from spots, granulation, and p-mode oscillations, it has also been suggested that the frequency spectrum of the Sun contains a signature of faculae. We have analyzed three stars observed for 13 months in short cadence (58.84 s sampling) by the Kepler mission. The frequency spectra of all three stars, as for the Sun, contain signatures that we can attribute to granulation, faculae, and p-mode oscillations. The temporal variability of the signatures attributed to granulation, faculae, and p-mode oscillations was analyzed and the analysis indicates a periodic variability in the granulation and faculae signatures-comparable to what is seen in the Sun.

  1. On the cause of the flat-spot phenomenon observed in silicon solar cells at low temperatures and low intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Broder, J. D.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    A model is presented that explains the "flat-spot" (FS) power loss phenomenon observed in silicon solar cells operating deep space (low temperature, low intensity) conditions. Evidence is presented suggesting that the effect is due to localized metallurgical interactions between the silicon substrate and the contact metallization. These reactions are shown to result in localized regions in which the PN junction is destroyed and replaced with a metal-semiconductor-like interface. The effects of thermal treatment, crystallographic orientation, junction depth, and metallurization are presented along with a method of preventing the effect through the suppression of vacancy formation at the free surface of the contact metallization. Preliminary data indicating the effectiveness of a TiN diffusion barrier in preventing the effect are also given.

  2. The Course of Pain Intensity in Patients Undergoing Herniated Disc Surgery: A 5-Year Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Dorow, Marie; Löbner, Margrit; Stein, Janine; Pabst, Alexander; Konnopka, Alexander; Meisel, Hans J.; Günther, Lutz; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Stengler, Katarina; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study are to answer the following questions (1) How does the pain intensity of lumbar and cervical disc surgery patients change within a postoperative time frame of 5 years? (2) Which sociodemographic, medical, work-related, and psychological factors are associated with postoperative pain in lumbar and cervical disc surgery patients? Methods The baseline survey (T0; n = 534) was conducted 3.6 days (SD 2.48) post-surgery in the form of face-to-face interviews. The follow-up interviews were conducted 3 months (T1; n = 486 patients), 9 months (T2; n = 457), 15 months (T3; n = 438), and 5 years (T4; n = 404) post-surgery. Pain intensity was measured on a numeric rating-scale (NRS 0–100). Estimated changes to and influences on postoperative pain by random effects were accounted by regression models. Results Average pain decreased continuously over time in patients with lumbar herniated disc (Wald Chi² = 25.97, p<0.001). In patients with cervical herniated disc a reduction of pain was observed, albeit not significant (Chi² = 7.02, p = 0.135). Two predictors were associated with postoperative pain in lumbar and cervical disc surgery patients: the subjective prognosis of gainful employment (p<0.001) and depression (p<0.001). Conclusion In the majority of disc surgery patients, a long-term reduction of pain was observed. Cervical surgery patients seemed to benefit less from surgery than the lumbar surgery patients. A negative subjective prognosis of gainful employment and stronger depressive symptoms were associated with postoperative pain. The findings may promote multimodal rehabilitation concepts including psychological and work-related support. PMID:27243810

  3. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period 2011 in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Kanawade, V. P.; You, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; Lee, Y.; McGraw, R. L.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period (July-August 2011) in Long Island, New York, we deployed a particle size magnifier (Airmodus A09) running at different working fluid saturation ratios and a TSI CPC3776 to extract the information of sub-3 nm particles formation. A scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), and a number of atmospheric trace gas analyzers were used to simultaneously measure aerosol size distributions, sulfuric acid, and other possible aerosol precursors, respectively. Our observation results show that sub-3 nm particles existed during both NPF and non-NPF events, indicating the formation of sub-3nm particle didn't always lead to NPF characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. However, sub-3 nm particles were much higher during NPF events. Sub-3 nm particles were well-correlated with sulfuric acid showing the same diurnal variations and noontime peaks, especially for NPF days. These results are consistent with laboratory studies showing that formation of sub-3 nm particles is very sensitive to sulfuric acid (than amines and ammonia) [Yu et al. GRL 2012]. HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis indicates that air masses from Great Lakes, containing more SO2, VOCs and secondary organics, may contribute to growth of sub-3 nm particles and NPF.

  4. Comparison of empirical models with intensively observed data for prediction of salt intrusion in the Sumjin River estuary, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, D. C.; Cho, Y.-K.

    2009-06-01

    Performance of empirical models has been compared with extensively observed data to determine the most suitable model for prediction of salt intrusion in the Sumjin River estuary, Korea. Intensive measurements of salt intrusion were taken at high and low waters during both spring and neap tide in each season from August 2004 to April 2007. The stratification parameter varied with the distance along the estuary, tidal period and freshwater discharge, indicating that the Sumjin River estuary experiences a transition from partially- or well-mixed during spring tide to stratified during neap tide. The salt intrusion length at high water varied from 13.4 km in summer 2005 to 25.6 km in autumn 2006. The salt intrusion mostly depends on the freshwater discharge rather than spring-neap tidal oscillation. Analysis of three years observed salinity data indicates that the scale of the salt intrusion length in the Sumjin River estuary is proportional to the river discharge to the -1/5 power. Four empirical models have been applied to the Sumjin River estuary to explore the most suitable model for prediction of the salt intrusion length. Comparative results show that the Nguyen and Savenije (2006) model, developed under both partially- and well-mixed estuaries, performs best of all models studied (relative error of 4.6%). The model was also applied under stratified neap tide conditions, with a relative error of 5.2%, implying applicability of this model under stratified conditions as well.

  5. Potential of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Ocean Surface Wind Observations for Determining Tropical Storm Vortex Intensity and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Miller, Timothy; Ruf, Christopher; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative technology development, which offers the potential of new and unique remotely sensed observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation from either UAS or satellite platforms. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a proven aircraft remote sensing technique for observing tropical cyclone ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by the NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard version of the instrument is complete and has been successfully tested in an anechoic chamber, and development of the aircraft instrument is well underway. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce wide-swath imagery of ocean vector winds and rain during hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered. Preliminary studies show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor.

  6. Observation of intracluster Coulombic decay of Rydberg-like states triggered by intense near-infrared pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Bernd; Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas; Jabbari, Ghazal; Gokhberg, Kirill; Kuleff, Alexander I.; Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Rouzée, Arnaud

    2015-05-01

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) describes a process, where an excited atom relaxes by transferring its energy to an atom in the environment that gets ionized. So far, ICD has been observed following XUV ionization or excitation of clusters. Here we present novel results of an intracluster Coulombic decay mechanism induced by intense NIR pulses and following Rydberg atom formation in the generated nanoplasma. When a highly-excited Rydberg atom relaxes to its ground state by transferring its excess energy to a weakly bound electron in the environment, electrons with kinetic energies close to the atomic ionization potential are emitted. We show evidence for such an intracluster Coulombic decay process that leaves clear signatures in the electron kinetic energy spectra. ICD is time-resolved in a pump-probe experiment, where a weak probe pulse depopulates the excited states, leading to a quenching of the ICD signal. We find a decay time of 87 ps, which is siginificantly longer than for previous ICD observations, where inner-shell holes were created by XUV pulses. Intracluster Coulombic decay is found to be a generic process that takes places in atomic and molecular clusters and at different wavelengths. It may play an important role in biological systems and in astronomical plasmas. Previous affiliation: Max-Born-Institut, Berlin, Germany.

  7. Delay of transfer from the intensive care unit: a prospective observational study of incidence, causes, and financial impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A paucity of literature exists regarding delays in transfer out of the intensive care unit. We sought to analyze the incidence, causes, and costs of delayed transfer from a surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Methods An IRB-approved prospective observational study was conducted from January 24, 2010, to July 31, 2010, of all 731 patients transferred from a 20-bed SICU at a large tertiary-care academic medical center. Data were collected on patients who were medically ready for transfer to the floor who remained in the SICU for at least 1 extra day. Reasons for delay were examined, and extra costs associated were estimated. Results Transfer to the floor was delayed in 22% (n = 160) of the 731 patients transferred from the SICU. Delays ranged from 1 to 6 days (mean, 1.5 days; median, 2 days). The extra costs associated with delays were estimated to be $581,790 during the study period, or $21,547 per week. The most common reasons for delay in transfer were lack of available surgical-floor bed (71% (114 of 160)), lack of room appropriate for infectious contact precautions (18% (28 of 160)), change of primary service (Surgery to Medicine) (7% (11 of 160)), and lack of available patient attendant ("sitter" for mildly delirious patients) (3% (five of 160)). A positive association was found between the daily hospital census and the daily number of SICU beds occupied by patients delayed in transfer (Spearman rho = 0.27; P < 0.0001). Conclusions Delay in transfer from the SICU is common and costly. The most common reason for delay is insufficient availability of surgical-floor beds. Delay in transfer is associated with high hospital census. Further study of this problem is necessary. PMID:23826830

  8. Study of large Forbush decreases in cosmic-ray intensity observed during solar cycle 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anand; Badruddin, B.

    2016-07-01

    Neutron monitors at different geomagnetic latitude and longitude of Earth measure the cosmic-ray intensity with high precision. Sudden decreases in cosmic-ray intensity within few hours and slow recovery to pre-decrease level within a few days (Forbush decreases) are observed in neutron monitor data. We identify large-amplitude Forbush decreases (FDs), using high counting rate neutron monitor data, that occurred during previous solar cycle 23 (1995-2009) and current solar cycle 24 (2010-2015). We then search for the solar sources and the interplanetary structures responsible for these decreases. We attempt to find the relative importance of various interplanetary plasma and field parameters and the physical mechanism(s) responsible for FDs of varying amplitudes. We analyze a number of interplanetary plasma and field parameters, during both the phases (main and recovery) of FDs. The interplanetary plasma and field data analyzed in this study are the solar-wind velocity, the interplanetary magnetic field, its fluctuations, interplanetary electric field and the time variation of interplanetary electric potential. For monitoring the changes in interplanetary plasma/field conditions during the development of FDs, we also utilize plasma density, temperature and plasma beta, dynamic pressure and Mach number during the passage of interplanetary structures responsible for FDs. In addition to their amplitude, we study the recovery of FDs in detail after determining the time constant during their recovery by exponential fit to the data. As the solar magnetic polarity reversed during the maximum phase of solar cycle 23 (in the year 2000), we study the differences in amplitude, time constant of recovery and plasma/field condition to search for the polarity dependent effects, if any, on the amplitude and recovery of FDs due to implication for the models suggested to explain the Forbush decrease phenomena. The implications of these results are discussed.

  9. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in P3HT:PCBM solar cells as observed under ultralow light intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Tzabari, Lior; Tessler, Nir

    2011-03-15

    We present light intensity dependent measurements of the quantum efficiency of P3HT:PCBM photovoltaic devices. Unlike previous studies we focus on ultralow light intensities down to 10{sup -3} mW/cm{sup 2}. We find that although when the devices are excited at intensities close to 1 Sun they exhibit very little bias or light intensity dependence, this is clearly not the case for light intensities below 1 mW/cm{sup 2}, where the cell's efficiency becomes highly dependent on the bias and light intensity. Using a simple model for the device efficiency we can fit the experimental data across a wide range of parameters and thus separate the effects of generation efficiency (geminate recombination) and charge recombination. Our finding suggests that recombination through trap (charge transfer) states is an important loss mechanism and we are able to quantify the density and depth of these states.

  10. Intense low-frequency chorus waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Fine structures and potential effect on radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhonglei; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chao; Wang, Shui

    2016-02-01

    Frequency distribution is a vital factor in determining the contribution of whistler mode chorus to radiation belt electron dynamics. Chorus is usually considered to occur in the frequency range 0.1-0.8fce_eq (with the equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce_eq). We here report an event of intense low-frequency chorus with nearly half of wave power distributed below 0.1fce_eq observed by Van Allen Probe A on 27 August 2014. This emission propagated quasi-parallel to the magnetic field and exhibited hiss-like signatures most of the time. The low-frequency chorus can produce the rapid loss of low-energy (˜0.1 MeV) electrons, different from the normal chorus. For high-energy (≥0.5 MeV) electrons, the low-frequency chorus can yield comparable momentum diffusion to that of the normal chorus but much stronger (up to 2 orders of magnitude) pitch angle diffusion near the loss cone.

  11. Comparison of empirical models with intensively observed data for prediction salt intrusion in the Sumjin River estuary, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, D. C.; Cho, Y.-K.

    2009-03-01

    Intensive measurements of salt intrusion in the Sumjin River estuary were taken at high and low waters during both spring and neap tides in each season from August 2004 to April 2007. The estuary demonstrated partially- and well-mixed characteristics during the spring tide and stratified condition during the neap tide. The salt intrusion at high water varied from about 13.39 km in summer 2005 to 25.62 km in autumn 2006. The salt intrusion depended primarily on the freshwater discharges rather than those of spring-neap tidal oscillations. Analysis of three years of observed salinity data indicated that the salt intrusion length scale in the Sumjin River estuary was proportional to the river discharge to the -1/5 power. Five empirical models were applied to the Sumjin River estuary to explore the most suitable as an easy-to-use tool for prediction of the salt intrusion length as functions of the geometry, river discharge and tide. Comparative results showed that the Nguyen and Savenije (2006) model developed under both partially- and well-mixed estuaries yielded the most satisfactory results of all the models studied for computing the salt intrusion length in the Sumjin River estuary. Our study suggests that the model can generate reasonable results for stratified conditions also.

  12. Shortwave Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement 2003 Aerosol Intensive Observation Period

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Anderson, Gail; Barnard, James C.; Delamere, Jennifer; Gueymard, C.; Kato, Seiji; Kiedron, P.; McComiskey, A.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    2006-07-20

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large aerosol intensive observation period (AIOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this AIOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky periods on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are in the worst case 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 1.9%.

  13. Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Observation Period (RCS-IOP) millimeter-wave radar calibration and data intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Firda, J.M.; McIntosh, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    During April 1994, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) and the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) fielded two millimeter-wave atmospheric radars in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Operation Period (RCS-IOP) experiment. The UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) operates simultaneously at 33.12 GHz and 94.92 GHz through a single antenna. The Penn State radar operates at 93.95 GHz and has separate transmitting and receiving antennas. The two systems were separated by approximately 75 meters and simultaneously observed a variety of cloud types at verticle incidence over the course of the experiment. This abstract presents some initial results from our calibration efforts. An absolute calibration of the UMass radar was made from radar measurements of a trihedral corner reflector, which has a known radar cross-section. A relative calibration of between the Penn State and UMass radars is made from the statistical comparison of zenith pointing measurements of low altitude liquid clouds. Attenuation is removed with the aid of radiosonde data, and the difference in the calibration between the UMass and Penn State radars is determined by comparing the ratio of 94-GHz and 95-GHz reflectivity values to a model that accounts for parallax effects of the two antennas used in the Penn State system.

  14. Comparison of Columnar Water Vapor Measurements During The Fall 1997 ARM Intensive Observation Period: Solar Transmittance Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Michalsky, J. J.; Slater, D. W.; Barnard, J. C.; Halthore, R. N.; Liljegren, J. C.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    In the fall of 1997, during an Intensive Observation Period (IOP), the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program conducted a study of water vapor abundance measurement at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Among a large number of instruments, four sun-tracking radiometers were present to measure the columnar water vapor (CWV). All four solar radiometers retrieve CWV by measuring total solar transmittance in the 0.94-gm water vapor absorption band and subtracting contributions due to Rayleigh, ozone and aerosol transmittances. The aerosol optical depth comparisons among the same four radiometers has been presented elsewhere (Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, 17, 2725-2728, 1999). We have used three different methods to retrieve CWV. In a first round of comparison no attempt was made to standardize on the same radiative transfer model and its underlying water vapor spectroscopy. In the second round of comparison we used the same line-by-line code (which includes recently corrected H2O spectroscopy) to retrieve CAN from all four suntracking radiometers. This decreased the mean CWV by 8% or 13%. The spread of 8% in the solar radiometer results found when using the same model is an indication of the other-than-model uncertainties involved in determining CWV from solar transmittance measurements with current instrumentation.

  15. Directly-Observed and Self-Administered Tuberculosis Treatment in a Chronic, Low-Intensity Conflict Setting in India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mrinalini; Isaakidis, Petros; Armstrong, Edward; Gundipudi, Nirmala Rani; Babu, Ramesh B.; Qureshi, Ihtesham A.; Claes, Andrea; Mudimanchi, Anil Kumar; Prasad, Nagendra; Mansoor, Homa; Abraham, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited data are available about tuberculosis treatment models of care for internally displaced populations in chronic, low-intensity conflict zones. This study aimed to detail experiences of a Médecins Sans Frontières tuberculosis programme in Andhra Pradesh-Chhattisgarh border area, India, from January to December 2012. Methods The study was a description of two retrospective, observational cohorts receiving category I tuberculosis treatment, either intermittent directly observed treatment (DOT) or daily self-administered therapy (SAT) depending on the security of the area and access to health care services. Results A total of 55 and 17 new tuberculosis patients under DOT and SAT respectively, with complete outcomes were included in the study. Most patients registered were new cases suffering from pulmonary, smear-positive tuberculosis. More than half of the patients in both cohorts were cured or completed treatment: 38/55 (69%) patients were successfully treated under DOT compared to 9/17 (53%) under SAT. Of the patients with adverse outcomes, the ratios of loss to follow up: failure: died were 10∶4:3 under DOT and 7∶0:1 under SAT. A much smaller proportion of patients under DOT (18%) were lost to follow up than under SAT (41%). Discussion Maximum efforts are required to implement successful tuberculosis control programmes for internally displaced populations in conflict zones. Our study suggests that complete tuberculosis treatment can be given to patients using either intermittent DOT or daily SAT, depending on security and access to health services. National TB programmes should include SAT strategies for tuberculosis treatment as these may be an alternative feasible option in conflict settings. PMID:24651176

  16. Intense energetic-electron flux enhancements in Mercury's magnetosphere: An integrated view with high-resolution observations from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, R. M.; Baker, D. N.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Peplowski, P. N.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Ho, G. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    One of the surprising observations by Mariner 10 during its March 1974 flyby of Mercury was the detection of intense bursts of energetic particles in Mercury's magnetosphere in association with substorm-like magnetic field reconfigurations. A full understanding of where, when, and how such particle bursts occur was not possible from the limited Mariner 10 data. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury has provided a wealth of new data about energetic particle phenomena. With observations from MESSENGER's Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS), as well as data arising from energetic electrons recorded by the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) and Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) instruments, recent work has greatly extended our record of the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic electrons at Mercury. The combined data sets include measurements from a few keV up to several hundred keV in electron kinetic energy and have permitted relatively good spatial and temporal resolution for many events. We focus here on the detailed nature of energetic electron bursts measured by the GRNS system, and we place these events in the context of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing at Mercury. Our examination of data at high temporal resolution (10 ms) during the period March 2013 through October 2014 supports strongly the view that energetic electrons are accelerated in the near-tail region of Mercury's magnetosphere and are subsequently "injected" onto closed magnetic field lines on the planetary night side. The electrons evidently fill the plasma sheet volume and drift rapidly eastward toward the dawn and pre-noon sectors, at time executing multiple complete drifts around the planet to form "quasi-trapped" populations.

  17. Observation of intensity of cosmic rays and daily magnetic shifts near meridian 70° in the South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordaro, E. G.; Gálvez, D.; Laroze, D.

    2016-05-01

    In analysis of experiments carried during September 2008 using secondary cosmic ray detectors located in Chacaltaya (Bolivia) and Niteroi (Brazil), Augusto et al. (2010) showed an increase in the intensity of charged particles which takes place 3 h after sunrise and lasts until 1 h after sunset, furthermore they said that during this period the solar magnetic field lines overtake the Earth‧s surface. These stations are located within the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA), having both different magnetic rigidities. To reproduce data from the Niteroi and Chacaltaya stations, we record data during the same hours and days using our neutron monitors, muon telescopes and magnetometers within the stations Putre and Los Cerrillos. Our observation stations in Putre and Cerrillos are located at 18°11‧47.8″S, 69°33‧10.9″W at an altitude of 3600 m and 33°29‧42.3″S, 70°42‧59.81″W with 570 m height above sea level, respectively. These stations are located within the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAMA) and are separated approximately 1700 km from each other and 1700 km from the center of the anomaly. Our network is composed furthermore by two auxiliary Cosmic Ray and/or Geomagnetic stations located at different latitudes along 70°W meridian, LARC and O'Higgins stations, which are located within Antarctic territory, covering a broad part of the Southern Hemisphere. Our magnetometer data shows that for each of the components, shifts in the magnetic field intensity for every station (even for those out of the SAMA) lasted between 3 and 4 h after sunrise and 1 and 2 h past sunset, which are the periods when the geomagnetic field is modulated by the transit of the dayside to nightside and nightside to dayside. We believe that, although the magnetometric data indicates the magnetic reconnection for the Chilean region, there is no direct influence from the SAMA other than the lower rigidity cut-off that leads to an increased count rate. Other details about the

  18. ASCA Observations of the Barnard 209 Dark Cloud and an Intense X-Ray Flare on V773 Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Guedel, Manuel; Koyama, Katsuji; Yamauchi, Shigeo

    1997-01-01

    ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) detected an intense X-ray flare on the weak-lined T Tauri star V773 Tau (=HD 283447) during a 30 ks observation of the Barnard 209 dark cloud in 1995 September. This star is a spectroscopic binary and shows signs of strong magnetic surface activity including a spot-modulated optical light curve. The flare was seen only during its decay phase but is still one of the strongest ever recorded from a T Tauri star with a peak luminosity L(sub x) = 10(exp 32.4) ergs/s (0.5-10 keV), a maximum temperature of at least 42 million K, and energy release of greater than 10(exp 37) ergs. A shorter ASCA observation taken five months later showed V773 Tau in a quiescent state (L(sub x)= 10(exp 31.0) ergs/s) and detected variable emission from the infrared binary IRAS 04113+2758. The differential emission measure (DEM) distribution during the V773 Tau flare shows a bimodal temperature structure that is almost totally dominated by hot plasma at an average temperature of approx. 37 million K. Using information from time-resolved spectra, we examine the flare decay in terms of solar flare models (cooling loops and two-ribbon flares) and also consider possible nonsolar behavior (interbinary flares, star-disk flares, and rotational X-ray modulation). Solar models are unable to reproduce the unusual convex-shaped X-ray light curve, which decays slowly over a timespan of at least 1 day. However, the light curve decay is accurately modeled as a sinusoid with an inferred X-ray period of 2.97 days, which is nearly identical to the optical rotation period(s) of the two K-type components. This provides tantalizing evidence that the flaring region was undergoing rotational occultation, but periodic X-ray variability is not yet proven since our ASCA observation spans only one-third of a rotation cycle.

  19. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Pardyjak, Eric; Mahrt, Larry; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with

  20. Note: 6Li III light intensity observation for 6Li3+ ion beam operation at Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kotaka, Yasuteru; Nishimura, Makoto; Kubono, Shigeru; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2014-12-01

    The light intensity of (6)Li III line spectrum at λ = 516.7 nm was observed during (6)Li(3+) beam tuning at the Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process. However, (6)Li III line intensity observation conducted in this study gives new insights into its simplification of this process. The light intensity of (6)Li III line spectrum from the ECR plasma was found to have a strong correlation with the extracted (6)Li(3+) beam intensity from the RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron. PMID:25554343

  1. Note: {sup 6}Li III light intensity observation for {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} ion beam operation at Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kotaka, Yasuteru; Nishimura, Makoto; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-15

    The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum at λ = 516.7 nm was observed during {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam tuning at the Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process. However, {sup 6}Li III line intensity observation conducted in this study gives new insights into its simplification of this process. The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum from the ECR plasma was found to have a strong correlation with the extracted {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam intensity from the RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron.

  2. Sudden Intensity Increases and Radial Gradient Changes of Cosmic Ray Mev Electrons and Protons Observed at Voyager 1 Beyond 111 AU in the Heliosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Mcdonald, F. B.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B.; Lal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Voyager 1 has entered regions of different propagation conditions for energetic cosmic rays in the outer heliosheathat a distance of about 111 AU from the Sun. The low energy 614 MeV galactic electron intensity increased by 20over a time period 10 days and the electron radial intensity gradient abruptly decreased from 19AU to 8AU at2009.7 at a radial distance of 111.2 AU. At about 2011.2 at a distance of 116.6 AU a second abrupt intensity increase of25 was observed for electrons. After the second sudden electron increase the radial intensity gradient increased to18AU. This large positive gradient and the 13 day periodic variations of 200 MeV particles observed near theend of 2011 indicate that V1 is still within the overall heliospheric modulating region. The implications of these resultsregarding the proximity of the heliopause are discussed.

  3. Does isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage merit a lower intensity level of observation than other traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Phelan, Herb A; Richter, Adam A; Scott, William W; Pruitt, Jeffrey H; Madden, Christopher J; Rickert, Kim L; Wolf, Steven E

    2014-10-15

    Evidence is emerging that isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (ITSAH) may be a milder form of traumatic brain injury (TBI). If true, ITSAH may not benefit from intensive care unit (ICU) admission, which would, in turn, decrease resource utilization. We conducted a retrospective review of all TBI admissions to our institution between February 2010 and November 2012 to compare the presentation and clinical course of subjects with ITSAH to all other TBI. We then performed descriptive statistics on the subset of ITSAH subjects presenting with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 13-15. Of 698 subjects, 102 had ITSAH and 596 had any other intracranial hemorrhage pattern. Compared to all other TBI, ITSAH had significantly lower injury severity scores (p<0.0001), lower head abbreviated injury scores (p<0.0001), higher emergency department GCS (p<0.0001), shorter ICU stays (p=0.007), higher discharge GCS (p=0.005), lower mortality (p=0.003), and significantly fewer head computed tomography scans (p<0.0001). Of those ITSAH subjects presenting with a GCS of 13-15 (n=77), none underwent placement of an intracranial monitor or craniotomy. One subject (1.3%) demonstrated a change in exam (worsened headache and dizziness) concomitant with a progression of his intracranial injury. His symptoms resolved with readmission to the ICU and continued observation. Our results suggest that ITSAH are less-severe brain injuries than other TBI. ITSAH patients with GCS scores of 13-15 demonstrate low rates of clinical progression, and when progression occurs, it resolves without further intervention. This subset of TBI patients does not appear to benefit from ICU admission. PMID:24926612

  4. Shock in the first 24 h of intensive care unit stay: observational study of protocol-based fluid management.

    PubMed

    See, Kay Choong; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Lau, Samuel Chuan-Xian; Tan, Sandra Ming-Yien; Lim, Tow Keang; Phua, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Precision in fluid management for shock could lead to better clinical outcomes. We evaluated the association of protocol-based fluid management with intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital mortality. We performed an observational study of mechanically ventilated patients admitted directly from our emergency department to the ICU from August 2011 to December 2013, who had circulatory shock in the first 24 h of ICU stay (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg at ICU admission or lactate >4 mmol/L). Patients with onset of shock beyond 24 h of ICU stay were excluded. Protocol-based fluid management required close physician-nurse cooperation and computerized documentation, checking for fluid response (≥10% arterial pulse pressure or stroke volume increase after two consecutive 250-mL crystalloid boluses), and fluid loading with repeated 500-mL boluses until fluid response became negative. Six hundred twelve mechanically ventilated patients with shock (mean [±SD] age, 63.0 years [16.5]; 252 or 41.2% females; mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, 30.2 [8.8]) were studied. The fluid management protocol was used 455 times for 242 patients (39.5% of 612 patients) within the first 24 h of ICU stay, with 244 (53.6% of 455) positive responses. Adjusted for age, sex, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, comorbidity, and admission year, protocol use was associated with reduced ICU mortality (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.94; P = 0.025) but not hospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.23; P = 0.369). Among mechanically ventilated patients with shock within the first 24 h of ICU stay, about half had positive fluid responses. Adherence to protocol-based fluid management was associated with improved ICU survival.

  5. Empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy of nosocomial pneumonia in the intensive care unit: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Alvarez, Bernabe; Luque, Pilar; Ruiz, Francisco; Dominguez-Roldan, Jose-Maria; Quintana, Elisabet; Sanz-Rodriguez, Cesar

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Antibiotic de-escalation, which consists of the initial institution of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics followed by antibiotic streamlining driven by microbiological documentation, is thought to provide maximum benefit for the individual patient, while reducing the selection pressure for resistance. Methods To assess a carbapenem-based de-escalating strategy in nosocomial pneumonia (NP), a prospective observational study was conducted in critically ill patients with NP treated empirically with imipenem ± aminoglycoside/glycopeptide in 24 intensive care units of Spanish general hospitals. Overall, 244 patients were assessable (91% with late-onset NP). The primary outcome was therapeutic success 7–9 days post therapy. Results Microbial identification – based on cultures of tracheal aspirates in 82% of patients, cultures of protected specimen brush in 33%, and cultures of bronchoalveolar lavage in 4% – was only available for 131 (54%) patients. Initial antibiotics were inadequate for 23 (9%) patients. Of the remaining patients, antibiotics were streamlined in 56 (23%) patients and remained unchanged in 14 (6%) patients based on microbiology data, in 38 (16%) patients despite microbiology data favouring de-escalation, and in 113 (46%) patients due to unknown aetiology. Overall, de-escalation was implemented in only 23% of patients with potentially multiresistant pathogens, compared with 68% of patients with the remaining pathogens (P < 0.001). Response rates were 53% for patients continuously treated with imipenem-based regimens and 50% for the de-escalated patients. Higher Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores were associated with greater mortality, whereas adequate empiric antibiotic therapy protected against fatal outcomes. No increase of superinfection rates caused by emerging pathogens was observed. The costs associated with de-escalation were mainly dependent on the duration of hospitalization. Conclusion This study

  6. Dependence of energetic ion and electron intensities on proximity to the magnetically sectored heliosheath: Voyager 1 and 2 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M. E.; Decker, R. B.; Brown, L. E.; Krimigis, S. M.; Drake, J. F.; Hamilton, D. C.; Opher, M.

    2014-02-01

    Taken together, the Voyager 1 and 2 (V1 and V2) spacecraft have collected over 11 yr of data in the heliosheath. Despite extensive study, energetic particles and magnetic fields measured in the heliosheath have not been reconciled by existing models. In particular, the differences between the energetic particle intensity variations at V1 and V2 are unexplained. While energetic particle intensities at V1 change gradually over 7 yr in the heliosheath, those at V2 vary by a factor ∼10 in 1 yr. Energetic particle intensities at V2 show temporally coherent variations over a broad range of species and energies: from suprathermal ions (10s of keV) to galactic cosmic rays (>1 GeV), as well as electrons from 10s of keV to >100 MeV, corresponding to a range ∼10{sup 4} in particle gyroradii. Here we suggest that many of the intensity variations of energetic particle populations in the heliosheath are organized by their proximity to two fundamentally different regions—the unipolar heliosheath (UHS) and the sectored heliosheath (SHS). The SHS is a region of enhanced particle intensities, wherein particle transport, acceleration, and magnetic connectivity differ from those in the UHS. The SHS may serve as either a reservoir of energetic particles or as a region of enhanced transport, depending on the particle species and energy. Comparatively, particle intensities in the UHS are greatly reduced. We propose that the boundary between the SHS and UHS plays as important a role in the physics of heliosheath particles and fields as do the termination shock and heliopause.

  7. Observations of galactic cosmic-ray intensity at heliocentric radial distances of from 1.0 to 2.0 astronomical units.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Allen, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    From observations with the Jupiter-bound spacecraft Pioneer 10 it is found that the integral intensity of the galactic cosmic radiation (E sub p greater than 80 MeV) varied by less than 3% (either plus or minus) over the heliocentric radial range from 1.0 to 2.0 AU during the epoch 1972 March-July.

  8. RHESSI Observations of Particle Acceleration and Energy Release in an Intense Solar Gamma-Ray Line Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. P.; Krucker, S.; Hurford, G. J.; Smith, D. M.; Hudson, H. S.; Holman, G. D.; Schwartz, R. A.; Dennis, B. R.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Emslie, A. G.; Johns-Krull, C.; Vilmer, N.

    2003-10-01

    We summarize Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) hard X-ray (HXR) and γ-ray imaging and spectroscopy observations of the intense (X4.8) γ-ray line flare of 2002 July 23. In the initial rise, a new type of coronal HXR source dominates that has a steep double-power-law X-ray spectrum and no evidence of thermal emission above 10 keV, indicating substantial electron acceleration to tens of keV early in the flare. In the subsequent impulsive phase, three footpoint sources with much flatter double-power-law HXR spectra appear, together with a coronal superhot (T~40 MK) thermal source. The north footpoint and the coronal source both move systematically to the north-northeast at speeds up to ~50 km s-1. This footpoint's HXR flux varies approximately with its speed, consistent with magnetic reconnection models, provided the rate of electron acceleration varies with the reconnection rate. The other footpoints show similar temporal variations but do not move systematically, contrary to simple reconnection models. The γ-ray line and continuum emissions show that ions and electrons are accelerated to tens of MeV during the impulsive phase. The prompt de-excitation γ-ray lines of Fe, Mg, Si, Ne, C, and O-resolved here for the first time-show mass-dependent redshifts of 0.1%-0.8%, implying a downward motion of accelerated protons and α-particles along magnetic field lines that are tilted toward the Earth by ~40°. For the first time, the positron annihilation line is resolved, and the detailed high-resolution measurements are obtained for the neutron-capture line. The first ever solar γ-ray line and continuum imaging shows that the source locations for the relativistic electron bremsstrahlung overlap the 50-100 keV HXR sources, implying that electrons of all energies are accelerated in the same region. The centroid of the ion-produced 2.223 MeV neutron-capture line emission, however, is located ~20''+/-6'' away, implying that the acceleration and

  9. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Ring Current Magnetic Field and Ion Fluxes and ENA Intensity during the 5 April 2010 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Lui, A.; Keesee, A. M.; Goldstein, J.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities, proton flux spectra and ENA intensity for the 5 April 2010 storm (minimum Dst ≈ -73 nT) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet using the magnetically and electrostatically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. We use ion temperatures inferred from TWINS energetic neutral atom (ENA) images and THEMIS/ESA and SST ion data, and proton densities from the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003] to guide our specification of the plasma sheet at 10 RE, our plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The oxygen to proton density ratio at the plasma boundary is specified from the empirical Young et al. [JGR, 1982] study. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous (GEO) altitude (6.6 Earth radii) and on THEMIS satellites. The simulated and observed proton spectra (GOES-14/MAGPD) at GEO and global ENA intensity (TWINS 1 and 2) are compared. We discuss the response of the ring current magnetic field and ion flux distribution to expansions and compressions of the magnetosphere associated with the dynamic solar wind pressure for this storm event.

  10. Short-period intensity oscillations in the solar corona observed during the total solar eclipse of 26 February 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, Ramanath; Singh, Jagdev; Saxena, A. K.; Srinivasan, R.; Raveendran, A. V.

    1999-08-01

    Encouraged by the detection of high-frequency, low-amplitude continuum intensity oscillations in the solar corona during the total solar eclipse of 1995, we designed and fabricated a six-channel photometer incorporating low-noise Hamamatsu R647 photomultipliers. Fast photometry at five different locations in the solar corona was performed at Don Bosco Mission, Venezuela during the total solar eclipse of 26 February 1998. Three interference filters with passbands of about 150 Å and centered around 4700, 4900, and 5000 Å were used. The photometric data were recorded at a rate of 20 Hz in three channels and 50 Hz in the remaining three channels. The power spectrum analysis of one of the channels that recorded appreciable counts indicates the existence of intensity oscillations in the frequency range 0.01-0.2 Hz. A least-squares analysis yields 90.1, 25.2, and 6.9 s periods for the three prominent components which have amplitudes in the range 0.5-3.5% of the coronal brightness. These periods and their amplitudes are similar to those detected in the coronal intensity oscillations during the 1995 eclipse.

  11. Relative coronal abundances derived from X-ray observations 3: The effect of cascades on the relative intensity of Fe (XVII) line fluxes, and a revised iron abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C., Jr.; Rugge, H. R.; Weiss, K.

    1974-01-01

    Permitted lines in the optically thin coronal X-ray spectrum were analyzed to find the distribution of coronal material, as a function of temperature, without special assumptions concerning coronal conditions. The resonance lines of N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, and Ar which dominate the quiet coronal spectrum below 25A were observed. Coronal models were constructed and the relative abundances of these elements were determined. The intensity in the lines of the 2p-3d transitions near 15A was used in conjunction with these coronal models, with the assumption of coronal excitation, to determine the Fe XVII abundance. The relative intensities of the 2p-3d Fe XVII lines observed in the corona agreed with theoretical prediction. Using a more complete theoretical model, and higher resolution observations, a revised calculation of iron abundance relative to hydrogen of 0.000026 was made.

  12. Indicators of photochemistry in DISCOVER-AQ observations: Implications for diagnosing ozone production and photochemical intensity from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J. H.; Olson, J. R.; Chen, G.; Kleb, M. M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D.; Fried, A.; Walega, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Barrick, J. D.; Janz, S. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Yang, M. M.; Pickering, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    The DISCOVER-AQ series of field studies aims to collect observations that will improve the ability of satellites to diagnose surface air quality. A related goal is to evaluate and optimize future observing strategies combining ground-based and satellite observations. To date, detailed repetitive observations of atmospheric composition in the lower atmosphere have been collected over three locations: the Baltimore-Washington corridor, the southern San Joaquin Valley, and Houston. These observations include remotely-sensed column abundances as well as detailed in situ chemical soundings of ozone and its precursors in the lowest 3 km. Satellite observations are limited to a few key constituents controlling ozone production, e.g., ozone, NO2, and CH2O. If available, space-based observations of CO, CO2, and CH4 may also be useful for understanding the relative importance of anthropogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons. An analysis of cross-correlations between observations of ozone, NO2, and formaldehyde columns along with photochemical modeling of the more detailed DISCOVER-AQ observations is presented to determine what behaviors are likely to be detectable from space and how they might be used to diagnose how photochemical transformation and transport of emissions influence local air quality related to ozone.

  13. Serratia marcescens in a neonatal intensive care unit: two long-term multiclone outbreaks in a 10-year observational study.

