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Sample records for ace2 null mice

  1. The role of ACE2 in cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Oudit, Gavin Y; Crackower, Michael A; Backx, Peter H; Penninger, Josef M

    2003-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is critically involved in cardiovascular and renal function and in disease conditions, and has been shown to be a far more complex system than initially thought. A recently discovered homologue of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)--ACE2--appears to negatively regulate the RAS. ACE2 cleaves Ang I and Ang II into the inactive Ang 1-9 and Ang 1-7, respectively. ACE2 is highly expressed in kidney and heart and is especially confined to the endothelium. With quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, ACE2 was defined as a QTL on the X chromosome in rat models of hypertension. In these animal models, kidney ACE2 messenger RNA and protein expression were markedly reduced, making ACE2 a candidate gene for this QTL. Targeted disruption of ACE2 in mice failed to elicit hypertension, but resulted in severe impairment in myocardial contractility with increased angiotensin II levels. Genetic ablation of ACE in the ACE2 null mice rescued the cardiac phenotype. These genetic data show that ACE2 is an essential regulator of heart function in vivo. Basal renal morphology and function were not altered by the inactivation of ACE2. The novel role of ACE2 in hydrolyzing several other peptides-such as the apelin peptides, opioids, and kinin metabolites-raises the possibility that peptide systems other than angiotensin and its derivatives also may have an important role in regulating cardiovascular and renal function.

  2. Administration of 17β-estradiol to ovariectomized obese female mice reverses obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Shoemaker, Robin; Thatcher, Sean E; Batifoulier-Yiannikouris, Frederique; English, Victoria L; Cassis, Lisa A

    2015-06-15

    We recently demonstrated that female mice are resistant to the development of obesity-induced hypertension through a sex hormone-dependent mechanism that involved adipose angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study, we hypothesized that provision of 17β-estradiol (E2) to ovariectomized (OVX) high-fat (HF)-fed female hypertensive mice would reverse obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Pilot studies defined dose-dependent effects of E2 in OVX female mice on serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. An E2 dose of 36 μg/ml restored normal serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. Therefore, HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice were administered vehicle or E2 (36 μg/ml) for 16 wk. E2 administration significantly decreased body weights of HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice of either genotype. At 15 wk, E2 administration decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) of OVX HF-fed Ace2(+/+) but not Ace2(-/-) females during the light but not the dark cycle. E2-mediated reductions in SBP in Ace2(+/+) females were associated with significant elevations in adipose ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and reduced plasma ANG II concentrations. In contrast to females, E2 administration had no effect on any parameter quantified in HF-fed male hypertensive mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, E2 promoted ACE2 mRNA abundance through effects at estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and resulted in ERα-mediated binding at the ACE2 promoter. These results demonstrate that E2 administration to OVX females reduces obesity-induced elevations in SBP (light cycle) through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Beneficial effects of E2 to decrease blood pressure in OVX obese females may result from stimulation of adipose ACE2.

  3. Uterine artery dysfunction in pregnant ACE2 knockout mice is associated with placental hypoxia and reduced umbilical blood flow velocity

    PubMed Central

    Pulgar, Victor M.; Lindsey, Sarah H.; Yamane, Larissa; Varagic, Jasmina; McGee, Carolynne; daSilva, Mauro; Lopes Bonfa, Paula; Gurley, Susan B.; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) knockout is associated with reduced fetal weight at late gestation; however, whether uteroplacental vascular and/or hemodynamic disturbances underlie this growth-restricted phenotype is unknown. Uterine artery reactivity and flow velocities, umbilical flow velocities, trophoblast invasion, and placental hypoxia were determined in ACE2 knockout (KO) and C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) mice at day 14 of gestation. Although systolic blood pressure was higher in pregnant ACE2 KO vs. WT mice (102.3 ± 5.1 vs. 85.1 ± 1.9 mmHg, n = 5–6), the magnitude of difference was similar to that observed in nonpregnant ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. Maternal urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine, and kidney or heart weights were not different in ACE2 KO vs. WT. Fetal weight and pup-to-placental weight ratio were lower in ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. A higher sensitivity to Ang II [pD2 8.64 ± 0.04 vs. 8.5 ± 0.03 (−log EC50)] and greater maximal contraction to phenylephrine (169.0 ± 9.0 vs. 139.0 ± 7.0% KMAX), were associated with lower immunostaining for Ang II receptor 2 and fibrinoid content of the uterine artery in ACE2 KO mice. Uterine artery flow velocities and trophoblast invasion were similar between study groups. In contrast, umbilical artery peak systolic velocities (60.2 ± 4.5 vs. 75.1 ± 4.5 mm/s) and the resistance index measured using VEVO 2100 ultrasound were lower in the ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. Immunostaining for pimonidazole, a marker of hypoxia, and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α were higher in the trophospongium and placental labyrinth of the ACE2 KO vs. WT. In summary, placental hypoxia and uterine artery dysfunction develop before major growth of the fetus occurs and may explain the fetal growth restricted phenotype. PMID:25968580

  4. Genetic Deletion of ACE2 Induces Vascular Dysfunction in C57BL/6 Mice: Role of Nitric Oxide Imbalance and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luiza A.; Todiras, Mihail; Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Szijártó, István András; Gollasch, Maik; Penninger, Josef M.; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A.; Alenina, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays a critical role in cardiovascular homeostasis, and its altered expression is associated with major cardiac and vascular disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulation of vascular function and assess the vascular redox balance in ACE2-deficient (ACE2-/y) animals. Experiments were performed in 20–22 week-old C57BL/6 and ACE2-/y male mice. Evaluation of endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation revealed an impairment of in vitro and in vivo vascular function in ACE2-/y mice. Drastic reduction in eNOS expression at both protein and mRNA levels, and a decrease in •NO concentrations were observed in aortas of ACE2-/y mice in comparison to controls. Consistently, these mice presented a lower plasma and urine nitrite concentration, confirming reduced •NO availability in ACE2-deficient animals. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased and superoxide dismutase activity was decreased in aorta homogenates of ACE2-/y mice, indicating impaired antioxidant capacity. Taken together, our data indicate, that ACE2 regulates vascular function by modulating nitric oxide release and oxidative stress. In conclusion, we elucidate mechanisms by which ACE2 is involved in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis. Furthermore, these findings provide insights into the role of the renin-angiotensin system in both vascular and systemic redox balance. PMID:27070147

  5. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) Activator Diminazene Aceturate Ameliorates Endotoxin-Induced Uveitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiguo; Shil, Pollob Kumar; Zhu, Ping; Yang, Hongxia; Verma, Amrisha; Lei, Bo; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Uveitis is a common cause of vision loss. The renin angiotensin system (RAS), which plays a vital role in cardiovascular system, is a potent mediator of inflammation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of uveitis. A newly identified axis of RAS, ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas, has emerged as a novel target because it counteracts the deleterious effect of angiotensin II. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of endogenous ACE2 activation in preventing endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in mice. Methods. ACE2 activator diminazene aceturate (DIZE) was administered both systemically and locally. For systemic administration, female BALB/c mice received intraperitoneal injection of DIZE (60 mg/kg body weight [BW]) for 2 days prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intravitreal injection (125 ng) to induce uveitis. For local study, DIZE was given at 0.5, 0.1, and 0 mg/mL as eyedrops six times per day for 2 days before LPS injection. The anterior segment of the mice was examined at 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after LPS injection, and clinical scores were determined at the same time. Morphology and infiltrating inflammatory cells were evaluated after 24 hours. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. ACE2 activity was determined using a self-quenching fluorescent substrate. Results. At 24 hours, the clinical score of mice treated with DIZE systemically was significantly lower (mean, ∼1.75) than the saline vehicle group (mean, ∼4) (P < 0.001). Histological examination showed 63.4% reduction of infiltrating inflammatory cells in the anterior segment and 57.4% reduction in the posterior segment of DIZE-treated eyes. The number of CD45+ inflammatory cells in the vitreous of the DIZE-treated group was decreased (43.3%) compared to the vehicle group (P < 0.01). The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines were significantly reduced in the DIZE-treated group (P < 0.01, P < 0.001). The number of infiltrating inflammatory cells was

  6. ACE2 Deficiency Worsens Epicardial Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Cardiac Dysfunction in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Mori, Jun; McLean, Brent A; Basu, Ratnadeep; Das, Subhash K; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Parajuli, Nirmal; Penninger, Josef M; Grant, Maria B; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. We studied the role of ACE2 in obesity-mediated cardiac dysfunction. ACE2 null (ACE2KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control diet and studied at 6 months of age. Loss of ACE2 resulted in decreased weight gain but increased glucose intolerance, epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) inflammation, and polarization of macrophages into a proinflammatory phenotype in response to HFD. Similarly, human EAT in patients with obesity and heart failure displayed a proinflammatory macrophage phenotype. Exacerbated EAT inflammation in ACE2KO-HFD mice was associated with decreased myocardial adiponectin, decreased phosphorylation of AMPK, increased cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, and myocardial insulin resistance, which worsened heart function. Ang 1-7 (24 µg/kg/h) administered to ACE2KO-HFD mice resulted in ameliorated EAT inflammation and reduced cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, resulting in normalization of heart failure. In conclusion, ACE2 plays a novel role in heart disease associated with obesity wherein ACE2 negatively regulates obesity-induced EAT inflammation and cardiac insulin resistance.

  7. Olmesartan Inhibits Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice Overexpressing Renin Independently of Blood Pressure: Its Beneficial Effects on ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas Axis and NADPH Oxidase Expression.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Tomohiro; Tomita, Hirofumi; Narita, Ikuyo; Kinjo, Takahiko; Nishizaki, Kimitaka; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Osanai, Tomohiro; Okumura, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced renin-angiotensin activity causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. The angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis pathway functions against Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling. We investigated whether olmesartan (Olm), an AT1R blocker, inhibits cardiac hypertrophy independently of blood pressure, and evaluated the potential mechanisms. The 3- to 4-month-old male mice overexpressing renin in the liver (Ren-Tg) were given Olm (5 mg/kg/d) and hydralazine (Hyd) (3.5 mg/kg/d) orally for 2 months. Systolic blood pressure was higher in the Ren-Tg mice than in wild-type littermates. Olm and Hyd treatments lowered systolic blood pressure to the same degree. However, cardiac hypertrophy, evaluated by echocardiography, heart weight, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes, and gene expression, was inhibited by only Olm treatment, but not by Hyd. Olm treatment reversed decreased gene expressions of ACE2 and Mas receptor of Ren-Tg mice and inhibited enhanced NADPH oxidase (Nox)4 expression and reactive oxygen species, whereas Hyd treatment had no influence on them. These findings indicate that Olm treatment inhibits cardiac hypertrophy independently of blood pressure, not only through its original AT1R blockade but partly through enhancement of ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis and suppression of Nox4 expression. PMID:26886190

  8. Bodyweight assessment of enamelin null mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert H-L; Lertlam, Rangsiyakorn; Simmer, James P; Wang, Chia-Ning; Hu, Jan C C

    2013-01-01

    The Enam null mice appear to be smaller than wild-type mice, which prompted the hypothesis that enamel defects negatively influence nutritional intake and bodyweight gain (BWG). We compared the BWG of Enam(-/-) and wild-type mice from birth (D0) to Day 42 (D42). Wild-type (WT) and Enam(-/-) (N) mice were given either hard chow (HC) or soft chow (SC). Four experimental groups were studied: WTHC, WTSC, NHC, and NSC. The mother's bodyweight (DBW) and the average litter bodyweight (ALBW) were obtained from D0 to D21. After D21, the pups were separated from the mother and provided the same type of food. Litter bodyweights were measured until D42. ALBW was compared at 7-day intervals using one-way ANOVA, while the influence of DBW on ALBW was analyzed by mixed-model analyses. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on hard chow (NHC) was significantly lower than the two WT groups at D21 and the differences persisted into young adulthood. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on soft chow (NSC) trended lower, but was not significantly different than that of the WT groups. We conclude that genotype, which affects enamel integrity, and food hardness influence bodyweight gain in postnatal and young adult mice. PMID:23509695

  9. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Usmani, Shirine E; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A; Hill, Tracy L; Welch, Ian D; Beier, Frank

    2016-07-26

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα's potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear.

  10. Context-specific protection of TGFα null mice from osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Shirine E.; Ulici, Veronica; Pest, Michael A.; Hill, Tracy L.; Welch, Ian D.; Beier, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) is a growth factor involved in osteoarthritis (OA). TGFα induces an OA-like phenotype in articular chondrocytes, by inhibiting matrix synthesis and promoting catabolic factor expression. To better understand TGFα’s potential as a therapeutic target, we employed two in vivo OA models: (1) post-traumatic and (2) aging related OA. Ten-week old and six-month old male Tgfa null mice and their heterozygous (control) littermates underwent destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery. Disease progression was assessed histologically using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. As well, spontaneous disease progression was analyzed in eighteen-month-old Tgfa null and heterozygous mice. Ten-week old Tgfa null mice were protected from OA progression at both seven and fourteen weeks post-surgery. No protection was seen however in six-month old null mice after DMM surgery, and no differences were observed between genotypes in the aging model. Thus, young Tgfa null mice are protected from OA progression in the DMM model, while older mice are not. In addition, Tgfa null mice are equally susceptible to spontaneous OA development during aging. Thus, TGFα might be a valuable therapeutic target in some post-traumatic forms of OA, however its role in idiopathic disease is less clear. PMID:27457421

  11. Cadmium modulates adipocyte functions in metallothionein-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Takashige; Nishiyama, Kaori; Kadota, Yoshito; Sato, Masao; Inoue, Masahisa; Suzuki, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, causes a reduction of adipocyte size and the modulation of adipokine expression. To further investigate the significance of the Cd action, we studied the effect of Cd on the white adipose tissue (WAT) of metallothionein null (MT{sup −/−}) mice, which cannot form atoxic Cd–MT complexes and are used for evaluating Cd as free ions, and wild type (MT{sup +/+}) mice. Cd administration more significantly reduced the adipocyte size of MT{sup −/−} mice than that of MT{sup +/+} mice. Cd exposure also induced macrophage recruitment to WAT with an increase in the expression level of Ccl2 (MCP-1) in the MT{sup −/−} mice. The in vitro exposure of Cd to adipocytes induce triglyceride release into culture medium, decrease in the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid hydrolysis at 24 h, and at 48 h increase in phosphorylation of the lipid-droplet-associated protein perilipin, which facilitates the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes. Therefore, the reduction in adipocyte size by Cd may arise from an imbalance between lipid synthesis and lipolysis. In addition, the expression levels of leptin, adiponectin and resistin decreased in adipocytes. Taken together, exposure to Cd may induce unusually small adipocytes and modulate the expression of adipokines differently from the case of physiologically small adipocytes, and may accelerate the risk of developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Cd causes a marked reduction in adipocyte size in MT-null mice. • Cd enhances macrophage migration into adipose tissue and disrupt adipokine secretion. • MT gene alleviates Cd-induced adipocyte dysfunctions. • Cd enhances the degradation of stored lipids in adipocytes, mediated by perilipin. • Cd induces unusually small adipocytes and the abnormal expression of adipokines.

  12. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice.

    PubMed

    Soenjaya, Y; Foster, B L; Nociti, F H; Ao, M; Holdsworth, D W; Hunter, G K; Somerman, M J; Goldberg, H A

    2015-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp(-/-)) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp(-/-) mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp(-/-) and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro-computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp(-/-) mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp(-/-) mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp(-/-) mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp(-/-) mice. Bsp(-/-) incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the

  13. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  14. Neuropathy in Human and Mice with PMP22 null

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario Andre; Katona, Istvan; Zhang, Xuebao; Roper, Helen P.; Carr, Louise; Macdonald, Fiona; Brueton, Louise; Blake, Julian; Suter, Ueli; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Haploinsufficiency of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). However, the biological functions of PMP22 in humans are largely unexplored due to the absence of patients with PMP22 null mutations. Design, Setting and Participants We have evaluated a 7-year-old boy with PMP22 null. Findings were compared with those from nerves of Pmp22 null mice. Results Motor and sensory deficits in the proband were non-length dependent. Weakness was found in cranial muscles, but not in the limbs. Large fiber sensory modalities were profoundly abnormal, which started prior to the maturation of myelin. This is in line with the temporal pattern of PMP22 expression predominantly in cranial motor neurons and DRG during embryonic development, becoming undetectable in adulthood. Moreover, there were conspicuous maturation defects of myelinating Schwann cells that were more significant in motor nerve fibers than in sensory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that PMP22 is important for the normal function of neurons that express PMP22 during early development, such as cranial motor neurons and spinal sensory neurons. Moreover, PMP22 deficiency differentially affects myelination between motor and sensory nerves, which may have contributed to the unique clinical phenotype in the patient with absence of PMP22. PMID:21670407

  15. Osteoclast differentiation and function in aquaglyceroporin AQP9 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangjian; Song, Linhua; Wang, Yiding; Rojek, Aleksandra; Nielsen, Søren; Agre, Peter; Carbrey, Jennifer M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Information Osteoclasts are cells specialized for bone resorption and play important roles in bone growth and calcium homeostasis. Differentiation of osteoclasts involves fusion of bone marrow macrophage mononuclear precursors in response to extracellular signals. A dramatic increase in osteoclast cell volume occurs during osteoclast biogenesis and is believed to be mediated by Aquaporin 9 (AQP9), a membrane protein that can rapidly transport water and other small neutral solutes across cell membranes. Results Here we report an increase in expression of AQP9 during differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line into osteoclasts. Bone marrow macrophages from wild type and AQP9 null mice differentiate into osteoclasts that have similar morphology, contain comparable numbers of nuclei, and digest synthetic bone to the same extent. Bones from wild type and AQP9 null mice contain similar numbers of osteoclasts and have comparable density and structure as measured by X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography. Conclusions Our data confirm that AQP9 expression rises during osteoclast biogenesis but indicate that AQP9 is not essential for osteoclast function or differentiation under normal physiological conditions. PMID:18666888

  16. Characterization of Periodontal Structures of Enamelin-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Giannobile, William V.; Eber, Robert M.; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Enamelin-null (ENAM−/−) mice have no enamel. When characterizing ENAM−/− mice, alveolar bone height reduction was observed, and it was hypothesized that enamel defects combined with diet are associated with the periodontal changes of ENAM−/− mice. The aim of the present study is to compare the dimension of interradicular bone of ENAM−/− (knock-out [KO]) with wild-type (WT) mice, maintained on hard (HC) or soft (SC) chow. Methods A total of 100 animals divided into four groups were studied at 3, 8, and 24 weeks of age: 1) KO/HC; 2) KO/SC; 3) WT/HC; and 4) WT/SC. Microcomputed tomography was performed, and the following measurements were made between mandibular first (M1) and second (M2) molars: relative alveolar bone height (RBH), crestal bone width (CBW), bone volume (BV), bone mineral content (BMC), and bone mineral density (BMD). The position of M1 and M2 in relation to the inferior border of the mandible was also determined at 24 weeks. All variables were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett test for pairwise comparisons. Morphologic analyses were conducted on hematoxylin and eosin–stained sections. Results Radiographically, the enamel layer was absent in ENAM−/− mice. Interproximal open contacts were observed exclusively in ENAM−/− mice, and the prevalence decreased over time, suggesting that a shifting of tooth position had occurred. Additionally, in the two ENAM−/− groups, RBH was significantly lower at 8 and 24 weeks (P <0.02); CBW, BV, and BMC were significantly less (P <0.05) at 24 weeks. No differences in BMD were found among the four groups. The molars migrated to a more coronal position in ENAM−/− mice and mice on HC. Histologic findings were consistent with radiographic observations. After eruption, the junctional epithelium was less organized in ENAM−/− mice. Conclusion The interdental bone density was not affected in the absence of enamelin, but its volume was, which is likely a

  17. Impairment in motor learning of somatostatin null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Zeyda, T; Diehl, N; Paylor, R; Brennan, M B; Hochgeschwender, U

    2001-07-01

    Somatostatin was first identified as a hypothalamic factor which inhibits the release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary (somatotropin release inhibitory factor, SRIF). Both SRIF and its receptors were subsequently found widely distributed within and outside the nervous system, in the adult as well as in the developing organism. Reflecting this wide distribution, somatostatin has been implicated regulating a diverse array of biological processes. These include body growth, homeostasis, sensory perception, autonomous functions, rate of intestinal absorption, behavior, including cognition and memory, and developmental processes. We produced null mutant mice lacking somatostatin through targeted mutagenesis. The mutant mice are healthy, fertile, and superficially indistinguishable from their heterozygous and wildtype littermates. A 'first round' phenotype screen revealed that mice lacking somatostatin have elevated plasma growth hormone levels, despite normal body size, and have elevated basal plasma corticosterone levels. In order to uncover subtle and unexpected differences, we carried out a systematic behavioral phenotype screen which identified a significant impairment in motor learning revealed when increased demands were made on motor coordination. Motor coordination and motor learning require an intact cerebellum. While somatostatin is virtually absent from the adult cerebellum, the ligand and its receptor(s) are transiently expressed at high levels in the developing cerebellum. This result suggests the functional significance of transient expression of SRIF and its receptors in the development of the cerebellum. PMID:11430867

  18. Renal NHE expression and activity in neonatal NHE3- and NHE8-null mice.

    PubMed

    Pirojsakul, Kwanchai; Gattineni, Jyothsna; Dwarakanath, Vangipuram; Baum, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE)3 is the predominant NHE on the brush-border membrane of the proximal tubule in adult animals. NHE8 has been localized to the brush-border membrane of proximal tubules and is more highly expressed in neonates than in adult animals. However, the relative role of NHE8 in neonatal renal acidification is unclear. The present study examined if there was a compensatory increase in NHE3 in NHE8-null neonatal mice and whether there was a compensatory increase in NHE8 in NHE3-null neonatal mice. In addition, we examined whether wild-type, NHE3-null, and NHE8-null mice had an increase in NHE activity in response to metabolic acidosis. We found that at baseline, there was comparable renal NHE3 mRNA, total protein, and brush-border membrane protein abundance as in neonatal control and NHE8-null mice. There was comparable renal NHE8 mRNA, total protein, and brush-border membrane protein abundance in NHE3-null neonatal and control mice. Both NHE3- and NHE8-null mice had a comparable but lower rate of NHE activity than control mice. We next imposed metabolic acidosis in wild-type, NHE3-null, and NHE8-null mice. Acidemic NHE8-null mice had an increase in brush-border membrane vesicle NHE3 protein abundance and NHE activity compared with vehicle-treated mice. Likewise, NHE3-null mice had an increase in NHE8 brush-border membrane protein abundance and NHE activity in response to metabolic acidosis. In conclusion, both NHE3 and NHE8 likely play a role in neonatal acidification.

  19. Reduced arsenic clearance and increased toxicity in aquaglyceroporin-9-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Carbrey, Jennifer M.; Song, Linhua; Zhou, Yao; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Rojek, Aleksandra; Wang, Yiding; Liu, Yangjian; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.; Nielsen, Søren; Rosen, Barry P.; Agre, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Expressed in liver, aquaglyceroporin-9 (AQP9) is permeated by glycerol, arsenite, and other small, neutral solutes. To evaluate a possible protective role, AQP9-null mice were evaluated for in vivo arsenic toxicity. After injection with NaAsO2, AQP9-null mice suffer reduced survival rates (LD50, 12 mg/kg) compared with WT mice (LD50, 15 mg/kg). The highest tissue level of arsenic is in heart, with AQP9-null mice accumulating 10–20 times more arsenic than WT mice. Within hours after NaAsO2 injection, AQP9-null mice sustain profound bradycardia, despite normal serum electrolytes. Increased arsenic levels are also present in liver, lung, spleen, and testis of AQP9-null mice. Arsenic levels in the feces and urine of AQP9-null mice are only ≈10% of the WT levels, and reduced clearance of multiple arsenic species by the AQP9-null mice suggests that AQP9 is involved in the export of multiple forms of arsenic. Immunohistochemical staining of liver sections revealed that AQP9 is most abundant in basolateral membrane of hepatocytes adjacent to the sinusoids. AQP9 is not detected in heart or kidney by PCR or immunohistochemistry. We propose that AQP9 provides a route for excretion of arsenic by the liver, thereby providing partial protection of the whole animal from arsenic toxicity. PMID:19805235

  20. Reduced arsenic clearance and increased toxicity in aquaglyceroporin-9-null mice.

    PubMed

    Carbrey, Jennifer M; Song, Linhua; Zhou, Yao; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Rojek, Aleksandra; Wang, Yiding; Liu, Yangjian; Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E; Nielsen, Søren; Rosen, Barry P; Agre, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2009-09-15

    Expressed in liver, aquaglyceroporin-9 (AQP9) is permeated by glycerol, arsenite, and other small, neutral solutes. To evaluate a possible protective role, AQP9-null mice were evaluated for in vivo arsenic toxicity. After injection with NaAsO(2), AQP9-null mice suffer reduced survival rates (LD(50), 12 mg/kg) compared with WT mice (LD(50), 15 mg/kg). The highest tissue level of arsenic is in heart, with AQP9-null mice accumulating 10-20 times more arsenic than WT mice. Within hours after NaAsO(2) injection, AQP9-null mice sustain profound bradycardia, despite normal serum electrolytes. Increased arsenic levels are also present in liver, lung, spleen, and testis of AQP9-null mice. Arsenic levels in the feces and urine of AQP9-null mice are only approximately 10% of the WT levels, and reduced clearance of multiple arsenic species by the AQP9-null mice suggests that AQP9 is involved in the export of multiple forms of arsenic. Immunohistochemical staining of liver sections revealed that AQP9 is most abundant in basolateral membrane of hepatocytes adjacent to the sinusoids. AQP9 is not detected in heart or kidney by PCR or immunohistochemistry. We propose that AQP9 provides a route for excretion of arsenic by the liver, thereby providing partial protection of the whole animal from arsenic toxicity.

  1. Resistance to acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in glutathione S-transferase Mu 1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Shingo; Maejima, Takanori; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yagi, Masae; Sugiura, Tomomi; Atsumi, Ryo; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the role of glutathione S-transferases Mu 1 (GSTM1) in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity using Gstm1-null mice. A single oral administration of APAP resulted in a marked increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase accompanied by hepatocyte necrosis 24 hr after administration in wild-type mice, but its magnitude was unexpectedly attenuated in Gstm1-null mice. Therefore, it is suggested that Gstm1-null mice are resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. To examine the mechanism of this resistance in Gstm1-null mice, we measured phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which mediates the signal of APAP-induced hepatocyte necrosis, by Western blot analysis 2 and 6 hr after APAP administration. A marked increase in phosphorylated JNK was observed in wild-type mice, but the increase was markedly suppressed in Gstm1-null mice. Therefore, it is suggested that suppressed phosphorylation of JNK may be a main mechanism of the resistance to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in Gstm1-null mice, although other possibilities of the mechanism cannot be eliminated. Additionally, phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4, which are upstream kinases of JNK in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, were also suppressed in Gstm1-null mice. A decrease in liver total glutathione 2 hr after APAP administration, which is an indicator for exposure to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine, the reactive metabolite of APAP, were similar in wild-type and Gstm1-null mice. In conclusion, Gstm1-null mice are considered to be resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity perhaps by the suppression of JNK phosphorylation. This study indicates the novel role of GSTM1 as a factor mediating the cellular signal for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  2. Cardiac Characterization of sgca-Null Mice Using High Resolution Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Renault, Gilles; Guerchet, Nicolas; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Fougerousse, Françoise; Richard, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2D (LGMD2D) is an inherited myogenic disorder belonging to the group of muscular dystrophies. Sgca-null mouse is a knock-out model of LGMD2D. Little is known about cardiac phenotype characterization in this model at different ages. We conducted a prospective study to characterize cardiac sgca-null mice phenotype using high resolution Doppler echocardiography at different ages. Conventional echocardiography was performed on anesthetised mice using a Vevo 770 (Visualsonics) with 30 MHz cardiac probe. Wild Type (WT) and sgca-null mice were scanned at 13, 15 and 17 months. From M-mode, we measured interventricular septal (IVS) wall thickness, posterior wall (PW) thickness, and end-left ventricular diameter in systolic and diastolic. From the above parameters, we calculated left ventricular (LV) shortening fraction (SF), LV ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass. At age 13 months, PW diastolic thickness was increased in sgca-null mice (0.89±0.14 mm vs 0.73±0.2 mm; P=0.020) and LV mass was higher in sgca-null mice (LV mass 205.2 mg vs 143 mg; P=0.001). We found also dilation of the LV (LVEDD: 4.84 mm vs 4.29 mm; P=0.019) in sgca-null mice. At age 15 months, dilation of the LV (LVEDD: 4.86 mm vs 4 mm; P=0.05) with an increase of the LV mass (165.7 mg vs 127.12; P=0.03) are found in sgca-null mice. At age 17 months, we found a decrease of the PW thickening (17% vs 30%; P=0.036). This work provides echocardiographic insights for the assessment of pharmaceutical therapies in sgca-null mice.

  3. Hepatic Effects of a Methionine-Choline-Deficient Diet in Hepatocyte RXRα-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gyamfi, Maxwell Afari; Tanaka, Yuji; He, Lin; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor-α (RXRα) is an obligate partner for several nuclear hormone receptors that regulate important physiological processes in the liver. In this study the impact of hepatocyte RXRα deficiency on methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced steatosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hepatic transporters gene expression were examined. The mRNA of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated genes, important for lipid synthesis, were not altered in wild type (WT) mice, but were increased 2.0- to 5.4-fold in hepatocyte RXRα-null (H-RXRα-null) mice fed a MCD diet for 14 days. Furthermore, hepatic mRNAs and proteins essential for fatty acid β-oxidation were not altered in WT mice, but were decreased in the MCD diet-fed H-RXRα-null mice, resulting in increased hepatic free fatty acid levels. Cyp2e1 enzyme activity and lipid peroxide levels were induced only in MCD-fed WT mice. In contrast, hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory factors were increased only in H-RXRα-null mice fed the MCD diet. Hepatic uptake transporters Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 mRNA levels were decreased in WT mice fed the MCD diet, whereas the efflux transporter Mrp4 was increased. However, in the H-RXRα-null mice, the MCD diet only moderately decreased Oatp1a1 and induced both Oatp1a4 and Mrp4 gene expression. Whereas the MCD diet increased serum bile acid levels and alkaline phosphatase activity in both WT and H-RXRα-null mice, serum ALT levels were induced (2.9-fold) only in the H-RXRα-null mice. In conclusion, these data suggest a critical role for RXRα in hepatic fatty acid homeostasis and protection against MCD-induced hepatocyte injury. PMID:18952117

  4. Hepatic effects of a methionine-choline-deficient diet in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gyamfi, Maxwell Afari; Tanaka, Yuji; He Lin; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Wan, Y.-J.Y.

    2009-01-15

    Retinoid X receptor-{alpha} (RXR{alpha}) is an obligate partner for several nuclear hormone receptors that regulate important physiological processes in the liver. In this study the impact of hepatocyte RXR{alpha} deficiency on methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced steatosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hepatic transporters gene expression were examined. The mRNA of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated genes, important for lipid synthesis, were not altered in wild type (WT) mice, but were increased 2.0- to 5.4-fold in hepatocyte RXR{alpha}-null (H-RXR{alpha}-null) mice fed a MCD diet for 14 days. Furthermore, hepatic mRNAs and proteins essential for fatty acid {beta}-oxidation were not altered in WT mice, but were decreased in the MCD diet-fed H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, resulting in increased hepatic free fatty acid levels. Cyp2e1 enzyme activity and lipid peroxide levels were induced only in MCD-fed WT mice. In contrast, hepatic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory factors were increased only in H-RXR{alpha}-null mice fed the MCD diet. Hepatic uptake transporters Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 mRNA levels were decreased in WT mice fed the MCD diet, whereas the efflux transporter Mrp4 was increased. However, in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, the MCD diet only moderately decreased Oatp1a1 and induced both Oatp1a4 and Mrp4 gene expression. Whereas the MCD diet increased serum bile acid levels and alkaline phosphatase activity in both WT and H-RXR{alpha}-null mice, serum ALT levels were induced (2.9-fold) only in the H-RXR{alpha}-null mice. In conclusion, these data suggest a critical role for RXR{alpha} in hepatic fatty acid homeostasis and protection against MCD-induced hepatocyte injury.

  5. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 null mice are sensitive to cholestatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Cheng, Xingguo; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-06-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1) is predominantly expressed in livers of mice and is thought to transport bile acids (BAs) from blood into liver. Because Oatp1a1 expression is markedly decreased in mice after bile duct ligation (BDL). We hypothesized that Oatp1a1-null mice would be protected against liver injury during BDL-induced cholestasis due largely to reduced hepatic uptake of BAs. To evaluate this hypothesis, BDL surgeries were performed in both male wild-type (WT) and Oatp1a1-null mice. At 24 h after BDL, Oatp1a1-null mice showed higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels and more severe liver injury than WT mice, and all Oatp1a1-null mice died within 4 days after BDL, whereas all WT mice survived. At 24 h after BDL, surprisingly Oatp1a1-null mice had higher total BA concentrations in livers than WT mice, suggesting that loss of Oatp1a1 did not prevent BA accumulation in the liver. In addition, secondary BAs dramatically increased in serum of Oatp1a1-null BDL mice but not in WT BDL mice. Oatp1a1-null BDL mice had similar basolateral BA uptake (Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and Oatp1b2) and BA-efflux (multidrug resistance-associated protein [Mrp]-3, Mrp4, and organic solute transporter α/β) transporters, as well as BA-synthetic enzyme (Cyp7a1) in livers as WT BDL mice. Hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner Cyp3a11, Cyp4a14, and Nqo1, which are target genes of farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and NF-E2-related factor 2, respectively, were increased in WT BDL mice but not in Oatp1a1-null BDL mice. These results demonstrate that loss of Oatp1a1 function exacerbates cholestatic liver injury in mice and suggest that Oatp1a1 plays a unique role in liver adaptive responses to obstructive cholestasis.

  6. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jane Q; Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D; Trott, Josephine F; Hovey, Russell C; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Tepper, Clifford G; Willis, Brandon J; Khan, Imran H; Ravindran, Resmi K; Chan, Szeman R; Schreiber, Robert D; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1(tm1Rds) homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment.

  7. Gender- and region-specific alterations in bone metabolism in Scarb1-null female mice.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Corine; Martin-Falstrault, Louise; Brissette, Louise; Moreau, Robert

    2014-08-01

    A positive correlation between plasma levels of HDL and bone mass has been reported by epidemiological studies. As scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), the gene product of Scarb1, is known to regulate HDL metabolism, we recently characterized bone metabolism in Scarb1-null mice. These mice display high femoral bone mass associated with enhanced bone formation. As gender differences have been reported in HDL metabolism and SR-BI function, we investigated gender-specific bone alterations in Scarb1-null mice by microtomography and histology. We found 16% greater relative bone volume and 39% higher bone formation rate in the vertebrae from 2-month-old Scarb1-null females. No such alteration was seen in males, indicating gender- and region-specific differences in skeletal phenotype. Total and HDL-associated cholesterol levels, as well as ACTH plasma levels, were increased in both Scarb1-null genders, the latter being concurrent to impaired corticosterone response to fasting. Plasma levels of estradiol did not differ between null and WT females, suggesting that the estrogen metabolism alteration is not relevant to the higher vertebral bone mass in female Scarb1-null mice. Constitutively, high plasma levels of leptin along with 2.5-fold increase in its expression in white adipose tissue were measured in female Scarb1-null mice only. In vitro exposure of bone marrow stromal cells to ACTH and leptin promoted osteoblast differentiation as evidenced by increased gene expression of osterix and collagen type I alpha. Our results suggest that hyperleptinemia may account for the gender-specific high bone mass seen in the vertebrae of female Scarb1-null mice.

  8. Crosstalk between ACE2 and PLGF regulates vascular permeability during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lantao; Li, Yong; Qin, Hao; Xing, Dong; Su, Jie; Hu, Zhenjie

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) treatment suppresses the severity of acute lung injury (ALI), through antagonizing hydrolyzing angiotensin II (AngII) and the ALI-induced apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the effects of ACE2 on vessel permeability and its relationship with placental growth factor (PLGF) remain ill-defined. In the current study, we examined the relationship between ACE2 and PLGF in ALI model in mice. We used a previously published bleomycin method to induce ALI in mice, and treated the mice with ACE2. We analyzed the levels of PLGF in these mice. The mouse lung vessel permeability was determined by a fluorescence pharmacokinetic assay following i.v. injection of 62.5 µg/kg Visudyne. PLGF pump or soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) pump was given to augment or suppress PLGF effects, respectively. The long-term effects on lung function were determined by measurement of lung resistance using methacholine. We found that ACE2 treatment did not alter PLGF levels in lung, but antagonized the effects of PLGF on increases of lung vessel permeability. Ectogenic PLGF abolished the antagonizing effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. On the other hand, suppression of PLGF signaling mimicked the effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. The suppression of vessel permeability resulted in improvement of lung function after ALI. Thus, ACE2 may antagonize the PLGF-mediated increases in lung vessel permeability during ALI, resulting in improvement of lung function after ALI. PMID:27158411

  9. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F.; Charbonneau, Noe L.; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J.; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  10. Attainment of Brown Adipocyte Features in White Adipocytes of Hormone-Sensitive Lipase Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ström, Kristoffer; Hansson, Ola; Lucas, Stéphanie; Nevsten, Pernilla; Fernandez, Céline; Klint, Cecilia; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Sundler, Frank; Ohlsson, Claes; Holm, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Background Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) is expressed predominantly in adipose tissue, where it plays an important role in catecholamine-stimulated hydrolysis of stored tri- and diglycerides, thus mobilizing fatty acids. HSL exhibits broad substrate specificity and besides acylglycerides it hydrolyzes cholesteryl esters, retinyl esters and lipoidal esters. Despite its role in fatty acid mobilization, HSL null mice have been shown to be resistant to diet-induced obesity. Methodology/Principal Findings Following a high-fat diet (HFD) regimen, energy expenditure, measured using indirect calorimetry, was increased in HSL null mice. White adipose tissue of HSL null mice was characterized by reduced mass and reduced protein expression of PPARγ, a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, the expression of which is known to be positively correlated to the differentiation state of the adipocyte. The protein expression of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1), the highly specific marker of brown adipocytes, was increased 7-fold in white adipose tissue of HSL null mice compared to wildtype littermates. Transmission electron microscopy revealed an increase in the size of mitochondria of white adipocytes of HSL null mice. The mRNA expression of pRb and RIP140 was decreased in isolated white adipocytes, while the expression of UCP-1 and CPT1 was increased in HSL null mice compared to wildtype littermates. Basal oxygen consumption was increased almost 3-fold in white adipose tissue of HSL null mice and was accompanied by increased uncoupling activity. Conclusions These data suggest that HSL is involved in the determination of white versus brown adipocytes during adipocyte differentiation The exact mechanism(s) underlying this novel role of HSL remains to be elucidated, but it seems clear that HSL is required to sustain normal expression levels of pRb and RIP140, which both promote differentiation into the white, rather than the brown, adipocyte lineage

  11. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  12. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F; Charbonneau, Noe L; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R; Sakai, Lynn Y

    2015-06-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  13. Increased Oxidative Stress Impairs Adipose Tissue Function in Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Naotaka; Gotoh, Tomomi; Watanabe, Ken; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Garan, Yohei; Taguchi, Ryo; Node, Koichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1) catalyzes the conversion of ceramide to sphingomyelin. Here, we found that SMS1 null mice showed lipodystrophic phenotype. Mutant mice showed up-regulation of plasma triglyceride concentrations accompanied by reduction of white adipose tissue (WAT) as they aged. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was severely reduced in mutant mice. In vivo analysis indicated that fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in liver decreased in SMS1 null compared to wild-type mice. In vitro analysis using cultured cell revealed that SMS1 depletion reduced fatty acid uptake. Proteins extracted from WAT of mutant mice were severely modified by oxidative stress, and up-regulation of mRNAs related to apoptosis, redox adjustment, mitochondrial stress response and mitochondrial biogenesis was observed. ATP content of WAT was reduced in SMS1 null mice. Blue native gel analysis indicated that accumulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was reduced. These results suggest that WAT of SMS1 null mice is severely damaged by oxidative stress and barely functional. Indeed, mutant mice treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed partial recovery of lipodystrophic phenotypes together with normalized plasma triglyceride concentrations. Altogether, our data suggest that SMS1 is crucial to control oxidative stress in order to maintain WAT function. PMID:23593476

  14. CARDIAC MICRO-CT FOR MORPHOLOGICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PHENOTYPING OF MLP NULL MICE

    PubMed Central

    Badea, Cristian T; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Boslego Mackel, Julie F.; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Investigate the use of micro-CT for morphological and functional phenotyping of MLP null mice and compare micro-CT with M-mode echocardiography. MATERIAL AND METHODS MLP null mice and controls were imaged using both micro-CT and M-mode echocardiography. For Micro-CT imaging, we used a custom built scanner. Following a single intravenous injection of a blood pool contrast agent (Fenestra™ VC) and using a cardio-respiratory gating, we acquired eight phases of the cardiac cycle (every 15 ms) and reconstructed 3D datasets with 94 micron isotropic resolution. Wall thickness and volumetric measurements of left ventricle were performed and cardiac function was estimated. RESULTS Micro-CT and M mode echocardiography showed both morphological and functional aspects that separate MLP null mice from controls. End Diastolic and Systolic Volumes were increased significantly 3 and 5 fold respectively in the MLP null versus controls. Ejection Fraction was reduced by an average of 32% in MLP null mice. The data analysis shows that two imaging modalities provided different results partly due to the difference in anesthesia regimes. Other sources of errors for micro-CT are also analyzed. CONCLUSION Micro-CT can provide the 4D data (3D isotropic volumes over time) required for morphological and functional phenotyping in mice. PMID:17711781

  15. Spontaneous skin erosions and reduced skin and corneal wound healing characterize CLIC4(NULL) mice.

    PubMed

    Padmakumar, V C; Speer, Kelsey; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Masiuk, Katelyn E; Ryscavage, Andrew; Dengler, Samuel L; Hwang, Shelly; Edwards, John C; Coppola, Vincenzo; Tessarollo, Lino; Stepp, Mary Ann; Yuspa, Stuart H

    2012-07-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving blood clotting, inflammation, migration of keratinocytes, angiogenesis, and, ultimately, tissue remodeling and wound closure. Many of these processes involve transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, and mice lacking components of the TGF-β signaling pathway are defective in wound healing. We show herein that CLIC4, an integral component of the TGF-β pathway, is highly up-regulated in skin wounds. We genetically deleted murine CLIC4 and generated a colony on a C57Bl/6 background. CLIC4(NULL) mice were viable and fertile but had smaller litters than did wild-type mice. After 6 months of age, up to 40% of null mice developed spontaneous skin erosions. Reepithelialization of induced full-thickness skin wounds and superficial corneal wounds was delayed in CLIC4(NULL) mice, resolution of inflammation was delayed, and expression of β4 integrin and p21 was reduced in lysates of constitutive and wounded CLIC4(NULL) skin. The induced level of phosphorylated Smad2 in response to TGF-β was reduced in cultured CLIC4(NULL) keratinocytes relative to in wild-type cells, and CLIC4(NULL) keratinocytes migrated slower than did wild-type keratinocytes and did not increase migration in response to TGF-β. CLIC4(NULL) keratinocytes were also less adherent on plates coated with matrix secreted by wild-type keratinocytes. These results indicate that CLIC4 participates in skin healing and corneal wound reepithelialization through enhancement of epithelial migration by a mechanism that may involve a compromised TGF-β pathway.

  16. Spontaneous Skin Erosions and Reduced Skin and Corneal Wound Healing Characterize CLIC4NULL Mice

    PubMed Central

    Padmakumar, V.C.; Speer, Kelsey; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Masiuk, Katelyn E.; Ryscavage, Andrew; Dengler, Samuel L.; Hwang, Shelly; Edwards, John C.; Coppola, Vincenzo; Tessarollo, Lino; Stepp, Mary Ann; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving blood clotting, inflammation, migration of keratinocytes, angiogenesis, and, ultimately, tissue remodeling and wound closure. Many of these processes involve transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, and mice lacking components of the TGF-β signaling pathway are defective in wound healing. We show herein that CLIC4, an integral component of the TGF-β pathway, is highly up-regulated in skin wounds. We genetically deleted murine CLIC4 and generated a colony on a C57Bl/6 background. CLIC4NULL mice were viable and fertile but had smaller litters than did wild-type mice. After 6 months of age, up to 40% of null mice developed spontaneous skin erosions. Reepithelialization of induced full-thickness skin wounds and superficial corneal wounds was delayed in CLIC4NULL mice, resolution of inflammation was delayed, and expression of β4 integrin and p21 was reduced in lysates of constitutive and wounded CLIC4NULL skin. The induced level of phosphorylated Smad2 in response to TGF-β was reduced in cultured CLIC4NULL keratinocytes relative to in wild-type cells, and CLIC4NULL keratinocytes migrated slower than did wild-type keratinocytes and did not increase migration in response to TGF-β. CLIC4NULL keratinocytes were also less adherent on plates coated with matrix secreted by wild-type keratinocytes. These results indicate that CLIC4 participates in skin healing and corneal wound reepithelialization through enhancement of epithelial migration by a mechanism that may involve a compromised TGF-β pathway. PMID:22613027

  17. Dmp1 Null Mice Develop a Unique Osteoarthritis-like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Baozhi; Harris, Steph E; Feng, Jian Q.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hypophosphatemia rickets (including DMP1 mutations) develop severe osteoarthritis (OA), although the mechanism is largely unknown. In this study, we first identified the expression of DMP1 in hypertrophic chondrocytes using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and X-gal analysis of Dmp1-knockout-lacZ-knockin heterozygous mice. Next, we characterized the OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice from 7-week-old to one-year-old using multiple techniques, including X-ray, micro-CT, H&E staining, Goldner staining, scanning electronic microscopy, IHC assays, etc. We found a classical OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice such as articular cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation, and subchondral osteosclerosis. These Dmp1 null mice also developed unique pathological changes, including a biphasic change in their articular cartilage from the initial expansion of hypertrophic chondrocytes at the age of 1-month to a quick diminished articular cartilage layer at the age of 3-months. Further, these null mice displayed severe enlarged knees and poorly formed bone with an expanded osteoid area. To address whether DMP1 plays a direct role in the articular cartilage, we deleted Dmp1 specifically in hypertrophic chondrocytes by crossing the Dmp1-loxP mice with Col X Cre mice. Interestingly, these conditional knockout mice didn't display notable defects in either the articular cartilage or the growth plate. Because of the hypophosphatemia remained in the entire life span of the Dmp1 null mice, we also investigated whether a high phosphate diet would improve the OA-like phenotype. A 8-week treatment of a high phosphate diet significantly rescued the OA-like defect in Dmp1 null mice, supporting the critical role of phosphate homeostasis in maintaining the healthy joint morphology and function. Taken together, this study demonstrates a unique OA-like phenotype in Dmp1 null mice, but a lack of the direct impact of DMP1 on chondrogenesis. Instead, the regulation of phosphate homeostasis

  18. Stimulation of Sigma-1 Receptor Ameliorates Depressive-like Behaviors in CaMKIV Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Yuzuru; Izumi, Hisanao; Zhang, Chen; Han, Feng; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2015-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a molecular chaperone regulating calcium efflux from the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and impaired neurogenesis as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into newborn cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Here, we demonstrate that chronic stimulation of Sig-1R by treatment with the agonist SA4503 or the SSRI fluvoxamine for 14 days improves depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice. By contrast, treatment with paroxetine, which lacks affinity for Sig-1R, did not alter these behaviors. Reduced numbers of BrdU-positive cells and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein kinase B (Akt; Ser-473) phosphorylation seen in the DG of CaMKIV null mice were significantly rescued by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Interestingly, reduced ATP production observed in the DG of CaMKIV null mice was improved by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Such stimulation also improved hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and maintenance, which are impaired in the DG of CaMKIV null mice. LTP rescue was closely associated with both increases in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) autophosphorylation and GluA1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation. Taken together, Sig-1R stimulation by SA4503 or fluvoxamine treatment increased hippocampal neurogenesis, which is closely associated with amelioration of depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice.

  19. Incisional wound healing in transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Koch, R M; Roche, N S; Parks, W T; Ashcroft, G S; Letterio, J J; Roberts, A B

    2000-01-01

    Expression of endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 is reduced in many animal models of impaired wound healing, and addition of exogenous transforming growth factor-beta has been shown to improve healing. To test the hypothesis that endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 is essential for normal wound repair, we have studied wound healing in mice in which the transforming growth factor-beta1 gene has been deleted by homologous recombination. No perceptible differences were observed in wounds made in 3-10-day-old neonatal transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice compared to wild-type littermates. To preclude interference from maternally transferred transforming growth factor-beta1, cutaneous wounds were also made on the backs of 30-day-old transforming growth factor-beta1 null and littermate control mice treated with rapamycin, which extends their lifetime and suppresses the inflammatory response characteristic of the transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice. Again, no impairment in healing was seen in transforming growth factor-beta1 null mice. Instead these wounds showed an overall reduction in the amount of granulation tissue and an increased rate of epithelialization compared to littermate controls. Our data suggest that release of transforming growth factor-beta1 from degranulating platelets or secretion by infiltrating macrophages and fibroblasts is not critical to initiation or progression of tissue repair and that endogenous transforming growth factor-beta1 may actually function to increase inflammation and retard wound closure.

  20. Targeting the ACE2 and Apelin Pathways Are Novel Therapies for Heart Failure: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi-Bajestani, Seyyed M. R.; Patel, Vaibhav B.; Wang, Wang; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang II/Ang 1–7 and the apelin/APJ are two important peptide systems which exert diverse effects on the cardiovascular system. ACE2 is a key negative regulator of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) where it metabolizes angiotensin (Ang) II into Ang 1–7, an endogenous antagonist of Ang II. Both the prolonged activation of RAS and the loss of ACE2 can be detrimental as they lead to functional deterioration of the heart and progression of cardiac, renal, and vascular diseases. Recombinant human ACE2 in an animal model of ACE2 knockout mice lowers Ang II. These interactions neutralize the pressor and subpressor pathologic effects of Ang II by producing Ang 1–7 levels in vivo, that might be cardiovascular protective. ACE2 hydrolyzes apelin to Ang II and, therefore, is responsible for the degradation of both peptides. Apelin has emerged as a promising peptide biomarker of heart failure. The serum level of apelin in cardiovascular diseases tends to be decreased. Apelin is recognized as an imperative controller of systemic blood pressure and myocardium contractility. Dysregulation of the apelin/APJ system may be involved in the predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, and enhancing apelin action may have important therapeutic effects. PMID:22655211

  1. VAMP3 null mice display normal constitutive, insulin- and exercise-regulated vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Mora, S; Ryder, J W; Coker, K J; Hansen, P; Allen, L A; Pessin, J E

    2001-03-01

    To investigate the physiological function of the VAMP3 vesicle SNARE (v-SNARE) isoform in the regulation of GLUT4 vesicle trafficking, we generated homozygotic VAMP3 null mice by targeted gene disruption. The VAMP3 null mice had typical growth rate and weight gain, with normal maintenance of fasting serum glucose and insulin levels. Analysis of glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity demonstrated normal insulin and glucose tolerance, with no evidence for insulin resistance. Insulin stimulation of glucose uptake in isolated primary adipocytes was essentially the same for the wild-type and VAMP3 null mice. Similarly, insulin-, hypoxia-, and exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in isolated skeletal muscle did not differ significantly. In addition, other general membrane trafficking events including phagocytosis, pinocytosis, and transferrin receptor recycling were also found to be unaffected in the VAMP3 null mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate that VAMP3 function is not necessary for either regulated GLUT4 translocation or general constitutive membrane recycling. PMID:11238894

  2. Impaired learning and memory in CD38 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Somi; Kim, TaeHyun; Lee, Hye-Ryeon; Jang, Eun-Hye; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Kang, Minkyung; Rah, So-Young; Yoo, Juyoun; Lee, Bolam; Kim, Jae-Ick; Lim, Chae Seok; Kim, Sang Jeong; Kim, Uh-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-02-09

    CD38 is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of cyclic ADP ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate, both of which are involved in the mobilization of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. Recently, CD38 has been shown to regulate oxytocin release from hypothalamic neurons. Importantly, CD38 mutations are associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and CD38 knockout (CD38(-/-)) mice display ASD-like behavioral phenotypes including deficient parental behavior and poor social recognition memory. Although ASD and learning deficits commonly co-occur, the role of CD38 in learning and memory has not been investigated. We report that CD38(-/-) mice show deficits in various learning and memory tasks such as the Morris water maze, contextual fear conditioning, and the object recognition test. However, either long-term potentiation or long-term depression is not impaired in the hippocampus of CD38(-/-) mice. Our results provide convincing evidence that CD38(-/-) mice show deficits in various learning and memory tasks including spatial and non-spatial memory tasks. Our data demonstrate that CD38 is critical for regulating hippocampus-dependent learning and memory without modulating synaptic plasticity.

  3. Generalized Degenerative Joint Disease in Osteoprotegerin (Opg) Null Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Bolon, B; Grisanti, M; Villasenor, K; Morony, S; Feige, U; Simonet, W S

    2015-09-01

    Bone structure is modulated by the interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANKL). Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for RANKL, modifies osteoclast-mediated bone resorption directly and spares articular cartilage indirectly in rodents with immune-mediated arthritis by preventing subchondral bone destruction. The OPG/RANKL balance also seems to be critical in maintaining joint integrity in osteoarthritis, a condition featuring articular bone and cartilage damage in the absence of profound inflammation. The current study explored the role of OPG in sparing articular cartilage by evaluating joint lesions in adult C57BL/6J mice lacking osteoprotegerin (Opg (-) (/-)). At 3, 5, 7, 9, and 12 months of age, both sexes of Opg (-) (/-) mice developed severe degenerative joint disease (DJD) characterized by progressive loss of cartilage matrix and eventually articular cartilage. Lesions developed earlier and more severely in Opg (-) (/-) mice relative to age-matched, wild-type (Opg (+) (/+)), or heterozygous (Opg (+) (/-)) littermates (P ≤ .05). The femorotibial joint was affected bilaterally at 3 months, while other key weight-bearing diarthrodial joints (eg, coxofemoral, scapulohumeral, humeroradioulnar) were affected later and unilaterally. Cortical bone in subchondral plates and long bone diaphyses of Opg (-) (/-) mice but not Opg (+/+) or Opg (+) (/-) animals was osteoporotic by 3 months of age (P ≤ .05); the extent of porosity was less than the degree of DJD. Closure of the physes in long bones (P ≤ .05) and cartilage retention in the femoral primary spongiosa (P ≤ .05) affected chiefly Opg (-) (/-) mice. These data suggest that OPG plays an essential direct role in maintaining cartilage integrity in the articular surfaces and physes.

  4. Impaired capsule formation of tumors in periostin-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, Masashi; Kudo, Akira

    2008-03-21

    Being a secreted protein, periostin is a multifunctional matricellular glycoprotein. In vitro, periostin has the ability to promote the proliferation and migration of fibroblasts. Previously, it was demonstrated that periostin is mainly produced by cancer-associated fibroblasts or tumor stromal cells. In the present study, we show that periostin regulates capsule formation in a positive manner and inhibits tumor growth. Consistent with a previous finding, several tumor cell lines did not exhibit expression of periostin in vitro or in vivo; and the growth of tumors that had been allografted into periostin -/- mice was significantly accelerated compared with that of the same kind of tumors grafted into periostin +/+ mice. Immunostaining and biochemical analyses revealed that mature collagen was detected abundantly in the capsules and interstitium of the wild-type-grafted tumors but not in those of the periostin -/- grafted tumors. Moreover, the number of activated tumor stromal cells was decreased significantly in the periostin -/- grafted tumors. Our studies suggest that host-derived periostin negatively regulates tumor growth by promoting capsule formation and by mediating changes in the deposition and organization of the tumor microenvironment coordinated by periostin-producing stromal cells.

  5. Reversal of liver fibrosis in aryl hydrocarbon receptor null mice by dietary vitamin A depletion.

    PubMed

    Andreola, Fausto; Calvisi, Diego F; Elizondo, Guillermo; Jakowlew, Sonia B; Mariano, Jennifer; Gonzalez, Frank J; De Luca, Luigi M

    2004-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-null mice display a liver fibrosis phenotype that is associated with a concomitant increase in liver retinoid concentration, tissue transglutaminase type II (TGaseII) activity, transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) overexpression, and accumulation of collagen. To test the hypothesis that this phenotype might be triggered by the observed increase in liver retinoid content, we induced the condition of retinoid depletion by feeding AHR-null mice a vitamin A- deficient diet with the purpose to reverse the phenotype. Liver retinoid content decreased sharply within the first few weeks on the retinoid-deficient diet. Analysis of TGF beta 1, TGF beta 2, and TGF beta 3 expression revealed a reduction to control levels in the AHR -/- mice accompanied by parallel changes in TGaseII protein levels. In addition, we observed an increase in the TGF beta receptors, TGF beta RI and TGF beta RII, as well as in Smad4, and their reduction to wild-type mouse liver levels in AHR -/- mice fed the retinoid-deficient diet. Reduction of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in AHR -/- mice was consistent with the presence of hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis. Vitamin A deficiency normalized PPAR gamma expression in AHR -/- mice. In conclusion, livers from AHR -/- mice fed the vitamin A-deficient diet showed a decrease in collagen deposition, consistent with the absence of liver fibrosis.

  6. Vitamin E Status and Metabolism in Adult and Aged Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Traber, Maret G.; Mustacich, Debbie J.; Sullivan, Laura C.; Leonard, Scott W.; Ahern-Rindell, Amelia; Kerkvliet, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is involved in regulation of mechanisms for detoxification of xenobiotics, as well as vitamin A metabolism. Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient whose metabolism is initialized via the cytochrome P450 system. Thus, AhR absence could alter hepatic regulation of α-tocopherol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we assessed vitamin E status in adult (2–5 m) and old (21–22 m), wildtype and AhR-null mice. Plasma α-tocopherol concentrations in AhR null mice (2.3 ± 1.2 μmol/L, n= 19) were lower than those of wildtype mice (3.2 ± 1.2, n=17, P=0.0131); those in old mice (3.2 ± 1.2, n= 20) were higher than those of adults (2.2 ± 1.0, n=16, p=0.0075). Hepatic α-tocopherol concentrations were not different between genotypes, but were nearly double in old (32 ± 8 nmol/g, n=20) as compared with adult mice (17 ± 2, n=16, p<0.0001). Hepatic Cyp3a concentrations in AhR-null mice were greater than those in wildtypes (p=0.0011). Genotype (p=0.0047), sex (p<0.0001) and age (p<0.0001) were significant modifiers of liver α-tocopherol metabolite (α-CEHC) concentrations. In general, Cyp3a concentrations correlated with hepatic α-tocopherol (r= 0.3957, p<0.05) and α-CEHC (r=0.4260, p<0.05) concentrations. Since there were no significant genotype differences in the hepatic α- or γ-tocopherol concentrations, AhR null mice did not have dramatically altered vitamin E metabolism. Since they did have higher hepatic α-CEHC concentrations, these data suggest metabolism was up-regulated in the AhR null mice in order to maintain the hepatic tocopherol concentrations similar to those of wildtypes. PMID:20153623

  7. Gastrointestinal Mucins of Fut2-Null Mice Lack Terminal Fucosylation without Affecting Colonization by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Elizabeth A.; Holmén, Jessica M.; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Domino, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Post-translational modification of apomucins by the sequential action of glycosyltransferases is required to produce mature mucins. The “Secretor” gene (FUT2) encodes an α(1,2)fucosyltransferase (E.C. 2.4.1.69) that catalyzes addition of terminal α(1,2)fucose residues on mucins and other molecules in mucosal epithelium. Mutant mice containing targeted replacement of Fut2 with the bacterial reporter gene lacZ were studied to determine the affect of the loss of Fut2 on glycosylation of mucins in the gastrointestinal tract. By whole organ X-gal staining, lacZ activity is prominently expressed in the foveolar pit and chief cells of the glandular stomach, Brunner's glands of the duodenum, and goblet cells in the large intestine of Fut2-LacZ null mice. Staining with Aleuria aurantia agglutinin demonstrates loss of l-fucosylated epithelial glycans throughout the gastrointestinal tract of Fut2-LacZ null mice, however, histologic appearance of the tissues appears normal. Analysis of oligosaccharides released from insoluble colonic mucins, largely Muc2, by mass spectrometry shows complete lack of terminal fucosylation of O-linked oligosaccharides in Fut2-LacZ null mice. Precursor glycans accumulate with no evidence of compensation by other fucosyltransferases or sialyltransferases on mucin glycosylation. Since Candida albicans has been reported to adhere to intestinal mucins creating a potential reservoir associated with vaginitis, Fut2-LacZ null and wild type mice were inoculated by gastric lavage with C. albicans. We observe no difference in colonization between genotypes suggesting mucin terminal fucosylation does not significantly influence C. albicans-host interaction in the intestine, highlighting that infections caused by the same organism at different mucosal surfaces are not equal. PMID:15958416

  8. Transgenic expression of the human MRP2 transporter reduces cisplatin accumulation and nephrotoxicity in Mrp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xia; Buckley, Brian; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Goedken, Michael J; Syed, Samira; Pelis, Ryan; Manautou, José E; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2014-05-01

    The chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin is actively transported into proximal tubules, leading to acute renal injury. Previous studies suggest that the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) transporter may efflux cisplatin conjugates from cells. We sought to determine whether the absence of Mrp2 alters the accumulation and toxicity of platinum in the kidneys of mice and whether transgenic expression of the human MRP2 gene could protect against cisplatin injury in vivo. Plasma, kidneys, and livers from vehicle- and cisplatin-treated wild-type and Mrp2-null mice were collected for quantification of platinum and toxicity. By 24 hours, twofold higher concentrations of platinum were detected in the kidneys and livers of Mrp2-null mice compared with wild types. Enhanced platinum concentrations in Mrp2-null mice were observed in DNA and cytosolic fractions of the kidneys. Four days after cisplatin treatment, more extensive proximal tubule injury was observed in Mrp2-null mice compared with wild-type mice. Kidneys from naive Mrp2-null mice had elevated glutathione S-transferase mRNA levels, which could increase the formation of cisplatin-glutathione conjugates that may be metabolized to toxic thiol intermediates. Transgenic expression of the human MRP2 gene in Mrp2-null mice reduced the accumulation and nephrotoxicity of cisplatin to levels observed in wild-type mice. These data suggest that deficiency in Mrp2 lowers platinum excretion and increases susceptibility to kidney injury, which can be rescued by the human MRP2 ortholog.

  9. Orexin Receptor Antagonism Improves Sleep and Reduces Seizures in Kcna1-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roundtree, Harrison M.; Simeone, Timothy A.; Johnson, Chaz; Matthews, Stephanie A.; Samson, Kaeli K.; Simeone, Kristina A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Comorbid sleep disorders occur in approximately one-third of people with epilepsy. Seizures and sleep disorders have an interdependent relationship where the occurrence of one can exacerbate the other. Orexin, a wake-promoting neuropeptide, is associated with sleep disorder symptoms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that orexin dysregulation plays a role in the comorbid sleep disorder symptoms in the Kcna1-null mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: Rest-activity was assessed using infrared beam actigraphy. Sleep architecture and seizures were assessed using continuous video-electroencephalography-electromyography recordings in Kcna1-null mice treated with vehicle or the dual orexin receptor antagonist, almorexant (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Orexin levels in the lateral hypothalamus/perifornical region (LH/P) and hypothalamic pathology were assessed with immunohistochemistry and oxygen polarography. Results: Kcna1-null mice have increased latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep onset, sleep fragmentation, and number of wake epochs. The numbers of REM and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs are significantly reduced in Kcna1-null mice. Severe seizures propagate to the wake-promoting LH/P where injury is apparent (indicated by astrogliosis, blood-brain barrier permeability, and impaired mitochondrial function). The number of orexin-positive neurons is increased in the LH/P compared to wild-type LH/P. Treatment with a dual orexin receptor antagonist significantly increases the number and duration of NREM sleep epochs and reduces the latency to REM sleep onset. Further, almorexant treatment reduces the incidence of severe seizures and overall seizure burden. Interestingly, we report a significant positive correlation between latency to REM onset and seizure burden in Kcna1-null mice. Conclusion: Dual orexin receptor antagonists may be an effective sleeping aid in epilepsy, and warrants further study on their somnogenic and ant-seizure effects in

  10. Leucine supplementation via drinking water reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE null mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dai, Xiao-yan; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Ge-xin; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-jiang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that the essential amino acid leucine may be involved in systemic cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. Methods: ApoE null mice were fed with chow supplemented with leucine (1.5% w/v) in drinking water for 8 week. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were examined using Oil Red O staining. Plasma lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were measured with fast protein liquid chromatography. Hepatic gene expression was detected using real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. Results: Leucine supplementation resulted in 57.6% reduction of aortic atherosclerotic lesion area in apoE null mice, accompanied by 41.2% decrease of serum LDL-C levels and 40.2% increase of serum HDL-C levels. The body weight, food intake and blood glucose level were not affected by leucine supplementation. Furthermore, leucine supplementation increased the expression of Abcg5 and Abcg8 (that were involved in hepatic cholesterol efflux) by 1.28- and 0.86-fold, respectively, and significantly increased their protein levels. Leucine supplementation also increased the expression of Srebf1, Scd1 and Pgc1b (that were involved in hepatic triglyceride metabolism) by 3.73-, 1.35- and 1.71-fold, respectively. Consequently, leucine supplementation resulted in 51.77% reduction of liver cholesterol content and 2.2-fold increase of liver triglyceride content. Additionally, leucine supplementation did not affect the serum levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-12, but markedly decreased the serum level of MCP-1. Conclusion: Leucine supplementation effectively attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE null mice by improving the plasma lipid profile and reducing systemic inflammation. PMID:26687933

  11. Exacerbated corneal inflammation and neovascularization in the HO-2 null mice is ameliorated by biliverdin

    PubMed Central

    Bellner, Lars; Vitto, Marco; Patil, Kiran A.; Dunn, Michael W.; Regan, Raymond; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO-1 and HO-2) represents an intrinsic cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory system based on its ability to modulate leukocyte migration and to inhibit expression of inflammatory cytokines and proteins. HO-2 deletion leads to unresolved corneal inflammation and chronic inflammatory complications including ulceration, perforation and neovascularization. We examined the consequences of HO-2 deletion on hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the model of suture-induced inflammatory neovascularization. A 8.0 silk suture was placed at the corneal apex of wild type and HO-2 null mice. Neovascularization was assessed by vital microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis were determined by immunofluorescence staining using anti-CD31 and anti-LYVE-1 antibodies, respectively. Inflammation was quantified by histology and myeloperoxidase activity. The levels of HO-1 expression and inflammatory cytokines were determined by real time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Corneal sutures produced a consistent inflammatory response and a time-dependent neovascularization. The response in HO-2 null mice was associated with a greater increase compared to the wild type in the number of leukocytes (827600±129000 vs. 294500±57510; p<0.05), neovessels measured by vital microscopy (21.91±1.05 vs. 12.77±1.55 mm; p<0.001) 4 days after suture placement. Hemangiogenesis but not lymphangiogenesis was more pronounced in HO-2 null mice compared to wild type mice. Induction of HO-1 in sutured corneas was greatly attenuated in HO-2 null corneas and treatment with biliverdin diminished the exaggerated inflammatory and neovascular response in HO-2 null mice. The demonstration that the inflammatory responses, including expression of proinflammatory proteins, inflammatory cell influx and hemangiogenesis are exaggerated in HO-2 knockout mice strongly supports the notion that the HO system is critical for controlling the inflammatory and neovascular

  12. 4-Hydroxychalcone Attenuates Hyperaldosteronism, Inflammation, and Renal Injury in Cryptochrome-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Qi; Dai, Bingguang; Yang, Bo; Li, Xuelian; Liu, Yimin; Zhang, Fuling

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the preventive effects of 4-hydroxychalcone (4HCH) on resistant hypertension. We used cryptochrome-null mice, which characteristically show high plasma aldosterone levels, inflammation, and renal injury. The cryptochrome-null mice received high-salt treatment and were treated orally with 4HCH 10 mg/kg, 4HCH 20 mg/kg, and 4HCH 40 mg/kg, respectively. The salt administration in cryptochrome-null mice is able to induce an increase in systolic pressure which is associated with hyperaldosteronism, inflammation, and kidney injury. Treatment with 40 mg/kg 4HCH reduced systolic hypertension, serum IL-1β, and TNF-α levels and suppressed the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and renal injury. The impact of 4HCH on the hyperaldosteronism, inflammation, and kidney injury provides new insights for future development of therapeutic strategies in resistant hypertension. PMID:25003119

  13. Nutritional intervention restores muscle but not kidney phenotypes in adult calcineurin Aα null mice.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kirsten; Reddy, Ramesh N; Price, S Russ; Williams, Clintoria R; Gooch, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Mice lacking the α isoform of the catalytic subunit of calcineurin (CnAα) were first reported in 1996 and have been an important model to understand the role of calcineurin in the brain, immune system, bones, muscle, and kidney. Research using the mice has been limited, however, by failure to thrive and early lethality of most null pups. Work in our laboratory led to the rescue of CnAα-/- mice by supplemental feeding to compensate for a defect in salivary enzyme secretion. The data revealed that, without intervention, knockout mice suffer from severe caloric restriction. Since nutritional deprivation is known to significantly alter development, it is imperative that previous conclusions based on CnAα-/- mice are revisited to determine which aspects of the phenotype were attributable to caloric restriction versus a direct role for CnAα. In this study, we find that defects in renal development and function persist in adult CnAα-/- mice including a significant decrease in glomerular filtration rate and an increase in blood urea nitrogen levels. These data indicate that impaired renal development we previously reported was not due to caloric restriction but rather a specific role for CnAα in renal development and function. In contrast, we find that rather than being hypoglycemic, rescued mice are mildly hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. Examination of muscle fiber types shows that previously reported reductions in type I muscle fibers are no longer evident in rescued null mice. Rather, loss of CnAα likely alters insulin response due to a reduction in insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS2) expression and signaling in muscle. This study illustrates the importance of re-examining the phenotypes of CnAα-/- mice and the advances that are now possible with the use of adult, rescued knockout animals. PMID:23638102

  14. Otx1 null mutant mice show partial segregation of sensory epithelia comparable to lamprey ears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Signore, M.; Simeone, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the development of inner ear innervation in Otx1 null mutants, which lack a horizontal canal, between embryonic day 12 (E12) and postnatal day 7 (P7) with DiI and immunostaining for acetylated tubulin. Comparable to control animals, horizontal crista-like fibers were found to cross over the utricle in Otx1 null mice. In mutants these fibers extend toward an area near the endolymphatic duct, not to a horizontal crista. Most Otx1 null mutants had a small patch of sensory hair cells at this position. Measurement of the area of the utricular macula suggested it to be enlarged in Otx1 null mutants. We suggest that parts of the horizontal canal crista remain incorporated in the utricular sensory epithelium in Otx1 null mutants. Other parts of the horizontal crista appear to be variably segregated to form the isolated patch of hair cells identifiable by the unique fiber trajectory as representing the horizontal canal crista. Comparison with lamprey ear innervation reveals similarities in the pattern of innervation with the dorsal macula, a sensory patch of unknown function. SEM data confirm that all foramina are less constricted in Otx1 null mutants. We propose that Otx1 is not directly involved in sensory hair cell formation of the horizontal canal but affects the segregation of the horizontal canal crista from the utricle. It also affects constriction of the two main foramina in the ear, but not their initial formation. Otx1 is thus causally related to horizontal canal morphogenesis as well as morphogenesis of these foramina.

  15. Stem cell expansion during carcinogenesis in stem cell-depleted conditional telomeric repeat factor 2 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, B; Ho, H-Y; Wu, J; Crowe, D L

    2013-10-24

    To examine the role of telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) in epithelial tumorigenesis, we characterized conditional loss of TRF2 expression in the basal layer of mouse epidermis. These mice exhibit some characteristics of dyskeratosis congenita, a human stem cell depletion syndrome caused by telomere dysfunction. The epidermis in conditional TRF2 null mice exhibited DNA damage response and apoptosis, which correlated with stem cell depletion. The stem cell population in conditional TRF2 null epidermis exhibited shorter telomeres than those in control mice. Squamous cell carcinomas induced in conditional TRF2 null mice developed with increased latency and slower growth due to reduced numbers of proliferating cells as the result of increased apoptosis. TRF2 null epidermal stem cells were found in both primary and metastatic tumors. Despite the low-grade phenotype of the conditional TRF2 null primary tumors, the number of metastatic lesions was similar to control cancers. Basal cells from TRF2 null tumors demonstrated extreme telomere shortening and dramatically increased numbers of telomeric signals by fluorescence in situ hybridization due to increased genomic instability and aneuploidy in these cancers. DNA damage response signals were detected at telomeres in TRF2 null tumor cells from these mice. The increased genomic instability in these tumors correlated with eightfold expansion of the transformed stem cell population compared with that in control cancers. We concluded that genomic instability resulting from loss of TRF2 expression provides biological advantages to the cancer stem cell population.

  16. Functional Prestin Transduction of Immature Outer Hair Cells from Normal and Prestin-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Anping; Wooltorton, Julian R.A.; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Pereira, Fred A.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2008-01-01

    Prestin is a membrane protein in the outer hair cell (OHC) that has been shown to be essential for electromotility. OHCs from prestin-null mice do not express prestin, do not have a nonlinear capacitance (the electrical signature of electromotility), and are smaller in size than wild-type OHCs. We sought to determine whether prestin-null OHCs can be transduced to incorporate functional prestin protein in a normal fashion. A recombinant helper-dependent adenovirus expressing prestin and green fluorescent protein (HDAd–prestin–GFP) was created and tested in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK cells). Transduced HEK cells demonstrated membrane expression of prestin and nonlinear capacitance. HDAd–prestin–GFP was then applied to cochlear sensory epithelium explants harvested from wild-type and prestin-null mice at postnatal days 2–3, the age at which native prestin is just beginning to become functional in wild-type mice. At postnatal days 4–5, we investigated transduced OHCs for (1) their prestin expression pattern as revealed by immunofluorescence; (2) their cell surface area as measured by linear capacitance; and (3) their prestin function as indicated by nonlinear capacitance. HDAd–prestin–GFP efficiently transduced OHCs of both genotypes and prestin protein localized to the plasma membrane. Whole-cell voltage clamp studies revealed a nonlinear capacitance in transduced wild-type and prestin-null OHCs, but not in non-transduced cells of either genotype. Prestin transduction did not increase the linear capacitance (cell surface area) for either genotype. In peak nonlinear capacitance, voltage at peak nonlinear capacitance, charge density of the nonlinear capacitance, and shape of the voltage-capacitance curves, the transduced cells of the two genotypes resembled each other and previously reported data from adult wild-type mouse OHCs. Thus, prestin introduced into prestin-deficient OHCs segregates normally to the cell membrane and generates a normal

  17. Altered somatosensory barrel cortex refinement in the developing brain of Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Moroto, M; Nishimura, A; Morimoto, M; Isoda, K; Morita, T; Yoshida, M; Morioka, S; Tozawa, T; Hasegawa, T; Chiyonobu, T; Yoshimoto, K; Hosoi, H

    2013-11-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. In previous studies, monoaminergic dysfunctions have been detected in patients with RTT and in a murine model of RTT, the Mecp2-null mouse. Therefore, the pathogenesis of RTT is thought to involve impairments in the monoaminergic systems. However, there have been limited data showing that the impairment of monoamines leads to early symptoms during development. We used histochemistry to study the somatosensory barrel cortex in the B6.129P2(C)-Mecp2(tm1.1Bird) mouse model of RTT. The barrel cortex is widely used to investigate neuronal development and its regulation by various neurotransmitters including 5-HT. 5-HT levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC/EC), and serotonin transporter (SERT) and 5-HT1B receptor mRNAs were measured in the somatosensory cortex, thalamus and striatum on postnatal days (P) 10, P20 and P40. Mecp2-null mice (Mecp2-/y) had significantly smaller barrel fields than age-matched wild-type controls (Mecp2+/y) on P10 and P40, but the topographic map was accurately formed. Levels of 5-HT, and SERT and 5-HT1B receptor mRNA expression in the somatosensory cortex did not differ significantly between the Mecp2-null and wild-type mice on P10. However, thalamic 5-HT was reduced in Mecp2-null mice. Our data indicate that a lack of MeCP2 may disturb the refinement of the barrel cortex in the early postnatal period. Our findings suggest that a decrease in thalamic 5-HT might be involved in this phenomenon.

  18. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  19. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F. Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  20. Chronic Toxoplasma gondii in Nurr1-null heterozygous mice exacerbates elevated open field activity.

    PubMed

    Eells, Jeffrey B; Varela-Stokes, Andrea; Guo-Ross, Shirley X; Kummari, Evangel; Smith, Holly M; Cox, Erin; Lindsay, David S

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection with Toxoplasma gondii is common in humans (approximately 30% of the global population) and is a significant risk factor for schizophrenia. Since prevalence of T. gondii infection is far greater than prevalence of schizophrenia (0.5-1%), genetic risk factors are likely also necessary to contribute to schizophrenia. To test this concept in an animal model, Nurr1-null heterozygous (+/-) mice and wild-type (+/+) mice were evaluate using an emergence test, activity in an open field and with a novel object, response to bobcat urine and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI) prior to and 6 weeks after infection with T. gondii. In the emergence test, T. gondii infection significantly decreased the amount of time spent in the cylinder. Toxoplasma gondii infection significantly elevated open field activity in both +/+ and +/- mice but this increase was significantly exacerbated in +/- mice. T. gondii infection reduced PPI in male +/- mice but this was not statistically significant. Aversion to bobcat urine was abolished by T. gondii infection in +/+ mice. In female +/- mice, aversion to bobcat urine remained after T. gondii infection while the male +/- mice showed no aversion to bobcat urine. Antibody titers of infected mice were a critical variable associated with changes in open field activity, such that an inverted U shaped relationship existed between antibody titers and the percent change in open field activity with a significant increase in activity at low and medium antibody titers but no effect at high antibody titers. These data demonstrate that the Nurr1 +/- genotype predisposes mice to T. gondii-induced alterations in behaviors that involve dopamine neurotransmission and are associated with symptoms of schizophrenia. We propose that these alterations in murine behavior were due to further exacerbation of the altered dopamine neurotransmission in Nurr1 +/- mice.

  1. Enhanced ethanol catabolism in orphan nuclear receptor SHP-null mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Eun; Lee, Mikang; Mifflin, Ryan; Lee, Yoon Kwang

    2016-05-15

    Deficiency of the orphan nuclear hormone receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0B2) protects mice from diet-induced hepatic steatosis, in part, via repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ2 (Pparg2) gene expression. Alcoholic fatty liver diseases (AFLD) share many common pathophysiological features with non-AFLD. To study the role of SHP and PPARγ2 in AFLD, we used a strategy of chronic ethanol feeding plus a single binge ethanol feeding to challenge wild-type (WT) and SHP-null (SHP(-/-)) mice with ethanol. The ethanol feeding induced liver fat accumulation and mRNA expression of hepatic Pparg2 in WT mice, which suggests that a high level of PPARγ2 is a common driving force for fat accumulation induced by ethanol or a high-fat diet. Interestingly, ethanol-fed SHP(-/-) mice displayed hepatic fat accumulation similar to that of ethanol-fed WT mice, even though their Pparg2 expression level remained lower. Mortality of SHP(-/-) mice after ethanol binge feeding was significantly reduced and their acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh2) mRNA level was higher than that of their WT counterparts. After an intoxicating dose of ethanol, SHP(-/-) mice exhibited faster blood ethanol clearance and earlier wake-up time than WT mice. Higher blood acetate, the end product of ethanol metabolism, and lower acetaldehyde levels were evident in the ethanol-challenged SHP(-/-) than WT mice. Ethanol-induced inflammatory responses and lipid peroxidation were also lower in SHP(-/-) mice. The current data show faster ethanol catabolism and extra fat storage through conversion of acetate to acetyl-CoA before its release into the circulation in this ethanol-feeding model in SHP(-/-) mice.

  2. Chronic Toxoplasma gondii in Nurr1-null heterozygous mice exacerbates elevated open field activity.

    PubMed

    Eells, Jeffrey B; Varela-Stokes, Andrea; Guo-Ross, Shirley X; Kummari, Evangel; Smith, Holly M; Cox, Erin; Lindsay, David S

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection with Toxoplasma gondii is common in humans (approximately 30% of the global population) and is a significant risk factor for schizophrenia. Since prevalence of T. gondii infection is far greater than prevalence of schizophrenia (0.5-1%), genetic risk factors are likely also necessary to contribute to schizophrenia. To test this concept in an animal model, Nurr1-null heterozygous (+/-) mice and wild-type (+/+) mice were evaluate using an emergence test, activity in an open field and with a novel object, response to bobcat urine and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI) prior to and 6 weeks after infection with T. gondii. In the emergence test, T. gondii infection significantly decreased the amount of time spent in the cylinder. Toxoplasma gondii infection significantly elevated open field activity in both +/+ and +/- mice but this increase was significantly exacerbated in +/- mice. T. gondii infection reduced PPI in male +/- mice but this was not statistically significant. Aversion to bobcat urine was abolished by T. gondii infection in +/+ mice. In female +/- mice, aversion to bobcat urine remained after T. gondii infection while the male +/- mice showed no aversion to bobcat urine. Antibody titers of infected mice were a critical variable associated with changes in open field activity, such that an inverted U shaped relationship existed between antibody titers and the percent change in open field activity with a significant increase in activity at low and medium antibody titers but no effect at high antibody titers. These data demonstrate that the Nurr1 +/- genotype predisposes mice to T. gondii-induced alterations in behaviors that involve dopamine neurotransmission and are associated with symptoms of schizophrenia. We propose that these alterations in murine behavior were due to further exacerbation of the altered dopamine neurotransmission in Nurr1 +/- mice. PMID:25855987

  3. Reactivation of autophagy by spermidine ameliorates the myopathic defects of collagen VI-null mice.

    PubMed

    Chrisam, Martina; Pirozzi, Marinella; Castagnaro, Silvia; Blaauw, Bert; Polishchuck, Roman; Cecconi, Francesco; Grumati, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a self-degradative process responsible for the clearance of damaged or unnecessary cellular components. We have previously found that persistence of dysfunctional organelles due to autophagy failure is a key event in the pathogenesis of COL6/collagen VI-related myopathies, and have demonstrated that reactivation of a proper autophagic flux rescues the muscle defects of Col6a1-null (col6a1(-/-)) mice. Here we show that treatment with spermidine, a naturally occurring nontoxic autophagy inducer, is beneficial for col6a1(-/-) mice. Systemic administration of spermidine in col6a1(-/-) mice reactivated autophagy in a dose-dependent manner, leading to a concurrent amelioration of the histological and ultrastructural muscle defects. The beneficial effects of spermidine, together with its being easy to administer and the lack of overt side effects, open the field for the design of novel nutraceutical strategies for the treatment of muscle diseases characterized by autophagy impairment.

  4. Impaired Thermogenesis and a Molecular Signature for Brown Adipose Tissue in Id2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Mathew, Deepa; Duffield, Giles E.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Id2 null mice have sex-specific elevated glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Here we further explored the role of Id2 in the regulation of core body temperature over the circadian cycle and the impact of Id2 deficiency on genes involved in insulin signaling and adipogenesis in BAT. We discovered a reduced core body temperature in Id2−/− mice. Moreover, in Id2−/− BAT, 30 genes including Irs1, PPARs, and PGC-1s were identified as differentially expressed in a sex-specific pattern. These data provide valuable insights into the impact of Id2 deficiency on energy homeostasis of mice in a sex-specific manner. PMID:27144179

  5. Reduced Excitatory Neurotransmission and Mild Autism-Relevant Phenotypes in Adolescent Shank3 Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mu; Bozdagi, Ozlem; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Wöhr, Markus; Roullet, Florence I.; Katz, Adam M.; Abrams, Danielle N.; Kalikhman, David; Simon, Harrison; Woldeyohannes, Leuk; Zhang, James Y.; Harris, Mark J.; Saxena, Roheeni; Silverman, Jill L.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the synaptic scaffolding protein gene SHANK3 are strongly implicated in autism and Phelan-McDermid 22q13 deletion syndrome. The precise location of the mutation within the Shank3 gene is key to its phenotypic outcomes. Here we report the physiological and behavioral consequences of null and heterozygous mutations in the ankyrin repeat domain in Shank3 mice. Both homozygous and heterozygous mice showed reduced glutamatergic transmission and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus with more severe deficits detected in the homozygous mice. Three independent cohorts were evaluated for magnitude and replicability of behavioral endophenotypes relevant to autism and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Mild social impairments were detected, primarily in juveniles during reciprocal interactions, while all genotypes displayed normal adult sociability on the three-chambered task. Impaired novel object recognition and rotarod performance were consistent across cohorts of null mutants. Repetitive self-grooming, reduced ultrasonic vocalizations, and deficits in reversal of water maze learning were detected only in some cohorts, emphasizing the importance of replication analyses. These results demonstrate the exquisite specificity of deletions in discrete domains within the Shank3 gene in determining severity of symptoms. PMID:22573675

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21-Null Mice Do Not Exhibit an Impaired Response to Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Antonellis, Patrick Joseph; Hayes, Meghan Patricia; Adams, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a pleotropic metabolic regulator, expression of which is elevated during fasting. To this end, the precise role played by FGF21 in the biology of fasting has been the subject of several recent studies, which have demonstrated contributions to the regulation of both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In the present study, we compared wild-type (WT) and FGF21-null (FGF21KO) mice, demonstrating that, despite the significant induction of FGF21 during fasting in the WT animals, our strain of FGF21-null mice exhibits only limited impairments in their adaptation to nutrient deprivation. Specifically, fasted FGF21KO mice display a mild attenuation of gluconeogenic transcriptional induction in the liver accompanied by partially blunted glucose production in response to a pyruvate challenge. Furthermore, FGF21KO mice displayed only minor impairments in lipid metabolism in the fasted state, limited to accumulation of hepatic triglycerides and a reduction in expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation. To address the possibility of compensation to germline deletion of FGF21, we further interrogated the role of endogenous FGF21 via acute pharmacological blockade of FGF21 signaling. At the transcriptional level, we show that FGF21 signaling is required for full induction of gluconeogenic and oxidative genes in the liver. However, corroborating our findings in FGF21KO mice, pharmacological blockade of the FGF21 axis did not profoundly disrupt the physiological response to fasting. Taken as a whole, these data demonstrate that, while FGF21 is partially required for appropriate gene expression during the fed to fasted transition, its absence does not significantly impact the downstream physiology of the fasted state. PMID:27445980

  7. ORAL EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN EXACERBATES ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN APO E-NULL MICE

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Sithu, Srinivas D.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Haberzettl, Petra; Hoetker, David J.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Conklin, Daniel J.; D'Souza, Stanley E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2011-01-01

    Background Acrolein is a dietary aldehyde that is present in high concentrations in alcoholic beverages and foods including cheese, donuts and coffee. It is also abundant in tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and is generated in vivo during inflammation and oxidative stress. Objectives The goal of this study was to examine the effects of dietary acrolein on atherosclerosis. Methods Eight-week old male apoE-null mice were gavage-fed acrolein (2.5 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. Atherosclerotic lesion formation and composition and plasma lipids and platelet factor 4 (PF4) levels were measured. Effects of acrolein and PF4 on endothelial cell function was measured in vitro. Results Acrolein feeding increased the concentration of cholesterol in the plasma. NMR analysis of the lipoproteins showed that acrolein feeding increased the abundance of small and medium VLDL particles. Acrolein feeding also increased atherosclerotic lesion formation in the aortic valve and the aortic arch. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased macrophage accumulation in the lesions of acrolein-fed mice. Plasma PF4 levels and accumulation of PF4 in atherosclerotic lesions was increased in the acrolein-fed mice. Incubation of endothelial cells with the plasma of acrolein-fed mice augmented transmigration of monocytic cells, which was abolished by anti-PF4 antibody treatment. Conclusions Dietary exposure to acrolein exacerbates atherosclerosis in apoE-null mice. Consumption of foods and beverages rich in unsaturated aldehydes such as acrolein may be a contributing factor to the progression of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:21371710

  8. Metallothionein-I/II null mice are more sensitive than wild-type mice to the hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects of chronic oral or injected inorganic arsenicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Liu, Y; Goyer, R A; Achanzar, W; Waalkes, M P

    2000-06-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a low-molecular-weight, sulfhydryl-rich, metal-binding protein that can protect against the toxicity of cadmium, mercury, and copper. However, the role of MT in arsenic (As)-induced toxicity is less certain. To better define the ability of MT to modify As toxicity, MT-I/II knockout (MT-null) mice and the corresponding wild-type mice (WT) were exposed to arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)] either through the drinking water for 48 weeks, or through repeated sc injections (5 days/week) for 15 weeks. Chronic As exposure increased tissue MT concentrations (2-5-fold) in the WT but not in MT-null mice. Arsenic by both routes produced damage to the liver (fatty infiltration, inflammation, and focal necrosis) and kidney (tubular cell vacuolization, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial fibrosis) in both MT-null and WT mice. However, in MT-null mice, the pathological lesions were more frequent and severe when compared to WT mice. This was confirmed biochemically, in that, at the higher oral doses of As, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were increased more in MT-null mice (60%) than in WT mice (30%). Chronic As exposures produced 2-10 fold elevation of serum interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels, with greater increases seen by repeated injections than by oral exposure, and again, MT-null mice had higher serum cytokines than WT mice after As exposure. Repeated As injections also decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) by 35%, but GSH-peroxidase and GSH-reductase were minimally affected. MT-null mice were more sensitive than WT mice to the effect of GSH depletion by As(V). Hepatic caspase-3 activity was increased (2-3-fold) in both WT and MT-null mice, indicative of apoptotic cell death. In summary, chronic inorganic As exposure produced injuries to multiple organs, and MT-null mice are generally more susceptible than WT mice to As-induced toxicity regardless of route of exposure, suggesting that MT could be a

  9. Increased Sensitivity of Glutathione S-Transferase P-Null Mice to Cyclophosphamide-Induced Urinary Bladder Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Haberzettl, Petra; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Prough, Russell A.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis and diffuse inflammation of the bladder, common side effects of cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment, have been linked to the generation of acrolein derived from CY metabolism. Metabolic removal of acrolein involves multiple pathways, which include reduction, oxidation, and conjugation with glutathione. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), the GST isoform that displays high catalytic efficiency with acrolein, protects against CY-induced urotoxicity by detoxifying acrolein. Treatment of wild-type (WT) and mGstP1/P2 null (GSTP-null) mice with CY caused hemorrhagic cystitis, edema, albumin extravasation, and sloughing of bladder epithelium; however, CY-induced bladder ulcerations of the lamina propria were more numerous and more severe in GSTP-null mice. CY treatment also led to greater accumulation of myeloperoxidase-positive cells and specific protein-acrolein adducts in the bladder of GSTP-null than WT mice. There was no difference in hepatic microsomal production of acrolein from CY or urinary hydroxypropyl mercapturic acid output between WT and GSTP-null mice, but CY induced greater c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38, activation in GSTP-null than in WT mice. Pretreatment with mesna (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate sodium) abolished CY toxicity and JNK activation in GSTP-null mice. Taken together, these data support the view that GSTP prevents CY-induced bladder toxicity, in part by detoxifying acrolein. Because polymorphisms in human GSTP gene code for protein variants differing significantly in their catalytic efficiency toward acrolein, it is likely that GSTP polymorphisms influence CY urotoxicity. In addition, pretreatment with dietary or nutrient inducers of GSTP may be of use in minimizing bladder injury in patients undergoing CY therapy. PMID:19696094

  10. Behavioral disturbances in estrogen-related receptor alpha-null mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z; Anderson, Rachel M; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E; Yin, Terry C; Radley, Jason J; Pieper, Andrew A; Lutter, Michael

    2015-04-21

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains.

  11. Behavioral Disturbances in Estrogen-Related Receptor alpha-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z.; Anderson, Rachel M.; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E.; Yin, Terry C.; Radley, Jason J.; Pieper, Andrew A.; Lutter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains. PMID:25865889

  12. Altered Arachidonate Distribution in Macrophages from Caveolin-1 Null Mice Leading to Reduced Eicosanoid Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Astudillo, Alma M.; Pérez-Chacón, Gema; Meana, Clara; Balgoma, David; Pol, Albert; del Pozo, Miguel A.; Balboa, María A.; Balsinde, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have studied the effect of caveolin-1 deficiency on the mechanisms that regulate free arachidonic acid (AA) availability. The results presented here demonstrate that macrophages from caveolin-1-deficient mice exhibit elevated fatty acid incorporation and remodeling and a constitutively increased CoA-independent transacylase activity. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomic analyses reveal stable alterations in the profile of AA distribution among phospholipids, manifested by reduced levels of AA in choline glycerophospholipids but elevated levels in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylinositol. Furthermore, macrophages from caveolin-1 null mice show decreased AA mobilization and prostaglandin E2 and LTB4 production upon cell stimulation. Collectively, these results provide insight into the role of caveolin-1 in AA homeostasis and suggest an important role for this protein in the eicosanoid biosynthetic response. PMID:21852231

  13. Transforming growth factor beta 1 null mutation in mice causes excessive inflammatory response and early death.

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, A B; Huh, C G; Becker, D; Geiser, A; Lyght, M; Flanders, K C; Roberts, A B; Sporn, M B; Ward, J M; Karlsson, S

    1993-01-01

    To delineate specific developmental roles of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) we have disrupted its cognate gene in mouse embryonic stem cells by homologous recombination to generate TGF-beta 1 null mice. These mice do not produce detectable amounts of either TGF-beta 1 RNA or protein. After normal growth for the first 2 weeks they develop a rapid wasting syndrome and die by 3-4 weeks of age. Pathological examination revealed an excessive inflammatory response with massive infiltration of lymphocytes and macrophages in many organs, but primarily in heart and lungs. Many lesions resembled those found in autoimmune disorders, graft-vs.-host disease, or certain viral diseases. This phenotype suggests a prominent role for TGF-beta 1 in homeostatic regulation of immune cell proliferation and extravasation into tissues. Images PMID:8421714

  14. Behavioral disturbances in estrogen-related receptor alpha-null mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z; Anderson, Rachel M; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E; Yin, Terry C; Radley, Jason J; Pieper, Andrew A; Lutter, Michael

    2015-04-21

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains. PMID:25865889

  15. Cutaneous metallothionein induction by ultraviolet B irradiation in interleukin-6 null mice.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Reeve, V E; Nishimura, H; Satoh, M; Tohyama, C

    2000-02-01

    The mediators of cutaneous metallothionein induction by ultraviolet radiation have not been defined. In this study we sought to identify cytokines that might be involved. We examined the role of interleukin-6, using the IL-6 null (IL-6-/-) mouse, which has been observed to be highly sensitive to ultraviolet radiation damage. Whereas cutaneous metallothionein concentration, measured by radioimmunoassay, began to rise in wild-type (IL-6+/+) mice by 12 h after ultraviolet irradiation, there was a significant delay in the IL-6-/- mice until 48 h after UV irradiation. Immunohistologically, metallothionein appeared in IL-6+/+ mice at 24 h in dermal fibroblasts, and then by 48 h in epidermal basal keratinocytes, with intensity increasing until 72 h, and was coincident with proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive staining. Corresponding metallothionein expression in IL-6-/- mouse skin was significantly delayed. Serum interleukin-6 was elevated in IL-6+/+ mice following ultraviolet irradiation, with peak concentration at 4 h, but no increase in serum interleukin-1beta was found in either IL-6+/+ or IL-6-/- mice. Interestingly, tumor necrosis factor alpha concentration in serum was elevated at 12 h postirradiation in IL-6+/+ mice, but there was an earlier (at 4 and 8 h) time-dependent increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha in serum of the IL-6-/- mice. Skin zinc and copper concentrations were not altered by ultraviolet irradiation in either IL-6+/+ or IL-6-/- mice. The results suggest that interleukin-6 may be a very early mediator of cutaneous metallothionein induction by ultraviolet radiation, but that this role is possibly assumed by alternative cytokines like tumor necrosis factor alpha when interleukin-6 is deficient. PMID:10651996

  16. Glycine receptor knock-in mice and hyperekplexia-like phenotypes: comparisons with the null mutant.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Geoffrey S; Phelan, Rachel; Roberts, Michael T; Homanics, Gregg E; Bergeson, Susan E; Lopreato, Gregory F; Mihic, S John; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron

    2003-09-01

    Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors (GlyRs) inhibit neurotransmission in the spinal cord and brainstem. To better define the function of this receptor in vivo, we constructed a point mutation that impairs receptor function in the alpha1-subunit and compared these knock-in mice to oscillator (spdot) mice lacking functional GlyR alpha1-subunits. Mutation of the serine residue at amino acid 267 to glutamine (alpha1S267Q) results in a GlyR with normal glycine potency but decreased maximal currents, as shown by electrophysiological recordings using Xenopus oocytes. In addition, single-channel recordings using human embryonic kidney 293 cells indicated profoundly altered properties of the mutated GlyR. We produced knock-in mice bearing the GlyR alpha1 S267Q mutation to assess the in vivo consequences of selectively decreasing GlyR efficacy. Chloride uptake into brain synaptoneurosomes from knock-in mice revealed decreased responses to maximally effective glycine concentrations, although wild-type levels of GlyR expression were observed using 3H-strychnine binding and immunoblotting. A profound increase in the acoustic startle response was observed in knock-in mice as well as a "limb clenching" phenotype. In contrast, no changes in coordination or pain perception were observed using the rotarod or hot-plate tests, and there was no change in GABA(A)-receptor-mediated chloride uptake. Homozygous S267Q knock-in mice, like homozygous spdot mice, exhibited seizures and died within 3 weeks of birth. In heterozygous spdot mice, both decreased 3H-strychnine binding and chloride flux were observed; however, neither enhanced acoustic startle responses nor limb clenching were seen. These data demonstrate that a dominant-negative point mutation in GlyR disrupting normal function can produce a more dramatic phenotype than the corresponding recessive null mutation, and provides a new animal model to evaluate GlyR function in vivo. PMID:12954867

  17. GDF9 modulates the reproductive and tumor phenotype of female inha-null mice.

    PubMed

    Myers, Michelle; Mansouri-Attia, Nadera; James, Rebecca; Peng, Jia; Pangas, Stephanie A

    2013-04-01

    Intraovarian factors play important roles in coordinating germ cell and somatic cell growth in the ovary. Prior to the onset of gonadotropin stimulation and reproductive cyclicity, follicle development is dependent upon locally produced growth factors, such as the transforming growth factor beta family members inhibin, activin, and GDF9. In the absence of inhibin in prepubertal mice (Inha(-/-)), there are marked alterations in preantral follicle growth, but no evidence of ovarian tumors characteristic of adult Inha-null mice. To ascertain the contribution of GDF9 to the Inha-null phenotype, we analyzed folliculogenesis in postnatal Inha Gdf9 double knockout mice. Deletion of Gdf9 from Inha(-/-) rescues the initial growth defects found at early follicle stages in Inha(-/-) ovaries, but surprisingly enhances the onset of pretumor lesions. The normalization of growth dynamics between granulosa cells and oocytes of Inha Gdf9 double knockout mice is also accompanied by a reduction in levels of the activin/inhibin beta B subunit, Inhbb, which is upregulated in Inha(-/-) ovaries. However, at later ages, Inha Gdf9 double knockout ovaries are similar to Inha(-/-) ovaries, and show upregulation of the activin/inhibin subunits and downregulation of the growth factor, kit ligand, thus resulting in a local environment that is growth-promoting for granulosa cells but growth-inhibitory for oocytes. These data suggest a sequential mechanism of action initiated by GDF9 in the Inha knockout mouse that promotes defective folliculogenesis. These studies thus provide a novel role for GDF9 in causing reproductive defects and suppressing tumor initiation in the Inha(-/-) mouse model.

  18. Nucleus-targeted Dmp1 transgene fails to rescue dental defects in Dmp1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Xian; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Ward, Leanne; Lu, Yong-Bo; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2014-09-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is essential to odontogenesis. Its mutations in human subjects lead to dental problems such as dental deformities, hypomineralization and periodontal impairment. Primarily, DMP1 is considered as an extracellular matrix protein that promotes hydroxyapatite formation and activates intracellular signaling pathway via interacting with αvβ3 integrin. Recent in vitro studies suggested that DMP1 might also act as a transcription factor. In this study, we examined whether full-length DMP1 could function as a transcription factor in the nucleus and regulate odontogenesis in vivo. We first demonstrated that a patient with the DMP1 M1V mutation, which presumably causes a loss of the secretory DMP1 but does not affect the nuclear translocation of DMP1, shows a typical rachitic tooth defect. Furthermore, we generated transgenic mice expressing (NLS)DMP1, in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) entry signal sequence of DMP1 was replaced by a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, under the control of a 3.6 kb rat type I collagen promoter plus a 1.6 kb intron 1. We then crossbred the (NLS)DMP1 transgenic mice with Dmp1 null mice to express the (NLS)DMP1 in Dmp1-deficient genetic background. Although immunohistochemistry demonstrated that (NLS)DMP1 was localized in the nuclei of the preodontoblasts and odontoblasts, the histological, morphological and biochemical analyses showed that it failed to rescue the dental and periodontal defects as well as the delayed tooth eruption in Dmp1 null mice. These data suggest that the full-length DMP1 plays no apparent role in the nucleus during odontogenesis.

  19. Neto2-null mice have impaired GABAergic inhibition and are susceptible to seizures

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Dargaei, Zahra; Ivakine, Evgueni A.; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Ng, David; Chevrier, Jonah; Ormond, Jake; Nothwang, Hans Gerd; McInnes, Roderick R.; Woodin, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Neto2 is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the neuron-specific K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2) in the central nervous system (CNS). Efficient KCC2 transport is essential for setting the neuronal Cl− gradient, which is required for fast GABAergic inhibition. Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 in neurons, and increases KCC2 function by binding to the active oligomeric form of this cotransporter. In the present study, we characterized GABAergic inhibition and KCC2-mediated neuronal chloride homeostasis in pyramidal neurons from adult hippocampal slices. Using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings we found that the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) was significantly depolarized. We also observed that surface levels of KCC2 and phosphorylation of KCC2 serine 940 (Ser940) were reduced in Neto2−/− neurons compared to wild-type controls. To examine GABAergic inhibition we recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and found that Neto2−/− neurons had significant reductions in both their amplitude and frequency. Based on the critical role of Neto2 in regulating GABAergic inhibition we rationalized that Neto2-null mice would be prone to seizure activity. We found that Neto2-null mice demonstrated a decrease in the latency to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and an increase in seizure severity. PMID:26441539

  20. Neto2-null mice have impaired GABAergic inhibition and are susceptible to seizures.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Dargaei, Zahra; Ivakine, Evgueni A; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Ng, David; Chevrier, Jonah; Ormond, Jake; Nothwang, Hans Gerd; McInnes, Roderick R; Woodin, Melanie A

    2015-01-01

    Neto2 is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2) in the central nervous system (CNS). Efficient KCC2 transport is essential for setting the neuronal Cl(-) gradient, which is required for fast GABAergic inhibition. Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 in neurons, and increases KCC2 function by binding to the active oligomeric form of this cotransporter. In the present study, we characterized GABAergic inhibition and KCC2-mediated neuronal chloride homeostasis in pyramidal neurons from adult hippocampal slices. Using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings we found that the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) was significantly depolarized. We also observed that surface levels of KCC2 and phosphorylation of KCC2 serine 940 (Ser940) were reduced in Neto2(-/-) neurons compared to wild-type controls. To examine GABAergic inhibition we recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and found that Neto2(-/-) neurons had significant reductions in both their amplitude and frequency. Based on the critical role of Neto2 in regulating GABAergic inhibition we rationalized that Neto2-null mice would be prone to seizure activity. We found that Neto2-null mice demonstrated a decrease in the latency to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and an increase in seizure severity. PMID:26441539

  1. Transcriptional Fingerprint of Hypomyelination in Zfp191null and Shiverer (Mbpshi) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aaker, Joshua D.; Elbaz, Benayahu; Wu, Yuwen; Looney, Timothy J.; Zhang, Li; Lahn, Bruce T.

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptional program that controls oligodendrocyte maturation and central nervous system (CNS) myelination has not been fully characterized. In this study, we use high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze how the loss of a key transcription factor, zinc finger protein 191 (ZFP191), results in oligodendrocyte development abnormalities and CNS hypomyelination. Using a previously described mutant mouse that is deficient in ZFP191 protein expression (Zfp191null), we demonstrate that key transcripts are reduced in the whole brain as well as within oligodendrocyte lineage cells cultured in vitro. To determine whether the loss of myelin seen in Zfp191null mice contributes indirectly to these perturbations, we also examined the transcriptome of a well-characterized mouse model of hypomyelination, in which the myelin structural protein myelin basic protein (MBP) is deficient. Interestingly, Mbpshi (shiverer) mice had far fewer transcripts perturbed with the loss of myelin alone. This study demonstrates that the loss of ZFP191 disrupts expression of genes involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination, largely independent from the loss of myelin. Nevertheless, hypomyelination in both mouse mutants results in the perturbation of lipid synthesis pathways, suggesting that oligodendrocytes have a feedback system that allows them to regulate myelin lipid synthesis depending on their myelinating state. The data presented are of potential clinical relevance as the human orthologs of the Zfp191 and MBP genes reside on a region of Chromosome 18 that is deleted in childhood leukodystrophies. PMID:27683878

  2. Autism phenotypes in ZnT3 null mice: Involvement of zinc dyshomeostasis, MMP-9 activation and BDNF upregulation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Min Heui; Kim, Tae-Youn; Yoon, Young Hee; Koh, Jae-Young

    2016-06-29

    To investigate the role of synaptic zinc in the ASD pathogenesis, we examined zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) null mice. At 4-5 weeks of age, male but not female ZnT3 null mice exhibited autistic-like behaviors. Cortical volume and neurite density were significantly greater in male ZnT3 null mice than in WT mice. In male ZnT3 null mice, consistent with enhanced neurotrophic stimuli, the level of BDNF as well as activity of MMP-9 was increased. Consistent with known roles for MMPs in BDNF upregulation, 2.5-week treatment with minocycline, an MMP inhibitor, significantly attenuated BDNF levels as well as megalencephaly and autistic-like behaviors. Although the ZnT3 null state removed synaptic zinc, it rather increased free zinc in the cytosol of brain cells, which appeared to increase MMP-9 activity and BDNF levels. The present results suggest that zinc dyshomeostasis during the critical period of brain development may be a possible contributing mechanism for ASD.

  3. Autism phenotypes in ZnT3 null mice: Involvement of zinc dyshomeostasis, MMP-9 activation and BDNF upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Min Heui; Kim, Tae-Youn; Yoon, Young Hee; Koh, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of synaptic zinc in the ASD pathogenesis, we examined zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) null mice. At 4–5 weeks of age, male but not female ZnT3 null mice exhibited autistic-like behaviors. Cortical volume and neurite density were significantly greater in male ZnT3 null mice than in WT mice. In male ZnT3 null mice, consistent with enhanced neurotrophic stimuli, the level of BDNF as well as activity of MMP-9 was increased. Consistent with known roles for MMPs in BDNF upregulation, 2.5-week treatment with minocycline, an MMP inhibitor, significantly attenuated BDNF levels as well as megalencephaly and autistic-like behaviors. Although the ZnT3 null state removed synaptic zinc, it rather increased free zinc in the cytosol of brain cells, which appeared to increase MMP-9 activity and BDNF levels. The present results suggest that zinc dyshomeostasis during the critical period of brain development may be a possible contributing mechanism for ASD. PMID:27352957

  4. A urine-concentrating defect in 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Louise C.; Livingstone, Dawn E.; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Jansen, Maurits A.; Dear, James W.; Mullins, John J.