    PubMed

    Casolari, Chiara; Pecorari, Monica; Della Casa, Elisa; Cattani, Silvia; Venturelli, Claudia; Fabio, Giuliana; Tagliazucchi, Sara; Serpini, Giulia Fregni; Migaldi, Mario; Marchegiano, Patrizia; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2013-10-01

    We investigated two consecutive Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) outbreaks which occurred in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a tertiary level hospital in North Italy in a period of 10 years (January 2003-December 2012). Risk factors associated with S. marcescens acquisition were evaluated by a retrospective case-control study. A total of 21,011 clinical samples was examined: S. marcescens occurred in 127 neonates: 43 developed infection and 3 died. Seven clusters were recorded due to 12 unrelated clones which persisted for years in the ward, although no environmental source was found. The main epidemic clone A sustaining the first cluster in 2003 reappeared in 2010 as an extended spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strain and supporting the second epidemic. Birth weight, gestational age, use of invasive devices and length of stay in the ward were significantly related to S. marcescens acquisition. The opening of a new ward for non-intensive care-requiring neonates, strict adherence to alcoholic hand disinfection, the timely identification and isolation of infected and colonized neonates assisted in containing the epidemics. Genotyping was effective in tracing the evolution and dynamics of the clones demonstrating their long-term persistence in the ward.

  14. Bottom-currents and high echo-intensity anomalies observed by ADCP-tows and AUV dives in the Izena Cauldron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaki, Kanae; Ura, Tamaki; Okamura, Kei; Koyama, Hisashi; Nagahashi, Kenji; Shibasaki, Hiroshi; Hosoi, Yoshitaka

    The Izena Cauldron in the Okinawa Trough has two sites of hydrothermal massive sulfide deposits named the Jade Site and the Hakurei Site. The present study conducted observation of ADCP/CTD towings and AUV dives to obtain the over-all distribution of bottom-currents in the caldera. In the ADCP observation, current velocity data and echo intensity data were obtained in multiple-layers between the seabed and the 100-150 m altitude. The analysis shows the characteristics of the bottom-currents; they have an organized structure with almost same directions in the whole region within the caldera, and averaged speed of horizontal velocity of approximately 10 cm s-1, and the directions change temporally with tidal frequency. There are descending currents with a 0-2 cm s-1 downward velocity component along the eastern slope of the caldera. The echo intensity data shows that high echo intensity anomalies distribute patchily at depths of approximately 1500 m. They are well-corresponded with turbidity maxima and upward velocity components, and two anomalies have an upward velocity component of more than 2 cm s-1. It is suggested that these high echo intensity anomalies show the distribution of particulate matter in hydrothermal plumes from the Hakurei Site. These results indicate a circulation pattern of hydrothermal plumes in the Izena Cauldron, as plumes rise to approximately 1500 m depth from the seabed in the Hakurei Site.

  15. High-speed observation of cavitation bubble clouds near a tissue boundary in high-intensity focused ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin

    2009-03-01

    Cavitation bubble clouds generated near a tissue boundary by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) were studied using high-speed photography. In all, 171 image series were captured during the initial 100 ms of continuous HIFU exposure, which showed that cavitation bubble clouds at the tissue boundary organized into two structures - "cone-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 146 image series and "crown-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 18 image series. The remaining 7 image series showed the interchanging of these two structures. It was found that when cavitation bubbles first appeared at the tissue boundary, they developed to cone-shape bubble cloud. The cone-shape bubble cloud structure was characterized by a nearly fixed tip in front of the tissue boundary. When the cavitation bubbles initially appeared away from the tissue boundary they evolved into a crown-shape bubble cloud. Deformation of tissue boundary was shown in all the recorded image series.

  16. High-speed observation of cavitation bubble clouds near a tissue boundary in high-intensity focused ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin

    2009-03-01

    Cavitation bubble clouds generated near a tissue boundary by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) were studied using high-speed photography. In all, 171 image series were captured during the initial 100 ms of continuous HIFU exposure, which showed that cavitation bubble clouds at the tissue boundary organized into two structures - "cone-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 146 image series and "crown-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 18 image series. The remaining 7 image series showed the interchanging of these two structures. It was found that when cavitation bubbles first appeared at the tissue boundary, they developed to cone-shape bubble cloud. The cone-shape bubble cloud structure was characterized by a nearly fixed tip in front of the tissue boundary. When the cavitation bubbles initially appeared away from the tissue boundary they evolved into a crown-shape bubble cloud. Deformation of tissue boundary was shown in all the recorded image series. PMID:19041998

  17. Epidemiology of pertussis-related paediatric intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in Australia, 1997–2013: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Robert S; McEniery, Julie A; Coulthard, Mark G; Lambert, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the epidemiology of pertussis-related intensive care unit (ICU) admissions across Australia, over a 17-year period. Design Retrospective descriptive study. Setting Australian ICUs contributing data to the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) Registry. The number of contributing ICUs increased over the study period, from 8 specialist paediatric ICUs in 1997 to 8 specialist paediatric and 13 general ICUs in 2013. Participants All paediatric (<16 years) ICU admissions, coded as pertussis-related, between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2013. Results A total of 373 pertussis-coded ICU admissions were identified in the ANZPIC Registry over the study period. Of these cases, 52.8% occurred during the 4 years of the recent Australian epidemic (2009–2012). ICU admissions were most likely to occur in infants aged younger than 6 weeks (41.8%, n=156) and aged 6 weeks to 4 months (42.9%, n=160). The median length of stay for pertussis-related ICU admissions was 3.6 days, with 77.5% of cases staying in ICU for <7 days. Approximately half of all admissions (54.8%) required some form of respiratory support, with 32.7% requiring invasive respiratory support. Over the study period, 23 deaths were recorded (6.2% of pertussis-related ICU admissions), of which 20 (87.0%) were infants <4 months old. Conclusions Pertussis-related ICU admissions occur primarily in infants too young to be fully protected from active immunisation. More needs to be done to protect these high-risk infants, such as maternal immunisation. PMID:27053270

  18. Frequency and intensity dependence of the sub-band-gap features observed in the surface photovoltage spectrum of semi-insulating GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, T. K.; Kumar, Shailendra; Rustagi, K. C.

    2002-11-01

    Surface photovoltage spectroscopy studies on thick semi-insulating GaAs wafers are reported in the range 850-950 nm using the chopped light geometry. We observed some interesting sharp features in the sub-band-gap of SI-GaAs, which were reported recently [Appl. Phys. Lett. 79, 1715(2001); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 1835 (2002)]. In this article, we present the dependence of these features on the chopping frequency and the source intensity. The intensity variation in the above-band-gap region and for the A peak (898 nm) in the sub-band-gap region could be fitted with single component while it is necessary to consider more than one component to fit the data for the Q peak (887 nm) in the sub-band-gap region. A model consistent with the observed features is also proposed.

  19. A Latent Heat Retrieval and its Effects on the Intensity and Structure Change of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part I: The Algorithm and Observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimond, Stephen R.; Bourassa, mark A.; Reasor, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The release of latent heat in clouds is an essential part of the formation and I intensification ohurricanes. The community knows very little about the intensity and structure of latent heating due largely to inadequate observations. In this paper, a new method for retrieving the latent heating field in hurricanes from airborne Dopple radar is presented and fields from rapidly intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997) are shown.

  20. A comparison of modeled and observed intensity profiles for C2, C3, CN, and the continuum for P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Tracy A.; Neff, John S.

    1992-01-01

    Model intensity profiles have been compared with those observed for the C2, C3, CN, and continuum emissions of Comet Halley, in order to constrain the dust and gas parameters. While most of the parameters were consistent with expected values, the lifetimes of C3 and its parent were unexpectedly small. The day:night production rate ratio, which was about 1:1 for the gas, covered the 4:3-1:0 range in the case of the dust.

  1. An analysis of an extreme rainstorm caused by the interaction of the Tibetan Plateau vortex and the Southwest China vortex from an intensive observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaolong; Li, Yueqing; Xu, Li

    2016-06-01

    A rainstorm caused by the coupling of the Tibetan Plateau vortex (TPV) and the Southwest China vortex (SWCV) in eastern Sichuan during 29 June-2 July 2013 is analyzed by using the conventional observed data and its time intensive observed data, the intensive observed data of SWCV scientific experiment during flood season. The results show that under the control of a large transverse trough in Eurasia region at mid-high latitude, the westerly flow in northern China leads TPV eastward movement. And SWCV moves northeastward. Finally, both of them merge to form a combined vortex (CBV) in Sichuan Basin resulting in heavy rainfall. The water vapor from both the Bay of Bengal and the South China Sea provides the sufficient humidity condition. The intensive observation clearly reveals the nascent states of TPV and SWCV, the movements and interactions, especially, the two vortices' merging process, and the effects of cold and warm advection, as well as the rainstorm. When the two vortices merge into CBV, cold tongue and warm flow meet and produce frontogenesis around the center of CBV. A frontogenetical area exists deeply from lower troposphere to upper troposphere with the south-positive and north-negative vertical structure, which is similar to front. The positive PV evidently developed both in the range and in the intensity with the stronger center at upper level, and the positive PV center located at the front of CBV has indicative significance for the vortex's activities. And CBV has the same distributions of vorticity and temperature with SWCV and TPV, respectively. SWCV and TPV make different key contributions to the dynamic-thermodynamic property of CBV, but both of them have obvious influences on the divergence distribution of CBV. Furthermore, rainfall mainly distributes in the high areas of averaged temperature deviation gradient, and it is closely related to the joint influences of warm-moist air from the south and dry-cold air from the north. But, only using

  2. Intensity of the /R/Q sub zero branch in the nu-9 fundamental of ethane. [laboratory spectra for Jupiter and Saturn IR observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokunaga, A.; Varanasi, P.

    1976-01-01

    Recent observations of Jupiter and Saturn at 12 microns have shown strong emission in the nu-9 fundamental of ethane. In order to derive the abundance of ethane from the planetary observations, the absolute intensity of the (R)Q sub zero branch of the nu-9 fundamental was measured, yielding a value of 0.74 plus or minus 0.09/sq cm/atm at 300 K. In order to study the absorption features of the nu-9 fundamental, the computed rotational structure of the band was compared with the laboratory spectrum.

  3. Direct observation of the core/double-shell architecture of intense dual-mode luminescent tetragonal bipyramidal nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Jang, Ho Seong

    2016-05-01

    Highly efficient downconversion (DC) green-emitting LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors have been synthesized for bright dual-mode upconversion (UC) and DC green-emitting core/double-shell (C/D-S) nanophosphors--Li(Gd,Y)F4:Yb(18%),Er(2%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%),Tb(15%)/LiYF4--and the C/D-S structure has been proved by extensive scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. Colloidal LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors with a tetragonal bipyramidal shape are synthesized for the first time and they show intense DC green light via energy transfer from Ce3+ to Tb3+ under illumination with ultraviolet (UV) light. The LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors show 65 times higher photoluminescence intensity than LiYF4:Tb nanophosphors under illumination with UV light and the LiYF4:Ce,Tb is adapted into a luminescent shell of the tetragonal bipyramidal C/D-S nanophosphors. The formation of the DC shell on the core significantly enhances UC luminescence from the UC core under irradiation of near infrared light and concurrently generates DC luminescence from the core/shell nanophosphors under UV light. Coating with an inert inorganic shell further enhances the UC-DC dual-mode luminescence by suppressing the surface quenching effect. The C/D-S nanophosphors show 3.8% UC quantum efficiency (QE) at 239 W cm-2 and 73.0 +/- 0.1% DC QE. The designed C/D-S architecture in tetragonal bipyramidal nanophosphors is rigorously verified by an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis, with the assistance of line profile simulation, using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a high-efficiency EDX. The feasibility of these C/D-S nanophosphors for transparent display devices is also considered.Highly efficient downconversion (DC) green-emitting LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors have been synthesized for bright dual-mode upconversion (UC) and DC green-emitting core/double-shell (C/D-S) nanophosphors--Li(Gd,Y)F4:Yb(18%),Er(2%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%),Tb(15%)/LiYF4--and the C/D-S structure

  4. STEREO and Wind Observations of Intense Cyclotron Harmonic Waves at the Earth's Bow Shock and Inside the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of electron cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock from STEREO and Wind burst waveform captures. These waves are observed at magnetic field gradients at a variety of shock geometries ranging from quasi-parallel to nearly perpendicular along with whistler mode waves, ion acoustic waves, and electrostatic solitary waves. Large amplitude cyclotron harmonic waveforms are also observed in the magnetosheath in association with magnetic field gradients convected past the bow shock. Amplitudes of the cyclotron harmonic waves range from a few tens to more than 500 millivolts/meter peak-peak. A comparison between the short (15 meters) and long (100 meters) Wind spin plane antennas shows a similar response at low harmonics and a stronger response on the short antenna at higher harmonics. This indicates that wavelengths are not significantly larger than 100 meters, consistent with the electron cyclotron radius. Waveforms are broadband and polarizations are distinctively comma-shaped with significant power both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Harmonics tend to be more prominent in the perpendicular directions. These observations indicate that the waves consist of a combination of perpendicular Bernstein waves and field-aligned waves without harmonics. A likely source is the electron cyclotron drift instability which is a coupling between Bernstein and ion acoustic waves. These waves are the most common type of high-frequency wave seen by STEREO during bow shock crossings and magnetosheath traversals and our observations suggest that they are an important component of the high-frequency turbulent spectrum in these regions.

  5. Evaluation of geostationary satellite observations and the development of a 1-2 h prediction model for future storm intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, John R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Manzato, Agostino

    2016-06-01

    A study was conducted to gain insights into the use of geostationary satellite-based indicators for characterizing and identifying growing cumulus clouds that evolve into severe weather producing convective storms. Eleven convective initiation (CI), 41 cloud top temperature-effective radius (T-re), and 9 additional fields were formed for 340 growing cumulus clouds that were manually tracked for 2 h and checked for association with severe weather to 2-3 h into the future. The geostationary satellite data were at 5 min resolution from Meteosat-8 on six convectively active days in 2010, 2012, and 2013. The study's goals were to determine which satellite fields are useful to forecasting severe storms and to form a simple model for predicting future storm intensity. The CI fields were applied on 3 × 3 pixel regions, and the T-re fields were analyzed on 9 × 9 and 51 × 51 pixel domains (needed when forming T-re vertical profiles). Of the 340 growing cumulus clouds examined, 34 were later associated with severe weather (using European Severe Weather Database reports), with the remaining being nonsevere storms. Using a multivariate analysis, transforming predictors into their empirical posterior probability, and maximizing the Peirce skill score, the best predictors were T1451 (51 × 51 pixel T, where re exceeds 14 µm), TG9 (9 × 9 pixel glaciation T surrounding a growing cloud), and ReBRTG51 (51 × 51 pixel re at the breakpoint T in the T-re profile). Rapid cloud growth prior to severe storm formation leads to delayed particle growth, colder temperatures of the first 14 µm particles, and lower TG values.

  6. Intensity of low-latitude nighttime F-region ionospheric density irregularities observed by ROCSAT and ground-based GPS receivers in solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang-Yi; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Chao, Chi-Kuang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the global correlation between the instantaneous total amplitude of ion density fluctuations observed by ROCSAT and the phase fluctuation of the total electron content (TEC) recorded by worldwide ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers during the high solar activity period of March 1999-December 2002 for Kp<3. The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is applied to compute the instantaneous total amplitude of ROCSAT ion densities. The event-based and climatological comparisons of the total amplitude and occurrence probability of irregularities observed by ROCSAT show that the total amplitude can reveal both the occurrence probability of irregularities and the associated intensity. The noise level of the total amplitude is about 103.5 (near 3000) ions/cm3. The high correlation (correlation coefficient=0.81) between the GPS TEC phase fluctuation index FP and instantaneous total amplitude of ROCSAT electron densities suggests that the total amplitude can be used to globally monitor the intensity of irregularities at equatorial and within the latitude belt of ±15°. The relationship between the ionospheric background ionization and the irregularity intensity is further investigated.

  7. Geomagnetic Secular Variation in Texas over the Last 17,000 Years: High-Intensity Geomagnetic Field 'Spike' Observed at ca. 3000 cal BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. D.; Feinberg, J. M.; Waters, M. R.; Stafford, T. W., Jr.; Forman, S. L.; Lundelius, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    By observing the fluctuations in direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field through time, we increase our understanding of the fluid motions in the Earth's outer core that sustain the geomagnetic field, the geodynamo. Recent archaeomagnetic studies in the Near East have proposed extremely rapid increases - 'spikes' - in geomagnetic field intensity ca. 3000 years ago that have proved problematic for our current understanding of core-flow. However, until now, these geomagnetic spikes had not been observed outside of the Near East, where they have been found in metallurgical slag and mud brick walls. We present a new fully-oriented, geomagnetic secular variation and relative palaeointensity (RPI) record for the last 17,000 years from Hall's Cave, Texas. Sediment washed into the cave has formed a continuous stratigraphic sequence that is at least 3.5 m thick. Within the stable, cool climate of the cave, pedogenic and bioturbation processes are almost non-existent, thereby limiting post-depositional physical and geochemical alteration of the magnetic record. The sub-aerial and subterranean setting of the sedimentary sequence in Hall's Cave enabled us to collect oriented palaeomagnetic cubes from an excavated section through the sequence. The palaeomagnetic samples yielded high-quality vectors. An age model for the sequence, determined using 57 AMS 14C-dates on individual bones from microvertebrate, was combined with the palaeomagnetic data to construct a secular variation record. The record is in broad agreement with predictions by Holocene field models for the site's location. However, at ca. 3000 years ago, the RPI data indicate an almost four-fold increase in geomagnetic field intensity lasting several hundred years and contemporaneous with the more short-lived, decadal-scale spikes reported from the Near East. Evidence for this extreme intensity event outside of the Near East has major implications for our current understanding of core-dynamics.

  8. The low-level jet dust emission mechanism in the central Sahara: Observations from Bordj-Badji Mokhtar during the June 2011 Fennec Intensive Observation Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christopher J. T.; Washington, Richard

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents the first detailed analysis of low-level jets (LLJs) in the central Sahara from ground-based observations at Bordj-Badji Mokhtar, Algeria, and addresses their operation as a dust emission mechanism. On LLJ mornings, composite wind speeds in the core (300 m aboveground level) reach 13.5 m s-1 at 0400. Surface temperatures increase from 0545 (30 min after sunrise), and jet decay begins around 0600. Ten meter winds lag those in the core by 5 h; peak 10 m wind speed, 7.5 m s-1, occurs at 0900. Only the deepest and strongest LLJs lead to dust emission. At 0600, these five LLJs have core wind speeds ≥16 m s-1, below-core wind shear ≥ 0.6 m s-1/30 m, and wind shear between the core and 500 m above the core ≤-1.8 m s-1. On these occasions, momentum mixes down from the LLJ after surface heating, leading to emission. On nondusty LLJ mornings, the convective boundary layer is 100 m shallower, and the LLJ is too weak to provide enough momentum to be mixed down for emission. LLJs are most frequently embedded in the monsoon flow or in the Harmattan; there is a clear association with the Saharan Heat Low. ERA-Interim reanalysis underestimates both Harmattan and monsoon LLJ core winds (by 4 m s-1 and 6 m s-1, respectively). The Met Office Africa Limited Area Model underestimates Harmattan LLJ core winds by only 0.2 m s-1. Monsoon LLJ core winds, however, are underestimated by 8.5 m s-1. Surface winds at 0900 are underestimated in both cases by up to 6 m s-1.

  9. Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Dialysis outside the Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Observational Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger-Mähr, Hannelore; Zitt, Emanuel; Lhotta, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of patients suffering from acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) is increasing. Whereas causes and outcome of AKI-D in the intensive care unit (ICU) are described extensively, few data exist about AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU. Aim of this study was to identify the causes of AKI-D, determine in-depth the comorbid conditions and outcome of this particular patient group and identify possibilities for its prevention. Methods We retrospectively studied all AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU in a single nephrology referral center between January 2010 and June 2015. Data on comorbid conditions, renal function and drug therapy prior to AKI-D, and possible causal events were collected. Patients were grouped into those with renal hypoperfusion as the predominant cause of AKI-D (hemodynamic group) and those with other causes (non-hemodynamic group). Results During 66 months 128 patients (57% male, mean age 69.3 years) were treated. AKI-D was community-acquired in 70.3%. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension (62.5%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (58.9%), coronary artery disease (CAD) (46.1%), diabetes (35.9%) and heart failure (34.1%). Most patients were prescribed diuretics (61.7%) and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RASI) (57.8%); 46.1% had a combination of both. In the 88 patients with hemodynamic AKI-D (68.8%) the most frequent initiating events were diarrhea (39.8%), infections (17.0%) and acute heart failure (13.6%). In the 40 patients with non-hemodynamic AKI-D (31.2%) interstitial nephritis (n = 15) was the prominent diagnosis. Patients with hemodynamic AKI-D were older (72.6 vs. 62.1 years, p = 0.001), suffered more often from CKD (68.2% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.003), CAD (54.5% vs. 27.5%, p = 0.004) and diabetes (42.0% vs. 22.5%, p = 0.033), and were more frequently on diuretics (75.0% vs. 32.5%, p<0.001), RASI (67.0% vs. 37.5%, p = 0.002) or their combination (58.0% vs. 20.0%, p<0

  10. Observation and modeling of Na density and OH airglow temperature and intensity perturbations by a gravity wave approaching a critical level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Pautet, P.; Taylor, M. J.; Swenson, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves at a broad range of temporal and spatial scales are frequently observed in MLT airglow imaging experiments. Airglow data provide significant insight into gravity wave propagation, directionality, and seasonality, and allow estimations of wave fluxes [e.g., Swenson et al., JGR, 104(D6), 1999]. The USU CEDAR Mesospheric Temperature Mapper (MTM) is a specialized CCD airglow imaging system, which was operated at Maui MALT from November 2001 to December 2006. The MTM captures OH(6,2) and O2(0,1) emissions intensities and associated rotational temperatures. The MTM has been used previously to assess zenith temperatures, showing close agreement with simultaneous lidar temperature data [Zhao et al., J. Geophys. Res., 110, D09S07, 2005]. It is additionally able to reveal two-dimensional structure of intensity and temperature perturbations associated with small-scale gravity waves. Here we investigate the vertical and horizontal structure of a small-scale gravity wave (~18 minute period and ~37 km horizontal wavelength) captured by the Maui MTM on April 11, 2002. The event was strongly visible in the OH(6,2) image data, showing intensity perturbations ~ 5-10 %, however relatively weak in the O2 data. Lidar temperatures and winds suggest the presence of a critical level shortly above ~90 km, which would have contributed to increased dissipation, and reduced detectability, due to small vertical scale. Using imaged intensity and rotational temperature data, along with evolving Na lidar data, we reconstruct and simulate the wave event under realistic ambient conditions using a suite of numerical models. Hydroxyl photochemistry and dynamics of O3, H, O, and Na densities are obtained with a two-dimensional nonlinear numerical model for gravity wave dynamics [Snively and Pasko, JGR, 113, A06303, 2008], allowing direct comparison of OH(6,2) intensity and brightness-weighted temperature perturbations [e.g., Makhlouf et al., JGR, 100(D6), 11289, 1995]. The

  11. Managing daily intensive care activities: An observational study concerning ad hoc decision making of charge nurses and intensivists

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Management of daily activities in ICUs is challenging. ICU shift leaders, charge nurses and intensivists have to make several immediate ad hoc decisions to enable the fluent flow of ICU activities. Even though the management of ICU activities is quite well delineated by international consensus guidelines, we know only a little about the content of the real clinical decision making of ICU shift leaders. Methods We conducted an observational study with the think-aloud technique to describe the ad hoc decision making of ICU shift leaders. The study was performed in two university-affiliated hospital ICUs. Twelve charge nurses and eight intensivists were recruited. Observations were recorded and transcribed for qualitative content analysis using the protocol analysis method. The software program NVivo 7 was used to manage the data. The interrater agreement was assessed with percentages and by Cohen's κ. Results We identified 463 ad hoc decisions made by the charge nurses and 444 made by the intensivists. During our data collection time, this breaks down to over 230 immediately made decisions per day (24 hours). We divided the ad hoc decision making of ICU shift leaders into two types: process-focused and situation-focused. Process-focused decision making included more permanent information, such as human resources, know-how and material resources, whereas situation-focused decision making included decisions about single events, such as patient admission. We named eight different categories for ICU ad hoc decision making: (1) adverse events, (2) diagnostics, (3) human resources and know-how, (4) material resources, (5) patient admission, (6) patient discharge, (7) patient information and vital signs and (8) special treatments. Conclusions ICU shift leaders make a great number of complex ad hoc decisions throughout the day. Often this decision making involves both intensivists and charge nurses. It forms a bundle that requires versatile, immediate

  12. Intense energetic electron flux enhancements in Mercury's magnetosphere: An integrated view with high-resolution observations from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Dewey, Ryan M.; Lawrence, David J.; Goldsten, John O.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Anderson, Brian J.; Ho, George C.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Raines, Jim M.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury has provided a wealth of new data about energetic particle phenomena. With observations from MESSENGER's Energetic Particle Spectrometer, as well as data arising from energetic electrons recorded by the X-Ray Spectrometer and Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) instruments, recent work greatly extends our record of the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic electrons at Mercury. The combined data sets include measurements from a few keV up to several hundred keV in electron kinetic energy and have permitted relatively good spatial and temporal resolution for many events. We focus here on the detailed nature of energetic electron bursts measured by the GRNS system, and we place these events in the context of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing at Mercury. Our examination of data at high temporal resolution (10 ms) during the period March 2013 through October 2014 supports strongly the view that energetic electrons are accelerated in the near-tail region of Mercury's magnetosphere and are subsequently "injected" onto closed magnetic field lines on the planetary nightside. The electrons populate the plasma sheet and drift rapidly eastward toward the dawn and prenoon sectors, at times executing multiple complete drifts around the planet to form "quasi-trapped" populations.

  13. A computer program for fast non-LTE analysis of interstellar line spectra. With diagnostic plots to interpret observed line intensity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, F. F. S.; Black, J. H.; Schöier, F. L.; Jansen, D. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The large quantity and high quality of modern radio and infrared line observations require efficient modeling techniques to infer physical and chemical parameters such as temperature, density, and molecular abundances. Methods: We present a computer program to calculate the intensities of atomic and molecular lines produced in a uniform medium, based on statistical equilibrium calculations involving collisional and radiative processes and including radiation from background sources. Optical depth effects are treated with an escape probability method. The program is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.sron.rug.nl/~vdtak/radex/index.shtml. The program makes use of molecular data files maintained in the Leiden Atomic and Molecular Database (LAMDA), which will continue to be improved and expanded. Results: The performance of the program is compared with more approximate and with more sophisticated methods. An Appendix provides diagnostic plots to estimate physical parameters from line intensity ratios of commonly observed molecules. Conclusions: This program should form an important tool in analyzing observations from current and future radio and infrared telescopes. Appendices A-D, are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities, Ion Plasma Parameters, and ENA Proton Flux in the Ring Current During Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Lui, T.; Goldstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities, proton flux spectra and/or ENA fluxes for two storm events to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet using the magnetically and electrostatically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Using either in-situ data (e.g., LANL/MPA and SOPA) or the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 Earth radii as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 Earth radii) and any other available satellite. We simulate a larger (11 August 2000; minimum Dst = -106 nT) and a smaller (6 April 2010; minimum Dst = 73 nT) storm. For the 11 August 2000 storm, we compare simulated and observed proton spectra (LANL/MPA and SOPA and Polar/CAMMICE). For the more recent 6 April 2010 storm we compare simulated and observed proton spectra (THEMIS) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux (TWINS). We discuss the response of the ring current magnetic field and ion flux distribution to expansions and compressions of the magnetosphere associated with the dynamic solar wind pressure for these storm events.

  15. The quasi-biennial periodicity (QBP) in velocity and intensity helioseismic observations. The seismic QBP over solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Jiménez, A.; Roth, M.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We looked for signatures of quasi-biennial periodicity (QBP) over different phases of solar cycle by means of acoustic modes of oscillation. Low-degree p-mode frequencies are shown to be sensitive to changes in magnetic activity due to the global dynamo. Recently there has been reported evidence of two-year variations in p-mode frequencies. Methods: Long high-quality helioseismic data are provided by BiSON (Birmingham Solar Oscillation Network), GONG (Global Oscillation Network Group), GOLF (Global Oscillation at Low Frequency) and VIRGO (Variability of Solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillation) instruments. We determined the solar cycle changes in p-mode frequencies for spherical degree ℓ = 0, 1, 2 with their azimuthal components in the frequency range 2.5 mHz ≤ ν ≤ 3.5 mHz. Results: We found signatures of QBP at all levels of solar activity in the modes more sensitive to higher latitudes. The signal strength increases with latitude and the equatorial component also seems to be modulated by the 11-year envelope. Conclusions: The persistent nature of the seismic QBP is not observed in the surface activity indices, where mid-term variations are found only from time to time and mainly in periods of high activity. This feature, together with the latitudinal dependence, provides more evidence of a mechanism that is almost independent and different from the one that brings the active regions up to the surface. Therefore, these findings can be used to provide more constraints on dynamo models that consider a further cyclic component on top of the 11-year cycle.

  16. Stacking sequence determines Raman intensities of observed interlayer shear modes in 2D layered materials--A general bond polarizability model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Lu, Xin; Cong, Chunxiao; Yu, Ting; Xiong, Qihua; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-01-01

    2D layered materials have recently attracted tremendous interest due to their fascinating properties and potential applications. The interlayer interactions are much weaker than the intralayer bonds, allowing the as-synthesized materials to exhibit different stacking sequences, leading to different physical properties. Here, we show that regardless of the space group of the 2D materials, the Raman frequencies of the interlayer shear modes observed under the typical z(xx)z configuration blue shift for AB stacked materials, and red shift for ABC stacked materials, as the number of layers increases. Our predictions are made using an intuitive bond polarizability model which shows that stacking sequence plays a key role in determining which interlayer shear modes lead to the largest change in polarizability (Raman intensity); the modes with the largest Raman intensity determining the frequency trends. We present direct evidence for these conclusions by studying the Raman modes in few layer graphene, MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and Bi2Se3, using both first principles calculations and Raman spectroscopy. This study sheds light on the influence of stacking sequence on the Raman intensities of intrinsic interlayer modes in 2D layered materials in general, and leads to a practical way of identifying the stacking sequence in these materials. PMID:26469313

  17. Spatial analysis of annual mean stable isotopes in precipitation across Japan based on an intensive observation period throughout 2013.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Kimpei; Tanoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Spatial distribution of annual mean stable isotopes in precipitation (δ(18)O, δ(2)H) was observed at 56 sites across Japan throughout 2013. Annual mean δ(18)O values showed a strong latitude effect, from -12.4 ‰ in the north to -5.1 ‰ in the south. Annual mean d-excess values ranged from 8 to 21 ‰, and values on the Sea of Japan side in Northern and Eastern Japan were relatively higher than those on the Pacific Ocean side. The local meteoric water line (LMWL) and isotope effects were based on the annual mean values from all sites across Japan as divided into distinct regions: the Sea of Japan side to the Pacific Ocean side and Northeastern to Southwestern Japan. Slopes and intercepts of LMWL ranged from 7.4 to 7.8 and 9.8 to 13.0, respectively. Slopes for latitude, altitude, and temperature effects ranged from -0.27 to -0.48 ‰/°N, -0.0034 to -0.0053 ‰/m, and 0.36 to 0.46 ‰/°C, respectively, with statistically significance at the 99 % level. However, there was no precipitation amount effect. From the result of a multiple regression analysis, the empirical formula of annual mean δ(18)O in precipitation from latitude and altitude for all sites across Japan was determined to be δ(18) O = -0.348 (LAT) - 0.00307 (ALT) + 4.29 (R(2) = 0.59). Slopes for latitude and altitude ranged from - 0.28 to - 0.51, and - 0.0019 to - 0.0045, respectively. Even though site distribution was uneven, these equations are the first trial estimation for annual mean stable isotopes in precipitation across Japan. Further research performed on the monthly basis is required to elucidate factors controlling the spatiotemporal variability of stable isotopes in precipitation across Japan.

  18. Effects of solar zenith angles on CO Cameron bands emission intensities in the dayside atmosphere of Mars: MEX/SPICAM observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothuraju, Thirupathaiah; Haider, Syed A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a model to calculate the photoelectron energy fluxes and emission intensities of the CO Cameron bands in the upper atmosphere of Mars between solar zenith angles 0° to 90°. The production and loss mechanisms of CO (a ^{3}Π) are incorporated in the model. The atmospheric neutral parameters are adopted from the Mars Climate Database (v5.2). The required solar EUV fluxes are taken from the Solar2000 model (v2.37) and scaled to Mars. The photoelectron fluxes are calculated at different solar zenith angles using an analytical yield spectrum approach based on the Monte Carlo method. In this model we have assumed that crustal magnetic fields are horizontal in direction. Thus, photoelectrons are losing their energy at the same height where they are produced. This assumption is valid at mid and high latitudes where magnetic fields are mostly horizontal. We have also developed a coupled chemistry model to calculate the ion and electron density at different solar zenith angles, which are used in the airglow model. The model results are compared with the observations provided by the SPICAM onboard MEX. Our model reproduces the observed intensity profiles quite well. The CO (a ^{3}Π) is produced due to photoelectron excitation/dissociation, photodissociation, and dissociative recombination processes. It is destroyed by CO _{2}, CO and radiative decay. It is found that photon and photoelectron dissociation are dominant production processes of CO (a ^{3}Π), while radiative decay is a major loss mechanism of this state. The estimated photoelectron fluxes, production rates and intensities are decreasing with increasing solar zenith angles.

  19. Twenty-Four-Hour Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Observation Periods

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.; Goldsmith, JE M.

    1999-08-01

    Prior to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's first water vapor intensive observation period (WVIOP) at the Cloud and Radiation Testbed site near Lamont, Oklahoma, an automated 24-h Raman lidar was delivered to the site. This instrument, which makes high-resolution measurements of water vapor both spatially and temporally, is capable of making these measurements with no operator interaction (other than initial startup) for days at a time. Water vapor measurements collected during the 1996 and 1997 WVIOPs are discussed here, illustrating both the nighttime and daytime capabilities of this system. System characteristics, calibration issues, and techniques are presented. Finally, detailed intercomparisons of the lidar's data with those from a microwave radiometer, radiosondes, an instrumented tower, a chilled mirror flown on both a tethersonde and a kite, and measurements from aircraft are shown and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and stability of this system for both nighttime and daytime measurements.

  20. Detector response and intensity cross-contribution as contributing factors to the observed non-linear calibration curves in mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Sie, Meng-Jie; Chen, Bud-Gen; Chang, Chiung Dan; Lin, Chia-Han; Liu, Ray H

    2011-01-21

    It is a common knowledge that detector fatigue causes a calibration curve to deviate from the preferred linear relationship at the higher concentration end. With the adaptation of an isotopically labeled analog of the analyte as the internal standard (IS), cross-contribution (CC) of the intensities monitored for the ions designating the analyte and the IS can also result in a non-linear relationship at both ends. A novel approach developed to assess 'the extent and the effect of [CC]… in quantitative GC-MS analysis' can be extended (a) to examine whether a specific set of CC values is accurate; and (b) to differentiate whether the observed non-linear calibration curve is caused by detector fatigue or the CC phenomenon. Data derived from the exemplar secobarbital (SB)/SB-d(5) system (as di-butyl-derivatives) are used to illustrate this novel approach. Comparing the non-linear nature of calibration data that are empirically observed to that derived from theoretical calculation (with the incorporation of adjustment resulting from the ion CC phenomenon), supports the conclusions that (a) both CC and detector fatigue contribute significantly to the observed non-linear nature of the calibration curve based on ion-pair m/z 207/212; and (b) detector fatigue is the dominating contributor when the calibration curve is based on ion-pair m/z 263/268.

  1. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    DOE PAGES

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; et al

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into Lmore » ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.« less

  2. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; Zuo, Pingbing; Spence, Harlan; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2016-05-01

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. Using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites, we report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse. When the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into L ˜ 6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. It is demonstrated that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.

  3. Observation of intensity oscillations above X-ray bright points from the Hinode/XRT: signature of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukul; Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N.

    2011-08-01

    We analyse the temporal image data of the quiet Sun observed by the X-ray Telescope (XRT) onboard the Hinode spacecraft and Al-poly filter on 2007 March 31. We choose these temporal image data of ˜30 s cadence from 11:34:48 UT to 14:19:35 UT to study intensity oscillations above selected X-ray bright points (XBPs) with an exposure time 8.193 s of each XRT image. Using the Fourier filtering method, we reconstruct X-ray light curves for the periods outside the cone-of-influence (COI) of their power spectrum. Using the standard wavelet software, we derive the power spectra of the reconstructed light curves which are generated by filtering the original X-ray time-series at the Fourier scale (54.55 min) outside the COI period (60.18 min) free from the edge effect and inappropriate long-term periodicities. This procedure provides statistically significant and globally distributed multiple periodicities in the intensity and global wavelet power spectra of the X-ray light curves derived from the selected coronal structures. We select seven XBPs to extract their respective X-ray light curves. We find the statistically significant observed periodicities (two or three) for XBP1, XBP2, XBP4, XBP5, XBP6 and XBP7, respectively, to be (28, 15) min, (50, 20) min, (60, 20, 12) min, (51, 23) min, (35, 23, 13) min, (49, 20) min and (35, 19) min. We interpret these observed periodicities in terms of the leakage of various harmonics of magnetoacoustic waves into the higher corona. Some BPs (XBP1, XBP3, XBP5 and XBP7) show the shift in the period ratio either as (P1/P2) < 2.0 or as (P1/P3)< 3.0. This period ratio shift provides the first most likely observational signature of the density stratification in these XBPs. Other BPs (XBP2, XBP4 and XBP6) show the shift in the period ratio (P1/P2) > 2.0, which may serve as evidence for magnetic field divergence with a significant effect on the various harmonics of magnetoacoustic waves.

  4. Levoglucosan and Lipid Class Compounds in the Asian Dusts and Marine Aerosols Collected During the ACE-Asia Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Simoneit, B. R.; Kawamura, K.; Mochida, M.; Lee, M.; Lee, G.; Huebert, B. J.