    2012-01-01

    In aldosterone target tissues, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11βHSD2) is coexpressed with mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and protects the receptor from activation by glucocorticoids. Null mutations in the encoding gene, HSD11B2, cause apparent mineralocorticoid excess, in which hypertension is thought to reflect volume expansion secondary to sodium retention. Hsd11b2−/− mice are indeed hypertensive, but impaired natriuretic capacity is associated with significant volume contraction, suggestive of a urine concentrating defect. Water turnover and the urine concentrating response to a 24-h water deprivation challenge were therefore assessed in Hsd11b2−/− mice and controls. Hsd11b2−/− mice have a severe and progressive polyuric/polydipsic phenotype. In younger mice (∼2 mo of age), polyuria was associated with decreased abundance of aqp2 and aqp3 mRNA. The expression of other genes involved in water transport (aqp4, slc14a2, and slc12a2) was not changed. The kidney was structurally normal, and the concentrating response to water deprivation was intact. In older Hsd11b2−/− mice (>6 mo), polyuria was associated with a severe atrophy of the renal medulla and downregulation of aqp2, aqp3, aqp4, slc14a2, and slc12a2. The concentrating response to water deprivation was impaired, and the natriuretic effect of the loop diuretic bumetanide was lost. In older Hsd11b2−/− mice, the V2 receptor agonist desmopressin did not restore full urine concentrating capacity. We find that Hsd11b2−/− mice develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Gross changes to renal structure are observed, but these were probably secondary to sustained polyuria, rather than of developmental origin. PMID:22622456

  5. MDM2 overexpression generates a skin phenotype in both wild type and p53 null mice.

    PubMed

    Alkhalaf, M; Ganguli, G; Messaddeq, N; Le Meur, M; Wasylyk, B

    1999-02-18

    The MDM2 proto-oncogene is overexpressed in human tumours and regulates the activities of the tumour suppressors p53 and pRB. We created mice that overexpress MDM2 under the control of the CMV promoter. These mice did not display an increased tumour incidence, but rather a specific skin phenotype, characterized by desquamation and hyperkeratosis. Transgenic MDM2 was found to be overexpressed in the epidermis, a tissue that normally expresses high levels of MDM2. The phenotype appeared during the first week after birth and then lessened with age, closely following the level of expression of the transgene. MDM2 overexpression was associated with an increase in proliferation in the basal layer, thickening of the epidermis, altered expression of the differentiation markers cytokeratin CK14, CK10 and CK1, and a decrease in the size and the number of granules that contain products of differentiation. Transgenic mice on a p53 null background displayed similar although not identical changes, showing that the effects of MDM2 are to a certain degree p53 independent. The skin is a major site of MDM2 expression in mice, raising the possibility that MDM2 overexpression perturbs the normal pattern of MDM2 expression and inhibits differentiation of the epidermis. PMID:10050879

  6. ACE2 and vasoactive peptides: novel players in cardiovascular/renal remodeling and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Torres, Evelyn; Oyarzún, Alejandra; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Azocar, Andrés; Castro, Pablo F; Jalil, Jorge E; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key component of cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis due to its influence on the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, vascular tone and cardiovascular remodeling. Deregulation of this system contributes significantly to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Numerous studies have generated new perspectives about a noncanonical and protective RAS pathway that counteracts the proliferative and hypertensive effects of the classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis. The key components of this pathway are ACE2 and its products, Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9). These two vasoactive peptides act through the Mas receptor (MasR) and AT2R, respectively. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR and ACE2/Ang-(1-9)/AT2R axes have opposite effects to those of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis, such as decreased proliferation and cardiovascular remodeling, increased production of nitric oxide and vasodilation. A novel peptide from the noncanonical pathway, alamandine, was recently identified in rats, mice and humans. This heptapeptide is generated by catalytic action of ACE2 on Ang A or through a decarboxylation reaction on Ang-(1-7). Alamandine produces the same effects as Ang-(1-7), such as vasodilation and prevention of fibrosis, by interacting with Mas-related GPCR, member D (MrgD). In this article, we review the key roles of ACE2 and the vasoactive peptides Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and alamandine as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II axis as well as the biological properties that allow them to regulate blood pressure and cardiovascular and renal remodeling.

  7. ACE2 and vasoactive peptides: novel players in cardiovascular/renal remodeling and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Torres, Evelyn; Oyarzún, Alejandra; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Azocar, Andrés; Castro, Pablo F; Jalil, Jorge E; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key component of cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis due to its influence on the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, vascular tone and cardiovascular remodeling. Deregulation of this system contributes significantly to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Numerous studies have generated new perspectives about a noncanonical and protective RAS pathway that counteracts the proliferative and hypertensive effects of the classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis. The key components of this pathway are ACE2 and its products, Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9). These two vasoactive peptides act through the Mas receptor (MasR) and AT2R, respectively. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR and ACE2/Ang-(1-9)/AT2R axes have opposite effects to those of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis, such as decreased proliferation and cardiovascular remodeling, increased production of nitric oxide and vasodilation. A novel peptide from the noncanonical pathway, alamandine, was recently identified in rats, mice and humans. This heptapeptide is generated by catalytic action of ACE2 on Ang A or through a decarboxylation reaction on Ang-(1-7). Alamandine produces the same effects as Ang-(1-7), such as vasodilation and prevention of fibrosis, by interacting with Mas-related GPCR, member D (MrgD). In this article, we review the key roles of ACE2 and the vasoactive peptides Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and alamandine as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II axis as well as the biological properties that allow them to regulate blood pressure and cardiovascular and renal remodeling. PMID:26275770

  8. Vitamin D and Human Health: Lessons from Vitamin D Receptor Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Roger; Carmeliet, Geert; Verlinden, Lieve; van Etten, Evelyne; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Luderer, Hilary F.; Lieben, Liesbet; Mathieu, Chantal; Demay, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The vitamin D endocrine system is essential for calcium and bone homeostasis. The precise mode of action and the full spectrum of activities of the vitamin D hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D], can now be better evaluated by critical analysis of mice with engineered deletion of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Absence of a functional VDR or the key activating enzyme, 25-OHD-1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), in mice creates a bone and growth plate phenotype that mimics humans with the same congenital disease or severe vitamin D deficiency. The intestine is the key target for the VDR because high calcium intake, or selective VDR rescue in the intestine, restores a normal bone and growth plate phenotype. The VDR is nearly ubiquitously expressed, and almost all cells respond to 1,25-(OH)2D exposure; about 3% of the mouse or human genome is regulated, directly and/or indirectly, by the vitamin D endocrine system, suggesting a more widespread function. VDR-deficient mice, but not vitamin D- or 1α-hydroxylase-deficient mice, and man develop total alopecia, indicating that the function of the VDR and its ligand is not fully overlapping. The immune system of VDR- or vitamin D-deficient mice is grossly normal but shows increased sensitivity to autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease or type 1 diabetes after exposure to predisposing factors. VDR-deficient mice do not have a spontaneous increase in cancer but are more prone to oncogene- or chemocarcinogen-induced tumors. They also develop high renin hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and increased thrombogenicity. Vitamin D deficiency in humans is associated with increased prevalence of diseases, as predicted by the VDR null phenotype. Prospective vitamin D supplementation studies with multiple noncalcemic endpoints are needed to define the benefits of an optimal vitamin D status. PMID:18694980

  9. Wound healing and inflammation genes revealed by array analysis of 'macrophageless' PU.1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lisa; Johnson, Claire; Burslem, Frank; Martin, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Background Wound healing is a complex process requiring the collaborative efforts of different tissues and cell lineages, and involving the coordinated interplay of several phases of proliferation, migration, matrix synthesis and contraction. Tissue damage also triggers a robust influx of inflammatory leukocytes to the wound site that play key roles in clearing the wound of invading microbes but also release signals that may be detrimental to repair and lead to fibrosis. Results To better define key cellular events pivotal for tissue repair yet independent of inflammation we have used a microarray approach to determine a portfolio of over 1,000 genes expressed across the repair response in a wild-type neonatal mouse versus its PU.1 null sib. The PU.1 null mouse is genetically incapable of raising the standard inflammatory response, because it lacks macrophages and functioning neutrophils, yet repairs skin wounds rapidly and with reduced fibrosis. Conversely, by subtraction, we have determined genes that are either expressed by leukocytes, or upregulated by fibroblasts, endothelial cells, muscle cells and others at the wound site, as a consequence of inflammation. To determine the spatial expression pattern for several genes in each cluster we have also performed in situ hybridization studies. Conclusions Cluster analysis of genes expressed after wounding wild-type mice versus PU.1 null sibs distinguishes between tissue repair genes and genes associated with inflammation and its consequences. Our data reveal and classify several pools of genes, giving insight into their likely functions during repair and hinting at potential therapeutic targets. PMID:15642097

  10. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure. PMID:26073556

  11. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-06-15

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure.

  12. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: The importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies

    PubMed Central

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research. PMID:24055600

  13. Reduced wheel running and blunted effects of voluntary exercise in LPA1-null mice: the importance of assessing the amount of running in transgenic mice studies.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Blanco, Eduardo; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J

    2013-11-01

    This work was aimed to assess whether voluntary exercise rescued behavioral and hippocampal alterations in mice lacking the lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor (LPA1-null mice), studying the potential relationship between the amount of exercise performed and its effects. Normal and LPA1-null mice underwent 23 days of free wheel running and were tested for open-field behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis (cell proliferation, immature neurons, cell survival). Running decreased anxiety-like behavior in both genotypes but increased exploration only in the normal mice. While running affected all neurogenesis-related measures in normal mice (especially in the suprapyramidal blade of the dentate gyrus), only a moderate increase in cell survival was found in the mutants. Importantly, the LPA1-nulls showed notably reduced running. Analysis suggested that defective running in the LPA1-null mice could contribute to explain the scarce benefit of the voluntary exercise treatment. On the other hand, a literature review revealed that voluntary exercise is frequently used to modulate behavior and the hippocampus in transgenic mice, but half of the studies did not assess the quantity of running, overlooking any potential running impairments. This study adds evidence to the relevance of the quantity of exercise performed, emphasizing the importance of its assessment in transgenic mice research.

  14. Phenotypic Characterization of Mice Heterozygous for a Null Mutation of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liqun; Picker, Jonathan D.; Schaevitz, Laura R.; Tsai, Guochuan; Feng, Jiamin; Jiang, Zhichun; Chu, Hillary C.; Basu, Alo C.; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne; Coyle, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. Disturbed glutamate signaling resulting in hypofunction of NMDA receptors has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) hydrolyzes N-acetyl-alpha L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA). NAAG is a neuropeptide that is an NMDA receptor antagonist as well as an agonist for the metabotropic glutamate receptor-3 (mGluR3), which inhibits glutamate release. The aggregate effect of NAAG is thus to attenuate NMDA receptor activation. To manipulate the expression of GCP II, loxP sites were inserted flanking exon 1 and 2, which were excised by crossing with a Cre-expressing mouse. The mice heterozygous for this deletion showed a 50% reduction in the expression level of protein and functional activity of GCP II in brain samples. Heterozygous mutant crosses did not yield any homozygous null animals at birth or as embryos (N >200 live births and fetuses). These data are consistent with the previous report that GCP II homozygous mutant mice generated by removing exons 9 and 10 of GCP II gene were embryonically lethal and confirm our hypothesis that GCP II plays an essential role early in embryonic development. Heterozygous mice, however, developed normally to adulthood and exhibited increased locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, and a subtle cognitive deficit in working memory. PMID:19347959

  15. Transgene-Mediated Rescue of Spermatogenesis in Cldn11-Null Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin; Peppi, Marcello; Vengalil, Matthew J.; Maheras, Kathleen J.; Southwood, Cherie M.; Bradley, Michael; Gow, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Claudins comprise a large family of tight junction (TJ) proteins that are often expressed broadly during development and in adult tissues and constitute the physical barriers that occlude the paracellular space in polarized epithelia. In mouse testis, the integrity of TJs is critical to normal spermatogenesis and is dependent on CLDN11 expression. In the current study, we have generated multiple transgenic mouse lines in which steady-state levels of transgene-derived Cldn11 mRNA are up to fourfold greater than endogenous gene expression. Spermatogenesis in all founder mice harboring two copies of the endogenous Cldn11 gene is normal. These animals breed well, indicating that transgene overexpression, at least at the level of mRNA, is well tolerated by Sertoli cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the promoter/enhancer of the transgene, comprising 5 kb of genomic sequence upstream of exon 1 of the mouse Cldn11 gene, is sufficient to rescue azoospermia in Cldn11-null mice. Finally, using transient transgenic mice, we narrow the location of Sertoli cell-specific cis regulatory elements to a 2-kb region upstream of the Cldn11 transcription start site. Together, these data provide essential information for further investigation of the biological regulation of CLDN11 TJs in the testis. PMID:22378758

  16. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE-/-) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE-/- mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE-/- mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE-/- mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities.

  17. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE(-/-)) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE(-/-) mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE(-/-) mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE(-/-) mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27648138

  18. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE-/-) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE-/- mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE-/- mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE-/- mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27648138

  19. Immunodeficient NOD-scid IL-2Rγ(null) mice do not display T and B cell leakiness.

    PubMed

    Katano, Ikumi; Ito, Ryoji; Eto, Tomoo; Aiso, Sadakazu; Ito, Mamoru

    2011-01-01

    NOD/Shi-scid IL-2Rγ(null) (NOG) mice established by introducing the IL-2Rγ(null) gene of IL-2Rγ KO mice into NOD/Shi-scid mice by backcross-mating show a high xenograft engraftment level and are therefore well suited as a humanized mouse model. SCID mice bearing the Prkdc(scid) gene show a high incidence of thymic lymphoma and a leaky phenomenon in which a few clonal T and B cells develop in aged mice. In the present study, NOG mice were assessed for the presence of a leaky phenomenon such as the one observed in C.B-17-scid and NOD-scid mice. Serum immunoglobulin analysis did not detect IgG or IgM in NOG mice, unlike the findings in C.B-17-scid and NOD-scid mice. Flow cytometry analysis revealed the absence of T and B cells in the peripheral blood and spleens of NOG mice. These results reflect the suppression of the leaky phenomenon in NOG mice through the inactivation of the IL-2Rγ gene, which is commonly expressed in T and B cell growth factor receptors to IL-2, IL-4 and IL-7.

  20. Seizure susceptibility of neuropeptide-Y null mutant mice in amygdala kindling and chemical-induced seizure models.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Harlan E; Yang, Lijuan

    2004-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) administered exogenously is anticonvulsant, and, NPY null mutant mice are more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures. In order to better understand the potential role of NPY in epileptogenesis, the present studies investigated the development of amygdala kindling, post-kindling seizure thresholds, and anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine and levetiracetam in 129S6/SvEv NPY(+/+) and NPY(-/-) mice. In addition, susceptibility to pilocarpine- and kainate-induced seizures was compared in NPY(+/+) and (-/-) mice. The rate of amygdala kindling development did not differ in the NPY(-/-) and NPY(+/+) mice either when kindling stimuli were presented once daily for at least 20 days, or, 12 times daily for 2 days. However, during kindling development, the NPY(-/-) mice had higher seizure severity scores and longer afterdischarge durations than the NPY(+/+) mice. Post-kindling, the NPY(-/-) mice had markedly lower afterdischarge thresholds and longer afterdischarge durations than NPY (+/+) mice. Carbamazepine and levetiracetam increased the seizure thresholds of both NPY (-/-) and (+/+) mice. In addition, NPY (-/-) mice had lower thresholds for both kainate- and pilocarpine-induced seizures. The present results in amygdala kindling and chemical seizure models suggest that NPY may play a more prominent role in determining seizure thresholds and severity of seizures than in events leading to epileptogenesis. In addition, a lack of NPY does not appear to confer drug-resistance in that carbamazepine and levetiracetam were anticonvulsant in both wild type (WT) and NPY null mutant mice.

  1. Gamma Interferon (IFN-γ) Receptor Null-Mutant Mice Are More Susceptible to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection than IFN-γ Ligand Null-Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Edouard; Tanamachi, Becky; Openshaw, Harry; Mann, Jeff; Clarke, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Mouse strains with null mutations in the gamma interferon gene (Ifng) or the gamma interferon receptor gene (Ifngr) have been engineered. The use of these strains as animal models of viral and bacterial infections has enhanced our understanding of the role of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in the host immune response. However, direct comparisons between Ifng−/− (GKO) and Ifngr−/− (RGKO) mice have been problematic because previously available strains of these mice have had different genetic backgrounds (i.e., C57BL/6 and BALB/c for GKO mice and 129/Sv//Ev for RGKO mice). To enable direct comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections in GKO and RGKO mice, we introduced the IFN-γ null mutation into the 129/Sv//Ev background. We report that, after HSV-1 inoculation, mortality was significantly greater in RGKO mice than in GKO mice (38 versus 23%, P = 0.0001). Similarly, the mortality from vaccinia virus challenge was significantly greater in RGKO mice than in GKO mice. With differences in genetic background excluded as a confounding issue, these results are consistent with the existence of an alternative ligand(s) for the IFN-γ receptor that is also capable of mediating protection against viral challenge. PMID:10233988

  2. Pathological Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch in the stressed heart is transcriptionally controlled by the endothelial Brg1-FoxM1 complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Feng, Xuhui; Zhou, Qiong; Cheng, Wei; Shang, Ching; Han, Pei; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Quertermous, Thomas; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2016-09-20

    Genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzymes (Ace and Ace2) are essential for heart function regulation. Cardiac stress enhances Ace, but suppresses Ace2, expression in the heart, leading to a net production of angiotensin II that promotes cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The regulatory mechanism that underlies the Ace2-to-Ace pathological switch, however, is unknown. Here we report that the Brahma-related gene-1 (Brg1) chromatin remodeler and forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) transcription factor cooperate within cardiac (coronary) endothelial cells of pathologically stressed hearts to trigger the Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch, angiotensin I-to-II conversion, and cardiac hypertrophy. In mice, cardiac stress activates the expression of Brg1 and FoxM1 in endothelial cells. Once activated, Brg1 and FoxM1 form a protein complex on Ace and Ace2 promoters to concurrently activate Ace and repress Ace2, tipping the balance to Ace2 expression with enhanced angiotensin II production, leading to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Disruption of endothelial Brg1 or FoxM1 or chemical inhibition of FoxM1 abolishes the stress-induced Ace2-to-Ace switch and protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy. In human hypertrophic hearts, BRG1 and FOXM1 expression is also activated in endothelial cells; their expression levels correlate strongly with the ACE/ACE2 ratio, suggesting a conserved mechanism. Our studies demonstrate a molecular interaction of Brg1 and FoxM1 and an endothelial mechanism of modulating Ace/Ace2 ratio for heart failure therapy.

  3. Pathological Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch in the stressed heart is transcriptionally controlled by the endothelial Brg1-FoxM1 complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Feng, Xuhui; Zhou, Qiong; Cheng, Wei; Shang, Ching; Han, Pei; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Quertermous, Thomas; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2016-09-20

    Genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzymes (Ace and Ace2) are essential for heart function regulation. Cardiac stress enhances Ace, but suppresses Ace2, expression in the heart, leading to a net production of angiotensin II that promotes cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The regulatory mechanism that underlies the Ace2-to-Ace pathological switch, however, is unknown. Here we report that the Brahma-related gene-1 (Brg1) chromatin remodeler and forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) transcription factor cooperate within cardiac (coronary) endothelial cells of pathologically stressed hearts to trigger the Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch, angiotensin I-to-II conversion, and cardiac hypertrophy. In mice, cardiac stress activates the expression of Brg1 and FoxM1 in endothelial cells. Once activated, Brg1 and FoxM1 form a protein complex on Ace and Ace2 promoters to concurrently activate Ace and repress Ace2, tipping the balance to Ace2 expression with enhanced angiotensin II production, leading to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Disruption of endothelial Brg1 or FoxM1 or chemical inhibition of FoxM1 abolishes the stress-induced Ace2-to-Ace switch and protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy. In human hypertrophic hearts, BRG1 and FOXM1 expression is also activated in endothelial cells; their expression levels correlate strongly with the ACE/ACE2 ratio, suggesting a conserved mechanism. Our studies demonstrate a molecular interaction of Brg1 and FoxM1 and an endothelial mechanism of modulating Ace/Ace2 ratio for heart failure therapy. PMID:27601681

  4. Deficits in visceral pain and referred hyperalgesia in Nav1.8 (SNS/PN3)-null mice.

    PubMed

    Laird, Jennifer M A; Souslova, Veronika; Wood, John N; Cervero, Fernando

    2002-10-01

    The tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.8 is expressed exclusively in primary sensory neurons and is proposed to play an important role in sensitization of nociceptors. Here we compared visceral pain and referred hyperalgesia in Nav1.8-null mice and their wild-type littermates in five tests that differ in the degree to which behavior depends on spontaneous, ongoing firing in sensitized nociceptors. Nav1.8-null mice showed normal nociceptive behavior provoked by acute noxious stimulation of abdominal viscera (intracolonic saline or intraperitoneal acetylcholine). However, Nav1.8-null mutants showed weak pain and no referred hyperalgesia to intracolonic capsaicin, a model in which behavior is sustained by ongoing activity in nociceptors sensitized by the initial application. Nav1.8-null mice also showed blunted pain and hyperalgesia to intracolonic mustard oil, which sensitizes nociceptors but also provokes tissue damage. To distinguish between a possible role for Nav1.8 in ongoing activity per se and ongoing activity after sensitization in the absence of additional stimuli, we tried a visceral model of tonic noxious chemical stimulation, cyclophosphamide cystitis. Cyclophosphamide produces cystitis by gradual accumulation of toxic metabolites in the bladder. In this model, Nav1.8-null mice showed normal responses. There were no differences between null mutants and their normal littermates in tissue damage and inflammation evoked by any of the stimuli tested, suggesting that the behavioral differences are not secondary to impairment of inflammatory responses. We conclude that there is an essential role for Nav1.8 in mediating spontaneous activity in sensitized nociceptors.

  5. Effects of Aging and Oxidative Stress on Spermatozoa of Superoxide-Dismutase 1- and Catalase-Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, Johanna S; Robaire, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    Advanced paternal age is linked to complications in pregnancy and genetic diseases in offspring. Aging results in excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in spermatozoa; this damage can be transmitted to progeny with detrimental consequences. Although there is a loss of antioxidants with aging, the impact on aging male germ cells of the complete absence of either catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) has not been investigated. We used CAT-null (Cat(-/-)) and SOD1-null (Sod(-/-)) mice to determine whether loss of these antioxidants increases germ cell susceptibility to redox dysfunction with aging. Aging reduced fertility and the numbers of Sertoli and germ cells in all mice. Aged Sod(-/-) mice displayed an increased loss of fertility compared to aged wild-type mice. Treatment with the pro-oxidant SIN-10 increased ROS in spermatocytes of aged wild-type and Sod(-/-) mice, while aged Cat(-/-) mice were able to neutralize this ROS. The antioxidant peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1) increased with age in wild-type and Cat(-/-) mice but was consistently low in young and aged Sod(-/-) mice. DNA damage and repair markers (γ-H2AX and 53BP1) were reduced with aging and lower in young Sod(-/-) and Cat(-/-) mice. Colocalization of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 suggested active repair in young wild-type mice but reduced in young Cat(-/-) and in Sod(-/-) mice and with age. Oxidative DNA damage (8-oxodG) increased in young Sod(-/-) mice and with age in all mice. These studies show that aged Sod(-/-) mice display severe redox dysfunction, while wild-type and Cat(-/-) mice have compensatory mechanisms to partially alleviate oxidative stress and reduce age-related DNA damage in spermatozoa. Thus, SOD1 but not CAT is critical to the maintenance of germ cell quality with aging. PMID:27465136

  6. Deficiency in acellular cementum and periodontal attachment in bsp null mice.

    PubMed

    Foster, B L; Soenjaya, Y; Nociti, F H; Holm, E; Zerfas, P M; Wimer, H F; Holdsworth, D W; Aubin, J E; Hunter, G K; Goldberg, H A; Somerman, M J

    2013-02-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues of the skeleton and dentition. BSP is multifunctional, affecting cell attachment and signaling through an RGD integrin-binding region, and acting as a positive regulator for mineral precipitation by nucleating hydroxyapatite crystals. BSP is present in cementum, the hard tissue covering the tooth root that anchors periodontal ligament (PDL) attachment. To test our hypothesis that BSP plays an important role in cementogenesis, we analyzed tooth development in a Bsp null ((-/-)) mouse model. Developmental analysis by histology, histochemistry, and SEM revealed a significant reduction in acellular cementum formation on Bsp (-/-) mouse molar and incisor roots, and the cementum deposited appeared hypomineralized. Structural defects in cementum-PDL interfaces in Bsp (-/-) mice caused PDL detachment, likely contributing to the high incidence of incisor malocclusion. Loss of BSP caused progressively disorganized PDL and significantly increased epithelial down-growth with aging. Bsp (-/-) mice displayed extensive root and alveolar bone resorption, mediated by increased RANKL and the presence of osteoclasts. Results collected here suggest that BSP plays a non-redundant role in acellular cementum formation, likely involved in initiating mineralization on the root surface. Through its importance to cementum integrity, BSP is essential for periodontal function. PMID:23183644

  7. Cognition and Mood-Related Behaviors in L3mbtl1 Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Erica Y.; Jiang, Yan; Mao, Wenjie; Futai, Kensuke; Hock, Hanno; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in histone lysine methylation and epigenetic regulators of gene expression could play a role in the neurobiology and treatment of patients diagnosed with mood spectrum disorder, including depression and anxiety. Mutations and altered expression of various lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) and demethylases (KDMs) have been linked to changes in motivational and emotional behaviors in preclinical model systems. However, it is not known whether regulators operating downstream of histone lysine methylation could affect mood-related behavior. Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) domain ‘chromatin reader’ proteins bind to methylated histone lysine residues and associate with chromatin remodeling complexes to facilitate or repress gene expression. MBT proteins, including the founding member, L3mbtl1, maintain high levels of expression in neurons of the mature brain. Here, we exposed L3mbtl1 null mutant mice to a wide range of tests exploring cognition and mood-relevant behaviors at baseline and in the context of social isolation, as a stressor to elicit depression-related behavior in susceptible mice. L3mbtl1 loss-of-function was associated with significant decreases in depression and and anxiety in some of the behavioral paradigms. This was not associated with a more generalized neurological dysfunction because cognition and memory remained unaltered in comparison to controls. These findings warrant further investigations on the role of MBT chromatin reader proteins in the context of emotional and affective behaviors. PMID:25849281

  8. Vascular stasis, intestinal hemorrhage, and heightened vascular permeability complicate acute portal hypertension in cd39-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Cárdenas, Andrés; Wu, Yan; Enjyoji, Keichi; Robson, Simon C.

    2009-01-01

    Vasoactive factors that regulate splanchnic hemodynamics include nitric oxide, catecholamines, and possibly extracellular nucleosides/nucleotides (adenosine, ATP). CD39/ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) is the major vascular ectonucleotidase that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleotides. CD39 activity may be modulated by vascular injury, inflammation, and altered oxygen tension. Altered Cd39 expression by the murine hepatosplanchnic vasculature may impact hemodynamics and portal hypertension (PHT) in vivo. We noted that basal portal pressures (PPs) were comparable in wild-type and Cd39-null mice (n = 9). ATP infusions resulted in increments in PP in wild-type mice, but, in contrast, this significantly decreased in Cd39-null mice (n = 9) post-ATP in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. We then studied Cd39/NTPDase1 deletion in the regulation of portal hemodynamics, vascular integrity, and intestinal permeability in a murine model of PHT. Partial portal vein ligation (PPVL) was performed in Cd39-null (n = 44) and wild-type (n = 23) mice. Sequential measurements obtained after PPVL were indicative of comparable levels of PHT (ranges 14–29 mmHg) in both groups. There was one death in the wild-type group and eight in the Cd39-null group from intestinal bleeding (P = 0.024). Circulatory stasis in the absence of overt portal vein thrombosis, portal congestion, intestinal hemorrhage, and increased permeability were evident in all surviving Cd39-null mice. Deletion of Cd39 results in deleterious outcomes post-PPVL that are associated with significant microcirculatory derangements and major intestinal congestion with hemorrhage mimicking acute mesenteric occlusion. Absent Cd39/NTPDase1 and decreased generation of adenosine in the splanchnic circulation cause heightened vascular permeability and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in PPVL. PMID:19520738

  9. Expression of human hepatic lipase negatively impacts apolipoprotein A-I production in primary hepatocytes from Lipc-null mice.

    PubMed

    Bamji-Mirza, Michelle; Zhang, Wandong; Yao, Zemin

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to examine whether expression of human hepatic lipase (hHL) exerted an intracellular effect on hepatic production of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. The levels of secreted and cell-associated apoA-I were contrasted between primary hepatocytes isolated from Lipc-null and C57BL/6 mice, and between Lipc-null hepatocytes transfected with either hHL-encoding or control adenovirus. An HSPG-binding deficient hHL protein (hHLmt) was used to determine the impact of cell surface binding on HL action. Accumulation of apoA-I in conditioned media of primary hepatocytes isolated from Lipc-null mice was increased as compared to that from C57BL/6 mice. Metabolic labeling experiments showed that secretion of (35)S-apoA-I from Lipc-null cells was significantly higher than that from C57BL/6 cells. Expression of hHL in Lipc-null hepatocytes, through adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, resulted in decreased synthesis and secretion of (35)S-apoA-I, but not (35)S-apoE, as compared with cells transfected with control adenovirus. Expression of HSPG-binding deficient hHLmt in Lipc-null cells also exerted an inhibitory effect on apoA-I production, even though hHLmt displayed impaired exit from the endoplasmic reticulum as compared with hHL. Subcellular fractionation revealed that expression of hHL or hHLmt led to increased microsome-association of apoA-I relative to non-transfected control. Expression of hHL negatively impacts hepatic production of apoA-I.

  10. Forelimb contractures and abnormal tendon collagen fibrillogenesis in fibulin-4 null mice.

    PubMed

    Markova, Dessislava Z; Pan, Te-Cheng; Zhang, Rui-Zhu; Zhang, Guiyun; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2016-06-01

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein essential for elastic fiber formation. Mice deficient in fibulin-4 die perinatally because of severe pulmonary and vascular defects associated with the lack of intact elastic fibers. Patients with fibulin-4 mutations demonstrate similar defects, and a significant number die shortly after birth or in early childhood from cardiopulmonary failure. The patients also demonstrate skeletal and other systemic connective tissue abnormalities, including joint laxity and flexion contractures of the wrist. A fibulin-4 null mouse strain was generated and used to analyze the roles of fibulin-4 in tendon fibrillogenesis. This mouse model displayed bilateral forelimb contractures, in addition to pulmonary and cardiovascular defects. The forelimb and hindlimb tendons exhibited disruption in collagen fibrillogenesis in the absence of fibulin-4 as analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Fewer fibrils were assembled, and fibrils were disorganized compared with wild-type controls. The organization of developing tenocytes and compartmentalization of the extracellular space was also disrupted. Fibulin-4 was co-localized with fibrillin-1 and fibrillin-2 in limb tendons by using immunofluorescence microscopy. Thus, fibulin-4 seems to play a role in regulating tendon collagen fibrillogenesis, in addition to its essential function in elastogenesis. PMID:26711913

  11. Deficiency of Glycine N-Methyltransferase Aggravates Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E–Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Yu; Ching, Li-Chieh; Liao, Yi-Jen; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tsou, Chia-Yuan; Shyue, Song-Kun; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism and inflammation in atherogenesis is not understood fully. Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) has been implicated in hepatic lipid metabolism and the pathogenesis of liver diseases. However, little is known about the significance of GNMT in atherosclerosis. We showed the predominant expression of GNMT in foamy macrophages of mouse atherosclerotic aortas. Genetic deletion of GNMT exacerbated the hyperlipidemia, inflammation and development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice. In addition, ablation of GNMT in macrophages aggravated oxidized low-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol accumulation in macrophage foam cells by downregulating the expression of reverse cholesterol transporters including ATP-binding cassette transporters-A1 and G1 and scavenger receptor BI. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α–induced inflammatory response was promoted in GNMT-null macrophages. Collectively, our data suggest that GNMT is a crucial regulator in cholesterol metabolism and in inflammation, and contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This finding may reveal a potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis. PMID:22415010

  12. Behavioral phenotype of maLPA1-null mice: increased anxiety-like behavior and spatial memory deficits

    PubMed Central

    Santin, L.J.; Bilbao, A.; Pedraza, C.; Matas-Rico, E.; López-Barroso, D.; Castilla-Ortega, E.; Sánchez-López, J.; Riquelme, R.; Varela-Nieto, I.; de la Villa, P.; Suardíaz, M.; Chun, J.; De Fonseca, F. Rodriguez; Estivill-Torrús, G.

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has emerged as a new regulatory molecule in the brain. Recently, some studies have demonstrated a role for this molecule and its LPA1 receptor in the regulation of plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult brain. However, no systematic studies have been conducted to investigate whether the LPA1 receptor is involved in behavior. Here we studied the phenotype of maLPA1–null mice, which bear a targeted deletion at the lpa1 locus, in a battery of tests examining neurologic performance, habituation in exploratory behavior in response to low and mild anxiety environments and spatial memory. MaLPA1-null mutants showed deficits in both olfaction and somesthesis, but not in retinal or auditory functions. Sensorimotor coordination was impaired only in the equilibrium and grasping reflexes. The mice also showed impairments in neuromuscular strength and analgesic response. No additional differences were observed in the rest of the tests used to study sensoriomotor orientation, limb reflexes, and coordinated limb use. At behavioral level, maLPA1-null mice showed an impaired exploration in the open field and increased anxiety-like response when exposed to the elevated plus maze. Furthermore, the mice exhibit impaired spatial memory retention and reduced use of spatial strategies in the Morris water maze. We propose that the LPA1 receptor may play a major role in both spatial memory and response to anxiety-like conditions. PMID:19689455

  13. Constitutive Androgen Receptor-Null Mice Are Sensitive to the Toxic Effects of Parathion: Association with Reduced Cytochrome P450-Mediated Parathion MetabolismS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Linda C.; Hernandez, Juan P.

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive androgen receptor (CAR) is activated by several chemicals and in turn regulates multiple detoxification genes. Our research demonstrates that parathion is one of the most potent, environmentally relevant CAR activators with an EC50 of 1.43 μM. Therefore, animal studies were conducted to determine whether CAR was activated by parathion in vivo. Surprisingly, CAR-null mice, but not wild-type (WT) mice, showed significant parathion-induced toxicity. However, parathion did not induce Cyp2b expression, suggesting that parathion is not a CAR activator in vivo, presumably because of its short half-life. CAR expression is also associated with the expression of several drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (P450). CAR-null mice demonstrate lower expression of Cyp2b9, Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, and Cyp3a11 primarily, but not exclusively in males. Therefore, we incubated microsomes from untreated WT and CAR-null mice with parathion in the presence of esterase inhibitors to determine whether CAR-null mice show perturbed P450-mediated parathion metabolism compared with that in WT mice. The metabolism of parathion to paraoxon and p-nitrophenol (PNP) was reduced in CAR-null mice with male CAR-null mice showing reduced production of both paraoxon and PNP, and female CAR-null mice showing reduced production of only PNP. Overall, the data indicate that CAR-null mice metabolize parathion slower than WT mice. These results provide a potential mechanism for increased sensitivity of individuals with lower CAR activity such as newborns to parathion and potentially other chemicals due to decreased metabolic capacity. PMID:20573718

  14. Lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration associated with axial and radiating low back pain in ageing SPARC-null mice.

    PubMed

    Millecamps, Magali; Tajerian, Maral; Naso, Lina; Sage, E Helene; Stone, Laura S

    2012-06-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a complex, multifactorial disorder with unclear underlying mechanisms. In humans and rodents, decreased expression of secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC) is associated with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and signs of LBP. The current study investigates the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP. SPARC-null and age-matched control mice ranging from 6 to 78 weeks of age were evaluated in this study. X-ray and histologic analysis revealed reduced IVD height, increased wedging, and signs of degeneration (bulging and herniation). Cutaneous sensitivity to cold, heat, and mechanical stimuli were used as measures of referred (low back and tail) and radiating pain (hind paw). Region specificity was assessed by measuring icilin- and capsaicin-evoked behaviour after subcutaneous injection into the hind paw or upper lip. Axial discomfort was measured by the tail suspension and grip force assays. Motor impairment was determined by the accelerating rotarod. Physical function was evaluated by voluntary activity after axial strain or during ambulation with forced lateral flexion. SPARC-null mice developed (1) region-specific, age-dependent hypersensitivity to cold, icilin, and capsaicin (hind paw only), (2) axial discomfort, (3) motor impairment, and (4) reduced physical function. Morphine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced cutaneous sensitivity and alleviated axial discomfort in SPARC-null mice. Ageing SPARC-null mice mirror many aspects of the complex and challenging nature of LBP in humans and incorporate both anatomic and functional components of the disease. The current study supports the hypothesis that IVD degeneration is a risk factor for chronic LBP.

  15. PV-1 IS NEGATIVELY REGULATED BY VEGF IN THE LUNG OF CAV-1, BUT NOT CAV-2, NULL MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An N-glycosylated 60-kDa PV-1 protein that binds heparin was detected in mouse lung from a single mRNA transcript. In the absence of disulfide bond reduction PV-1 is detected as a dimer or large molecular weight oligomer. In the lung of Cav-1, but not Cav-2, null mice the amount of PV-1 protein is d...

  16. Postnatal changes in serotonergic innervation to the hippocampus of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Isoda, K; Morimoto, M; Matsui, F; Hasegawa, T; Tozawa, T; Morioka, S; Chiyonobu, T; Nishimura, A; Yoshimoto, K; Hosoi, H

    2010-02-17

    Rett syndrome is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. Previous reports have revealed serotonergic function to be altered in the medullas of patients with Rett syndrome and in an animal model of the disease. However, it has remained unclear whether a genetic loss of MeCP2 disrupts serotonergic innervation to the forebrain. In this study, we measured levels of monoamines by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection in selected regions of the forebrains of Mecp2-null mice (Mecp2-/y) and wild-type mice (Mecp2+/y) on postnatal day (P) 14, P28, P42 and P56. The levels of hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) and its main metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), were significantly lower in Mecp2-null mice than in age-matched wild-type mice on P28, P42 and P56. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a loss of 5-HT-immunoreactive fibers in the Mecp2-null hippocampus on P56. By contrast, in the raphe region of Mecp2-null mice, there were significant decreases in 5-HT and noradrenaline levels, but these differences later disappeared and there was no change in the number of 5-HT-immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies. Furthermore, we conducted an experiment comparing HPLC measurements in presymptomatic heterozygous females (Mecp2+/-) and wild-type female littermates (Mecp2+/+) on P56. Significant decreases in hippocampal 5-HT and 5-HIAA contents in Mecp2-heterozygous mice were revealed, and these were not accompanied by changes in 5-HT or noradrenaline contents in the raphe region. Therefore, these results indicated decreases in serotonergic innervation to the hippocampus in Mecp2-null males and Mecp2 heterozygous females. We speculate that disturbances in serotonergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus may be linked to the behavioral abnormalities seen in Rett syndrome, such as increased anxiety-like behaviors and reduced exploratory locomotion. MeCP2 may be required for stable

  17. Lens transcriptome profile during cataract development in Mip-null mice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas M; Zhou, Yuefang; Shiels, Alan

    2016-09-16

    Major intrinsic protein or aquaporin-0 (MIP/AQP0) functions as a water channel and a cell-junction molecule in the vertebrate eye lens. Loss of MIP function in the lens leads to degraded optical quality and cataract formation by pathogenic mechanisms that are unclear. Here we have used microarray-hybridization analysis to detect lens transcriptome changes during cataract formation in mice that are functionally null for MIP (Mip-/-). In newborn Mip-/- lenses (P1) 11 genes were up-regulated and 18 were down-regulated (>2-fold, p=<0.05) and a similar number of genes was differentially regulated at P7. The most up-regulated genes (>6-fold) in the Mip-/- lens at P1 included those coding for a mitochondrial translocase (Timmdc1), a matrix metallopeptidase (Mmp2), a Rho GTPase-interacting protein (Ubxn11) and a transcription factor (Twist2). Apart from Mip, the most down-regulated genes (>4-fold) in the Mip-/- lens at P1 included those coding for a proteasome sub-unit (Psmd8), a ribonuclease (Pop4), and a heat-shock protein (Hspb1). Lens fiber cell degeneration in the Mip-/- lens was associated with increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cell nuclei and dramatically elevated levels of calpain-mediated proteolysis of αII-spectrin. However red-ox status, measured by glutathione and free-radical levels, was similar to that of wild-type. These data suggest that while relatively few genes (∼1.5% of the transcriptome) were differentially regulated >2-fold in the Mip-/- lens, calpain hyper-activation acts as a terminal pathogenic event during lens fiber cell death and cataract formation. PMID:27524245

  18. AMPA receptor-mediated miniature synaptic calcium transients in GluR2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sabrina; Jia, Zhengping; Roder, John; Murphy, Timothy H

    2002-07-01

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors are normally Ca(2+) impermeable due to the expression of the GluR2 receptor subunit. By using GluR2 null mice we were able to detect miniature synaptic Ca(2+) transients (MSCTs) associated with AMPA-type receptor-mediated miniature synaptic currents at single synapses in primary cortical cultures. MSCTs and associated Ca(2+) transients were monitored under conditions that isolated responses mediated by AMPA or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. As expected, addition of the antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxalene-2,3-dione (CNQX, 3 microM) blocked the AMPA receptor-mediated MSCTs. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels did not contribute to AMPA MSCTs because CdCl(2) (0.1-0.2 mM) did not significantly alter the frequency or the amplitude of the MSCTs. The amplitude of AMPA MSCTs appeared to be regulated independently from event frequency since the two measures were not correlated (R = 0.023). Synapses were identified that only expressed MSCTs attributed to either NMDA or AMPA receptors. At synapses with only NMDA responses, MSCT amplitude was significantly lower (by 40%) than synapses expressing both NMDA and AMPA responses. At synapses that showed MSCTs mediated by both AMPA and NMDA receptors, the amplitude of the transients in each condition was positively correlated (R = 0.94). Our results suggest that when AMPA and NMDA receptors are co-expressed at synapses, mechanisms exist to ensure proportional scaling of each receptor type that are distinct from the presynaptic factors controlling the frequency of miniature release. PMID:12091530

  19. Lens transcriptome profile during cataract development in Mip-null mice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas M; Zhou, Yuefang; Shiels, Alan

    2016-09-16

    Major intrinsic protein or aquaporin-0 (MIP/AQP0) functions as a water channel and a cell-junction molecule in the vertebrate eye lens. Loss of MIP function in the lens leads to degraded optical quality and cataract formation by pathogenic mechanisms that are unclear. Here we have used microarray-hybridization analysis to detect lens transcriptome changes during cataract formation in mice that are functionally null for MIP (Mip-/-). In newborn Mip-/- lenses (P1) 11 genes were up-regulated and 18 were down-regulated (>2-fold, p=<0.05) and a similar number of genes was differentially regulated at P7. The most up-regulated genes (>6-fold) in the Mip-/- lens at P1 included those coding for a mitochondrial translocase (Timmdc1), a matrix metallopeptidase (Mmp2), a Rho GTPase-interacting protein (Ubxn11) and a transcription factor (Twist2). Apart from Mip, the most down-regulated genes (>4-fold) in the Mip-/- lens at P1 included those coding for a proteasome sub-unit (Psmd8), a ribonuclease (Pop4), and a heat-shock protein (Hspb1). Lens fiber cell degeneration in the Mip-/- lens was associated with increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cell nuclei and dramatically elevated levels of calpain-mediated proteolysis of αII-spectrin. However red-ox status, measured by glutathione and free-radical levels, was similar to that of wild-type. These data suggest that while relatively few genes (∼1.5% of the transcriptome) were differentially regulated >2-fold in the Mip-/- lens, calpain hyper-activation acts as a terminal pathogenic event during lens fiber cell death and cataract formation.

  20. A mouse renin distal enhancer is essential for blood pressure homeostasis in BAC-rescued renin-null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Keiji; Kanafusa, Sumiyo; Ushiki, Aki; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Ishida, Junji; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Renin is predominantly expressed in juxtaglomerular cells in the kidney and regulates blood pressure homeostasis. To examine possible in vivo functions of a mouse distal enhancer (mdE), we generated transgenic mice (TgM) carrying either wild-type or mdE-deficient renin BACs (bacterial artificial chromosome), integrated at the identical chromosomal site. In the kidneys of the TgM, the mdE contributed 80% to basal renin promoter activity. To test for possible physiological roles for the mdE, renin BAC transgenes were used to rescue the hypotensive renin-null mice. Interestingly, renal renin expression in the Tg(BAC):renin-null compound mice was indistinguishable between the wild-type and mutant BAC carriers. Surprisingly, however, the plasma renin activity and angiotensin I concentration in the mdE compound mutant mice were significantly lower than the same parameters in the control mice, and the mutants were consistently hypotensive, demonstrating that blood pressure homeostasis is regulated through transcriptional cis elements controlling renin activity.

  1. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Orlicky, David J; Maclean, Kenneth N

    2015-08-14

    In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap.

  2. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K. Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P.; Allen, Robert H.; Orlicky, David J.; Maclean, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap. PMID:26276101

  3. Disruption of Npr1 gene differentially regulates the juxtaglomerular and distal tubular renin levels in null mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Minolfa C; Das, Subhankar; Somanna, Naveen K; Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M; Navar, L Gabriel; Pandey, Kailash N

    2012-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) exerts an inhibitory effect on juxtaglomerular (JG) renin synthesis and release by activating guanylyl cyclase/ natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA). Renin has also been localized in connecting tubule cells; however, the effect of ANP/NPRA signaling on tubular renin has not been determined. In the present study, we determined the role of NPRA in regulating both JG and tubular renin using Npr1 (coding for NPRA) gene-disrupted mice, which exhibit a hypertensive phenotype. Renin-positive immunoreactivity in Npr1-/- homozygous null mutant mice was significantly reduced compared with Npr1+/+ wild-type mice (23% vs 69% renin-positive glomeruli). However, after chronic diuretic treatment, Npr1-/- mice showed an increment of JG renin immunoreactivity compared with Npr1+/+ mice (70% vs 81% renin-positive glomeruli). There were no significant differences in the distal tubule renin between Npr1+/+ and Npr1-/- mice. However, after diuretic treatment, Npr1-/- mice showed a significant decrease in renin immunoreactivity in principal cells of cortical collecting ducts (p<0.05). The increased JG renin immunoreactivity after reduction in blood pressure in diuretic-treated Npr1-/- mice, demonstrates an inhibitory action of ANP/NPRA system on JG renin; however, a decreased expression of distal tubular renin suggests a differential effect of ANP/NPRA signaling on JG and distal tubular renin. PMID:23071870

  4. ACE2/Ang 1-7 axis: A critical regulator of epicardial adipose tissue inflammation and cardiac dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Basu, Ratnadeep; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by an excessive fat accumulation in adipose tissues leading to weight gain and is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; activated RAS and angiotensin (Ang) II production results in worsening of cardiovascular diseases and angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. ACE2 is expressed in the adipocytes and its expression is upregulated in response to high fat diet induced obesity in mice. Loss of ACE2 results in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction which is mediated in part by epicardial adipose tissue inflammation. Angiotensin 1-7 reduces the obesity associated cardiac dysfunction predominantly via its role in adiponectin expression and attenuation of epicardial adipose tissue inflammation. Human heart disease is also linked with inflammed epicardial adipose tissue. Here, we discuss the important interpretation of the novel of ACE2/Ang 1-7 pathway in obesity associated cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27617176

  5. Attenuation of the pulmonary inflammatory response following butylated hydroxytoluene treatment of cytosolic phospholipase A2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Amy M; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D; Hurteau, Gregory; Keith, Robert L; Ouyang, Yanli; Freed, Brian M; Kisley, Lori R; Geraci, Mark W; Bonventre, Joseph V; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Malkinson, Alvin M

    2006-06-01

    Administration of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) to mice causes lung damage characterized by the death of alveolar type I pneumocytes and the proliferation and subsequent differentiation of type II cells to replace them. Herein, we demonstrate this injury elicits an inflammatory response marked by chemokine secretion, alveolar macrophage recruitment, and elevated expression of enzymes in the eicosanoid pathway. Cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) catalyzes release of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids to initiate the synthesis of prostaglandins and other inflammatory mediators. A role for cPLA(2) in this response was examined by determining cPLA(2) expression and enzymatic activity in distal respiratory epithelia and macrophages and by assessing the consequences of cPLA(2) genetic ablation. BHT-induced lung inflammation, particularly monocyte infiltration, was depressed in cPLA(2) null mice. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid increases after BHT treatment but before monocyte influx, suggesting a causative role. Bronchiolar Clara cells isolated from cPLA(2) null mice secrete less MCP-1 than Clara cells from wild-type mice, consistent with the hypothesis that cPLA(2) is required to secrete sufficient MCP-1 to induce an inflammatory monocytic response.

  6. Reduction of aberrant NF-κB signalling ameliorates Rett syndrome phenotypes in Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Noriyuki; MacDonald, Jessica L; Ye, Julia; Molyneaux, Bradley J; Azim, Eiman; Macklis, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-29

    Mutations in the transcriptional regulator Mecp2 cause the severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). In this study, we investigate genes that function downstream of MeCP2 in cerebral cortex circuitry, and identify upregulation of Irak1, a central component of the NF-κB pathway. We show that overexpression of Irak1 mimics the reduced dendritic complexity of Mecp2-null cortical callosal projection neurons (CPN), and that NF-κB signalling is upregulated in the cortex with Mecp2 loss-of-function. Strikingly, we find that genetically reducing NF-κB signalling in Mecp2-null mice not only ameliorates CPN dendritic complexity but also substantially extends their normally shortened lifespan, indicating broader roles for NF-κB signalling in RTT pathogenesis. These results provide new insight into both the fundamental neurobiology of RTT, and potential therapeutic strategies via NF-κB pathway modulation.

  7. Reduction of aberrant NF-κB signalling ameliorates Rett syndrome phenotypes in Mecp2-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Noriyuki; MacDonald, Jessica L.; Ye, Julia; Molyneaux, Bradley J.; Azim, Eiman; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the transcriptional regulator Mecp2 cause the severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). In this study, we investigate genes that function downstream of MeCP2 in cerebral cortex circuitry, and identify upregulation of Irak1, a central component of the NF-κB pathway. We show that overexpression of Irak1 mimics the reduced dendritic complexity of Mecp2-null cortical callosal projection neurons (CPN), and that NF-κB signalling is upregulated in the cortex with Mecp2 loss-of-function. Strikingly, we find that genetically reducing NF-κB signalling in Mecp2-null mice not only ameliorates CPN dendritic complexity but also substantially extends their normally shortened lifespan, indicating broader roles for NF-κB signalling in RTT pathogenesis. These results provide new insight into both the fundamental neurobiology of RTT, and potential therapeutic strategies via NF-κB pathway modulation. PMID:26821816

  8. iNOS null MRL+/+ mice show attenuation of trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity: contribution of reactive nitrogen species and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Wakamiya, Maki; Wang, Jianling; Ansari, G A S; Firoze Khan, M

    2015-12-01

    Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggest that free radicals, especially overproduction of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and lipid-derived reactive aldehydes (LDRAs), are associated with trichloroethene (TCE)-mediated autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the contribution of RNS and LDRAs in TCE-mediated autoimmunity by using iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice. iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were obtained by backcrossing iNOS-null mice (B6.129P2-Nos2(tm1Lau)/J) to MRL +/+ mice. Female MRL+/+ and iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were given TCE (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4(th) day) for 6 weeks; their respective controls received corn oil only. TCE exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA in livers, iNOS protein in livers and sera, increased nitrotyrosine (NT) formation in both livers and sera, induction of MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in livers and their respective antibodies in sera along with significant increases in serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-dsDNA in MRL+/+ mice. Even though in iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice, the iNOS and NT levels were negligible in both TCE-treated and untreated groups, TCE treatment still led to significant increases in MDA-/HNE-protein adducts and their respective antibodies along with increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA compared to controls. Most remarkably, the increases in serum ANA and anti-dsDNA induced by TCE in the iNOS-null MRL+/+ mice were significantly less pronounced compared to that in MRL+/+ mice. Our results provide further evidence that both RNS and LDRAs contribute to TCE-induced autoimmunity in MRL+/+ mice, and iNOS deficiency attenuates this autoimmune response.

  9. The anxiety-like phenotype of 5-HT receptor null mice is associated with genetic background-specific perturbations in the prefrontal cortex GABA-glutamate system.

    PubMed

    Bruening, S; Oh, E; Hetzenauer, A; Escobar-Alvarez, S; Westphalen, R I; Hemmings, H C; Singewald, N; Shippenberg, T; Toth, M

    2006-11-01

    A deficit in the serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor has been found in panic and post-traumatic stress disorders, and genetic inactivation of the receptor results in an anxiety-like phenotype in mice on both the C57Bl6 and Swiss-Webster genetic backgrounds. Anxiety is associated with increased neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex and here we describe changes in glutamate and GABA uptake of C57Bl6 receptor null mice. Although these alterations were not present in Swiss-Webster null mice, we have previously reported reductions in GABA(A) receptor expression in these but not in C57Bl6 null mice. This demonstrates that inactivation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor elicits different and genetic background-dependent perturbations in the prefrontal cortex GABA/glutamate system. These perturbations can result in a change in the balance between excitation and inhibition, and indeed both C57Bl6 and Swiss-Webster null mice show signs of increased neuronal excitability. Because neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex controls the extent of response to anxiogenic stimuli, the genetic background-specific perturbations in glutamate and GABA neurotransmission in C57Bl6 and Swiss-Webster 5-HT(1A) receptor null mice may contribute to their shared anxiety phenotype. Our study shows that multiple strains of genetically altered mice could help us to understand the common and individual features of anxiety.

  10. Selective reconstitution of liver cholesterol biosynthesis promotes lung maturation but does not prevent neonatal lethality in Dhcr7 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongwei; Li, Man; Tint, G Stephen; Chen, Jianliang; Xu, Guorong; Patel, Shailendra B

    2007-01-01

    Background Targeted disruption of the murine 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7-reductase gene (Dhcr7), an animal model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, leads to loss of cholesterol synthesis and neonatal death that can be partially rescued by transgenic replacement of DHCR7 expression in brain during embryogenesis. To gain further insight into the role of non-brain tissue cholesterol deficiency in the pathophysiology, we tested whether the lethal phenotype could be abrogated by selective transgenic complementation with DHCR7 expression in the liver. Results We generated mice that carried a liver-specific human DHCR7 transgene whose expression was driven by the human apolipoprotein E (ApoE) promoter and its associated liver-specific enhancer. These mice were then crossed with Dhcr7+/- mutants to generate Dhcr7-/- mice bearing a human DHCR7 transgene. Robust hepatic transgene expression resulted in significant improvement of cholesterol homeostasis with cholesterol concentrations increasing to 80~90 % of normal levels in liver and lung. Significantly, cholesterol deficiency in brain was not altered. Although late gestational lung sacculation defect reported previously was significantly improved, there was no parallel increase in postnatal survival in the transgenic mutant mice. Conclusion The reconstitution of DHCR7 function selectively in liver induced a significant improvement of cholesterol homeostasis in non-brain tissues, but failed to rescue the neonatal lethality of Dhcr7 null mice. These results provided further evidence that CNS defects caused by Dhcr7 null likely play a major role in the lethal pathogenesis of Dhcr7-/- mice, with the peripheral organs contributing the morbidity. PMID:17408495

  11. Modeling the Cell Muscle Membrane from Normal and Desmin- or Dystrophin-null Mice as an Elastic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Santamaría-Holek, Ivan; Bloch, Robert J.; Ortega, Alicia; González-Serratos, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    Two of the most important proteins linking the contractile apparatus and costameres at the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers are dystrophin and desmin. We have developed an elastic model of the proteins that link the sarcolemma to the myofibrils. This is a distributed model, with an elastic constant, k, that includes the main protein components of the costameres. The distributed spring model is composed of parallel units attached in series. To test the model, we performed experiments in which we applied negative pressure, generated by an elastimeter, to a small area of the sarcolemma from single myofiber. The negative pressure formed a bleb of variable height, dependent on the pressure applied. We normalized our measurements of k in dystrophin-null (mdx) and desmin-null (des-/-) mice to the value we obtained for wild type (WT) mice, which was set at 1.0. The relative experimental value for the stiffness of myofibers from mice lacking dystrophin or desmin was 0.5 and 0.7, respectively. The theoretical k values of the individual elements were obtained using neural networks (NN), in which the input was the k value for each parallel spring component and the output was the solution of each resulting parallel system. We compare the experimental values of k in control and mutant muscles to the theoretical values obtained by NN for each protein. Computed theoretical values were 0.4 and 0.8 for dystrophin- and desmin-null muscles, respectively, and 0.9 for WT, in reasonable agreement with our experimental results. This suggests that, although it is a simplified spring model solved by NN, it provides a good approximation of the distribution of spring elements and the elastic constants of the proteins that form the costameres. Our results show that dystrophin is the protein that contributes more than any other to the strength of the connections between the sarcolemma and the contractile apparatus, the costameres.

  12. Age-related and depot-specific changes in white adipose tissue of growth hormone receptor-null mice.

    PubMed

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Berryman, Darlene E; Lubbers, Ellen R; Zhang, Han; Vesel, Clare B; Troike, Katie M; Gosney, Elahu S; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone receptor-null (GHR(-/-)) mice are dwarf, insulin sensitive, and long-lived in spite of increased adiposity. However, their adiposity is not uniform, with select white adipose tissue (WAT) depots enlarged. To study WAT depot-specific effects on insulin sensitivity and life span, we analyzed individual WAT depots of 12- and 24-month-old GHR(-) (/-) and wild-type (WT) mice, as well as their plasma levels of selected hormones. Adipocyte sizes and plasma insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels decreased with age in both GHR(-) (/-) and WT mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis proteomes of WAT depots were similar among groups, but several proteins involved in endocytosis and/or cytoskeletal organization (Ehd2, S100A10, actin), anticoagulation (S100A10, annexin A5), and age-related conditions (alpha2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein A-I, transthyretin) showed significant differences between genotypes. Because Ehd2 may regulate endocytosis of Glut4, we measured Glut4 levels in the WAT depots of GHR(-) (/-) and WT mice. Inguinal WAT of 12-month-old GHR(-) (/-) mice displayed lower levels of Glut4 than WT. Overall, the protein changes detected in this study offer new insights into possible mechanisms contributing to enhanced insulin sensitivity and extended life span in GHR(-) (/-) mice. PMID:23873966

  13. α2-Null mutant mice have altered levels of neuronal activity in restricted midbrain and limbic brain regions during nicotine withdrawal as demonstrated by cfos expression.

    PubMed

    Upton, Montana; Lotfipour, Shahrdad

    2015-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the primary binding sites for nicotine within the brain. Using alpha(α)2 nAChR subunit-null mutant mice, the current study evaluates whether the absence of this gene product during mecamylamine-precipitated nicotine withdrawal eliminates neuronal activity within selective midbrain and limbic brain regions, as determined by the expression of the immediate early gene, cfos. Our results demonstrate that nicotine withdrawal enhances neuronal activity within the interpeduncular nucleus and dorsal hippocampus, which is absent in mice null for α2-containing nAChRs. In contrast, we observe that α2-null mutant mice exhibit a suppression of neuronal activity in the dentate gyrus in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. Interestingly, α2-null mutant mice display potentiated neuronal activity specifically within the stratum lacunosum moleculare layer of the hippocampus, independent of nicotine withdrawal. Overall, our findings demonstrate that α2-null mutant mice have altered cfos expression in distinct populations of neurons within selective midbrain and limbic brain structures that mediate baseline and nicotine withdrawal-induced neuronal activity.

  14. Endocrine expression of the active form of TGF-beta1 in the TGF-beta1 null mice fails to ameliorate lethal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, Glenn; Thyagarajan, Tamizchelvi; Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; Flanders, Kathleen C; Factor, Valentina; Miller, Georgina; Ward, Jerrold M; Nalca, Aysegul; Rangnekar, Vivek M; Thorgeirsson, Snorri; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2002-04-01

    TGF-beta1 null mice die by 3 to 4 weeks of age due to a severe autoimmune-mediated multifocal inflammation resulting in multi-organ failure. To assess the therapeutic potential of circulating levels of active TGF-beta1, we generated mice with endocrine expression of active TGF-beta1 on a TGF-beta1 null background (TGF-beta1 (-/-/TG)) by crossing TGF-beta1(+/-) mice with transgenic mice (TG) that express recombinant TGF-beta1 specifically in the liver and secrete it in the blood. The TGF-beta1 (-/-/TG) mice exhibit a survival profile similar to the TGF-beta1 (-/-) mice indicating a failure to rescue the lethal phenotype. However, serum TGF-beta1 levels in the TGF-beta1 (-/-/TG) mice were restored to near normal levels with expression in all the tissues, notably in the kidney and spleen. Histopathology showed reduced inflammation in the target tissues, especially in the heart. Interestingly, unlike TGF-beta1 (-/-) mice, the TGF-beta1 (-/-/TG) mice have glomerulonephritis in their kidneys similar to the TG mice. Thus, the phenotype of TGF-beta1 (-/-/TG) animal model indicates the potential role of circulating active-TGF-beta1 in reducing inflammation, but its failure to rescue lethality in TGF-beta1 null mice indicates a critical autocrine role of TGF-beta1.

  15. Liver specific expression of Cu/ZnSOD extends the lifespan of Sod1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Liu, Yuhong; Walsh, Michael; Bokov, Alex; Ikeno, Yuji; Jang, Young C; Perez, Viviana I; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan

    2016-03-01

    Genetic ablation of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1) in mice (Sod1(-/-) mice) leads to shortened lifespan with a dramatic increase in hepatocellular carcinoma and accelerated aging phenotypes, including early onset sarcopenia. To study the tissue specific effects of oxidative stress in the Sod1(-/-) mice, we generated mice that only express the human SOD1 gene specifically in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice (Sod1(-/-)/hSOD1(alb) mice). Expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice improved liver function, reduced oxidative damage in liver, and partially restored the expression of several genes involved in tumorigenesis, which are abnormally expressed in the livers of the Sod1(-/-) mice. However, liver specific expression of hSOD1 did not prevent the loss of body weight and muscle mass and alterations in the structure of neuromuscular junctions. The expression of hSOD1 in the liver of Sod1(-/-) mice significantly improved the lifespan of Sod1(-/-) mice; however, the lifespan of the Sod1(-/-)/hSOD1(alb) mice was still significantly shorter than wild type mice.

  16. Dioxin-Dependent and Dioxin-Independent Gene Batteries: Comparison of Liver and Kidney in AHR-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boutros, Paul C.; Bielefeld, Kirsten A.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Harper, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a widely expressed ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates cellular responses to dioxins and other planar aromatic hydrocarbons. Ahr-null mice are refractory to the toxic effects of dioxin exposure. Although some mechanistic aspects of AHR activity are well understood, the tissue specificity of AHR effects remains unclear, both during development and following administration of exogenous ligands. To address the latter issue, we defined and compared transcriptional responses to dioxin exposure in the liver and kidney of wild-type and Ahr-null adult C57BL/6J mice treated with either 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or corn-oil vehicle. In both tissues, essentially all effects of dioxin on hepatic mRNA levels were mediated by the AHR. Although 297 genes were altered by dioxin exposure in the liver, only 17 were changed in the kidney, including a number of well-established AHR target genes. Ahr genotype had a large effect in both tissues, profoundly remodeling both the renal and hepatic transcriptomes. Surprisingly, a large number of genes were affected by Ahr genotype in both tissues, suggesting the presence of a basal AHR gene battery. Alterations of the renal transcriptome in Ahr-null animals were associated with perturbation of specific functional pathways and enrichment of specific DNA motifs. Our results demonstrate the importance of intertissue comparisons, highlight the basal role of the AHR in liver and kidney, and support a role in development or normal physiology. PMID:19759094

  17. Pharmacological treatment with mirtazapine rescues cortical atrophy and respiratory deficits in MeCP2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Bittolo, Tamara; Raminelli, Carlo Antonio; Deiana, Chiara; Baj, Gabriele; Vaghi, Valentina; Ferrazzo, Sara; Bernareggi, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Loss of MeCP2 (Methyl CpG binding protein 2) in Rett syndrome (RTT) causes brain weight decrease, shrinkage of the cortex with reduced dendritic arborization, behavioral abnormalities, seizures and cardio-respiratory complications. The observed monoamine neurotransmitters reduction in RTT suggested antidepressants as a possible therapy. We treated MeCP2-null mice from postnatal-day 28 for two weeks with desipramine, already tested in RTT, or mirtazapine, an antidepressant with limited side-effects, known to promote GABA release. Mirtazapine was more effective than desipramine in restoring somatosensory cortex thickness by fully rescuing pyramidal neurons dendritic arborization and spine density. Functionally, mirtazapine treatment normalized heart rate, breath rate, anxiety levels, and eliminated the hopping behavior observed in MeCP2-null mice, leading to improved phenotypic score. These morphological and functional effects of mirtazapine were accompanied by reestablishment of the GABAergic and glutamatergic receptor activity recorded in cortex and brainstem tissues. Thus, mirtazapine can represent a new potential pharmacological treatment for the Rett syndrome. PMID:26806603

  18. Role of RANKL (TNFSF11)-Dependent Osteopetrosis in the Dental Phenotype of Msx2 Null Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castaneda, Beatriz; Simon, Yohann; Ferbus, Didier; Robert, Benoit; Chesneau, Julie; Mueller, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The MSX2 homeoprotein is implicated in all aspects of craniofacial skeletal development. During postnatal growth, MSX2 is expressed in all cells involved in mineralized tissue formation and plays a role in their differentiation and function. Msx2 null (Msx2−/−) mice display complex craniofacial skeleton abnormalities with bone and tooth defects. A moderate form osteopetrotic phenotype is observed, along with decreased expression of RANKL (TNFSF11), the main osteoclast-differentiating factor. In order to elucidate the role of such an osteopetrosis in the Msx2−/− mouse dental phenotype, a bone resorption rescue was performed by mating Msx2−/− mice with a transgenic mouse line overexpressing Rank (Tnfrsf11a). Msx2−/− RankTg mice had significant improvement in the molar phenotype, while incisor epithelium defects were exacerbated in the enamel area, with formation of massive osteolytic tumors. Although compensation for RANKL loss of function could have potential as a therapy for osteopetrosis, but in Msx2−/− mice, this approach via RANK overexpression in monocyte-derived lineages, amplified latent epithelial tumor development in the peculiar continuously growing incisor. PMID:24278237

  19. Decreased bile-acid synthesis in livers of hepatocyte-conditional NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-null mice results in increased bile acids in serum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) is essential for the function of microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450), including those P450s involved in bile acid (BA) synthesis. Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (H-Cpr-null) have been engineered to understand the in vivo function of hepatic P450s in the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. However, the impact of hepatic Cpr on BA homeostasis is not clear. The present study revealed that H-Cpr-null mice had a 60% decrease in total BA concentration in liver, whereas the total BA concentration in serum was almost doubled. The decreased level of cholic acid (CA) in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice is likely due to diminished enzyme activity of Cyp8b1 that is essential for CA biosynthesis. Feedback mechanisms responsible for the reduced liver BA concentrations and/or increased serum BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice included the following: 1) enhanced alternative BA synthesis pathway, as evidenced by the fact that classic BA synthesis is diminished but chenodeoxycholic acid still increases in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice; 2) inhibition of farnesoid X receptor activation, which increased the mRNA of Cyp7a1 and 8b1; 3) induction of intestinal BA transporters to facilitate BA absorption from the intestine to the circulation; 4) induction of hepatic multidrug resistance-associated protein transporters to increase BA efflux from the liver to blood; and 5) increased generation of secondary BAs. In summary, the present study reveals an important contribution of the alternative BA synthesis pathway and BA transporters in regulating BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice.

  20. Prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) null mice have increased mu opioid receptor levels accompanied by altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence.

    PubMed

    Lutfy, K; Parikh, D; Lee, D L; Liu, Y; Ferrini, M G; Hamid, A; Friedman, T C

    2016-08-01

    Chronic morphine treatment increases the levels of prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) in brain regions involved in nociception, tolerance and dependence. Thus, we tested if PC2 null mice exhibit altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. PC2 null mice and their wild-type controls were tested for baseline hot plate latency, injected with morphine (1.25-10mg/kg) and tested for antinociception 30min later. For tolerance studies, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg) on day 1. Mice then received an additional dose so that the final dose of morphine was 10mg/kg on this day. On days 2-4, mice received additional doses of morphine (20, 40 and 80mg/kg on days 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively). On day 5, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg). For withdrawal studies, mice were treated with the escalating doses of morphine (10, 20, 40 and 80mg/kg) for 4days, implanted with a morphine pellet on day 5 and 3 days later injected with naloxone (1mg/kg) and signs of withdrawal were recorded. Morphine dose-dependently induced antinociception and the magnitude of this response was greater in PC2 null mice. Tolerance to morphine was observed in wild-type mice and this phenomenon was blunted in PC2 null mice. Withdrawal signs were also reduced in PC2 null mice. Immunohistochemical studies showed up-regulation of the mu opioid receptor (MOP) protein expression in the periaqueductal gray area, ventral tegmental area, lateral hypothalamus, medial hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and somatosensory cortex in PC2 null mice. Likewise, naloxone specific binding was increased in the brains of these mice compared to their wild-type controls. The results suggest that the PC2-derived peptides may play a functional role in morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. Alternatively, lack of opioid peptides led to up-regulation of the MOP and altered morphine

  1. Transplantation of human spleen into immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice generates humanized mice that improve functional B cell development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Park, Jae Berm; Chang, Jun; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-12-01

    We previously generated humanized TB34N mice that received human fetal thymus (T), bone tissue (B) and fetal liver-derived (FL)-CD34(+) cells (34) in immunodeficient, NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (N) mice. Although humanized TB34N mice had excellent hematopoiesis, here, we sought to further improve this model by additional transplantation of human spleen tissue (S) as a secondary hematopoietic tissue (TBS34N). The human spleen grafts were enlarged and differentiated into a similar morphology of adult humans, including follicular lymphoid structures with T- and B-cells. The TBS34N mice mimicked mature human immune system (HIS): mature T- and B-cells and follicular dendritic cells; activated germinal center B-cells expressing CD71, BR3(+) cells, memory B-cells and activation-induced cytidine deaminase(+) B-cells; CD138(+) plasma cells were enriched in the mouse spleen. HBsAg-specific hIgG antibodies were secreted into the sera of all TBS34N mice upon immunization with HBsAg. Taken together, the humanized TBS34N mice improved mature HIS and achieved adaptive antibody responses. PMID:26360254

  2. Transplantation of human spleen into immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice generates humanized mice that improve functional B cell development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Park, Jae Berm; Chang, Jun; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-12-01

    We previously generated humanized TB34N mice that received human fetal thymus (T), bone tissue (B) and fetal liver-derived (FL)-CD34(+) cells (34) in immunodeficient, NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (N) mice. Although humanized TB34N mice had excellent hematopoiesis, here, we sought to further improve this model by additional transplantation of human spleen tissue (S) as a secondary hematopoietic tissue (TBS34N). The human spleen grafts were enlarged and differentiated into a similar morphology of adult humans, including follicular lymphoid structures with T- and B-cells. The TBS34N mice mimicked mature human immune system (HIS): mature T- and B-cells and follicular dendritic cells; activated germinal center B-cells expressing CD71, BR3(+) cells, memory B-cells and activation-induced cytidine deaminase(+) B-cells; CD138(+) plasma cells were enriched in the mouse spleen. HBsAg-specific hIgG antibodies were secreted into the sera of all TBS34N mice upon immunization with HBsAg. Taken together, the humanized TBS34N mice improved mature HIS and achieved adaptive antibody responses.

  3. Similar L-dopa-stimulated motor activity in mice with adult-onset 6-hydroxydopamine-induced symmetric dopamine denervation and in transcription factor Pitx3 null mice with perinatal-onset symmetric dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Sagot, Ben; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2015-07-30

    The transcription factor Pitx3 null mutant (Pitx3Null) mice have a constitutive perinatal-onset and symmetric bilateral dopamine (DA) loss in the striatum. In these mice l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) induces apparently normal horizontal movements (walking) but also upward movements consisting of the vertical body trunk and waving paws that are absent in normal animals and in animals with the classic unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion-induced DA denervation. Thus, a concern is that the perinatal timing of the DA loss and potential developmental abnormalities in Pitx3Null mice may underlie these upward movements, thus reducing the usefulness as a DA denervation model. Here we show that in normal wild-type (Pitx3WT) mice with adult-onset symmetric, bilateral 6-OHDA-induced DA lesion in the dorsal striatum, l-dopa induces normal horizontal movements and upward movements that are qualitatively identical to those in Pitx3Null mice. Furthermore, after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the residual DA innervation in the striatum in Pitx3Null mice, l-dopa induces contraversive rotation that is similar to that in Pitx3WT mice with the classic unilateral 6-OHDA lesion. These results indicate that in Pitx3Null mice, the bilateral symmetric DA denervation in the dorsal striatum is sufficient for expressing the l-dopa-induced motor phenotype and the perinatal timing of their DA loss is not a determining factor, providing further evidence that Pitx3Null mice are a convenient and suitable mouse model to study the consequences of DA loss and dopaminergic replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  4. Transforming growth factor-beta1 null mutation causes infertility in male mice associated with testosterone deficiency and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Wendy V; Robertson, Sarah A

    2007-08-01

    TGFbeta1 is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in gonad and secondary sex organ development, steroidogenesis, and spermatogenesis. To determine the physiological requirement for TGFbeta1 in male reproduction, Tgfb1 null mutant mice on a Prkdc(scid) immunodeficient background were studied. TGFbeta1-deficient males did not deposit sperm or induce pseudopregnancy in females, despite an intact reproductive tract with morphologically normal penis, seminal vesicles, and testes. Serum and intratesticular testosterone and serum androstenedione were severely diminished in TGFbeta1-deficient males. Testosterone deficiency was secondary to disrupted pituitary gonadotropin secretion because serum LH and to a lesser extent serum FSH were reduced, and exogenous LH replacement with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induced serum testosterone to control levels. In the majority of TGFbeta1-deficient males, spermatogenesis was normal and sperm were developmentally competent as assessed by in vitro fertilization. Analysis of sexual behavior revealed that although TGFbeta1 null males showed avid interest in females and engaged in mounting activity, intromission was infrequent and brief, and ejaculation was not attained. Administration of testosterone to adult males, even after neonatal androgenization, was ineffective in restoring sexual function; however, erectile reflexes and ejaculation could be induced by electrical stimulation. These studies demonstrate the profound effect of genetic deficiency in TGFbeta1 on male fertility, implicating this cytokine in essential roles in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in testosterone-independent regulation of mating competence.

  5. Kharon1 Null Mutants of Leishmania mexicana Are Avirulent in Mice and Exhibit a Cytokinesis Defect within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marco A.; Valli, Jessica; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis. PMID:26266938

  6. Microglia contribute to circuit defects in Mecp2 null mice independent of microglia-specific loss of Mecp2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Dorothy P; Heller, Christopher T; Gunner, Georgia; Heller, Molly; Gordon, Christopher; Hammond, Timothy; Wolf, Yochai; Jung, Steffen; Stevens, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the resident CNS macrophages, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Rett Syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder. However, the mechanism by which microglia contribute to the disorder is unclear and recent data suggest that microglia do not play a causative role. Here, we use the retinogeniculate system to determine if and how microglia contribute to pathogenesis in a RTT mouse model, the Mecp2 null mouse (Mecp2tm1.1Bird/y). We demonstrate that microglia contribute to pathogenesis by excessively engulfing, thereby eliminating, presynaptic inputs at end stages of disease (≥P56 Mecp2 null mice) concomitant with synapse loss. Furthermore, loss or gain of Mecp2 expression specifically in microglia (Cx3cr1CreER;Mecp2fl/yor Cx3cr1CreER; Mecp2LSL/y) had little effect on excessive engulfment, synapse loss, or phenotypic abnormalities. Taken together, our data suggest that microglia contribute to end stages of disease by dismantling neural circuits rendered vulnerable by loss of Mecp2 in other CNS cell types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15224.001 PMID:27458802

  7. CMP-Neu5Ac Hydroxylase Null Mice as a Model for Studying Metabolic Disorders Caused by the Evolutionary Loss of Neu5Gc in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Choi, Yun-Jung; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Seo, Han Geuk; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the modification/turnover of gene products that are altered in humans due to evolutionary loss of Neu5Gc. CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase- (Cmah-) deficient mice show the infiltration of Kupffer cells within liver sinusoids, whereas body and liver weight develop normally. Pathway analysis by use of Illumina MouseRef-8 v2 Expression BeadChip provided evidence that a number of biological pathways, including the glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, and pentose phosphate pathways, as well as glycogen metabolism-related gene expression, were significantly upregulated in Cmah-null mice. The intracellular glucose supply in Cmah-null mice resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and the advanced glycation end products accumulation that could further induce oxidative stress. Finally, low sirtuin-1 and sirtuin-3 gene expressions due to higher NADH/NAD in Cmah-null mice decreased Foxo-1 and MnSOD gene expression, suggesting that oxidative stress may result in mitochondrial dysfunction in Cmah-null mouse. The present study suggests that mice with CMAH deficiency can be taken as an important model for studying metabolic disorders in humans. PMID:26558285

  8. Neil2-null Mice Accumulate Oxidized DNA Bases in the Transcriptionally Active Sequences of the Genome and Are Susceptible to Innate Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Wakamiya, Maki; Venkova-Canova, Tatiana; Pandita, Raj K; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Sarker, Altaf H; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Hosoki, Koa; Wood, Thomas G; Sharma, Gulshan; Cardenas, Victor; Sarkar, Partha S; Sur, Sanjiv; Pandita, Tej K; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K

    2015-10-01

    Why mammalian cells possess multiple DNA glycosylases (DGs) with overlapping substrate ranges for repairing oxidatively damaged bases via the base excision repair (BER) pathway is a long-standing question. To determine the biological role of these DGs, null animal models have been generated. Here, we report the generation and characterization of mice lacking Neil2 (Nei-like 2). As in mice deficient in each of the other four oxidized base-specific DGs (OGG1, NTH1, NEIL1, and NEIL3), Neil2-null mice show no overt phenotype. However, middle-aged to old Neil2-null mice show the accumulation of oxidative genomic damage, mostly in the transcribed regions. Immuno-pulldown analysis from wild-type (WT) mouse tissue showed the association of NEIL2 with RNA polymerase II, along with Cockayne syndrome group B protein, TFIIH, and other BER proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis from mouse tissue showed co-occupancy of NEIL2 and RNA polymerase II only on the transcribed genes, consistent with our earlier in vitro findings on NEIL2's role in transcription-coupled BER. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of genomic region-specific repair in mammals. Furthermore, telomere loss and genomic instability were observed at a higher frequency in embryonic fibroblasts from Neil2-null mice than from the WT. Moreover, Neil2-null mice are much more responsive to inflammatory agents than WT mice. Taken together, our results underscore the importance of NEIL2 in protecting mammals from the development of various pathologies that are linked to genomic instability and/or inflammation. NEIL2 is thus likely to play an important role in long term genomic maintenance, particularly in long-lived mammals such as humans.

  9. Premature aging-like phenotype in fibroblast growth factor 23 null mice is a vitamin D-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Razzaque, Mohammed S; Sitara, Despina; Taguchi, Takashi; St-Arnaud, René; Lanske, Beate

    2006-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 null mice (Fgf-23-/-) have a short lifespan and show numerous biochemical and morphological features consistent with premature aging-like phenotypes, including kyphosis, severe muscle wasting, hypogonadism, osteopenia, emphysema, uncoordinated movement, T cell dysregulation, and atrophy of the intestinal villi, skin, thymus, and spleen. Furthermore, increased vitamin D activities in homozygous mutants are associated with severe atherosclerosis and widespread soft tissue calcifications; ablation of vitamin D activity from Fgf-23-/- mice, by genetically deleting the 1alpha(OH)ase gene, eliminates atherosclerosis and ectopic calcifications and significantly rescues premature aging-like features of Fgf-23-/- mice, resulting in prolonged survival of Fgf-23-/-/1alpha(OH)ase-/- double mutants. Our results indicate a novel role of Fgf-23 in developing premature aging-like features through regulating vitamin D homeostasis. Finally, our data support a new model of interactions among Fgf-23, vitamin D, and klotho, a gene described as being associated with premature aging process.

  10. Pubertal impairment in Nhlh2 null mice is associated with hypothalamic and pituitary deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Tiziana; Delgado-Romero, Petra; Norwitz, Errol R; Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; Kaiser, Ursula B; Wray, Susan; Kirsch, Ilan R

    2007-12-01

    Pubertal development is impaired in mice lacking the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Nhlh2. The mechanisms underlying changes in reproduction in Nhlh2-deficient mice (Nhlh2(-/-)) are unclear. Here we show that hypothalamic GnRH-1 content is reduced in adult Nhlh2(-/-) mice as is the number of GnRH-1 neurons localized to mid- and caudal hypothalamic regions. This reduction was detected postnatally after normal migration of GnRH-1 neurons within nasal regions had occurred. Phenotype rescue experiments showed that female Nhlh2(-/-) mice were responsive to estrogen treatment. In contrast, puberty could not be primed in female Nhlh2(-/-) mice with a GnRH-1 regimen. The adenohypophysis of Nhlh2(-/-) mice was hypoplastic although it contained a full complement of the five anterior pituitary cell types. GnRH-1 receptors (GnRHRs) were reduced in Nhlh2(-/-) pituitary gonadotropes as compared with wild type. In vitro assays indicated that Nhlh2 expression is regulated in parallel with GnRHR expression. However, direct transcriptional activity of Nhlh2 on the GnRHR promoter was not found. These results indicate that Nhlh2 plays a role in the development and functional maintenance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis at least at two levels: 1) in the hypothalamus by regulating the number and distribution of GnRH-1 neurons and, 2) in the developing and mature adenohypophysis.

  11. Altered Body Weight Regulation in CK1ε Null and tau Mutant Mice on Regular Chow and High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lili; Summa, Keith C.; Olker, Christopher; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms results in metabolic dysfunction. Casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) is a canonical circadian clock gene. Null and tau mutations in CK1ε show distinct effects on circadian period. To investigate the role of CK1ε in body weight regulation under both regular chow (RC) and high fat (HF) diet conditions, we examined body weight on both RC and HF diets in CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mice on a standard 24 hr light-dark (LD) cycle. Given the abnormal entrainment of CK1εtau/tau mice on a 24 hr LD cycle, a separate set of CK1εtau/tau mice were tested under both diet conditions on a 20 hr LD cycle, which more closely matches their endogenous period length. On the RC diet, both CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mutants on a 24 hr LD cycle and CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle exhibited significantly lower body weights, despite similar overall food intake and activity levels. On the HF diet, CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle were protected against the development of HF diet-induced excess weight gain. These results provide additional evidence supporting a link between circadian rhythms and energy regulation at the genetic level, particularly highlighting CK1ε involved in the integration of circadian biology and metabolic physiology. PMID:27144030

  12. Oxidative stress and ROS metabolism via down-regulation of sirtuin 3 expression in Cmah-null mice affect hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah) disruption caused several abnormalities and diseases including hearing loss in old age. However, underling molecular mechanisms that give rise to age-related hearing loss (AHL) in Cmah-null mouse are still obscure. In this study, Cmah-null mice showed age-related decline of hearing associated with loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons, and/or stria vascularis degeneration in the cochlea. To identify differential gene expression profiles and pathway associated with AHL, we performed microarray analysis using Illumina MouseRef-8 v2 Expression BeadChip and pathway-focused PCR array in the cochlear tissues of Cmah-null mouse. Pathway and molecular mechanism analysis using differentially expressed genes provided evidences that altered biological pathway due to oxidative damage by low expressed antioxidants and dysregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Especially, low sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) gene expressions in Cmah-null mice decreased both of downstream regulator (Foxo1 and MnSod) and regulatory transcription factor (Hif1α and Foxo3a) gene expression. Taken together, we suggest that down-regulation of Sirt3 expression leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction by regulation of ROS and that it could alter various signaling pathways in Cmah-null mice with AHL. PMID:26319214

  13. GPRC6A Null Mice Exhibit Osteopenia, Feminization and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Min; Chen, Ling; Huang, Min-Zhao; Zhu, Wenyu; Ringhofer, Brian; Luo, Junming; Christenson, Lane; Li, Benyi; Zhang, Jianghong; Jackson, P. David; Faber, Pieter; Brunden, Kurt R.; Harrington, John J.; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2008-01-01

    Background GPRC6A is a widely expressed orphan G-protein coupled receptor that senses extracellular amino acids, osteocalcin and divalent cations in vitro. The physiological functions of GPRC6A are unknown. Methods/Principal Findings In this study, we created and characterized the phenotype of GPRC6A−/− mice. We observed complex metabolic abnormalities in GPRC6A−/− mice involving multiple organ systems that express GPRC6A, including bone, kidney, testes, and liver. GPRC6A−/− mice exhibited hepatic steatosis, hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. In addition, we observed high expression of GPRC6A in Leydig cells in the testis. Ablation of GPRC6A resulted in feminization of male GPRC6A−/− mice in association with decreased lean body mass, increased fat mass, increased circulating levels of estradiol, and reduced levels of testosterone. GPRC6A was also highly expressed in kidney proximal and distal tubules, and GPRC6A−/− mice exhibited increments in urine Ca/Cr and PO4/Cr ratios as well as low molecular weight proteinuria. Finally, GPRC6A−/− mice exhibited a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) in association with impaired mineralization of bone. Conclusions/Significance GPRC6A−/− mice have a metabolic syndrome characterized by defective osteoblast-mediated bone mineralization, abnormal renal handling of calcium and phosphorus, fatty liver, glucose intolerance and disordered steroidogenesis. These findings suggest the overall function of GPRC6A may be to coordinate the anabolic responses of multiple tissues through the sensing of extracellular amino acids, osteocalcin and divalent cations. PMID:19050760

  14. Characterizing the role of endothelin-1 in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) null mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Amie K.; Goens, M. Beth; Nunez, Bethany A.; Walker, Mary K. . E-mail: mkwalker@unm.edu

    2006-04-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor characterized to play a role in detection and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Genetic deletion of AhR results in hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, associated with elevated plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), thus AhR appears to contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that ET-1 mediates cardiovascular pathology in AhR null mice via ET{sub A} receptor activation. First, we determine the time courses of cardiac hypertrophy, and of plasma and tissue ET-1 expression in AhR wildtype and null mice. AhR null mice exhibited increases in heart-to-body weight ratio and age-related expression of cardiac hypertrophy markers, {beta}-myosin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC), and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), which were significant at 2 months. Similarly, plasma and tissue ET-1 expression was significantly elevated at 2 months and increased further with age. Second, AhR null mice were treated with ET{sub A} receptor antagonist, BQ-123 (100 nmol/kg/day), for 7, 28, or 58 days and blood pressure, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiac hypertrophy assessed, respectively. BQ-123 for 7 days significantly reduced mean arterial pressure in conscious, catheterized mice. BQ-123 for 28 days significantly reduced the histological appearance of cardiac fibrosis. Treatment for 58 days significantly reduced cardiac mass, assessed by heart weight, echocardiography, and {beta}-MHC and ANF expression; and reduced cardiac fibrosis as determined by osteopontin and collagen I mRNA expression. These findings establish ET-1 and the ET{sub A} receptor as primary determinants of hypertension and cardiac pathology in AhR null mice.

  15. GENE PROFILING IN WILD TYPE AND PPARÁ NULL MICE EXPOSED TO PFOA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perflurooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid used in a variety of commercial applications. Concerns have been raised because PFOA is ubiquitous in the environment and can be detected in human tissues. PFOA is a rodent carcinogen and a developmental toxicant in mice. W...

  16. Biomechanics of the sarcolemma and costameres in single skeletal muscle fibers from normal and dystrophin-null mice

    PubMed Central

    García-Pelagio, K. P.; Bloch, R. J.; Ortega, A.; González-Serratos, H.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the biomechanical properties of the sarcolemma and its links through costameres to the contractile apparatus in single mammalian myofibers of Extensor digitorum longus muscles isolated from wild (WT) and dystrophin-null (mdx) mice. Suction pressures (P) applied through a pipette to the sarcolemma generated a bleb, the height of which increased with increasing P. Larger increases in P broke the connections between the sarcolemma and myofibrils and eventually caused the sarcolemma to burst. We used the values of P at which these changes occurred to estimate the tensions and stiffness of the system and its individual elements. Tensions of the whole system and the sarcolemma, as well as the maximal tension sustained by the costameres, were all significantly lower (1.8–3.3 fold) in muscles of mdx mice compared to WT. Values of P at which separation and bursting occurred, as well as the stiffness of the whole system and of the isolated sarcolemma, were ~2-fold lower in mdx than in WT. Our results indicate that the absence of dystrophin reduces muscle stiffness, increases sarcolemmal deformability, and compromises the mechanical stability of costameres and their connections to nearby myofibrils. PMID:21312057

  17. Ectopic Cerebellar Cell Migration Causes Maldevelopment of Purkinje Cells and Abnormal Motor Behaviour in Cxcr4 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guo-Jen; Edwards, Andrew; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Yi-Shin; Peng, Lei; Era, Takumi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Chen, Shu-Jen; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice. PMID:24516532

  18. The Effect of Cigarette Smoke Exposure on Developing Folate Binding Protein-2 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Kristin H.; Esposito, Emily R.; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2008-01-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke exposures have been linked to adverse health effects. Folate is essential for normal development, with deficiencies often causing fetal growth restriction. Mice lacking the folate binding protein-2 receptor (Folr2) exhibit increased susceptibility to teratogens. The purpose of the current study was to determine if the loss of Folr2 would increase sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced effects on development. Pregnant Folr2−/−, Folr2+/+, and C57BL/6J mice were exposed to sidestream cigarette smoke during gestation. Exposure to sidestream smoke on gd 6–9 had no adverse effects on fetal outcomes. However, cigarette smoke exposure on gd 6–18 increased the number of fetal resorptions (Folr2−/− cohort) and decreased crown-rump length (Folr2+/+ fetuses). These data confirm an association between sidestream smoke exposure and fetal growth restriction, but do not suggest that loss of Folr2 increased susceptibility to these effects. PMID:18992323

  19. Peptide Transporter 1 is Responsible for Intestinal Uptake of the Dipeptide Glycylsarcosine: Studies in Everted Jejunal Rings from Wild-type and Pept1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Katherine; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of PEPT1 in the uptake of peptides/mimetics from mouse small intestine using glycylsarcosine (GlySar). After isolating jejunal tissue from wild-type and Pept1 null mice, 2-cm intestinal segments were everted and mounted on glass rods for tissue uptake studies. [14C]GlySar (4 μM) was studied as a function of time, temperature, sodium and pH, concentration, and potential inhibitors. Compared to wild-type animals, Pept1 null mice exhibited a 78% reduction of GlySar uptake at pH 6.0, 37°C. GlySar uptake showed pH dependence with peak values between pH 6.0-6.5 in wild-type animals, while no such tendency was observed in Pept1 null mice. GlySar exhibited Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics and a minor nonsaturable component in wild-type animals. In contrast, GlySar uptake occurred by only a nonsaturable process in Pept1 null mice. GlySar uptake was significantly inhibited by dipeptides, aminocephalosporins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and the antiviral prodrug valacyclovir; these inhibitors had little, if any, effect on the uptake of GlySar in Pept1 null mice. The findings demonstrate that PEPT1 plays a critical role in the uptake of GlySar in jejunum, and suggest that PEPT1 is the major transporter responsible for the intestinal absorption of small peptides. PMID:20862774

  20. Comparative metabolism of methacrylonitrile and acrylonitrile to cyanide using cytochrome P4502E1 and microsomal epoxide hydrolase-null mice

    SciTech Connect

    El Hadri, L.; Chanas, B.; Ghanayem, B.I. . E-mail: ghanayem@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-06-01

    Methacrylonitrile (MAN) and acrylonitrile (AN) are metabolized via glutathione (GSH) conjugation or epoxide formation. We have recently shown that CYP2E1 is essential for AN epoxidation and subsequent cyanide liberation. Current studies were designed to compare the enzymatic basis of MAN vs. AN metabolism to cyanide using wild-type (WT), CYP2E1-, and mEH-null mice. Mice received a single gavage dose of 0.047, 0.095, 0.19, or 0.38 mmol/kg of MAN or AN, and blood cyanide was measured at 1 or 3 h later. Blood cyanide levels in WT mice treated with AN or MAN were dose and time dependent. At equimolar doses, significantly higher levels of cyanide were detected in the blood of MAN- vs. AN-treated mice. Further, while significant reduction in blood cyanide levels occurred in MAN-treated CYP2E1-null vs. WT mice, AN metabolism to cyanide was largely abolished in CYP2E1-null mice. Pretreatment of mice with 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT, CYP inhibitor) demonstrated that CYPs other than CYP2E1 also contribute to MAN metabolism to cyanide. Blood cyanide levels in mEH-null mice treated with aliphatic nitriles are generally lower than levels in similarly treated WT mice. Western blot analysis showed that expression of sEH was greater in male vs. female mice. The role of various epoxide hydrolases (EHs) in the production of cyanide from aliphatic nitriles is apparently structure and dose dependent. Regardless of genotype, significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female mice treated with MAN or AN. In conclusion, these data showed that (1) at equimolar doses, higher blood cyanide levels were detected in mice treated with MAN vs. AN; (2) while CYP2E1 is the only enzyme responsible for AN metabolism to cyanide, other CYPs also contribute to MAN metabolism; and (3) significantly higher levels of cyanide were measured in the blood of male vs. female treated with either nitrile. Higher blood cyanide levels in male vs. female mice and in MAN- vs. AN

  1. Genetically null mice reveal a central role for epidermal growth factor receptor in the differentiation of the hair follicle and normal hair development.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L. A.; Alexander, N.; Hogan, M. E.; Sundberg, J. P.; Dlugosz, A.; Threadgill, D. W.; Magnuson, T.; Yuspa, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Mice harboring a targeted disruption of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) allele exhibit a severely disorganized hair follicle phenotype, fuzzy coat, and systemic disease resulting in death before 3 weeks. This skin phenotype was reproduced in whole skin grafts and in grafts of EGFR null hair follicle buds onto nude mice, providing a model to evaluate the natural evolution of skin lacking the EGFR. Hair follicles in grafts of null skin did not progress from anagen to telogen and scanning electron micrografts revealed wavy, flattened hair fibers with cuticular abnormalities. Many of the EGFR null hair follicles in the grafted skin were consumed by an inflammatory reaction resulting in complete hair loss in 67% of the grafts by 10 weeks. Localization of follicular differentiation markers including keratin 6, transglutaminase, and the hair keratins mHa2 and hacl-1 revealed a pattern of premature differentiation within the null hair follicles. In intact EGFR null mice, proliferation in the interfollicular epidermis, but not hair follicles, was greatly decreased in the absence of EGFR. In contrast, grafting of EGFR null skin resulted in a hyperplastic response in the epidermis that did not resolve even after 10 weeks, although the wound-induced hyperplasia in EGFR wild-type grafts had resolved within 3 to 4 weeks. Thus, epithelial expression of the EGFR has complex functions in the skin. It is important in delaying follicular differentiation, may serve to protect the hair follicle from immunological reactions, and modifies both normal and wound-induced epidermal proliferation but seems dispensable for follicular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9176390

  2. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Over 60 mutations of SCN4A encoding the NaV1.4 sodium channel of skeletal muscle have been identified in patients with myotonia, periodic paralysis, myasthenia, or congenital myopathy. Most mutations are missense with gain-of-function defects that cause susceptibility to myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss-of-function from enhanced inactivation or null alleles is rare and has been associated with myasthenia and congenital myopathy, while a mix of loss and gain of function changes has an uncertain relation to hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. To better define the functional consequences for a loss-of-function, we generated NaV1.4 null mice by deletion of exon 12. Heterozygous null mice have latent myasthenia and a right shift of the force-stimulus relation, without evidence of periodic paralysis. Sodium current density was half that of wild-type muscle and no compensation by retained expression of the foetal NaV1.5 isoform was detected. Mice null for NaV1.4 did not survive beyond the second postnatal day. This mouse model shows remarkable preservation of muscle function and viability for haploinsufficiency of NaV1.4, as has been reported in humans, with a propensity for pseudo-myasthenia caused by a marginal Na(+) current density to support sustained high-frequency action potentials in muscle. PMID:27048647

  3. Iron insufficiency compromises motor neurons and their mitochondrial function in Irp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Suh Young; Crooks, Daniel R; Wilson-Ollivierre, Hayden; Ghosh, Manik C; Sougrat, Rachid; Lee, Jaekwon; Cooperman, Sharon; Mitchell, James B; Beaumont, Carole; Rouault, Tracey A

    2011-01-01

    Genetic ablation of Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2), which post-transcriptionally regulates iron metabolism genes, causes a gait disorder in mice that progresses to hind-limb paralysis. Here we have demonstrated that misregulation of iron metabolism from loss of Irp2 causes lower motor neuronal degeneration with significant spinal cord axonopathy. Mitochondria in the lumbar spinal cord showed significantly decreased Complex I and II activities, and abnormal morphology. Lower motor neurons appeared to be the most adversely affected neurons, and we show that functional iron starvation due to misregulation of iron import and storage proteins, including transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, may have a causal role in disease. We demonstrated that two therapeutic approaches were beneficial for motor neuron survival. First, we activated a homologous protein, IRP1, by oral Tempol treatment and found that axons were partially spared from degeneration. Secondly, we genetically decreased expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, to diminish functional iron starvation. These data suggest that functional iron deficiency may constitute a previously unrecognized molecular basis for degeneration of motor neurons in mice. PMID:22003390

  4. Reduced T-cell-dependent humoral immune response in microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 null mice is mediated by non-hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Fumiaki; Frolov, Andrey; Matnani, Rahul; Woodward, Jerold G.; Crofford, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) is an inducible enzyme that specifically catalyzes the conversion of prostaglandin (PG)H2 to PGE2. We showed that mPGES-1 null mice had a significantly reduced incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) compared to wild-type (WT) mice associated with a marked reduction in antibodies to type II collagen. In the present study, we further elucidated the role of mPGES-1 in the humoral immune response. Basal levels of serum IgM and IgG were significantly reduced in mPGES-1 null mice. Compared with WT mice, mPGES-1 null mice exhibited a significant reduction of hapten-specific serum antibodies in response to immunization with the T-cell dependent antigen DNP-KLH. Immunization with the T-cell independent type-1 antigen TNP-LPS or the T-cell independent type-2 antigen DNP-Ficoll revealed minimal differences between strains. Germinal center formation in the spleens of mPGES-1 null and WT mice were similar after immunization with DNP-KLH. To determine if the effect of mPGES-1 and PGE2 was localized to hematopoietic or non-hematopoietic cells, we generated bone marrow chimeras. We demonstrated that mPGES-1 deficiency in non-hematopoietic cells was the critical factor for reduced T-cell dependent antibody production. We conclude that mPGES-1 and PGE2-dependent phenotypic changes of non-hematopoietic/mesenchymal stromal cells play a key role in T-cell dependent humoral immune responses in vivo. These findings may have relevance to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune inflammatory diseases associated with autoantibody formation. PMID:24127557

  5. A human FSHB transgene encoding the double N-glycosylation mutant (Asn(7Δ) Asn(24Δ)) FSHβ subunit fails to rescue Fshb null mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huizhen; Butnev, Vladimir; Bousfield, George R; Kumar, T Rajendra

    2016-05-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a gonadotrope-derived heterodimeric glycoprotein. Both the common α- and hormone-specific β subunits contain Asn-linked N-glycan chains. Recently, macroheterogeneous FSH glycoforms consisting of β-subunits that differ in N-glycan number were identified in pituitaries of several species and subsequently the recombinant human FSH glycoforms biochemically characterized. Although chemical modification and in vitro site-directed mutagenesis studies defined the roles of N-glycans on gonadotropin subunits, in vivo functional analyses in a whole-animal setting are lacking. Here, we have generated transgenic mice with gonadotrope-specific expression of either an HFSHB(WT) transgene that encodes human FSHβ WT subunit or an HFSHB(dgc) transgene that encodes a human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, and separately introduced these transgenes onto Fshb null background using a genetic rescue strategy. We demonstrate that the human FSHβ(Asn7Δ 24Δ) double N-glycosylation site mutant subunit, unlike human FSHβ WT subunit, inefficiently combines with the mouse α-subunit in pituitaries of Fshb null mice. FSH dimer containing this mutant FSHβ subunit is inefficiently secreted with very low levels detectable in serum. Fshb null male mice expressing HFSHB(dgc) transgene are fertile and exhibit testis tubule size and sperm number similar to those of Fshb null mice. Fshb null female mice expressing the mutant, but not WT human FSHβ subunit-containing FSH dimer are infertile, demonstrate no evidence of estrus cycles, and many of the FSH-responsive genes remain suppressed in their ovaries. Thus, HFSHB(dgc) unlike HFSHB(WT) transgene does not rescue Fshb null mice. Our genetic approach provides direct in vivo evidence that N-linked glycans on FSHβ subunit are essential for its efficient assembly with the α-subunit to form FSH heterodimer in pituitary. Our studies also reveal that N-glycans on FSHβ subunit are

  6. Macrophage-specific expression of human apolipoprotein E reduces atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-null mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bellosta, S; Mahley, R W; Sanan, D A; Murata, J; Newland, D L; Taylor, J M; Pitas, R E

    1995-01-01

    apoE deficiency causes hyperlipidemia and premature atherosclerosis. To determine if macrophage-specific expression of apoE would decrease the extent of atherosclerosis, we expressed human apoE in macrophages of apoE-null mice (apoE-/-) and assessed the effect on lipid accumulation in cells of the arterial wall. Macrophage-specific expression of human apoE in normal mice was obtained by use of the visna virus LTR. These animals were bred with apoE-/- mice to produce animals hemizygous for expression of human apoE in macrophages in the absence of murine apoE (apoE-/-,hTgE+/0). Low levels of human apoE mRNA were present in liver and spleen and high levels in lung and peritoneal macrophages. Human apoE was secreted by peritoneal macrophages and was detected in Kupffer cells of the liver. Human apoE in the plasma of apoE-/-,hTgE+/0 mice (n = 30) was inversely correlated (P < 0.005) with the plasma cholesterol concentration. After 15 wk on a normal chow diet, atherosclerosis was assessed in apoE-/-,hTgE+/0 animals and in apoE-/-,hTgE0/0 littermates matched for plasma cholesterol level (approximately 450 mg/dl) and lipoprotein profile. There was significantly less atherosclerosis in both the aortic sinus and in the proximal aorta (P < 0.0001) in the animals expressing the human apoE transgene. In apo-E-/-,hTgE+/0 animals, which had detectable atherosclerotic lesions, human apoE was detected in the secretory apparatus of macrophage-derived foam cells in the arterial wall. The data demonstrate that expression of apoE by macrophages is antiatherogenic even in the presence of high levels of atherogenic lipoproteins. The data suggest that apoE prevents atherosclerosis by promoting cholesterol efflux from cells of the arterial wall. Images PMID:7593602

  7. Insulin decreases atherosclerotic plaque burden and increases plaque stability via nitric oxide synthase in apolipoprotein E-null mice.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yusaku; Chiang, Simon; Bendeck, Michelle P; Giacca, Adria

    2016-08-01

    It has been argued whether insulin accelerates or prevents atherosclerosis. Although results from in vitro studies have been conflicting, recent in vivo mice studies demonstrated antiatherogenic effects of insulin. Insulin is a known activator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), leading to increased production of NO, which has potent antiatherogenic effects. We aimed to examine the role of NOS in the protective effects of insulin against atherosclerosis. Male apolipoprotein E-null mice (8 wk old) fed a high-cholesterol diet (1.25% cholesterol) were assigned to the following 12-wk treatments: control, insulin (0.05 U/day via subcutaneous pellet), N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME, via drinking water at 100 mg/l), and insulin plus l-NAME. Insulin reduced atherosclerotic plaque burden in the descending aorta by 42% compared with control (plaque area/aorta lumen area: control, 16.5 ± 1.9%; insulin, 9.6 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05). Although insulin did not decrease plaque burden in the aortic sinus, macrophage accumulation in the plaque was decreased by insulin. Furthermore, insulin increased smooth muscle actin and collagen content and decreased plaque necrosis, consistent with increased plaque stability. In addition, insulin treatment increased plasma NO levels, decreased inducible NOS staining, and tended to increase phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein staining in the plaques of the aortic sinus. All these effects of insulin were abolished by coadministration of l-NAME, whereas l-NAME alone showed no effect. Insulin also tended to increase phosphorylated endothelial NOS and total neuronal NOS staining, effects not modified by l-NAME. In conclusion, we demonstrate that insulin treatment decreases atherosclerotic plaque burden and increases plaque stability through NOS-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27221119

  8. Drosophila atonal fully rescues the phenotype of Math1 null mice: new functions evolve in new cellular contexts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vincent Y; Hassan, Bassem A; Bellen, Hugo J; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2002-09-17

    Many genes share sequence similarity between species, but their properties often change significantly during evolution. For example, the Drosophila genes engrailed and orthodenticle and the onychophoran gene Ultrabithorax only partially substitute for their mouse or Drosophila homologs. We have been analyzing the relationship between atonal (ato) in the fruit fly and its mouse homolog, Math1. In flies, ato acts as a proneural gene that governs the development of chordotonal organs (CHOs), which serve as stretch receptors in the body wall and joints and as auditory organs in the antennae. In the fly CNS, ato is important not for specification but for axonal arborization. Math1, in contrast, is required for the specification of cells in both the CNS and the PNS. Furthermore, Math1 serves a role in the development of secretory lineage cells in the gut, a function that does not parallel any known to be served by ato. We wondered whether ato and Math1 might be more functionally homologous than they appear, so we expressed Math1 in ato mutant flies and ato in Math1 null mice. To our surprise, the two proteins are functionally interchangeable.

  9. Drosophila atonal fully rescues the phenotype of Math1 null mice: new functions evolve in new cellular contexts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Vincent Y.; Hassan, Bassem A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2002-01-01

    Many genes share sequence similarity between species, but their properties often change significantly during evolution. For example, the Drosophila genes engrailed and orthodenticle and the onychophoran gene Ultrabithorax only partially substitute for their mouse or Drosophila homologs. We have been analyzing the relationship between atonal (ato) in the fruit fly and its mouse homolog, Math1. In flies, ato acts as a proneural gene that governs the development of chordotonal organs (CHOs), which serve as stretch receptors in the body wall and joints and as auditory organs in the antennae. In the fly CNS, ato is important not for specification but for axonal arborization. Math1, in contrast, is required for the specification of cells in both the CNS and the PNS. Furthermore, Math1 serves a role in the development of secretory lineage cells in the gut, a function that does not parallel any known to be served by ato. We wondered whether ato and Math1 might be more functionally homologous than they appear, so we expressed Math1 in ato mutant flies and ato in Math1 null mice. To our surprise, the two proteins are functionally interchangeable.

  10. Brain abnormalities, defective meiotic chromosome synapsis and female subfertility in HSF2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Marko; Chang, Yunhua; Manuel, Martine; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Rallu, Murielle; Gitton, Yorick; Pirkkala, Lila; Loones, Marie-Thérèse; Paslaru, Liliana; Larney, Severine; Hiard, Sophie; Morange, Michel; Sistonen, Lea; Mezger, Valérie

    2002-01-01

    Heat shock factor 2, one of the four vertebrate HSFs, transcriptional regulators of heat shock gene expression, is active during embryogenesis and spermatogenesis, with unknown functions and targets. By disrupting the Hsf2 gene, we show that, although the lack of HSF2 is not embryonic lethal, Hsf2–/– mice suffer from brain abnormalities, and meiotic and gameto genesis defects in both genders. The disturbances in brain are characterized by the enlargement of lateral and third ventricles and the reduction of hippocampus and striatum, in correlation with HSF2 expression in proliferative cells of the neuroepithelium and in some ependymal cells in adults. Many developing spermatocytes are eliminated via apoptosis in a stage-specific manner in Hsf2–/– males, and pachytene spermatocytes also display structural defects in the synaptonemal complexes between homologous chromosomes. Hsf2–/– females suffer from multiple fertility defects: the production of abnormal eggs, the reduction in ovarian follicle number and the presence of hemorrhagic cystic follicles are consistent with meiotic defects. Hsf2–/– females also display hormone response defects, that can be rescued by superovulation treatment, and exhibit abnormal rates of luteinizing hormone receptor mRNAs. PMID:12032072

  11. Altered expression of neuropeptides in FoxG1-null heterozygous mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Frullanti, Elisa; Amabile, Sonia; Lolli, Maria Grazia; Bartolini, Anna; Livide, Gabriella; Landucci, Elisa; Mari, Francesca; Vaccarino, Flora M; Ariani, Francesca; Massimino, Luca; Renieri, Alessandra; Meloni, Ilaria

    2016-02-01

    Foxg1 gene encodes for a transcription factor essential for telencephalon development in the embryonic mammalian forebrain. Its complete absence is embryonic lethal while Foxg1 heterozygous mice are viable but display microcephaly, altered hippocampal neurogenesis and behavioral and cognitive deficiencies. In order to evaluate the effects of Foxg1 alteration in adult brain, we performed expression profiling in total brains from Foxg1+/- heterozygous mutants and wild-type littermates. We identified statistically significant differences in expression levels for 466 transcripts (P<0.001), 29 of which showed a fold change ≥ 1.5. Among the differentially expressed genes was found a group of genes expressed in the basal ganglia and involved in the control of movements. A relevant (three to sevenfold changes) and statistically significant increase of expression, confirmed by qRT-PCR, was found in two highly correlated genes with expression restricted to the hypothalamus: Oxytocin (Oxt) and Arginine vasopressin (Avp). These neuropeptides have an important role in maternal and social behavior, and their alteration is associated with impaired social interaction and autistic behavior. In addition, Neuronatin (Nnat) levels appear significantly higher both in Foxg1+/- whole brain and in hippocampal neurons after silencing Foxg1, strongly suggesting that it is directly or indirectly repressed by Foxg1. During fetal and neonatal brain development, Nnat may regulate neuronal excitability, receptor trafficking and calcium-dependent signaling and, in the adult brain, it is predominantly expressed in parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons. Overall, these results implicate the overexpression of a group of neuropeptides in the basal ganglia, hypothalamus, cortex and hippocampus in the pathogenesis FOXG1 behavioral impairments.

  12. Membrane-associated zinc peptidase families: comparing ACE and ACE2.

    PubMed

    Guy, J L; Lambert, D W; Warner, F J; Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    2005-08-01

    In contrast to the relatively ubiquitous angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), expression of the mammalian ACE homologue, ACE2, was initially described in the heart, kidney and testis. ACE2 is a type I integral membrane protein with its active site domain exposed to the extracellular surface of endothelial cells and the renal tubular epithelium. Here ACE2 is poised to metabolise circulating peptides which may include angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor and the product of angiotensin I cleavage by ACE. To this end, ACE2 may counterbalance the effects of ACE within the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Indeed, ACE2 has been implicated in the regulation of heart and renal function where it is proposed to control the levels of angiotensin II relative to its hypotensive metabolite, angiotensin-(1-7). The recent solution of the structure of ACE2, and ACE, has provided new insight into the substrate and inhibitor profiles of these two key regulators of the RAS. As the complexity of this crucial pathway is unravelled, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of agents that modulate the activity of ACE2.