    2002-12-01

    In order to characterize organic aerosols in the Asian Pacific region, we collected filter samples at Gosan (formerly Kosan) and Sapporo sites as well as on mobile platforms (R.V. R.H. Brown and NCAR C-130) in the western North Pacific. The aerosol extracts were analyzed by capillary GC-MS employing a TMS derivatization technique. We identified over 100 organic compounds in the samples. They are categorized into seven different classes in terms of functional groups and sources. First, sugar-type compounds were detected in the aerosols, including levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan, which are tracers for biomass burning. Second, a homologous series of fatty acids (C12-C30) and fatty alcohols (C12-C30) mainly from plant waxes and marine lipids were present. The third group includes dicarboxylic acids (>C3) and other atmospheric oxidation products. Although oxalic (C2) and malonic (C3) acids were not detected by this method, they are very abundant in the aerosols. The fourth group includes n-alkanes (C18-C35) which usually showed a strong odd/even predominance, suggesting an important contribution from higher plant waxes. The fifth includes polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from phenanthrene to coronene, all combustion products of petroleum and mainly coal. Saccharides were the sixth group and consisted mainly of a- and b- glucose, sucrose and its alditol, and minor amounts of xylitol, sorbitol and arabitol. These saccharides are tracers for soil dust. Phthalates were detected as the seventh class, with a dominance of dioctyl phthalate. The results suggest that organic aerosols originate primarily from (1) natural emissions of terrestrial plant wax and marine lipids, (2) smoke from biomass burning (mainly non-conifer fuels), (3) soil resuspension due to spring agricultural activity, (4) urban/industrial emissions from fossil fuel use (coal), and (5) secondary reaction products. These compounds are transported by the strong westerly winds and therefore secondary oxidation is also significant in Southeast Asia and the western North Pacific.

  5. Intercomparisons of Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Ionic Chemical Composition during TRACE-P and ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y.; Weber, R. J.; Maxwell-Meier, K.; Orsini, D. A.; Lee, Y.-N.; Huebert, B. J.; Howell, S. G.; Bertram, T.; Talbot, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the two field studies, Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P), and the Asian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACEAsia), the inorganic chemical composition of tropospheric aerosols was measured over the western Pacific from three separate aircraft using various methods. Comparisons are made between the rapid online techniques of the Particle Into Liquid Sampler (PILS) for measurement of a suite of fine particle ionic compounds and a mist chamber (MC/IC) measurement of fine sulfate, and the longer time-integrated filter and multi-orifice impactor (MOI) measurements. Comparisons between identical PILS on two separate aircraft flying in formation showed that they were highly correlated (e.g., sulfate r(sup 2) of 0.95), but were systematically different by 10 +/- 5% (linear regression slope and 95% confidence bounds), and had generally higher concentrations on the aircraft with a low turbulence inlet and shorter inlet-to-instrument transmission tubing. Comparisons of PILS and mist chamber measurements of fine sulfate on two different aircraft during formation flying had an 3 of 0.78 and a relative difference of 39% +/- 5%. MOI ionic data integrated to the PILS upper measurement size of 1.3 pm sampling from separate inlets on the same aircraft showed that for sulfate, PILS and MOI were within 14% +/- 6% and correlated with an r(sup 2) of 0.87. Most ionic compounds were within f 30%, which is in the range of differences reported between PILS and integrated samplers from ground-based comparisons. In many cases, direct intercomparison between the various instruments is difficult due to differences in upper-size detection limits. However, for this study, the results suggest that the fine particle mass composition measured from aircraft agree to within 30-40%.

  6. Rainfall and runoff Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves for Washington State considering the change and uncertainty of observed and anticipated extreme rainfall and snow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Y. K.; Mortuza, M. R.; Li, H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The observed and anticipated increasing trends in extreme storm magnitude and frequency, as well as the associated flooding risk in the Pacific Northwest highlighted the need for revising and updating the local intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves, which are commonly used for designing critical water infrastructure. In Washington State, much of the drainage system installed in the last several decades uses IDF curves that are outdated by as much as half a century, making the system inadequate and vulnerable for flooding as seen more frequently in recent years. In this study, we have developed new and forward looking rainfall and runoff IDF curves for each county in Washington State using recently observed and projected precipitation data. Regional frequency analysis coupled with Bayesian uncertainty quantification and model averaging methods were used to developed and update the rainfall IDF curves, which were then used in watershed and snow models to develop the runoff IDF curves that explicitly account for effects of snow and drainage characteristic into the IDF curves and related designs. The resulted rainfall and runoff IDF curves provide more reliable, forward looking, and spatially resolved characteristics of storm events that can assist local decision makers and engineers to thoroughly review and/or update the current design standards for urban and rural storm water management infrastructure in order to reduce the potential ramifications of increasing severe storms and resulting floods on existing and planned storm drainage and flood management systems in the state.

  7. Tropical Cyclone Outflow Structure Observed during the Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) and Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI) Experiments (2012-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, P. G.; Hendricks, E. A.; Doyle, J. D.; Moskaitis, J.; Velden, C.

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the detailed vertical and horizontal structure of the Tropical Cyclone (TC) outflow layer owing to lack of in-situ observations in this region over the years. We hypothesize that TC outflow structure change due either to external environmental interactions or internal dynamical changes are related to TC intensity changes, making the outflow layer an important region of study for improvement of TC predictability. Dropsonde profiles through TC outflow layers were obtained during the Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) experiment (2012-2014) and the Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI) experiment (2014). Using mini-dropsondes deployed with the Airborne Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS) from a NASA Global Hawk and eXpendable Digital Dropsondes (XDDs) deployed with the High Definition Sounding System (HDSS) from a NASA WB-57F, new insights into the vertical structure of the TC outflow layer have been obtained. Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) show that 'far-field' outflow jet dropsondes in Hurricane Leslie (2012) were obtained during a period of jet development and deformation in response the 'pincer effect' of an upper trough to the east and an upper cold low to west of Leslie. We speculate that the resulting deformation of the outflow layer and associated jet feature may have been responsible for limiting further development of Leslie. AMVs in Hurricane Nadine (2012) and pre-TC Gabrielle (2013) showed that outflow jets sampled by dropsondes developed over time scales of several hours. Wind profile observations in outflow jet 'roots' near 'convective bursts' showed that they were weaker and thicker near the convection and became thinner and stronger downstream as the 'far-field' region was sampled. All dropsonde profiles showed that the outflow layer contained numerous thin isothermal layers and layers of enhanced vertical wind shear. These numerous thin unstable layers were characterized by a super-critical Richardson number in

  8. SOLAR CYCLE DEPENDENCE OF THE DIURNAL ANISOTROPY OF 0.6 TeV COSMIC-RAY INTENSITY OBSERVED WITH THE MATSUSHIRO UNDERGROUND MUON DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, K.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Kato, C.; Yasue, S.; Mori, S.; Takita, M.; Kota, J.

    2010-04-01

    We analyze the temporal variation of the diurnal anisotropy of sub-TeV cosmic-ray intensity observed with the Matsushiro (Japan) underground muon detector over two full solar activity cycles in 1985-2008. We find an anisotropy component in the solar diurnal anisotropy superimposed on the Compton-Getting anisotropy due to Earth's orbital motion around the Sun. The phase of this additional anisotropy is almost constant at {approx}15:00 local solar time corresponding to the direction perpendicular to the average interplanetary magnetic field at Earth's orbit, while the amplitude varies between a maximum (0.043% +- 0.002%) and minimum ({approx}0.008% +- 0.002%) in a clear correlation with the solar activity. We find a significant time lag between the temporal variations of the amplitude and the sunspot number (SSN) and obtain the best correlation coefficient of +0.74 with the SSN delayed for 26 months. We suggest that this anisotropy might be interpreted in terms of the energy change due to the solar-wind-induced electric field expected for galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) crossing the wavy neutral sheet. The average amplitude of the sidereal diurnal variation over the entire period is 0.034% +- 0.003%, which is roughly one-third of the amplitude reported from air shower and deep-underground muon experiments monitoring multi-TeV GCR intensity suggesting a significant attenuation of the anisotropy due to the solar modulation. We find, on the other hand, only a weak positive correlation between the sidereal diurnal anisotropy and the solar activity cycle in which the amplitude in the 'active' solar activity epoch is about twice the amplitude in the 'quiet' solar activity epoch. This implies that only one-fourth of the total attenuation varies in correlation with the solar activity cycle and/or the solar magnetic cycle. We finally examine the temporal variation of the 'single-band valley depth' (SBVD) quoted by the Milagro experiment and, in contrast with recent Milagro

  9. Assessment of Postresuscitation Volume Status by Bioimpedance Analysis in Patients with Sepsis in the Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ribic, Christine M.; Lalji, Faraz; Clarke, France J.; Gantareddy, Susheel; Ranganath, Nischal; Walele, Aziz; McDonald, Ellen; Meade, Maureen O.; Cook, Deborah J.; Wilkieson, Trevor T.; Clase, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a novel method of assessing a patient's volume status. Objective. We sought to determine the feasibility of using vector length (VL), derived from bioimpedance analysis (BIA), in the assessment of postresuscitation volume status in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with sepsis. Method. This was a prospective observational single-center study. Our primary outcome was feasibility. Secondary clinical outcomes included ventilator status and acute kidney injury. Proof of concept was sought by correlating baseline VL measurements with other known measures of volume status. Results. BIA was feasible to perform in the ICU. We screened 655 patients, identified 78 eligible patients, and approached 64 for consent. We enrolled 60 patients (consent rate of 93.8%) over 12 months. For each 50-unit increase in VL, there was an associated 22% increase in the probability of not requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (p = 0.13). Baseline VL correlated with other measures of volume expansion including serum pro-BNP levels, peripheral edema, and central venous pressure (CVP). Conclusion. It is feasible to use BIA to predict postresuscitation volume status and patient-important outcomes in septic ICU patients. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01379404 registered on June 7, 2011.

  10. Assessment of Postresuscitation Volume Status by Bioimpedance Analysis in Patients with Sepsis in the Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Rochwerg, Bram; Cheung, Jason H; Ribic, Christine M; Lalji, Faraz; Clarke, France J; Gantareddy, Susheel; Ranganath, Nischal; Walele, Aziz; McDonald, Ellen; Meade, Maureen O; Cook, Deborah J; Wilkieson, Trevor T; Clase, Catherine M; Margetts, Peter J; Gangji, Azim S

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a novel method of assessing a patient's volume status. Objective. We sought to determine the feasibility of using vector length (VL), derived from bioimpedance analysis (BIA), in the assessment of postresuscitation volume status in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with sepsis. Method. This was a prospective observational single-center study. Our primary outcome was feasibility. Secondary clinical outcomes included ventilator status and acute kidney injury. Proof of concept was sought by correlating baseline VL measurements with other known measures of volume status. Results. BIA was feasible to perform in the ICU. We screened 655 patients, identified 78 eligible patients, and approached 64 for consent. We enrolled 60 patients (consent rate of 93.8%) over 12 months. For each 50-unit increase in VL, there was an associated 22% increase in the probability of not requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (p = 0.13). Baseline VL correlated with other measures of volume expansion including serum pro-BNP levels, peripheral edema, and central venous pressure (CVP). Conclusion. It is feasible to use BIA to predict postresuscitation volume status and patient-important outcomes in septic ICU patients. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01379404 registered on June 7, 2011. PMID:27597811

  11. Evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a super intensive olive orchard. An application of SIMDualKc and METRIC models using ground and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paço, Teresa A.; Pôças, Isabel; Cunha, Mário; Silvestre, José C.; Santos, Francisco L.; Paredes, Paula; Pereira, Luís S.

    2014-11-01

    The estimation of crop evapotranspiration (ETc) from the reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and a standard crop coefficient (Kc) in olive orchards requires that the latter be adjusted to planting density and height. The use of the dual Kc approach may be the best solution because the basal crop coefficient Kcb represents plant transpiration and the evaporation coefficient reproduces the soil coverage conditions and the frequency of wettings. To support related computations for a super intensive olive orchard, the model SIMDualKc was adopted because it uses the dual Kc approach. Alternatively, to consider the physical characteristics of the vegetation, the satellite-based surface energy balance model METRIC™ - Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution using Internalized Calibration - was used to estimate ETc and to derive crop coefficients. Both approaches were compared in this study. SIMDualKc model was calibrated and validated using sap-flow measurements of the transpiration for 2011 and 2012. In addition, eddy covariance estimation of ETc was also used. In the current study, METRIC™ was applied to Landsat images from 2011 to 2012. Adaptations for incomplete cover woody crops were required to parameterize METRIC. It was observed that ETc obtained from both approaches was similar and that crop coefficients derived from both models showed similar patterns throughout the year. Although the two models use distinct approaches, their results are comparable and they are complementary in spatial and temporal scales.

  12. Information structure and organisation in change of shift reports: An observational study of nursing hand-offs in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Foster-Hunt, Tara; Parush, Avi; Ellis, Jacqueline; Thomas, Margot; Rashotte, Judy

    2015-06-01

    Patient hand-offs involve the exchange of critical information. Ineffective hand-offs can result in reduced patient safety by leading to wrong treatment, delayed diagnoses or other outcomes that can negatively affect the healthcare system. The objectives of this study were to uncover the structure of the information conveyed during patient hand-offs and look for principles characterising the organisation of the information. With an observational study approach, data was gathered during the morning and evening nursing change of shift hand-offs in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. Content analysis identified a common meta-structure used for information transfer that contained categories with varying degrees of information integration and the repetition of high consequence information. Differences were found in the organisation of the hand-off structures, and these varied as a function of nursing experience. The findings are discussed in terms of the potential benefits of computerised tools which utilise standardised structure for information transfer and the implications for future education and critical care skill acquisition.

  13. Assessment of Postresuscitation Volume Status by Bioimpedance Analysis in Patients with Sepsis in the Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ribic, Christine M.; Lalji, Faraz; Clarke, France J.; Gantareddy, Susheel; Ranganath, Nischal; Walele, Aziz; McDonald, Ellen; Meade, Maureen O.; Cook, Deborah J.; Wilkieson, Trevor T.; Clase, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a novel method of assessing a patient's volume status. Objective. We sought to determine the feasibility of using vector length (VL), derived from bioimpedance analysis (BIA), in the assessment of postresuscitation volume status in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with sepsis. Method. This was a prospective observational single-center study. Our primary outcome was feasibility. Secondary clinical outcomes included ventilator status and acute kidney injury. Proof of concept was sought by correlating baseline VL measurements with other known measures of volume status. Results. BIA was feasible to perform in the ICU. We screened 655 patients, identified 78 eligible patients, and approached 64 for consent. We enrolled 60 patients (consent rate of 93.8%) over 12 months. For each 50-unit increase in VL, there was an associated 22% increase in the probability of not requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (p = 0.13). Baseline VL correlated with other measures of volume expansion including serum pro-BNP levels, peripheral edema, and central venous pressure (CVP). Conclusion. It is feasible to use BIA to predict postresuscitation volume status and patient-important outcomes in septic ICU patients. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT01379404 registered on June 7, 2011. PMID:27597811

  14. A statistical approach for rain intensity differentiation using Meteosat Second Generation-Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardelli, E.; Cimini, D.; Di Paola, F.; Romano, F.; Viggiano, M.

    2014-07-01

    This study exploits the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG)-Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) observations to evaluate the rain class at high spatial and temporal resolutions and, to this aim, proposes the Rain Class Evaluation from Infrared and Visible observation (RainCEIV) technique. RainCEIV is composed of two modules: a cloud classification algorithm which individuates and characterizes the cloudy pixels, and a supervised classifier that delineates the rainy areas according to the three rainfall intensity classes, the non-rainy (rain rate value < 0.5 mm h-1) class, the light-to-moderate rainy class (0.5 mm h-1 ≤ rain rate value < 4 mm h-1), and the heavy-to-very-heavy-rainy class (rain rate value ≥ 4 mm h-1). The second module considers as input the spectral and textural features of the infrared and visible SEVIRI observations for the cloudy pixels detected by the first module. It also takes the temporal differences of the brightness temperatures linked to the SEVIRI water vapour channels as indicative of the atmospheric instability strongly related to the occurrence of rainfall events. The rainfall rates used in the training phase are obtained through the Precipitation Estimation at Microwave frequencies, PEMW (an algorithm for rain rate retrievals based on Atmospheric Microwave Sounder Unit (AMSU)-B observations). RainCEIV's principal aim is that of supplying preliminary qualitative information on the rainy areas within the Mediterranean Basin where there is no radar network coverage. The results of RainCEIV have been validated against radar-derived rainfall measurements from the Italian Operational Weather Radar Network for some case studies limited to the Mediterranean area. The dichotomous assessment related to daytime (nighttime) validation shows that RainCEIV is able to detect rainy/non-rainy areas with an accuracy of about 97% (96%), and when all the rainy classes are considered, it shows a Heidke skill score of 67% (62%), a bias

  15. A synoptic-scale overview of the TOGA COARE intensive observing period November 1992 to February 1993 based on analyses from US operational global data assimilation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorino, M.; Lord, S. J.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Phoebus, P. A.; Strey, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The operational global analyses from the two major U.S. numerical weather prediction centers, the Navy's Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center and the National Meteorological Center, are used to describe the synoptic-scale features of the 1 Nov. 1992 to 28 Feb. 1993 TOGA COARE intensive observing period (IOP). TOGA COARE is an international field experiment in which a large number of research scientists from the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910) and the Laboratory for Hydrospheres (Code 970) participated. Two high-amplitude intraseasonal (30-60 day) oscillations passed through the TOGA COARE observational network located in the equatorial western Pacific. Associated with the oscillations were two 6-10 day periods of persistent westerly surface winds at the equator or 'westerly wind bursts.' These events are depicted through time series and time-longitude cross sections of divergence/velocity potential, surface winds, precipitation, ocean mixed-layer depth, and sea surface temperature. The high and low frequency components of the flow in which the intraseasonal oscillations were embedded are shown using seasonal, monthly, and 5-day averages of the surface, 850 and 200 mb winds, precipitation, and sea-level pressure, and a time-longitude cross section of tropical cyclone activity. Independent verification of precipitation comes from near real-time satellite estimates, and a reference climatology is given based on 9 years of ECMWF analyses. Daily 00 UTC analyses of surface winds and sea-level pressure for the entire western Pacific and Indian Ocean are provided to trace the evolution of individual synoptic events.

  16. Observations of Gaseous Mercury Over the Eastern North Pacific: Gradients, Transports, Variability, and Lifetime Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, L. F.; Friedli, H. R.; Heikes, B.

    2002-12-01

    . resolution ITCT2K2 TGM data set, together with its long trans Pacific fetch are particularly suitable for this residence time determination. Analyzing the data by flight the TGM residence time averaged 102 days with a modest SD =23 days. Should these TGM vertical gradient and revised residence times be globally confirmed they would force major revisions in atmospheric reservoir, source and sink estimates. A data set of similar size was collected over the Western North Pacific off the Asian coast in spring 2001(ACE-Asia). Downwind of the continent and its many anthropogenic TGM sources, application of Junge's hypothesis produced a much shorter Junge residence time averaging 12 days with a standard deviation of 3 days. As much of the variability observed during ACE is certainly due the proximity of diverse nearby TGM sources, Junge's sampling criteria is clearly violated. Hence the trans -Pacific 100-day lifetime is the more relevant estimate for the remote oceanic reaches. During ACE- Asia distinct plumes and multiple layering of TGM with maximum concentrations elevated more than 5X background were found beyond 1,000 km from their likely continental source (Shanghai). Across the Pacific during ITCT2K2 similar layering was encountered. Remarkably, a single TGM plume (3X background) was encountered at 6km mixed with a variety anthropogenic pollutants on a trajectory suggesting a rapid trans Pacific transit with minimal dilution or loss enroute.

  17. Diagnosis of an intense atmospheric river impacting the pacific northwest: Storm summary and offshore vertical structure observed with COSMIC satellite retrievals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neiman, P.J.; Ralph, F.M.; Wick, G.A.; Kuo, Y.-H.; Wee, T.-K.; Ma, Z.; Taylor, G.H.; Dettinger, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses the new satellite-based Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) mission to retrieve tropospheric profiles of temperature and moisture over the data-sparse eastern Pacific Ocean. The COSMIC retrievals, which employ a global positioning system radio occultation technique combined with "first-guess" information from numerical weather prediction model analyses, are evaluated through the diagnosis of an intense atmospheric river (AR; i.e., a narrow plume of strong water vapor flux) that devastated the Pacific Northwest with flooding rains in early November 2006. A detailed analysis of this AR is presented first using conventional datasets and highlights the fact that ARs are critical contributors to West Coast extreme precipitation and flooding events. Then, the COSMIC evaluation is provided. Offshore composite COSMIC soundings north of, within, and south of this AR exhibited vertical structures that are meteorologically consistent with satellite imagery and global reanalysis fields of this case and with earlier composite dropsonde results from other landfalling ARs. Also, a curtain of 12 offshore COSMIC soundings through the AR yielded cross-sectional thermodynamic and moisture structures that were similarly consistent, including details comparable to earlier aircraft-based dropsonde analyses. The results show that the new COSMIC retrievals, which are global (currently yielding ???2000 soundings per day), provide high-resolution vertical-profile information beyond that found in the numerical model first-guess fields and can help monitor key lower-tropospheric mesoscale phenomena in data-sparse regions. Hence, COSMIC will likely support a wide array of applications, from physical process studies to data assimilation, numerical weather prediction, and climate research. ?? 2008 American Meteorological Society.

  18. HONO and Inorganic Fine Particle Composition in Typical Monsoon Region with Intensive Anthropogenic Emission: In-situ Observations and Source Identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Nie, W.; Ding, A.; Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Yangtze River Delta (YRD) is one of the most typical monsoon area with probably the most largest population intensity in the world. With sharply economic development and the large anthropogenic emissions, fine particle pollution have been one of the major air quality problem and may further have impact on the climate system. Though a lot of control policy (sulfur emission have been decreasing from 2007) have been conducted in the region, studies showed the sulfate in fine particles still take major fraction as the nitrate from nitrogen oxides increased significantly. In this study, the role of inorganic chemical compositions in fine particles was investigated with two years in-situ observation. Sulfate and Nitrate contribute to fine particle mass equally in general, but sulfate contributes more during summer and nitrate played more important role in winter. Using lagrangian dispersion backward modeling and source contribution clustering method, the impact of airmass coming from different source region (industrial, dust, biogenic emissions, etc) on fine particle inorganic compositions were discussed. Furthermore, we found two unique cases showing in-situ implications for sulfate formation by nitrogen dioxide oxidation mechanisms. It was showed that the mixing of anthropogenic pollutants with long-range transported mineral dust and biomass burning plume would enhance the sulfate formation by different chemistry mechanisms. This study focus on the complex aspects of fine particle formation in airmasses from different source regions: . It highlights the effect of NOx in enhancing the atmospheric oxidization capacity and indicates a potentially very important impact of increasing NOx on air pollution formation and regional climate change in East Asia.

  19. Intense secondary aerosol formation due to strong atmospheric photochemical reactions in summer: observations at a rural site in eastern Yangtze River Delta of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfang; Zhou, Bin; Fu, Qingyan; Zhao, Qianbiao; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin; Duan, Yusen; Li, Juan

    2016-11-15

    High pollution episodes of PM2.5 and O3 were frequently observed at a rural site (N31.0935º, E120.978°) in eastern Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in summer. To study the impacts of photochemical reactions on secondary aerosol formation in this region, we performed real-time measurements of the mass concentration and composition of PM2.5, particle size distribution (13.6~736.5 nm), concentrations of gas pollutants including O3, SO2, NO2, CO, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC)), and nitrate radical in 2013. During the sampling period, the average concentration of PM2.5 was 76.1 (± 16.5) μg/m(3), in which secondary aerosol species including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounted for ~ 62%. Gas-phase oxidation of SO2 was mainly responsible for a fast increase of sulfate (at 1.70 μg/m(3)/h) in the morning. Photochemical production of nitric acid was intense during daytime, but particulate nitrate concentration was low in the afternoon due to high temperature. At night, nitrate was mainly formed through the hydrolysis of NO3 and/or N2O5. The correlations among NMHC, Ox (= O3 + NO2), and SOA suggested that a combination of high emission of hydrocarbons and active photochemical reactions led to the rapid formation of SOA. In addition, several new particle formation and fast growth events were observed despite high ambient aerosol loading. Since the onset of new particle events was accompanied by a rapid increase of H2SO4 and SOA, enhanced formation of sulfate and SOA driven by photochemical oxidation likely promoted the formation and growth of new particles. Together, our results demonstrated that strong atmospheric photochemical reactions enhanced secondary aerosols formation and led to the synchronous occurrence of high concentrations of PM2.5 and O3 in a regional scale. These findings are important for better understanding the air pollution in summer in YRD. PMID:27418517

  20. Ionospheric F region effects observed in the American and African sectors during the intense geomagnetic storm of September-October 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jesus, Rodolfo; Gende, Mauricio; Fagundes, Paulo Roberto; Coster, Anthea; Bolaji, Segun; Kavutarapu, Venkatesh; De Abreu, Alessandro; Sobral, J. H. A.; Pillat, Valdir Gil; Batista, Inez S.

    This study presents an investigation of geomagnetic disturbance effects on the equatorial, low- and mid-latitude ionospheric F region over the American and African sectors during the intense geomagnetic storm (maximum Kp index of 6.7) that occurred on 30th September, 2012 and 1st October, 2012. In this study digital ionosonde and Global Positioning System (GPS) data are simultaneously utilized from 30th September to 3rd October 2012. The diurnal variability over this four day period observed from both the digital ionosonde and from ground based GPS units can be characterized as quiet, slightly disturbed, and strongly disturbed periods. This time period includes the sudden commencement of the storm (SCS), the main phase (MPS), and the recovery phase of the storm (RPS). During the period of investigation, ionospheric parameters F-region critical frequency (foF2) and minimum F-region virtual height ('hF) were obtained at Jicamarca, São Luís, Fortaleza, Palmas and Port Stanley at the following geographical coordinates, respectively: 12.0ºS 76.8ºW, 2.6ºS 44.2ºW, 3.8ºS 38ºW, 10.2ºS 48.8ºW and 51.6ºS 57.9ºW. In this study, we also used observations of 20 GPS stations located at Greenbelt (39.0ºN, 76.8ºW), Cambridge (38.6ºN, 76.1ºW), Virgin Islands (17.6ºN, 64.6ºW), Eusebio (03.9ºS, 38.4ºW), Iquitos (03.8ºS, 73.3 ºW), Arequipa (16.5ºS, 71.5ºW), Cachoeira Paulista (22.7ºS, 45.0ºW), Copiapo (27.4ºS, 70.4ºW), La Plata (34.9ºS, 57.9ºW), Concepcion (36.8ºS, 73.0ºW), Rio Grande (53.8ºS, 67.8ºW), Dakar (14.7ºN, 17.4ºW), Addis (09.0ºN, 38.8ºE), Cotonou (06.4ºN, 02.5ºE), Libreville (00.4ºN, 09.7ºE), Mbarara (00.6ºS, 30.7ºE), Lusaka (15.4ºS, 28.3ºE), Windhoek (22.6ºS, 17.1ºE), Springbok (29.7ºS, 17.9ºE) and Sutherland (32.4ºS, 20.8ºE). Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) and TEC fluctuations (ROT, rate of change of TEC) are calculated from GPS data using the measured Slant Total Electron Content (STEC) records from the 20 GPS

  1. Hospital-wide infection control practice and Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the intensive care unit (ICU): an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Rella

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To estimate trends in infection/colonisation with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in an intensive care unit (ICU). Design Observational study of results of ICU admission and weekly screens for MRSA. Setting and Participants All ICU admissions in 2001–2012. Interventions ICU admissions were screened for MRSA throughout. In late 2006, screening was extended to the whole hospital and extra measures taken in ICU. Main outcome measures Prevalence of MRSA in ICU admissions and number acquiring MRSA therein. Results In all, 366 of 6565 admissions to ICU were MRSA positive, including 270 of 4466 coming from within the hospital in which prevalence increased with time prior to transfer to ICU. Prevalence in this group was 9.4% (8.2–10.6) in 2001–2006, decreasing to 3.4% (2.3–4.5) in 2007–2009 and 1.3% (0.6–2.0) in 2010–2012, p < 0.001, due to decreased prevalence in those spending >5 days on wards before ICU admission: 18.9% (15.6–22.2) in 2001–2006, 7.1% (4.0–10.2) in 2007–2009 and 1.6% (0.1–3.1) in 2010–2012, p < 0.001. In addition, 201 patients acquired MRSA within ICU, the relative risk being greater when known positives present: 4.34 (3.98–4.70), p < 0.001. Acquisition rate/1000 bed days decreased from 13.3 (11.2–15.4) in 2001–2006 to 3.6 (2.6–4.6) in 2007–2012, p < 0.0001. Of 41 ICU-acquired MRSA bacteraemias, 38 were in 2001–2006. The risk of bacteraemia in those acquiring MRSA decreased from 25% (18.1–31.9) in 2001–2006 to 6.1% (0–12.8) thereafter, p = 0.022. Conclusions Following better hospital-wide infection control, fewer MRSA-positive patients were admitted to ICU with a parallel decrease in acquisition therein. Better practice there reduced the risk of bacteraemia. PMID:25383196

  2. Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosols during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) remote clouds sensing (RCS) intensive observation period (IOP)

    SciTech Connect

    Melfi, S.H.; Starr, D.O`C.; Whiteman, D.

    1996-04-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program.

  3. Gross rainfall amount and maximum rainfall intensity in 60-minute influence on interception loss of shrubs: a 10-year observation in the Tengger Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Zhao, Yang; Li, Xin-Rong; Huang, Lei; Tan, Hui-Juan

    2016-05-01

    In water-limited regions, rainfall interception is influenced by rainfall properties and crown characteristics. Rainfall properties, aside from gross rainfall amount and duration (GR and RD), maximum rainfall intensity and rainless gap (RG), within rain events may heavily affect throughfall and interception by plants. From 2004 to 2014 (except for 2007), individual shrubs of Caragana korshinskii and Artemisia ordosica were selected to measure throughfall during 210 rain events. Various rainfall properties were auto-measured and crown characteristics, i.e., height, branch and leaf area index, crown area and volume of two shrubs were also measured. The relative interceptions of C. korshinskii and A. ordosica were 29.1% and 17.1%, respectively. Rainfall properties have more contributions than crown characteristics to throughfall and interception of shrubs. Throughfall and interception of shrubs can be explained by GR, RI60 (maximum rainfall intensities during 60 min), RD and RG in deceasing importance. However, relative throughfall and interception of two shrubs have different responses to rainfall properties and crown characteristics, those of C. korshinskii were closely related to rainfall properties, while those of A. ordosica were more dependent on crown characteristics. We highlight long-term monitoring is very necessary to determine the relationships between throughfall and interception with crown characteristics.

  4. Gross rainfall amount and maximum rainfall intensity in 60-minute influence on interception loss of shrubs: a 10-year observation in the Tengger Desert

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Zhao, Yang; Li, Xin-Rong; Huang, Lei; Tan, Hui-Juan

    2016-01-01

    In water-limited regions, rainfall interception is influenced by rainfall properties and crown characteristics. Rainfall properties, aside from gross rainfall amount and duration (GR and RD), maximum rainfall intensity and rainless gap (RG), within rain events may heavily affect throughfall and interception by plants. From 2004 to 2014 (except for 2007), individual shrubs of Caragana korshinskii and Artemisia ordosica were selected to measure throughfall during 210 rain events. Various rainfall properties were auto-measured and crown characteristics, i.e., height, branch and leaf area index, crown area and volume of two shrubs were also measured. The relative interceptions of C. korshinskii and A. ordosica were 29.1% and 17.1%, respectively. Rainfall properties have more contributions than crown characteristics to throughfall and interception of shrubs. Throughfall and interception of shrubs can be explained by GR, RI60 (maximum rainfall intensities during 60 min), RD and RG in deceasing importance. However, relative throughfall and interception of two shrubs have different responses to rainfall properties and crown characteristics, those of C. korshinskii were closely related to rainfall properties, while those of A. ordosica were more dependent on crown characteristics. We highlight long-term monitoring is very necessary to determine the relationships between throughfall and interception with crown characteristics. PMID:27184918

  5. Gross rainfall amount and maximum rainfall intensity in 60-minute influence on interception loss of shrubs: a 10-year observation in the Tengger Desert.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Zhao, Yang; Li, Xin-Rong; Huang, Lei; Tan, Hui-Juan

    2016-01-01

    In water-limited regions, rainfall interception is influenced by rainfall properties and crown characteristics. Rainfall properties, aside from gross rainfall amount and duration (GR and RD), maximum rainfall intensity and rainless gap (RG), within rain events may heavily affect throughfall and interception by plants. From 2004 to 2014 (except for 2007), individual shrubs of Caragana korshinskii and Artemisia ordosica were selected to measure throughfall during 210 rain events. Various rainfall properties were auto-measured and crown characteristics, i.e., height, branch and leaf area index, crown area and volume of two shrubs were also measured. The relative interceptions of C. korshinskii and A. ordosica were 29.1% and 17.1%, respectively. Rainfall properties have more contributions than crown characteristics to throughfall and interception of shrubs. Throughfall and interception of shrubs can be explained by GR, RI60 (maximum rainfall intensities during 60 min), RD and RG in deceasing importance. However, relative throughfall and interception of two shrubs have different responses to rainfall properties and crown characteristics, those of C. korshinskii were closely related to rainfall properties, while those of A. ordosica were more dependent on crown characteristics. We highlight long-term monitoring is very necessary to determine the relationships between throughfall and interception with crown characteristics. PMID:27184918

  6. Identification of Possible Intense Historical Solar Storms During the Years 1781-1788 Inferred from Aurorae and Geomagnetic Observations in Rio De Janeiro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquero, José M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2006-05-01

    The reconstruction of solar activity during the late 18th century is a puzzle for researchers due to the scarcity of sunspot observations in that epoch. In this work, we analyse some details of the solar activity during the years 1781-1788, inferred from geomagnetic measurements and visual observations of aurorae performed by the Portuguese scientist Bento Sanches Dorta from Rio de Janeiro. We describe in greater detail four large solar storms that induced large changes in daily values of geomagnetic declination and, simultaneously, correspond to visual observations of aurorae described by Sanches Dorta.

  7. Trends in nitrogen concentrations and load in 48 minor streams draining intensively farmed Danish catchments, 1990-2014. How can the observed trend be explained?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windolf, Jørgen; Børgesen, Christen; Blicher-Mathiesen, Gitte; Kronvang, Brian; Larsen, Søren E.; Tornbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The total land-based nitrogen load to Danish coastal waters has decreased by 50% since 1990 through a reduction of the outlet of nitrogen from sewage point sources and diffuse sources. On a national scale nitrogen load from diffuse sources, has been reduced by 43% , mainly due to limitation of the amount of N input to different crops, rules for timing and application of manure, mandatory demands for catch crops and restoration of wetlands. The latter increasing the nitrogen retention capacity in surface waters. However, on a local scale huge variations exist in the reduction of the diffuse nitrogen load. Since 1990, an important part of the Danish national monitoring program on the aquatic environment (NOVANA) has been directed at quantifying the nitrogen concentrations and load in 48 minor streams draining small intensively farmed catchments. The 48 catchments have a mean size of 18 km2, farmed area constitutes more than 60% of the catchment area and the catchments have no significant outlets of sewage to the streams. The statistical trend results (based on a seasonal Mann-Kendall) from these 48 streams show a 9-65% reduction in the diffuse nitrogen load (mean: 48%). The large differences in trends in the diffuse N load are related to differences in catchment-specific variables such as nitrogen surpluses, nitrogen leaching from the root zone, hydrogeology and nitrogen retention in ground and surface waters.

  8. An intensely star-forming galaxy at z ∼ 7 with low dust and metal content revealed by deep ALMA and HST observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Ellis, Richard; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Kurono, Yasutaka; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Iono, Daisuke

    2013-12-01

    We report deep ALMA observations complemented by associated Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging for a luminous (m {sub UV} = 25) galaxy, 'Himiko', at a redshift of z = 6.595. The galaxy is remarkable for its high star formation rate, 100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which has been securely estimated from our deep HST and Spitzer photometry, and the absence of any evidence for strong active galactic nucleus activity or gravitational lensing magnification. Our ALMA observations probe an order of magnitude deeper than previous IRAM observations, yet fail to detect a 1.2 mm dust continuum, indicating a flux of <52 μJy, which is comparable to or weaker than that of local dwarf irregulars with much lower star formation rates. We likewise provide a strong upper limit for the flux of [C II] 158 μm, L{sub [C} {sub II]}<5.4×10{sup 7} L{sub ⊙}, which is a diagnostic of the hot interstellar gas that is often described as a valuable probe for early galaxies. In fact, our observations indicate that Himiko lies off the local L{sub [C} {sub II]}-star formation rate scaling relation by a factor of more than 30. Both aspects of our ALMA observations suggest that Himiko is a unique object with a very low dust content and perhaps nearly primordial interstellar gas. Our HST images provide unique insight into the morphology of this remarkable source, highlighting an extremely blue core of activity and two less extreme associated clumps. Himiko is undergoing a triple major merger event whose extensive ionized nebula of Lyα emitting gas, discovered in our earlier work with Subaru, is powered by star formation and the dense circumgalactic gas. We are likely witnessing an early massive galaxy during a key period of its mass assembly close to the end of the reionization era.