  13. Galanin Receptor Subtype 2 (GalR2) Null Mutant Mice Display an Anxiogenic-like Phenotype Specific to the Elevated Plus-maze

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kathleen R.; Pavlova, Maria N.; Rohde, Alex D.; Hohmann, John G.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2007-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has been implicated in anxiety-related behaviors, cognition, analgesia, and feeding in rodents. Neuromodulatory actions of galanin are mediated by three G-protein coupled receptors, GalR1, GalR2, and GalR3. The present study investigates the role of the GalR2 receptor by evaluating behavioral phenotypes of mice with a targeted mutation in the GalR2 gene. A three-tiered behavioral phenotyping approach first examined control measures of general health, body weight, neurological reflexes, sensory abilities and motor function. Mice were then assessed on several tests for cognitive and anxiety-like behaviors. GalR2 null mutants and heterozygotes were not significantly different from wildtype littermates on two cognitive tests previously shown to be sensitive to galanin manipulation: acquisition of the Morris water maze spatial task, and trace cued and contextual fear conditioning, an emotional learning and memory task. Two independent cohorts of GalR2 null mutant mice demonstrated an anxiogenic-like phenotype in the elevated plus-maze. No genotype differences were detected on several other measures of anxiety-like behavior. The discovery of an anxiogenic phenotype specific to the elevated plus-maze, similar to findings in GalR1 null mutants, highlights the potential therapeutic efficacy of targeting GalR1 and GalR2 receptors in treating anxiety disorders. PMID:17257664

  14. Recoupling of eNOS with Folic Acid Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Angiotensin II-Infused Apolipoprotein E Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Kin Lung; Miao, Xiao Niu; Cai, Hua

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that eNOS uncoupling mediates abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation in hph-1 mice. In the present study we examined whether recoupling of eNOS prevents AAA formation in a well-established model of Angiotensin II-infused apolipoprotein E (apoE) null mice by targeting some common pathologies of AAA. Infusion of Ang II resulted in a 92% incidence rate of AAA in the apoE null animals. In a separate group, animals were treated orally with folic acid (FA), which is known to recouple eNOS through augmentation of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) function. This resulted in a reduction of AAA rate to 19.5%. Imaging with ultrasound showed that FA markedly inhibited expansion of abdominal aorta. FA also abolished elastin breakdown and macrophage infiltration in the AAA animals. The eNOS uncoupling activity, assessed by L-NAME-sensitive superoxide production, was minimal at baseline but greatly exaggerated with Ang II infusion, which was completely attenuated by FA. This was accompanied by markedly improved tetrahydrobiopterin and nitric oxide bioavailability. Furthermore, the expression and activity of DHFR was decreased in Ang II-infused apoE null mice specifically in the endothelial cells, while FA administration resulted in its recovery. Taken together, these data further establish a significant role of uncoupled eNOS in mediating AAA formation, and a universal efficacy of FA in preventing AAA formation via restoration of DHFR to restore eNOS function. PMID:24558445

  15. Nuclear Factor-κB Activation and Postischemic Inflammation Are Suppressed in CD36-Null Mice after Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Alexander; Abe, Takato; Hochrainer, Karin; Shimamura, Munehisa; Anrather, Josef; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Zhou, Ping; Iadecola, Costantino

    2008-01-01

    CD36, a class-B scavenger receptor involved in multiple functions, including inflammatory signaling, may also contribute to ischemic brain injury through yet unidentified mechanisms. We investigated whether CD36 participates in the molecular events underlying the inflammatory reaction that accompanies cerebral ischemia and may contribute to the tissue damage. We found that activation of nuclear factor-κB, a transcription factor that coordinates postischemic gene expression, is attenuated in CD36-null mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. The infiltration of neutrophils and the glial reaction induced by cerebral ischemia were suppressed. Treatment with an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that contributes to the tissue damage, reduced ischemic brain injury in wild-type mice, but not in CD36 nulls. In contrast to cerebral ischemia, the molecular and cellular inflammatory changes induced by intracerebroventricular injection of interleukin-1β were not attenuated in CD36-null mice. The findings unveil a novel role of CD36 in early molecular events leading to nuclear factor-κB activation and postischemic inflammation. Inhibition of CD36 signaling may be a valuable therapeutic approach to counteract the deleterious effects of postischemic inflammation. PMID:18272685

  16. Molecular profiles of Quadriceps muscle in myostatin-null mice reveal PI3K and apoptotic pathways as myostatin targets

    PubMed Central

    Chelh, Ilham; Meunier, Bruno; Picard, Brigitte; Reecy, Mark James; Chevalier, Catherine; Hocquette, Jean-François; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the TGF-β superfamily, has been identified as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Inactivating mutations in the MSTN gene are responsible for the development of a hypermuscular phenotype. In this study, we performed transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to detect altered expression/abundance of genes and proteins. These differentially expressed genes and proteins may represent new molecular targets of MSTN and could be involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. Results Transcriptomic analysis of the Quadriceps muscles of 5-week-old MSTN-null mice (n = 4) and their controls (n = 4) was carried out using microarray (human and murine oligonucleotide sequences) of 6,473 genes expressed in muscle. Proteomic profiles were analysed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. Comparison of the transcriptomic profiles revealed 192 up- and 245 down- regulated genes. Genes involved in the PI3K pathway, insulin/IGF pathway, carbohydrate metabolism and apoptosis regulation were up-regulated. Genes belonging to canonical Wnt, calcium signalling pathways and cytokine-receptor cytokine interaction were down-regulated. Comparison of the protein profiles revealed 20 up- and 18 down-regulated proteins spots. Knockout of the MSTN gene was associated with up-regulation of proteins involved in glycolytic shift of the muscles and down-regulation of proteins involved in oxidative energy metabolism. In addition, an increased abundance of survival/anti-apoptotic factors were observed. Conclusion All together, these results showed a differential expression of genes and proteins related to the muscle energy metabolism and cell survival/anti-apoptotic pathway (e.g. DJ-1, PINK1, 14-3-3ε protein, TCTP/GSK-3β). They revealed the PI3K and apoptotic pathways as MSTN targets and are in favour of a role of MSTN as a modulator of cell survival in vivo. PMID:19397818

  17. ACE2 overexpression inhibits acquired platinum resistance-induced tumor angiogenesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Ling; Zhou, Jianping; Wan, Huanying; Li, Qingyun; Feng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a multifunctional bioactive peptide in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a newly identified component of RAS. We previously reported that ACE2 overexpression may inhibit cell growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ACE2 on tumor-associated angiogen-esis after the development of acquired platinum resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Four NSCLC cell lines, A549, LLC, A549-DDP and LLC-DDP, were used in vitro, while A549 and A549-DDP cells were used in vivo. A549-DDP and LLC-DDP cells were newly established at our institution as acquired platinum-resistant sublines by culturing the former parent cells in cisplatin (CDDP)-containing conditioned medium for 6 months. These platinum-resistant cells showed significantly higher angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), ACE and VEGF production and lower ACE2 expression than their corresponding parent cells. We showed that ACE2 overexpression inhibited the production of VEGF in vitro and in vivo compared to their corresponding parent cells. We also found that ACE2 overexpression reduced the expression of AT1R and ACE. Additionally, we confirmed that ACE2 overexpres-sion inhibited cell growth and VEGF production while simultaneously suppressing ACE and AT1R expression in human lung cancer xenografts. Our findings indicate that ACE2 overexpression may potentially suppress angiogenesis in NSCLC after the development of acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27460845

  18. Long-term improvements in sensory inhibition with gestational choline supplementation linked to α7 nicotinic receptors through studies in Chrna7 null mutation mice.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Karen E; Choo, Kevin S; Stitzel, Jerry A; Marks, Michael J; Adams, Catherine E

    2014-03-13

    Perinatal choline supplementation has produced several benefits in rodent models, from improved learning and memory to protection from the behavioral effects of fetal alcohol exposure. We have shown that supplemented choline through gestation and lactation produces long-term improvement in deficient sensory inhibition in DBA/2 mice which models a similar deficit in schizophrenia patients. The present study extends that research by feeding normal or supplemented choline diets to DBA/2 mice carrying the null mutation for the α7 nicotinic receptor gene (Chrna7). DBA/2 mice heterozygotic for Chrna7 were bred together. Dams were placed on supplemented (5 gm/kg diet) or normal (1.1 gm/kg diet) choline at mating and remained on the specific diet until offspring weaning. Thereafter, offspring were fed standard rodent chow. Adult offspring were assessed for sensory inhibition. Brains were obtained to ascertain hippocampal α7 nicotinic receptor levels. Choline-supplemented mice heterozygotic or null-mutant for Chrna7 failed to show improvement in sensory inhibition. Only wildtype choline-supplemented mice showed improvement with the effect solely through a decrease in test amplitude. This supports the hypothesis that gestational-choline supplementation is acting through the α7 nicotinic receptor to improve sensory inhibition. Although there was a significant gene-dose-related change in hippocampal α7 receptor numbers, binding studies did not reveal any choline-dose-related change in binding in any hippocampal region, the interaction being driven by a significant genotype main effect (wildtype>heterozygote>null mutant). These data parallel a human study wherein the offspring of pregnant women receiving choline supplementation during gestation, showed better sensory inhibition than offspring of women on placebo. PMID:24462939

  19. FosB null mutant mice show enhanced methamphetamine neurotoxicity: potential involvement of FosB in intracellular feedback signaling and astroglial function.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kumi O; Ornthanalai, Veravej G; Kato, Tadafumi; Murphy, Niall P

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies show that (1) two members of fos family transcription factors, c-Fos and FosB, are induced in frontal brain regions by methamphetamine; (2) null mutation of c-Fos exacerbates methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity; and (3) null mutation of FosB enhances behavioral responses to cocaine. Here we sought a role of FosB in responses to methamphetamine by studying FosB null mutant (-/-) mice. After a 10 mg/kg methamphetamine injection, FosB(-/-) mice were more prone to self-injury. Concomitantly, the intracellular feedback regulators of Sprouty and Rad-Gem-Kir (RGK) family transcripts had lower expression profiles in the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of the FosB(-/-) mice. Three days after administration of four 10 mg/kg methamphetamine injections, the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of FosB(-/-) mice contained more degenerated neurons as determined by Fluoro-Jade B staining. The abundance of the small neutral amino acids, serine, alanine, and glycine, was lower and/or was poorly induced after methamphetamine administration in the frontoparietal cortex and striatum of FosB(-/-) mice. In addition, methamphetamine-treated FosB(-/-) frontoparietal and piriform cortices showed more extravasation of immunoglobulin, which is indicative of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia, brain dopamine content, and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum, however, were not different between genotypes. These data indicate that FosB is involved in thermoregulation-independent protective functions against methamphetamine neurotoxicity in postsynaptic neurons. Our findings suggest two possible mechanisms of FosB-mediated neuroprotection: one is induction of negative feedback regulation within postsynaptic neurons through Sprouty and RGK. Another is supporting astroglial function such as maintenance of the blood-brain barrier, and metabolism of serine and glycine, which are important glial modulators of nerve cells

  20. Leptin receptor null mice with reexpression of LepR in GnRHR expressing cells display elevated FSH levels but remain in a prepubertal state.

    PubMed

    Allen, Susan J; Garcia-Galiano, David; Borges, Beatriz C; Burger, Laura L; Boehm, Ulrich; Elias, Carol F

    2016-06-01

    Leptin signals energy sufficiency to the reproductive hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Studies using genetic models have demonstrated that hypothalamic neurons are major players mediating these effects. Leptin receptor (LepR) is also expressed in the pituitary gland and in the gonads, but the physiological effects of leptin in these sites are still unclear. Female mice with selective deletion of LepR in a subset of gonadotropes show normal pubertal development but impaired fertility. Conditional deletion approaches, however, often result in redundancy or developmental adaptations, which may compromise the assessment of leptin's action in gonadotropes for pubertal maturation. To circumvent these issues, we adopted a complementary genetic approach and assessed if selective reexpression of LepR only in gonadotropes is sufficient to enable puberty and improve fertility of LepR null female mice. We initially assessed the colocalization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) and LepR in the HPG axis using GnRHR-IRES-Cre (GRIC) and LepR-Cre reporter (tdTomato or enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice. We found that GRIC and leptin-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 are expressed in distinct hypothalamic neurons. Whereas LepR-Cre was observed in theca cells, GRIC expression was rarely found in the ovarian parenchyma. In contrast, a subpopulation of gonadotropes expressed the LepR-Cre reporter gene (tdTomato). We then crossed the GRIC mice with the LepR null reactivable (LepR(loxTB)) mice. These mice showed an increase in FSH levels, but they remained in a prepubertal state. Together with previous findings, our data indicate that leptin-selective action in gonadotropes serves a role in adult reproductive physiology but is not sufficient to allow pubertal maturation in mice.

  1. Fut2-null mice display an altered glycosylation profile and impaired BabA-mediated Helicobacter pylori adhesion to gastric mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana; Gomes, Joana; Ismail, Mohd Nazri; Haslam, Stuart M; Mendes, Nuno; Osório, Hugo; David, Leonor; Le Pendu, Jacques; Haas, Rainer; Dell, Anne; Borén, Thomas; Reis, Celso A

    2009-01-01

    Glycoconjugates expressed on gastric mucosa play a crucial role in host–pathogen interactions. The FUT2 enzyme catalyzes the addition of terminal α(1,2)fucose residues, producing the H type 1 structure expressed on the surface of epithelial cells and in mucosal secretions of secretor individuals. Inactivating mutations in the human FUT2 gene are associated with reduced susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection. H. pylori infects over half the world's population and causes diverse gastric lesions, from gastritis to gastric cancer. H. pylori adhesion constitutes a crucial step in the establishment of a successful infection. The BabA adhesin binds the Leb and H type 1 structures expressed on gastric mucins, while SabA binds to sialylated carbohydrates mediating the adherence to inflamed gastric mucosa. In this study, we have used an animal model of nonsecretors, Fut2-null mice, to characterize the glycosylation profile and evaluate the effect of the observed glycan expression modifications in the process of H. pylori adhesion. We have demonstrated expression of terminal difucosylated glycan structures in C57Bl/6 mice gastric mucosa and that Fut2-null mice showed marked alteration in gastric mucosa glycosylation, characterized by diminished expression of α(1,2)fucosylated structures as indicated by lectin and antibody staining and further confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis. This altered glycosylation profile was further confirmed by the absence of Fucα(1,2)-dependent binding of calicivirus virus-like particles. Finally, using a panel of H. pylori strains, with different adhesin expression profiles, we have demonstated an impairment of BabA-dependent adhesion of H. pylori to Fut2-null mice gastric mucosa, whereas SabA-mediated binding was not affected. PMID:19706747

  2. Partial rescue of epithelial phenotype in integrin beta4 null mice by a keratin-5 promoter driven human integrin beta4 transgene.

    PubMed

    van der Neut, R; Cachaço, A S; Thorsteinsdóttir, S; Janssen, H; Prins, D; Bulthuis, J; van der Valk, M; Calafat, J; Sonnenberg, A

    1999-11-01

    Integrin beta4 null mice exhibit extensive epidermal detachment, reminiscent of the human skin blistering disease junctional epidermolysis bullosa associated with pyloric atresia. Hemidesmosomes, the stable adhesion structures of squamous epithelia, are not formed in the absence of alpha6beta4. Null mutant mice die shortly after birth, but apart from their striking epithelial phenotype, no obvious developmental defects have been observed. To elucidate the cause of death in these mice, we generated transgenic mice with a heterologous construct consisting of the squamous epithelial-specific keratin-5 promoter and a human integrin beta4 subunit cDNA. The transgene was not expressed in the presence of endogenous beta4, probably as a result of competition for a limited pool of alpha6 subunits. In a beta4 null background, however, the transgene was expressed, and its expression pattern followed that of squamous epithelial-specific keratins. These rescued pups appeared healthy and ultrastructural analysis revealed that the interspecies heterodimer alpha6(mouse)/beta4(human) was sufficient to trigger the assembly of hemidesmosomes. After a variable period of up to 48 hours after birth these animals began to exhibit haemorrhages at the plantar and palmar areas. We observed the formation of small blisters and found that the transgene was not detectably expressed in this region, which is devoid of hair follicles. The rescued neonates became increasingly cyanotic and died soon after the onset of this phenomenon. We performed a developmental study of the expression of beta4 in the complete respiratory tract, but we found no correlation between the spatiotemporal distribution of beta4 and the onset of the respiratory insufficiency. It became clear, however, that there was a gradual detachment of squamous epithelia in the oral and nasal cavities which led to obstruction of the respiratory tract, suggesting that in beta4 null and rescued mice, neonatal death was a direct

  3. Cilostazol reduces atherosclerosis by inhibition of superoxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha formation in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice fed high cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Oh, Goo Taeg; Park, So Youn; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Gil; Kim, Chi Dae; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Shin, Yung Woo; Hong, Ki Whan

    2005-05-01

    This study shows that 6-[4-(1-cyclohexyl-1H-tetrazol-5-yl) butoxy]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone (cilostazol) suppresses the atherosclerotic lesion formation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr)-null mice. Ldlr-null mice fed a high cholesterol diet showed multiple plaque lesions in the proximal ascending aorta including aortic sinus, accompanied by increased macrophage accumulation with increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Supplementation of cilostazol (0.2% w/w) in diet significantly decreased the plaque lesions with reduced macrophage accumulation and suppression of VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in situ. Increased superoxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production were significantly lowered by cilostazol in situ as well as in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). TNF-alpha-induced increased inhibitory kappaBalpha degradation in the cytoplasm and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) p65 activation in the nuclei of HUVECs were reversed by cilostazol (1 approximately 100 microM) as well as by (E)-3[(4-t-butylphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile (BAY 11-7085) (10 microM), suggesting that cilostazol strongly inhibits NF-kappaB activation and p65 translocation into the nuclei. Furthermore, in gel shift and DNA-binding assay, cilostazol inhibited NF-kappaB/DNA complex and nuclear DNA-binding activity of the NF-kappaB in the nuclear extracts of the RAW 264.7 cells. Taken together, it is suggested that the anti-atherogenic effect of cilostazol in cholesterol-fed Ldlr-null mice is ascribed to its property to suppress superoxide and TNF-alpha formation, and thereby reducing NF-kappaB activation/transcription, VCAM-1/MCP-1 expressions, and monocyte recruitments.

  4. Retina restored and brain abnormalities ameliorated by single-copy knock-in of human NR2E1 in null mice.

    PubMed

    Schmouth, J-F; Banks, K G; Mathelier, A; Gregory-Evans, C Y; Castellarin, M; Holt, R A; Gregory-Evans, K; Wasserman, W W; Simpson, E M

    2012-04-01

    Nr2e1 encodes a stem cell fate determinant of the mouse forebrain and retina. Abnormal regulation of this gene results in retinal, brain, and behavioral abnormalities in mice. However, little is known about the functionality of human NR2E1. We investigated this functionality using a novel knock-in humanized-mouse strain carrying a single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). We also documented, for the first time, the expression pattern of the human BAC, using an NR2E1-lacZ reporter strain. Unexpectedly, cerebrum and olfactory bulb hypoplasia, hallmarks of the Nr2e1-null phenotype, were not fully corrected in animals harboring one functional copy of human NR2E1. These results correlated with an absence of NR2E1-lacZ reporter expression in the dorsal pallium of embryos and proliferative cells of adult brains. Surprisingly, retinal histology and electroretinograms demonstrated complete correction of the retina-null phenotype. These results correlated with appropriate expression of the NR2E1-lacZ reporter in developing and adult retina. We conclude that the human BAC contained all the elements allowing correction of the mouse-null phenotype in the retina, while missing key regulatory regions important for proper spatiotemporal brain expression. This is the first time a separation of regulatory mechanisms governing NR2E1 has been demonstrated. Furthermore, candidate genomic regions controlling expression in proliferating cells during neurogenesis were identified.

  5. Role of Serratia marcescens ACE2 on diesel degradation and its influence on corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Babu, Thambidurai Ganesh; Pandian, Shunmugiah Thevar Karutha; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Palaniswamy, Narayanan; Rajendran, Annamalai

    2007-09-01

    A facultative anaerobic species Serratia marcescens ACE2 isolated from the corrosion products of diesel transporting pipeline in North West, India was identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The role of Serratia marcesens ACE2 on biodegradation of diesel and its influence on the corrosion of API 5LX steel has been elucidated. The degrading strain ACE2 is involved in the process of corrosion of steel API 5LX and also utilizes the diesel as an organic source. The quantitative biodegradation efficiency (BE) of diesel was 58%, calculated by gas-chromatography-mass spectrum analysis. On the basis of gas-chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), the involvement of Serratia marcescens on degradation and corrosion has been investigated. This basic study will be useful for the development of new approaches for detection, monitoring and control of microbial corrosion.

  6. Pathological Type-2 Immune Response, Enhanced Tumor Growth, and Glucose Intolerance in Retnlβ (RELMβ) Null Mice: A Model of Intestinal Immune System Dysfunction in Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Kim-Muller, Ja Young; Rutkowski, Joseph M; Crewe, Clair; Tao, Caroline; Scherer, Philipp E

    2016-09-01

    Resistin, and its closely related homologs, the resistin-like molecules (RELMs) have been implicated in metabolic dysregulation, inflammation, and cancer. Specifically, RELMβ, expressed predominantly in the goblet cells in the colon, is released both apically and basolaterally, and is hence found in both the intestinal lumen in the mucosal layer as well as in the circulation. RELMβ has been linked to both the pathogenesis of colon cancer and type 2 diabetes. RELMβ plays a complex role in immune system regulation, and the impact of loss of function of RELMβ on colon cancer and metabolic regulation has not been fully elucidated. We therefore tested whether Retnlβ (mouse ortholog of human RETNLβ) null mice have an enhanced or reduced susceptibility for colon cancer as well as metabolic dysfunction. We found that the lack of RELMβ leads to increased colonic expression of T helper cell type-2 cytokines and IL-17, associated with a reduced ability to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This defect leads to an enhanced susceptibility to the development of inflammation, colorectal cancer, and glucose intolerance. In conclusion, the phenotype of the Retnlβ null mice unravels new aspects of inflammation-mediated diseases and strengthens the notion that a proper intestinal barrier function is essential to sustain a healthy phenotype. PMID:27397737

  7. Dissecting the role of sodium currents in visceral sensory neurons in a model of chronic hyperexcitability using Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 null mice.

    PubMed

    Hillsley, Kirk; Lin, Jia-Hui; Stanisz, Andre; Grundy, David; Aerssens, Jeroen; Peeters, Pieter J; Moechars, Diederik; Coulie, Bernard; Stead, Ronald H

    2006-10-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents have been proposed to underlie sensory neuronal hyperexcitability in acute inflammatory models, but their role in chronic models is unknown. Since no pharmacological tools to separate TTX-R currents are available, this study employs Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 null mice to evaluate these currents roles in a chronic hyperexcitability model after the resolution of an inflammatory insult. Transient jejunitis was induced by infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) in Na(v)1.9 and Na(v)1.8 null, wild-type and naïve mice. Retrogradely labelled dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were harvested on day 20-24 post-infection for patch clamp recording. Rheobase and action potential (AP) parameters were recorded as measures of excitability, and Na(v)1.9 and Na(v)1.8 currents were recorded. DRG neuronal excitability was significantly increased in post-infected mice compared to sham animals, despite the absence of ongoing inflammation (sham = 1.9 +/- 0.3, infected = 3.6 +/- 0.7 APs at 2x rheobase, P = 0.02). Hyperexcitability was associated with a significantly increased amplitude of TTX-R currents. Hyperexcitability was maintained in Na(v)1.9(-/-) mice, but hyperexcitability was absent and APs were blunted in Na(v)1.8(-/-) mice. This study identifies a critical role for Na(v)1.8 in chronic post-infectious visceral hyperexcitability, with no contribution from Na(v)1.9. Nb infection-induced hyperexcitability is not observed in Na(v)1.8(-/-) mice, but is still present in Na(v)1.9(-/-) mice. It is not clear whether hyperexcitability is due to a change in the function of Na(v)1.8 channels or a change in the number of Na(v)1.8 channels. PMID:16857712

  8. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein–binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jaehong; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Wang, Lirong; Hafeez, Imran; Herz, Joachim; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Guénette, Suzanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    FE65 and FE65L1 are cytoplasmic adaptor proteins that bind a variety of proteins, including the amyloid precursor protein, and that mediate the assembly of multimolecular complexes. We previously reported that FE65/FE65L1 double knockout (DKO) mice display disorganized laminin in meningeal fibroblasts and a cobblestone lissencephaly-like phenotype in the developing cortex. Here, we examined whether loss of FE65 and FE65L1 causes ocular and muscular deficits, 2 phenotypes that frequently accompany cobblestone lissencephaly. Eyes of FE65/FE65L1 DKO mice develop normally, but lens degeneration becomes apparent in young adult mice. Abnormal lens epithelial cell migration, widespread small vacuole formation, and increased laminin expression underneath lens capsules suggest impaired interaction between epithelial cells and capsular extracellular matrix in DKO lenses. Cortical cataracts develop in FE65L1 knockout (KO) mice aged 16 months or more but are absent in wild-type or FE65 KO mice. FE65 family KO mice show attenuated grip strength, and the nuclei of DKO muscle cells frequently locate in the middle of muscle fibers. These findings reveal that FE65 and FE65L1 are essential for the maintenance of lens transparency, and their loss produce phenotypes in brain, eye, and muscle that are comparable to the clinical features of congenital muscular dystrophies in humans.—Suh, J., Moncaster, J. A., Wang, L., Hafeez, I., Herz, J., Tanzi, R. E., Goldstein, L. E., Guénette, S. Y. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein–binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness. PMID:25757569

  9. Tissue specific up regulation of ACE2 in rabbit model of atherosclerosis by atorvastatin: role of epigenetic histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Patel, Gaurang; Kumar, Sandeep; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Sanghavi, Maitri; Malek, Vajir; Srinivasan, K

    2015-02-01

    Growing body of evidence points out the crucial role of ACE2 in preventing atherosclerosis. However, data on how atherosclerosis affects ACE2 expression in heart and kidney remains unknown. Atherosclerosis was induced by feeding New Zealand White rabbits with high cholesterol diet (HCD - 2%) for 12 weeks and atorvastatin was administered (5mg/kg/day p.o) in last 3 weeks. ACE2 mRNA and protein expression was assessed by Western blotting and real time PCR. HCD fed rabbits developed atherosclerosis as confirmed by increase in plasma total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides as well as formation atherosclerotic plaques in arch of aorta. The ACE2 protein but not mRNA expression was reduced in heart and kidney of HCD rabbits. Interestingly, atorvastatin increased the ACE2 protein expression in heart and kidney of HCD rabbits. However, atorvastatin increased ACE2 mRNA in heart but not in kidney of HCD rabbits. Atorvastatin increased the occupancy of histone H3 acetylation (H3-Ac) mark on ACE2 promoter region in heart of HCD rabbits indicating direct or indirect epigenetic up-regulation of ACE2 by atorvastatin. Further, atorvastatin suppressed Ang II-induced contractile responses and enhanced AT2 receptor mediated relaxant responses in atherosclerotic aorta. We propose that atherosclerosis is associated with reduced ACE2 expression in heart and kidney. We also show an unexplored potential of atorvastatin to up-regulate ACE2 via epigenetic histone modifications. Our data suggest a novel way of replenishing ACE2 expression for preventing not only atherosclerosis but also other cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25482567

  10. Recovery of emotional behaviour in neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) null mutant mice through transgenic expression of NCAM180.

    PubMed

    Stork, O; Welzl, H; Wolfer, D; Schuster, T; Mantei, N; Stork, S; Hoyer, D; Lipp, H; Obata, K; Schachner, M

    2000-09-01

    In the present study we further investigate functions of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in the mature central nervous system and its implications for animal behaviour. To this end we generated transgenic mice expressing the major NCAM isoform with the largest cytoplasmic domain, NCAM180, under control of a promoter for the small form neurofilament gene. Transgenic mice were also bred with mice deficient in endogenous NCAM (Ncam-/- mice) so that effects of NCAM180 could be analysed in the presence and absence of endogenous NCAM. While overexpression of transgenic NCAM180 was without apparent behavioural or morphological effect, its expression in Ncam-/- mice counteracted NCAM ablation-induced aggressive, anxiety-like and antidepressant-like behaviour. It furthermore prevented a hypersensitivity of Ncam-/- mice to the anxiolytic serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist buspirone. Such recovery of emotional behaviour and behavioural 5-HT1A response occurred in spite of misdevelopment of the olfactory bulb and hippocampus that is characteristic of Ncam-/- mice, and without an apparent change in the expression of 5-HT1A binding sites in the brain. Hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent learning, though disturbed in Ncam-/- mice, remained unaffected by the transgenic NCAM180. We suggest an involvement of NCAM180-mediated cell recognition processes in the serotonergic modulation of emotional behaviour in adult mice.

  11. Impairment of SLC17A8 Encoding Vesicular Glutamate Transporter-3, VGLUT3, Underlies Nonsyndromic Deafness DFNA25 and Inner Hair Cell Dysfunction in Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Jérôme; Emery, Sarah; Nouvian, Régis; Bersot, Tiphaine; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Van Rybroek, Jana M.; Rebillard, Guy; Lenoir, Marc; Eybalin, Michel; Delprat, Benjamin; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Giros, Bruno; El Mestikawy, Salah; Moser, Tobias; Smith, Richard J.H.; Lesperance, Marci M.; Puel, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant sensorineural hearing loss is genetically heterogeneous, with a phenotype closely resembling presbycusis, the most common sensory defect associated with aging in humans. We have identified SLC17A8, which encodes the vesicular glutamate transporter-3 (VGLUT3), as the gene responsible for DFNA25, an autosomal-dominant form of progressive, high-frequency nonsyndromic deafness. In two unrelated families, a heterozygous missense mutation, c.632C→T (p.A211V), was found to segregate with DFNA25 deafness and was not present in 267 controls. Linkage-disequilibrium analysis suggested that the families have a distant common ancestor. The A211 residue is conserved in VGLUT3 across species and in all human VGLUT subtypes (VGLUT1-3), suggesting an important functional role. In the cochlea, VGLUT3 accumulates glutamate in the synaptic vesicles of the sensory inner hair cells (IHCs) before releasing it onto receptors of auditory-nerve terminals. Null mice with a targeted deletion of Slc17a8 exon 2 lacked auditory-nerve responses to acoustic stimuli, although auditory brainstem responses could be elicited by electrical stimuli, and robust otoacoustic emissions were recorded. Ca2+-triggered synaptic-vesicle turnover was normal in IHCs of Slc17a8 null mice when probed by membrane capacitance measurements at 2 weeks of age. Later, the number of afferent synapses, spiral ganglion neurons, and lateral efferent endings below sensory IHCs declined. Ribbon synapses remaining by 3 months of age had a normal ultrastructural appearance. We conclude that deafness in Slc17a8-deficient mice is due to a specific defect of vesicular glutamate uptake and release and that VGLUT3 is essential for auditory coding at the IHC synapse. PMID:18674745

  12. ZnT4 (SLC30A4)-null ("lethal milk") mice have defects in mammary gland secretion and hallmarks of precocious involution during lactation.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicholas H; Lee, Sooyeon; Hennigar, Stephen R; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2016-01-01

    During lactation, highly specialized secretory mammary epithelial cells (MECs) produce and secrete huge quantities of nutrients and nonnutritive factors into breast milk. The zinc (Zn) transporter ZnT4 (SLC30A4) transports Zn into the trans-Golgi apparatus for lactose synthesis, and across the apical cell membrane for efflux from MECs into milk. This is consistent with observations in "lethal milk" (lm/lm) mice, which have a truncation mutation in SLC30A4, and present with not only low milk Zn concentration, but also smaller mammary glands, decreased milk volume, and lactation failure by lactation day 2. However, the molecular underpinnings of these defects are not understood. Here, we used lactating C57BL/6J(lm/lm) (ZnT4-null) mice to explore the consequences of a ZnT4-null phenotype on mammary gland function during early lactation. Lactating C57BL/6J(lm/lm) mice had significantly fewer, smaller, and collapsed alveoli comprising swollen, lipid-filled MECs during early lactation. These defects were associated with decreased Akt expression and STAT5 activation, indicative of defects in MEC secretion. In addition, increased expression of ZnT2, TNF-α, and cleaved e-cadherin concomitant with increased activation of STAT3 implicated the loss of ZnT4 in precocious activation of involution. Collectively, our study indicates that the loss of ZnT4 has profound consequences on MEC secretion and may promote tissue remodeling in the mammary gland during early lactation. PMID:26538236

  13. Wild-type and IL10-null mice have differential colonic epithelial gene expression responses to dietary supplementation with synbiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis and inulin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Chan, Wan-Chun; Hu, Zihua

    2014-03-01

    Prebiotic plus probiotic (synbiotic) supplementations promote fermentation and have shown anti-inflammatory activity in colonic epithelium. However, in many instances, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have demonstrated adverse effects after prebiotic supplementation at a dose well tolerated by normal individuals. To test the hypothesis that the host inflammation affects the colonic epithelial response to increased fermentation, the gene expression of colonic epithelium was analyzed. In a 1-way experimental design to test the effect of supplements in wild-type mice using the standard diet formulated by the American Institute of Nutrition (AIN-93G) as the control diet, fermentable fiber inulin (5%) in the absence or presence of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) (10(8) CFU/kg diet) showed limited effects on gene expression as determined by whole-genome microarray. Bb12 supplementation alone was known not to increase fermentation and here instead significantly upregulated genes in nucleic acid metabolic processes. The effects of the synbiotic diet were then determined in mice exposed to LPS-induced inflammation in a 2-way experimental design testing the effect of diet and LPS. The microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses on the wild-type mice revealed that LPS-induced changes in the colonic epithelium were 4- to 10-fold less in the synbiotic diet group compared with the control diet group. Unlike the wild-type mice, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL10)-null mice (susceptible to IBD) given the synbiotic diet, compared with those given the control diet, had 3- to 40-fold increased expression of inflammation-related genes such as Cxcl1 (chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1) and S100a9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9) in the absence and presence of LPS exposure. These contrasting intestinal epithelial responses to increased fermentation in wild-type and IL10-null mice are similar

  14. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  15. Long-Term Enrichment Enhances the Cognitive Behavior of the Aging Neurogranin Null Mice without Affecting Their Hippocampal LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Freesia L.; Huang, Kuo-Ping; Boucheron, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Neurogranin (Ng), a PKC substrate, is abundantly expressed in brain regions important for cognitive functions. Deletion of Ng caused severe deficits in spatial learning and LTP in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice. These Ng-/- mice also exhibit deficits in the amplification of their hippocampal signaling pathways critical for learning and memory.…

  16. Null mutation of the β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit attenuates nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Stoker, Astrid K; Marks, Michael J; Markou, Athina

    2015-04-15

    The anhedonic signs of nicotine withdrawal are predictive of smoking relapse rates in humans. Identification of the neurobiological substrates that mediate anhedonia will provide insights into the genetic variations that underlie individual responses to smoking cessation and relapse. The present study assessed the role of β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nACh receptor) subunits in nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia using β2 nACh receptor subunit knockout (β2(-/-)) and wildtype (β2(+/+)) mice. Anhedonia was assessed with brain reward thresholds, defined as the current intensity that supports operant behavior in the discrete-trial current-intensity intracranial self-stimulation procedure. Nicotine was delivered chronically through osmotic minipumps for 28 days (40 mg/kg/day, base), and withdrawal was induced by either administering the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (i.e., antagonist-precipitated withdrawal) in mice chronically treated with nicotine or terminating chronic nicotine administration (i.e., spontaneous withdrawal). Mecamylamine (6 mg/kg, salt) significantly elevated brain reward thresholds in nicotine-treated β2(+/+) mice compared with saline-treated β2(+/+) mice and nicotine-treated β2(-/-) mice. Spontaneous nicotine withdrawal similarly resulted in significant elevations in thresholds in nicotine-withdrawing β2(+/+) mice compared with saline-treated β2(+/+) and nicotine-treated β2(-/-) mice, which remained at baseline levels. These results showed that precipitated and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal-induced anhedonia was attenuated in β2(-/-) mice. The reduced expression of anhedonic signs during nicotine withdrawal in β2(-/-) mice may have resulted from the lack of neuroadaptations in β2 nACh receptor subunit expression and function that may have occurred during either nicotine exposure or nicotine withdrawal in wildtype mice. In conclusion, individuals with genetic variations that result in diminished

  17. Trks and p75 genes are differentially expressed in the inner ear of human embryos. What may Trks and p75 null mutant mice suggest on human development?

    PubMed

    Vega, J A; San José, I; Cabo, R; Rodriguez, S; Represa, J

    1999-09-10

    Recent work has shown the expression of Neurotrophins low (p75) and high affinity (Trk's A, B, and C) receptors in the developing inner ear sensory neurons of chick and mouse. Likewise the biological significance of such receptor expression was demonstrated by using both Trks and Neurotrophins null mutant mice. The present study was conducted to determine the expression of Trks and p75 proteins in the human inner ear throughout development. Hence to assess the potential role of Neurotrophins in the development of auditory and vestibular specific innervation in man. In other words, we intend to address the issue whether or not what null mutant mice for Trks and p75 have revealed on inner ear development may be relevant for human embryos. Fifty-two inner ears and their cochleovestibular ganglions (CVG) from human embryos and fetuses, ranging from 5 to 24 weeks of pregnancy were analyzed. Both Western blot and immunocytochemistry on frozen sections were used as complementary procedures. Quantitative Western blot studies revealed that Trk-B and C immunoreactivity (IR) appeared by embryonic week 5 in CVG neurons, increased at high levels between embryonic weeks 7 and 12, and later on, in 15 week-old specimens and older began to decrease to minimal levels. Trk-A IR was detected at just moderate levels during 5 and 7 weeks reflecting the presence of NGF high affinity receptors only at these earlier developmental ages. The p75 IR was detected at high degrees in the early stage of the 5th week and at abundant levels in all studied inner ears from the 7th to the 24th pregnancy week. These Western blot observations were corroborated by immunocytochemistry on frozen sections, which also revealed a major distribution of both p75 and Trks on neuronal bodies while p75 appears localized on supporting cells. Our findings reveal a tight correlation between p75 and Trks expression throughout human development and specific inner ear developmental events, such as target

  18. The impact of agrin on the formation of orthogonal arrays of particles in cultured astrocytes from wild-type and agrin-null mice.

    PubMed

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Sperveslage, Jan; Wolburg, Hartwig; Noell, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet membranes are studded with aquaporin-4 (AQP4) containing orthogonal arrays of particles (OAP) which can be visualized exclusively by the freeze-fracturing method. They are predominantly expressed where the astroglial membrane is in contact with the superficial and perivascular basal lamina. This polarity seems to be essential for the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The basal lamina containing many extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagen, laminin and heparansulfate proteoglycans like agrin is thought to influence this OAP-related polarity of astrocytes. Recently, we have shown that agrin, in particular the neuronal isoform A4B8, is capable of influencing the formation of OAPs in astrocytes when cultured in the presence of agrin-conditioned media. In this paper we wanted to investigate whether coating with exogenous agrin compared to coating with other ECM components would induce OAP formation in astrocytes of the agrin-null mouse. For this purpose, we cultured astrocytes from agrin-null and wild-type mice on agrin- or ECM-coated surfaces. Immunofluorescent cytochemical staining of AQP4 indicated a higher AQP4 expression level in cultures with agrin- or ECM-coated than in cultures with uncoated surfaces, whereas western blot analyses and PCR showed no differences. α-Dystroglycan is thought to be a potential receptor of agrin and was immunostained in wild-type as well as in agrin-null astrocytes. In freeze-fracture replicas, we observed an increase in OAP density in astrocytes when growing on agrin- and ECM-coatings. These results concurred with other experiments in which changes in volume were measured following hypotonic stress, which supported the positive influence of exogenous agrin on AQP4 insertion into the membrane, on OAP formation and on water transport. PMID:20920487

  19. Maintenance of muscle mass and load-induced growth in Muscle RING Finger 1 null mice with age.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Baehr, Leslie M; Philp, Andrew; Baar, Keith; Bodine, Sue C

    2014-02-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass occurs to varying degrees in all individuals and has a detrimental effect on morbidity and mortality. Muscle RING Finger 1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase, is believed to mediate muscle atrophy through the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Deletion of MuRF1 (KO) in mice attenuates the loss of muscle mass following denervation, disuse, and glucocorticoid treatment; however, its role in age-related muscle loss is unknown. In this study, skeletal muscle from male wild-type (WT) and MuRF1 KO mice was studied up to the age of 24 months. Muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area decreased significantly with age in WT, but not in KO mice. In aged WT muscle, significant decreases in proteasome activities, especially 20S and 26S β5 (20-40% decrease), were measured and were associated with significant increases in the maladaptive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress marker, CHOP. Conversely, in aged MuRF1 KO mice, 20S or 26S β5 proteasome activity was maintained or decreased to a lesser extent than in WT mice, and no increase in CHOP expression was measured. Examination of the growth response of older (18 months) mice to functional overload revealed that old WT mice had significantly less growth relative to young mice (1.37- vs. 1.83-fold), whereas old MuRF1 KO mice had a normal growth response (1.74- vs. 1.90-fold). These data collectively suggest that with age, MuRF1 plays an important role in the control of skeletal muscle mass and growth capacity through the regulation of cellular stress.

  20. Role of the ACE2/Angiotensin 1-7 Axis of the Renin-Angiotensin System in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Zhong, Jiu-Chang; Grant, Maria B; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-04-15

    Heart failure (HF) remains the most common cause of death and disability, and a major economic burden, in industrialized nations. Physiological, pharmacological, and clinical studies have demonstrated that activation of the renin-angiotensin system is a key mediator of HF progression. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homolog of ACE, is a monocarboxypeptidase that converts angiotensin II into angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) which, by virtue of its actions on the Mas receptor, opposes the molecular and cellular effects of angiotensin II. ACE2 is widely expressed in cardiomyocytes, cardiofibroblasts, and coronary endothelial cells. Recent preclinical translational studies confirmed a critical counter-regulatory role of ACE2/Ang 1-7 axis on the activated renin-angiotensin system that results in HF with preserved ejection fraction. Although loss of ACE2 enhances susceptibility to HF, increasing ACE2 level prevents and reverses the HF phenotype. ACE2 and Ang 1-7 have emerged as a key protective pathway against HF with reduced and preserved ejection fraction. Recombinant human ACE2 has been tested in phase I and II clinical trials without adverse effects while lowering and increasing plasma angiotensin II and Ang 1-7 levels, respectively. This review discusses the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of ACE2 and the role of the ACE2/Ang 1-7 axis in cardiac physiology and in the pathophysiology of HF. The pharmacological and therapeutic potential of enhancing ACE2/Ang 1-7 action as a novel therapy for HF is highlighted.

  1. Trypanosoma brucei (UMP synthase null mutants) are avirulent in mice, but recover virulence upon prolonged culture in vitro while retaining pyrimidine auxotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Han B; Sienkiewicz, Natasha; Wyllie, Susan; Patterson, Stephen; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2013-01-01

    African trypanosomes are capable of both de novo synthesis and salvage of pyrimidines. The last two steps in de novo synthesis are catalysed by UMP synthase (UMPS) – a bifunctional enzyme comprising orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) and orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC). To investigate the essentiality of pyrimidine biosynthesis in Trypanosoma brucei, we generated a umps double knockout (DKO) line by gene replacement. The DKO was unable to grow in pyrimidine-depleted medium in vitro, unless supplemented with uracil, uridine, deoxyuridine or UMP. DKO parasites were completely resistant to 5-fluoroorotate and hypersensitive to 5-fluorouracil, consistent with loss of UMPS, but remained sensitive to pyrazofurin indicating that, unlike mammalian cells, the primary target of pyrazofurin is not OMPDC. The null mutant was unable to infect mice indicating that salvage of host pyrimidines is insufficient to support growth. However, following prolonged culture in vitro, parasites regained virulence in mice despite retaining pyrimidine auxotrophy. Unlike the wild-type, both pyrimidine auxotrophs secreted substantial quantities of orotate, significantly higher in the virulent DKO line. We propose that this may be responsible for the recovery of virulence in mice, due to host metabolism converting orotate to uridine, thereby bypassing the loss of UMPS in the parasite. PMID:23980694

  2. Ketogenic diet exposure during the juvenile period increases social behaviors and forebrain neural activation in adult Engrailed 2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Verpeut, Jessica L; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-07-01

    Prolonged consumption of ketogenic diets (KD) has reported neuroprotective benefits. Several studies suggest KD interventions could be useful in the management of neurological and developmental disorders. Alterations in the Engrailed (En) genes, specifically Engrailed 2 (En2), have neurodevelopmental consequences and produce autism-related behaviors. The following studies used En2 knockout (KO; En2(-/-)), and wild-type (WT; En2(+/+)), male mice fed either KD (80% fat, 0.1% carbohydrates) or control diet (CD; 10% fat, 70% carbohydrates). The objective was to determine whether a KD fed from weaning at postnatal day (PND) 21 to adulthood (PND 60) would alter brain monoamines concentrations, previously found dysregulated, and improve social outcomes. In WT animals, there was an increase in hypothalamic norepinephrine content in the KD-fed group. However, regional monoamines were not altered in KO mice in KD-fed compared with CD-fed group. In order to determine the effects of juvenile exposure to KD in mice with normal blood ketone levels, separate experiments were conducted in mice removed from the KD or CD and fed standard chow for 2days (PND 62). In a three-chamber social test with a novel mouse, KO mice previously exposed to the KD displayed similar social and self-grooming behaviors compared with the WT group. Groups previously exposed to a KD, regardless of genotype, had more c-Fos-positive cells in the cingulate cortex, lateral septal nuclei, and anterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. In the novel object condition, KO mice previously exposed to KD had similar behavioral responses and pattern of c-Fos immunoreactivity compared with the WT group. Thus, juvenile exposure to KD resulted in short-term consequences of improving social interactions and appropriate exploratory behaviors in a mouse model that displays autism-related behaviors. Such findings further our understanding of metabolic-based therapies for neurological and developmental disorders. PMID

  3. Axonopathy in the Central Nervous System Is the Hallmark of Mice with a Novel Intragenic Null Mutation of Dystonin.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Frauke; Kiel, Kirsten; Jottini, Stefano; Wohlsein, Peter; Habierski, Andre; Seibel, Katharina; Vogel, Tanja; Urlaub, Henning; Kollmar, Martin; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Teichmann, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Dystonia musculorum is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the dystonin gene. It has been described in mice and humans where it is called hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy. Mutated mice show severe movement disorders and die at the age of 3-4 weeks. This study describes the discovery and molecular, clinical, as well as pathological characterization of a new spontaneously occurring mutation in the dystonin gene in C57BL/6N mice. The mutation represents a 40-kb intragenic deletion allele of the dystonin gene on chromosome 1 with exactly defined deletion borders. It was demonstrated by Western blot, mass spectrometry, and immunohistology that mice with a homozygous mutation were entirely devoid of the dystonin protein. Pathomorphological lesions were restricted to the brain stem and spinal cord and consisted of swollen, argyrophilic axons and dilated myelin sheaths in the white matter and, less frequently, total chromatolysis of neurons in the gray matter. Axonal damage was detected by amyloid precursor protein and nonphosphorylated neurofilament immunohistology. Axonopathy in the central nervous system (CNS) represents the hallmark of this disease. Mice with the dystonin mutation also showed suppurative inflammation in the respiratory tract, presumably due to brain stem lesion-associated food aspiration, whereas skeletal muscles showed no pathomorphological changes. This study describes a novel mutation in the dystonin gene in mice leading to axonopathy in the CNS. In further studies, this model may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and may elucidate the complex interactions of dystonin with various other cellular proteins especially in the CNS. PMID:27401753

  4. Regulation of alveolar epithelial cell survival by the ACE-2/angiotensin 1–7/Mas axis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Xue, Anita; Gao, Xu; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2011-01-01

    Earlier work from this laboratory demonstrated that apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires autocrine generation of angiotensin (ANG) II. More recent studies showed that angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), which degrades ANGII to form ANG1–7, is protective but severely downregulated in human and experimental lung fibrosis. Here it was theorized that ACE-2 and its product ANG1–7 might therefore regulate AEC apoptosis. To evaluate this hypothesis, the AEC cell line MLE-12 and primary cultures of rat AECs were exposed to the profibrotic apoptosis inducers ANGII or bleomycin (Bleo). Markers of apoptosis (caspase-9 or -3 activation and nuclear fragmentation), steady-state ANGII and ANG1–7, and JNK phosphorylation were measured thereafter. In the absence of Bleo, inhibition of ACE-2 by small interfering RNA or by a competitive inhibitor (DX600 peptide) caused a reciprocal increase in autocrine ANGII and corresponding decrease in ANG1–7 in cell culture media (both P < 0.05) and, moreover, induced AEC apoptosis. At baseline (without inhibitor), ANG1–7 in culture media was 10-fold higher than ANGII (P < 0.01). Addition of purified ANGII or bleomycin-induced caspase activation, nuclear fragmentation, and JNK phosphorylation in cultured AECs. However, preincubation with ANG1–7 (0.1 μM) prevented JNK phosphorylation and apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment with A779, a specific blocker of the ANG1–7 receptor mas, prevented ANG1–7 blockade of JNK phosphorylation, caspase activation, and nuclear fragmentation. These data demonstrate that ACE-2 regulates AEC survival by balancing the proapoptotic ANGII and its antiapoptotic degradation product ANG1–7. They also suggest that ANG1–7 inhibits AEC apoptosis through the ANG1–7 receptor mas. PMID:21665960

  5. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative Forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting, future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites, as illustrated in Figure 1. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux chances, or radiative forcing, from the satellite-measured radiances or 'etrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key Initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle and high latitudes.

  6. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate In potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols, Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects, TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent, ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle latitudes.

  7. Humanizing NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice using busulfan and retro-orbital injection of umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Kyung; Ko, Yunmi; Choi, Aery; Choi, Hyeong Jwa; Seo, Jin-Hee; Lee, Minyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Humanized mouse models are still under development, and various protocols exist to improve human cell engraftment and function. Methods Fourteen NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice (4‒5 wk old) were conditioned with busulfan and injected with human umbilical cord blood (hUCB)-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) via retro-orbital sinuses. The bone marrow (BM), spleen, and peripheral blood (PB) were analyzed 8 and 12 weeks after HSC transplantation. Results Most of the NSG mice tolerated the regimen well. The percentage of hCD45+ and CD19+ cells rose significantly in a time-dependent manner. The median percentage of hCD45+cells in the BM was 55.5% at week 8, and 67.2% at week 12. The median percentage of hCD45+ cells in the spleen at weeks 8 and 12 was 42% and 51%, respectively. The median percentage of hCD19+ cells in BM at weeks 8 and 12 was 21.5% and 39%, respectively (P=0.04). Similarly, the median percentage of hCD19+ cells in the spleen at weeks 8 and 12 was 10% and 24%, respectively (P=0.04). The percentage of hCD19+ B cells in PB was 23% at week 12. At week 8, hCD3+ T cells were barely detectable, while hCD7+ was detected in the BM and spleen. The percentage of hCD3+ T cells was 2‒3% at week 12 in the BM, spleen, and PB of humanized NSG mice. Conclusion We adopted a simplified protocol for establishing humanized NSG mice. We observed a higher engraftment rate of human CD45+ cells than earlier studies without any significant toxicity. And human CD45+ cell engraftment at week 8 was comparable to that of week 12. PMID:27104189

  8. A mouse model for ulcerative colitis based on NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from affected individuals.

    PubMed

    Palamides, Pia; Jodeleit, Henrika; Föhlinger, Michael; Beigel, Florian; Herbach, Nadja; Mueller, Thomas; Wolf, Eckhard; Siebeck, Matthias; Gropp, Roswitha

    2016-09-01

    Animal models reflective of ulcerative colitis (UC) remain a major challenge, and yet are crucial to understand mechanisms underlying the onset of disease and inflammatory characteristics of relapses and remission. Mouse models in which colitis-like symptoms are induced through challenge with toxins such as oxazolone, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) have been instrumental in understanding the inflammatory processes of UC. However, these neither reflect the heterogeneous symptoms observed in the UC-affected population nor can they be used to test the efficacy of inhibitors developed against human targets where high sequence and structural similarity of the respective ligands is lacking. In an attempt to overcome these problems, we have developed a mouse model that relies on NOD-scid IL2R γ(null) mice reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from UC-affected individuals. Upon challenge with ethanol, mice developed colitis-like symptoms and changes in the colon architecture, characterized by influx of inflammatory cells, edema, crypt loss, crypt abscesses and epithelial hyperplasia, as previously observed in immune-competent mice. TARC, TGFβ1 and HGF expression increased in distal parts of the colon. Analysis of human leucocytes isolated from mouse spleen revealed an increase in frequencies of CD1a+, CD64+, CD163+ and TSLPR+ CD14+ monocytes, and antigen-experienced CD44+ CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in response to ethanol. Analysis of human leucocytes from the colon of challenged mice identified CD14+ monocytes and CD11b+ monocytes as the predominant populations. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis from distal parts of the colon indicated that IFNγ might be one of the cytokines driving inflammation. Treatment with infliximab ameliorated symptoms and pathological manifestations, whereas pitrakinra had no therapeutic benefit. Thus, this model is partially reflective of the human disease and might help

  9. A mouse model for ulcerative colitis based on NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from affected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Palamides, Pia; Jodeleit, Henrika; Föhlinger, Michael; Beigel, Florian; Herbach, Nadja; Mueller, Thomas; Wolf, Eckhard; Siebeck, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal models reflective of ulcerative colitis (UC) remain a major challenge, and yet are crucial to understand mechanisms underlying the onset of disease and inflammatory characteristics of relapses and remission. Mouse models in which colitis-like symptoms are induced through challenge with toxins such as oxazolone, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) have been instrumental in understanding the inflammatory processes of UC. However, these neither reflect the heterogeneous symptoms observed in the UC-affected population nor can they be used to test the efficacy of inhibitors developed against human targets where high sequence and structural similarity of the respective ligands is lacking. In an attempt to overcome these problems, we have developed a mouse model that relies on NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice reconstituted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from UC-affected individuals. Upon challenge with ethanol, mice developed colitis-like symptoms and changes in the colon architecture, characterized by influx of inflammatory cells, edema, crypt loss, crypt abscesses and epithelial hyperplasia, as previously observed in immune-competent mice. TARC, TGFβ1 and HGF expression increased in distal parts of the colon. Analysis of human leucocytes isolated from mouse spleen revealed an increase in frequencies of CD1a+, CD64+, CD163+ and TSLPR+ CD14+ monocytes, and antigen-experienced CD44+ CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in response to ethanol. Analysis of human leucocytes from the colon of challenged mice identified CD14+ monocytes and CD11b+ monocytes as the predominant populations. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis from distal parts of the colon indicated that IFNγ might be one of the cytokines driving inflammation. Treatment with infliximab ameliorated symptoms and pathological manifestations, whereas pitrakinra had no therapeutic benefit. Thus, this model is partially reflective of the human disease and might

  10. Basigin null mutant male mice are sterile and exhibit impaired interactions between germ cells and Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jiajia; Li, Yanfen; Sun, Fengyun; Saalbach, Anja; Klein, Claudia; Miller, David J.; Hess, Rex; Nowak, Romana A.