  9. Lack of increased signal intensity in the dentate nucleus after repeated administration of a macrocyclic contrast agent in multiple sclerosis: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Philipp; Alonso, Angelika; Szabo, Kristina; Ebert, Anne; Ong, Melissa; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Gass, Achim

    2016-09-01

    Recently, several studies reported increased signal intensity (SI) in the dentate nucleus (DN) after repeated application of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), suggesting a deposition of gadolinium in this location. Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) frequently show increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier as part of the inflammatory process in the brain parenchyma, which theoretically might increase the risk of gadolinium deposition. In this retrospective study, we investigated a possible increasing SI in the DN after repeated administrations of the macrocyclic contrast agent gadoterate meglumine.Forty-one RRMS patients (33 women, mean age 38 years) with at least 6 prior gadolinium-enhanced examinations (single dose gadoterate meglumine) were identified. A total of 279 unenhanced T1-weighted examinations were analyzed.SI ratio differences did not differ between the first and last MRI examination, neither for the DN-to-pons ratio (P = 0.594) nor for the DN-to-cerebellum ratio (P = 0.847). There was no correlation between the mean DN-to-pons, or between the mean DN-to-cerebellum SI ratio and the number of MRI examinations (P = 0.848 and 0.891), disease duration (P = 0.676 and 0.985), and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) (P = 0.639 and 0.945).We found no signal increases in the DN after a minimum of 6 injections of the macrocyclic GBCA gadoterate meglumine in RRMS patients. This warrants further investigations in regard to the true pathophysiologic basis of intracerebral gadolinium deposition. PMID:27684794

  10. Validity and Reliability of a Tool for Determining Appropriateness of Days of Stay: An Observational Study in the Orthopedic Intensive Rehabilitation Facilities in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Aida; Flotta, Domenico; Lotito, Francesca; Nobile, Carmelo G. A.; Pileggi, Claudia; Pavia, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To test the validity and reliability of a tool specifically developed for the evaluation of appropriateness in rehabilitation facilities and to assess the prevalence of appropriateness of the days of stay. Methods The tool underwent a process of cross-cultural translation, content validity, and test-retest validity. Two hospital-based rehabilitation wards providing intensive rehabilitation care located in the Region of Calabria, Southern Italy, were randomly selected. A review of medical records on a random sample of patients aged 18 or more was performed. Results The process of validation resulted in modifying some of the criteria used for the evaluation of appropriateness. Test-retest reliability showed that the agreement and the k statistic for the assessment of the appropriateness of days of stay were 93.4% and 0.82, respectively. A total of 371 patient days was reviewed, and 22.9% of the days of stay in the sample were judged to be inappropriate. The most frequently selected appropriateness criterion was the evaluation of patients by rehabilitation professionals for at least 3 hours on the index day (40.8%); moreover, the most frequent primary reason accounting for the inappropriate days of stay was social and/or family environment issues (34.1%). Conclusions The findings showed that the tool used is reliable and have adequate validity to measure the extent of appropriateness of days of stay in rehabilitation facilities and that the prevalence of inappropriateness is contained in the investigated settings. Further research is needed to expand appropriateness evaluation to other rehabilitation settings, and to investigate more thoroughly internal and external causes of inappropriate use of rehabilitation services. PMID:23185588

  11. High-altitude observations of an intense inverted V event. [convection electric field reversal over pre-midnight sector auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.; Eastman, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    Inverted-V events which generally occur in the pre-midnight sector over the auroral zone are frequently associated with reversals in the convection electric field. Such a reversal is observed by the University of Iowa quasispherical LEPEDEA on board ISEE 1 at an altitude of 13 RE on May 1, 1978. The bulk of the plasma shows a large shear over a five-minute interval. The associated change in the convection electric field is 5.1 mV/m. Large values of the field-aligned current are simultaneously detected. The potential structure appears to extend to the satellite location. Using a theoretical model, the field-aligned current due to the electric field discontinuity has been calculated. The magnitude of the parallel potential drop and width of the inverted-V region agree well with observation.

  12. Ultraviolet observations of cool stars. IV - Intensities of Lyman-alpha and Mg II in epsilon Pegasi and epsilon Eridani, and line width-luminosity correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, W.; Linsky, J. L.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrometer on the Copernicus satellite has been used to confirm the existence of a line width-luminosity relation for the Ly-alpha and Mg II 2800-A chromospheric emission lines in K-type stars by observation of a K2 dwarf (epsilon Eri) and a K2 supergiant (epsilon Peg). Combined with previously reported observations of lines in three K giants (alpha Boo, alpha Tau, and beta Gem), the data are consistent with an identical dependence of line width on absolute visual magnitude for the Ca II K, Ly-alpha, and Mg II 2795-A lines. Surface fluxes of Ly-alpha, Mg II 2800-A, and O V 1218-A (upper limit) for epsilon Eri, and of Mg II 2800-A for epsilon Peg are also compared with values reported previously for the three giant stars.

  13. Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES, and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 h in magnetic local time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Lessard, M. R.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H. E.; Smith, C. W.; Singer, H. J.; Omura, Y.; Horne, R. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Gkioulidou, M.; Oksavik, K.; Mann, I. R.; Raita, T.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-07-01

    Although most studies of the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on Earth's outer radiation belt have focused on events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of a wave event on 23 February 2014 that extended over 8 h in UT and over 12 h in local time, stimulated by a gradual 4 h rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) appeared for over 4 h at both Van Allen Probes, from late morning through local noon, when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. Waves were also observed by ground-based induction magnetometers in Antarctica (near dawn), Finland (near local noon), Russia (in the afternoon), and in Canada (from dusk to midnight). Ten passes of NOAA-POES and METOP satellites near the northern foot point of the Van Allen Probes observed 30-80 keV subauroral proton precipitation, often over extended L shell ranges; other passes identified a narrow L shell region of precipitation over Canada. Observations of relativistic electrons by the Van Allen Probes showed that the fluxes of more field-aligned and more energetic radiation belt electrons were reduced in response to both the emission over Canada and the more spatially extended emission associated with the compression, confirming the effectiveness of EMIC-induced loss processes for this event.

  14. Nature and Intensity of the 22-23 April 2015 Eruptions of Volcán Calbuco, Chile, from Satellite, Lightning, and Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eaton, A. R.; Amigo, A.; Bertin, D.; Mastin, L. G.; Giacosa, R.; Behnke, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    On 22 April 2015, Calbuco Volcano in southern Chile erupted for the first time in 43 years. The two primary phases of eruption, separated by a few hours, produced pyroclastic density currents, lahars, and spectacular vertical eruption columns that rose into the stratosphere. Clear weather conditions allowed the populated areas of Puerto Montt and Puerto Varas full view of the lightning-rich eruption, which was rapidly shared through social media. A wealth of remote-sensing data was also publically available in near real-time. We used this information to assess the eruption behavior by combining satellite-based umbrella growth rates, and the location and frequency of volcanic lightning. Umbrella expansion rates from GOES-13 satellite retrievals correspond to eruption rates of about 4x106 kg s-1 for the first eruptive phase and 6x106 kg s-1 for the second phase, following the approach of Pouget et al. (2013, JVGR, 258, 100-112). The location and timing of lightning flashes were obtained from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) Global Volcanic Lightning Monitor, which is updated approximately every minute (Ewert et al., 2010, Fall AGU Abstract AE31A-04). Interestingly, the onset of detected flashes was delayed by ~30 min after the start of each eruptive phase. Lighting provided a useful proxy for the waxing or waning intensity of the eruption, and helped identify the end of significant ash emissions. Using the 1-D volcanic plume model Plumeria, we have also simulated the vertical distribution of ash and ice in the plumes to examine potential causes of the extraordinary amount of volcanic lightning (1,094 flashes detected). Our analysis provides information on eruption timing, duration, and mass flow rate, which are necessary for ash dispersal modeling within hours of eruption. Results are also consistent with the field-based measurements of total erupted volume. We suggest that the combination of satellite-detected umbrella expansion rates with lightning

  15. Insights into the Problem of Alarm Fatigue with Physiologic Monitor Devices: A Comprehensive Observational Study of Consecutive Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Barbara J.; Harris, Patricia; Zègre-Hemsey, Jessica K.; Mammone, Tina; Schindler, Daniel; Salas-Boni, Rebeca; Bai, Yong; Tinoco, Adelita; Ding, Quan; Hu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Physiologic monitors are plagued with alarms that create a cacophony of sounds and visual alerts causing “alarm fatigue” which creates an unsafe patient environment because a life-threatening event may be missed in this milieu of sensory overload. Using a state-of-the-art technology acquisition infrastructure, all monitor data including 7 ECG leads, all pressure, SpO2, and respiration waveforms as well as user settings and alarms were stored on 461 adults treated in intensive care units. Using a well-defined alarm annotation protocol, nurse scientists with 95% inter-rater reliability annotated 12,671 arrhythmia alarms. Results A total of 2,558,760 unique alarms occurred in the 31-day study period: arrhythmia, 1,154,201; parameter, 612,927; technical, 791,632. There were 381,560 audible alarms for an audible alarm burden of 187/bed/day. 88.8% of the 12,671 annotated arrhythmia alarms were false positives. Conditions causing excessive alarms included inappropriate alarm settings, persistent atrial fibrillation, and non-actionable events such as PVC's and brief spikes in ST segments. Low amplitude QRS complexes in some, but not all available ECG leads caused undercounting and false arrhythmia alarms. Wide QRS complexes due to bundle branch block or ventricular pacemaker rhythm caused false alarms. 93% of the 168 true ventricular tachycardia alarms were not sustained long enough to warrant treatment. Discussion The excessive number of physiologic monitor alarms is a complex interplay of inappropriate user settings, patient conditions, and algorithm deficiencies. Device solutions should focus on use of all available ECG leads to identify non-artifact leads and leads with adequate QRS amplitude. Devices should provide prompts to aide in more appropriate tailoring of alarm settings to individual patients. Atrial fibrillation alarms should be limited to new onset and termination of the arrhythmia and delays for ST-segment and other parameter alarms should be

  16. Cloud Properties Derived From GOES-7 for Spring 1994 ARM Intensive Observing Period Using Version 1.0.0 of ARM Satellite Data Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.; Ayers, J. Kirk; Doelling, David R.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the initial formulation (Version 1.0.0) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program satellite data analysis procedures. Techniques are presented for calibrating geostationary satellite data with Sun synchronous satellite radiances and for converting narrowband radiances to top-of-the-atmosphere fluxes and albedos. A methodology is documented for combining geostationary visible and infrared radiances with surface-based temperature observations to derive cloud amount, optical depth, height, thickness, temperature, and albedo. The analysis is limited to two grids centered over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility in north-central Oklahoma. Daytime data taken during 5 Apr. - 1 May 1994, were analyzed on the 0.3 deg and 0.5 deg latitude-longitude grids that cover areas of 0.9 deg x 0.9 deg and 10 deg x 14 deg, respectively. Conditions ranging from scattered low cumulus to thin cirrus and thick cumulonimbus occurred during the study period. Detailed comparisons with hourly surface observations indicate that the mean cloudiness is within a few percent of the surface-derived sky cover. Formats of the results are also provided. The data can be accessed through the World Wide Web computer network.

  17. An intense state of hard X-ray emission of Cyg X-1 observed by INTEGRAL coincident with TeV measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzac, J.; Lubiński, P.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Türler, M.; Laurent, P.

    2008-12-01

    Aims: We present INTEGRAL light curves and spectra of the black-hole binary Cyg X-1 during a bright event that occurred in 2006 September, and which was simultaneous with a detection at 0.15-1 TeV energies by the MAGIC telescope. Methods: We analyse the hard X-ray emission from 18 to 700 keV with the INTEGRAL data taken on 2006 September 24-26 by the IBIS and SPI instruments. These data are supplemented with RXTE All Sky Monitor data at lower energy. We present the light curves and fit the high energy spectrum with various spectral models. Results: Despite variations in the flux by a factor of ~2 in the 20-700 keV energy band, the shape of the energy spectrum remained remarkably stable. It is very well represented by an e-folded power law with the photon index of Γ ≃ 1.4 and a high energy cut-off at Ec ≃ 130-140 keV. The spectrum is also well described by thermal Comptonisation including a moderate reflection component, with a solid angle of the reflector of ~ 0.4 × 2π. The temperature of the hot Comptonising electrons is kTe ~ 70 keV and their Thomson optical depth is τ ~ 2.5. These spectral properties are typical of those observed in the low/hard state. This shows that Cyg X-1 may stay in the low hard state at least up to the flux level of 2 Crab, which corresponds to ~2-3% of the Eddington luminosity. It is the first time a persistent high-mass black-hole binary is observed at a few percent of the Eddington luminosity with a stable low/hard state spectrum over a period of a few days. Such a bright hard state has so far been observed only during the rising phase of transient low-mass black-hole binaries. The TeV detection coincides with the peak of a small X-ray flare just after a very fast rise in hard X-ray flux. In contrast, the source remained undetected by MAGIC at the peak of a larger X-ray flare occurring one day later and corresponding to the maximum of the X-ray luminosity of the whole outburst. We do not find any obvious correlation between the

  18. Study Design of the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely Ill Patients (microSOAP): an International Multicenter Observational Study of Sublingual Microcirculatory Alterations in Intensive Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vellinga, Namkje A. R.; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Koopmans, Matty; Donati, Abele; Dubin, Arnaldo; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Pearse, Rupert M.; Bakker, Jan; Ince, Can

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Sublingual microcirculatory alterations are associated with an adverse prognosis in several critical illness subgroups. Up to now, single-center studies have reported on sublingual microcirculatory alterations in ICU patient subgroups, but an extensive evaluation of the prevalence of these alterations is lacking. We present the study design of an international multicenter observational study to investigate the prevalence of microcirculatory alterations in critically ill: the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely ill Patients (microSOAP). Methods. 36 ICU's worldwide have participated in this study aiming for inclusion of over 500 evaluable patients. To enable communication and data collection, a website, an Open Clinica 3.0 database, and image uploading software have been designed. A one-session assessment of the sublingual microcirculation using Sidestream Dark Field imaging and data collection on patient characteristics has been performed in every ICU patient >18 years, regardless of underlying disease. Statistical analysis will provide insight in the prevalence and severity of sublingual alterations, its relation to systemic hemodynamic variables, disease, therapy, and outcome. Conclusion. This study will be the largest microcirculation study ever performed. It is expected that this study will also establish a basis for future studies related to the microcirculation in critically ill. PMID:22666566

  19. Aerosol particles collected on aircraft flights over the northwestern Pacific region during the ACE-Asia campaign: Composition and major sources of the organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Kobayashi, Minoru; Mochida, Michihiro; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Huebert, Barry J.

    2004-10-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter, collected over the polluted east Asia/Pacific region in spring 2001 during research flights with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130 aircraft, was analyzed for different types of organic compounds using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More than 70 organic species were detected in the aerosols and grouped into different compound classes on the basis of functional groups, including n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fatty acids, dehydroabietic acid, alkanols, water-soluble sugars (including glucose, sucrose, mycose, and levoglucosan), monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids, urea, and phthalates. Interestingly, the water-soluble compounds (72-133 ng m-3) were found to account for 16-50% (average 34%) of the total identified compound mass (TCM). Organic compounds were further categorized into several groups to suggest their sources. Fossil fuel combustion was recognized as the most significant source for the TCM (contributing 33-80% of TCM, average 50%), followed by soil resuspension (5-25%, average 19%) and secondary oxidation products (4-15%, average 9%). In contrast, the contribution of natural sources such as terrestrial plant wax and marine lipids (fatty acids and alkanols) was relatively small (3.4% and 9.4% on average, respectively). Biomass burning was suggested to contribute only a minor portion to the TCM of the Asian aerosols during the spring season (1.4% on average based on levoglucosan). However, levoglucosan may have been hydrolyzed and/or oxidized in part during long-range transport, and therefore this value represents a lower limit. The organic compound compositions of these samples are very different from those reported for aerosol particles of the Atlantic Ocean and from the earlier data for the mid-Pacific in terms of the abundant presence of water-soluble compounds consisting of saccharides, anhydrosaccharides, and the secondary dicarboxylic acids. This study demonstrated that the organic tracer approach can be carried out on small samples acquired on aircraft and is useful to better understand the sources of organic aerosols over the Asia/Pacific region.

  20. GnRH agonist trigger with intensive luteal phase support vs. human chorionic gonadotropin trigger in high responders: an observational study reporting pregnancy outcomes and incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Georgios; Vlismas, Antonios; Carby, Anna; Lavery, Stuart; Trew, Geoffrey

    2016-09-01

    A retrospective, cohort study of high-risk patients undergoing IVF treatment was performed to assess if there is a difference in clinical pregnancy rate, live birth rate and the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, when a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) trigger with intensive luteal support is compared to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with standard luteal support. The control group consisted of 382 high-risk patients having a GnRH antagonist protocol with 194 receiving an hCG trigger. All patients had ≥18 follicles ≥11mm or serum oestradiol >18,000pmol/l on the day of trigger. Patients had a single or double embryo transfer at cleavage or blastocyst stage. Logistic regression was used to adjust for differences between the groups. An intention-to-treat analysis of all cycles was performed. No statistically significant differences were observed in terms of positive pregnancy test, clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate. Only one patient (0.3%) was hospitalized with severe OHSS in the GnRHa group, compared to 26 patients (13%) in the hCG group. In conclusion, GnRHa trigger is associated with similar pregnancy rates with hCG trigger and a significant reduction in hospitalization for severe OHSS after an intention to treat analysis was performed. PMID:27662416

  1. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) intensive observation period (IOP)-4 and simulations of land use pattern effect on the LLJ

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Raman, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation. It transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of weather over the Great Plains of the central United States. The LLJ is generally recognized as a complex response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the diurnal cycle of thermal forcing. Early studies have attributed the Great Plains LLJ to the diurnal oscillations of frictional effect, buoyancy over sloping terrain, and the blocking effects of the Rocky Mountains. Recent investigations show that the speed of the LLJ is also affected by the soil type and soil moisture. Some studies also suggest that synoptic patterns may play an important role in the development of the LLJ. Land surface heterogeneties significantly affect mesoscale circulations by generating strong contrasts in surface thermal fluxes. Thus one would expect that the land use pattern should have effects on the LLJ`s development and structure. In this study, we try to determine the relative roles of the synoptic forcing, planetary boundary layers (PBL) processes, and the land use pattern in the formation of the LLJ using the observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Intensive Operation Period (IOP)-4 and numerical sensitivity tests.

  2. Mechanism of biological effects observed in honey bees (Apis mellifera, L. ) hived under extra-high-voltage transmission lines: implications derived from bee exposure to simulated intense electric fields and shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    This work explores mechanisms for disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765 kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) observed in previous studies. Proposed mechanisms fell into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields and perception of shock from induced currents. The adverse biological effects could be reproduced in simulations where only the worker bees were exposed to shock or to E field in elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). We now report the results of full-scale experiments using the tunnel exposure scheme, which assesses the contribution of shock and intense E field to colony disturbance. Exposure of worker bees (1400 h) to 60-Hz E fields including 100 kV/m under moisture-free conditions within a nonconductive tunnel causes no deleterious affect on colony behavior. Exposure of bees in conductive (e.g., wet) tunnels produces bee disturbance, increased mortality, abnormal propolization, and possible impairment of colony growth. We propose that this substrate dependence of bee disturbance is the result of perception of shock from coupled body currents and enhanced current densities postulated to exist in the legs and thorax of bees on conductors. Similarly, disturbance occurs when bees are exposed to step-potential-induced currents. At 275-350 nA single bees are disturbed; at 600 nA bees begin abnormal propolization behavior; and stinging occurs at 900 nA. We conclude that biological effects seen in bee colonies under a transmission line are primarily the result of electric shock from induced hive currents. This evaluation is based on the limited effects of E-field exposure in tunnels, the observed disturbance thresholds caused by shocks in tunnels, and the ability of hives exposed under a transmission line to source currents 100-1,000 times the shock thresholds.

  3. To observe the intensity of the inflammatory reaction caused by neonatal urine and meconium on the intestinal wall of rats in order to understand etiology of intestinal damage in gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Samala, Devdas S.; Parelkar, Sandesh V.; Sanghvi, Beejal V.; Vageriya, Natasha L.; Paradkar, Bhupesh A.; Kandalkar, Bhuvaneshwari M.; Sathe, Pragati A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this experimental study was to observe the intensity of the inflammatory reaction caused by neonatal urine and meconium on the intestinal wall of rats to better understand etiology of intestinal damage in gastroschisis. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 adult Wistar rats were used as experimental models to simulate the effect of exposed bowel in cases of gastroschisis. The peritoneal cavity of the rats was injected with substances which constitute human amniotic fluid to study the effect on the bowel. Sterile urine and meconium were obtained from newborn humans. The rats were divided into four groups according to the material to be injected. In Group I (Control group) 3 mL of distilled water was injected, in Group II (Urine group) 3 mL of neonatal urine was injected, in Group III (Meconium group) 5% meconium suspension was injected, while in Group IV, a combination of 5% meconium suspension and urine was injected. A total of 3mL solution was injected into the right inferior quadrant twice a day for 5 days. The animals were sacrificed on the 6th day by a high dose of thiopentone sodium. A segment of small bowel specimen was excised, fixed in paraffin, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis for determination of the degree of inflammatory reaction in the intestinal wall. All pathology specimens were studied by the same pathologist. Results: The maximum bowel damage was seen in Group II (Urine group) in the form of serositis, severe enteritis, parietal necrosis, and peeling. A lesser degree of damage was observed in Group III (Meconium group) as mild enteritis (mild lymphoid hyperplasia). The least damage was seen in Group IV (Combination of meconium and urine) and Group I (Control group). Conclusion: The intraabdominal injection of neonatal human urine produces significant inflammatory reactions in the intestinal wall of rats. PMID:24604977

  4. Portable intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, Elliott P.; Camarata, Matthew A.

    2012-07-01

    A limitation of the current generation of long baseline optical interferometers is the need to make the light interfere prior to detection. This is unlike the radio regime where signals can be recorded fast enough to use electronics to accomplish the same result. This paper describes a modern optical intensity interferometer based on electronics with picosecond timing resolution. The instrument will allow for portable optical interferometry with much larger baselines than currently possible by using existing large telescopes. With modern electronics, the limiting magnitude of the technique at a 4-m aperture size becomes competitive with some amplitude-based interferometers. The instrumentation will permit a wireless mode of operation with GPS clocking technology, extending the work to extremely large baselines. We discuss the basic observing strategy, a planned observational program at the Lowell Observatory 1.8-m and 1.0-m telescopes, and the science that can realistically be done with this instrumentation.

  5. Intense Magnetism in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.

    2002-05-01

    Observations of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars have provided strong evidence for a class of neutron stars with magnetic fields exceeding 1015 G. This talk will overview the excellent prospects for generating such intense fields in a core-collapse supernova, with a focus on the violent convective motions believed to occur both inside and outside the neutrinosphere of the forming neutron star. I will also examine the effects of late fallback, and the role of (electron-type) neutrinos in aiding buoyant motions of the magnetic field. The case will be made that the SGRs and AXPs are distinguished from classical radio pulsars by a very rapid initial rotation of the neutron star.

  6. Intensive Versus Non-Intensive Arabic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Sami A.

    This paper investigates the difference in achievement among 20 University of Utah students of modern standard Arabic. One group of 11 students followed an intensive eight-week summer course, and a second group of nine students studied the same course during a regular academic year. Also reported on is the correlation between achievement and…

  7. Intensity Frontier Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kettell S.; Rameika, R.; Tshirhart, B.

    2013-09-24

    The fundamental origin of flavor in the Standard Model (SM) remains a mystery. Despite the roughly eighty years since Rabi asked “Who ordered that?” upon learning of the discovery of the muon, we have not understood the reason that there are three generations or, more recently, why the quark and neutrino mixing matrices and masses are so different. The solution to the flavor problem would give profound insights into physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and tell us about the couplings and the mass scale at which the next level of insight can be found. The SM fails to explain all observed phenomena: new interactions and yet unseen particles must exist. They may manifest themselves by causing SM reactions to differ from often very precise predictions. The Intensity Frontier (1) explores these fundamental questions by searching for new physics in extremely rare processes or those forbidden in the SM. This often requires massive and/or extremely finely tuned detectors.

  8. Intensive Care, Intense Conflict: A Balanced Approach.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Erin Talati; Kolaitis, Irini N

    2015-01-01

    Caring for a child in a pediatric intensive care unit is emotionally and physically challenging and often leads to conflict. Skilled mediators may not always be available to aid in conflict resolution. Careproviders at all levels of training are responsible for managing difficult conversations with families and can often prevent escalation of conflict. Bioethics mediators have acknowledged the important contribution of mediation training in improving clinicians' skills in conflict management. Familiarizing careproviders with basic mediation techniques is an important step towards preventing escalation of conflict. While training in effective communication is crucial, a sense of fairness and justice that may only come with the introduction of a skilled, neutral third party is equally important. For intense conflict, we advocate for early recognition, comfort, and preparedness through training of clinicians in de-escalation and optimal communication, along with the use of more formally trained third-party mediators, as required.

  9. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  10. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-02-06

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  11. Intensity Biased PSP Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.; Amer, Tahani R.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The current pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique assumes a linear relationship (Stern-Volmer Equation) between intensity ratio (I(sub o)/I) and pressure ratio (P/P(sub o)) over a wide range of pressures (vacuum to ambient or higher). Although this may be valid for some PSPs, in most PSPs the relationship is nonlinear, particularly at low pressures (less than 0.2 psia when the oxygen level is low). This non-linearity can be attributed to variations in the oxygen quenching (de-activation) rates (which otherwise is assumed constant) at these pressures. Other studies suggest that some paints also have non-linear calibrations at high pressures; because of heterogeneous (non-uniform) oxygen diffusion and quenching. Moreover, pressure sensitive paints require correction for the output intensity due to light intensity variation, paint coating variation, model dynamics, wind-off reference pressure variation, and temperature sensitivity. Therefore to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to these causes, an insitu intensity correction method was developed. A non-oxygen quenched paint (which provides a constant intensity at all pressures, called non-pressure sensitive paint, NPSP) was used for the reference intensity (I(sub NPSP) with respect to which all the PSP intensities (I) were measured. The results of this study show that in order to fully reap the benefits of this technique, a totally oxygen impermeable NPSP must be available.

  12. Intensity Biased PSP Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.; Amer, Tahani R.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The current pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique assumes a linear relationship (Stern-Volmer Equation) between intensity ratio (I(sub 0)/I) and pressure ratio (P/P(sub 0)) over a wide range of pressures (vacuum to ambient or higher). Although this may be valid for some PSPs, in most PSPs the relationship is nonlinear, particularly at low pressures (less than 0.2 psia when the oxygen level is low). This non-linearity can be attributed to variations in the oxygen quenching (de-activation) rates (which otherwise is assumed constant) at these pressures. Other studies suggest that some paints also have non-linear calibrations at high pressures; because of heterogeneous (non-uniform) oxygen diffusion and c quenching. Moreover, pressure sensitive paints require correction for the output intensity due to light intensity variation, paint coating variation, model dynamics, wind-off reference pressure variation, and temperature sensitivity. Therefore to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to these causes, an in- situ intensity correction method was developed. A non-oxygen quenched paint (which provides a constant intensity at all pressures, called non-pressure sensitive paint, NPSP) was used for the reference intensity (I(sub NPSP)) with respect to which all the PSP intensities (I) were measured. The results of this study show that in order to fully reap the benefits of this technique, a totally oxygen impermeable NPSP must be available.

  13. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  14. Hurricane intensity and eyewall replacement.

    PubMed

    Houze, Robert A; Chen, Shuyi S; Smull, Bradley F; Lee, Wen-Chau; Bell, Michael M

    2007-03-01

    Observations made during the historic 2005 hurricane season document a case of "eyewall replacement." Clouds outside the hurricane eyewall coalesce to form a new eyewall at a greater radius from the storm center, and the old eyewall dies. The winds in the new eyewall are initially weaker than those in the original eyewall, but as the new eyewall contracts, the storm reintensifies. Understanding this replacement mechanism is vital to forecasting variations in hurricane intensity. Processes in the "moat" region between the new and old eyewall have been particularly unclear. Aircraft data now show that the moat becomes dynamically similar to the eye and thus is converted into a region inimical to survival of the inner eyewall. We suggest that targeting aircraft to key parts of the storm to gain crucial input to high-resolution numerical models can lead to improvements in forecasting hurricane intensity.

  15. Intense ion beams accelerated by ultra-intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, T. E.; Gauthier, J. C.; Vehn, J. Meyer-Ter; Allen, M.; Audebert, P.; Blazevic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, M.; Karsch, S.; Pukhov, A.; Schlegel, T.

    2002-04-01

    The discovery of intense ion beams off solid targets irradiated by ultra-intense laser pulses has become the subject of extensive international interest. These highly collimated, energetic beams of protons and heavy ions are strongly depending on the laser parameters as well as on the properties of the irradiated targets. Therefore we have studied the influence of the target conditions on laser-accelerated ion beams generated by multi-terawatt lasers. The experiments were performed using the 100 TW laser facility at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Laser Intense (LULI). The targets were irradiated by pulses up to 5×1019 W/cm2 (~300 fs,λ=1.05 μm) at normal incidence. A strong dependence on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and purity was observed. The plasma density on the front and rear surface was determined by laser interferometry. We characterized the ion beam by means of magnetic spectrometers, radiochromic film, nuclear activation and Thompson parabolas. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was confirmed in agreement with predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Finally shaping of the ion beam has been demonstrated by the appropriate tailoring of the target. .

  16. An intense traveling airglow front in the upper mesosphere-lower thermosphere with characteristics of a bore observed over Alice Springs, Australia, during a strong 2 day wave episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Hecht, J. H.; Gelinas, L. J.; Hickey, M. P.; Reid, I. M.

    2012-11-01

    The Aerospace Corporation's Nightglow Imager observed a large step function change in airglow in the form of a traveling front in the OH Meinel (OHM) and O2atmospheric (O2A) airglow emissions over Alice Springs, Australia, on 2 February 2003. The front exhibited nearly a factor of 2 stepwise increase in the OHM brightness and a stepwise decrease in the O2A brightness. There was significant (˜25 K) cooling behind the airglow fronts. The OHM airglow brightness behind the front was among the brightest for Alice Springs that we have measured in 7 years of observations. The event was associated with a strong phase-locked 2 day wave (PL/TDW). We have analyzed the wave trapping conditions for the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere using a combination of data and empirical models and found that the airglow layers were located in a region of ducting. The PL/TDW-disturbed wind profile was effective in supporting a high degree of ducting, whereas without the PL/TDW the ducting was minimal or nonexistent. The change in brightness in each layer was associated with a strong leading disturbance followed by a train of weak barely visible waves. In OHM the leading disturbance was an isolated disturbance resembling a solitary wave. The characteristics of the wave train suggest an undular bore with some turbulent dissipation at the leading edge.

  17. Photoelectric effect at ultrahigh intensities.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, A A; Bobashev, S V; Feigl, T; Tiedtke, K; Wabnitz, H; Richter, M

    2007-11-23

    In the spectral range of the extreme ultraviolet at a wavelength of 13.3 nm, we have studied the photoionization of xenon at ultrahigh intensities. For our ion mass-to-charge spectroscopy experiments, irradiance levels from 10(12) to 10(16) W cm(-2) were achieved at the new free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH by strong beam focusing with the aid of a spherical multilayer mirror. Ion charges up to Xe21+ were observed and investigated as a function of irradiance. Our surprising results are discussed in terms of a perturbative and nonperturbative description.

  18. Photoelectric Effect at Ultrahigh Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, A. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Feigl, T.; Tiedtke, K.; Wabnitz, H.; Richter, M.

    2007-11-23

    In the spectral range of the extreme ultraviolet at a wavelength of 13.3 nm, we have studied the photoionization of xenon at ultrahigh intensities. For our ion mass-to-charge spectroscopy experiments, irradiance levels from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2} were achieved at the new free-electron laser in Hamburg FLASH by strong beam focusing with the aid of a spherical multilayer mirror. Ion charges up to Xe{sup 21+} were observed and investigated as a function of irradiance. Our surprising results are discussed in terms of a perturbative and nonperturbative description.

  19. Strongly intensive quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, M. I.; Gazdzicki, M.

    2011-07-15

    Analysis of fluctuations of hadron production properties in collisions of relativistic particles profits from use of measurable intensive quantities which are independent of system size variations. The first family of such quantities was proposed in 1992; another is introduced in this paper. Furthermore we present a proof of independence of volume fluctuations for quantities from both families within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. These quantities are referred to as strongly intensive ones. Influence of conservation laws and resonance decays is also discussed.

  20. Measurement of muon intensity by Cerenkov method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Li, G. J.; Bai, G. Z.; Liu, J. G.; Geng, Q. X.; Ling, J.

    1985-01-01

    Optical detection is an important technique in studies and observations of air showers, muons and relevant phenomena. The muon intensity is measured in a proper energy range and to study some problems about Cerenkov radiation of cosmic rays are studied, by a muon-telescope operated with Cerenkov detector. It is found that the measured muon intensity agrees with the integral energy spectrum of cosmic ray muons.

  1. Binge Drinking Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Marissa B.; Kanny, Dafna; Brewer, Robert D.; Naimi, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Binge drinking (≥4 drinks for women; ≥5 drinks for men, per occasion) is responsible for more than half of the estimated 80,000 U.S. deaths annually and three-quarters of the $223.5 billion in costs in 2006. Binge drinking prevalence is assessed more commonly than binge drinking intensity (i.e., number of drinks consumed per binge episode). Risk of binge drinking–related harm increases with intensity, and thus it is important to monitor. The largest number of drinks consumed is assessed in health surveys, but its usefulness for assessing binge intensity is unknown. Purpose To assess the agreement between two potential measures of binge drinking intensity: the largest number of drinks consumed by binge drinkers (maximum-drinks) and the total number of drinks consumed during their most recent binge episode (drinks-per-binge). Methods Data were analyzed from 7909 adult binge drinkers from 14 states responding to the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) binge drinking module. Mean and median drinks-per-binge from that module were compared to mean and median maximum-drinks. Analyses were conducted in 2010–2011. Results Mean (8.2) and median (5.9) maximum-drinks were strongly correlated with mean (7.4) and median (5.4) drinks-per-binge (r=0.57). These measures were also strongly correlated across most sociodemographic and drinking categories overall and within states. Conclusions The maximum-drinks consumed by binge drinkers is a practical method for assessing binge drinking intensity and thus can be used to plan and evaluate Community Guide–recommended strategies for preventing binge drinking (e.g., increasing the price of alcoholic beverages and regulating alcohol outlet density). PMID:22608381

  2. HI Intensity Mapping with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Sazy, M.-A.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Battye, R. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Chen, T.; Dickinson, C.; Harper, S.; Maffei, B.; Olivari, L. C.; Wilkinsondagger, P. N.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the detectability of large-scale HI intensity fluctuations using the FAST telescope. We present forecasts for the accuracy of measuring the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and constraining the properties of dark energy. The FAST 19-beam L-band receivers (1.05-1.45 GHz) can provide constraints on the matter power spectrum and dark energy equation of state parameters (w0,wa) that are comparable to the BINGO and CHIME experiments. For one year of integration time we find that the optimal survey area is 6000 deg2. However, observing with larger frequency coverage at higher redshift (0.95-1.35 GHz) improves the projected errorbars on the HI power spectrum by more than 2 σ confidence level. The combined constraints from FAST, CHIME, BINGO and Planck CMB observations can provide reliable, stringent constraints on the dark energy equation of state.

  3. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  4. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  5. Intense ion beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, Jr., Stanley; Sudan, Ravindra N.

    1977-08-30

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

  6. Water intensity of transportation.

    PubMed

    King, Carey W; Webber, Michael E

    2008-11-01

    As the need for alternative transportation fuels increases, it is important to understand the many effects of introducing fuels based upon feedstocks other than petroleum. Water intensity in "gallons of water per mile traveled" is one method to measure these effects on the consumer level. In this paper we investigate the water intensity for light duty vehicle (LDV) travel using selected fuels based upon petroleum, natural gas, unconventional fossil fuels, hydrogen, electricity, and two biofuels (ethanol from corn and biodiesel from soy). Fuels more directly derived from fossil fuels are less water intensive than those derived either indirectly from fossil fuels (e.g., through electricity generation) or directly from biomass. The lowest water consumptive (<0.15 gal H20/mile) and withdrawal (<1 gal H2O/mile) rates are for LDVs using conventional petroleum-based gasoline and diesel, nonirrigated biofuels, hydrogen derived from methane or electrolysis via nonthermal renewable electricity, and electricity derived from nonthermal renewable sources. LDVs running on electricity and hydrogen derived from the aggregate U.S. grid (heavily based upon fossil fuel and nuclear steam-electric power generation) withdraw 5-20 times and consume nearly 2-5 times more water than by using petroleum gasoline. The water intensities (gal H20/mile) of LDVs operating on biofuels derived from crops irrigated in the United States at average rates is 28 and 36 for corn ethanol (E85) for consumption and withdrawal, respectively. For soy-derived biodiesel the average consumption and withdrawal rates are 8 and 10 gal H2O/mile. PMID:19031873

  7. Measurement of Itch Intensity.

    PubMed

    Reich, Adam; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of itch intensity is essential to properly evaluate pruritic disease severity, to understand the patients' needs and burden, and especially to assess treatment efficacy, particularly in clinical trials. However, measurement of itch remains a challenge, as, per definition, it is a subjective sensation and assessment of this symptom represents significant difficulty. Intensity of itch must be considered in relation to its duration, localization, course of symptoms, presence and type of scratch lesions, response to antipruritic treatment, and quality of life impairment. Importantly, perception of itch may also be confounded by different cofactors including but not limited to patient general condition and other coexisting ailments. In the current chapter we characterize the major methods of itch assessments that are used in daily clinical life and as research tools. Different methods of itch assessment have been developed; however, so far none is without limitations and any data on itch intensity should always be interpreted with caution. Despite these limitations, it is strongly recommended to implement itch measurement tools in routine daily practice, as it would help in proper assessment of patient clinical status. In order to improve evaluation of itch in research studies, it is recommended to use at least two independent methods, as such an approach should increase the validity of achieved results. PMID:27578068

  8. Intensity and Variability of Geomagnetic Time Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, B. J.; Connors, M. G.; Reiter, K.; Singleton, M.

    2015-12-01

    Time derivatives of the geomagnetic field are studied for more than a decade of observations at more than a dozen sites in northern Canada. In the auroral zone the derivative magnitude observed by 5-second fluxgate magnetometers often has a lognormal distribution. Parameter estimates corresponding to intensity (log-mean) and variability (log-variance) are nearly independent and have very different statistical properties. Variability is essentially a random variable, while intensity autocorrelation times are on the order of tens of minutes. Observed intensities are highly correlated with AE, and increase with solar wind speed and the magnitude of Bz<0. Both variability and intensity have local-time maxima before and after midnight, but with different patterns that combine to produce a larger post-midnight peak. Post-midnight variability is almost completely determined by latitude, with largest values at subauroral sites and smallest values in the polar cap. Intensity depends on latitude, but also has a site-specific element which may be due to local conductivity.

  9. Intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Kooy, H M; Grassberger, C

    2015-07-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed "pencil beams" of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak-the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range-combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose "painting" within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the highest level of

  10. High intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    ter Haar, G

    2001-03-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a technique that was first investigated in the 1940s as a method of destroying selective regions within the brain in neuro-surgical An ultrasound beam can be brought to a tight focus at a distance from its source, and if sufficient energy is concentrated within the focus, the cells lying within this focal volume are killed, whereas those lying elsewhere are spared. This is a noninvasive method of producing selective and trackless tissue destruction in deep seated targets in the body, without damage to overlying tissues. This field, known both as HIFU and focused ultrasound surgery (FUS), is reviewed in this article.

  11. Intensive Care Unit Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Monks, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients who become psychotic in intensive care units are usually suffering from delirium. Underlying causes of delirium such as anxiety, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation and overload, immobilization, an unfamiliar environment and pain, are often preventable or correctable. Early detection, investigation and treatment may prevent significant mortality and morbidity. The patient/physician relationship is one of the keystones of therapy. More severe cases may require psychopharmacological measures. The psychotic episode is quite distressing to the patient and family; an educative and supportive approach by the family physician may be quite helpful in patient rehabilitation. PMID:21279016

  12. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose “painting” within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the

  13. [Safety of intensive sweeteners].

    PubMed

    Lugasi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays low calorie or intesive sweeteners are getting more and more popular. These sweeteners can be placed to the market and used as food additives according to the recent EU legislation. In the meantime news are coming out one after the other stating that many of these artificial intensive sweeteners can cause cancer - the highest risk has been attributed to aspartam. Low calorie sweeteners, just like all the other additives can be authorized after strickt risk assessment procedure according to the recent food law. Only after the additive has gone through these procedure can be placed to the list of food additives, which contains not only the range of food these additives can be used, but also the recommended highest amount of daily consumption. European Food Safety Authority considering the latest scientific examination results, evaluates regularly the safety of sweeteners authorized earlier. Until now there is no evidence found to question the safety of the authorized intensive sweeteners. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(Suppl. 1), 14-28. PMID:27088715

  14. French intensive truck garden

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T D

    1983-01-01

    The French Intensive approach to truck gardening has the potential to provide substantially higher yields and lower per acre costs than do conventional farming techniques. It was the intent of this grant to show that there is the potential to accomplish the gains that the French Intensive method has to offer. It is obvious that locally grown food can greatly reduce transportation energy costs but when there is the consideration of higher efficiencies there will also be energy cost reductions due to lower fertilizer and pesticide useage. As with any farming technique, there is a substantial time interval for complete soil recovery after there have been made substantial soil modifications. There were major crop improvements even though there was such a short time since the soil had been greatly disturbed. It was also the intent of this grant to accomplish two other major objectives: first, the garden was managed under organic techniques which meant that there were no chemical fertilizers or synthetic pesticides to be used. Second, the garden was constructed so that a handicapped person in a wheelchair could manage and have a higher degree of self sufficiency with the garden. As an overall result, I would say that the garden has taken the first step of success and each year should become better.

  15. High intensity proton synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, M. K.

    1986-10-01

    Strong initiatives are being pursued in a number of countries for the construction of ``kaon factory'' synchrotrons capable of producing 100 times more intense proton beams than those available now from machines such as the Brookhaven AGS and CERN PS. Such machines would yield equivalent increases in the fluxes of secondary particles (kaons, pions, muons, antiprotons, hyperons and neutrinos of all varieties)—or cleaner beams for a smaller increase in flux—opening new avenues to various fundamental questions in both particle and nuclear physics. Major areas of investigation would be rare decay modes, CP violation, meson and hadron spectroscopy, antinucleon interactions, neutrino scattering and oscillations, and hypernuclear properties. Experience with the pion factories has already shown how high beam intensities make it possible to explore the ``precision frontier'' with results complementary to those achievable at the ``energy frontier''. This paper will describe proposals for upgrading and AGS and for building kaon factories in Canada, Europe, Japan and the United States, emphasizing the novel aspects of accelerator design required to achieve the desired performance (typically 100 μA at 30 GeV).

  16. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  17. Statistical modeling of tornado intensity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotzek, Nikolai; Grieser, Jürgen; Brooks, Harold E.

    We address the issue to determine an appropriate general functional shape of observed tornado intensity distributions. Recently, it was suggested that in the limit of long and large tornado records, exponential distributions over all positive Fujita or TORRO scale classes would result. Yet, our analysis shows that even for large databases observations contradict the validity of exponential distributions for weak (F0) and violent (F5) tornadoes. We show that observed tornado intensities can be much better described by Weibull distributions, for which an exponential remains a special case. Weibull fits in either v or F scale reproduce the observations significantly better than exponentials. In addition, we suggest to apply the original definition of negative intensity scales down to F-2 and T-4 (corresponding to v=0 m s -1) at least for climatological analyses. Weibull distributions allow for an improved risk assessment of violent tornadoes up to F6, and better estimates of total tornado occurrence, degree of underreporting and existence of subcritical tornadic circulations below damaging intensity. Therefore, our results are relevant for climatologists and risk assessment managers alike.

  18. Humidification in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Joynt, G M; Lipman, J

    1994-03-01

    The normal physiological function of the upper respiratory tract is to filter and humidify inspired air. In intensive care units the upper respiratory tract is frequently bypassed. The importance of humidifying and warming the dry, cold, piped gas is well documented. The results of lack of adequate humidification include endotracheal tube obstruction, impairment of the mucociliary elevator and altered pulmonary function. Optimal levels of humidification are as yet undefined and useful clinical markers of adequate humidification are not available. As a result there is a bewildering array of humidification devices available at present, the most recent of which are heat and moisture exchangers with or without specific filtration properties. This article reviews available data on these humidification devices, and recommends an approach to their appropriate use, based on the probable physiological needs of individual patients.

  19. Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Butt, Ali R; Ma, Xiaosong

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

  20. STS-9 Shuttle grow - Ram angle effect and absolute intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    Visible imagery from Space Shuttle mission STS-9 (Spacelab 1) has been analyzed for the ram angle effect and the absolute intensity of glow. The data are compared with earlier measurements and the anomalous high intensities at large ram angles are confirmed. Absolute intensities of the ram glow on the shuttle tile, at 6563 A, are observed to be about 20 times more intense than those measured on the AE-E spacecraft. Implications of these observations for an existing theory of glow involving NO2 are presented.

  1. [Coagulation disorders in the intensive care station].

    PubMed

    Hart, C; Spannagl, M

    2014-05-01

    Coagulation disorders are frequently encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU) and are challenging due to a variety of potential etiologies. Critically ill patients with coagulation abnormalities may present with an increased risk of bleeding, show coagulation activation resulting in thromboembolism, or have no specific symptoms. Hemostatic abnormalities observed in ICU patients range from isolated thrombocytopenia or prolonged global clotting tests to complex and life-threatening coagulation defects. Successful management of coagulation disorders requires prompt and accurate identification of the underlying cause. This review describes the most frequently occurring diagnoses found in intensive care patients with thrombocytopenia and coagulation test abnormalities and summarizes appropriate diagnostic interventions and current approaches to differential diagnosis.

  2. Extremely Intense Magnetospheric Substorms : External Triggering? Preconditioning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Echer, Ezequiel; Hajra, Rajkumar

    2016-07-01

    We study particularly intense substorms using a variety of near-Earth spacecraft data and ground observations. We will relate the solar cycle dependences of events, determine whether the supersubstorms are externally or internally triggered, and their relationship to other factors such as magnetospheric preconditioning. If time permits, we will explore the details of the events and whether they are similar to regular (Akasofu, 1964) substorms or not. These intense substorms are an important feature of space weather since they may be responsible for power outages.

  3. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  4. Integrating Models and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Womebarger, Amy

    2011-01-01

    For the past ten years, the coronal loops community has held bi-annual workshops to discuss the analysis of coronal loop observations and the latest efforts to model the loop structures. During this time, several heating scenarios have been proposed to explain loop observations. These heating scenarios rely on different heating frequencies, locations, and durations, as well as different loop sub-structure. Often the scenarios are developed to explain an observation, hence all heating scenarios match some observational criteria. The key to discriminating between the competing heating scenarios is to first identify the distinguishing observables. For instance, both effectively steady and nanoflare-heating scenarios can produce quasi-steady intensities. Observing quasi-steady intensities, then, does not help determine which heating scenario is most likely. These heating scenarios may, however, predict different velocities or different emission measure distributions. In this talk, I will discuss a few of the expected observations for some simple heating scenarios. I will ask the modeling community to calculate similar observations for the different heating scenarios to generate a standard list of expected observations. After the community develops this list, comparisons with actual loop observations can then distinguish the most likely heating scenario.

  5. Intensive psychotherapy of schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Keats, C. J.; McGlashan, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    The literature on strategies of investigative psychotherapy of schizophrenia is selectively reviewed, and a case history is presented. The format is modelled on the authors' research technique of contrasting theory with practice. While long-term observation of single cases does not address cause and effect, descriptions of cases with a variety of known outcomes can help to build a typology of treatment processes. PMID:4049907

  6. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    PubMed

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width. PMID:25229242

  7. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    PubMed

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width.

  8. Tornado Intensity Estimated from Damage Path Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, James B.; Jagger, Thomas H.; Elsner, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s−1 for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width. PMID:25229242

  9. Maternal Intensive Care’: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Van Parys, A.S.; Verstraelen, H.; Roelens, K.; Temmerman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this systematic literature review is to review current scientific knowledge on the definition of and the indications for maternal/obstetric intensive care (MIC). Methods: We conducted a extensive search in OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, CINHAL and CEBAM using the keywords: maternal/obstetric intensive care, subacute care, intermediate care, postacute care, critical care, sub intensive care, progressive patient care, postnatal care, perinatal care, obstetrical nursing, neonatology, pregnancy, maternal mortality/morbidity and pregnancy complication. A total of 180 articles and one guideline were identified and supplemented by a hand search. After title, abstract and full text evaluation, the articles and guideline were subjected to critical appraisal. Results: Out of 180 potentially relevant articles, we identified 44 eligible articles of which 14 relevant MIC-articles of relatively good quality were selected. The concept ‘maternal intensive care’ was not found elsewhere, “high-dependency care” and “obstetrical intermediate care” appeared to be best comparable to what is understood as a MIC-service in Belgium. This thorough literature search resulted in a limited amount of scientific literature, with most studies retrospective observational tertiary centre based. No clear definition and admission criteria for maternal intensive care were found. Conclusion: This systematic literature review revealed that 1) there is no standard definition of maternal intensive care and 2) that admission criteria to a MIC unit differ widely. Further research is needed to create an evidence-based triage system to help clinicians attribute women to the appropriate level of care and thus stimulate an efficient utilization of maternal/obstetric intensive care services. PMID:25013706

  10. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin; Connors, Alanna; Freeman, Peter E.; Zezas, Andreas E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed

    2010-08-10

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper

  11. Voyager 2 Observes Energetic Electrons

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Voyager 2 observations of energetic electrons. Voyager 2 detected a dramatic drop of the flux of electrons as it left the sector region. The intense flux came back as soon ...

  12. Evaluating Intensity Prediction Equations for Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Sum; Schorlemmer, Danijel

    2016-04-01

    The macroseismic intensity has been, and will likely continue to be used for purposes such as seismic hazard assessment, loss estimation and communication to the public. Recently, there have been numerous validation studies for ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), while intensity prediction equations (IPEs) have received less attention. We attempted to extend the validation study to IPEs. We evaluated a number of Italian IPEs and one global IPE using intensity observations in Italy since 2002, derived from multiple datasets. The prediction and observations were compared using a simple metric of mean absolute error, as well as conventional residual analysis. IPEs with a physically meaningful functional form were found to perform better. Some IPEs derived from a large amount of data were not found to perform better than those derived from a moderate amount of data. A global IPE was found to have comparable performance with the best indigenous model, suggesting that the regional difference of intensity attenuation may not be significant. These findings could guide the development of IPEs in the future.

  13. Effect of noise intensity and illumination intensity on visual performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Chiuan

    2014-10-01

    The results of Experiment 1 indicated that noise and illumination intensity have a significant effect on character identification performance, which was better at 30 dBA than at 60 and 90 dBA, and better at 500 and 800 lux than at 200 lux. However, the interaction of noise and illumination intensity did not significantly affect visual performance. The results of Experiment 2 indicated that noise and illumination intensity also had a significant effect on reading comprehension performance, which was better at 30 dBA than at 60 and 90 dBA, and better at 500 lux than at 200 and 800 lux. Furthermore, reading comprehension performance was better at 500 lux lighting and 30 dBA noise than with 800 lux and 90 dBA. High noise intensity impaired visual performance, and visual performance at normal illumination intensity was better than at other illumination intensities. The interaction of noise and illumination had a significant effect on reading comprehension. These results indicate that noise intensity lower than 30 dBA and illumination intensity approximately 500 lux might be the optimal conditions for visual work.

  14. Effect of noise intensity and illumination intensity on visual performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Chiuan

    2014-10-01

    The results of Experiment 1 indicated that noise and illumination intensity have a significant effect on character identification performance, which was better at 30 dBA than at 60 and 90 dBA, and better at 500 and 800 lux than at 200 lux. However, the interaction of noise and illumination intensity did not significantly affect visual performance. The results of Experiment 2 indicated that noise and illumination intensity also had a significant effect on reading comprehension performance, which was better at 30 dBA than at 60 and 90 dBA, and better at 500 lux than at 200 and 800 lux. Furthermore, reading comprehension performance was better at 500 lux lighting and 30 dBA noise than with 800 lux and 90 dBA. High noise intensity impaired visual performance, and visual performance at normal illumination intensity was better than at other illumination intensities. The interaction of noise and illumination had a significant effect on reading comprehension. These results indicate that noise intensity lower than 30 dBA and illumination intensity approximately 500 lux might be the optimal conditions for visual work. PMID:25153619

  15. Intense Loyalty in Organizations: A Case Study of College Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Peter; Adler, Patricia A.

    1988-01-01

    Using data gathered during a five-year participant-observation study of a major college basketball program, this paper examines the intense form of organizational loyalty associated with college athletics. Finds five essential ingredients for developing intense organizational loyalty: documentation, identification, commitment, integration, and…

  16. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities. PMID:25192094

  17. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities.

  18. Catfish production using intensive aeration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the last 3 years, researchers at UAPB and NWAC have been monitoring and verifying production yields in intensively aerated catfish ponds with aeration rates greater than 6 hp/acre. We now have three years of data on commercial catfish production in intensively aerated ponds. With stocking densi...

  19. Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11

    In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

  20. Cosmic Ray Helium Intensities over the Solar Cycle from ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeNolfo, G. A.; Yanasak, N. E.; Binns, W. R.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; George, J. S.; Hink. P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Lave, K.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Ogliore, R.; Stone, E. C.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenback, M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of cosmic-ray helium energy spectra provide important constraints on cosmic ray origin and propagation. However, helium intensities measured at Earth are affected by solar modulation, especially below several GeV/nucleon. Observations of helium intensities over a solar cycle are important for understanding how solar modulation affects galactic cosmic ray intensities and for separating the contributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays. The Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on ACE has been measuring cosmic ray isotopes, including helium, since 1997 with high statistical precision. We present helium elemental intensities between approx. 10 to approx. 100 MeV/nucleon from the Solar Isotope Spectrometer (SIS) and CRIS observations over a solar cycle and compare these results with the observations from other satellite and balloon-borne instruments, and with GCR transport and solar modulation models.

  1. Evaluating the intensity of U.S. earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, R.; Stover, C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of seismic shaking are objective. All observers can agree these are real occurences and not subjective speculation. Reliable intensity evaluations are based not on a single factor on any scale but on consistent combinations. 

  2. The Impact of Saharan Air Layer Dust on the Intensity and Intensity Change of Hurricane Earl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, G.; Boybeyi, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The study of tropical cyclone (TC) intensity and intensity change has become an increasingly important research topic, as the storms pose a significant threat to the lives and property along coastal regions, and maritime interests. The Saharan Air Layer (SAL) is an elevated layer of warm, dry, and dusty air that is formed by intense heating and strong winds over the Sahara desert. This dust, and hot and dry air moves across the Atlantic over the maritime layer. An emerging area of research is the role that the SAL has on the development and intensity of TCs in the North Atlantic tropical basin. In 2010, Hurricane Earl gave us a unique opportunity to study the effects of the SAL during the formative stages of the storm. Using the Weather and Forecasting Model with chemistry (WRF-Chem), this study investigated what the effect of SAL characteristics (thermodynamic and aerosol) had on Earl's intensity and intensity change. We concentrated on the direct and indirect radiative effects of the SAL aerosols, by utilizing the dust-only module in WRF-Chem and comparing results to observations, reanalysis, and a dust-free run. The results show that Earl did not appreciably intensify until it moved out from beneath the influence of the SAL, after which it evolved into a CAT 4 hurricane. This was due mainly to the shear associated with the SAL, but the dust radiative effects also contributed to the slow growth.

  3. Judging Pain Intensity in Children with Autism Undergoing Venepuncture: The Influence of Facial Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Rosemary L.; Nader, Rami; Craig, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    The biasing effect of pain sensitivity information and the impact of facial activity on observers' judgments of pain intensity of children with autism were examined. Observers received information that pain experience in children with autism is either the same as, more intense than, or less intense than children without autism. After viewing six…

  4. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Homma, K.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers. First we envision the laser-driven plasma accelerator may be able to extend the reach of the collider. For this approach to bear fruit, we need to develop the technology of high averaged power laser in addition to the high intensity. For this we mention that the latest research effort of ICAN is an encouraging sign. In addition to this, we now introduce the concept of the noncollider paradigm in exploring fundamental physics with high intensity (and large energy) lasers. One of the examples we mention is the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) far beyond TeV without large luminosity. If we relax or do not require the large luminosity necessary for colliders, but solely in ultrahigh energy frontier, we are still capable of exploring such a fundamental issue. Given such a high energetic particle source and high-intensity laser fields simultaneously, we expect to be able to access new aspects on the matter and the vacuum structure from fundamental physical point of views. LWFA naturally exploits the nonlinear optical effects in the plasma when it becomes of relativistic intensity. Normally nonlinear optical effects are discussed based upon polarization susceptibility of matter to external fields. We suggest application of this concept even to the vacuum structure as a new kind of order parameter to discuss vacuum-originating phenomena at semimacroscopic scales. This viewpoint unifies the following observables with the unprecedented experimental environment we envision; the dispersion relation of

  5. Intensities of Fundamental and Overtone Vibrational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2012-06-01

    We have measured and calculated vibrational XH-stretching overtone spectra (where X is C,N,O,S,..) for a range of molecules and hydrated complexes (e.g. water dimer). Spectroscopic studies of such systems are difficult because: vibrational overtone transitions have low intensities, species that exhibit intramolecular hydrogen bonding typically have low vapor pressures and hydrated complexes have small equilibrium constants. The use of coupled cluster theory including perturbative triples, CCSD(T) or CCSD(T)-F12, as well as a large augmented basis, aug-cc-pVTZ or VDZ-F12, is necessary to obtain calculated vibrational spectra of near experimental accuracy. We explain the interesting intensity patterns in terms of an anharmonic oscillator local mode model. The intensity ratio of the fundamental to first XH-stretching overtone covers a wide range. In the past decade, we have used this local mode model to explain observed spectra of both molecules and complexes. I will show recent results for amines and complexes with amines and will illustrate how the ratio of calculated to measured intensity can provide the room temperature equilibrium constant for formation of the binary complex, a quantity that is difficult to calculate accurately.

  6. Intense low energy positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, K.G.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    Intense positron beams are under development or being considered at several laboratories. Already today a few accelerator based high intensity, low brightness e{sup +} beams exist producing of the order of 10{sup 8} {minus} 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec. Several laboratories are aiming at high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams with intensities greater than 10{sup 9} e{sup +}/sec and current densities of the order of 10{sup 13} {minus} 10{sup 14} e{sup +} sec{sup {minus}} {sup 1}cm{sup {minus}2}. Intense e{sup +} beams can be realized in two ways (or in a combination thereof) either through a development of more efficient B{sup +} moderators or by increasing the available activity of B{sup +} particles. In this review we shall mainly concentrate on the latter approach. In atomic physics the main trust for these developments is to be able to measure differential and high energy cross-sections in e{sup +} collisions with atoms and molecules. Within solid state physics high intensity, high brightness e{sup +} beams are in demand in areas such as the re-emission e{sup +} microscope, two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation, low energy e{sup +} diffraction and other fields. Intense e{sup +} beams are also important for the development of positronium beams, as well as exotic experiments such as Bose condensation and Ps liquid studies.

  7. Intense laser propagation in sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Jennifer L.

    When a sufficiently energetic short laser pulse propagates through a medium it can generate an explosive increase in bandwidth leading to the creation of white light; this is known as supercontinuum generation (SCG). Although it is frequently referred to as a single process, SCG is actually the result of many different parallel and competing processes. In this work we investigate the contribution of the individual physical processes underlying the SCG effect, focusing specifically on Raman processes and plasma formation in sapphire. For our experiments we use an amplified Ti:sapphire laser system producing nearly transform limited 60 fs pulses at 800 nm. Typical pulse energies for the experiments are 1--3 muJ/pulse. Using a new experimental technique, the spectrally resolved interferometric double pump, we study the contribution of non-instantaneous Raman effects. We see two distinct Raman contributions in sapphire which are much stronger than indicated in previous work. One Raman process has a period of approximately 185 fs and is related to an available optical phonon; the second Raman process has a period of 20 fs and is related to defect states caused by an oxygen vacancy in the sapphire crystal. Data from the same experiment show that the SCG light is not phase stable at low excitation energies, but that the phase stability is restored and saturates with increasing laser intensity. In a separate experiment we investigate the dynamics of plasma formation using a pump-probe technique. We observe that in sapphire both the formation and the decay of the plasma occur over time scales much longer than predicted by current theory. The plasma rise time is ˜225 fs, while the decay time is ˜150 ps; we also observe that these values do not depend on input pulse energy. In addition to these experiments, we perform a numerical integration of the extended (3 + 1) dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation, which models the propagation of a short laser pulse through a

  8. Multipole expansions and intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard R.

    1984-02-01

    In the context of two-body bound-state systems subjected to a plane-wave electromagnetic field, it is shown that high field intensity introduces a distinction between long-wavelength approximation and electric dipole approximation. This distinction is gauge dependent, since it is absent in Coulomb gauge, whereas in "completed" gauges of Göppert-Mayer type the presence of high field intensity makes electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole terms of importance equal to electric dipole at long wavelengths. Another consequence of high field intensity is that multipole expansions lose their utility in view of the equivalent importance of a number of low-order multipole terms and the appearance of large-magnitude terms which defy multipole categorization. This loss of the multipole expansion is gauge independent. Also gauge independent is another related consequence of high field intensity, which is the intimate coupling of center-of-mass and relative coordinate motions in a two-body system.

  9. Intensity patterns in eastern Asia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evernden, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of the intensity patterns of earthquakes of E Asia indicates a strong regional pattern of attenuation parameter k and systematic correlation of this pattern with topography, P residuals, and level of seismicity as in the USA.-Author

  10. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  11. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  12. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  13. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  14. Data-Intensive Benchmarking Suite

    2008-11-26

    The Data-Intensive Benchmark Suite is a set of programs written for the study of data-or storage-intensive science and engineering problems, The benchmark sets cover: general graph searching (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce breadth-first search), genome sequence searching, HTTP request classification (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce), low-level data communication, and storage device micro-beachmarking

  15. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  16. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  17. Tropical Cyclone Intensity in Vertical Wind Shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Martin L. M.; Chan, Johnny C. L.

    2004-08-01

    The structure and intensity changes of tropical cyclones (TCs) in environmental vertical wind shear (VWS) are investigated in this study using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5). Triply nested domains of 36-, 12-, and 4-km resolution are used with fully explicit moisture physics in the 4-km domain. Idealized environments with easterly shears of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 m s-1 between 800 and 200 hPa are applied on an f plane. Under small values of VWS (2 and 4 m s-1), the TC intensities are similar to that of the control (CTRL; i.e., no VWS) after initial adjustments. The TCs under 6 and 8 m s-1 of VWS are not as intense, although they do not weaken during the simulation. On the other hand, the TC in 10 m s-1 of VWS weakened significantly.Given the same VWS, the TC intensity is also found to be sensitive to TC size. Experiments with TCs with a smaller radius of 15 m s-1 wind reveal that while the TC in 2 m s-1 of VWS remains as intense as the CTRL, the TC in the 4 m s-1 VWS case weakened significantly to a minimal hurricane by the end of the simulation. A VWS of 6 m s-1 is strong enough to cause dissipation of the TC in 72 h. These results indicate that the size of a TC has to be taken into account in determining the intensity change of a TC in VWS.In the 10 m s-1 VWS case, the average temperature over the lower half of the troposphere within 50 km from the TC surface center is higher than that of the CTRL throughout the simulation. Such a warming, though of a small magnitude, is also observed for a brief period in the upper half of the troposphere before the rapid weakening of the TC and is related to the asymmetry of temperature required for a tilt of the vortex axis. The evolution of the vortex tilt is found to be similar to the dry simulations in previous studies, with the midlevel center (σ = 0.525) located mainly in the southeast quadrant of the surface center. A tendency for

  18. Airglow Intensities and the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstang, R. H.

    1997-05-01

    Some time ago we reported (Bull AAS 27,1213,1995) on an analysis of a series of measurements of night sky brightness published by Walker (1988). Those measures were made at San Benito Mountain in California over a period of about 12 years. We have made minor improvements to our analysis and present our final results. We took each observed brightness measurement, and subtracted from it in turn our estimated contributions of light pollution, zodiacal light and faint star background. Allowances were made for nightly extinction coefficients. The remainder is the contribution of the airglow to the sky brightness. The airglow intensities, which are integrals over the B and V photometric bands, show good correlations with the Ottawa 10.7 cm solar flux intensities. We are performing a similar analysis on night sky brightnesses measured at Kitt Peak by Pilachowski and colleagues (PASP 101,707,1989) to strengthen our deduced correlations.

  19. Energetic particle pressure in intense ESP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-09-01

    We study three intense energetic storm particle (ESP) events in which the energetic particle pressure PEP exceeded both the pressure of the background thermal plasma Pth and the pressure of the magnetic field PB. The region upstream of the interplanetary shocks associated with these events was characterized by a depression of the magnetic field strength coincident with the increase of the energetic particle intensities and, when plasma measurements were available, a depleted solar wind density. The general feature of cosmic-ray mediated shocks such as the deceleration of the upstream background medium into which the shock propagates is generally observed. However, for those shocks where plasma parameters are available, pressure balance is not maintained either upstream of or across the shock, which may result from the fact that PEP is not included in the calculation of the shock parameters.

  20. Behavioral assessment for pediatric intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, M F; Bessman, C A; Parker, L H; Pearson, J E; Rogers, M C

    1979-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to analyze behaviors of staff and patients on a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). In the first study, behavioral observation procedures were employed to assess patient state, physical position, affect, verbal behaviors, visual attention and activity engagement, and staff verbal behavior. On the average, one-third of the patients were judged to be conscious and alert but markedly nonengaged with their environment. In the second study, a member of the hospital staff provided alert patients with individual activities to determine whether a simple environmental manipulation could positively affect behavior of children in intensive care. Employing a reversal design, the activity intervention was found to increase attention and engagement and positive affect, and to decrease inappropriate behavior. Both studies demonstrate that behavioral assessment procedures can provide an empirical basis for designing PICU routines affecting children's psychosocial status, and, thus, complement current procedures designed to provide quality medical care.

  1. Dynamics of intense upstream ion events

    SciTech Connect

    Wibberenz, G.; Zoellich, F.; Fischer, H.M.; Keppler, E.

    1985-01-01

    We study temporal structures, energy spectra, and spatial gradients of 25--70 keV protons during four intense upstream ion events observed on December 3, 1977, by the medium-energy particle telescope (KED) on ISEE 2. The strong role of the bow shock connection time in controlling the absolute intensity and spectral shape of the upstream ions is confirmed. The path along which the convected magnetic field is carried on the bow shock surface has no observable influence. During the plateau phases, we determine a field-aligned gradient pointing toward the bow shock with an e-folding distance L = 6.5 +- 1.5 R/sub E/ for roughly-equal30 keV protons. The combination with anisotropy data leads to a direct determination of the mean free path lambda/sub parallel/ = 2.6 +- 0.6 R/sub E/. A gradient perpendicular to the magnetic field points toward the nose of the bow shock with a north-south component of about 6%/R/sub E/. Its conversion to a spatial scale allows to estimate the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. We conclude that lateral diffusion is not the main escape mechanism which determines the exponential energy spectrum. The control of the acceleration efficiency by local characteristics of the bow shock is suggested by various observations: (1) fluctuations on a temporal scale of about 20 min and with a peak-to-peak amplitude of about 50% superimposed on the plateau phases; (2) structured onsets of events during smoothly improving connection conditions; (3) strong intensity modulation during marginal acceleration conditions when the connection time is of the order 10 to 12 min; (4) convection of differently populated field lines across the observer.

  2. Shelf response to intense offshore wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoll, Manel; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Espino, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Cross and along-shelf winds drive cross-shelf transport that promotes the exchange of tracers and nutrients to the open sea. The shelf response to cross-shelf winds is studied in the north shelf of the Ebro Delta (Mediterranean Sea), where those winds are prevalent and intense. Offshore winds in the region exhibit strong intensities (wind stress larger than 0.8 Pa) during winter and fall. The monthly average flow observed in a 1 year current meter record at 43.5 m was polarized following the isobaths with the along-shelf variability being larger than the cross-shelf. Prevalent southwestward along-shelf flow was induced by the three-dimensional regional response to cross-shelf winds and the coastal constraint. Seaward near-surface velocities occurred predominantly during offshore wind events. During intense wind periods, the surface cross-shelf water transport exceeded the net along-shelf transport. During typically stratified seasons, the intense cross-shelf winds resulted in a well-defined two-layer flow and were more effective at driving offshore transport than during unstratified conditions. While transfer coefficients between wind and currents were generally around 1%, higher cross-shelf transfer coefficients were observed in the near-inertial band. The regional extent of the resulting surface cold water during energetic cross-shelf winds events was concentrated around the region of the wind jet. Cross-shelf transport due to along-shelf winds was only effective during northeast wind events. During along-shelf wind conditions, the transport was estimated to be between 10 and 50% of the theoretical Ekman transport.

  3. The Associations Between 6-N-propylthiouracil (PROP) Intensity and Taste Intensities Differ by TAS2R38 Haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Mary E.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan; Schubert, Carla R.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Klein, Barbara E K.; Klein, Ronald; Pinto, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The influence of TAS2R38 haplotype on the relationship between the perceived intensity of propylthiouracil (PROP) and the basic tastes of salt, sweet, sour, and bitter (quinine) was evaluated in the Beaver Dam Offspring Study. Methods Genotyping was performed on 1670 participants 45 years of age and older (mean age=54.4; range = 45–84 years) and suprathreshold taste intensity was measured using filter paper disks and a general labeled magnitude scale (0–100). Results Among those with taste intensity data and the PAV or AVI haplotype (n=1258), the mean perceived intensity of PROP was 37.3 (Standard Deviation=30.0) and it varied significantly (p<.0001) by diplotype (PAV/PAV:60.1; PAV/AVI:46.5; AVI/AVI:14.4). PROP intensity was correlated with the basic taste intensities (salt: r=0.22; sweet: r=0.25; sour: r=0.21; quinine bitterness: r=0.38; p < 0.001 for all tastes) but significant effect modification of the PROP-taste intensity relationships by TAS2R38 diplotype was observed. There was a stronger association between PROP and each of the basic tastes in the PAV/PAV diplotype group than in the other groups. Conclusions Directly measuring perceived intensity of the 4 tastes, rather than using PROP intensity as an indicator of taste responsiveness, is recommended for studies of taste perception. PMID:25634331

  4. Relationships between peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and modified mercalli intensity in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Quitoriano, V.; Heaton, T.H.; Kanamori, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed regression relationships between Modified Mercalli Intensity (Imm) and peak ground acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV) by comparing horizontal peak ground motions to observed intensities for eight significant California earthquakes. For the limited range of Modified Mercalli intensities (Imm), we find that for peak acceleration with V ??? Imm ??? VIII, Imm = 3.66 log(PGA) - 1.66, and for peak velocity with V ??? Imm ??? IX, Imm = 3.47 log(PGV) + 2.35. From comparison with observed intensity maps, we find that a combined regression based on peak velocity for intensity > VII and on peak acceleration for intensity < VII is most suitable for reproducing observed Imm patterns, consistent with high intensities being related to damage (proportional to ground velocity) and with lower intensities determined by felt accounts (most sensitive to higher-frequency ground acceleration). These new Imm relationships are significantly different from the Trifunac and Brady (1975) correlations, which have been used extensively in loss estimation.

  5. Contracting for intensive care services.

    PubMed

    Dorman, S

    1996-01-01

    Purchasers will increasingly expect clinical services in the NHS internal market to provide objective measures of their benefits and cost effectiveness in order to maintain or develop current funding levels. There is limited scientific evidence to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of intensive care services in terms of mortality/morbidity. Intensive care is a high-cost service and studies of cost-effectiveness need to take account of case-mix variations, differences in admission and discharge policies, and other differences between units. Decisions over development or rationalisation of intensive care services should be based on proper outcome studies of well defined patient groups. The purchasing function itself requires development in order to support effective contracting. PMID:9873335

  6. Intensity of tennis match play

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, J; Mendez‐Villanueva, A; Pluim, B M

    2006-01-01

    This review focuses on the characteristics of tennis players during match play and provides a greater insight into the energy demands of tennis. A tennis match often lasts longer than an hour and in some cases more than five hours. During a match there is a combination of periods of maximal or near maximal work and longer periods of moderate and low intensity activity. Match intensity varies considerably depending on the players' level, style, and sex. It is also influenced by factors such as court surface and ball type. This has important implications for the training of tennis players, which should resemble match intensity and include interval training with appropriate work to rest ratios. PMID:16632566

  7. Observation Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher integrates science observations into the writing center. At the observation station, students explore new items with a science theme and use their notes and questions for class writings every day. Students are exposed to a variety of different topics and motivated to write in different styles all while…

  8. Torsion-rotation intensities in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John

    Methanol exists in numerous kinds of astronomical objects featuring a wide range of local conditions. The light nature of the molecule coupled with the internal rotation of the methyl group with respect to the hydroxyl group results in a rich, strong spectrum that spans the entire far-infrared region. As a result, any modest size observational window will have a number of strong methanol transitions. This has made it the gas of choice for testing THz receivers and to extract the local physical conditions from observations covering small frequency windows. The latter has caused methanol to be dubbed the Swiss army knife of astrophysics. Methanol has been increasingly used in this capacity and will be used even more for subsequent investigations into the Herschel archive, and with SOFIA and ALMA. Interpreting physical conditions on the basis of a few methanol lines requires that the molecular data, line positions, intensities, and collision rates, be complete, consistent and accurate to a much higher level than previously required for astrophysics. The need for highly reliable data is even more critical for modeling the two classes of widespread maser action and many examples of optical pumping through the torsional bands. Observation of the torsional bands in the infrared will be a unique opportunity to directly connect JWST observations with those of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The theory for the intensities of torsion-rotation transitions in a molecule featuring a single internally rotating methyl group is well developed after 70 years of research. However, other than a recent very preliminary and not completely satisfactory investigation of a few CH3OH torsional bands, this theory has never been experimentally tested for any C3V internal rotor. More alarming is a set of recent intensity calibrated microwave measurements that showed deviations relative to calculations of up to 50% in some ground state rotational transitions commonly used by astronomers to extract

  9. Flame Speed and Spark Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, D W; Silsbee, F B

    1925-01-01

    This report describes a series of experiments undertaken to determine whether or not the electrical characteristics of the igniting spark have any effect on the rapidity of flame spread in the explosive gas mixtures which it ignites. The results show very clearly that no such effect exists. The flame velocity in carbon-monoxide oxygen, acetylene oxygen, and gasoline-air mixtures was found to be unaffected by changes in spark intensity from sparks which were barely able to ignite the mixture up to intense condenser discharge sparks having fifty time this energy. (author)

  10. Underwater measurements of muon intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, V. M.; Pustovetov, V. P.; Trubkin, Y. A.; Kirilenkov, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental measurements of cosmic ray muon intensity deep underwater aimed at determining a muon absorption curve are of considerable interest, as they allow to reproduce independently the muon energy spectrum at sea level. The comparison of the muon absorption curve in sea water with that in rock makes it possible to determine muon energy losses caused by nuclear interactions. The data available on muon absorption in water and that in rock are not equivalent. Underground measurements are numerous and have been carried out down to the depth of approx. 15km w.e., whereas underwater muon intensity have been measured twice and only down to approx. 3km deep.

  11. Expected intensities of solar neon-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the expected intensities of the stronger solar neon-like ion emission lines, some not yet observed, is carried out to compare with the observational situation. The potential usefulness of the 2p5 3s(3P2) - 2p6 forbidden line as a density diagnostic is discussed, and new electric quadrupole lines in the soft X-ray range are noted. 'Observability diagrams' are presented as a convenient overview of the known and unobserved lines. The S VII resonance lines appear to have anomalous intensities.

  12. Visitation and physical activity intensity at rural and urban parks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Less physical activity among rural residents may contribute to rural–urban health disparities. This study compared park visitation and activity intensity at 15 urban and 15 rural parks matched for acreage and amenities. Each park was observed (System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities...

  13. Exploring Intensive Longitudinal Measures of Student Engagement in Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrie, Curtis R.; Bodily, Robert; Manwaring, Kristine C.; Graham, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory study we used an intensive longitudinal approach to measure student engagement in a blended educational technology course, collecting both self-report and observational data. The self-report measure included a simple survey of Likert-scale and open-ended questions given repeatedly during the semester. Observational data were…

  14. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  15. Resonant high-order harmonic generation from plasma ablation: Laser intensity dependence of the harmonic intensity and phase

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D. B.