    2013-01-01

    Basigin (BSG) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that plays an important role in male reproduction since male knockout (KO) mice are sterile. The Bsg KO testis lacks elongated spermatids and mature spermatozoa, a phenotype similar to that of alpha-mannosidase IIx (MX) KO mice. MX regulates formation of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) terminated N-glycans that participate in germ cell-Sertoli cell adhesion. Results showed that Bsg KO spermatocytes displayed normal homologous chromosome synapsis and progression through meiosis. However, only punctate expression of the round spermatid marker SP-10 in the acrosomal granule of germ cells of Bsg KO mice was detected indicating that spermatogenesis in Bsg KO mice was arrested at the early round spermatid stages. We observed a large increase in the number of germ cells undergoing apoptosis in Bsg KO testes. Using lectin blotting, we determined that GlcNAc terminated N-glycans are linked to BSG. GlcNAc terminated N-glycans were significantly reduced in Bsg KO testes. These observations indicate that BSG may act as a germ cell-Sertoli cell attachment molecule. Loss of BSG significantly reduced adhesion between GC-2 and SF7 cells. Moreover, wild type testes showed strong expression of N-cadherin (CDH2) while expression was greatly reduced in the testes of Bsg KO mice. In addition, the integrity of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) was compromised in Bsg KO testes. In conclusion, although some Bsg KO spermatogonia can undergo normal progression to the spermatocyte stage, BSG-mediated germ cell-Sertoli cell interactions appear to be necessary for integrity of the BTB and spermatocyte progression to mature spermatozoa. PMID:23727514

  11. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Uncovers a Novel Function for the Transcription Factor Ace2 during Candida albicans Hyphal Development

    PubMed Central

    Orellana-Muñoz, Sara; Gutiérrez-Escribano, Pilar; Arnáiz-Pita, Yolanda; Dueñas-Santero, Encarnación; Suárez, M. Belén; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; del Rey, Francisco; Sherlock, Gavin; d’Enfert, Christophe; Correa-Bordes, Jaime; de Aldana, Carlos R. Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major invasive fungal pathogen in humans. An important virulence factor is its ability to switch between the yeast and hyphal forms, and these filamentous forms are important in tissue penetration and invasion. A common feature for filamentous growth is the ability to inhibit cell separation after cytokinesis, although it is poorly understood how this process is regulated developmentally. In C. albicans, the formation of filaments during hyphal growth requires changes in septin ring dynamics. In this work, we studied the functional relationship between septins and the transcription factor Ace2, which controls the expression of enzymes that catalyze septum degradation. We found that alternative translation initiation produces two Ace2 isoforms. While full-length Ace2, Ace2L, influences septin dynamics in a transcription-independent manner in hyphal cells but not in yeast cells, the use of methionine-55 as the initiation codon gives rise to Ace2S, which functions as the nuclear transcription factor required for the expression of cell separation genes. Genetic evidence indicates that Ace2L influences the incorporation of the Sep7 septin to hyphal septin rings in order to avoid inappropriate activation of cell separation during filamentous growth. Interestingly, a natural single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the C. albicans WO-1 background and other C. albicans commensal and clinical isolates generates a stop codon in the ninth codon of Ace2L that mimics the phenotype of cells lacking Ace2L. Finally, we report that Ace2L and Ace2S interact with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and that impairing activity of this kinase results in a defect in septin dynamics similar to that of hyphal cells lacking Ace2L. Together, our findings identify Ace2L and the NDR kinase Cbk1 as new elements of the signaling system that modify septin ring dynamics in hyphae to allow cell-chain formation, a feature that appears to have evolved in specific C. albicans lineages

  12. Cardiac and renal distribution of ACE and ACE-2 in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Segev, Ravit; Francis, Bahaa; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Awad, Hoda; Lazarovich, Aviva; Kabala, Aviva; Aronson, Doron; Abassi, Zaid

    2014-10-01

    Congestive heart failure is often associated with impaired kidney function. Over-activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) contributes to avid salt and water retention in heart failure. While the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a key enzyme in the synthesis of angiotensin II (Ang II), is well established, the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), an enzyme responsible for angiotensin 1-7 generation, is largely unknown. This issue is of a special interest since angiotensin 1-7 counteracts many of the proliferative and hypertensive effects of angiotensin II. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the expression of both enzymes in the kidney and heart of rats with heart failure. Heart failure (CHF) was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats (n=9) by the creation of a surgical aorto-caval fistula. Sham-operated rats served as controls (n=8). Two weeks after surgery, the animals were sacrificed and their hearts and kidneys were harvested for assessment of cardiac remodeling and ACE and ACE-2 immunoreactivity by immunohistochemical staining. ACE immunostaining was significantly increased in the kidneys (4.34 ± 0.39% vs. 2.96 ± 0.40%, P<0.05) and hearts (4.57 ± 0.54% vs. 2.19 ± 0.37%, P<0.01) of CHF rats as compared with their sham controls. In a similar manner, ACE-2 immunoreactivity was also elevated in the kidneys (4.65 ± 1.17% vs. 1.75 ± 0.29%, P<0.05) and hearts (5.48 ± 1.11% vs. 1.13 ± 0.26%, P<0.01) of CHF rats as compared with their healthy controls. This study showed that both ACE and ACE-2 are overexpressed in the cardiac and renal tissues of animals with heart failure as compared with their sham controls. The increased expression of the beneficial ACE-2 in heart failure may serve as a compensatory response to the over-activity of the deleterious isoform, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme 1(ACE-1).

  13. Co-transplantation of human fetal thymus, bone and CD34(+) cells into young adult immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice optimizes humanized mice that mount adaptive antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Joo, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae Berm; Moon, Hana; Kim, Tae Jin; Kim, Se Ho; Hong, Seokmann; Chang, Jun; Kang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-04-01

    Both the thymus (T) and bone (B) are necessary hematopoietic niches in adult humans. We previously showed that co-transplantation of human fetal T and B tissues into neonatal immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (NSG, N) mice facilitated hematopoiesis. However, transplantation into neonatal mice resulted in high frequency of early death, making it unrealistic for repetitive experiments. In this study, young adult N mice were pre-engrafted with T and B, T alone, B alone or no tissues. The animals were irradiated and injected with autologous fetal liver (FL)-derived CD34(+) cells (34). The resultant mice were TB34N, T34N, B34N and 34N, respectively, and challenged with T cell dependent antigens (Ags). The humanized TB34N mice showed best performance of these mouse models in many aspects resembling the adult human Ag-experienced spleen. The TB34N mice exhibited better hematopoietic reconstitution; balanced development of T- and B-cell, and common progenitor cells; follicular lymphoid structures with a functional germinal center (GC) enriched with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and plasma cells (PCs); secretion of hIgG in the sera in response to Ags at comparable levels to those of human; derivations of hIgG mAb-secreting hybridoma clones. Collectively, the humanized TB34N mice could develop an adaptive immunity that was capable of producing Ag-specific hIgG at a significant level via class switching. This unprecedented TB34N platform in humanized mice would be useful in dissecting human immunity, for generating human Abs and clinical applications. PMID:25725428

  14. Co-transplantation of human fetal thymus, bone and CD34(+) cells into young adult immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice optimizes humanized mice that mount adaptive antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Joo, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae Berm; Moon, Hana; Kim, Tae Jin; Kim, Se Ho; Hong, Seokmann; Chang, Jun; Kang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-04-01

    Both the thymus (T) and bone (B) are necessary hematopoietic niches in adult humans. We previously showed that co-transplantation of human fetal T and B tissues into neonatal immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (NSG, N) mice facilitated hematopoiesis. However, transplantation into neonatal mice resulted in high frequency of early death, making it unrealistic for repetitive experiments. In this study, young adult N mice were pre-engrafted with T and B, T alone, B alone or no tissues. The animals were irradiated and injected with autologous fetal liver (FL)-derived CD34(+) cells (34). The resultant mice were TB34N, T34N, B34N and 34N, respectively, and challenged with T cell dependent antigens (Ags). The humanized TB34N mice showed best performance of these mouse models in many aspects resembling the adult human Ag-experienced spleen. The TB34N mice exhibited better hematopoietic reconstitution; balanced development of T- and B-cell, and common progenitor cells; follicular lymphoid structures with a functional germinal center (GC) enriched with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and plasma cells (PCs); secretion of hIgG in the sera in response to Ags at comparable levels to those of human; derivations of hIgG mAb-secreting hybridoma clones. Collectively, the humanized TB34N mice could develop an adaptive immunity that was capable of producing Ag-specific hIgG at a significant level via class switching. This unprecedented TB34N platform in humanized mice would be useful in dissecting human immunity, for generating human Abs and clinical applications.

  15. Heterozygous Pitx2 Null Mice Accurately Recapitulate the Ocular Features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lisheng; Gage, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to assess the utility of Pitx2+/− mice as a model for the ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and for congenital glaucoma. Methods Eyes of Pitx2+/− and wild-type littermates were examined clinically using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus photography. Intraocular pressures were measured using a TonoLab rebound tonometer. Eyes were examined histologically to assess PITX2 expression, structural integrity, and optic nerve and ganglion cell content. Results PITX2 is present postnatally in the corneal endothelium and stroma, iris stroma, trabecular meshwork, and Schlemm's canal. Reduced central corneal thickness, iris defects, and iridicorneal adhesions are all prevalent in Pitx2+/− eyes. Although optic nerve heads appear normal at postnatal day 7, IOP is elevated and optic nerve head cupping is fully penetrant in Pitx2+/− eyes by 3 weeks of age. Neurodegeneration is present in a significant percentage of optic nerves from Pitx2+/− mice by 3 weeks of age, and is fully penetrant by 2 months of age. Pitx2+/− eyes show significant reductions in specifically ganglion cell density in all four quadrants by 2 months of age. Conclusions Pitx2+/− mice model the major ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and will be an important resource for understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to anterior segment dysgenesis and a high prevalence of glaucoma in this disease. In addition, these mice may provide an efficient new model for assessing the molecular events in glaucoma more generally, and for developing and testing new treatment paradigms for this disease. PMID:27654429

  16. Recombinant Expression and Characterization of Human and Murine ACE2: Species-Specific Activation of the Alternative Renin-Angiotensin-System

    PubMed Central

    Poglitsch, Marko; Domenig, Oliver; Schwager, Cornelia; Stranner, Stefan; Peball, Bernhard; Janzek, Evelyne; Wagner, Bettina; Jungwirth, Helmut; Loibner, Hans; Schuster, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) which is known to cleave several substrates among vasoactive peptides. Its preferred substrate is Angiotensin II, which is tightly involved in the regulation of important physiological functions including fluid homeostasis and blood pressure. Ang 1–7, the main enzymatic product of ACE2, became increasingly important in the literature in recent years, as it was reported to counteract hypertensive and fibrotic actions of Angiotensin II via the MAS receptor. The functional connection of ACE2, Ang 1–7, and the MAS receptor is also referred to as the alternative axis of the RAS. In the present paper, we describe the recombinant expression and purification of human and murine ACE2 (rhACE2 and rmACE2). Furthermore, we determined the conversion rates of rhACE2 and rmACE2 for different natural peptide substrates in plasma samples and discovered species-specific differences in substrate specificities, probably leading to functional differences in the alternative axis of the RAS. In particular, conversion rates of Ang 1–10 to Ang 1–9 were found to be substantially different when applying rhACE2 or rmACE2 in vitro. In contrast to rhACE2, rm ACE2 is substantially less potent in transformation of Ang 1–10 to Ang 1–9. PMID:22518284

  17. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adult hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.

  18. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adultmore » hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.« less

  19. Mouse and human BAC transgenes recapitulate tissue-specific expression of the vitamin D receptor in mice and rescue the VDR-null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Min; Bishop, Kathleen A; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-06-01

    The biological actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in numerous target tissues in a cell type-selective manner. Recent studies using genomic analyses and recombineered bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) have defined the specific features of mouse and human VDR gene loci in vitro. In the current study, we introduced recombineered mouse and human VDR BACs as transgenes into mice and explored their expression capabilities in vivo. Individual transgenic mouse strains selectively expressed BAC-derived mouse or human VDR proteins in appropriate vitamin D target tissues, thereby recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of endogenous mouse VDR. The mouse VDR transgene was also regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 and dibutyryl-cAMP. When crossed into a VDR-null mouse background, both transgenes restored wild-type basal as well as 1,25(OH)2D3-inducible gene expression patterns in the appropriate tissues. This maneuver resulted in the complete rescue of the aberrant phenotype noted in the VDR-null mouse, including systemic features associated with altered calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and disrupted production of parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23, and abnormalities associated with the skeleton, kidney, parathyroid gland, and the skin. This study suggests that both mouse and human VDR transgenes are capable of recapitulating basal and regulated expression of the VDR in the appropriate mouse tissues and restore 1,25(OH)2D3 function. These results provide a baseline for further dissection of mechanisms integral to mouse and human VDR gene expression and offer the potential to explore the consequence of selective mutations in VDR proteins in vivo.

  20. LCAT-null mice develop improved hepatic insulin sensitivity through altered regulation of transcription factors and suppressors of cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Lixin; Naples, Mark; Song, Hui; Yuan, Ronghua; Ye, Feilu; Shafi, Sharmi; Adeli, Khosrow; Ng, Dominic S

    2007-08-01

    We previously reported that LCAT-deficient mice develop not only low HDL-cholesterol but also hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic triglyceride (TG) overproduction, and, unexpectedly, improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and reduced hepatic TG content. Here, we examined the mechanistic links underlying this apparent paradox. The LDL receptor-deficient (Ldlr)(-/-)xLcat(-/-) mouse model and age- and sex-matched Ldlr(-/-)xLcat(+/+) littermates, both in C57Bl/6 background, were employed. Studies of hepatic insulin signal transduction showed an upregulation of hepatic Irs2 mRNA level (5.3-fold, P = 0.02), IRS-2 protein mass level (1.5-fold, P = 0.009) and pIRS-2 (1.8-fold. P = 0.02) in the Ldlr(-/-)xLcat(-/-) mice. There was a 1.2-fold increase in pAkt (P = 0.03) with a nonsignificant change in total Akt. We observed a significant shift in its downstream transcription factor FoxO-1 to the cytosolic compartment (2.3-fold increase in cytosolic/nuclear ratio, P = 0.04). We also observed a significant 3.1-fold increase in nuclear abundance of FoxA-2 mass (P = 0.017) and a 1.5-fold upregulation of its coactivator PGC-1beta (P = 0.002), the coordinated actions of which promotes hepatic TG production and beta-oxidation. Increased hepatic insulin signaling in the Ldlr(-/-)xLcat(-/-) mice was associated with an upregulation of the Tcfe3 gene (1.7-fold, P = 0.024), a selective downregulation of the Socs-1 gene by 60% (P = 0.01), and no change in PTP-1B protein mass. These data suggest that LCAT deficiency induces complex alterations in hepatic signal transduction cascades, which explain, at least in part, the observed enhanced insulin signaling in association with hepatic TG overproduction and reduced hepatic TG content.

  1. Addition of aspirin to a fish oil-rich diet decreases inflammation and atherosclerosis in ApoE-null mice.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Alexander V; Yang, Zhi-Hong; Vaisman, Boris L; Thacker, Seth; Yu, Zu-Xi; Sampson, Maureen; Serhan, Charles N; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is known to alter the production of potent inflammatory lipid mediators, but whether it interacts with omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) from fish oil to affect atherosclerosis has not been determined. The goal was to investigate the impact of a fish oil-enriched diet alone and in combination with ASA on the production of lipid mediators and atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) female mice were fed for 13weeks one of the four following diets: omega-3 FA deficient (OD), omega-3 FA rich (OR) (1.8g omega-3 FAs/kg·diet per day), omega-3 FA rich plus ASA (ORA) (0.1g ASA/kg·diet per day) or an omega-3 FA deficient plus ASA (ODA) with supplement levels equivalent to human doses. Plasma lipids, atherosclerosis, markers of inflammation, hepatic gene expression and aortic lipid mediators were determined. Hepatic omega-3 FAs were markedly higher in OR (9.9-fold) and ORA (7-fold) groups. Mice in both OR and ORA groups had 40% less plasma cholesterol in very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein fractions, but aortic plaque area formation was only significantly lower in the ORA group (5.5%) compared to the OD group (2.5%). Plasma PCSK9 protein levels were approximately 70% lower in the OR and ORA groups. Proinflammatory aortic lipid mediators were 50%-70% lower in the ODA group than in the OD group and more than 50% lower in the ORA group. In summary, less aortic plaque lesions and aortic proinflammatory lipid mediators were observed in mice on the fish oil diet plus ASA vs. just the fish oil diet. PMID:27394692

  2. Mechanical and material properties of cortical and trabecular bone from cannabinoid receptor-1-null (Cnr1(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Aysha B; Goodyear, Simon R; Ross, Ruth A; Aspden, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system is known for its regulatory effects on bone metabolism through the cannabinoid receptors, Cnr1 and Cnr2. In this study we analysed the mechanical and material properties of long bones from Cnr1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 background. Tibiae and femora from 5- and 12-week-old mice were subjected to three-point bending to measure bending stiffness and yield strength. Elastic modulus, density and mineral content were measured in the diaphysis. Second moment of area (MOA2), inner and outer perimeters of the cortical shaft and trabecular fractional bone volume (BV/TV) were measured using micro-CT. In Cnr1(-/-) males and females at both ages the bending stiffness was reduced due to a smaller MOA2. Bone from Cnr1(-/-) females had a greater modulus than wild-type controls, although no differences were observed in males. BV/TV of 12-week-old Cnr1(-/-) females was greater than controls, although no difference was seen at 5-weeks. On the contrary, Cnr1(-/-) males had the same BV/TV as controls at 12-weeks while they had significantly lower values at 5-weeks. This study shows that deleting Cnr1 decreases the amount of cortical bone in both males and females at 12-weeks, but increases the amount of trabecular bone only in females.

  3. Autistic-Like Syndrome in Mu Opioid Receptor Null Mice is Relieved by Facilitated mGluR4 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jérôme AJ; Clesse, Daniel; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Schwab, Yannick; Le Merrer, Julie; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) remains largely unknown. Identifying vulnerability genes for autism represents a major challenge in the field and allows the development of animal models for translational research. Mice lacking the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm1−/−) were recently proposed as a monogenic mouse model of autism, based on severe deficits in social behavior and communication skills. We confirm this hypothesis by showing that adult Oprm1−/− animals recapitulate core and multiple comorbid behavioral symptoms of autism and also display anatomical, neurochemical, and genetic landmarks of the disease. Chronic facilitation of mGluR4 signaling, which we identified as a novel pharmacological target in ASDs in these mice, was more efficient in alleviating behavioral deficits than the reference molecule risperidone. Altogether, our data provide first evidence that disrupted mu opioid receptor signaling is sufficient to trigger a comprehensive autistic syndrome, maybe through blunted social reward processes, and this mouse model opens promising avenues for therapeutic innovation. PMID:24619243

  4. Sex differences in brain proteomes of neuron-specific STAT3-null mice after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Casalena, Gabriella; Jia, Jia; Sultana, Rukhsana; Barone, Eugenio; Cai, Jian; Pierce, William M; Cini, Chiara; Mancuso, Cesare; Perluigi, Marzia; Davis, Catherine M; Alkayed, Nabil J; Butterfield, D Allan; Butterfield, Allan D

    2012-05-01

    Signal transduction and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) plays an important role in neuronal survival, regeneration and repair after brain injury. We previously demonstrated that STAT3 is activated in brain after cerebral ischemia specifically in neurons. The effect was sex-specific and modulated by sex steroids, with higher activation in females than males. In the current study, we used a proteomics approach to identify downstream proteins affected by ischemia in male and female wild-type (WT) and neuron-specific STAT3 knockout (KO) mice. We established four comparison groups based on the transgenic condition and the hemisphere analyzed, respectively. Moreover, the sexual variable was taken into account and male and female animals were analyzed independently. Results support a role for STAT3 in metabolic, synaptic, structural and transcriptional responses to cerebral ischemia, indeed the adaptive response to ischemia/reperfusion injury is delayed in neuronal-specific STAT3 KO mice. The differences observed between males and females emphasize the importance of sex-specific neuronal survival and repair mechanisms, especially those involving antioxidant and energy-related activities, often caused by sex hormones.

  5. The reproductive phenotype of mice null for transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 13 suggests compensatory function of family member Krüppel-like factor 9 in the peri-implantation uterus.

    PubMed

    Heard, Melissa E; Pabona, John Mark P; Clayberger, Carol; Krensky, Alan M; Simmen, Frank A; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2012-11-01

    The ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone promote uterine receptivity and successful pregnancy through their cognate receptors functioning in concert with context-dependent nuclear coregulators. Previously, we showed that the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor (KLF) 9 is a progesterone receptor (PGR) coactivator in the uterus and that mice null for Klf9 exhibit subfertility and reduced progesterone sensitivity. The highly related family member KLF13 displays increased expression in uteri of pregnant and nonpregnant Klf9 null mice and similarly regulates PGR-mediated transactivation in endometrial stromal cells. However, a uterine phenotype with loss of Klf13 has not been reported. In the present study, we demonstrate that Klf13 deficiency in mice did not compromise female fertility and pregnancy outcome. Klf13 null females had litter sizes, numbers of implanting embryos, uterine morphology, and ovarian steroid hormone production comparable to those of wild-type (WT) counterparts. Further, pregnant WT and Klf13 null females at Day Postcoitum (DPC) 3.5 had similar uterine Pgr, estrogen receptor, and Wnt-signaling component transcript levels. Nuclear levels of KLF9 were higher in Klf13 null than in WT uteri at DPC 3.5, albeit whole-tissue KLF9 protein and transcript levels did not differ between genotypes. The lack of a similar induction of nuclear KLF9 levels in uteri of virgin Klf13((-/-)) mice relative to WT uteri was associated with lower stromal PGR expression. In differentiating human endometrial stromal cells, coincident KLF9/KLF13 knockdown by small interfering RNA targeting reduced decidualization-associated PRL expression, whereas KLF9 and KLF13 knockdowns alone reduced transcript levels of WNT4 and BMP2, respectively. Results suggest that KLF9 and KLF13 functionally compensate in peri-implantation uterus for pregnancy success.

  6. Disruption of NBS1 gene leads to early embryonic lethality in homozygous null mice and induces specific cancer in heterozygous mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Henrie, Melinda; Ouyang, Honghai; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Ito, Hisao; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B.; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Gloria C.; Chen, David J.

    2002-04-15

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive chromosome instability syndrome characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition, with cellular features similar to that of ataxia telangiectasia (AT). NBS results from mutations in the mammalian gene Nbs1 that codes for a 95-kDa protein called nibrin, NBS1, or p95. To establish an animal model for NBS, we attempted to generate NBS1 knockout mice. However, NBS1 gene knockouts were lethal at an early embryonic stage. NBS1 homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured in vitro showed retarded growth and subsequently underwent growth arrest within 5 days of culture. Apoptosis, assayed by TUNEL staining, was observed in NBSI homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured for four days. NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice were normal, and exhibited no specific phenotype for at least one year. However, fibroblast cells from NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice displayed an enhanced frequency of spontaneous transformation to anchorage-independent growth as compared to NBS1 wild-type(+/+) cells. Furthermore, heterozygous(+/-) mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after one year compared to wild-type mice, even though no significant differences in the incidence of other tumors such as lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma were observed. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that NBS1 heterozygosity and reduced NBSI expression induces formation of specific tumors in mice.

  7. Hyalinosis and Ym1/Ym2 Gene Expression in the Stomach and Respiratory Tract of 129S4/SvJae and Wild-Type and CYP1A2-Null B6,129 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jerrold M.; Yoon, Michung; Anver, Miriam R.; Haines, Diana C.; Kudo, Gen; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Kimura, Shioko

    2001-01-01

    The C57BL/6, 129, and B6,129 mouse strains or stocks have been commonly used to generate targeted mutant mice. The pathology of these mice is not well characterized. In studies of these aging mice, we found high incidences of hyalinosis (eosinophilic cytoplasmic change) in the glandular stomach, respiratory tract, bile duct, and gall bladder of B6,129 CYP1A2-null and wild-type mice as well as in both sexes of the background 129S4/SvJae strain. The gastric lesions of the glandular stomach were found in 95.7% of female CYP1A2-null mice as well as in 45.7% of female 129S4/SvJae animals. The eosinophilic protein isolated from characteristic hyaline gastric lesions was identified as Ym2, a member of the chitinase family. Immunohistochemistry, using rabbit polyclonal antibodies to oligopeptides derived from the Ym1 sequence, detected focal to diffuse reactivity within both normal and abnormal nasal olfactory and respiratory epithelium, pulmonary alveolar macrophages, bone marrow myeloid cells, and the squamous epithelium of the forestomach and epithelium of the glandular stomach. Alveolar macrophages in acidophilic pneumonia, a major cause of death of aging 129 mice, and in mice with the me mutation also were highly immunoreactive. The possible cause of this protein excess in gastric and other lesions and its possible functions are discussed. PMID:11141507

  8. Desert Dust Layers Over Polluted Marine Boundary Layers: ACE-2 Measurements and ACE-Asia Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosols in ACE-Asia are expected to have some commonalties with those in ACE-2, along with important differences. Among the commonalities are occurrences of desert dust layers over polluted marine boundary layers. Differences include the nature of the dust (yellowish in the East Asia desert outflow, vs. reddish-brown in the Sahara Outflow measured in ACE-2) and the composition of boundary-layer aerosols (e.g., more absorbing, soot and organic aerosol in-the Asian plume, caused by coal and biomass burning, with limited controls). In this paper we present ACE-2 measurements and analyses as a guide to our plans for ACE-2 Asia. The measurements include: (1) Vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth and extinction (380-1558 nm), and of water vapor column and concentration, from the surface through the elevated desert dust, measured by the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14); (2) Comparisons of airborne and shipborne sunphotometer optical depths to satellite-retrieved values, with and without desert dust; (3) Comparisons between airborne Sunphotometer optical depth and extinction spectra and those derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of aerosol size distribution, scattering and absorption; (4) Comparisons between size distributions measured in situ and retrieved from sunphotometer optical depth spectra; (5) Comparisons between aerosol single scattering albedo values obtained by several techniques, using various combinations of measurements of backscatter, extinction, size distribution, scattering, absorption, and radiative flux. We show how analyses of these data can be used to address questions important to ACE-Asia, such as: (1) How do dust and other absorbing aerosols affect the accuracy of satellite optical depth retrievals? How important are asphericity effects? (2) How important are supermicron dust and seasalt aerosols to overall aerosol optical depth and radiative forcing? How well are these aerosols sampled by aircraft

  9. Post-translationally Abnormal Collagens of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase-2 Null Mice Offer a Pathobiological Mechanism for the High Myopia Linked to Human LEPREL1 Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, David M.; Joeng, Kyu Sang; Werther, Rachel; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Weis, MaryAnn; Lee, Brendan H.; Eyre, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Myopia, the leading cause of visual impairment worldwide, results from an increase in the axial length of the eyeball. Mutations in LEPREL1, the gene encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase-2 (P3H2), have recently been identified in individuals with recessively inherited nonsyndromic severe myopia. P3H2 is a member of a family of genes that includes three isoenzymes of prolyl 3-hydroxylase (P3H), P3H1, P3H2, and P3H3. Fundamentally, it is understood that P3H1 is responsible for converting proline to 3-hydroxyproline. This limited additional knowledge also suggests that each isoenzyme has evolved different collagen sequence-preferred substrate specificities. In this study, differences in prolyl 3-hydroxylation were screened in eye tissues from P3h2-null (P3h2n/n) and wild-type mice to seek tissue-specific effects due the lack of P3H2 activity on post-translational collagen chemistry that could explain myopia. The mice were viable and had no gross musculoskeletal phenotypes. Tissues from sclera and cornea (type I collagen) and lens capsule (type IV collagen) were dissected from mouse eyes, and multiple sites of prolyl 3-hydroxylation were identified by mass spectrometry. The level of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at multiple substrate sites from type I collagen chains was high in sclera, similar to tendon. Almost every known site of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in types I and IV collagen from P3h2n/n mouse eye tissues was significantly under-hydroxylated compared with their wild-type littermates. We conclude that altered collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is caused by loss of P3H2. We hypothesize that this leads to structural abnormalities in multiple eye tissues, but particularly sclera, causing progressive myopia. PMID:25645914

  10. Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Atherosclerosis at the Aortic Root Identified in an Intercross between DBA2J and 129S6 Apolipoprotein E-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kayashima, Yukako; Tomita, Hirofumi; Zhilicheva, Svetlana; Kim, Shinja; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Bennett, Brian J.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E-null mice on a DBA/2J genetic background (DBA-apoE) are highly susceptible to atherosclerosis in the aortic root area compared with those on a 129S6 background (129-apoE). To explore atherosclerosis-responsible genetic regions, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis using 172 male and 137 female F2 derived from an intercross between DBA-apoE and 129-apoE mice. A genome-wide scan identified two significant QTL for the size of lesions at the root: one is Ath44 on Chromosome (Chr) 1 at 158 Mb, and the other Ath45 on Chr 2 at 162 Mb. Ath44 co-localizes with but appears to be independent of a previously reported QTL, Ath1, while Ath45 is a novel QTL. DBA alleles of both Ath44 and Ath45 confer atherosclerosis-susceptibility. In addition, a QTL on Chr 14 at 73 Mb was found significant only in males, and 129 allele conferring susceptibility. Further analysis detected female-specific interactions between a second QTL on Chr 1 at 73 Mb and a QTL on Chr 3 at 21 Mb, and between Chr 7 at 84 Mb and Chr 12 at 77 Mb. These loci for the root atherosclerosis were independent of QTLs for plasma total cholesterol and QTLs for triglycerides, but a QTL for HDL (Chr 1 at 126 Mb) overlapped with the Ath44. Notably, haplotype analysis among 129S6, DBA/2J and C57BL/6 genomes and their gene expression data narrowed the candidate regions for Ath44 and Ath45 to less than 5 Mb intervals where multiple genome wide associations with cardiovascular phenotypes have also been reported in humans. SNPs in or near Fmo3, Sele and Selp for Ath44, and Lbp and Pkig for Ath45 were suggested for further investigation as potential candidates underlying the atherosclerosis susceptibility. PMID:24586312

  11. Decreased TNF Levels and Improved Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival in MMP-2 Null Mice Suggest a Role for MMP-2 as TNF Sheddase

    PubMed Central

    De Groef, Lies; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Van Imschoot, Griet; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Moons, Lieve

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been designated as both friend and foe in the central nervous system (CNS): while being involved in many neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, their actions appear to be indispensable to a healthy CNS. Pathological conditions in the CNS are therefore often related to imbalanced MMP activities and disturbances of the complex MMP-dependent protease network. Likewise, in the retina, various studies in animal models and human patients suggested MMPs to be involved in glaucoma. In this study, we sought to determine the spatiotemporal expression profile of MMP-2 in the excitotoxic retina and to unravel its role during glaucoma pathogenesis. We reveal that intravitreal NMDA injection induces MMP-2 expression to be upregulated in the Müller glia. Moreover, MMP-2 null mice display attenuated retinal ganglion cell death upon excitotoxic insult to the retina, which is accompanied by normal glial reactivity, yet reduced TNF levels. Hence, we propose a novel in vivo function for MMP-2, as an activating sheddase of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Given the pivotal role of TNF as a proinflammatory cytokine and neurodegeneration-exacerbating mediator, these findings generate important novel insights into the pathological processes contributing to glaucomatous neurodegeneration and into the interplay of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the CNS. PMID:26451076

  12. Disordered purinergic signaling and abnormal cellular metabolism are associated with development of liver cancer in Cd39/Entpd1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Han, Lihui; Seth, Pankaj; Bian, Shu; Li, Linglin; Csizmadia, Eva; Junger, Wolfgang G.; Schmelzle, Moritz; Usheva, Anny; Tapper, Elliot B.; Baffy, Gyorgy; Sukhatme, Vikas P.; Wu, Yan; Robson, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Liver cancer is associated with chronic inflammation, which is linked to immune dysregulation, disordered metabolism and aberrant cell proliferation. CD39/ENTPD1 is an ectonucleotidase that regulates extracellular nucleotide/nucleoside concentrations by scavenging nucleotides to ultimately generate adenosine. These properties inhibit anti tumor immune responses and promote angiogenesis, being permissive for the growth of transplanted tumors. Here, we show Cd39 deletion promotes development of both induced and spontaneous autochthonous liver cancer in mice. Loss of Cd39 results in higher concentrations of extracellular nucleotides, which stimulate proliferation of hepatocytes, abrogate autophagy and disrupt glycolytic metabolism. Constitutive activation of Ras-MAPK and mTOR-S6K1 pathways occurs in both quiescent Cd39 null hepatocytes in vitro and liver tissues in vivo. Exogenous ATP boosts these signaling pathways, while rapamycin inhibits such aberrant responses in hepatocytes. Conclusions Deletion of Cd39 and resulting changes in disordered purinergic signaling perturb hepatocellular metabolic/proliferative responses, paradoxically resulting in malignant transformation. These findings might impact adjunctive therapies for cancer. Lastly, our studies indicate that the biology of autochthonous and transplanted tumors is quite distinct. PMID:22859060

  13. Localization and Behaviors in Null Mice Suggest that ASIC1 and ASIC2 Modulate Responses to Aversive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Price, Margaret P.; Gong, Huiyu; Parsons, Meredith G.; Kundert, Jacob R.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Chaloner, Kathryn; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Wemmie, John A.; Richerson, George B.; Cassell, Martin D.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) generate H+-gated Na+ currents that contribute to neuronal function and animal behavior. Like ASIC1, ASIC2 subunits are expressed in the brain and multimerize with ASIC1 to influence acid-evoked currents and facilitate ASIC1 localization to dendritic spines. To better understand how ASIC2 contributes to brain function, we localized the protein and tested the behavioral consequences of ASIC2 gene disruption. For comparison, we also localized ASIC1 and studied ASIC1−/− mice. ASIC2 was prominently expressed in areas of high synaptic density, and with a few exceptions, ASIC1 and ASIC2 localization exhibited substantial overlap. Loss of ASIC1 or ASIC2 decreased freezing behavior in contextual and auditory cue fear conditioning assays, in response to predator odor, and in response to CO2 inhalation. In addition, loss of ASIC1 or ASIC2 increased activity in a forced swim assay. These data suggest that ASIC2, like ASIC1, plays a key role in determining the defensive response to aversive stimuli. They also raise the question of whether gene variations in both ASIC1 and ASIC2 might affect fear and panic in humans. PMID:24256442

  14. Altered gene expression patterns in muscle ring finger 1 null mice during denervation- and dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Monica L.; Waddell, David S.; Neff, Eric S.; Baehr, Leslie M.; Ross, Adam P.; Bodine, Sue C.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle atrophy can result from inactivity or unloading on one hand or the induction of a catabolic state on the other. Muscle-specific ring finger 1 (MuRF1), a member of the tripartite motif family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, is an essential mediator of multiple conditions inducing muscle atrophy. While most studies have focused on the role of MuRF1 in protein degradation, the protein may have other roles in regulating skeletal muscle mass and metabolism. We therefore systematically evaluated the effect of MuRF1 on gene expression during denervation and dexamethasone-induced atrophy. We find that the lack of MuRF1 leads to few differences in control animals, but there were several significant differences in specific sets of genes upon denervation- and dexamethasone-induced atrophy. For example, during denervation, MuRF1 knockout mice showed delayed repression of metabolic and structural genes and blunted induction of genes associated with the neuromuscular junction. In the latter case, this pattern correlates with blunted HDAC4 and myogenin upregulation. Lack of MuRF1 caused fewer changes in the dexamethasone-induced atrophy program, but certain genes involved in fat metabolism and intracellular signaling were affected. Our results demonstrate a new role for MuRF1 in influencing gene expression in two important models of muscle atrophy. PMID:24130153

  15. MMP20, KLK4, and MMP20/KLK4 double null mice define roles for matrix proteases during dental enamel formation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Smith, Charles E; Richardson, Amelia S; Bartlett, John D; Hu, Jan C C; Simmer, James P

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) are secreted proteinases that are essential for proper dental enamel formation. We characterized and compared enamel formed in wild-type, Mmp20 (-/-), Klk4 (-/-), Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-), and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mice using dissecting and light microscopy, backscattered scanning electron microscopy (bSEM), SEM, microcomputed tomography (μCT), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Following eruption, fractures were observed on Mmp20 (-/-), Klk4 (-/-), Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-), and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) molars. Failure of the enamel in the Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) molars was unexpected and suggested that digenic effects could contribute to the etiology of amelogenesis imperfecta in humans. Micro-CT analyses of hemimandibles demonstrated significantly reduced high-density enamel volume in the Mmp20 (-/-) and Klk4 (-/-) mice relative to the wild-type, which was further reduced in Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mice. bSEM images of 7-week Mmp20 (-/-) and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) mandibular incisors showed rough, pitted enamel surfaces with numerous indentations and protruding nodules. The Mmp20 (+/-) and Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) incisors showed prominent, evenly spaced, horizontal ridges that were more distinct in Mmp20 (+/-) Klk4 (+/-) incisors relative to Mmp20 (+/-) incisors due to the darkening of the valleys between the ridges. In cross sections, the Mmp20 (-/-) and Mmp20 (-/-) Klk4 (-/-) exhibited three distinct layers. The outer layer exhibited a disturbed elemental composition and an irregular enamel surface covered with nodules. The Mmp20 null enamel was apparently unable to withstand the sheer forces associated with eruption and separated from dentin during development. Cells invaded the cracks and interposed between the dentin and enamel layers. MMP20 and KLK4 serve overlapping and complementary functions to harden enamel by removing protein, but MMP20 potentially serves multiple

  16. Hyper-Variability in Circulating Insulin, High Fat Feeding Outcomes, and Effects of Reducing Ins2 Dosage in Male Ins1-Null Mice in a Specific Pathogen-Free Facility.

    PubMed

    Templeman, Nicole M; Mehran, Arya E; Johnson, James D

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is an essential hormone with key roles in energy homeostasis and body composition. Mice and rats, unlike other mammals, have two insulin genes: the rodent-specific Ins1 gene and the ancestral Ins2 gene. The relationships between insulin gene dosage and obesity has previously been explored in male and female Ins2-/- mice with full or reduced Ins1 dosage, as well as in female Ins1-/- mice with full or partial Ins2 dosage. We report herein unexpected hyper-variability in Ins1-null male mice, with respect to their circulating insulin levels and to the physiological effects of modulating Ins2 gene dosage. Two large cohorts of Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- mice and their Ins1-/-:Ins2+/+ littermates were fed chow diet or high fat diet (HFD) from weaning, and housed in specific pathogen-free conditions. Cohort A and cohort B were studied one year apart. Contrary to female mice from the same litters, inactivating one Ins2 allele on the complete Ins1-null background did not consistently cause a reduction of circulating insulin in male mice, on either diet. In cohort A, all HFD-fed males showed an equivalent degree of insulin hypersecretion and weight gain, regardless of Ins2 dosage. In cohort B the effects of HFD appeared generally diminished, and cohort B Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- males showed decreased insulin levels and body mass compared to Ins1-/-:Ins2+/+ littermates, on both diets. Although experimental conditions were consistent between cohorts, we found that HFD-fed Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- mice with lower insulin levels had increased corticosterone. Collectively, these observations highlight the phenotypic characteristics that change in association with differences in circulating insulin and Ins2 gene dosage, particularly in male mice. PMID:27055260

  17. Hyper-Variability in Circulating Insulin, High Fat Feeding Outcomes, and Effects of Reducing Ins2 Dosage in Male Ins1-Null Mice in a Specific Pathogen-Free Facility

    PubMed Central

    Templeman, Nicole M.; Mehran, Arya E.; Johnson, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is an essential hormone with key roles in energy homeostasis and body composition. Mice and rats, unlike other mammals, have two insulin genes: the rodent-specific Ins1 gene and the ancestral Ins2 gene. The relationships between insulin gene dosage and obesity has previously been explored in male and female Ins2-/- mice with full or reduced Ins1 dosage, as well as in female Ins1-/- mice with full or partial Ins2 dosage. We report herein unexpected hyper-variability in Ins1-null male mice, with respect to their circulating insulin levels and to the physiological effects of modulating Ins2 gene dosage. Two large cohorts of Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- mice and their Ins1-/-:Ins2+/+ littermates were fed chow diet or high fat diet (HFD) from weaning, and housed in specific pathogen-free conditions. Cohort A and cohort B were studied one year apart. Contrary to female mice from the same litters, inactivating one Ins2 allele on the complete Ins1-null background did not consistently cause a reduction of circulating insulin in male mice, on either diet. In cohort A, all HFD-fed males showed an equivalent degree of insulin hypersecretion and weight gain, regardless of Ins2 dosage. In cohort B the effects of HFD appeared generally diminished, and cohort B Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- males showed decreased insulin levels and body mass compared to Ins1-/-:Ins2+/+ littermates, on both diets. Although experimental conditions were consistent between cohorts, we found that HFD-fed Ins1-/-:Ins2+/- mice with lower insulin levels had increased corticosterone. Collectively, these observations highlight the phenotypic characteristics that change in association with differences in circulating insulin and Ins2 gene dosage, particularly in male mice. PMID:27055260

  18. The heparan sulphate deficient Hspg2 exon 3 null mouse displays reduced deposition of TGF-β1 in skin compared to C57BL/6 wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Cindy; Smith, Susan M; Melrose, James

    2016-06-01

    This was an observational study where we examined the role of perlecan HS on the deposition of TGF-β1 in C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) perlecan exon 3 null mouse skin. Despite its obvious importance in skin repair and tissue homeostasis no definitive studies have immunolocalised TGF-β1 in skin in WT or Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) perlecan exon 3 null mice. Vertical parasagittal murine dorsal skin from 3, 6 and 12 week old C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) mice were fixed in neutral buffered formalin, paraffin embedded and 4 μm sections stained with Mayers haematoxylin and eosin (H & E). TGF-β1 was immunolocalised using a rabbit polyclonal antibody, heat retrieval and the Envision NovaRED detection system. Immunolocalisation of TGF-β1 differed markedly in C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) mouse skin, ablation of exon 3 of Hspg2 resulted in a very severe reduction in the deposition of TGF-β1 in skin 3-12 weeks postnatally. The reduced deposition of TGF-β1 observed in the present study would be expected to impact detrimentally on the remodelling and healing capacity of skin in mutant mice compounding on the poor wound-healing properties already reported for perlecan exon 3 null mice due to an inability to signal with FGF-2 and promote angiogenic repair processes. TGF-β1 also has cell mediated effects in tissue homeostasis and matrix stabilisation a reduction in TGF-β1 deposition would therefore be expected to detrimentally impact on skin homeostasis in the perlecan mutant mice.

  19. Relationship between hemodynamics and atherosclerosis in aortic arches of apolipoprotein E-null mice on 129S6/SvEvTac and C57BL/6J genetic backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hirofumi; Hagaman, John; Friedman, Morton H.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2011-01-01

    Objective We investigated the relationships between hemodynamics and differential plaque development at the aortic arch of apolipoprotein E (apoE)-null mice on 129S6/SvEvTac (129) and C57BL/6J (B6) genetic backgrounds. Methods Mean flow velocities at the ascending and descending aorta (mVAA and mVDA) were measured by Doppler ultrasound in wild type and apoE-null male mice at 3 and 9 months of age. Following dissection of the aortic arches, anatomical parameters and plaque areas were evaluated. Results Arch plaques were five times bigger in 129-apoE than in B6-apoE mice at 3 months, and twice as large at 9 months. The geometric differences, namely larger vessel diameter in the B6 strain and broader inner curvature of the aortic arch in the 129 strain, were exaggerated in 9-month-old apoE-null mice. Cardiac output and heart rate under anesthesia were significantly higher in the B6 strain than in the 129 strain. The values of mVAA were similar in the two strains, while mVDA was lower in the 129 strain. However, there was a 129-apoE-specific reduction of flow velocities with age, and both mVAA and mVDA were significantly lower in 129-apoE than in B6-apoE mice at 9 months. The mean relative wall shear stress (rWSS) over the aortic arch in 129-apoE and B6-apoE mice were not different, but animals with lower mean rWSS had larger arch plaques within each strain. Conclusions The plaque formation in the arch of apoE-null mice is accompanied by strain-dependent changes in both arch geometry and hemodynamics. While arch plaque sizes negatively correlate with mean rWSS, additional factors are necessary to account for the strain differences in arch plaque development. PMID:22078246

  20. Sex Hormones Promote Opposite Effects on ACE and ACE2 Activity, Hypertrophy and Cardiac Contractility in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalpiaz, P. L. M.; Lamas, A. Z.; Caliman, I. F.; Ribeiro, R. F.; Abreu, G. R.; Moyses, M. R.; Andrade, T. U.; Gouvea, S. A.; Alves, M. F.; Carmona, A. K.; Bissoli, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in sex differences and RAS components. However, whether gender influences cardiac angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) activity is still unknown. In the present work, we determined the relationship between ACE and ACE2 activity, left ventricular function and gender in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Methodology / Principal Findings Twelve-week-old female (F) and male (M) SHRs were divided into 2 experimental groups (n = 7 in each group): sham (S) and gonadectomized (G). Fifty days after gonadectomy, we measured positive and negative first derivatives (dP/dt maximum left ventricle (LV) and dP/dt minimum LV, respectively), hypertrophy (morphometric analysis) and ACE and ACE2 catalytic activity (fluorimetrically). Expression of calcium handling proteins was measured by western blot. Male rats exhibited higher cardiac ACE and ACE2 activity as well as hypertrophy compared to female rats. Orchiectomy decreased the activity of these enzymes and hypertrophy, while ovariectomy increased hypertrophy and ACE2, but did not change ACE activity. For cardiac function, the male sham group had a lower +dP/dt than the female sham group. After gonadectomy, the +dP/dt increased in males and reduced in females. The male sham group had a lower -dP/dt than the female group. After gonadectomy, the -dP/dt increased in the male and decreased in the female groups when compared to the sham group. No difference was observed among the groups in SERCA2a protein expression. Gonadectomy increased protein expression of PLB (phospholamban) and the PLB to SERCA2a ratio in female rats, but did not change in male rats. Conclusion Ovariectomy leads to increased cardiac hypertrophy, ACE2 activity, PLB expression and PLB to SERCA2a ratio, and worsening of hemodynamic variables, whereas in males the removal of testosterone has the opposite effects on RAS components. PMID:26010093

  1. Efficient xenoengraftment in severe immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid IL2rγnull mice is attributed to a lack of CD11c+B220+CD122+ cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryoji; Katano, Ikumi; Ida-Tanaka, Miyuki; Kamisako, Tsutomu; Kawai, Kenji; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Aiso, Sadakazu; Ito, Mamoru

    2012-11-01

    Xenograft animal models using immunodeficient mice have been widely applied in medical research on various human diseases. NOD/Shi-scid-IL2rγ(null) (NOG) mice are known to show an extremely high engraftment rate of xenotransplants compared with conventional immunodeficient mice. This high engraftment rate of xenotransplants in NOG mice was substantially suppressed by the transfer of spleen cells from NOD-scid mice that were devoid of NK cells. These results indicate that cell types other than splenic NK cells present in NOD-scid mice but not in NOG mice may be involved in this suppression. To identify the cell types responsible for this effect, we transferred subpopulations of spleen cells from NOD-scid mice into NOG mice and assessed the levels of human cell engraftment after human PBMC (hPBMC) transplantation. These experiments revealed that CD11c(+)B220(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) from NOD-scid mice markedly inhibited engraftment of human cells. The CD11c(+)B220(+)CD122(+) cells further fractionated from the pDCs based on the expression of CD122, which is an NK cell marker strongly inhibited during hPBMC engraftment in NOG mice. Moreover, the CD122(+) cells in the pDC fraction were morphologically distinguishable from conventional CD122(+) NK cells and showed a higher rejection efficiency. The current results suggest that CD11c(+)B220(+)CD122(+) cells play an important role in xenograft rejection, and their absence in NOG mice may be critical in supporting the successful engraftment of xenotransplants.

  2. Application of Osmotic Pumps for Sustained Release of 1-Aminobenzotriazole and Inhibition of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Mice: Model Comparison with the Hepatic P450 Reductase Null Mouse.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Rowan A; Ferreira, Suzie; Rose, Jonathan; Ronseaux, Sebastien

    2016-08-01

    The effectiveness of controlled release 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) administration to inhibit cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes has been evaluated in mice. To maximize the duration of P450 inhibition in vivo, ABT was administered via an osmotic pump. The degree of P450 inhibition was compared with that achieved with a single bolus dose of ABT. Two-hour prior subcutaneous treatment of mice with ABT (50 mg/kg) inhibited antipyrine clearance by 88%. A less pronounced inhibitory effect (29% reduction in clearance) was observed when ABT was administered 24-hours before antipyrine administration, indicating partial restoration of P450 activity during this longer pretreatment time. The duration of ABT in mice was very short (mean residence time = 1.7 hours) after subcutaneous bolus administration. When the inhibitor was delivered by an osmotic pump, maximum blood concentrations of the inhibitor were observed 24 hours after device implantation and were maintained at steady state for 6 days. Inhibition of P450 activity, as measured by antipyrine clearance, was confirmed at 24 hours and 120 hours after pump implantation, highlighting the utility of this method as a longer-term model for P450 inhibition in mice. The magnitude of P450 inhibition in ABT-treated mice was compared with that in hepatic P450 reductase null mice and both models were comparable. In vivo ABT administration by an osmotic pump offers an effective approach for longer-term P450 inhibition in mice and avoids the necessity for multiple dosing of the inhibitor.

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) mediates influenza H7N9 virus-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghui; Gu, Hongjing; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Wang, Wei; Cao, Bin; Lai, Chengcai; Yang, Xiaolan; Zhang, LiangYan; Duan, Yueqiang; Zhang, Shaogeng; Chen, Weiwen; Zhen, Wenbo; Cai, Maosheng; Penninger, Josef M; Jiang, Chengyu; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-11-13

    Since March 2013, the emergence of an avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus has raised concern in China. Although most infections resulted in respiratory illness, some severe cases resulted in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI) that further contributes to morbidity. To date, no effective drugs that improve the clinical outcome of influenza A (H7N9) virus-infected patients have been identified. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 are involved in several pathologies such as cardiovascular functions, renal disease, and acute lung injury. In the current study, we report that ACE2 could mediate the severe acute lung injury induced by influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in an experimental mouse model. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency worsened the disease pathogenesis markedly, mainly by targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1). The current findings demonstrate that ACE2 plays a critical role in influenza A (H7N9) virus-induced acute lung injury, and suggest that might be a useful potential therapeutic target for future influenza A (H7N9) outbreaks.

  4. ACE inhibition, ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) axis in kidney and cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Simões E Silva, Ana Cristina; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-05-01

    The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a pivotal physiological regulator of heart and kidney homeostasis, but also plays an important role in the pathophysiology of heart and kidney diseases. Recently, new components of the RAS have been discovered, including angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7), Mas receptor, Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine. These new components of RAS are formed by the hydrolysis of Ang I and Ang II and, in general, counteract the effects of Ang II. In experimental models of heart and renal diseases, Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine produced vasodilation, inhibition of cell growth, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. Recent pharmacological strategies have been proposed to potentiate the effects or to enhance the formation of Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9), including ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, cyclized form of Ang-(1-7) and nonpeptide synthetic Mas receptor agonists. Here, we review the role and effects of ACE2, ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) and synthetic Mas receptor agonists in the control of inflammation and fibrosis in cardiovascular and renal diseases and as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. We briefly comment on the therapeutic potential of the novel members of RAS, Ang-(1-9) and alamandine, and the interactions between classical RAS inhibitors and new players in heart and kidney diseases. PMID:26995300

  5. Cardiac protective effects of irbesartan via the PPAR-gamma signaling pathway in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a monocarboxypeptidase which metabolizes angiotensin II (Ang II) to generate Ang-(1–7), has been shown to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and injury but the mechanism remains elusive. Irbesartan has the dual actions of angiotensin receptor blockade and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation. We hypothesized that irbesartan would exert its protective effects on ACE2 deficiency-mediated myocardial fibrosis and cardiac injury via the PPARγ signaling. Methods 10-week-old ACE2 knockout (ACE2KO; Ace2-/y) mice received daily with irbesartan (50 mg/kg) or saline for 2 weeks. The wild-type mice (Ace2+/y) were used to the normal controls. We examined changes in myocardial ultrastructure, fibrosis-related genes and pathological signaling by real-time PCR gene array, Western blotting, Masson trichrome staining and transmission electron microscope analyses, respectively. Results Compared with the Ace2+/y mice, cardiac expression of PPARα and PPARγ were reduced in Ace2-/y mice and the myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) and expression of fibrosis-related genes were increased, including transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and collagen III. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency triggered cardiac hypertrophy, increased myocardial fibrosis and adverse ultrastructure injury in ACE2KO hearts with higher levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), without affecting cardiac systolic function. Intriguingly, treatment with irbesartan significantly reversed ACE2 deficiency-mediated pathological hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in Ace2-/y mice linked with enhancement of plasma Ang-(1–7) level and downregulation of AT1 receptor in heart. Consistent with attenuation of myocardial fibrosis and ultrastructure injury, the myocardial CVF and levels of ANF, TGFβ1, CTGF, collagen I, collagen III

  6. Perinatally administered losartan augments renal ACE2 expression but not cardiac or renal Mas receptor in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Jan; Olvedy, Michael; Ochodnicka-Mackovicova, Katarina; Kruzliak, Peter; Cacanyiova, Sona; Kristek, Frantisek; Krenek, Peter; Ochodnicky, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Since the identification of the alternative angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a new complex target for a pharmacological intervention. We investigated the expression of RAS components in the heart and kidney during the development of hypertension and its perinatal treatment with losartan in young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Expressions of RAS genes were studied by the RT-PCR in the left ventricle and kidney of rats: normotensive Wistar, untreated SHR, SHR treated with losartan since perinatal period until week 9 of age (20 mg/kg/day) and SHR treated with losartan only until week 4 of age and discontinued until week 9. In the hypertrophied left ventricle of SHR, cardiac expressions of Ace and Mas were decreased while those of AT1 receptor (Agtr1a) and Ace2 were unchanged. Continuous losartan administration reduced LV weight (0.43 ± 0.02; P < 0.05 versus SHR) but did not influence altered cardiac RAS expression. Increased blood pressure in SHR (149 ± 2 in SHR versus 109 ± 2 mmHg in Wistar; P < 0.05) was associated with a lower renal expressions of renin, Agtr1a and Mas and with an increase in ACE2. Continuous losartan administration lowered blood pressure to control levels (105 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05 versus SHR), however, only renal renin and ACE2 were significantly up-regulated (for both P < 0.05 versus SHR). Conclusively, prevention of hypertension and LV hypertrophy development by losartan was unrelated to cardiac or renal expression of Mas. Increased renal Ace2, and its further increase by losartan suggests the influence of locally generated Ang-(1-7) in organ response to the developing hypertension in SHRs.