    2010-02-15

    Experimentally observed strong enhancement of a single high-order harmonic in harmonic generation from low-ionized laser plasma ablation is explained as resonant harmonic generation. The resonant harmonic intensity increases regularly with the increase of the laser intensity, while the phase of the resonant harmonic is almost independent of the laser intensity. This is in sharp contrast with the usual plateau and cutoff harmonics, the intensity of which exhibits wild oscillations while its phase changes rapidly with the laser intensity. The temporal profile of a group of harmonics, which includes the resonant harmonic, has the form of a broad peak in each laser-field half cycle. These characteristics of resonant harmonics can have an important application in attoscience. We illustrate our results using examples of Sn and Sb plasmas.

  16. High-intensity interval training evokes larger serum BDNF levels compared with intense continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Saucedo Marquez, Cinthia Maria; Vanaudenaerde, Bart; Troosters, Thierry; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-15

    Exercise can have a positive effect on the brain by activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-related processes. In healthy humans there appears to be a linear relationship between exercise intensity and the positive short-term effect of acute exercise on BDNF levels (i.e., the highest BDNF levels are reported after high-intensity exercise protocols). Here we performed two experiments to test the effectiveness of two high-intensity exercise protocols, both known to improve cardiovascular health, to determine whether they have a similar efficacy in affecting BDNF levels. Participants performed a continuous exercise (CON) protocol at 70% of maximal work rate and a high-intensity interval-training (HIT) protocol at 90% of maximal work rate for periods of 1 min alternating with 1 min of rest (both protocols lasted 20 min). We observed similar BDNF kinetics in both protocols, with maximal BDNF concentrations being reached toward the end of training (experiment 1). We then showed that both exercise protocols significantly increase BDNF levels compared with a rest condition (CON P = 0.04; HIT P < 0.001), with HIT reaching higher BDNF levels than CON (P = 0.035) (experiment 2). These results suggest that shorter bouts of high intensity exercise are slightly more effective than continuous high-intensity exercise for elevating serum BDNF. Additionally, 73% of the participants preferred the HIT protocol (P = 0.02). Therefore, we suggest that the HIT protocol might represent an effective and preferred intervention for elevating BDNF levels and potentially promoting brain health.

  17. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  18. On the Intensity Profile of Electric Lamps and Light Bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalla, Xavier; Salumbides, Edcel John

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate that the time profile of the light intensity from domestic lighting sources exhibits simple yet interesting properties that foster lively student discussions. We monitor the light intensity of an industrial fluorescent lamp (also known as TL) and an incandescent bulb using a photodetector connected to an oscilloscope. The light intensity of these sources displays modulation at twice the ac power supply frequency. The familiarity of ac line power supply, commonplace light sources, and simplicity of the setup encourage student confidence, allowing them to think deeper and continually reassess their notions, and if managed can lead to a satisfactory explanation of the observations.

  19. Perceiving the Intensity of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Dale; Williams, S. Mark; Nundy, Surajit; Lotto, R. Beau

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between luminance (i.e., the photometric intensity of light) and its perception (i.e., sensations of lightness or brightness) has long been a puzzle. In addition to the mystery of why these perceptual qualities do not scale with luminance in any simple way, "illusions" such as simultaneous brightness contrast, Mach bands,…

  20. Intensive production of hybrid catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Economic analysis by others shows clearly that under certain fish price-feed price combinations, intensively aerated ponds are not only an alternative, but are the profit-maximizing technology. We have raised hybrid catfish at stocking rates of 20,000/acre with aeration rates up to 10 hp/acre, produ...

  1. Intensive Business Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooperative Educational Services, Norwalk, CT.

    A project involving educators and business leaders in southwestern Connecticut was undertaken to develop an intensive, competency-based business course to provide high school students with the skills to fill entry-level administrative support positions. The project was designed to: (1) recruit and motivate students with high potential for success…

  2. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  3. Complete feeds-intensive systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most commercially cultivated fish are raised in high-density culture systems where the assumption is that the contribution of natural foods to the nutrition of the fish is insignificant. Thus, intensively cultured fish must be fed a nutritionally complete feed. A short section on the concept and im...

  4. Intensity-intensity and intensity-amplitude correlation of microwave photons from a superconducting artificial atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Feng, Xunli; Oh, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the microwave-frequency nonclassical correlations in a three-level Δ -configuration artificial atom, which is realized by superconducting quantum circuits. The intensity-intensity correlation and intensity field are strongly dependent on the relative phase Φ of the driven fields. It is found that two interference loops are formed in the dressed state picture at Φ =0 or π, which are responsible for the generation of nonclassical microwave photons. When the phase is changed into Φ =π /2 or 3π /2 , the temporal correlation functions exhibit different oscillating behaviors. The phase-sensitive nonclassical correlations of fluorescence photons may find practical application in the design of all-optical switches and quantum information processing.

  5. Whipple Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trangsrud, A.

    2015-12-01

    The solar system that we know today was shaped dramatically by events in its dynamic formative years. These events left their signatures at the distant frontier of the solar system, in the small planetesimal relics that populate the vast Oort Cloud, the Scattered Disk, and the Kuiper Belt. To peer in to the history and evolution of our solar system, the Whipple mission will survey small bodies in the large volume that begins beyond the orbit of Neptune and extends out to thousands of AU. Whipple detects these objects when they occult distant stars. The distance and size of the occulting object is reconstructed from well-understood diffraction effects in the object's shadow. Whipple will observe tens of thousands of stars simultaneously with high observing efficiency, accumulating roughly a billion "star-hours" of observations over its mission life. Here we describe the Whipple observing strategy, including target selection and scheduling.

  6. Observing Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbel, Ilil

    1991-01-01

    Describes how to observe and study the fascinating world of insects in public parks, backyards, and gardens. Discusses the activities and habits of several common insects. Includes addresses for sources of beneficial insects, seeds, and plants. (nine references) (JJK)

  7. Activity Level from Birth through First Grade: Stability or Inversion of Intensity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined two hypotheses regarding activity level: (1) early appearing stability; and (2) inversion of intensity. Measured behavioral intensity or activity level six times between the neonatal period and first grade. Results indicated that parent ratings supported activity level stability. Observations revealed that intense neonatal activity…

  8. Data-Intensive Statistical Computations in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The emerging large datasets are posing major challenges for their subsequent statistical analyses. One needs reinvent optimal statistical algorithms, where the cost of computing is taken into account. Moving large amounts of data is becoming increasingly untenable, thus our computations must be performed close to the data. Existing computer architectures are CPU-heavy, while the first passes of most data analyses require an extreme I/O bandwidth. Novel computational algorithms, optimized for extreme datasets, and the new, data-intensive architectures must be invented. The outputs of large numerical simulations increasingly resemble the "observable” universe, with data volumes are approaching if not exceeding observational data. Persistent "laboratories” of numerical experiments will soon be publicly available, and will change the way we approach the comparisons of observational data to first principle simulations.

  9. Review of Astrophysics Experiments on Intense Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Takabe, H; Arnett, D

    2000-01-19

    Astrophysics has traditionally been pursued at astronomical observatories and on theorists' computers. Observations record images from space, and theoretical models are developed to explain the observations. A component often missing has been the ability to test theories and models in an experimental setting where the initial and final states are well characterized. Intense lasers are now being used to recreate aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively tested against data. We describe here several areas of astrophysics--supernovae, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and giant planets--where laser experiments are under development to test our understanding of these phenomena.

  10. Storage-Intensive Supercomputing Benchmark Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J; Dossa, D; Gokhale, M; Hysom, D; May, J; Pearce, R; Yoo, A

    2007-10-30

    DBE Xeon Dual Socket Blackford Server Motherboard; 2 Intel Xeon Dual-Core 2.66 GHz processors; 1 GB DDR2 PC2-5300 RAM (2 x 512); 80GB Hard Drive (Seagate SATA II Barracuda). The Fusion board is presently capable of 4X in a PCIe slot. The image resampling benchmark was run on a dual Xeon workstation with NVIDIA graphics card (see Chapter 5 for full specification). An XtremeData Opteron+FPGA was used for the language classification application. We observed that these benchmarks are not uniformly I/O intensive. The only benchmark that showed greater that 50% of the time in I/O was the graph algorithm when it accessed data files over NFS. When local disk was used, the graph benchmark spent at most 40% of its time in I/O. The other benchmarks were CPU dominated. The image resampling benchmark and language classification showed order of magnitude speedup over software by using co-processor technology to offload the CPU-intensive kernels. Our experiments to date suggest that emerging hardware technologies offer significant benefit to boosting the performance of data-intensive algorithms. Using GPU and FPGA co-processors, we were able to improve performance by more than an order of magnitude on the benchmark algorithms, eliminating the processor bottleneck of CPU-bound tasks. Experiments with a prototype solid state nonvolative memory available today show 10X better throughput on random reads than disk, with a 2X speedup on a graph processing benchmark when compared to the use of local SATA disk.

  11. Steplike Intensity Threshold Behavior of Extreme Ionization in Laser-Driven Xenon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T.; Mueller, J. P.; Przystawik, A.; Goede, S.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Varin, C.; Ramunno, L.; Brabec, T.; Fennel, T.

    2010-07-30

    The generation of highly charged Xe{sup q+} ions up to q=24 is observed in Xe clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets and exposed to intense femtosecond laser pulses ({lambda}=800 nm). Laser intensity resolved measurements show that the high-q ion generation starts at an unexpectedly low threshold intensity of about 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Above threshold, the Xe ion charge spectrum saturates quickly and changes only weakly for higher laser intensities. Good agreement between these observations and a molecular dynamics analysis allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the highly charged ion production and the surprising intensity threshold behavior of the ionization process.

  12. Ultrahigh-intensity inverse bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Rax, J.-M.

    1999-01-01

    We study inverse bremsstrahlung in the ultrahigh intensity relativistic regime. The fully relativistic ultrahigh intensity absorption (emission) coefficient is derived for an arbitrary scattering potential and small-angle scattering. We find that in the Coulomb field case this absorption (emission) coefficient can be calculated as a function of the quiver energy, drift momentum, and impact parameter in two complementary regimes: (i) for remote collisions when the impact parameter is larger than the amplitude of the quiver motion, and (ii) for instantaneous collisions when the scattering time is shorter than the period of the wave. Both circular and linear polarizations are considered, and this study reveals that in this relativistic regime inverse bremsstrahlung absorption can be viewed as a harmonic Compton resonance heating of the laser-driven electron by the virtual photon of the ion Coulomb field. The relativistic modification of Marcuse's effect [Bell Syst. Tech. J. 41, 1557 (1962)] are also discussed, and relations with previous nonrelativistic results are elucidated.

  13. The metabolism of intense sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Renwick, A G

    1986-01-01

    Three organic acids (saccharin, acesulfame-K and cyclamate) are used or have been used extensively as intense sweeteners. Once absorbed from the gut they are eliminated, largely in the urine, without undergoing metabolism. Early studies using radiolabelled saccharin indicated the existence of limited metabolism, but this was not confirmed by later more extensive studies using highly purified compound. Metabolism could not be induced by a variety of pretreatments. Following an initial report of the presence of traces of cyclohexylamine in the urines of subjects given cyclamate, it was shown that chronic administration of the sweetener caused the induction of extensive metabolism. The metabolism, which showed wide inter- and intra-individual variability was performed the gut microflora. The peptide sweeteners (aspartame and thaumatin) are metabolized to their constituent amino acids in the gastro intestinal tract, prior to absorption. As such they are incorporated into normal intermediary metabolism and their low-calorie applications derive from their intense sweetness.

  14. IONIS: Approximate atomic photoionization intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinäsmäki, Sami

    2012-02-01

    A program to compute relative atomic photoionization cross sections is presented. The code applies the output of the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method for atoms in the single active electron scheme, by computing the overlap of the bound electron states in the initial and final states. The contribution from the single-particle ionization matrix elements is assumed to be the same for each final state. This method gives rather accurate relative ionization probabilities provided the single-electron ionization matrix elements do not depend strongly on energy in the region considered. The method is especially suited for open shell atoms where electronic correlation in the ionic states is large. Program summaryProgram title: IONIS Catalogue identifier: AEKK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1149 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 877 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: Workstations Operating system: GNU/Linux, Unix Classification: 2.2, 2.5 Nature of problem: Photoionization intensities for atoms. Solution method: The code applies the output of the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock codes Grasp92 [1] or Grasp2K [2], to compute approximate photoionization intensities. The intensity is computed within the one-electron transition approximation and by assuming that the sum of the single-particle ionization probabilities is the same for all final ionic states. Restrictions: The program gives nonzero intensities for those transitions where only one electron is removed from the initial configuration(s). Shake-type many-electron transitions are not computed. The ionized shell must be closed in the initial state. Running time: Few seconds for a

  15. Arab observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoohi, L. J.

    There are two main medieval Arab sources of astronomical observations: chronicles and astronomical treatises. Medieval Arabs produced numerous chronicles many of which reported astronomical events that the chroniclers themselves observed or were witnessed by others. Astronomical phenomena that were recorded by chroniclers include solar and lunar eclipses, cometary apparitions, meteors, and meteor showers. Muslim astronomers produced many astronomical treatises known as zijes. Zijes include records of mainly predictable phenomena, such as eclipses of the Sun and Moon. Unlike chronicles, zijes usually ignore irregular phenomena such as the apparitions of comets and meteors, and meteor showers. Some zijes include astronomical observations, especially of eclipses. Not unexpectedly, records in zijes are in general more accurate than their counterparts in chronicles. However, research has shown that medieval Arab chronicles and zijes both contain some valuable astronomical observational data. Unfortunately, much of the heritage of medieval Arab chroniclers and astronomers is still in manuscript form. Moreover, most of the huge numbers of Arabic manuscripts that exist in various libraries, especially in Arab countries, are still uncatalogued. Until now there is only one catalogue of zijes which was compiled in the fifties and which includes brief comments on 200 zijes. There is a real need for systematic investigation of medieval Arab historical and astronomical manuscripts which exist in many libraries all over the world.

  16. Macroseismic Intensities from the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. S.; Hough, S. E.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Hung, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake, the largest central Himalayan earthquake in eighty-one years, yielded few instrumental recording of strong motion. To supplement these we collected 3800 detailed media and first-person accounts of macroseismic effects that included sufficiently detailed information to assign intensities. Our resultant macroseismic intensity map reveals the distribution of shaking in Nepal and the adjacent Gangetic basin. A key observation was that only in rare instances did near-field shaking intensities exceed intensity 8 on the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS), a level that corresponds with heavy damage or total collapse of many unengineered masonry structures. Within the Kathmandu Valley, intensities were generally 6-7 EMS, with generally lower intensities in the center of the valley than along the edges and foothills. This surprising (and fortunate) result can be explained by the nature of the mainshock ground motions, which were dominated by energy at periods significantly longer than the resonant periods of vernacular structures throughout Kathmandu. Outside the Kathmandu Valley the earthquake took a heavy toll on a number of remote villages, where many especially vulnerable masonry houses collapsed catastrophically in shaking equivalent to 7-8 EMS. Intensities were also generally higher along ridges and small hills, suggesting that topographic amplification played a significant role in controlling damage. The spatially rich intensity data set provides an opportunity to consider several key issues, including amplification of shaking in the Ganges basin, and the distribution of shaking across the rupture zone. Of note, relatively higher intensities within the near-field region are found to correlate with zones of enhanced high-frequency source radiation imaged by teleseismic back-projection (Avouac et al., 2015). We further reconsider intensities from a sequence of earthquakes on 26 August 1833, and conclude the largest of these ruptured

  17. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  18. Sh-Stretching Intensities and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Alkanethiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. J.; Lane, J. R.; Sodergren, A. H.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Dunn, M. E.; Vaida, V.

    2009-06-01

    The SH-stretching overtone transitions of tert-butylthiol and ethanethiol are observed using FT-IR, NIR and photoacoustic spectroscopies. The intensities of these are compared with OH-stretching overtones from the corresponding alcohols. We explain the paucity of SH-stretching intensity using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model. SH- and OH-stretching overtone spectra of 1,2-ethanedithiol and 2-mercaptoethanol are recorded to observe the different effects that hydrogen bonding involving SH - - - S, SH - - - O and OH - - - S have on the spectra. We discuss these effects with the help of high level ab initio calculations.

  19. Cosmic ray intensity gradients in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckibben, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Recent progress in the determination of cosmic-ray intensity gradients is reviewed. Direct satellite measurements of the integral gradient are described together with various types of indirect measurements, including measurements of the Ar-37/Ar-39 ratio in samples from the Lost City meteorite, studies of anisotropies in neutron-monitor counting rates, and analysis of the sidereal diurnal anisotropy observed at a single point on earth. Nucleonic radial gradients and electron gradients measured by satellites in differential energy windows are discussed, and theoretical studies of the physical processes involved in these gradients are summarized. Observations of intensity gradients in heliographic latitude are reported.

  20. A model for non-monotonic intensity coding

    PubMed Central

    Nehrkorn, Johannes; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Herz, Andreas V. M.; Yarali, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neurons of most sensory systems increase their response with increasing stimulus intensity. Behavioural responses, however, can be specific to some intermediate intensity level whose particular value might be innate or associatively learned. Learning such a preference requires an adjustable trans- formation from a monotonic stimulus representation at the sensory periphery to a non-monotonic representation for the motor command. How do neural systems accomplish this task? We tackle this general question focusing on odour-intensity learning in the fruit fly, whose first- and second-order olfactory neurons show monotonic stimulus–response curves. Nevertheless, flies form associative memories specific to particular trained odour intensities. Thus, downstream of the first two olfactory processing layers, odour intensity must be re-coded to enable intensity-specific associative learning. We present a minimal, feed-forward, three-layer circuit, which implements the required transformation by combining excitation, inhibition, and, as a decisive third element, homeostatic plasticity. Key features of this circuit motif are consistent with the known architecture and physiology of the fly olfactory system, whereas alternative mechanisms are either not composed of simple, scalable building blocks or not compatible with physiological observations. The simplicity of the circuit and the robustness of its function under parameter changes make this computational motif an attractive candidate for tuneable non-monotonic intensity coding. PMID:26064666

  1. Endohelminth parasites from salmonids in intensive culture from southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Torres, P; Quintanilla, J C; Rozas, M; Miranda, P; Ibarra, R; San Martín, M F; Raddatz, B; Wolter, M; Villegas, A; Canobra, C; Hausdorf, M; Silva, R

    2010-06-01

    A total of 228 salmonids (90 Oncorhynchus mykiss, 48 Oncorhynchus kisutch, and 90 Salmo salar) from 8 intensive aquaculture centers in the south of Chile were examined for endohelminths parasites between December 2008 and May 2009. The body cavities of 2 O. mykiss were infected by Diphyllobothrium sp. plerocercoids (prevalence: 6.7%, mean intensity: 1.0, mean abundance: 0.07) from the Lake Tarahuin hatchery on the south of Chiloé Island. Also, tetraphyllidean plerocercoids (prevalence: 3.3%, mean intensity: 1, mean abundance: 0.03) and fourth-stage larvae of Hysterothylacium aduncum (prevalence: 6.7%, mean intensity: 1, mean abundance 0.07) were observed in O. kisutch from a marine hatchery in Chiloé. The occurrences of Diphyllobothrium sp. in a lake and a tetraphyllidean plerocercoid from marine cultured salmonid in Chiloé are reported for first time. No muscular infection by helminths was recorded in the fish examined. PMID:20557217

  2. Negotiating natural death in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Seymour, J E

    2000-10-01

    Recent empirical evidence of barriers to palliative care in acute hospital settings shows that dying patients may receive invasive medical treatments immediately before death, in spite of evidence of their poor prognosis being available to clinicians. The difficulties of ascertaining treatment preferences, predicting the trajectory of dying in critically ill people, and assessing the degree to which further interventions are futile are well documented. Further, enduring ethical complexities attending end of life care mean that the process of withdrawing or withholding medical care is associated with significant problems for clinical staff. Specific difficulties attend the legitimation of treatment withdrawal, the perceived differences between 'killing' and 'letting die' and the cultural constraints which attend the orchestration of 'natural' death in situations where human agency is often required before death can follow dying. This paper draws on ethnographic research to examine the way in which these problems are resolved during medical work within intensive care. Building on insights from the literature, an analysis of observational case study data is presented which suggests that the negotiation of natural death in intensive care hinges upon four strategies. These, which form a framework with which to interpret social interaction between physicians during end of life decision-making in intensive care, are as follows: firstly, the establishment of a 'technical' definition of dying--informed by results of investigations and monitoring equipment--over and above 'bodily' dying informed by clinical experience. Secondly, the alignment of the trajectories of technical and bodily dying to ensure that the events of non-treatment have no perceived causative link to death. Thirdly, the balancing of medical action with non-action, allowing a diffusion of responsibility for death to the patient's body; and lastly, the incorporation of patient's companions and nursing staff

  3. Assessing physical activity intensity by video analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Santiago, C; Reis, L P; Sousa, A; Mota, J; Welk, G

    2015-05-01

    Assessing physical activity (PA) is a challenging task and many different approaches have been proposed. Direct observation (DO) techniques can objectively code both the behavior and the context in which it occurred, however, they have significant limitations such as the cost and burden associated with collecting and processing data. Therefore, this study evaluated the utility of an automated video analysis system (CAM) designed to record and discriminate the intensity of PA using a subject tracking methodology. The relative utility of the CAM system and DO were compared with criterion data from an objective accelerometry-based device (Actigraph GT3X+). Eight 10 year old children (three girls and five boys) wore the GT3X+ during a standard basketball session. PA was analyzed by two observers using the SOPLAY instrument and by the CAM system. The GT3X+ and the CAM were both set up to collect data at 30 Hz while the DO was performed every two minutes, with 10 s of observation for each gender. The GT3X+ was processed using cut points by Evanson and the outcome measure was the percentage of time spent in different intensities of PA. The CAM data were processed similarly using the same speed thresholds as were used in establishing the Evenson cut-off points (light: <2 mph; walking: 2-4 mph; very active: >4 mph). Similar outcomes were computed from the SOPLAY default analyses. A chi-square test was used to test differences in the percentage of time at the three intensity zones (light, walking and very active). The Yates' correction was used to prevent overestimation of statistical significance for small data. When compared with GT3X+, the CAM had better results than the SOPLAY. The chi-square test yielded the following pairwise comparisons: CAM versus GT3x+ was χ(2) (5) = 24.18, p < .001; SOPLAY2 versus GT3x+ was χ(2) (5) = 144.44, p < .001; SOPLAY1 versus GT3x+ was χ(2) (5) = 119.55, p < .001. The differences were smaller between CAM and GT3x

  4. Estimating earthquake location and magnitude from seismic intensity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Wentworth, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of Modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) observations for a training set of 22 California earthquakes suggests a strategy for bounding the epicentral region and moment magnitude M from MMI observations only. We define an intensity magnitude MI that is calibrated to be equal in the mean to M. MI = mean (Mi), where Mi = (MMIi + 3.29 + 0.0206 * ??i)/1.68 and ??i is the epicentral distance (km) of observation MMIi. The epicentral region is bounded by contours of rms [MI] = rms (MI - Mi) - rms0 (MI - Mi-), where rms is the root mean square, rms0 (MI - Mi) is the minimum rms over a grid of assumed epicenters, and empirical site corrections and a distance weighting function are used. Empirical contour values for bounding the epicenter location and empirical bounds for M estimated from MI appropriate for different levels of confidence and different quantities of intensity observations are tabulated. The epicentral region bounds and MI obtained for an independent test set of western California earthquakes are consistent with the instrumental epicenters and moment magnitudes of these earthquakes. The analysis strategy is particularly appropriate for the evaluation of pre-1900 earthquakes for which the only available data are a sparse set of intensity observations.

  5. Towards Perfect Water Line Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodi, L.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-06-01

    Over the last ten years the increased availability of computational resources and the steady refinement of theoretical methods have permitted more and more accurate first principle calculations of water-vapor spectra as exemplified, e.g., by the very successful BT2 line list both line positions and intensities, a reliable dipole moment surface (DMS), affecting line intensities. It is also very useful to several application to give reasonable uncertainty bars for computed quantities, an aspect which traditionally has received little attention. We report here recent progress leading to very accurate room-temperature linelists covering the range 0.05-20 000 cm-1, complete with uncertainty bars, for the H_218O and H_217O water isotopologues Line intensities were produced using a recent DMS produced by our group which is capable of giving line intensites accurate to 1% for most medium and strong transitions. Line positions are based if possible on the experimentally derived energy levels recently produced by a IUPAC task group and have a typical accuracy of 0.0002 cm-1; when experimentally derived energy levels are unavailable calculated line position are provided, with an accuracy of the order of 0.2 cm-1. An extension to the main isotopologue H_216O is currently underway. R. J. Barber, J. Tennyson, G. J. Harris and R. N. Tolchenov, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. {368}, 1087-1094 (2006). L. Lodi and J. Tennyson, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. (2012), doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.02.023 L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and O. L. Polyansky, J. Chem. Phys. {135}, 034113 (2011). J. Tennyson at al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. {110}, 573-96 (2009).

  6. Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, D.

    2003-03-01

    The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) is a state of the art variable energy positron beam under construction at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL). Projected intensities on the order of the order of 10^7 e+/second using ^64Cu as the positron source are expected. Owing to is short half-life (t1/2 12.8 hrs), plans are to produce the ^64Cu isotope on-site using beam port 1 of NETL TRIGA Mark II reactor. Following tungsten moderation, the positrons will be electrostatically focused and accelerated from few 10's of eV up to 30 keV. This intensity and energy range should allow routine performance of several analytical techniques of interest to surface scientists (PALS, PADB and perhaps PAES and LEPD.) The TIPS project is being developed in parallel phases. Phase I of the project entails construction of the vacuum system, source chamber, main beam line, electrostatic/magnetic focusing and transport system as well as moderator design. Initial construction, testing and characterization of moderator and beam transport elements are underway and will use a commercially available 10 mCi ^22Na radioisotope as a source of positrons. Phase II of the project is concerned primarily with the Cu source geometry and thermal properties as well as production and physical handling of the radioisotope. Additional instrument optimizing based upon experience gained during Phase I will be incorporated in the final design. Current progress of both phases will be presented along with motivations and future directions.

  7. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  8. Intense source of slow positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, P.; Rosowsky, A.

    2004-10-01

    We describe a novel design for an intense source of slow positrons based on pair production with a beam of electrons from a 10 MeV accelerator hitting a thin target at a low incidence angle. The positrons are collected with a set of coils adapted to the large production angle. The collection system is designed to inject the positrons into a Greaves-Surko trap (Phys. Rev. A 46 (1992) 5696). Such a source could be the basis for a series of experiments in fundamental and applied research and would also be a prototype source for industrial applications, which concern the field of defect characterization in the nanometer scale.

  9. High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Redwine, Robert P.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of the project was to investigate the possibility of building a very high intensity polarized electron gun for the Electron-Ion Collider. This development is crucial for the eRHIC project. The gun implements a large area cathode, ring-shaped laser beam and active cathode cooling. A polarized electron gun chamber with a large area cathode and active cathode cooling has been built and tested. A preparation chamber for cathode activation has been built and initial tests have been performed. Major parts for a load-lock chamber, where cathodes are loaded into the vacuum system, have been manufactured.

  10. Intense microwave pulses II. SPIE Volume 2154

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    The primary purpose of this conference was to present and critically evaluate new and ongoing research on the generation and transmission of intense microwave pulses. Significant progress was reported on high-power, high-current relativistic klystron amplifier research and design. Other work presented at the conference, include research on a high-power relativistic magnetron driven by a high-current linear induction accelerator, derivation of a Pierce-type dispersion relation describing the interaction of an intense relativistic electron beam with a corrugated cylindrical slow-wave structure, experiments on an X-band backward-wave cyclotron maser oscillator, and observation of frequency chirping in a free electron laser amplifier. Other presentations included work on multiwave Cerenkov generator experiments, analysis of resonance characteristics of slow-wave structures in high-power Cerenkov devices, linear analysis and numerical simulation of Doppler-shifted cyclotron harmonics in a cyclotron autoresonance klystron, high-power virtual cathode oscillator theory and experiments, design of a sixth-harmonic gyrofrequency multiplier as a millimeter-wave source, and experiments on dielectric-loaded and multiwave slotted gyro-TWT amplifiers. A review was presented on innovative concepts which employ high-power microwaves in propulsion of space vehicles. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers of this conference.

  11. Intense infrared lasers and laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roso, Luis

    2012-02-01

    Electrons accelerate due to the huge electric field of the laser itself, and so they can generate very particular plasmas because the ionization process occurs in a few femtosecond, or even in a fraction of a femtosecond. Lasers can be focused now to intensities beyond 1022W/cm2 and there are projects to arrive up 1026W/cm2. Electric fields of the laser arrive now to 1014V/cm and magnetic fields reach the Megatesla. This is a monster density of electromagnetic energy, so that we are close to obtain light denser than matter. In this respect it is very convenient to observe that the well known Einstein's energy - mass equation, E = mc2, can be rewritten for laser light I = ρc3, I being the laser intensity and ρ the equivalent density. There are several PW lasers around the world, in operation or in construction, and one of them is going to be at Salamanca's CLPU.

  12. Introduction to Atomic Dynamics in Intense Light Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Farhad H. M.

    A brief description is given of the early developments leading to the discovery of some of the basic phenomena that occur during the interaction of intense light fields with atomic systems - such as multiphoton ionization (MPI), above-threshold ionization (ATI), and high harmonic generation (HHG). Also outlined are the related theoretical concepts and the nonperturbative "KFR model" for interpreting the phenomena. Recent observation of the breakdown of a popular "tunneling model" (Keldysh γ < 1) is noted and the role of discrete photon effects that can account for the observed parallel momentum distribution is given. Next, the role of e-e correlation in intense-field processes in many-electron atomic systems is discussed. A systematic analysis of intense-field problems using the "intense-field many-body S-matrix theory" (IMST) is outlined. To this end, the basic motivation behind and the derivation of IMST is discussed, and its use is illustrated by application to the problem of nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) that provided a fully quantum analysis of the mechanism behind the NSDI process. Also discussed is how NSDI and its opposite, sequential double ionization (SDI), can both occur in intense fields depending, respectively, on near-infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths of the light field used. A mechanism for multiple ionization is suggested by the IMST diagrams, which can provide a good estimate of the known experimental observations of the ion states vs. intensity in noble gases. Finally, an example is given of the spatial distributions of the charge states that can be produced in the focal region (a "flying reaction vessel"!) of an intense Ti:sapphire laser.

  13. Polyatomic molecules under intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Jackson, James E; Levine, Benjamin G; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-12-11

    Interaction of intense laser pulses with atoms and molecules is at the forefront of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. It is the gateway to powerful new tools that include above threshold ionization, high harmonic generation, electron diffraction, molecular tomography, and attosecond pulse generation. Intense laser pulses are ideal for probing and manipulating chemical bonding. Though the behavior of atoms in strong fields has been well studied, molecules under intense fields are not as well understood and current models have failed in certain important aspects. Molecules, as opposed to atoms, present confounding possibilities of nuclear and electronic motion upon excitation. The dynamics and fragmentation patterns in response to the laser field are structure sensitive; therefore, a molecule cannot simply be treated as a "bag of atoms" during field induced ionization. In this article we present a set of experiments and theoretical calculations exploring the behavior of a large collection of aryl alkyl ketones when irradiated with intense femtosecond pulses. Specifically, we consider to what extent molecules retain their molecular identity and properties under strong laser fields. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with pump-probe techniques we study the dynamical behavior of these molecules, monitoring ion yield modulation caused by intramolecular motions post ionization. The set of molecules studied is further divided into smaller sets, sorted by type and position of functional groups. The pump-probe time-delay scans show that among positional isomers the variations in relative energies, which amount to only a few hundred millielectronvolts, influence the dynamical behavior of the molecules despite their having experienced such high fields (V/Å). High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to predict molecular dynamics along with single and multiphoton resonances in the neutral and ionic states. We propose the

  14. Intense submesoscale upwelling in anticyclonic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannigan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Observations from around the global ocean show that enhanced biological activity can be found in anticyclonic eddies. This may mean that upwelling of nutrient-rich water occurs within the eddy, but such upwelling is not captured by models that resolve mesoscale processes. High-resolution simulations presented here show intense submesoscale upwelling from the thermocline to the mixed layer in anticyclonic eddies. The properties of the upwelling are consistent with a process known as symmetric instability. A simple limiting nutrient experiment shows that this upwelling can drive much higher biological activity in anticyclonic eddies when there is a high nutrient concentration in the thermocline. An estimate for the magnitude of upwelling associated with symmetric instability in anticyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea shows that it may be of comparable magnitude to other processes, though further work is required to understand the full implications for basin-scale nutrient budgets.

  15. Instruments for monitoring intensive care unit sedation

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Genís

    2000-01-01

    Although many promising objective methods (measuring systems) are available, there are no truly validated instruments for monitoring intensive care unit (ICU) sedation. Auditory evoked potentials can be used only for research in patients with a deep level of sedation. Other measuring systems require further development and validation to be useful in the ICU. Continuing research will provide an objective system to improve the monitoring and controlling of this essential treatment for ICU patients. Subjective methods (scoring systems) that are based on clinical observation have proven their usefulness in guiding sedative therapy. The Glasgow Coma Score modified by Cook and Palma (GCSC) achieves good face validity and reliability, which assures its clinical utility for routine practice and research. Other scales, in particular the Ramsay Scale, can be recommended preferably for clinical use. An accurate use of available instruments can improve the sedative treatment that we deliver to our patients. PMID:11094504

  16. CGRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1997-01-01

    This final report presents an investigation of the CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) observations. The investigation includes: Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at High Latitudes; and Echoes in X-Ray Novae; A Localized Excess of Gamma-Radiation; Transient Hard X-Ray Emission from Globular Clusters; and A Search for Be/X-Ray Binaries in Hard X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters; X-Ray Transients in Star-Forming Regions; Gamma-ray Emission from Globular Clusters; Shock High Energy Emission from Be-Star/Pulsar System PSR 1259-63m; Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of Nearby OB Associations; Long Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Busters; and Periodic Hard X-Ray Emission from GRO J1849-03.

  17. ASCA Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This recently expired grant has supported the work of the PI, his students, and his collaborators on a variety of ASCA projects over the past four years. Annual reports have summarized much of the work accomplished; here we provide a brief review of the work resulting from this effort, and a summary of the personnel who have benefited from the grant's support. Starburst Galaxies with Extreme X-ray Luminosities This project began as a careful examination of the claims of Boller et al. (1992) that there were dozens of "normal" galaxies in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey that had X-ray luminosities in excess of 1042 erg sec, higher than that seen in the hundreds of non-AGN galaxies observed with Einstein. If true, this suggested that X-ray emission associated with star formation activity might have a significant contribution to make to the still unexplained cosmic X-ray background (XRB). Since some of our earlier work with the Einstein Observatory Deep Surveys had suggested a similar possibility and several sets of authors over the years had modelled the starburst XRB contribution, these claims were worth pursuing. Our work expanded the examination beyond the RASS to include earlier claims of high-luminosity galaxies powered by starburst emission (selected in this case on the basis of the far-IR luminosities). The result of extensive followup observations under several programs using ROSAT, ASCA, and ground-based facilities was to show that nearly all of these objects in fact have hidden AGN at their cores, and that their luminosities are not in any way extraordinary.

  18. L-alpha intensity in coronal streamers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noci, G.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    White-light images are presently the primary source of information on physical conditions in the solar corona at distances greater than a few tenths of a solar radius above the limb. As a consequence, we still only have an incomplete description of structures extending beyond the solar limb. In particular, streamers, although observed for decades, represent a poorly known phenomenon. SOHO, to be launched in 1995, will be able to make long-term observations of these features up to heights of a few solar radii, both in white light and UV. In this paper we present simulations of L-alpha intensity in coronal streamers, based on the two-dimensional (2D) model developed by Wang et at. (1992, 1993) via a time-dependent numerical relaxation approach. Because the model is 2D, we make an a priori hypothesis about the extension of streamers in the third dimension. L-alpha data, obtained from a rocket (Kohl et al., 1983), allowed us to identify a shape which fits the observations.

  19. L-alpha intensity in coronal streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noci, G.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.

    1993-09-01

    White-light images are presently the primary source of information on physical conditions in the solar corona at distances greater than a few tenths of a solar radius above the limb. As a consequence, we still only have an incomplete description of structures extending beyond the solar limb. In particular, streamers, although observed for decades, represent a poorly known phenomenon. SOHO, to be launched in 1995, will be able to make long-term observations of these features up to heights of a few solar radii, both in white light and UV. In this paper we present simulations of L-alpha intensity in coronal streamers, based on the two-dimensional (2D) model developed by Wang et at. (1992, 1993) via a time-dependent numerical relaxation approach. Because the model is 2D, we make an a priori hypothesis about the extension of streamers in the third dimension. L-alpha data, obtained from a rocket (Kohl et al., 1983), allowed us to identify a shape which fits the observations.

  20. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  1. [The organization of a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit].

    PubMed

    Barnay, Claire; Luauté, Jacques; Tell, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    When a patient is admitted to a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit, the functional outcome is the main objective of the care. The motivation of the team relies on strong cohesion between professionals. Personalised support provides a heightened observation of the patient's progress. Listening and sharing favour a relationship of trust between the patient, the team and the families. PMID:26365639

  2. Ultrashort pulse high intensity laser illumination of a simple metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchberg, H. M.; Freeman, R. R.; Davey, S. C.

    1988-10-01

    We have observed the self-reflection of intense, sub-picosecond 308 nm light pulse incident on a planar Al target and have inferred the electrical conductivity of solid density Al. The pulse lengths were sufficiently short that no significant expansion of the target occurred during the measurement.

  3. Nonlinear behavior in high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The light flicker problem of high intensity discharge lamps is studied numerically and experimentally. It is shown that in some respects the systems behave very similar to the forced Duffing oscillator with a softening spring. In particular, the jump phenomenon and hysteresis are observed in the simulations and in the experiments.

  4. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  5. Learning Beginning Algebra with Spreadsheets in a Computer Intensive Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabach, Michal; Hershkowitz, Rina; Arcavi, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    This study is part of a large research and development project aimed at observing, describing and analyzing the learning processes of two seventh grade classes during a yearlong beginning algebra course in a computer intensive environment (CIE). The environment includes carefully designed algebra learning materials with a functional approach, and…

  6. Ubiquitous Fast Propagating Intensity Disturbances in Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.

    2016-01-01

    High cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment "the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP)" reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere, transition region, or both at a speed much higher than the sound speed.

  7. Observational exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere absorbs partially or completely many ultraviolet, infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Atmospheric seeing distorts small images, imposing a limit on the achievable angular resolution at optical and infrared wavelengths that is much poorer than the intrinsic capability of telescope optics. The atomic and molecular species of the atmosphere confuse or prevent the spectral studies of similar compounds outside of the terrestrial environment. Telescopes placed in orbit above the atmosphere avoid these problems and enjoy a unique view of the universe. There are many complex questions pertaining to the origin and evolution of the biogenic elements and compounds and the existence of terrestrial types of planets elsewhere that can be only tackled from orbiting facilities. The detailed nature of the spacecraft, platforms and instrumentation most likely to be launched by the United States and Europe in the near future in an attempt to determine what observational programs would be tractable and which areas of interest to exobiology required hardware capabilities beyond those currently envisioned are considered.

  8. A new intensive care worksheet.

    PubMed

    Gurman, G; Steiner, Z; Kriemerman, S

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a new manual daily worksheet for recording data on a patient's status in an Intensive Care Unit. It permits a rapid view of the whole picture of the patient's condition at a certain hour since the system of recording is based on the time an event happened. Only one single page is used for each day. Space is provided for essential data, ventilatory parameters, laboratory results, fluid balance, drug therapy and special treatments. Attended staff, invited consultants as well as nurses add written notes which complete the picture provided by numbers. It does not replace the computerized interpretation, statistical analysis or storage of data, but it comes as an easy-to-use daily tool at the bedside.

  9. Effect of high intensity ultrasound on the allergenicity of shrimp*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Lin, Hong; Cao, Li-Min; Jameel, Khalid

    2006-01-01

    The tropomyosin fraction of shrimp proteins is potentially responsible for allergic reaction in individuals with genetic predisposition to allergy. However, there are no efficient and safe methods to reduce its allergenicity. High intensity ultrasound is known to change the structure of proteins. This study is aimed at assessing high intensity ultrasound’s effect on the allergenicity of shrimp allergen. Shrimp and purified shrimp allergen were treated with high intensity ultrasound for 30~180 min. Extracts of treated samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with pool serum of shrimp allergy patients and polyclonal anti-allergen antibodies and by immunoblotting after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Shrimp treated with high intensity ultrasound showed a decrease in allergenicity measured with ELISA. A linear relationship between the immune response induced by treated shrimp allergen and the applied treatment time was observed. The decrease in allergenicity was confirmed by immunoblot assays with shrimp allergic patients serum. Allergenicity of shrimp allergen extracted from treated shrimp was higher than that of purified shrimp allergen with the same treatment time. Gel-filtration HPLC was applied for analysis of shrimp allergen after treatment with high intensity ultrasound. Some fractions were appeared with increasing treatment time. The results suggested that high intensity ultrasound could be used to reduce the allergenicity of shrimp. PMID:16532525

  10. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Adam H; Camargo, Suzana J; Hall, Timothy M; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K; Wing, Allison A

    2016-07-15

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  11. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Adam H; Camargo, Suzana J; Hall, Timothy M; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K; Wing, Allison A

    2016-07-15

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities. PMID:27418502

  12. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  13. Human influence on tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity. We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas–driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  14. Human Influence on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Hall, Timothy M.; Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Wing, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent assessments agree that tropical cyclone intensity should increase as the climate warms. Less agreement exists on the detection of recent historical trends in tropical cyclone intensity.We interpret future and recent historical trends by using the theory of potential intensity, which predicts the maximum intensity achievable by a tropical cyclone in a given local environment. Although greenhouse gas-driven warming increases potential intensity, climate model simulations suggest that aerosol cooling has largely canceled that effect over the historical record. Large natural variability complicates analysis of trends, as do poleward shifts in the latitude of maximum intensity. In the absence of strong reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, future greenhouse gas forcing of potential intensity will increasingly dominate over aerosol forcing, leading to substantially larger increases in tropical cyclone intensities.

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... modulating—or controlling—the intensity of the radiation beam in multiple small volumes. IMRT also allows higher ... of multiple intensity-modulated fields coming from different beam directions produce a custom tailored radiation dose that ...

  16. Repeatability of feather mite prevalence and intensity in passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Real, Javier; Serrano, David; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Fernández-González, Sofía; Bermejo, Ana; Calleja, Juan A; De la Puente, Javier; De Palacio, Diana; Martínez, José L; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Ponce, Carlos; Frías, Óscar; Tella, José L; Møller, Anders P; Figuerola, Jordi; Pap, Péter L; Kovács, István; Vágási, Csongor I; Meléndez, Leandro; Blanco, Guillermo; Aguilera, Eduardo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Galván, Ismael; Atiénzar, Francisco; Barba, Emilio; Cantó, José L; Cortés, Verónica; Monrós, Juan S; Piculo, Rubén; Vögeli, Matthias; Borràs, Antoni; Navarro, Carlos; Mestre, Alexandre; Jovani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Understanding why host species differ so much in symbiont loads and how this depends on ecological host and symbiont traits is a major issue in the ecology of symbiosis. A first step in this inquiry is to know whether observed differences among host species are species-specific traits or more related with host-symbiont environmental conditions. Here we analysed the repeatability (R) of the intensity and the prevalence of feather mites to partition within- and among-host species variance components. We compiled the largest dataset so far available: 119 Paleartic passerine bird species, 75,944 individual birds, ca. 1.8 million mites, seven countries, 23 study years. Several analyses and approaches were made to estimate R and adjusted repeatability (R(adj)) after controlling for potential confounding factors (breeding period, weather, habitat, spatial autocorrelation and researcher identity). The prevalence of feather mites was moderately repeatable (R = 0.26-0.53; R(adj) = 0.32-0.57); smaller values were found for intensity (R = 0.19-0.30; R(adj )= 0.18-0.30). These moderate repeatabilities show that prevalence and intensity of feather mites differ among species, but also that the high variation within species leads to considerable overlap among bird species. Differences in the prevalence and intensity of feather mites within bird species were small among habitats, suggesting that local factors are playing a secondary role. However, effects of local climatic conditions were partially observed for intensity.

  17. The knowledge of intensive care professionals about diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Lordani, Cláudia Regina Felicetti; Eckert, Raquel Goreti; Tozetto, Altevir Garcia; Lordani, Tarcísio Vitor Augusto; Duarte, Péricles Almeida Delfino

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the opinions and practices of intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea in critically ill patients. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted among health care professionals working at three adult intensive care units. Participants responded individually to a self-administered questionnaire about their length of work experience in intensive care; the definition, characterization, and causes of diarrhea; types of records in the patient's medical record; and training received. Results A total of 78 professionals participated in this study, of whom 59.0% were nurse technicians, 25.7% were nurses, and 15.3% were physicians; 77.0% of them had worked in intensive care for over 1 year. Only 37.2% had received training on this topic. Half of the interviewees defined diarrhea as "liquid and/or pasty stools" regardless of frequency, while the other 50.0% defined diarrhea based on the increased number of daily bowel movements. The majority of them mentioned diet as the main cause of diarrhea, followed by "use of medications" (p<0.001). Distinct nutritional practices were observed among the analyzed professionals regarding episodes of diarrhea, such as discontinuing, maintaining, or reducing the volume of enteral nutrition; physicians reported that they do not routinely communicate the problem to other professionals (for example, to a nutritionist) and do not routinely record and quantify diarrhea events in patients' medical records. Conclusion Different opinions and practices were observed in intensive care professionals with regard to diarrhea. PMID:25295825

  18. Diffraction pattern intensity measurements in the introductory college physics laboratory using microcomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soundranayagam, R.; Ramayya, A. V.; Cleeman, L.; Riecken, Mark; Fuson, Nelson; Springer, John

    1983-10-01

    Measurement of the intensity variations in a single slit diffraction pattern formed by a laser beam is made by means of a photoresistor detector interfaced with an Apple II-plus microcomputer through the paddle (game controller) connection. The computer programs, written in BASIC and assembly language, enable the student to (1) determine quantitatively the intensity of the maxima and minima; (2) see the intensity pattern as the data is acquired; (3) obtain a hard copy of the intensity plot observed on the screen monitor; and (4) compare the experimental and theoretical intensity patterns.

  19. The Intensity of Intensive Care: A Patient’s Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Alida; Drenth, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study involved action research to explore one woman’s narrative of awareness, emotions and thoughts during treatment in an intensive care unit (ICU). The overarching aim is to increase insight into the thoughts, feelings and bio-psychosocial needs of the patient receiving treatment in ICU. Data was collected by means of narrative discourse analysis. Literature on the psychosocial and spiritual implications of ICU treatment is limited, and often patients have no recall of their treatment in an ICU at all. Documenting the illness narrative of this individual case is valuable as the participant could recall a certain amount of awareness, thoughts and emotions. These experiences included delirium, anxiety, helplessness, frustration and uncertainty. Once sedation was decreased, the patient’s consciousness increased and she was confronted with thoughts and emotions that were unrealistic and frightening. It was found in this study that the opportunity to share a narrative on the emotions and awareness during treatment in an ICU had cathartic value and the participant suffered little symptoms of post traumatic stress syndrome, often associated with long term treatment in an ICU. Further research on this topic is necessary to improve ICU treatment, not only on a physical level, but with emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual needs of the patient. PMID:22980374

  20. Treatment Intensity and Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namasivayam, Aravind K.; Pukonen, Margit; Goshulak, Debra; Hard, Jennifer; Rudzicz, Frank; Rietveld, Toni; Maassen, Ben; Kroll, Robert; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intensive treatment has been repeatedly recommended for the treatment of speech deficits in childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). However, differences in treatment outcomes as a function of treatment intensity have not been systematically studied in this population. Aim: To investigate the effects of treatment intensity on outcome…

  1. Relative intensity calculations for nitrous oxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. D. G.

    1972-01-01

    A tabulation of calculated rotational line intensities, relative to the integrated intensity of a vibration-rotation band, is given for Sigma-Sigma, Pi-Sigma, Sigma-Pi, Pi-Pi, and Delta-Pi transitions of nitrous oxide. These calculations were made for temperatures of 250 K and 300 K. A summary of band-intensity measurements is also presented.

  2. 7 CFR 29.2258 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2258 Section 29.2258 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2258 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3509 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3509 Section 29.3509 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3509 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2508 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2508 Section 29.2508 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2508 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3011 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3011 Section 29.3011 Agriculture... Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to all colors...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2258 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2258 Section 29.2258 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2258 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3509 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3509 Section 29.3509 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3509 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2258 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2258 Section 29.2258 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2258 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes...

  9. 7 CFR 29.1006 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.1006 Section 29.1006 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1006 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. (See Elements of...

  10. 7 CFR 29.1006 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.1006 Section 29.1006 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1006 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. (See Elements of...

  11. 7 CFR 29.1006 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.1006 Section 29.1006 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1006 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. (See Elements of...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3011 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3011 Section 29.3011 Agriculture... Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to all colors...

  13. 7 CFR 29.2508 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2508 Section 29.2508 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2508 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a...

  14. 7 CFR 29.1006 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.1006 Section 29.1006 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1006 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. (See Elements of...

  15. 7 CFR 29.2508 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2508 Section 29.2508 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2508 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a...

  16. 7 CFR 29.3011 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3011 Section 29.3011 Agriculture... Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to all colors...

  17. 7 CFR 29.3509 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3509 Section 29.3509 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3509 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to...

  18. 7 CFR 29.2258 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2258 Section 29.2258 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2258 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3011 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3011 Section 29.3011 Agriculture... Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to all colors...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3011 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3011 Section 29.3011 Agriculture... Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to all colors...

  1. 7 CFR 29.2508 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2508 Section 29.2508 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2508 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1006 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.1006 Section 29.1006 Agriculture... Type 92) § 29.1006 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. (See Elements of...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3509 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3509 Section 29.3509 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3509 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3509 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.3509 Section 29.3509 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3509 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a specific color or hue. It is applicable to...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2258 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2258 Section 29.2258 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2258 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2508 - Color intensity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color intensity. 29.2508 Section 29.2508 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2508 Color intensity. The varying degree of saturation or chroma. Color intensity as applied to tobacco describes the strength or weakness of a...

  7. Fluorescence wavelength and intensity variations of cave waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A.; Genty, D.

    1999-04-01

    The fluorescence properties of groundwaters percolating into four cave systems have been monitored over the period 1997-1998. Fluorescence was excited between 220 and 400 nm and the emission measured from 300 to 500 nm using a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Three fluorescence centres were observed; one at the excitation-emission pair of 290-340:395-430 nm, (humic-like, probably fulvic acid), one at 265-280:300-370 nm (protein like) and a less defined region of high fluorescence at 230-280:310-420 nm (humic and/or protein like). The most consistent fluorescence intensity was observed in the excitation-emission pair of 290-340:395-430 nm, attributed to a fulvic acid source. Subtle differences (±5%) in the fluorescence excitation and emission wavelength of this fluorescence peak in the groundwater were observed between the four sites, and the fluorescence intensity varied considerably (×60) between the four sites. Both the wavelength and the intensity variations in fluorescence are caused by the differences in the vegetation cover, soil type and humification. Data from the most intensely monitored site (Brown's Folly Mine, England; 9 sample stations, 10-20 days frequency sampling) revealed no spatial variability in the 290-340:395-430 nm (fulvic acid) fluorescence; in contrast time-series analysis suggests that the seasonal variations do occur, with a decrease in the emission wavelength correlating with the first (autumn) peak in fluorescence intensity, and a decrease in the excitation wavelength correlating with a second (winter) fluorescence intensity peak. Results demonstrate the potential of utilising fluorescence wavelength variations in sourcing karst groundwaters, and as a possible palaeoenvironmental proxy of the overlying soil conditions if trapped within the cave speleothems.

  8. Temporal loudness weights for sounds with increasing and decreasing intensity profiles.

    PubMed

    Ponsot, Emmanuel; Susini, Patrick; Saint Pierre, Guillaume; Meunier, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    Using molecular psychophysics, temporal loudness weights were measured for 2-s, 1-kHz tones with flat, increasing and decreasing time-intensity profiles. While primacy and recency effects were observed for flat profile stimuli, the so-called "level dominance" effect was observed for both increasing and decreasing profile stimuli, fully determining their temporal weights. The weighs obtained for these profiles were basically zero for all but the most intense parts of these sounds. This supports the view that the "level dominance" effect is prominent with intensity-varying sounds and that it persists over time since temporal weights are not affected by the direction of intensity change.

  9. Temporal loudness weights for sounds with increasing and decreasing intensity profiles.

    PubMed

    Ponsot, Emmanuel; Susini, Patrick; Saint Pierre, Guillaume; Meunier, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    Using molecular psychophysics, temporal loudness weights were measured for 2-s, 1-kHz tones with flat, increasing and decreasing time-intensity profiles. While primacy and recency effects were observed for flat profile stimuli, the so-called "level dominance" effect was observed for both increasing and decreasing profile stimuli, fully determining their temporal weights. The weighs obtained for these profiles were basically zero for all but the most intense parts of these sounds. This supports the view that the "level dominance" effect is prominent with intensity-varying sounds and that it persists over time since temporal weights are not affected by the direction of intensity change. PMID:24116537

  10. Spatial Standard Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrw B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to devices and methods for the measurement and/or for the specification of the perceptual intensity of a visual image. or the perceptual distance between a pair of images. Grayscale test and reference images are processed to produce test and reference luminance images. A luminance filter function is convolved with the reference luminance image to produce a local mean luminance reference image . Test and reference contrast images are produced from the local mean luminance reference image and the test and reference luminance images respectively, followed by application of a contrast sensitivity filter. The resulting images are combined according to mathematical prescriptions to produce a Just Noticeable Difference, JND value, indicative of a Spatial Standard Observer. SSO. Some embodiments include masking functions. window functions. special treatment for images lying on or near border and pre-processing of test images.

  11. Spatial Standard Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to devices and methods for the measurement and/or for the specification of the perceptual intensity of a visual image, or the perceptual distance between a pair of images. Grayscale test and reference images are processed to produce test and reference luminance images. A luminance filter function is convolved with the reference luminance image to produce a local mean luminance reference image. Test and reference contrast images are produced from the local mean luminance reference image and the test and reference luminance images respectively, followed by application of a contrast sensitivity filter. The resulting images are combined according to mathematical prescriptions to produce a Just Noticeable Difference, JND value, indicative of a Spatial Standard Observer, SSO. Some embodiments include masking functions, window functions, special treatment for images lying on or near borders and pre-processing of test images.

  12. Intensity fluctuations of asymmetrical optical beams in anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-09-20

    Intensity fluctuations of asymmetrical optical beams are examined when such beams propagate through anisotropic turbulence. Anisotropic turbulence is modeled by non-Kolmogorov von Kármán spectrum. The variations of the scintillation index are observed against the changes in the asymmetry factor of the Gaussian beam, power law exponent of non-Kolmogorov spectrum, anisotropic factors in the transverse direction, and the link length. It is found that for all the conditions, asymmetry in the optical beam is a disadvantage but the anisotropy in the atmosphere is an advantage for reducing the intensity fluctuations in an optical wireless communications link operating in the atmosphere. PMID:27661570

  13. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, K.; Murphy, B.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-09-10

    The interactions of large xenon clusters irradiated by intense, femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at a wavelength of 38 nm have been studied. Using high harmonic generation from a 35 fs near-infrared terawatt laser, clusters have been irradiated by XUV pulses of 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. Charge states up to Xe{sup 8+} are observed, states well above that produced by single atom illumination, indicating that plasma continuum lowering is important. Furthermore the kinetic energy distribution of the exploding ions is consistent with a quasineutral hydrodynamic expansion, rather than a Coulomb explosion.

  14. Correlated pulsations in auroral light intensity and VLF hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duthie, D. D.; Rash, J. P. S.; Scourfield, M. W. J.

    1985-12-01

    Observations at Sanae, Antarctica of a pulsating aurora with a low light level TV system have been combined with simultaneous recordings of VLF hiss on a broad band receiver. Both auroral light and hiss intensities display a significant peak at 1.3 Hz in the power spectrum. The peaks in the auroral light intensity variations lead those in the VLF hiss by times between zero and 0.2 s, as revealed by cross-spectral analysis. These results are explained in terms of cyclotron resonance in the equatorial plane between the auroral electrons and echoing VLF hiss.

  15. Radar imaging of intense nonlinear Ekman divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoqiang; Perrie, William; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; He, Yijun; Shen, Hui; Zhang, Biao; Hu, Haibo

    2016-09-01

    In general, given an oceanic thermal front, there is a strong positive correlation between sea surface temperature (SST) gradients and surface winds, and the marine atmospheric boundary layer is unstable over the warm side of the oceanic thermal front. The Gulf Stream is a notable example of an oceanic thermal front, and its warm side is often detected as enhanced backscatter in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. However, in some "anomalous" SAR images, low backscatter is sometimes observed on the warm side of the front, which seems inconsistent. Therefore, we propose a mechanism to interpret the generation of the low backscatter, based on interactions between ocean surface wind waves and intense nonlinear Ekman divergence. This mechanism is verified by showing that patterns in an observed anomalous SAR image are in good agreement with those in the simulated radar signature. In addition, this methodology and analysis demonstrate that SAR is potentially important for detecting and diagnosing small scale air-sea interactions and upper ocean dynamics with strong vertical transports induced by submesoscale processes.

  16. Equatorial noise emissions with quasiperiodic modulation of wave intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, F.; Santolík, O.; Hrbáčková, Z.; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2015-04-01

    Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic wave events at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. They propagate nearly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and they exhibit a harmonic line structure characteristic of the proton cyclotron frequency in the source region. However, they were generally believed to be continuous in time. We investigate more than 2000 EN events observed by the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations and Wide-Band Data Plasma Wave investigation instruments on board the Cluster spacecraft, and we show that this is not always the case. A clear quasiperiodic (QP) time modulation of the wave intensity is present in more than 5% of events. We perform a systematic analysis of these EN events with QP modulation of the wave intensity. Such events occur usually in the noon-to-dawn magnetic local time sector. Their occurrence seems to be related to the increased geomagnetic activity, and it is associated with the time intervals of enhanced solar wind flow speeds. The modulation period of these events is on the order of minutes. Compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations with periods about double the modulation periods of EN wave intensity and magnitudes on the order of a few tenths of nanotesla were identified in about 46% of events. We suggest that these compressional magnetic field pulsations might be responsible for the observed QP modulation of EN wave intensity, in analogy to formerly reported VLF whistler mode QP events.

  17. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2001-06-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  18. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  19. High intensity portable fluorescent light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, F. B.

    1972-01-01

    Eight high intensity portable fluorescent lights were produced. Three prototype lights were also produced, two of which were subsequently updated to the physical and operational configuration of the qualification and flight units. Positioning of lamp apertures and reflectors in these lights is such that the light is concentrated and intensified in a specific pattern rather than widely diffused. Indium amalgam control of mercury vapor pressure in the lamp gives high output at lamp ambient temperatures up to 105 C. A small amount of amalgam applied to each electrode stem helps to obtain fast warm-up. Shrinking a Teflon sleeve on the tube and potting metal caps on each end of the lamp minimizes dispersion of mercury vapor and glass particles in the event of accidental lamp breakage. Operation at 20 kHz allows the lamps to consume more power than at low frequency, thus increasing their light output and raising their efficiency. When used to expose color photographic film, light from the lamps produces results approximately equal to sunlight.

  20. Classification of knowledge-intensive organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquart, Edward J.

    Managing knowledge workers in knowledge-intensive organizations has become important because knowledge itself is emerging as a primary sustainable competitive advantage. This dissertation traces the development of two important items related to knowledge-intensive organizations. First, it documents a careful study of the literature which allows for the construction of a Knowledge-Intensity Continuum. This continuum then forms the basis for the development of a Knowledge-Intensity Assessment survey instrument which allows an organization to be placed along this continuum. A cross-section of research, consulting, and manufacturing organizations was surveyed using this instrument. The findings provided evidence that supports the validity of the Knowledge-Intensity Continuum. Additionally, onsite interviews provided evidence that the Knowledge-Intensity Assessment survey can be used as a tool to locate any organization on this continuum. Using this survey to clearly identify knowledge-intensive organizations will allow for further research into effective management systems for knowledge workers in these organizations.

  1. Potential of ILRIS3D Intensity Data for Planar Surfaces Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Kuei; Lu, Yao-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Intensity value based point cloud segmentation has received less attention because the intensity value of the terrestrial laser scanner is usually altered by receiving optics/hardware or the internal propriety software, which is unavailable to the end user. We offer a solution by assuming the terrestrial laser scanners are stable and the behavior of the intensity value can be characterized. Then, it is possible to use the intensity value for segmentation by observing its behavior, i.e., intensity value variation, pattern and presence of location of intensity values, etc. In this study, experiment results for characterizing the intensity data of planar surfaces collected by ILRIS3D, a terrestrial laser scanner, are reported. Two intensity formats, grey and raw, are employed by ILRIS3D. It is found from the experiment results that the grey intensity has less variation; hence it is preferable for point cloud segmentation. A warm-up time of approximate 1.5 hours is suggested for more stable intensity data. A segmentation method based on the visual cues of the intensity images sequence, which contains consecutive intensity images, is proposed in order to segment the 3D laser points of ILRIS3D. This method is unique to ILRIS3D data and does not require radiometric calibration. PMID:22346726

  2. Spatial Intensity Profiles of Galactic Cosmic Rays in the Heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Moraal, H.; Caballero-Lopez, R.A.; McDonald, F.B.

    2004-09-15

    We study the spatial intensity profiles of galactic cosmic ray protons (H) and {alpha}-particles (He) during the solar minimum periods of 1987 (the so-called negative drift state) and 1977/1997 (both positive drift states) of the heliosphere. These intensities were measured with the Pioneer, Voyager and IMP spacecraft. The 1997 intensities were so low that one cannot readily explain them, even with the acceleration at the solar wind termination shock (SWTS) and modulation in the heliosheath included. Our heliospheric model is azimuthally symmetric with a spherical shock and heliopause, however, and we infer from its results that more realistic geometries may produce modulation effects that will explain the observations better.

  3. Factors controlling the interannual variations of MJO intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Li; Li, Tim; Liu, Jia; Peng, Melinda

    2016-06-01

    The interannual variations of intensity of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) during boreal winter are investigated by using the observed outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and the reanalysis data of ECMWF and NCEP. The standard deviation of 20-80-day filtered OLR anomaly is used to measure the MJO intensity. The dominant spatial structure of the interannual variability is revealed by an EOF analysis of the MJO intensity field. It is found that the leading mode is associated with eastern Pacific type ENSO, whereas the second mode is related to central Pacific type ENSO. A simple atmospheric model is used to investigate the relative roles of background moisture and wind changes in affecting the overall strength of MJO. The numerical experiments indicate that the background moisture effect is dominant while the background wind change has a minor effect.

  4. Intense field double detachment of atomic versus molecular anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albeck, Y.; Lerner, G.; Kandhasamy, D. M.; Chandrasekaran, V.; Strasser, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of intense ultrafast laser pulses with atomic F- and with molecular S F6 - anions is directly compared. The double-detachment mechanism is investigated by a systematic variation of peak intensity, polarization ellipticity, and pulse shape. For both systems, the observed weak polarization ellipticity dependence is not consistent with a rescattering-based mechanism. A double-detachment saturation intensity of 22 ±4 ×1013W /c m2 is determined for the atomic anion, which is significantly higher than the 9 ±2 ×1013W /c m2 of the analogous molecular system. The different atomic and molecular responses to spectral chirp and third-order dispersion induced pulse shapes are discussed in the context of the double-detachment time scale.

  5. Forward modeling of gyrosynchrotron intensity perturbations by sausage modes

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikova, V. E.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Antolin, P.

    2014-04-20

    To determine the observable radio signatures of the fast sausage standing wave, we examine gyrosynchrotron (GS) emission modulation using a linear three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of a plasma cylinder. Effects of the line-of-sight angle and instrumental resolution on perturbations of the GS intensity are analyzed for two models: a base model with strong Razin suppression and a low-density model in which the Razin effect was unimportant. Our finding contradicts previous predictions made with simpler models: an in-phase variation of intensity between low (f < f {sub peak}) and high (f > f {sub peak}) frequencies is found for the low-density model and an anti-phase variation for the base model in the case of a viewing angle of 45°. The spatially inhomogeneous character of the oscillating emission source and the spatial resolution of the model are found to have a significant effect on the resulting intensity.

  6. Response of graphene to femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Adam; Cormode, Daniel; Reynolds, Collin; Newhouse-Illige, Ty; LeRoy, Brian J.; Sandhu, Arvinder S.

    2011-08-01

    We study the response of graphene to high-intensity, 50-femtosecond laser pulse excitation. We establish that graphene has a high ({approx}3 x 10{sup 12} Wcm{sup -2}) single-shot damage threshold. Above this threshold, a single laser pulse cleanly ablates graphene, leaving microscopically defined edges. Below this threshold, we observe laser-induced defect formation leading to degradation of the lattice over multiple exposures. We identify the lattice modification processes through in-situ Raman microscopy. The effective lifetime of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene under femtosecond near-infrared irradiation and its dependence on laser intensity is determined. These results also define the limits of non-linear applications of graphene in femtosecond high-intensity regime.

  7. High intensity exercise decreases global brain glucose uptake in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Jukka; Aalto, Sargo; Fujimoto, Toshihiko; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Långsjö, Jaakko; Oikonen, Vesa; Rinne, Juha; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani

    2005-01-01

    Physiological activation increases glucose uptake locally in the brain. However, it is not known how high intensity exercise affects regional and global brain glucose uptake. The effect of exercise intensity and exercise capacity on brain glucose uptake was directly measured using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ([18F]FDG). Fourteen healthy, right-handed men were studied after 35 min of bicycle exercise at exercise intensities corresponding to 30, 55 and 75% of V˙O2max on three separate days. [18F]FDG was injected 10 min after the start of the exercise. Thereafter exercise was continued for another 25 min. PET scanning of the brain was conducted after completion of the exercise. Regional glucose metabolic rate (rGMR) decreased in all measured cortical regions as exercise intensity increased. The mean decrease between the highest and lowest exercise intensity was 32% globally in the brain (38.6 ± 4.6 versus 26.1 ± 5.0 μmol (100 g)−1 min−1, P < 0.001). Lactate availability during exercise tended to correlate negatively with the observed brain glucose uptake. In addition, the decrease in glucose uptake in the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate cortex (37% versus 20%, P < 0.05 between 30% and 75% of V˙O2max) was significantly more pronounced in subjects with higher exercise capacity. These results demonstrate that brain glucose uptake decreases with increase in exercise intensity. Therefore substrates other than glucose, most likely lactate, are utilized by the brain in order to compensate the increased energy needed to maintain neuronal activity during high intensity exercise. Moreover, it seems that exercise training could be related to adaptive metabolic changes locally in the frontal cortical regions. PMID:16037089

  8. Global Changes of the Water Cycle Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Walker, Gregory K.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate numerical simulations of the twentieth century climate, focusing on the changes in the intensity of the global water cycle. A new diagnostic of atmospheric water vapor cycling rate is developed and employed, that relies on constituent tracers predicted at the model time step. This diagnostic is compared to a simplified traditional calculation of cycling rate, based on monthly averages of precipitation and total water content. The mean sensitivity of both diagnostics to variations in climate forcing is comparable. However, the new diagnostic produces systematically larger values and more variability than the traditional average approach. Climate simulations were performed using SSTs of the early (1902-1921) and late (1979- 1998) twentieth century along with the appropriate C02 forcing. In general, the increase of global precipitation with the increases in SST that occurred between the early and late twentieth century is small. However, an increase of atmospheric temperature leads to a systematic increase in total precipitable water. As a result, the residence time of water in the atmosphere increased, indicating a reduction of the global cycling rate. This result was explored further using a number of 50-year climate simulations from different models forced with observed SST. The anomalies and trends in the cycling rate and hydrologic variables of different GCMs are remarkably similar. The global annual anomalies of precipitation show a significant upward trend related to the upward trend of surface temperature, during the latter half of the twentieth century. While this implies an increase in the hydrologic cycle intensity, a concomitant increase of total precipitable water again leads to a decrease in the calculated global cycling rate. An analysis of the land/sea differences shows that the simulated precipitation over land has a decreasing trend while the oceanic precipitation has an upward trend consistent with previous studies and the

  9. Regional intensity of vascular care and lower extremity amputation rates

    PubMed Central

    Goodney, Philip P.; Holman, Kerianne; Henke, Peter K.; Travis, Lori L.; Dimick, Justin B.; Stukel, Therese A.; Fisher, Elliott. S.; Birkmeyer, John D.

    2013-01-01

    , although the observational nature of associations do not impart causality. High-risk patients, especially African-American diabetic patients residing in low-intensity vascular care regions, represent an important target for systematic efforts to reduce amputation risk. PMID:23375611

  10. Detection of increments in noise intensity by monkeys.

    PubMed

    Clopton, B M

    1972-05-01

    Monkeys were trained to detect 100-msec increments in the intensity of continuous white noise. A response on one of two bars was reinforced with some probability if it conformed to the presence or absence of the increment on that trial. Stimulus parameters of background intensity, increment size, and probability of increment presentation were varied, and response probabilities and latencies were recorded. The task was analogous to the "yes-no" task used in human psychophysics. Data analysis within the context of signal-detection theory revealed response biasing toward one bar or the other to be related to the probability of increment presentation, whereas sensitivity depended on the combination of increment size and background noise intensity. Weber's law was found to hold for a large range of background intensities in that the sensitivity to relative intensity increments varied little. Performance was compared to that of an ideal observer that uses samples of the envelope of the noise waveform on which to base its responses.

  11. Modulation of chorus intensity by ULF waves deep in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhiyang; Chen, Lunjin; Dai, Lei; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Chan, Anthony A.; Soto-Chavez, A. R.; Reeves, G. D.

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that chorus wave intensity can be modulated by Pc4-Pc5 compressional ULF waves. In this study, we present Van Allen Probes observation of ULF wave modulating chorus wave intensity, which occurred deep in the magnetosphere. The ULF wave shows fundamental poloidal mode signature and mirror mode compressional nature. The observed ULF wave can modulate not only the chorus wave intensity but also the distribution of both protons and electrons. Linear growth rate analysis shows consistence with observed chorus intensity variation at low frequency (f <˜ 0.3fce), but cannot account for the observed higher-frequency chorus waves, including the upper band chorus waves. This suggests the chorus waves at higher-frequency ranges require nonlinear mechanisms. In addition, we use combined observations of Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) A and B to verify that the ULF wave event is spatially local and does not last long.

  12. Underwater Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea: Intensity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew W.

    In the spring of 2009, broadband transmissions from a ship-suspended source with a 284 Hz center frequency were received on a moored and navigated vertical array of hydrophones over a range of 107 km in the Philippine Sea. During a 60-hour period over 19 000 transmissions were carried out. The observed wavefront arrival structure reveals four distinct purely refracted acoustic paths: one with a single upper turning point near 80 m depth, two with a pair of upper turning points at a depth of roughly 300 m, and one with three upper turning points at 420 m. Individual path intensity, defined as the absolute square of the center frequency Fourier component for that arrival, was estimated over the 60-hour duration and used to compute scintillation index and log-intensity variance. Monte Carlo parabolic equation simulations using internal-wave induced sound speed perturbations obeying the Garrett-Munk internal-wave en- ergy spectrum were in agreement with measured data for the three deeper-turning paths but differed by as much as a factor of four for the near surface-interacting path. Estimates of the power spectral density and temporal autocorrelation function of intensity were attempted, but were complicated by gaps in the measured time-series. Deep fades in intensity were observed in the near surface-interacting path. Hypothesized causes for the deep fades were examined through further acoustic propagation modeling and analysis of various available oceanographic measurements.

  13. Crop yield response to climate change varies with cropping intensity.

    PubMed

    Challinor, Andrew J; Parkes, Ben; Ramirez-Villegas, Julian

    2015-04-01

    Projections of the response of crop yield to climate change at different spatial scales are known to vary. However, understanding of the causes of systematic differences across scale is limited. Here, we hypothesize that heterogeneous cropping intensity is one source of scale dependency. Analysis of observed global data and regional crop modelling demonstrate that areas of high vs. low cropping intensity can have systematically different yields, in both observations and simulations. Analysis of global crop data suggests that heterogeneity in cropping intensity is a likely source of scale dependency for a number of crops across the globe. Further crop modelling and a meta-analysis of projected tropical maize yields are used to assess the implications for climate change assessments. The results show that scale dependency is a potential source of systematic bias. We conclude that spatially comprehensive assessments of climate impacts based on yield alone, without accounting for cropping intensity, are prone to systematic overestimation of climate impacts. The findings therefore suggest a need for greater attention to crop suitability and land use change when assessing the impacts of climate change.

  14. Optical electronics for meteor observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafiev, R. I.; Mukhamednazarov, S.; Atamas, I. A.

    1987-01-01

    Spectral observations of meteors have been carried out for several years using an optical electronics facility. Interest has centered on faint meteors and their trails in the period of intensive meteor showers. Over 800 meteors were registered during the observation period, with spectrograms obtained for 170 of these. A total of 86 meteors were photographed from two sites and for 25 of these spectrograms of the meteors as well as their trails were obtained. All meteors have undergone routine processing in order to determine atmospheric characteristics. Results are discussed.

  15. Auditory intensity discrimination in blackbirds and pigeons.

    PubMed

    Hienz, R D; Sinnott, J M; Sachs, M B

    1980-12-01

    Redwing blackbirds, brown-headed cowbirds, and pigeons were trained with operant conditioning techniques to respond to small increases in the intensity of pulsed tone trains at three frequencies: .5, 1.0, and 2.0 kHz. All three species produced similar intensity difference limens (DLs) at the frequencies tested. Intensity DLs decreased as sensation level (intensity level above absolute threshold) increased at all three frequencies, with the slopes of these sensation level functions being greatest at 2.0 kHz . The median intensity DLs at 50 dB sensation level were 3.3, 2.7, and 2.9 dB at .5, 1.0, and 2.0 kHz, respectively, averaged over the three species. Some subjects were also required to detect decreases in intensity. They produced intensity DLs two to three times larger than the DLs obtained when these same subjects were required to detect increases in intensity. Avian intensity DLs generally appear to be 1-2 dB higher than the DLs of those mammals that have been tested (rat, cat, monkey, humans).

  16. EUV observations of quiescent prominences from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, O. K.; Cook, J. W.; Mango, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of line intensities and line widths for three quiescent prominences observed with Naval Research Laboratory slit spectrograph on ATM/Skylab are reported. The wavelengths of the observed lines cover the range 1175 A to 1960 A. The measured intensities have been calibrated to within approximately a factor 2 and are average intensities over a 2 arcsec by 60 arcsec slit. Nonthermal velocities from the measured line widths are derived. The nonthermal velocity is found to increase with temperature in the prominence transition zone. Electron densities and pressures are derived from density sensitive line ratios. Electron pressures for two of the prominences are found to lie in the range 0.04-0.08 dyn/sq cm, while values for the third and most intense and active of the three prominences are in the range 0.07-0.22 dyn/sq cm.

  17. The craft of intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Simon

    2013-06-01

    The practice of medicine is often represented as a dualism: is medicine a 'science' or an 'art'? This dualism has been long-lasting, with evident appeal for the medical profession. It also appears to have been rhetorically powerful, for example in enabling clinicians to resist the encroachment of 'scientific' evidence-based medicine into core areas of medical work such as individual clinical judgement. In this article I want to make the case for a more valid conceptualisation of medical practice: that it is a 'craft' activity. The case I make is founded on a theoretical synthesis of the concept of craft, combined with an analysis of ethnographic observations of routine medical practice in intensive care. For this context the craft aspects of medical work can be seen in how biomedical and other types of knowledge are used in practice, the embodied skills and practical judgement of practitioners and the technological and material environment. These aspects are brought together in two conceptual dimensions for 'craft': first, the application of knowledge; second, interaction with the material world. Some practical and political implications of a 'craft' metaphor for medical practice are noted.