  7. Collectrin, a homologue of ACE2, its transcriptional control and functional perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanling Wada, Jun

    2007-11-09

    Collectrin is a type I membrane protein and shares significant homology with C-terminal domain of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). However, collectrin lacks catalytic domain and it suggests the presence of uncharacterized physiological functions of collectrin. Collectrin is transcriptionally regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor-{alpha} and -{beta} and is highly expressed on renal proximal tubules and collecting ducts as well as pancreatic {beta}-cells. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated interesting physiological roles of collectrin related to insulin secretion, formation of primary cilia, renal cyst formation and amino acid transport. The common underlying molecular mechanism may be suggested by the evidence that collectrin binds to SNARE complex by interacting with snapin. Collectrin is involved in the process of vesicle transport and membrane fusion and thus it delivers insulin for exocytosis or various membrane proteins to apical plasmalemma and primary cilia. Collectrin may be the new therapeutic target for various pathological processes such as diabetes, polycystic kidney disease, hypertension and aminoaciduria.

  8. Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves glycemia in angiotensin II-infused mice

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Xia, Huijing; Pedersen, Kim Brint; Speth, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    An overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to contribute to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although ACE2 overexpression has been shown to be protective against the overactive RAS, a role for pancreatic ACE2, particularly in the islets of Langerhans, in regulating glycemia in response to elevated angiotensin II (Ang II) levels remains to be elucidated. This study examined the role of endogenous pancreatic ACE2 and the impact of elevated Ang II levels on the enzyme's ability to alleviate hyperglycemia in an Ang II infusion mouse model. Male C57bl/6J mice were infused with Ang II or saline for a period of 14 days. On the 7th day of infusion, either an adenovirus encoding human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2) or a control adenovirus (Ad-eGFP) was injected into the mouse pancreas. After an additional 7–8 days, glycemia and plasma insulin levels as well as RAS components expression and oxidative stress were assessed. Ang II-infused mice exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets compared with control mice. This phenotype was associated with decreased ACE2 expression and activity, increased Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, and increased oxidative stress in the mouse pancreas. Ad-hACE2 treatment restored pancreatic ACE2 expression and compensatory activity against Ang II-mediated impaired glycemia, thus improving β-cell function. Our data suggest that decreased pancreatic ACE2 is a link between overactive RAS and impaired glycemia in T2DM. Moreover, maintenance of a normal endogenous ACE2 compensatory activity in the pancreas appears critical to avoid β-cell dysfunction, supporting a therapeutic potential for ACE2 in controlling diabetes resulting from an overactive RAS. PMID:23462816

  9. Increasing brain angiotensin converting enzyme 2 activity decreases anxiety-like behavior in male mice by activating central Mas receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; de Kloet, Annette D; Pati, Dipanwita; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; Pioquinto, David J; Ludin, Jacob A; Oh, S Paul; Katovich, Michael J; Frazier, Charles J; Raizada, Mohan K; Krause, Eric G

    2016-06-01

    Over-activation of the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the etiology of anxiety disorders. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibits RAS activity by converting angiotensin-II, the effector peptide of RAS, to angiotensin-(1-7), which activates the Mas receptor (MasR). Whether increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety by stimulating central MasR is unknown. To test the hypothesis that increasing brain ACE2 activity reduces anxiety-like behavior via central MasR stimulation, we generated male mice overexpressing ACE2 (ACE2 KI mice) and wild type littermate controls (WT). ACE2 KI mice explored the open arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM) significantly more than WT, suggesting increasing ACE2 activity is anxiolytic. Central delivery of diminazene aceturate, an ACE2 activator, to C57BL/6 mice also reduced anxiety-like behavior in the EPM, but centrally administering ACE2 KI mice A-779, a MasR antagonist, abolished their anxiolytic phenotype, suggesting that ACE2 reduces anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR. To identify the brain circuits mediating these effects, we measured Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, subsequent to EPM exposure and found that ACE2 KI mice had decreased Fos in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis but had increased Fos in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Within the BLA, we determined that ∼62% of GABAergic neurons contained MasR mRNA and expression of MasR mRNA was upregulated by ACE2 overexpression, suggesting that ACE2 may influence GABA neurotransmission within the BLA via MasR activation. Indeed, ACE2 overexpression was associated with increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (indicative of presynaptic release of GABA) onto BLA pyramidal neurons and central infusion of A-779 eliminated this effect. Collectively, these results suggest that ACE2 may reduce anxiety-like behavior by activating central MasR that facilitate GABA release onto pyramidal neurons within the

  10. Atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves the canine rapid atrial pacing-induced structural and electrical remodeling. Fan, ACE2 improves atrial substrate remodeling.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinqi; Zou, Lili; Cui, Kun; Woo, Kamsang; Du, Huaan; Chen, Shaojie; Ling, Zhiyu; Zhang, Quanjun; Zhang, Bo; Lan, Xianbin; Su, Li; Zrenner, Bernhard; Yin, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) by homogeneous transmural atrial gene transfer can reverse atrial remodeling and its mechanisms in a canine atrial-pacing model. Twenty-eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into four groups: Sham-operated, AF-control, gene therapy with adenovirus-enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) and gene therapy with Ad-ACE2 (Ad-ACE2) (n = 7 per subgroup). AF was induced in all dogs except the Sham-operated group by rapid atrial pacing at 450 beats/min for 2 weeks. Ad-EGFP and Ad-ACE2 group then received epicardial gene painting. Three weeks after gene transfer, all animals except the Sham group underwent rapid atrial pacing for another 3 weeks and then invasive electrophysiological, histological and molecular studies. The Ad-ACE2 group showed an increased ACE2 and Angiotensin-(1-7) expression, and decreased Angiotensin II expression in comparison with Ad-EGFP and AF-control group. ACE2 overexpression attenuated rapid atrial pacing-induced increase in activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) levels, and decrease in MAPK phosphatase 1(MKP-1) level, resulting in attenuation of atrial fibrosis collagen protein markers and transforming growth factor-β1. Additionally, ACE2 overexpression also modulated the tachypacing-induced up-regulation of connexin 40, down-regulation of connexin 43 and Kv4.2, and significantly decreased the inducibility and duration of AF. ACE2 overexpression could shift the renin-angiotensin system balance towards the protective axis, attenuate cardiac fibrosis remodeling associated with up-regulation of MKP-1 and reduction of MAPKs activities, modulate tachypacing-induced ion channels and connexin remodeling, and subsequently reduce the inducibility and duration of AF.

  11. Evaluation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), its homologue ACE2 and neprilysin in angiotensin peptide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    In the RAS (renin–angiotensin system), Ang I (angiotensin I) is cleaved by ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) to form Ang II (angiotensin II), which has effects on blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis. We have examined the kinetics of angiotensin peptide cleavage by full-length human ACE, the separate N- and C-domains of ACE, the homologue of ACE, ACE2, and NEP (neprilysin). The activity of the enzyme preparations was determined by active-site titrations using competitive tight-binding inhibitors and fluorogenic substrates. Ang I was effectively cleaved by NEP to Ang (1–7) (kcat/Km of 6.2×105 M−1·s−1), but was a poor substrate for ACE2 (kcat/Km of 3.3×104 M−1·s−1). Ang (1–9) was a better substrate for NEP than ACE (kcat/Km of 3.7×105 M−1·s−1 compared with kcat/Km of 6.8×104 M−1·s−1). Ang II was cleaved efficiently by ACE2 to Ang (1–7) (kcat/Km of 2.2×106 M−1·s−1) and was cleaved by NEP (kcat/Km of 2.2×105 M−1·s−1) to several degradation products. In contrast with a previous report, Ang (1–7), like Ang I and Ang (1–9), was cleaved with a similar efficiency by both the N- and C-domains of ACE (kcat/Km of 3.6×105 M−1·s−1 compared with kcat/Km of 3.3×105 M−1·s−1). The two active sites of ACE exhibited negative co-operativity when either Ang I or Ang (1–7) was the substrate. In addition, a range of ACE inhibitors failed to inhibit ACE2. These kinetic data highlight that the flux of peptides through the RAS is complex, with the levels of ACE, ACE2 and NEP dictating whether vasoconstriction or vasodilation will predominate. PMID:15283675

  12. Apolipoprotein A-I Mimetic Peptide D-4F Reduces Cardiac Hypertrophy and Improves Apolipoprotein A-I-Mediated Reverse Cholesterol Transport From Cardiac Tissue in LDL Receptor-null Mice Fed a Western Diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Zhang, Song; Ye, Ping; Liu, Yong-Xue; Qin, Yan-Wen; Miao, Dong-Mei

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that hypercholesterolemia is an independent determinant of increased left ventricular (LV) mass. Because high-density lipoprotein and its major protein apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mediate reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and have cardiac protective effects, we hypothesized that the apoA-I mimetic peptide D-4F could promote RCT in cardiac tissue and decrease cardiac hypertrophy induced by hypercholesterolemia. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice were fed by a Western diet for 18 weeks and then randomized to receive water, or D-4F 0.3 mg/mL, or D-4F 0.5 mg/mL added to drinking water for 6 weeks. After D-4F administration, an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride in a trend toward dose-responsivity were found in cardiac tissue. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed a reduction in LV posterior wall end-diastolic dimension, and an increase in mitral valve E/A ratio and LV ejection fraction. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed reduced LV wall thickness and myocardial cell diameter. The protein levels of ABCA1 and LXRα were elevated in cardiac tissue of D-4F treated mice compared with the controls (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that D-4F treatment reduced cardiac hypertrophy, and improved cardiac performance in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice fed a Western diet, presumably through the LXRα-ABCA1 pathway associated with enhanced myocardial RCT.

  13. Variability in the benzodiazepine response of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor null mice displaying anxiety-like phenotype: evidence for genetic modifiers in the 5-HT-mediated regulation of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Sarah J; Toth, Miklos

    2004-07-14

    Benzodiazepines (BZs) acting as modulators of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are an important group of drugs for the treatment of anxiety disorders. However, a large inter-individual variation in BZ sensitivity occurs in the human population with some anxiety disorder patients exhibiting diminished sensitivity to BZ and reduced density of GABA(A)Rs. The mechanism underlying BZ treatment resistance is not known, and it is not possible to predict whether an anxiety patient will respond to BZ. 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor (5-HT1AR) null mice (R-/-) on the Swiss-Webster (SW) background reproduce several features of BZ-resistant anxiety; they exhibit anxiety-related behaviors, do not respond to BZ, have reduced BZ binding, and have decreased expression of the major GABA(A)R subunits alpha1 and alpha2. Here, we show that R-/- mice on the C57Bl6 (B6) background also have anxiety phenotype, but they respond to BZ and have normal GABA(A)R subunit expression. This indicates that the 5-HT1AR-mediated regulation of GABA(A)R alpha subunit expression is subject to genetic modification. Hybrid SW/B6-R-/- mice also exhibit BZ-resistant anxiety, suggesting that SW mice carry a genetic modifier, which mediates the effect of the 5-HT1AR on the expression of GABA(A)Ralpha subunits. In addition, we show that this genetic interaction in SW mice operates early in postnatal life to influence the expression of GABA(A)R alpha subunits at the transcriptional level. These data indicate that BZ-resistant anxiety results from a developmental arrest of GABA(A)R expression in SW-R-/- mice, and a similar mechanism may be responsible for the BZ insensitivity of some anxiety patients.

  14. Differential post-surgical metastasis and survival in SCID, NOD-SCID and NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(null) mice with parental and subline variants of human breast cancer: implications for host defense mechanisms regulating metastasis.

    PubMed

    Milsom, Chloe C; Lee, Christina R; Hackl, Christina; Man, Shan; Kerbel, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    We compare for the first time, the metastatic aggressiveness of the parental MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and two luciferase-tagged in vivo-derived and selected pro-metastatic variants (LM2-4/luc⁺ and 164/8-1B/luc⁺ in SCID, NOD-SCID and NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(null) (NSG) mice following orthotopic implantation and primary tumour resection. The variants are known to be more aggressively metastatic in SCID mice, compared to the parental line which has limited spontaneous metastatic competence in these mice. When 2×10⁶ cells were injected into the mammary fat pad, the growth of the resultant primary tumours was identical for the various cell lines in the three strains of mice. However, metastatic spread of all three cell lines, including the MDA-MB-231 parental cell line, was strikingly more aggressive in the highly immunocompromised NSG mice compared to both NOD-SCID and SCID mice, resulting in extensive multi-organ metastases and a significant reduction in overall survival. While these studies were facilitated by monitoring post-surgical spontaneous metastases using whole body bioluminescence imaging, we observed that the luciferase-tagged parental line showed altered growth and diminished metastatic properties compared to its untagged counterpart. Our results are the first to show that host immunity can have a profound impact on the spread of spontaneous visceral metastases and survival following resection of a primary tumour in circumstances where the growth of primary tumours is not similarly affected; as such they highlight the importance of immunity in the metastatic process, and by extension, suggest certain therapeutic strategies that may have a significant impact on reducing metastasis.

  15. Chronic proliferative dermatitis in Sharpin null mice: development of an autoinflammatory disease in the absence of B and T lymphocytes and IL4/IL13 signaling.

    PubMed

    Potter, Christopher S; Wang, Zhe; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Burzenski, Lisa; Shultz, Leonard D; Hogenesch, Harm; Sundberg, John P

    2014-01-01

    SHARPIN is a key regulator of NFKB and integrin signaling. Mice lacking Sharpin develop a phenotype known as chronic proliferative dermatitis (CPDM), typified by progressive epidermal hyperplasia, apoptosis of keratinocytes, cutaneous and systemic eosinophilic inflammation, and hypoplasia of secondary lymphoid organs. Rag1(-/-) mice, which lack mature B and T cells, were crossed with Sharpin(-/-) mice to examine the role of lymphocytes in CDPM. Although inflammation in the lungs, liver, and joints was reduced in these double mutant mice, dermatitis was not reduced in the absence of functional lymphocytes, suggesting that lymphocytes are not primary drivers of the inflammation in the skin. Type 2 cytokine expression is increased in CPDM. In an attempt to reduce this aspect of the phenotype, Il4ra(-/-) mice, unresponsive to both IL4 and IL13, were crossed with Sharpin(-/-) mice. Double homozygous Sharpin(-/-) , Il4ra(-/-) mice developed an exacerbated granulocytic dermatitis, acute system inflammation, as well as hepatic necrosis and mineralization. High expression of CHI3L4, normally seen in CPDM skin, was abolished in Sharpin(-/-) , Il4ra(-/-) double mutant mice indicating the crucial role of IL4 and IL13 in the expression of this protein. Cutaneous eosinophilia persisted in Sharpin(-/-) , Il4ra(-/-) mice, although expression of Il5 mRNA was reduced and the expression of Ccl11 and Ccl24 was completely abolished. TSLP and IL33 were both increased in the skin of Sharpin(-/-) mice and this was maintained in Sharpin(-/-) , Il4ra(-/-) mice suggesting a role for TSLP and IL33 in the eosinophilic dermatitis in SHARPIN-deficient mice. These studies indicate that cutaneous inflammation in SHARPIN-deficient mice is autoinflammatory in nature developing independently of B and T lymphocytes, while the systemic inflammation seen in CPDM has a strong lymphocyte-dependent component. Both the cutaneous and systemic inflammation is enhanced by loss of IL4 and IL13 signaling

  16. Chronic Proliferative Dermatitis in Sharpin Null Mice: Development of an Autoinflammatory Disease in the Absence of B and T Lymphocytes and IL4/IL13 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Christopher S.; Wang, Zhe; Silva, Kathleen A.; Kennedy, Victoria E.; Stearns, Timothy M.; Burzenski, Lisa; Shultz, Leonard D.; HogenEsch, Harm; Sundberg, John P.

    2014-01-01

    SHARPIN is a key regulator of NFKB and integrin signaling. Mice lacking Sharpin develop a phenotype known as chronic proliferative dermatitis (CPDM), typified by progressive epidermal hyperplasia, apoptosis of keratinocytes, cutaneous and systemic eosinophilic inflammation, and hypoplasia of secondary lymphoid organs. Rag1−/− mice, which lack mature B and T cells, were crossed with Sharpin−/− mice to examine the role of lymphocytes in CDPM. Although inflammation in the lungs, liver, and joints was reduced in these double mutant mice, dermatitis was not reduced in the absence of functional lymphocytes, suggesting that lymphocytes are not primary drivers of the inflammation in the skin. Type 2 cytokine expression is increased in CPDM. In an attempt to reduce this aspect of the phenotype, Il4ra−/− mice, unresponsive to both IL4 and IL13, were crossed with Sharpin−/− mice. Double homozygous Sharpin−/−, Il4ra−/− mice developed an exacerbated granulocytic dermatitis, acute system inflammation, as well as hepatic necrosis and mineralization. High expression of CHI3L4, normally seen in CPDM skin, was abolished in Sharpin−/−, Il4ra−/− double mutant mice indicating the crucial role of IL4 and IL13 in the expression of this protein. Cutaneous eosinophilia persisted in Sharpin−/−, Il4ra−/− mice, although expression of Il5 mRNA was reduced and the expression of Ccl11 and Ccl24 was completely abolished. TSLP and IL33 were both increased in the skin of Sharpin−/− mice and this was maintained in Sharpin−/−, Il4ra−/− mice suggesting a role for TSLP and IL33 in the eosinophilic dermatitis in SHARPIN-deficient mice. These studies indicate that cutaneous inflammation in SHARPIN-deficient mice is autoinflammatory in nature developing independently of B and T lymphocytes, while the systemic inflammation seen in CPDM has a strong lymphocyte-dependent component. Both the cutaneous and systemic inflammation is enhanced by loss of IL4 and

  17. Clear Sky Column Closure Studies of Urban-Marine and Mineral-Dust Aerosols Using Aircraft, Ship, Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements in ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Oestroem, Elisabeth; Noone, Kevin J.; Durkee, Philip A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gordon, Howard R.; Formenti, Paola; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), European urban-marine and African mineral-dust aerosols were measured aboard the Pelican aircraft, the Research Vessel Vodyanitskiy from the ground and from satellites.

  18. Identification of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins with nuclear export activity: cell cycle-regulated transcription factor ace2p shows cell cycle-independent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T H; Neville, M; Rain, J C; McCarthy, T; Legrain, P; Rosbash, M

    2000-11-01

    Nuclear export of proteins containing leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) is mediated by the NES receptor CRM1/Crm1p. We have carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen with Crm1p as a bait. The Crm1p-interacting clones were subscreened for nuclear export activity in a visual assay utilizing the Crm1p-inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB). This approach identified three Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins not previously known to have nuclear export activity. These proteins are the 5' RNA triphosphatase Ctl1p, the cell cycle-regulated transcription factor Ace2p, and a protein encoded by the previously uncharacterized open reading frame YDR499W. Mutagenesis analysis show that YDR499Wp contains an NES that conforms to the consensus sequence for leucine-rich NESs. Mutagenesis of Ctl1p and Ace2p were unable to identify specific NES residues. However, a 29-amino-acid region of Ace2p, rich in hydrophobic residues, contains nuclear export activity. Ace2p accumulates in the nucleus at the end of mitosis and activates early-G(1)-specific genes. We now provide evidence that Ace2p is nuclear not only in late M-early G(1) but also during other stages of the cell cycle. This feature of Ace2p localization explains its ability to activate genes such as CUP1, which are not expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner.

  19. Up-regulation of Thrombospondin-2 in Akt1-null Mice Contributes to Compromised Tissue Repair Due to Abnormalities in Fibroblast Function*

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, Tara; Bouaouina, Mohamed; Roberts, Sophia; Lee, Monica; Calderwood, David A.; Schwartz, Martin; Simons, Michael; Sessa, William C.; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is essential for tissue repair and is regulated by multiple factors, including thrombospondin-2 (TSP2) and hypoxia/VEGF-induced activation of Akt. In contrast to TSP2 knock-out (KO) mice, Akt1 KO mice have elevated TSP2 expression and delayed tissue repair. To investigate the contribution of increased TSP2 to Akt1 KO mice phenotypes, we generated Akt1/TSP2 double KO (DKO) mice. Full-thickness excisional wounds in DKO mice healed at an accelerated rate when compared with Akt1 KO mice. Isolated dermal Akt1 KO fibroblasts expressed increased TSP2 and displayed altered morphology and defects in migration and adhesion. These defects were rescued in DKO fibroblasts or after TSP2 knockdown. Conversely, the addition of exogenous TSP2 to WT cells induced cell morphology and migration rates that were similar to those of Akt1 KO cells. Akt1 KO fibroblasts displayed reduced adhesion to fibronectin with manganese stimulation when compared with WT and DKO cells, revealing an Akt1-dependent role for TSP2 in regulating integrin-mediated adhesions; however, this effect was not due to changes in β1 integrin surface expression or activation. Consistent with these results, Akt1 KO fibroblasts displayed reduced Rac1 activation that was dependent upon expression of TSP2 and could be rescued by a constitutively active Rac mutant. Our observations show that repression of TSP2 expression is a critical aspect of Akt1 function in tissue repair. PMID:25389299

  20. Ventilatory responses during and following exposure to a hypoxic challenge in conscious mice deficient or null in S-nitrosoglutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Lisa A; May, Walter J; deRonde, Kimberly; Brown-Steinke, Kathleen; Bates, James N; Gaston, Benjamin; Lewis, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to a hypoxic challenge increases ventilation in wild-type (WT) mice that diminish during the challenge (roll-off) whereas return to room air causes an increase in ventilation (short-term facilitation, STF). Since plasma and tissue levels of ventilatory excitant S-nitrosothiols such as S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) increase during hypoxia, this study examined whether (1) the initial increase in ventilation is due to generation of GSNO, (2) roll-off is due to increased activity of the GSNO degrading enzyme, GSNO reductase (GSNOR), and (3) STF is limited by GSNOR activity. Initial ventilatory responses to hypoxic challenge (10% O2, 90% N2) were similar in WT, GSNO+/− and GSNO−/− mice. These responses diminished markedly during hypoxic challenge in WT mice whereas there was minimal roll-off in GSNOR+/− and GSNOR−/− mice. Finally, STF was greater in GSNOR+/− and GSNOR−/− mice than WT mice (especially females). This study suggests that GSNOR degradation of GSNO is a vital step in the expression of ventilatory roll-off and that GSNOR suppresses STF. PMID:23183419

  1. Rapid tumor formation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected cell lines in novel NOD-SCID/gammac(null) mice: suppression by an inhibitor against NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Dewan, M Zahidunnabi; Terashima, Kazuo; Taruishi, Midori; Hasegawa, Hideki; Ito, Mamoru; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Mori, Naoki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Maeda, Michiyuki; Kubuki, Yoko; Okayama, Akihiko; Fujii, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2003-05-01

    We established a novel experimental model for human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced tumor using NOD-SCID/gammac(null) (NOG) mice. This model is very useful for investigating the mechanism of tumorigenesis and malignant cell growth of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL)/lymphoma, which still remains unclear. Nine HTLV-1-infected cell lines were inoculated subcutaneously in the postauricular region of NOG mice. As early as 2 to 3 weeks after inoculation, seven cell lines produced a visible tumor while two transformed cell lines failed to do so. Five of seven lines produced a progressively growing large tumor with leukemic infiltration of the cells in various organs that eventually killed the animals. Leukemic cell lines formed soft tumors, whereas some transformed cell lines developed into hemorrhagic hard tumors in NOG mice. One of the leukemic cell lines, ED-40515(-), was unable to produce visible tumors in NOD-SCID mice with a common gamma-chain after 2 weeks. In vivo NF-kappaB DNA binding activity of the ED-40515(-) cell line was higher and the NF-kappaB components were changed compared to cells in vitro. Bay 11-7082, a specific and effective NF-kappaB inhibitor, prevented tumor growth at the sites of the primary region and leukemic infiltration in various organs of NOG mice. This in vivo model of ATL could provide a novel system for use in clarifying the mechanism of growth of HTLV-1-infected cells as well as for the development of new drugs against ATL.

  2. Disabled-2 heterozygous mice are predisposed to endometrial and ovarian tumorigenesis and exhibit sex-biased embryonic lethality in a p53-null background.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Hua; Fazili, Zia; Smith, Elizabeth R; Cai, Kathy Qi; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Cohen, Cynthia; Horowitz, Ira R; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2006-07-01

    Disabled-2 (Dab2) is a phosphoprotein involved in cellular signal transduction and endocytic trafficking. The expression of Dab2 is frequently lost or suppressed in several epithelial tumors, and studies of its cellular function and growth suppressive activity when re-expressed in cancer cells led to the suggestion that Dab2 is a tumor suppressor. A role for Dab2 in epithelial cell positioning organization was derived from study of knockout mice: homozygous deletion of dab2 results in early embryonic lethality due to the disorganization of the primitive endoderm, the first epithelium in early embryos. We now report that dab2 heterozygous mice develop uterine hyperplasia and ovarian preneoplastic morphological changes at a high frequency. Crossing into a p53(-/-) background unexpectedly produced few female dab2(+/-):p53(-/-) mice, while the male dab2(+/-):p53(-/-) were born at the expected Mendelian frequency. The tumor-prone phenotype of dab2(+/-) mice provides additional support for a role of human Dab2 as a tumor suppressor, and the sex-biased embryonic lethality suggests a genetic interaction between p53 and dab2 genes in female mice. PMID:16816378

  3. Sex Differences in Ethanol’s Anxiolytic Effect and Chronic Ethanol Withdrawal Severity in Mice With a Null Mutation of the 5α-Reductase Type 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tanchuck-Nipper, Michelle A.; Ford, Matthew M.; Hertzberg, Anna; Beadles-Bohling, Amy; Cozzoli, Debra K.; Finn, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of endogenous levels of the GABAergic neurosteroid allopregnanolone alters sensitivity to some effects of ethanol. Chronic ethanol withdrawal decreases activity and expression of 5α-reductase-1, an important enzyme in allopregnanolone biosynthesis encoded by the 5α-reductase-1 gene (Srd5a1). The present studies examined the impact of Srd5a1 deletion in male and female mice on several acute effects of ethanol and on chronic ethanol withdrawal severity. Genotype and sex did not differentially alter ethanol-induced hypothermia, ataxia, hypnosis, or metabolism, but ethanol withdrawal was significantly lower in female versus male mice. On the elevated plus maze, deletion of the Srd5a1 gene significantly decreased ethanol’s effect on total entries versus wildtype (WT) mice and significantly decreased ethanol’s anxiolytic effect in female knockout (KO) versus WT mice. The limited sex differences in the ability of Srd5a1 genotype to modulate select ethanol effects may reflect an interaction between developmental compensations to deletion of the Srd5a1 gene with sex hormones and levels of endogenous neurosteroids. PMID:25355320

  4. Alteration of BACE1-dependent NRG1/ErbB4 signaling and schizophrenia-like phenotypes in BACE1-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Savonenko, A. V.; Melnikova, T.; Laird, F. M.; Stewart, K.-A.; Price, D. L.; Wong, P. C.

    2008-01-01

    β-Site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is required for the penultimate cleavage of the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) leading to the generation of amyloid-β peptides that is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In addition to its role in endoproteolysis of APP, BACE1 participates in the proteolytic processing of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and influences the myelination of central and peripheral axons. Although NRG1 has been genetically linked to schizophrenia and NRG1+/− mice exhibit a number of schizophrenia-like behavioral traits, it is not known whether altered BACE1-dependent NRG1 signaling can cause similar behavioral abnormalities. To test this hypothesis, we analyze the behaviors considered to be rodent analogs of clinical features of schizophrenia in BACE1−/− mice with impaired processing of NRG1. We demonstrate that BACE1−/− mice exhibit deficits in prepulse inhibition, novelty-induced hyperactivity, hypersensitivity to a glutamatergic psychostimulant (MK-801), cognitive impairments, and deficits in social recognition. Importantly, some of these manifestations were responsive to treatment with clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic drug. Moreover, although the total amount of ErbB4, a receptor for NRG1 was not changed, binding of ErbB4 with postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) was significantly reduced in the brains of BACE1−/− mice. Consistent with the role of ErbB4 in spine morphology and synaptic function, BACE1−/− mice displayed reduced spine density in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Collectively, our findings suggest that alterations in BACE1-dependent NRG1/ErbB4 signaling may participate in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related psychiatric disorders. PMID:18385378

  5. The antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic drugs ketamine and AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646 are preserved in bdnf⁺/⁻ heterozygous null mice.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Jesse S O; Autio, Henri; Vesa, Liisa; Antila, Hanna; Lindemann, Lothar; Hoener, Marius C; Skolnick, Phil; Rantamäki, Tomi; Castrén, Eero

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that biogenic amine-based antidepressants act, at least in part, via regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Biogenic amine-based antidepressants increase BDNF synthesis and activate its signaling pathway through TrkB receptors. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of these molecules are abolished in BDNF deficient mice. Glutamate-based drugs, including the NMDA antagonist ketamine, and the AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646, mimic the effects of antidepressants in preclinical tests with high predictive validity. In humans, a single intravenous dose of ketamine produces an antidepressant effect that is rapid, robust and persistent. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF in expression of the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and an AMPA receptor potentiator (LY 451646) in the forced swim test (FST). Ketamine and LY 451646 produced antidepressant-like effects in the FST in mice at 45 min after a single injection, but no effects were observed one week after a single ketamine injection. As previously reported, the effects of imipramine in the forced swim test were blunted in heterozygous BDNF knockout (bdnf(+/-)) mice. However ketamine and LY 451646 produced similar antidepressant-like responses in wildtype and bdnf(+/-) mice. Neither ketamine nor LY 451646 significantly influenced the levels BDNF or TrkB phosphorylation in the hippocampus when assessed at 45 min or 7 days after the drug administration. These data demonstrate that under the conditions tested, neither ketamine nor the AMPA-potentiator LY 451656 activate BDNF signaling, but produce a characteristic antidepressant-like response in heterozygous bdnf(+/-) mice. These data indicate that unlike biogenic amine-based agents, BDNF signaling does not play a pivotal role in the antidepressant effects of glutamate-based compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  6. Fusobacterium nucleatum Alters Atherosclerosis Risk Factors and Enhances Inflammatory Markers with an Atheroprotective Immune Response in ApoE(null) Mice.

    PubMed

    Velsko, Irina M; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    The American Heart Association supports an association between periodontal disease (PD) and atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) but does not as of yet support a causal relationship. Recently, we have shown that major periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are causally associated with acceleration of aortic atherosclerosis in ApoEnull hyperlipidemic mice. The aim of this study was to determine if oral infection with another significant periodontal pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum can accelerate aortic inflammation and atherosclerosis in the aortic artery of ApoEnull mice. ApoEnull mice (n = 23) were orally infected with F. nucleatum ATCC 49256 and euthanized at 12 and 24 weeks. Periodontal disease assessments including F. nucleatum oral colonization, gingival inflammation, immune response, intrabony defects, and alveolar bone resorption were evaluated. Systemic organs were evaluated for infection, aortic sections were examined for atherosclerosis, and inflammatory markers were measured. Chronic oral infection established F. nucleatum colonization in the oral cavity, induced significant humoral IgG (P=0.0001) and IgM (P=0.001) antibody response (12 and 24 weeks), and resulted in significant (P=0.0001) alveolar bone resorption and intrabony defects. F. nucleatum genomic DNA was detected in systemic organs (heart, aorta, liver, kidney, lung) indicating bacteremia. Aortic atherosclerotic plaque area was measured and showed a local inflammatory infiltrate revealed the presence of F4/80+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells. Vascular inflammation was detected by enhanced systemic cytokines (CD30L, IL-4, IL-12), oxidized LDL and serum amyloid A, as well as altered serum lipid profile (cholesterol, triglycerides, chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL), in infected mice and altered aortic gene expression in infected mice. Despite evidence for systemic infection in several organs and modulation of known atherosclerosis risk factors, aortic atherosclerotic

  7. Alteration of BACE1-dependent NRG1/ErbB4 signaling and schizophrenia-like phenotypes in BACE1-null mice.

    PubMed

    Savonenko, A V; Melnikova, T; Laird, F M; Stewart, K-A; Price, D L; Wong, P C

    2008-04-01

    beta-Site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is required for the penultimate cleavage of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) leading to the generation of amyloid-beta peptides that is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In addition to its role in endoproteolysis of APP, BACE1 participates in the proteolytic processing of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and influences the myelination of central and peripheral axons. Although NRG1 has been genetically linked to schizophrenia and NRG1(+/-) mice exhibit a number of schizophrenia-like behavioral traits, it is not known whether altered BACE1-dependent NRG1 signaling can cause similar behavioral abnormalities. To test this hypothesis, we analyze the behaviors considered to be rodent analogs of clinical features of schizophrenia in BACE1(-/-) mice with impaired processing of NRG1. We demonstrate that BACE1(-/-) mice exhibit deficits in prepulse inhibition, novelty-induced hyperactivity, hypersensitivity to a glutamatergic psychostimulant (MK-801), cognitive impairments, and deficits in social recognition. Importantly, some of these manifestations were responsive to treatment with clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic drug. Moreover, although the total amount of ErbB4, a receptor for NRG1 was not changed, binding of ErbB4 with postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) was significantly reduced in the brains of BACE1(-/-) mice. Consistent with the role of ErbB4 in spine morphology and synaptic function, BACE1(-/-) mice displayed reduced spine density in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Collectively, our findings suggest that alterations in BACE1-dependent NRG1/ErbB4 signaling may participate in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related psychiatric disorders. PMID:18385378

  8. Augmented atherogenesis in ApoE-null mice co-exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Qiuli; Wang, Jing; Huang, Fengchen; Lv, Xiaowen; Ma, Min; Du, Yuguo

    2014-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants found as complex mixtures in the environment throughout the world. Therefore, humans are ubiquitously and simultaneously exposed to TCDD and PCBs. TCDD and PCBs alone have been linked to atherosclerosis. However, the effects of interactions or synergism between TCDD and PCBs on atherogenesis are unknown. We investigated the possible enhanced atherogenesis by co-exposure to TCDD and PCBs and the potential mechanism(s) involved in this enhancement. Male ApoE{sup −/−} mice were exposed to TCDD (15 μg/kg) and Aroclor1254 (55 mg/kg, a representative mixture of PCBs) alone or in combination by intraperitoneal injection four times over six weeks of duration. Our results showed that mice exposed to TCDD alone, but not Aroclor1254 alone, developed atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, we found that atherosclerotic disease was exacerbated to the greatest extent in mice co-exposed to TCDD and Aroclor1254. The enhanced lesions correlated with several pro-atherogenic changes, including a marked increase in the accumulation of the platelet-derived chemokine PF4, and the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine MCP-1 and the critical immunity gene-RIG-I. Our data demonstrated that co-exposure to TCDD and Aroclor1254 markedly enhanced atherogenesis in ApoE{sup −/−} mice. Significantly, our observations suggest that combined exposure to TCDD and PCBs may be a greater cardiovascular health risk than previously anticipated from individual studies. - Highlights: • Augmented atherogenesis was found in ApoE{sup −/−} mice co-exposed to Aroclor1254 and TCDD. • Enhanced expression of PF4, MCP-1 and RIG-I correlated with augmented lesions. • POPs combination may be a greater cardiovascular health risk than individual POPs.

  9. A null c-myc mutation causes lethality before 10.5 days of gestation in homozygotes and reduced fertility in heterozygous female mice.

    PubMed

    Davis, A C; Wims, M; Spotts, G D; Hann, S R; Bradley, A

    1993-04-01

    To directly assess c-myc function in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and embryogenesis, we have used homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells to generate both heterozygous and homozygous c-myc mutant ES cell lines. The mutation is a null allele at the protein level. Mouse chimeras from seven heterozygous cell lines transmitted the mutant allele to their offspring. The analysis of embryos from two clones has shown that the mutation is lethal in homozygotes between 9.5 and 10.5 days of gestation. The embryos are generally smaller and retarded in development compared with their littermates. Pathologic abnormalities include the heart, pericardium, neural tube, and delay or failure in turning of the embryo. Heterozygous females have reduced fertility owing to embryonic resorption before 9.5 days of gestation in 14% of implanted embryos. c-Myc protein is necessary for embryonic survival beyond 10.5 days of gestation; however, it appears to be dispensable for cell division both in ES cell lines and in the embryo before that time.

  10. Examination of FGFRL1 as a candidate gene for diaphragmatic defects at chromosome 4p16.3 shows that Fgfrl1 null mice have reduced expression of Tpm3, sarcomere genes and Lrtm1 in the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    LopezJimenez, Nelson; Gerber, Simon D.; Popovici, Vlad; Mirza, Sonia; Copren, Kirsten; Ta, Linda; Shaw, Gary M.; Trueb, Beat

    2010-01-01

    Fgfrl1 (also known as Fgfr5; OMIM 605830) homozygous null mice have thin, amuscular diaphragms and die at birth because of diaphragm hypoplasia. FGFRL1 is located at 4p16.3, and this chromosome region can be deleted in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We examined FGFRL1 as a candidate gene for the diaphragmatic defects associated with 4p16.3 deletions and re-sequenced this gene in 54 patients with CDH. We confirmed six known coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): c.209G > A (p.Pro20Pro), c.977G > A (p.Pro276Pro), c.1040T > C (p.Asp297Asp), c.1234C > A (p.Pro362Gln), c.1420G > T (p.Arg424Leu), and c.1540C > T (p.Pro464Leu), but we did not identify any gene mutations. We genotyped additional CDH patients for four of these six SNPs, including the three non-synonymous SNPs, to make a total of 200 chromosomes, and found that the allele frequency for the four SNPs, did not differ significantly between patients and normal controls (p ≥ 0.05). We then used Affymetrix Genechip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST arrays and found eight genes with significantly reduced expression levels in the diaphragms of Fgfrl1 homozygous null mice when compared with wildtype mice—Tpm3, Fgfrl1 (p = 0.004), Myl2, Lrtm1, Myh4, Myl3, Myh7 and Hephl1. Lrtm1 is closely related to Slit3, a protein associated with herniation of the central tendon of the diaphragm in mice. The Slit proteins are known to regulate axon branching and cell migration, and inhibition of Slit3 reduces cell motility and decreases the expression of Rac and Cdc42, two genes that are essential for myoblast fusion. Further studies to determine if Lrtm1 has a similar function to Slit3 and if reduced Fgfrl1 expression can cause diaphragm hypoplasia through a mechanism involving decreased myoblast motility and/or myoblast fusion, seem indicated. PMID:20024584

  11. Genetic background influences embryonic lethality and the occurrence of neural tube defects in Men1 null mice: relevance to genetic modifiers.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Manuel C; Harding, Brian; Reed, Anita A C; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Walls, Gerard V; Bowl, Michael R; Sharpe, James; Wedden, Sarah; Moss, Julie E; Ross, Allyson; Davidson, Duncan; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2009-10-01

    Germline mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene cause parathyroid, pancreatic and pituitary tumours in man. MEN1 mutations also cause familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and the same MEN1 mutations, in different families, can cause either FIHP or MEN1. This suggests a role for genetic background and modifier genes in altering the expression of a mutation. We investigated the effects of genetic background on the phenotype of embryonic lethality that occurs in a mouse model for MEN1. Men1(+/-) mice were backcrossed to generate C57BL/6 and 129S6/SvEv incipient congenic strains, and used to obtain homozygous Men1(-/-) mice. No viable Men1(-/-) mice were obtained. The analysis of 411 live embryos obtained at 9.5-16.5 days post-coitum (dpc) revealed that significant deviations from the expected Mendelian 1:2:1 genotype ratio were first observed at 12.5 and 14.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively (P<0.05). Moreover, live Men1(-/-) embryos were absent by 13.5 and 15.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively thereby indicating an earlier lethality by 2 days in the 129S6/SvEv strain (P<0.01). Men1(-/-) embryos had macroscopic haemorrhages, and histology and optical projection tomography revealed them to have internal haemorrhages, myocardial hypotrophy, pericardial effusion, hepatic abnormalities and neural tube defects. The neural tube defects occurred exclusively in 129S6/SvEv embryos (21 vs 0%, P<0.01). Thus, our findings demonstrate the importance of genetic background in influencing the phenotypes of embryonic lethality and neural tube defects in Men1(-/-) mice, and implicate a role for genetic modifiers.

  12. Intratibial Injection of Human Multiple Myeloma Cells in NOD/SCID IL-2Rγ(Null) Mice Mimics Human Myeloma and Serves as a Valuable Tool for the Development of Anticancer Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schueler, Julia; Wider, Dagmar; Klingner, Kerstin; Siegers, Gabrielle M.; May, Annette M.; Wäsch, Ralph; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert; Engelhardt, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Background We systematically analyzed multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines and patient bone marrow cells for their engraftment capacity in immunodeficient mice and validated the response of the resulting xenografts to antimyeloma agents. Design and Methods Using flow cytometry and near infrared fluorescence in-vivo-imaging, growth kinetics of MM cell lines L363 and RPMI8226 and patient bone marrow cells were investigated with use of a murine subcutaneous bone implant, intratibial and intravenous approach in NOD/SCID, NOD/SCID treated with CD122 antibody and NOD/SCID IL-2Rγ(null) mice (NSG). Results Myeloma growth was significantly increased in the absence of natural killer cell activity (NSG or αCD122-treated NOD/SCID). Comparison of NSG and αCD122-treated NOD/SCID revealed enhanced growth kinetics in the former, especially with respect to metastatic tumor sites which were exclusively observed therein. In NSG, MM cells were more tumorigenic when injected intratibially than intravenously. In NOD/SCID in contrast, the use of juvenile long bone implants was superior to intratibial or intravenous cancer cell injection. Using the intratibial NSG model, mice developed typical disease symptoms exclusively when implanted with human MM cell lines or patient-derived bone marrow cells, but not with healthy bone marrow cells nor in mock-injected animals. Bortezomib and dexamethasone delayed myeloma progression in L363- as well as patient-derived MM cell bearing NSG. Antitumor activity could be quantified via flow cytometry and in vivo imaging analyses. Conclusions Our results suggest that the intratibial NSG MM model mimics the clinical situation of the disseminated disease and serves as a valuable tool in the development of novel anticancer strategies. PMID:24223204

  13. Anaplerotic Triheptanoin Diet Enhances Mitochondrial Substrate Use to Remodel the Metabolome and Improve Lifespan, Motor Function, and Sociability in MeCP2-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qun; Degano, Alicia L.; Penati, Judith; Zhuo, Justin; Roe, Charles R.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene that encodes methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Symptoms range in severity and include psychomotor disabilities, seizures, ataxia, and intellectual disability. Symptom onset is between 6-18 months of age, a critical period of brain development that is highly energy-dependent. Notably, patients with RTT have evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as abnormal levels of the adipokines leptin and adiponectin, suggesting overall metabolic imbalance. We hypothesized that one contributor to RTT symptoms is energy deficiency due to defective nutrient substrate utilization by the TCA cycle. This energy deficit would lead to a metabolic imbalance, but would be treatable by providing anaplerotic substrates to the TCA cycle to enhance energy production. We show that dietary therapy with triheptanoin significantly increased longevity and improved motor function and social interaction in male mice hemizygous for Mecp2 knockout. Anaplerotic therapy in Mecp2 knockout mice also improved indicators of impaired substrate utilization, decreased adiposity, increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, decreased serum leptin and insulin, and improved mitochondrial morphology in skeletal muscle. Untargeted metabolomics of liver and skeletal muscle revealed increases in levels of TCA cycle intermediates with triheptanoin diet, as well as normalizations of glucose and fatty acid biochemical pathways consistent with the improved metabolic phenotype in Mecp2 knockout mice on triheptanoin. These results suggest that an approach using dietary supplementation with anaplerotic substrate is effective in improving symptoms and metabolic health in RTT. PMID:25299635

  14. Muscle-specific AMPK β1β2-null mice display a myopathy due to loss of capillary density in nonpostural muscles.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa M; Wang, David C; D'Souza, Donna M; Krause, Matthew P; Layne, Andrew S; Criswell, David S; O'Neill, Hayley M; Connor, Michael K; Anderson, Judy E; Kemp, Bruce E; Steinberg, Gregory R; Hawke, Thomas J

    2014-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of metabolism. While muscle-specific AMPK β1β2 double-knockout (β1β2M-KO) mice display alterations in metabolic and mitochondrial capacity, their severe exercise intolerance suggested a secondary contributor to the observed phenotype. We find that tibialis anterior (TA), but not soleus, muscles of sedentary β1β2M-KO mice display a significant myopathy (decreased myofiber areas, increased split and necrotic myofibers, and increased centrally nucleated myofibers. A mitochondrial- and fiber-type-specific etiology to the myopathy was ruled out. However, β1β2M-KO TA muscles displayed significant (P<0.05) increases in platelet aggregation and apoptosis within myofibers and surrounding interstitium (P<0.05). These changes correlated with a 45% decrease in capillary density (P<0.05). We hypothesized that the β1β2M-KO myopathy in resting muscle resulted from impaired AMPK-nNOSμ signaling, causing increased platelet aggregation, impaired vasodilation, and, ultimately, ischemic injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, AMPK-specific phosphorylation (Ser1446) of nNOSμ was decreased in β1β2M-KO compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The AMPK-nNOSμ relationship was further demonstrated by administration of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) to β1β2-MKO muscles and C2C12 myotubes. AICAR significantly increased nNOSμ phosphorylation and nitric oxide production (P<0.05) within minutes of administration in WT muscles and C2C12 myotubes but not in β1β2M-KO muscles. These findings highlight the importance of the AMPK-nNOSμ pathway in resting skeletal muscle.

  15. Plaque Size Is Decreased but M1 Macrophage Polarization and Rupture Related Metalloproteinase Expression Are Maintained after Deleting T-Bet in ApoE Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsaousi, Aikaterini; Hayes, Elaine M.; Di Gregoli, Karina; Bond, Andrew R.; Bevan, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background Thelper1 (Th1) lymphocytes have been previously implicated in atherosclerotic plaque growth but their role in plaque vulnerability to rupture is less clear. We investigated whether T-bet knockout that prevents Th1 lymphocyte differentiation modulates classical (M1) macrophage activation or production of matrix degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors, TIMPs. Methods & Results We studied the effect of T-bet deletion in apolipoproteinE (ApoE) knockout mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) or normal chow diet (ND). Transcript levels of M1/M2 macrophage polarization markers, selected MMPs and TIMPs were measured by RT-qPCR in macrophages isolated from subcutaneous granulomas or in whole aortae. Immunohistochemistry of aortic sinus (AS) and brachiocephalic artery (BCA) plaques was conducted to quantify protein expression of the same factors. Deletion of T-bet decreased mRNA for the M1 marker NOS-2 in granuloma macrophages but levels of M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1 and Ym-1), MMPs-2, -9, -12, -13, -14 and -19 or TIMPs-1 to -3 were unchanged. No mRNA differences were observed in aortic extracts from mice fed a HFD for 12 weeks. Moreover, AS and BCA plaques were similarly sized between genotypes, and had similar areas stained for NOS-2, COX-2, MMP-12 and MMP-14 proteins. T-bet deletion increased MMP-13, MMP-14 and arginase-1 in AS plaques. After 35 weeks of ND, T-bet deletion reduced the size of AS and BCA plaques but there were no differences in the percentage areas stained for M1 or M2 markers, MMPs-12, -13, -14, or TIMP-3. Conclusions Absence of Th1 lymphocytes is associated with reduced plaque size in ApoE knockout mice fed a normal but not high fat diet. In either case, M1 macrophage polarization and expression of several MMPs related to plaque instability are either maintained or increased. PMID:26886778

  16. [Effect of Astragali Radix in improving early renal damage in metabolic syndrome rats through ACE2/Mas pathway].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong-ying; Liang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Ning-yin; Xu, Han; Yang, Mi-na; Lin, Xin; Yu, Heng; Chang, Peng; Yu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To study the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin (Ang) 1-7 specific receptor Mas protain in renal blood vessels of metabolic syndrome ( MS) rats and its anti-oxidative effect. A total of 80 male SD rats were divided into four groups: the normal control group (NC, the same volume of normal saline), the MS group (high fat diet), the MS + Astragali Radix group (MS + HQ, 6 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage) and the MS + Valsartan group (MS + XST, 30 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage). After four weeks of intervention, their general indexes, biochemical indexes and blood pressure were measured; plasma and renal tissue Ang II, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide demutase (SOD) levels were measured with radioimmunoassay. The protein expressions of Mas receptor, AT1R, ACE and ACE2 were detected by western blot analysis. According to the result, compared with the NC group, the MS group and the MS + HQ group showed significant increases in systolic and diastolic pressures, body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, free fatty acid and Ang II level of MS rats (P < 0.05). The MS + XST group showed notable decreases in systolic and diastolic pressures than that of the MS group. The MS group showed significant increases in the SOD activity and NO level and decrease in the MDA level after being intervened with Astragali Radix. ACE and AT1R protein expressions in renal tissues of the MS group were higher than that in the NC group, but with lower ACE2 and -Mas receptor expressions (all P < 0.05). Compared with the MS group, the MS + HQ group showed significant increase in Mas receptor expression in renal tissues, whereas the MS + XST group showed notable decrease in AT1R (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, Astragali Radix can increase the Mas receptor expressions in renal tissues, decrease ACE expression and change local Ang II, MDA, NO and SOD in kidneys, so as to protect early damages in renal tissues. PMID:27071265

  17. Increased Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Aquaporin 1-Null Mice Is Mediated via Decreased Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α Stability.

    PubMed

    Ge, Haiyan; Zhu, Huili; Xu, Nuo; Zhang, Dan; Ou, Jiaxian; Wang, Guifang; Fang, Xiaocong; Zhou, Jian; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2016-06-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) 1, a water channel protein expressed widely in vascular endothelia, has been shown to regulate cell migration, angiogenesis, and organ regeneration. Even though its role in the pathogenesis of lung ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury has been defined, the functional role of AQP1 during long-term IR resolution remains to be clarified. Here, we found that AQP1 expression was increased at late time points (7-14 d) after IR and colocalized with endothelial cell (EC) marker CD31. Compared with IR in wild-type mice, IR in Aqp1(-/-) mice had significantly enhanced leukocyte infiltration, collagen deposition, and microvascular permeability, as well as inhibited angiogenic factor expression. AQP1 knockdown repressed hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α protein stability. HIF-2α overexpression rescued the angiogenic factor expression in pulmonary microvascular ECs with AQP1 knockdown exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation. Furthermore, AQP1 knockdown suppressed cellular viability and capillary tube formation, and enhanced permeability in pulmonary microvascular ECs, which were partly rescued by HIF-2α overexpression. Thus, this study demonstrates that AQP1 deficiency delays long-term IR resolution, partly through repressing angiogenesis mediated by destabilizing HIF-2α. These results suggest that AQP1 participates in long-term IR resolution, at least in part by promoting angiogenesis. PMID:26649797

  18. Brain propagation of transduced α-synuclein involves non-fibrillar protein species and is enhanced in α-synuclein null mice.

    PubMed

    Helwig, Michael; Klinkenberg, Michael; Rusconi, Raffaella; Musgrove, Ruth E; Majbour, Nour K; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Ulusoy, Ayse; Di Monte, Donato A

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation and neuron-to-neuron transmission are attributes of α-synuclein relevant to its pathogenetic role in human synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. Intraparenchymal injections of fibrillar α-synuclein trigger widespread propagation of amyloidogenic protein species via mechanisms that require expression of endogenous α-synuclein and, possibly, its structural corruption by misfolded conformers acting as pathological seeds. Here we describe another paradigm of long-distance brain diffusion of α-synuclein that involves inter-neuronal transfer of monomeric and/or oligomeric species and is independent of recruitment of the endogenous protein. Targeted expression of human α-synuclein was induced in the mouse medulla oblongata through an injection of viral vectors into the vagus nerve. Enhanced levels of intra-neuronal α-synuclein were sufficient to initiate its caudo-rostral diffusion that likely involved at least one synaptic transfer and progressively reached specific brain regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphae and amygdala in the pons, midbrain and forebrain. Transfer of human α-synuclein was compared in two separate lines of α-synuclein-deficient mice versus their respective wild-type controls and, interestingly, lack of endogenous α-synuclein expression did not counteract diffusion but actually resulted in a more pronounced and advanced propagation of exogenous α-synuclein. Self-interaction of adjacent molecules of human α-synuclein was detected in both wild-type and mutant mice. In the former, interaction of human α-synuclein with mouse α-synuclein was also observed and might have contributed to differences in protein transmission. In wild-type and α-synuclein-deficient mice, accumulation of human α-synuclein within recipient axons in the pons, midbrain and forebrain caused morphological evidence of neuritic pathology. Tissue sections from the medulla oblongata and pons were stained with different antibodies recognizing

  19. Brain propagation of transduced α-synuclein involves non-fibrillar protein species and is enhanced in α-synuclein null mice.