  18. Intensely oscillating cavitation bubble in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew-Wan, Ohl; Tandiono; Klaseboer, Evert; Dave, Ow; Choo, Andre; Claus-Dieter, Ohl

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the technical breakthrough in generating intense ultrasonic cavitation in the confinement of a microfluidics channel [1], and applications that has been developed on this platform for the past few years [2,3,4,5]. Our system consists of circular disc transducers (10-20 mm in diameter), the microfluidics channels on PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and a driving circuitry. The cavitation bubbles are created at the gas- water interface due to strong capillary waves which are generated when the system is driven at its natural frequency (around 100 kHz) [1]. These bubbles oscillate and collapse within the channel. The bubbles are useful for sonochemistry and the generation of sonoluminescence [2]. When we add bacteria (Escherichia coli), and yeast cells (Pichia pastoris) into the microfluidics channels, the oscillating and collapsing bubbles stretch and lyse these cells [3]. Furthermore, the system is effective (DNA of the harvested intracellular content remains largely intact), and efficient (yield reaches saturation in less than 1 second). In another application, human red blood cells are added to a microchamber. Cell stretching and rapture are observed when a laser generated cavitation bubble expands and collapses next to the cell [4]. A numerical model of a liquid pocket surrounded by a membrane with surface tension which was placed next to an oscillating bubble was developed using the Boundary Element Method. The simulation results showed that the stretching of the liquid pocket occurs only when the surface tension is within a certain range.

  19. Bioelectric effects of intense ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R P; Schoenbach, K H

    2010-01-01

    Models for electric field interactions with biological cells predict that pulses with durations shorter than the charging time of the outer membrane can affect intracellular structures. Experimental studies in which human cells were exposed to pulsed electric fields of up to 300 kV/cm amplitude, with durations as short as 10 ns, have confirmed this hypothesis. The observed effects include the breaching of intracellular granule membranes without permanent damage to the cell membrane, abrupt rises in intracellular free calcium levels, enhanced expression of genes, cytochrome c release, and electroporation for gene transfer and drug delivery. At increased electric fields, the application of nanosecond pulses induces apoptosis (programmed cell death) in biological cells, an effect that has been shown to reduce the growth of tumors. Possible applications of the intracellular electroeffects are enhancing gene delivery to the nucleus, controlling cell functions that depend on calcium release (causing cell immobilization), and treating tumors. Such nanosecond electrical pulses have been shown to successfully treat melanoma tumors by using needle arrays as pulse delivery systems. Reducing the pulse duration of intense electric field pulses even further into the subnanosecond range will allow for the use of wideband antennas to deliver the electromagnetic fields into tissue with a spatial resolution in the centimeter range. This review carefully examines the above concepts, provides a theoretical basis, and modeling results based on both continuum approaches and atomistic molecular dynamics methods. Relevant experimental data are also presented, and some of the many potential bioengineering applications discussed.

  20. Infection control in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Chudleigh, J; Fletcher, M; Gould, D

    2005-10-01

    Healthcare-associated infection is a major problem in acute hospital settings. Hand decontamination is considered to be the most effective means of preventing healthcare-associated infection, but is poorly performed. Few studies have examined technique, which may be important in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) where clinical procedures are intricate and could result in contamination of many areas of the hand, resulting in cross-infection. This study examined technique in six NICUs. Eighty-eight nurses were observed. A scoring system was developed so that technique could be quantified and subjected to statistical testing. The mean score was 6.29 out of 11 when hands were washed and 3.87 out of 7 when alcohol hand rub was used, indicating that performance was not optimal. Scores for technique were not significantly different in each NICU. Senior nurses achieved higher scores for handwashing (P<0.01), as did nurses holding positive feelings about the atmosphere in their NICU (P=0.04). Junior nurses scored less well on a knowledge questionnaire than senior nurses (P<0.01). Nurses who had been employed in the neonatal unit for less than one year also scored less well (P<0.01). Differences in technique were noted when comparing the beginning and end of long shifts. These differences were not noted at the beginning and end of standard shifts.

  1. Are ceramics and bricks reliable absolute geomagnetic intensity carriers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Juan; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Aguilar-Reyes, Bertha; Pineda-Duran, Modesto; Camps, Pierre; Carvallo, Claire; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel

    2011-08-01

    (bottom and upper parts of both central and peripheral parts) revealed the existence of significant thermal gradients, similar to those observed in ovens from other localities. Different cooling rates are then expected in a single oven. The scatter in the intensity determinations observed in this study, retrieved from pieces elaborated together in the same oven, could arise from this differentiated cooling rate within the oven and thus, to an inappropriate cooling rate correction in the archeointensity protocol. As this situation was probably reproduced in the baking of ancient ceramic artifacts, a better knowledge of the temperature distribution inside these types of kiln would be desirable in order to choose the appropriate cooling rate correction.

  2. Streaming Limit: New Observations and Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. K.; Reames, D. V.; Tylka, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Solar energetic particle intensities at 1 AU often show an early temporal plateau where the intensity is limited. This early intensity limit may provide a valuable time window for astronauts to seek shelter before large shock-associated intensity increase (if any). The Ng and Reames (1994) time-dependent model of SEP transport through self-amplified Alfvén waves predicts a maximum proton intensity of ~ 250 particles /(cm^2 s str MeV) at ~ 1 MeV, in agreement within a factor of 2 with the observational survey by Reames and Ng (1998). In fact, streaming-limited intensity is implicit in the steady-state shock-acceleration solution of Bell (1978) and Lee (1983). Further studies on the effect of self-amplified waves on SEP intensity spectra have been made by Ng, Reames and Tylka (2003), Vanio (2003), and Lee (2005). Intensities exceeding the Ng and Reames (1994) limit have been reported (e.g., Lario et al. 2009). We present new observations of multi-species SEP spectra at the temporal intensity plateau. We also present new theoretical results on how the streaming limit depends on ion species and energy, ambient wave intensity spectrum, Alfvén speed, solar-wind speed, shock speed, and the presence of interplanetary shocks and interaction regions. Among the new interesting observations is the strong suppression of ion intensities near 1 MeV/amu in events that have high 10-100 MeV proton intensity. New modeling results confirm that this is due to these low-energy ions being strongly scattered at small pitch angles by waves amplified by 10-100 MeV protons at large pitch angles. As the high-energy protons travel upstream and scatter from small to large pitch-angles, they simultaneously amplify waves en route over a range of wavenumbers, including those that are resonant with low-energy protons. Thus, wave amplification by streaming protons and the pitch-angle dependence of the wave-particle resonance condition are essential factors in understanding the limiting behavior

  3. Pion observables and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs) are a tower of coupled integral equations that relate the Green functions of QCD to one another. Solving these equations provides the solution of QCD. This tower of equations includes the equation for the quark self-energy, which is the analogue of the gap equation in superconductivity, and the Bethe-Salpeter equation, the solution of which is the quark-antiquark bound state amplitude in QCD. The application of this approach to solving Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories is reviewed. The nonperturbative DSE approach is being developed as both: (1) a computationally less intensive alternative and; (2) a complement to numerical simulations of the lattice action of QCD. In recent years, significant progress has been made with the DSE approach so that it is now possible to make sensible and direct comparisons between quantities calculated using this approach and the results of numerical simulations of Abelian gauge theories. Herein the application of the DSE approach to the calculation of pion observables is described: the {pi}-{pi} scattering lengths (a{sub 0}{sup 0}, a{sub 0}{sup 2}, A{sub 1}{sup 1}, a{sub 2}{sup 2}) and associated partial wave amplitudes; the {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay width; and the charged pion form factor, F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). Since this approach provides a straightforward, microscopic description of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (D{sub X}SB) and confinement, the calculation of pion observables is a simple and elegant illustrative example of its power and efficacy. The relevant DSEs are discussed in the calculation of pion observables and concluding remarks are presented.

  4. Effect of Intense Sound Waves on a Stationary Gas Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahnemann, H; Ehret, L

    1950-01-01

    Intense sound waves with a resonant frequency of 5000 cycles per second were imposed on a stationary propane-air flame issuing from a nozzle. In addition to a slight increase of the flame velocity, a fundamental change both in the shape of the burning zone and in the flow pattern could be observed. An attempt is made to explain the origin of the variations in the flame configuration on the basis of transition at the nozzle from jet flow to potential flow.

  5. Intensive care management of organophosphate insecticide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sungur, Murat; Güven, Muhammed

    2001-01-01

    % FIO2. Weaning was performed using either T-tube trials or pressure support weaning. The chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Results There were 25 female and 22 male patients. Thirty-two (68%) were suicide attempts and 15 (32%) were accidental exposure. The gastrointestinal route was the main route in 44 (93.6%) patients. The mortality rates for the patients who did and did not receive pralidoxime were 32 and 18.7%, respectively, and were not statistically different. The most frequent signs were meiosis, change in mental status, hypersalivation and fasciculations. Ten patients (21.2%) required mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate for the patients who required mechanical ventilation was 50%, but the rate was 21.6% for the patients who were not mechanically ventilated. Intermediate syndrome was observed in 9 (19.1%) patients. Complications were observed in 35 (74.4%) patients. These complications were respiratory failure (14 patients), aspiration pneumonia (10 patients), urinary system infection (6 patients), convulsion (4 patients) and septic shock (1 patient). The duration of the intensive care stay was 5.2 ± 3.0 days. Discussion Ingestion of OP compounds for suicidal purposes is a major problem, especially in developing countries. Thirty-two (68%) of our patients used the OP insecticide for suicide. Two patients did not receive pralidoxime because of delayed admission and they were successfully treated with atropine alone. Three of the patients who did not receive pralidoxime because of unavailability died. The mortality rate was no different between the patients treated with pralidoxime or those without pralidoxime. De Silva and coworkers have also reported that the mortality rate was not different between each group. Three patients with intermediate syndrome died due to delay for endotracheal intubation. The average respiratory rate of these patients increased from 22 to 38 breaths/min, which is

  6. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  7. Characteristic infrared intensities of carbonyl stretching vibrations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wagner E; Silva, Arnaldo F; Vidal, Luciano N; Bruns, Roy E

    2016-07-14

    The experimental infrared fundamental intensities of gas phase carbonyl compounds obtained by the integration of spectral bands in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) spectral database are in good agreement with the intensities reported by other laboratories having a root mean square error of 27 km mol(-1) or about 13% of the average intensity value. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules/Charge-Charge Transfer-Counterpolarization (QTAIM/CCTCP) model indicates that the large intensity variation from 61.7 to 415.4 km mol(-1) is largely due to static atomic charge contributions, whereas charge transfer and counterpolarization effects essentially cancel one another leaving only a small net effect. The Characteristic Substituent Shift Model estimates the atomic charge contributions to the carbonyl stretching intensities within 30 km mol(-1) or 10% of the average contribution. However, owing to the size of the 2 × C × CTCP interaction contribution, the total intensities cannot be estimated with this degree of accuracy. The dynamic intensity contributions of the carbon and oxygen atoms account for almost all of the total stretching intensities. These contributions vary over large ranges with the dynamic contributions of carbon being about twice the size of the oxygen ones for a large majority of carbonyls. Although the carbon monoxide molecule has an almost null dipole moment contrary to the very polar bond of the characteristic carbonyl group, its QTAIM/CCTCP model is very similar to those found for the carbonyl compounds. PMID:27306140

  8. [Treating pain in paediatric intensive care].

    PubMed

    Abderrahamn, Nadia; Beck, Nathalie; Fazilleau, Laura; Langlois, Claudette

    2014-01-01

    Pain is extremely present in paediatric intensive care units. It is caused both by the care procedures and by the pathology itself. Its assessment is essential and is based on scales adapted to the child.Treatment methods, pharmacological or not, depend on the type of pain and its intensity.

  9. Intensity correlations and dynamical processes in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Stephen Lawrence

    1998-10-01

    Dynamical processes in a cavity quantum electrodynamical system are studied with two-level atoms in an optical cavity. The initial condition for the dynamics is either an internal or external step. The internal step is caused by the escape of a photon from the system, and the external step by a change in the driving intensity. After either step there is an oscillatory exchange of energy as the system reaches steady state. The frequency of oscillation decreases with increasing input intensity. The experimental results are compared quantitatively to theoretical calculations and to transmission spectroscopy measurements. After the external step, the output intensity oscillates to a value many times larger than the steady state. Response to the internal step is measured by photon correlations. Antibunched light with sub-Poissonian statistics is observed. Antibunched light with super-Poissonian statistics, as well as bunched light with larger correlations for non-zero times are also observed. All three effects are nonclassical. The latter two have not previously been observed, and violate the Schwarz inequality.

  10. Atmospheric energetics in regions of intense convective activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Synoptic-scale budgets of kinetic and total potential energy are computed using 3- and 6-h data at nine times from NASA's fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE IV). Two intense squall lines occurred during the period. Energy budgets for areas that enclose regions of intense convection are shown to have systematic changes that relate to the life cycles of the convection. Some of the synoptic-scale energy processes associated with the convection are found to be larger than those observed in the vicinity of mature cyclones. Volumes enclosing intense convection are found to have large values of cross-contour conversion of potential to kinetic energy and large horizontal export of kinetic energy. Although small net vertical transport of kinetic energy is observed, values at individual layers indicate large upward transport. Transfer of kinetic energy from grid to subgrid scales of motion occurs in the volumes. Latent heat release is large in the middle and upper troposphere and is thought to be the cause of the observed cyclic changes in the budget terms. Total potential energy is found to be imported horizontally in the lower half of the atmosphere, transported aloft, and then exported horizontally. Although local changes of kinetic energy and total potential energy are small, interaction between volumes enclosing convection with surrounding larger volumes is quite large.

  11. Quasi-periodic Intensity Disturbances in Polar Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JIAO, F.; Xia, L.; Li, B.; Li, X.; Mou, C.; Fu, H.

    2013-12-01

    It's known that polar coronal plumes appear to be hazy and ray-like structures. Quasi-periodic disturbances in polar plumes are often observed with Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images and are identified as alternating slanted ridges in the distance-time maps with periods of 10-30 minutes. Usually, their propagating speeds range from 60 to 150 km/s. We analyse the intensity variation above polar coronal holes with data from three SDO/AIA bandpass channels (171Å, 193Å, 304Å) by using wavelet analysis and FFT, and produce intensity power distribution images. We find that slender radial structures (which we call fine structures) in these images and their widths are only a few arcsec in the plume and inter-plume regions. We propose that these fine structures could depict the orientation of the magnetic field in the polar coronal hole. Similar to the previous research, intensity disturbances along fine structures have periods of 15-20 min. Besides, the propagating speed of intensity disturbances along the fine structures ranges from more than a dozen kilometers per second at just above the solar limb to 150 km/s around 140'' above the limb. It is easy to identify the 304Å jets in the power images. We find that the intensity variation of jets obtained from the distance-time maps of the 304 line is often inversely correlated with that obtained from the 171 line (which is formed at 0.8MK) at the same position, which suggests that cool jets may be the driving source of intensity disturbances of hotter lines. This study may contribute to our understanding of the fine structures of plumes, the magnetic fields in polar corona hole and the acceleration of the fast solar wind.

  12. INTEGRAL/SPI data segmentation to retrieve source intensity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, L.; Amestoy, P. R.; Buttari, A.; Rouet, F.-H.; Chauvin, M.

    2013-07-01

    Context. The INTEGRAL/SPI, X/γ-ray spectrometer (20 keV-8 MeV) is an instrument for which recovering source intensity variations is not straightforward and can constitute a difficulty for data analysis. In most cases, determining the source intensity changes between exposures is largely based on a priori information. Aims: We propose techniques that help to overcome the difficulty related to source intensity variations, which make this step more rational. In addition, the constructed "synthetic" light curves should permit us to obtain a sky model that describes the data better and optimizes the source signal-to-noise ratios. Methods: For this purpose, the time intensity variation of each source was modeled as a combination of piecewise segments of time during which a given source exhibits a constant intensity. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratios, the number of segments was minimized. We present a first method that takes advantage of previous time series that can be obtained from another instrument on-board the INTEGRAL observatory. A data segmentation algorithm was then used to synthesize the time series into segments. The second method no longer needs external light curves, but solely SPI raw data. For this, we developed a specific algorithm that involves the SPI transfer function. Results: The time segmentation algorithms that were developed solve a difficulty inherent to the SPI instrument, which is the intensity variations of sources between exposures, and it allows us to obtain more information about the sources' behavior. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland), Czech Republic and Poland with participation of Russia and the USA.

  13. Luminous efficiency functions at higher intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Lawrence Kent

    Two psychophysical measurement techniques, flicker photometry and successive heterochromatic brightness matching, were used to measure changes in luminance efficiency functions with increasing levels of light adaptation. Both measurement techniques were performed using the same optical system and the same seven healthy adults as subjects. Measurements were taken at four reference stimulus intensities, 1, 10, 100 and 1000 foot-lamberts. Luminous efficiency was found to depend on both the technique and the reference stimulus intensity with which the measurements were taken. For heterochromatic brightness matching, luminous efficiency increased for longer wavelengths as reference intensity increased. Peak luminous efficiency shifted from approximately 540nm to greater than 600nm with increasing intensity for all seven subjects. Peak luminous efficiency was constant for flicker photometry across all intensities but the function narrowed slightly at 100 foot-lamberts.

  14. Punishment shock intensity and basal skin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A

    1965-11-01

    The relationship between punishment shock intensity and basal skin resistance (BSR) was investigated in two sessions with human females selected for their ability to maintain a fairly substantial operant rate under a wide range of shock intensities. In both sessions each button-pressing response was reinforced with a counter tally. Subjects were paid one cent for each 20 counts. In session 1, punishment followed each response during alternate 4-min periods; in session 2 punishment was programmed in all 4-min periods. Shock intensities were presented randomly among the 4-min shock periods, with the restriction that the first three presentations occurred in ascending order. Operant responding showed some suppression at higher shock intensities in session 1, with substantial recovery in most subjects during session 2. Respondent behavior was characterized by greater activity at successively higher intensities, with recovery at all shock levels, especially the lowest levels, apparent during the second session.

  15. Repeatability of Feather Mite Prevalence and Intensity in Passerine Birds

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Real, Javier; Serrano, David; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Fernández-González, Sofía; Bermejo, Ana; Calleja, Juan A.; De la Puente, Javier; De Palacio, Diana; Martínez, José L.; Moreno-Opo, Rubén; Ponce, Carlos; Frías, Óscar; Tella, José L.; Møller, Anders P.; Figuerola, Jordi; Pap, Péter L.; Kovács, István; Vágási, Csongor I.; Meléndez, Leandro; Blanco, Guillermo; Aguilera, Eduardo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Galván, Ismael; Atiénzar, Francisco; Barba, Emilio; Cantó, José L.; Cortés, Verónica; Monrós, Juan S.; Piculo, Rubén; Vögeli, Matthias; Borràs, Antoni; Navarro, Carlos; Mestre, Alexandre; Jovani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Understanding why host species differ so much in symbiont loads and how this depends on ecological host and symbiont traits is a major issue in the ecology of symbiosis. A first step in this inquiry is to know whether observed differences among host species are species-specific traits or more related with host-symbiont environmental conditions. Here we analysed the repeatability (R) of the intensity and the prevalence of feather mites to partition within- and among-host species variance components. We compiled the largest dataset so far available: 119 Paleartic passerine bird species, 75,944 individual birds, ca. 1.8 million mites, seven countries, 23 study years. Several analyses and approaches were made to estimate R and adjusted repeatability (Radj) after controlling for potential confounding factors (breeding period, weather, habitat, spatial autocorrelation and researcher identity). The prevalence of feather mites was moderately repeatable (R = 0.26–0.53; Radj = 0.32–0.57); smaller values were found for intensity (R = 0.19–0.30; Radj = 0.18–0.30). These moderate repeatabilities show that prevalence and intensity of feather mites differ among species, but also that the high variation within species leads to considerable overlap among bird species. Differences in the prevalence and intensity of feather mites within bird species were small among habitats, suggesting that local factors are playing a secondary role. However, effects of local climatic conditions were partially observed for intensity. PMID:25216248

  16. Predicting Ly-alpha intensities in coronal streamers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noci, Giancarlo; Poletto, Giannina; Suess, Steven T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.

    1992-01-01

    SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer) will make long term observations of coronal streamers in UV lines, providing a new tool for the analysis of structures which have been known for decades but are still far from being adequately described. Work to evaluate the Lyman alpha brightness of coronal streamers is reported, adopting the streamer models obtained, via a time dependent numerical relaxation technique. This will yield understanding on the role of geometric versus physical factors in determining the streamer lyman alpha intensity and provide guidelines for UVCS observational operations. Future prospects along this line of research are summarized.

  17. Voyager Observations in the Heliosheath and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, E. C.

    2016-07-01

    Now at ˜136 AU, Voyager 1 has been observing the intensity, composition, pitch-angle anisotropies, and transient perturbations of the local interstellar galactic cosmic rays over the last four years. During this time, Voyager 2 has continued to observe the spectral evolution of anomalous cosmic rays and the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays in the heliosheath and is now at ˜112 AU. An overview and update of these and other observations will be presented.

  18. Enhancement of Ion Line Intensity in the Analytical Zone of an Arc Dual-Jet Plasmatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, E. V.; Chumakova, N. L.

    2015-07-01

    We show that the effect of enhancement of the intensity (Ii) of ion lines, observed in atomic emission analysis when using an arc dual-jet plasmatron, is not an anomalous phenomenon compared with an arc plasma. For total ion energy <15 eV, it corresponds to a thermal mechanism for excitation of the spectra. At higher energy, we observe an increase in the intensity Ii relative to the equilibrium values that is due to the phenomenon of nonresonant charge exchange.

  19. Criteria for the observation of strong-field photoelectron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, T.; Huismans, Y.; Schafer, K. J.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-11-15

    Photoelectron holography is studied experimentally and computationally using the ionization of ground-state xenon atoms by intense near-infrared radiation. A strong dependence of the occurrence of the holographic pattern on the laser wavelength and intensity is observed, and it is shown that the observation of the hologram requires that the ponderomotive energy U{sub p} is substantially larger than the photon energy. The holographic interference is therefore favored by longer wavelengths and higher laser intensities. Our results indicate that the tunneling regime is not a necessary condition for the observation of the holographic pattern, which can be observed under the conditions formally attributed to the multiphoton regime.

  20. The nature of relativistic electron intensity changes during solar flare quiet times between 1963 and 1969

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B.; Cline, T. L.; Simnett, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    Time variations of the 3-12 MeV interplanetary electron intensity, observed by the Explorer-18, -28, and -33 spacecrafts, have been studied in detail. Apart from solar flare effects, there are five distinct periods when the electron intensity has undergone a series of increases, and these are strongly correlated with solar rotation. The intensity increases are separate phenomena, and are strikingly anticorrelated with increases in the low energy solar proton intensity. The electron energy spectrum during those quiet-time increases is typically represented by dJ/dE = k E/2.0 + or - 0.25 similar to the galactic electron spectrum. There are, in addition, Forbush decreases in the electron intensity frequently coincident with those in the neutron monitor. It is concluded that these characteristics all support the hypothesis of a galactic origin for the electrons observed during quiet-time increases.

  1. The effects of visitor density and intensity on the behavior of two captive jaguars (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Sellinger, Rebecca L; Ha, James C

    2005-01-01

    Several researchers have reported significant effects of visitor density and intensity on captive animal behavior. This study determined whether this was the case for 2 captive jaguars housed at the Woodland Park Zoo, Seattle, WA. Subjects were monitored for changes in behavior as a function of visitor density and intensity. The jaguars were observed for 8 hr per week for 29 weeks--March 31 until October 11, 1998--for a total of 230 hr. Continuous frequency sampling was used, and visitor density and intensity were recorded every minute. Parametric statistics were used to test for correlations between behavior and density, intensity, or a combination of the two. Both density and intensity were significant for time spent non-visible for both cats, and intensity showed a significant effect on the female's pacing behavior. In addition, the male cat exhibited a trend for increased aggression based on both visitor density and intensity and a trend of intensity affecting his social behavior. In conclusion, both density and intensity had a significant effect on behavior, with intensity showing a larger effect.

  2. PCATMIP: enhancing signal intensity in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pai, V M; Rapacchi, S; Kellman, P; Croisille, P; Wen, H

    2011-06-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI studies generally lose signal intensity to physiological motion, which can adversely affect quantification/diagnosis. Averaging over multiple repetitions, often used to improve image quality, does not eliminate the signal loss. In this article, PCATMIP, a combined principal component analysis and temporal maximum intensity projection approach, is developed to address this problem. Data are first acquired for a fixed number of repetitions. Assuming that physiological fluctuations of image intensities locally are likely temporally correlated unlike random noise, a local moving boxcar in the spatial domain is used to reconstruct low-noise images by considering the most relevant principal components in the temporal domain. Subsequently, a temporal maximum intensity projection yields a high signal-intensity image. Numerical and experimental studies were performed for validation and to determine optimal parameters for increasing signal intensity and minimizing noise. Subsequently, a combined principal component analysis and temporal maximum intensity projection approach was used to analyze diffusion-weighted porcine liver MRI scans. In these scans, the variability of apparent diffusion coefficient values among repeated measurements was reduced by 59% relative to averaging, and there was an increase in the signal intensity with higher intensity differences observed at higher b-values. In summary, a combined principal component analysis and temporal maximum intensity projection approach is a postprocessing approach that corrects for bulk motion-induced signal loss and improves apparent diffusion coefficient measurement reproducibility. PMID:21590803

  3. [Effects of excess Mn on photosynthesis characteristics in cucumber under different light intensity].

    PubMed

    Shi, Qinghua; Zhu, Zhujun; Ying, Quansheng; Qian, Qiongqiu

    2005-06-01

    By a solution culture experiment, this paper studied the effects of excess Mn on the growth, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and photosynthesis of cucumber under different light intensity. The results indicated that excess Mn inhibited plant growth, which was more obvious under high light intensity than under low light intensity. The primary maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (v/Fm), quantum efficiency of non-cyclic electron transport of PSII (phiPSII), and photochemical quenching (qP) were significantly decreased in excess Mn treatment under high light intensity, while no significant effects on Fv/Fm and qP were observed under low light intensity. Excess Mn, particularly under high light intensity, decreased net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and stomatal conductance (Gs). Excess Mn increased intracellular CO2 (Ci) under high light intensity and decreased Ci under low light intensity, while stomatal limitation value (Ls) was just reverse to Ci. It could be concluded that the decrease of Pn in excess Mn treatment was not resulted from stomatal limitation under high light intensity, but was true under low light intensity.

  4. INTERPRETING THE UNRESOLVED INTENSITY OF COSMOLOGICALLY REDSHIFTED LINE RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Switzer, E. R.; Chang, T.-C.; Pen, U.-L.; Voytek, T. C.

    2015-12-10

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise ratio. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of foregrounds may also not be well known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data themselves. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they are spectrally smooth, but instead that they have fewer bright spectral degrees of freedom than the cosmological signal. Spurious correlations between the signal and foregrounds produce additional bias. Compensation for signal attenuation must estimate and correct this bias. A successful intensity mapping experiment will control instrumental systematics that spread variance into new modes, and it must observe a large enough volume that contaminant modes can be determined independently from the signal on scales of interest.

  5. Simulating the large-scale structure of HI intensity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehars, Sebastian; Paranjape, Aseem; Witzemann, Amadeus; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Intensity mapping of neutral hydrogen (HI) is a promising observational probe of cosmology and large-scale structure. We present wide field simulations of HI intensity maps based on N-body simulations of a 2.6 Gpc / h box with 20483 particles (particle mass 1.6 × 1011 Msolar / h). Using a conditional mass function to populate the simulated dark matter density field with halos below the mass resolution of the simulation (108 Msolar / h < Mhalo < 1013 Msolar / h), we assign HI to those halos according to a phenomenological halo to HI mass relation. The simulations span a redshift range of 0.35 lesssim z lesssim 0.9 in redshift bins of width Δ z ≈ 0.05 and cover a quarter of the sky at an angular resolution of about 7'. We use the simulated intensity maps to study the impact of non-linear effects and redshift space distortions on the angular clustering of HI. Focusing on the autocorrelations of the maps, we apply and compare several estimators for the angular power spectrum and its covariance. We verify that these estimators agree with analytic predictions on large scales and study the validity of approximations based on Gaussian random fields, particularly in the context of the covariance. We discuss how our results and the simulated maps can be useful for planning and interpreting future HI intensity mapping surveys.

  6. Interpreting The Unresolved Intensity Of Cosmologically Redshifted Line Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, E. R.; Chang, T.-C.; Masui, K. W.; Pen, U.-L.; Voytek, T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise ratio. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically approximately 10(sup 2)-10(Sup 3) times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of fore-grounds may also not be well known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data themselves. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they are spectrally smooth, but instead that they have fewer bright spectral degrees of freedom than the cosmological signal. Spurious correlations between the signal and foregrounds produce additional bias. Compensation for signal attenuation must estimate and correct this bias. A successful intensity mapping experiment will control instrumental systematics that spread variance into new modes, and it must observe a large enough volume that contaminant modes can be determined independently from the signal on scales of interest.

  7. Internal dynamics of intense twin beams and their coherence

    PubMed Central

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of intense twin beams in pump-depleted parametric down-conversion is studied. A generalized parametric approximation is suggested to solve the quantum model. Its comparison with a semiclassical model valid for larger twin-beam intensities confirms its applicability. The experimentally observed maxima in the spectral and spatial intensity auto- and cross- correlation functions depending on pump power are explained in terms of different speeds of the (back-) flow of energy between the individual down-converted modes and the corresponding pump modes. This effect is also responsible for the gradual replacement of the initial exponential growth of the down-converted fields by the linear one. Furthermore, it forms a minimum in the curve giving the effective number of twin-beam modes. These effects manifest a tight relation between the twin-beam coherence and its internal structure, as clearly visible in the model. Multiple maxima in the intensity correlation functions originating in the oscillations of energy flow between the pump and down-converted modes are theoretically predicted. PMID:26924749

  8. Internal dynamics of intense twin beams and their coherence.

    PubMed

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2016-02-29

    The dynamics of intense twin beams in pump-depleted parametric down-conversion is studied. A generalized parametric approximation is suggested to solve the quantum model. Its comparison with a semiclassical model valid for larger twin-beam intensities confirms its applicability. The experimentally observed maxima in the spectral and spatial intensity auto- and cross- correlation functions depending on pump power are explained in terms of different speeds of the (back-) flow of energy between the individual down-converted modes and the corresponding pump modes. This effect is also responsible for the gradual replacement of the initial exponential growth of the down-converted fields by the linear one. Furthermore, it forms a minimum in the curve giving the effective number of twin-beam modes. These effects manifest a tight relation between the twin-beam coherence and its internal structure, as clearly visible in the model. Multiple maxima in the intensity correlation functions originating in the oscillations of energy flow between the pump and down-converted modes are theoretically predicted.

  9. Convolution formulations for non-negative intensity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Earl G

    2013-08-01

    Previously unknown spatial convolution formulas for a variant of the active normal intensity in planar coordinates have been derived that use measured pressure or normal velocity near-field holograms to construct a positive-only (outward) intensity distribution in the plane, quantifying the areas of the vibrating structure that produce radiation to the far-field. This is an extension of the outgoing-only (unipolar) intensity technique recently developed for arbitrary geometries by Steffen Marburg. The method is applied independently to pressure and velocity data measured in a plane close to the surface of a point-driven, unbaffled rectangular plate in the laboratory. It is demonstrated that the sound producing regions of the structure are clearly revealed using the derived formulas and that the spatial resolution is limited to a half-wavelength. A second set of formulas called the hybrid-intensity formulas are also derived which yield a bipolar intensity using a different spatial convolution operator, again using either the measured pressure or velocity. It is demonstrated from the experiment results that the velocity formula yields the classical active intensity and the pressure formula an interesting hybrid intensity that may be useful for source localization. Computations are fast and carried out in real space without Fourier transforms into wavenumber space. PMID:23927105

  10. On extreme rainfall intensity increases with air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Peter; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Gaal, Ladislav; Szolgay, Jan; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The water vapour holding capacity of air increases at about 7% per degree C according to the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) relation. This is one of the arguments why a warmer future atmosphere, being able to hold more moisture, will generate higher extreme precipitation intensities. However, several empirical studies have recently demonstrated an increase in extreme rain intensities with air temperature above CC rates, in the range 7-14% per degree C worldwide (called super-CC rates). This was observed especially for shorter duration rainfall, i.e. in hourly and finer resolution data (e.g. review in Westra et al., 2014). The super-CC rate was attributed to positive feedbacks between water vapour and the updraft dynamics in convective clouds and lateral supply (convergence) of moisture. In addition, mixing of storm types was shown to be potentially responsible for super-CC rates in empirical studies. Assuming that convective events are accompanied by lightning, we will show on a large rainfall dataset in Switzerland (30 year records of 10-min and 1-hr data from 59 stations) that while the average rate of increase in extreme rainfall intensity (95th percentile) is 6-7% in no-lightning events and 8-9% in lightning events, it is 11-13% per degree C when all events are combined (Molnar et al., 2015). These results are relevant for climate change studies which predict shifts in storm types in a warmer climate in some parts of the world. The observation that extreme rain intensity and air temperature are positively correlated has consequences for the stochastic modelling of rainfall. Most current stochastic models do not explicitly include a direct rain intensity-air temperature dependency beyond applying factors of change predicted by climate models to basic statistics of precipitation. Including this dependency explicitly in stochastic models will allow, for example in the nested modelling approach of Paschalis et al. (2014), the random cascade disaggregation routine to be

  11. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  12. Muscle Atrophy in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koukourikos, Konstantinos; Tsaloglidou, Areti; Kourkouta, Labrini

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The muscle atrophy is one of the most important and frequent problems observed in patients in Intensive Care Units. The term describes the disorder in the structure and in the function of the muscle while incidence rates range from 25-90 % in patients with prolonged hospitalization. Purpose: This is a review containing all data related to the issue of muscle atrophy and is especially referred to its causes and risk factors. The importance of early diagnosis and early mobilization are also highlighted in the study. Material and methods: a literature review was performed on valid databases such as Scopus, PubMed, Cinhal for the period 2000-2013 in English language. The following keywords were used: loss of muscle mass, ICU patients, immobilization, bed rest. Results: From the review is concluded that bed rest and immobilization in order to reduce total energy costs, are the main causes for the appearance of the problem. The results of the reduction of the muscle mass mainly affect the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory system. The administration of the cortisone, the immobility, the sepsis and hyperglycemia are included in the risk factors. The prevention is the primary therapeutic agent and this is achieved due to the early mobilization of the patients, the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and the avoidance of exposure to risk factors. Conclusions: The prevention of muscle atrophy is a primary goal of treatment for the patients in the ICU, because it reduces the incidence of the disease, reduces the time spent in ICU and finally improves the quality of patients’ life. PMID:25684851

  13. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron-positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  14. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  15. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  16. Approach to intensely enhancing neck nodes

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Amit; Gummalla, Krishna Mohan; Loke, Siu Cheng; Goh, Julian; Tan, Tiong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cervical node evaluation is one of the most common problems encountered by a radiologist. Here, we present a pictorial review of intensely enhancing neck nodes. While enhancement in a cervical node is a common radiologic finding on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, only few conditions cause intense enhancement in cervical nodes. We discuss the common causes of intensely enhancing neck nodes along with pertinent radiologic features and key differentiating points that aid radiologists in reaching a diagnosis. In addition, we discuss certain potential non-nodal mimics, which need to be excluded. PMID:26782154

  17. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  18. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron–positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  19. A revised ground-motion and intensity interpolation scheme for shakemap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worden, C.B.; Wald, D.J.; Allen, T.I.; Lin, K.; Garcia, D.; Cua, G.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a weighted-average approach for incorporating various types of data (observed peak ground motions and intensities and estimates from groundmotion prediction equations) into the ShakeMap ground motion and intensity mapping framework. This approach represents a fundamental revision of our existing ShakeMap methodology. In addition, the increased availability of near-real-time macroseismic intensity data, the development of newrelationships between intensity and peak ground motions, and new relationships to directly predict intensity from earthquake source information have facilitated the inclusion of intensity measurements directly into ShakeMap computations. Our approach allows for the combination of (1) direct observations (ground-motion measurements or reported intensities), (2) observations converted from intensity to ground motion (or vice versa), and (3) estimated ground motions and intensities from prediction equations or numerical models. Critically, each of the aforementioned data types must include an estimate of its uncertainties, including those caused by scaling the influence of observations to surrounding grid points and those associated with estimates given an unknown fault geometry. The ShakeMap ground-motion and intensity estimates are an uncertainty-weighted combination of these various data and estimates. A natural by-product of this interpolation process is an estimate of total uncertainty at each point on the map, which can be vital for comprehensive inventory loss calculations. We perform a number of tests to validate this new methodology and find that it produces a substantial improvement in the accuracy of ground-motion predictions over empirical prediction equations alone.

  20. The near wall TIRFM measurement of nano-tracer's statistical intensity distribution (SID) and determining the base intensity I0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xu; LNM Team

    2015-11-01

    The total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is an evanescent-wave-based technique for measuring nanoparticle dynamics very close to wall. The intensity of the evanescent wave decays exponentially (i.e. I(z) =I0exp(z/zp)) , which can provide information of the tracer particle position not just parallel but also normal to wall. However, considering the z information is encoded in tracer intensity, it is critical to determine the base intensity I0. In this study, we will first establish a model to describe the statistical intensity distribution (SID) of the nano-tracers observed in the evanescent field inspired by the works of Huang et al. A different function of particle-wall interaction and a term of the influence of the objective focal plane thickness are introduced in the present SID method. Then, TIRFM experiments are performed to measure the histogram of SID. The experimental histogram of SID is then fitted by the theoretical curve to determine I0 which is the only one fit parameter. By near wall velocity measurement, we will show that the SID method has a very high precision in determining I0 and the vertical z position of every nanotracer. Further tests show that the PDF of nano-tracers can reveal more information about how nanoparticles interact with the charged solid wall. This provides a promising method to detect the physical properties near interface.