    PubMed

    Helwig, Michael; Klinkenberg, Michael; Rusconi, Raffaella; Musgrove, Ruth E; Majbour, Nour K; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Ulusoy, Ayse; Di Monte, Donato A

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation and neuron-to-neuron transmission are attributes of α-synuclein relevant to its pathogenetic role in human synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. Intraparenchymal injections of fibrillar α-synuclein trigger widespread propagation of amyloidogenic protein species via mechanisms that require expression of endogenous α-synuclein and, possibly, its structural corruption by misfolded conformers acting as pathological seeds. Here we describe another paradigm of long-distance brain diffusion of α-synuclein that involves inter-neuronal transfer of monomeric and/or oligomeric species and is independent of recruitment of the endogenous protein. Targeted expression of human α-synuclein was induced in the mouse medulla oblongata through an injection of viral vectors into the vagus nerve. Enhanced levels of intra-neuronal α-synuclein were sufficient to initiate its caudo-rostral diffusion that likely involved at least one synaptic transfer and progressively reached specific brain regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphae and amygdala in the pons, midbrain and forebrain. Transfer of human α-synuclein was compared in two separate lines of α-synuclein-deficient mice versus their respective wild-type controls and, interestingly, lack of endogenous α-synuclein expression did not counteract diffusion but actually resulted in a more pronounced and advanced propagation of exogenous α-synuclein. Self-interaction of adjacent molecules of human α-synuclein was detected in both wild-type and mutant mice. In the former, interaction of human α-synuclein with mouse α-synuclein was also observed and might have contributed to differences in protein transmission. In wild-type and α-synuclein-deficient mice, accumulation of human α-synuclein within recipient axons in the pons, midbrain and forebrain caused morphological evidence of neuritic pathology. Tissue sections from the medulla oblongata and pons were stained with different antibodies recognizing

  20. A Novel Arginase Inhibitor Derived from Scutellavia indica Restored Endothelial Function in ApoE-Null Mice Fed a High-Cholesterol Diet.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Mi; Lee, Jeong Hyung; Min, Byung Sun; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Hoe, Kwang Lae; Kim, Young Myeong; Ryoo, Sungwoo

    2015-10-01

    Elevated endothelial arginase activity decreases nitric oxide (NO) production by competing with the substrate l-arginine, previously reported, and reciprocally regulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Thus, arginase inhibitors may help treat vascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. A screening of metabolites from medicinal plants revealed that (2S)-5,2',5'-trihydroxy-7,8-dimethoxy flavanone (TDF) was a noncompetitive inhibitor of arginase. We investigated whether TDF reciprocally regulated endothelial NO production and its possible mechanism. TDF noncompetitively inhibited arginase I and II activity in a dose-dependent manner. TDF incubation decreased arginase activity and increased NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and isolated mouse aortic vessels and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the endothelium of the latter. These TDF-mediated effects were associated with increased eNOS phosphorylation and dimerization but not with changes in protein content. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine (Ach) were significantly increased in TDF-incubated aortic rings and attenuated by incubation with soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Phenylephrine-induced vasoconstrictor responses were markedly attenuated in TDF-treated vessels from wild-type mice. In atherogenic-prone ApoE(-/-) mice, TDF attenuated the high-cholesterol diet (HCD)-induced increase in arginase activity, which was accompanied by restoration of NO production and reduction of ROS generation. TDF incubation induced eNOS dimerization and phosphorylation at Ser1177. In addition, TDF improved Ach-dependent vasorelaxation responses and attenuated U46619-dependent contractile responses but did not change sodium nitroprusside-induced vasorelaxation or N-NAME-induced vasoconstriction. The findings suggest that TDF may help treat cardiovascular diseases by reducing pathophysiology derived from HCD-mediated endothelial

  1. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Howles, Philip N; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol.

  2. Characterization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in estrogen receptor (ER) Null mice reveals hypergonadism and endocrine sex reversal in females lacking ERalpha but not ERbeta.

    PubMed

    Couse, John F; Yates, Mariana M; Walker, Vickie R; Korach, Kenneth S

    2003-06-01

    To determine the role of each estrogen receptor (ER) form (ERalpha, ERbeta) in mediating the estrogen actions necessary to maintain proper function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, we have characterized the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in female ER knockout (ERKO) mice. Evaluation of pituitary function included gene expression assays for Gnrhr, Cga, Lhb, Fshb, and Prl. Evaluation of ovarian steroidogenic capacity included gene expression assays for the components necessary for estradiol synthesis: i.e. Star, Cyp11a, Cyp17, Cyp19, Hsd3b1, and Hsd17b1. These data were corroborated by assessing plasma levels of the respective peptide and steroid hormones. alphaERKO and alphabetaERKO females exhibited increased pituitary Cga and Lhb expression and increased plasma LH levels, whereas both were normal in betaERKO. Pituitary Fshb expression and plasma FSH were normal in all three ERKOs. In the ovary, all three ERKOs exhibited normal expression of Star, Cyp11a, and Hsd3b1. In contrast, Cyp17 and Cyp19 expression were elevated in alphaERKO but normal in betaERKO and alphabetaERKO. Plasma steroid levels in each ERKO mirrored the steroidogenic enzyme expression, with only the alphaERKO exhibiting elevated androstenedione and estradiol. Elevated plasma testosterone in alphaERKO and alphabetaERKO females was attributable to aberrant expression of Hsd17b3 in the ovary, representing a form of endocrine sex reversal, as this enzyme is unique to the testes. Enhanced steroidogenic capacity in alphaERKO ovaries was erased by treatment with a GnRH antagonist, indicating these phenotypes to be the indirect result of excess LH stimulation that follows the loss of ERalpha in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Overall, these findings indicate that ERalpha, but not ERbeta, is indispensable to the negative-feedback effects of estradiol that maintain proper LH secretion from the pituitary. The subsequent hypergonadism is illustrated as increased Cyp17, Cyp19, Hsd17b1, and

  3. Islet-Specific CTL Cloned from a Type 1 Diabetes Patient Cause Beta-Cell Destruction after Engraftment into HLA-A2 Transgenic NOD/SCID/IL2RG Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Wendy W. J.; Pearson, Todd; Abreu, Joana R. F.; Laban, Sandra; van der Slik, Arno R.; der Kracht, Sacha Mulder-van; Kester, Michel G. D.; Serreze, Dave V.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Griffioen, Marieke; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that autoreactive CD8 T-cells are involved in both the initiation of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and the destruction of beta-cells, direct evidence for their destructive role in-vivo is lacking. To address a destructive role for autoreactive CD8 T-cells in human disease, we assessed the pathogenicity of a CD8 T-cell clone derived from a T1D donor and specific for an HLA-A2-restricted epitope of islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic-subunit related protein (IGRP). HLA-A2/IGRP tetramer staining revealed a higher frequency of IGRP-specific CD8 T-cells in the peripheral blood of recent onset human individuals than of healthy donors. IGRP265–273-specific CD8 T-cells that were cloned from the peripheral blood of a recent onset T1D individual were shown to secrete IFNγ and Granzyme B after antigen-specific activation and lyse HLA-A2-expressing murine islets in-vitro. Lytic capacity was also demonstrated in-vivo by specific killing of peptide-pulsed target cells. Using the HLA-A2 NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model, HLA-A2-restricted IGRP-specific CD8 T-cells induced a destructive insulitis. Together, this is the first evidence that human HLA-restricted autoreactive CD8 T-cells target HLA-expressing beta-cells in-vivo, demonstrating the translational value of humanized mice to study mechanisms of disease and therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:23155466

  4. Rac-null leukocytes are associated with increased inflammation-mediated alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Sima, Corneliu; Gastfreund, Shoshi; Sun, Chunxiang; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by altered host-biofilm interactions that result in irreversible inflammation-mediated alveolar bone loss. Genetic and epigenetic factors that predispose to ineffective control of biofilm composition and maintenance of tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. We elucidated how leukocytes affect the course of periodontitis in Rac-null mice. Mouse models of acute gingivitis and periodontitis were used to assess the early inflammatory response and patterns of chronicity leading to loss of alveolar bone due to inflammation in Rac-null mice. Leukocyte margination was differentially impaired in these mice during attachment in conditional Rac1-null (granulocyte/monocyte lineage) mice and during rolling and attachment in Rac2-null (all blood cells) mice. Inflammatory responses to subgingival ligatures, assessed by changes in peripheral blood differential leukocyte numbers, were altered in Rac-null compared with wild-type mice. In response to persistent subgingival ligature-mediated challenge, Rac-null mice had increased loss of alveolar bone with patterns of resorption characteristic of aggressive forms of periodontitis. These findings were partially explained by higher osteoclastic coverage of the bone-periodontal ligament interface in Rac-null compared with wild-type mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that leukocyte defects, such as decreased endothelial margination and tissue recruitment, are rate-limiting steps in the periodontal inflammatory process that lead to more aggressive forms of periodontitis.

  5. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A self-calibrating nulling radiometer for non-contact temperature measurement of an object, such as a body of water, employs a black body source as a temperature reference, an optomechanical mechanism, e.g., a chopper, to switch back and forth between measuring the temperature of the black body source and that of a test source, and an infrared detection technique. The radiometer functions by measuring radiance of both the test and the reference black body sources; adjusting the temperature of the reference black body so that its radiance is equivalent to the test source; and, measuring the temperature of the reference black body at this point using a precision contact-type temperature sensor, to determine the radiative temperature of the test source. The radiation from both sources is detected by an infrared detector that converts the detected radiation to an electrical signal that is fed with a chopper reference signal to an error signal generator, such as a synchronous detector, that creates a precision rectified signal that is approximately proportional to the difference between the temperature of the reference black body and that of the test infrared source. This error signal is then used in a feedback loop to adjust the reference black body temperature until it equals that of the test source, at which point the error signal is nulled to zero. The chopper mechanism operates at one or more Hertz allowing minimization of l/f noise. It also provides pure chopping between the black body and the test source and allows continuous measurements.

  6. Thermogenic characterization of ghrelin receptor null mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that increases food intake and promotes adiposity, and these physiological functions of ghrelin are mediated through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin/GHS-R signaling plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis....

  7. Radiative Flux Changes by Aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa over the Atlantic Ocean: Measurements and Calculations from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Hignett, P.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Chien, A.; Bergstrom, R.; Durkee, P. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the past climate and predicting climate change. To help reduce this uncertainty, the 1996 Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (TARFOX) and the 1997 second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) measured the properties and radiative effects of American, European, and African aerosols over the Atlantic. In TARFOX, radiative fluxes and microphysics of the American aerosol were measured from the UK C-130 while optical depth spectra, aerosol composition, and other properties were measured by the University of Washington C-131A and the CIRPAS Pelican. Closure studies show that the measured flux changes agree with those derived from the aerosol measurements using several modelling approaches. The best-fit midvisible single-scatter albedos (approx. 0.89 to 0.93) obtained from the TARFOX flux comparisons are in accord with values derived by independent techniques. In ACE-2 we measured optical depth and extinction spectra for both European urban-marine aerosols and free-tropospheric African dust aerosols, using sunphotometers on the R/V Vodyanitskiy and the Pelican. Preliminary values for the radiative flux sensitivities (Delta Flux / Delta Optical depth) computed for ACE-2 aerosols (boundary layer and African dust) over ocean are similar to those found in TARFOX. Combining a satellite-derived optical depth climatology with the aerosol optical model validated for flux sensitivities in TARFOX provides first-cut estimates of aerosol-induced flux changes over the Atlantic Ocean.

  8. Association of Genetic Variants in the Apelin-APJ System and ACE2 with Blood Pressure Responses to Potassium Supplementation: the GenSalt Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Gu, Dongfeng; Kelly, Tanika N.; Hixson, James E.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Chen, Jing; Huang, Jianfeng; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Gu, C. Charles; Whelton, Paul K.; He, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic factors may influence blood pressure (BP) responses to dietary potassium intake. We examined the association of genetic variants in the apelin-APJ system and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) with BP responses to potassium supplementation. METHODS We conducted a 7-day potassium supplementation (60 mmol/day) intervention among 1,906 Chinese adults who participated in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt-Sensitivity (GenSalt) study. Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on HapMap data and potential functional SNPs were selected in the APLN, APLNR, and ACE2 genes. Because the ACE2 and APLN genes are located on the X chromosome, men and women were analyzed separately. RESULTS In women, SNP rs2235306 in the APLN gene was significantly associated with diastolic BP (DBP) response to potassium supplementation (P=0.0009). The DBP responses [95% confidence interval (CI)] among those with genotypes T/T, T/C, and C/C were −2.22 (−2.74, −1.70), −1.69 (−2.20, −1.19), and −0.81 (−1.54, −0.09) mmHg, respectively. In men, SNP rs4646174 of the ACE2 gene was significantly associated with systolic BP (SBP), DBP, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to potassium supplementation (P=0.0001, P=0.001, and P=3.0×10−6, respectively). The SBP, DBP and MAP responses (95% CI) were −0.79 (−2.27, 0.69) versus −3.53 (−3.94, −3.12), 1.07 (−0.34, 2.49) versus −1.06 (−1.43, −0.69), and 0.44 (−0.60, 1.48) versus −1.89 (−2.22, −1.55) mmHg among men with minor G allele compared to those with major C allele of rs4646174, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Our study indicates that genetic variation of APLN and ACE2 may influence BP response to potassium intake. PMID:20224560

  9. Influence of Humidity on the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, B. S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.; Jonsson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of attitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands or the EOS-AM ("Terra") detectors, MODIS and MISR. The UWPH measured (sigma(sub sp)) at 2 RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient (sigma(sub sp)) was obtained by interpolation of these 2 measurements. The data were stratified in terms of 3 types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., 2- or 1-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of (sigma(sub sp)) on RH, defined by (sigma(sub sp))(RH) = k. ((1 - RH/100)(exp -gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 + 0.06. Based on the measured (gamma)(s), the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the pre-launch estimated precision of the sensors and

  10. Influence of Humidity On the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K. J.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of altitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions, absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands of the EOS (Earth Observing System) AM-1 (Terra) detectors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer). The UWPH measured sigma(sub sp) at two RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient sigma(sub sp) was obtained by interpolation of these two measurements. The data were stratified in terms of three types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., two- or one-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of sigma(sub sp) on RH, defined by sigma(sub sp)(RH) = k.(1 - RH/100)(sup gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 +/- 0.06. Based on the measured gammas, the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each

  11. Designing with null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Null flux were suggested by Danby and Powell in the late 1960`s as a useful means for realizing induced lift with little drag. As an array of alternating magnets is translated past a set of null flux coils, the currents induced in these coils act to vertically center the magnets on those coils. At present, one Japanese MAGLEV system company and two American-based companies are employing either null flux or flux eliminating coils in their design for high speed magnetically levitated transportation. The principle question addressed in paper is: what is the proper choice of coil length to magnet length in a null flux system? A generic analysis in the time and frequency domain is laid out with the intent of showing the optimal design specification in terms of coil parameters.

  12. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  13. Pattern nulling by reflector shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, D. A.

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of adaptive array concepts to continuous aperture antennas was studied and appropriate aperture field distributions for pattern nulling were found from them. The adaptive array weights were found to be useful as discrete points in a continuous distribution. This distribution could then be used in an aperture integration scheme to produce a nulled pattern. Also studied was the use of geometrical optics to calculate the aperture field distribution of an arbitrarily shaped reflector. Under some restrictions, geometrical optics can provide a useful approximation. Constructing the aperture field of a reflector defined by a discrete grid of points using a numerical ray tracing scheme was also investigated. Certain numerical problems were identified. Finally, an attempt was made to implement the nulled pattern by a well known beam shaping method based on geometrical optics principles. This technique was found to be inadequate. More promising techniques for implementing the aperture distributions were suggested but not pursued in this work.

  14. Differential regulation of the cellulase transcription factors XYR1, ACE2, and ACE1 in Trichoderma reesei strains producing high and low levels of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, Thomas; Margeot, Antoine; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Le Crom, Stéphane; Ben Chaabane, Fadhel; Linke, Rita; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2011-02-01

    Due to its capacity to produce large amounts of cellulases, Trichoderma reesei is increasingly being investigated for second-generation biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. The induction mechanisms of T. reesei cellulases have been described recently, but the regulation of the genes involved in their transcription has not been studied thoroughly. Here we report the regulation of expression of the two activator genes xyr1 and ace2, and the corepressor gene ace1, during the induction of cellulase biosynthesis by the inducer lactose in T. reesei QM 9414, a strain producing low levels of cellulase (low producer). We show that all three genes are induced by lactose. xyr1 was also induced by d-galactose, but this induction was independent of d-galactose metabolism. Moreover, ace1 was carbon catabolite repressed, whereas full induction of xyr1 and ace2 in fact required CRE1. Significant differences in these regulatory patterns were observed in the high-producer strain RUT C30 and the hyperproducer strain T. reesei CL847. These observations suggest that a strongly elevated basal transcription level of xyr1 and reduced upregulation of ace1 by lactose may have been important for generating the hyperproducer strain and that thus, these genes are major control elements of cellulase production.

  15. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements of Aerosols During ACE-2 Instrument Description, Results, and Comparisons with Other Ground-Based and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gordon, Howard R.; Maring, Hal; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent; Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Durkee, Philip A.; Formenti, Paolo

    2000-01-01

    A micro-pulse lidar system (MPL) was used to measure the vertical and horizontal distribution or aerosols during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment 2 (ACE-2) in June and July of 1997. The MPL measurements were made at the Izana observatory (IZO), a weather station located on a mountain ridge (28 deg 18'N, 16 deg 30'W, 2367 m asl) near the center of the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands. The MPL was used to acquire aerosol backscatter, extinction, and optical depth profiles for normal background periods and periods influenced by Saharan dust from North Africa. System tests and calibration procedures are discussed, and in analysis of aerosol optical profiles acquired during ACE-2 is presented. MPL data taken during normal IZO conditions (no dust) showed that upslope aerosols appeared during the day and dissipated at night and that the layers were mostly confined to altitudes a few hundred meters above IZO. MPL data taken during a Saharan dust episode on 17 July showed that peak aerosol extinction values were an order of magnitude greater than molecular scattering over IZO. and that the dust layers extended to 5 km asl. The value of the dust backscatter-extinction ratio was determined to be 0.027 + 0.007 per sr. Comparisons of the MPL data with data from other co-located instruments showed good agreement during the dust episode.

  16. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements of Aerosols During ACE-2: Instrument Description, Results, and Comparisons with Other Ground-Based and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gordon, Howard R.; Maring, Hal; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent; Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Durkee, Philip A.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-pulse lidar system (MPL) was used to measure the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment 2 (ACE-2) in June and July of 1997. The MPL measurements were made at the Izana observatory (IZO), a weather station located on a mountain ridge (28 deg 18 min N, 16 deg 30 min W, 2367 m asl) near the center of the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands. The MPL was used to acquire aerosol backscatter, extinction, and optical depth profiles for normal background periods and periods influenced by Saharan dust from North Africa. System tests and calibration procedures are discussed, and an analysis of aerosol optical profiles acquired during ACE-2 is presented. MPL data taken during normal IZO conditions (no dust) showed that upslope aerosols appeared during the day and dissipated at night and that the layers were mostly confined to altitudes a few hundred meters above IZO. MPL data taken during a Saharan dust episode on 17 July showed that peak aerosol extinction values were an order of magnitude greater than molecular scattering over IZO, and that the dust layers extended to 5 km asl. The value of the dust backscatter-extinction ratio was determined to be 0.027 +/- 0.007 sr(exp -1). Comparisons of the MPL data with data from other collocated instruments showed good agreement during the dust episode.

  17. The atherogenic Scarb1 null mouse model shows a high bone mass phenotype.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Corine; Martin-Falstrault, Louise; Brissette, Louise; Moreau, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), the Scarb1 gene product, is a receptor associated with cholesteryl ester uptake from high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which drives cholesterol movement from peripheral tissues toward the liver for excretion, and, consequently, Scarb1 null mice are prone to atherosclerosis. Because studies have linked atherosclerosis incidence with osteoporosis, we characterized the bone metabolism in these mice. Bone morphometry was assessed through microcomputed tomography and histology. Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) were used to characterize influence of endogenous SR-BI in cell functions. Total and HDL-associated cholesterol in null mice were increased by 32-60%, correlating with its role in lipoprotein metabolism. Distal metaphyses from 2- and 4-mo-old null mice showed correspondingly 46 and 37% higher bone volume fraction associated with a higher number of trabeculae. Histomorphometric analyses in 2-mo-old null male mice revealed 1.42-fold greater osteoblast surface, 1.37-fold higher percent mineralizing surface, and 1.69-fold enhanced bone formation rate. In vitro assays for MSCs from null mice revealed 37% higher proliferation rate, 48% more alkaline phosphatase activity, 70% greater mineralization potential and a 2-fold osterix (Sp7) expression, yet a 0.5-fold decrease in caveolin-1 (Cav1) expression. Selective uptake levels of HDL-associated cholesteryl oleate and estradiol were similar between MSC from wild-type and Scarb1 null mice, suggesting that its contribution to this process is not its main role in these cells. However, Scarb1 knockout stunted the HDL-dependent regulation of Cav1 genic expression. Scarb1 null mice are not prone to osteoporosis but show higher bone mass associated with enhanced bone formation.

  18. Proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in connexin43-null osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, F.; Lecanda, F.; Screen, J.; Civitelli, R.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoblasts are highly coupled by gap junctions formed primarily by connexin43 (Cx43). We have shown that interference with Cx43 expression or function disrupts transcriptional regulation of osteoblast genes, and that deletion of Cx43 in the mouse causes skeletal malformations, delayed mineralization, and osteoblast dysfunction. Here, we studied the mechanisms by which genetic deficiency of Cx43 alters osteoblast development. While cell proliferation rates were similar in osteoblastic cells derived from calvaria of Cx43-null and wild type mice, camptothecin-induced apoptosis was 3-fold higher in mutant compared to wild type osteoblasts. When grown in mineralizing medium, Cx43-null cells were able to produce mineralized matrix but it took one week longer to reach the same mineralization levels as in normal cells. Likewise, expression of alkaline phosphatase activity per cell--a marker of osteoblast differentiation--was maximal only 2 weeks later in Cx43-null relative to wild-type cells. These observations suggest that Cx43 is important for a normal and timely development of the osteoblastic phenotype. Delayed differentiation and increase programmed cell death may explain the skeletal phenotype of Cx43-null mice.

  19. Fracture characterisation using geoelectric null-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Pierik; Negro, François; Szalai, Sándor; Milnes, Ellen

    2013-06-01

    The term "geoelectric null-array" is used for direct current electrode configurations yielding a potential difference of zero above a homogeneous half-space. This paper presents a comparative study of the behaviour of three null-arrays, midpoint null-array (MAN), Wenner-γ null-array and Schlumberger null-array in response to a fracture, both in profiling and in azimuthal mode. The main objective is to determine which array(s) best localise fractures or best identify their orientation. Forward modelling of the three null-arrays revealed that the Wenner-γ and Schlumberger null-arrays localise vertical fractures the most accurately, whilst the midpoint null-array combined with the Schlumberger null-array allows accurate orientation of a fracture. Numerical analysis then served as a basis to interpret the field results. Field test measurements were carried out above a quarry in Les Breuleux (Switzerland) with the three null-arrays and classical arrays. The results were cross-validated with quarry-wall geological mapping. In real field circumstances, the Wenner-γ null-array proved to be the most efficient and accurate in localising fractures. The orientations of the fractures according to the numerical results were most efficiently determined with the midpoint null-array, whilst the Schlumberger null-array adds accuracy to the results. This study shows that geoelectrical null-arrays are more suitable than classical arrays for the characterisation of fracture geometry.

  20. Behavioural signs of chronic back pain in the SPARC-null mouse

    PubMed Central

    Millecamps, Magali; Tajerian, Maral; Sage, E. Helene; Stone, Laura S

    2010-01-01

    Study Design SPARC-null mice were examined for behavioural signs of chronic low back and/or radicular pain. Objective To assess SPARC-null mice as a rodent model of chronic low back and/or radicular pain due to degenerative disc disease. Summary of Background Data Degeneration of intervertebral discs is a major cause of chronic low back and radicular pain in humans. Inactivation of the SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic and Rich in Cysteine, also known as osteonectin and BM-40) gene in mice results in premature intervertebral disc degeneration. The impact of disc degeneration on behavioural measures of chronic pain has not been evaluated in this model. Methods Cohorts of young and old (3 and 6–12 months, respectively) SPARC-null and wild-type control mice were screened for behavioural indices of low back and/or radiating pain. Sensitivity to mechanical, cold and heat stimuli, locomotor impairment, and movement-evoked hypersensitivity were determined. Animals were challenged with three analgesic agents with different mechanisms: morphine, dexamethasone, and gabapentin. Results SPARC-null mice showed signs of movement-evoked discomfort as early as 3 months of age. Hypersensitivity to cold stimuli on both the lower back and hindpaws developed with increasing age. SPARC-null mice had normal sensitivity to tactile and heat stimuli, and locomotor skills were not impaired. The hypersensitivity to cold was reversed by morphine, but not by dexamethasone or gabapentin. Conclusion SPARC-null mice display behavioural signs consistent with chronic low back and radicular pain that we attribute to intervertebral disc degeneration. We predict that the SPARC-null mouse is a useful model of chronic back pain due to degenerative disc disease. PMID:20714283

  1. Effects of Local Heart Irradiation in a Glutathione S-Transferase Alpha 4-Null Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Marjan; Singh, Preeti; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Singh, Sharda P

    2015-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 (GSTA4-4) is one of the enzymes responsible for the removal of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), an electrophilic product of lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes during oxidative stress. 4-HNE is a direct activator of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor with many target genes encoding antioxidant and anti-electrophile enzymes. We have previously shown that Gsta4-null mice on a 129/Sv background exhibited increased activity of Nrf2 in the heart. Here we examined the sensitivity of this Gsta4-null mouse model towards cardiac function and structure loss due to local heart irradiation. Male Gsta4-null and wild-type mice were exposed to a single X-ray dose of 18 Gy to the heart. Six months after irradiation, immunohistochemical staining for respiratory complexes 2 and 5 indicated that radiation exposure had caused most pronounced alterations in mitochondrial morphology in Gsta4-null mice. On the other hand, wild-type mice showed a decline in cardiac function and an increase in plasma levels of troponin-I, while no such changes were observed in Gsta4-null mice. Radiation-induced Nrf2-target gene expression only in Gsta4-null mice. In conclusion, although loss of GSTA4-4 led to enhanced susceptibility of cardiac mitochondria to radiation-induced loss of morphology, cardiac function was preserved in Gsta4-null mice. We propose that this protection against cardiac function loss may occur, at least in part, by upregulation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  2. Nulling at the Keck Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. Mark; Serabyn, Gene; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Akeson, Rachel L.

    2006-01-01

    The nulling mode of the Keck Interferometer is being commissioned at the Mauna Kea summit. The nuller combines the two Keck telescope apertures in a split-pupil mode to both cancel the on-axis starlight and to coherently detect the residual signal. The nuller, working at 10 um, is tightly integrated with the other interferometer subsystems including the fringe and angle trackers, the delay lines and laser metrology, and the real-time control system. Since first 10 um light in August 2004, the system integration is proceeding with increasing functionality and performance, leading to demonstration of a 100:1 on-sky null in 2005. That level of performance has now been extended to observations with longer coherent integration times. An overview of the overall system is presented, with emphasis on the observing sequence, phasing system, and differences with respect to the V2 system, along with a presentation of some recent engineering data.

  3. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  4. Fibrosis and inflammation are greater in muscles of beta-sarcoglycan-null mouse than mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Gibertini, Sara; Zanotti, Simona; Savadori, Paolo; Curcio, Maurizio; Saredi, Simona; Salerno, Franco; Andreetta, Francesca; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Mora, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The Sgcb-null mouse, with knocked-down β-sarcoglycan, develops severe muscular dystrophy as in type 2E human limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The mdx mouse, lacking dystrophin, is the most used model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Unlike DMD, the mdx mouse has mild clinical features and shows little fibrosis in limb muscles. To characterize ECM protein deposition and the progression of muscle fibrosis, we evaluated protein and transcript levels of collagens I, III and VI, decorin, and TGF-β1, in quadriceps and diaphragm, at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks in Sgcb-null mice, and protein levels at 12, 26, and 52 weeks in mdx mice. In Sgcb-null mice, severe morphological disruption was present from 4 weeks in both quadriceps and diaphragm, and included conspicuous deposition of extracellular matrix components. Histopathological features of Sgcb-null mouse muscles were similar to those of age-matched mdx muscles at all ages examined, but, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the extent of connective tissue deposition was generally greater than mdx. Furthermore, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the amount of all three collagen isoforms increased steadily, while, in the mdx, they remained stable. We also found that, at 12 weeks, macrophages were significantly more numerous in mildly inflamed areas of Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to mdx quadriceps (but not in highly inflamed regions), while, in the diaphragm, macrophages did not differ significantly between the two models, in either region. Osteopontin mRNA was also significantly greater at 12 weeks in laser-dissected highly inflamed areas of the Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to the mdx quadriceps. TGF-β1 was present in areas of degeneration-regeneration, but levels were highly variable and in general did not differ significantly between the two models and controls. The roles of the various subtypes of macrophages in muscle repair and fibrosis in the two models require further study. The Sgcb-null mouse, which develops early fibrosis

  5. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy.

  6. Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances

  7. Suppressed Accumulation of Cerebral Amyloid β Peptides in Aged Transgenic Alzheimer’s Disease Mice by Transplantation with Wild-Type or Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 2-Null Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Keene, C. Dirk; Chang, Rubens C.; Lopez-Yglesias, Americo H.; Shalloway, Bryan R.; Sokal, Izabella; Li, Xianwu; Reed, Patrick J.; Keene, Lisa M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Breyer, Richard M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A complex therapeutic challenge for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is minimizing deleterious aspects of microglial activation while maximizing beneficial actions, including phagocytosis/clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. One potential target is selective suppression of microglial prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) function, which influences microglial phagocytosis and elaboration of neurotoxic cytokines. To test this hypothesis, we transplanted bone marrow cells derived from wild-type mice or mice homozygous deficient for EP2 (EP2−/−) into lethally irradiated 5-month-old wild-type or APPswe-PS1ΔE9 double transgenic AD mouse model recipients. We found that cerebral engraftment by bone marrow transplant (BMT)-derived wild-type or EP2−/− microglia was more efficient in APPswe-PS1ΔE9 than in wild-type mice, and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mice that received EP2−/− BMT had increased cortical microglia compared with APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mice that received wild-type BMT. We found that myeloablative irradiation followed by bone marrow transplant-derived microglia engraftment, rather than cranial irradiation or BMT alone, was responsible for the approximate one-third reduction in both Aβ plaques and potentially more neurotoxic soluble Aβ species. An additional 25% reduction in cerebral cortical Aβ burden was achieved in mice that received EP2−/− BMT compared with mice that received wild-type BMT. Our results provide a foundation for an adult stem cell-based therapy to suppress soluble Aβ peptide and plaque accumulation in the cerebrum of patients with AD. PMID:20522650

  8. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  9. Engraftment of low numbers of pediatric acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemias into NOD/SCID/IL2Rcγnull mice reflects individual leukemogenecity and highly correlates with clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Woiterski, Jeanette; Ebinger, Martin; Witte, Kai E; Goecke, Barbara; Heininger, Vanessa; Philippek, Martin; Bonin, Michael; Schrauder, Andre; Röttgers, Silja; Herr, Wolfgang; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hartwig, Udo F; André, Maya C

    2013-10-01

    Although immortalized cell lines have been extensively used to optimize treatment strategies in cancer, the usefulness of such in vitro systems to recapitulate primary disease is limited. Therefore, the design of in vivo models ideally utilizing patient-derived material is of critical importance. In this regard, NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) IL2rg(tmWjl) /Sz (NSG) mice have been reported to provide superior engraftment rates. However, limited data exist on the validity of such a model to constitute a surrogate marker for clinical parameters. We studied primary and serial engraftment on more than 200 NSG mice with 54 primary pediatric B cell precursor acute lymphatic leukemia (B-ALL), myeloid leukemia (AML) and T cell leukemia (T-ALL) samples, characterized the leukemogenic profile and correlated engraftment kinetics with clinical outcome. Median time to engraftment was 7-10 weeks and 90% of the mice engrafted. Male recipients conferred significantly higher engraftment levels than female recipients (p ≤ 0.004). PCR-based minimal residual disease marker expression and fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of patient-specific genetic aberrations in mice. Transcriptome cluster analysis of genes known to be important in the leukemogenesis of all three diseases revealed that well-known tumor-regulating genes were expressed to a comparable extent in mice and men. The extent of engraftment and overall survival of NSG mice highly correlated with the individual prognosis of B-ALL, AML and T-ALL patients. Thus, we propose an in vivo model that provides a valuable preclinical tool to explore the heterogeneity of leukemic disease and exploit patient-tailored leukemia-targeting strategies within multivariate analyses.

  10. Visualization of the human CD4{sup +} T-cell response in humanized HLA-DR4-expressing NOD/Shi-scid/γc{sup null} (NOG) mice by retrogenic expression of the human TCR gene

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Takeshi Katano, Ikumi; Ito, Ryoji; Ito, Mamoru

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) specific TCR genes were introduced to human HSC by retrovirus. • Human HSC with BLG-specific TCR were transplanted into NOG-HLA-DR4 I-A{sup −/−} mice. • BLG-specific TCR induced positive selection of thymocytes. • BLG-specific TCR positive CD4{sup +} T cells mediated immune responses in humanized mice. - Abstract: The development of severe immunodeficient mouse strains containing various human genes, including cytokines or HLA, has enabled the reconstitution of functional human immune systems after transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Accumulating evidence has suggested that HLA-restricted antigen-specific human T-cell responses can be generated in these humanized mice. To directly monitor immune responses of human CD4{sup +} T cells, we introduced β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes derived from CD4{sup +} T-cell clones of cow-milk allergy patients into HSCs, and subsequently transplanted them into NOG-HLA-DR4 transgenic/I-Aβ deficient mice (NOG-DR4/I-A{sup o}). In the thymus, thymocytes with BLG-specific TCR preferentially differentiated into CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} single-positive cells. Adoptive transfer of mature CD4{sup +} T cells expressing the TCR into recipient NOG-DR4/I-A{sup o} mice demonstrated that human CD4{sup +} T cells proliferated in response to antigenic stimulation and produced IFN-γ in vivo, suggesting that functional T-cell reactions (especially Th1-skewed responses) were induced in humanized mice.

  11. Hypersensitivities for acetaldehyde and other agents among cancer cells null for clinically relevant Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C; Ren, Yunzhao R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Azad, Nilofer A; Kern, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities.

  12. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  13. Collagen VI deficiency reduces muscle pathology, but does not improve muscle function, in the γ-sarcoglycan-null mouse.

    PubMed

    de Greef, Jessica C; Hamlyn, Rebecca; Jensen, Braden S; O'Campo Landa, Raul; Levy, Jennifer R; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Campbell, Kevin P

    2016-04-01

    Muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and dystrophic muscle exhibits degeneration and regeneration of muscle cells, inflammation and fibrosis. Skeletal muscle fibrosis is an excessive deposition of components of the extracellular matrix including an accumulation of Collagen VI. We hypothesized that a reduction of Collagen VI in a muscular dystrophy model that presents with fibrosis would result in reduced muscle pathology and improved muscle function. To test this hypothesis, we crossed γ-sarcoglycan-null mice, a model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C, with a Col6a2-deficient mouse model. We found that the resulting γ-sarcoglycan-null/Col6a2Δex5 mice indeed exhibit reduced muscle pathology compared with γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. Specifically, fewer muscle fibers are degenerating, fiber size varies less, Evans blue dye uptake is reduced and serum creatine kinase levels are lower. Surprisingly, in spite of this reduction in muscle pathology, muscle function is not significantly improved. In fact, grip strength and maximum isometric tetanic force are even lower in γ-sarcoglycan-null/Col6a2Δex5 mice than in γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. In conclusion, our results reveal that Collagen VI-mediated fibrosis contributes to skeletal muscle pathology in γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. Importantly, however, our data also demonstrate that a reduction in skeletal muscle pathology does not necessarily lead to an improvement of skeletal muscle function, and this should be considered in future translational studies.

  14. Disruptions of Sleep/Wake Patterns in the Stable Tubule Only Polypeptide (STOP) Null Mouse Model of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Profitt, Maxine F; Deurveilher, Samuel; Robertson, George S; Rusak, Benjamin; Semba, Kazue

    2016-09-01

    Disruption of sleep/wake cycles is common in patients with schizophrenia and correlates with cognitive and affective abnormalities. Mice deficient in stable tubule only polypeptide (STOP) show cognitive, behavioral, and neurobiological deficits that resemble those seen in patients with schizophrenia, but little is known about their sleep phenotype. We characterized baseline sleep/wake patterns and recovery sleep following sleep deprivation in STOP null mice. Polysomnography was conducted in adult male STOP null and wild-type (WT) mice under a 12:12 hours light:dark cycle before, during, and after 6 hours of sleep deprivation during the light phase. At baseline, STOP null mice spent more time awake and less time in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) over a 24-hour period, with more frequent transitions between wake and NREMS, compared to WT mice, especially during the dark phase. The distributions of wake, NREMS and REMS across the light and the dark phases differed by genotype, and so did features of the electroencephalogram (EEG). Following sleep deprivation, both genotypes showed homeostatic increases in sleep duration, with no significant genotype differences in the initial compensatory increase in sleep intensity (EEG delta power). These results indicate that STOP null mice sleep less overall, and their sleep and wake periods are more fragmented than those of WT mice. These features in STOP null mice are consistent with the sleep patterns observed in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26940700

  15. Disruptions of Sleep/Wake Patterns in the Stable Tubule Only Polypeptide (STOP) Null Mouse Model of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Profitt, Maxine F; Deurveilher, Samuel; Robertson, George S; Rusak, Benjamin; Semba, Kazue

    2016-09-01

    Disruption of sleep/wake cycles is common in patients with schizophrenia and correlates with cognitive and affective abnormalities. Mice deficient in stable tubule only polypeptide (STOP) show cognitive, behavioral, and neurobiological deficits that resemble those seen in patients with schizophrenia, but little is known about their sleep phenotype. We characterized baseline sleep/wake patterns and recovery sleep following sleep deprivation in STOP null mice. Polysomnography was conducted in adult male STOP null and wild-type (WT) mice under a 12:12 hours light:dark cycle before, during, and after 6 hours of sleep deprivation during the light phase. At baseline, STOP null mice spent more time awake and less time in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) over a 24-hour period, with more frequent transitions between wake and NREMS, compared to WT mice, especially during the dark phase. The distributions of wake, NREMS and REMS across the light and the dark phases differed by genotype, and so did features of the electroencephalogram (EEG). Following sleep deprivation, both genotypes showed homeostatic increases in sleep duration, with no significant genotype differences in the initial compensatory increase in sleep intensity (EEG delta power). These results indicate that STOP null mice sleep less overall, and their sleep and wake periods are more fragmented than those of WT mice. These features in STOP null mice are consistent with the sleep patterns observed in patients with schizophrenia.

  16. DAVINCI: Dilute Aperture VIsible Nulling Coronagraphic Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. M.; Vasisht, G.; Lane, B. F.; Woodruff, R.; Vasudevan, G.; Samuele, R.; Lloyd, C. A.; Clampin, M.; Lyon, R.; Guyon, O.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of DAVINCI (Dilute Aperture VIsible Nulling Coronagraphic Imager). The presentation also includes information about dilute aperture coronagraph, and lyot efficiency.

  17. Altitude Differentiated Aerosol Extinction Over Tenerife (North Atlantic Coast) During ACE-2 by Means of Ground and Airborne Photometry and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formenti, P.; Elias, T.; Welton, J.; Diaz, J. P.; Exposito, F.; Schmid, B.; Powell, D.; Holben, B. N.; Smirnov, A.; Andreae, M. O.; Devaux, C.; Voss, K.; Lelieveld, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Retrievals of spectral aerosol optical depths (tau(sub a)) by means of sun photometers have been undertaken in Tenerife (28 deg 16' N, 16 deg 36' W) during ACE-2 (June-July 1997). Five ground-based sites were located at four different altitudes in the marine boundary layer and in the free troposphere, from 0 to 3570 m asl. The goal of the investigation was to provide estimates of the vertical aerosol extinction over the island, both under clean and turbid conditions. Inversion of spectral tau(sub a) allowed to retrieve size distributions, from which the single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) and the asymmetry factor g could be estimated as a function of altitude. These parameters were combined to calculate aerosol forcing in the column. Emphasis is put on episodes of increased turbidity, which were observed at different locations simultaneously, and attributed to outbreaks of mineral dust from North Africa. Differentiation of tau(sub a) as a function of altitude provided the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient sigma(sub e). For dust outbreaks, aerosol extinction is concentrated in two distinct layers above and below the strong subsidence inversion around 1200 m asl. Vertical profiles of tau(sub a) and sigma(sub e) are shown for July 8. In some occasions, vertical profiles are compared to LIDAR observations, performed both at sea level and in the low free troposphere, and to airborne measurements of aerosol optical depths.

  18. Egg ovotransferrin‐derived ACE inhibitory peptide IRW increases ACE2 but decreases proinflammatory genes expression in mesenteric artery of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Kaustav; Liang, Guanxiang; Chen, Yanhong; Guan, LeLuo; Davidge, Sandra T.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Egg ovotransferrin‐derived angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide IRW was previously shown to reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats through reduced vascular inflammation and increased nitric oxide‐mediated vasorelaxation. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of this peptide through transcriptome analysis by RNAseq technique. Methods and results Total RNA was extracted from kidney and mesenteric arteries; the RNAseq libraries (from untreated and IRW‐treated groups) were constructed and subjected to sequence using HiSeq 2000 system (Illumina) system. A total of 12 764 and 13 352 genes were detected in kidney and mesenteric arteries, respectively. The differentially expressed (DE) genes between untreated and IRW‐treated groups were identified and the functional analysis through ingenuity pathway analysis revealed a greater role of DE genes identified from mesenteric arteries than that of kidney in modulating various cardiovascular functions. Subsequent qPCR analysis further confirmed that IRW significantly increased the expression of ACE‐2, ABCB‐1, IRF‐8, and CDH‐1 while significantly decreased the expression ICAM‐1 and VCAM‐1 in mesenteric arteries. Conclusion Our research showed for the first time that ACE inhibitory peptide IRW could contribute to its antihypertensive activity through increased ACE2 and decreased proinflammatory genes expression. PMID:26016560

  19. Progesterone facilitates chromosome instability (aneuploidy) in p53 null normal mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goepfert, T. M.; McCarthy, M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Stephens, C.; Ullrich, R. L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Medina, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from p53 null mice have been shown recently to exhibit an increased risk for tumor development. Hormonal stimulation markedly increased tumor development in p53 null mammary cells. Here we demonstrate that mammary tumors arising in p53 null mammary cells are highly aneuploid, with greater than 70% of the tumor cells containing altered chromosome number and a mean chromosome number of 56. Normal mammary cells of p53 null genotype and aged less than 14 wk do not exhibit aneuploidy in primary cell culture. Significantly, the hormone progesterone, but not estrogen, increases the incidence of aneuploidy in morphologically normal p53 null mammary epithelial cells. Such cells exhibited 40% aneuploidy and a mean chromosome number of 54. The increase in aneuploidy measured in p53 null tumor cells or hormonally stimulated normal p53 null cells was not accompanied by centrosome amplification. These results suggest that normal levels of progesterone can facilitate chromosomal instability in the absence of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The results support the emerging hypothesis based both on human epidemiological and animal model studies that progesterone markedly enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

  20. The Importance of Proving the Null

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallistel, C. R.

    2009-01-01

    Null hypotheses are simple, precise, and theoretically important. Conventional statistical analysis cannot support them; Bayesian analysis can. The challenge in a Bayesian analysis is to formulate a suitably vague alternative, because the vaguer the alternative is (the more it spreads out the unit mass of prior probability), the more the null is…

  1. Electron trapping around a magnetic null

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.-S.; Zong, Q.-G.; Deng, X.-H.; Tu, C.-Y.; Xiao, C.-J.; Wang, X.-G.; Ma, Z.-W.; Pu, Z.-Y.; Lucek, E.; Pedersen, A.; Fazakerley, A.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Dunlop, M. W.; Tian, H.; Yao, S.; Tan, B.; Fu, S.-Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.; Escoubet, C. P.

    2008-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important process in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas. The magnetic null pair structure is theoretically suggested to be a crucial feature of the three-dimensional magnetic reconnection. The physics around the null pair, however, has not been explored in combination with the magnetic field configuration deduced from in situ observations. Here, we report the identification of the configuration around a null pair and simultaneous electron dynamics near one null of the pair, observed by four Cluster spacecraft in the geo-magnetotail. Further, we propose a new scenario of electron dynamics in the null region, suggesting that electrons are temporarily trapped in the central reconnection region including electron diffusion region resulting in an electron density peak, accelerated possibly by parallel electric field and electron pressure gradient, and reflected from the magnetic cusp mirrors leading to the bi-directional energetic electron beams, which excite the observed high frequency electrostatic waves.

  2. In vitro analysis of the glucose-transport system in GLUT4-null skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, J W; Kawano, Y; Chibalin, A V; Rincón, J; Tsao, T S; Stenbit, A E; Combatsiaris, T; Yang, J; Holman, G D; Charron, M J; Zierath, J R

    1999-01-01

    We have characterized the glucose-transport system in soleus muscle from female GLUT4-null mice to determine whether GLUT1, 3 or 5 account for insulin-stimulated glucose-transport activity. Insulin increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake 2.8- and 2.1-fold in soleus muscle from wild-type and GLUT4-null mice, respectively. Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of GLUT1- and GLUT4-mediated glucose transport, inhibited insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake by >95% in wild-type and GLUT4-null soleus muscle. Addition of 35 mM fructose to the incubation media was without effect on insulin-stimulated 3-O-methylglucose transport activity in soleus muscle from either genotype, whereas 35 mM glucose inhibited insulin-stimulated (20 nM) 3-O-methylglucose transport by 65% in wild-type and 99% in GLUT4-null mice. We utilized the 2-N-4-1-(1-azi-2,2,2-triflu oroethyl)benzoyl-1, 3-bis(D-mannose-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA) exofacial photolabel to determine if increased cell-surface GLUT1 or GLUT4 content accounted for insulin-stimulated glucose transport in GLUT4-null muscle. In wild-type soleus muscle, cell-surface GLUT4 content was increased by 2.8-fold under insulin-stimulated conditions and this increase corresponded to the increase in 2-deoxyglucose uptake. No detectable cell-surface GLUT4 was observed in soleus muscle from female GLUT4-null mice under either basal or insulin-stimulated conditions. Basal cell-surface GLUT1 content was similar between wild-type and GLUT4-null mice, with no further increase noted in either genotype with insulin exposure. Neither GLUT3 nor GLUT5 appeared to account for insulin-stimulated glucose-transport activity in wild-type or GLUT4-null muscle. In conclusion, insulin-stimulated glucose-transport activity in female GLUT4-null soleus muscle is mediated by a facilitative transport process that is glucose- and cytochalasin B-inhibitable, but which is not labelled strongly by ATB-BMPA. PMID:10455018

  3. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Null structure groups in eleven dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Mac Conamhna, Oisin A. P.

    2006-02-15

    We classify all the structure groups which arise as subgroups of the isotropy group (Spin(7)xR{sup 8})xR, of a single null Killing spinor in 11 dimensions. We construct the spaces of spinors fixed by these groups. We determine the conditions under which structure subgroups of the maximal null structure group (Spin(7)xR{sup 8})xR may also be embedded in SU(5), and hence the conditions under which a supersymmetric spacetime admits only null, or both timelike and null, Killing spinors. We discuss how this purely algebraic material will facilitate the direct analysis of the Killing spinor equation of 11 dimensional supergravity, and the classification of supersymmetric spacetimes therein.

  5. On the Penrose inequality along null hypersurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, Marc; Soria, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    The null Penrose inequality, i.e. the Penrose inequality in terms of the Bondi energy, is studied by introducing a functional on surfaces and studying its properties along a null hypersurface Ω extending to past null infinity. We prove a general Penrose-type inequality which involves the limit at infinity of the Hawking energy along a specific class of geodesic foliations called Geodesic Asymptotically Bondi (GAB), which are shown to always exist. Whenever this foliation approaches large spheres, this inequality becomes the null Penrose inequality and we recover the results of Ludvigsen-Vickers (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 3349-53) and Bergqvist (1997 Class. Quantum Grav. 14 2577-83). By exploiting further properties of the functional along general geodesic foliations, we introduce an approach to the null Penrose inequality called the Renormalized Area Method and find a set of two conditions which imply the validity of the null Penrose inequality. One of the conditions involves a limit at infinity and the other a restriction on the spacetime curvature along the flow. We investigate their range of applicability in two particular but interesting cases, namely the shear-free and vacuum case, where the null Penrose inequality is known to hold from the results by Sauter (2008 PhD Thesis Zürich ETH), and the case of null shells propagating in the Minkowski spacetime. Finally, a general inequality bounding the area of the quasi-local black hole in terms of an asymptotic quantity intrinsic of Ω is derived.

  6. Premeiotic germ cell defect in seminiferous tubules of Atm-null testis

    SciTech Connect

    Takubo, Keiyo . E-mail: keiyot@gmail.com; Hirao, Atsushi; Ohmura, Masako; Azuma, Masaki; Arai, Fumio; Nagamatsu, Go; Suda, Toshio . E-mail: sudato@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp

    2006-12-29

    Lifelong spermatogenesis is maintained by coordinated sequential processes including self-renewal of stem cells, proliferation of spermatogonial cells, meiotic division, and spermiogenesis. It has been shown that ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) is required for meiotic division of the seminiferous tubules. Here, we show that, in addition to its role in meiosis, ATM has a pivotal role in premeiotic germ cell maintenance. ATM is activated in premeiotic spermatogonial cells and the Atm-null testis shows progressive degeneration. In Atm-null testicular cells, differing from bone marrow cells of Atm-null mice, reactive oxygen species-mediated p16{sup Ink4a} activation does not occur in Atm-null premeiotic germ cells, which suggests the involvement of different signaling pathways from bone marrow defects. Although Atm-null bone marrow undergoes p16{sup Ink4a}-mediated cellular senescence program, Atm-null premeiotic germ cells exhibited cell cycle arrest and apoptotic elimination of premeiotic germ cells, which is different from p16{sup Ink4a}-mediated senescence.

  7. Phase-only nulling for transmit antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Moayyed A.; Yu, Kai-Bor

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a technique for transmit antenna nulling for low-cost large sparse phased array radar system. Radar system described includes an array of elemental antennas, each with a transmit/receive (T/R) module. The T/R modules are operated at or near maximum output to achieve maximum CD-to-RF efficiency. A phase controller controls the phase shift, which are imparted by each module to its signal, to form a mainbeam and its associated sidelobes. A perturbation phase generator adds phase shifts computed, to form wide nulls in the sidelobe structure. The nulls are achieved at very minimal loss of gain, in the order of fraction of a dB. The speed of obtaining these nulls in real time allows a rapid steering of these nulls in a hostile environment. The thinned aperture allow designing a light weigh mobile system. In radar context, these nulls may be placed on a source of ground clutter, a set of jammers or a set of undesirable radio sources.

  8. Results of ACE 1, ACE 2, AEROSOLS99, INDOEX, TARFOX, and NEAQS: What Have We Learned? Where Do We Go From Here?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2003-12-01

    Since 1995, a series of international field experiments has focused on the measurement of aerosol properties in marine regions downwind of continental emissions. A goal of these experiments has been the characterization of regional aerosol properties and their controlling processes in order to improve estimates of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing. The first Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1) purposefully steered clear of any continental plumes in order to characterize the "background" aerosol upon which anthropogenic perturbations could be imposed. ACE 2 focused on the European plume, INDOEX (Indian Ocean Experiment) on the plume emanating from the Indian subcontinent, ACE Asia on the Asian plume, and TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) and NEAQS (New England Air Quality Study) on the eastern U.S. plume. In addition, measurements of dust and biomass burning aerosols from Africa were made the Atlantic Aerosols99 cruise. With the exception of TARFOX, all experiments included the shipboard sampling of aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties. The shipboard sampling was done with standardized protocols to minimize sampling biases and to make the data from the different regions directly comparable. Regional aerosol properties from the North American, European, African, Asian, and Indian plumes will be compared and the major findings from these experiments will be presented. Properties that will be compared include the relative contribution of the dominant chemical components to aerosol mass and light extinction, the absolute concentrations of the chemical components, light scattering and absorption by the aerosol, single scattering albedo, and aerosol optical depth. Since TARFOX was an aircraft study we include only data collected at altitudes less than 300 m. In addition to using standardized sampling protocols on the ship, over-determined data sets were collected so that a measured aerosol property

  9. Regional aerosol properties: Comparisons of boundary layer measurements from ACE 1, ACE 2, Aerosols99, INDOEX, ACE Asia, TARFOX, and NEAQS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2005-07-01

    Means and variability of aerosol chemical composition and optical properties are compared for the first and second Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE 1 and ACE 2), a cruise across the Atlantic (Aerosols99), the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), the Asian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE Asia), the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX), and the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS). These experiments were focused either on the remote marine atmosphere (ACE 1) or areas downwind of continental aerosol source regions including western Europe, North America, Africa, India, and Asia. Presented here are size-segregated concentrations of aerosol mass, sea salt, non-sea-salt (nss) SO4=, NH4+, NO3-, dust, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and nss K+, as well as mass ratios that are commonly used to identify aerosol sources and to assess aerosol processing (Cl- to Na+, OC to nss SO4=, EC to total carbon (TC), EC to nss SO4=, nss K+ to EC, Fe to Al, and Si to Al). Optical properties that are compared include size-segregated scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients, and single-scattering albedo at 550 nm. Size-segregated mass scattering and mass absorption efficiencies for the total aerosol and mass extinction efficiencies for the dominant chemical components also are compared. In addition, we present the contribution to light extinction by the dominant chemical components for each region. All data are based on shipboard measurements performed at a relative humidity of 55 ± 5%. Scattering coefficients and single-scattering albedos also are reported at ambient relative humidity (RH) using published values of f(RH). Finally, aerosol optical depths from each region are compared. Identical sampling protocols were used in all experiments in order to eliminate sampling biases and to make the data directly comparable. Major findings include (1) nss SO4= makes up only 16 to 46% of the submicron aerosol mass

  10. Interactions Between Nuclear receptor SHP and FOXA1 Maintain Oscillatory Homocysteine Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Lee, Sangmin; Renga, Barbara; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Yang, Zhihong; Orena, Stephen J.; Goedken, Michael J.; Zhang, Yuxia; Kong, B; Lebofsky, Margitta; Rudraiah, Swetha; Smalling, Rana; Guo, Grace; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zeisel, Steven H.; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Hyperhomocysteinemia is often associated with liver and metabolic diseases. We studied nuclear receptors that mediate oscillatory control of homocysteine homeostasis in mice. METHODS We studied mice with disruptions in Nr0b2 (called SHP-null mice) Bhmt, or both genes (BHMT-null/SHP-null mice), along with mice with wild-type copies of these genes (controls). Hyperhomocysteinemia was induced by feeding mice alcohol (the NIAAA binge model) or chow diets along with water containing 0.18% DL-homocysteine. Some mice were placed on diets containing cholic acid (1%) or cholestyramine (2%), or high-fat diets (60%). Serum and livers were collected over a 24 hr light–dark cycle and analyzed by RNA-seq, metabolomic, and quantitative PCR, immunoblot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS SHP-null mice had altered timing in expression of genes that regulate homocysteine metabolism, compared with control mice. Oscillatory production of S-adenosylmethionine, betaine, choline, phosphocholine, glyceophosphocholine, cystathionine, cysteine, hydrogen sulfide, glutathione disulfide, and glutathione, differed between SHP-null mice and control mice. SHP inhibited transcriptional activation of Bhmt and Cth by FOXA1. Expression of Bhmt and Cth was decreased when mice were fed cholic acid but increased when they were placed on diets containing cholestyramine or high-fat content. Diets containing ethanol or homocysteine induced hyperhomocysteinemia and glucose intolerance in control but not SHP-null mice. In BHMT-null and BHMT-null/SHP-null mice fed a control liquid, lipid vacuoles were observed in livers. Ethanol feeding induced accumulation of macrovesicular lipid vacuoles to the greatest extent in BHMT-null and BHMT-null/SHP-null mice. CONCLUSIONS Disruption of Shp in mice alters timing of expression of genes that regulate homocysteine metabolism and the liver responses to ethanol and homocysteine. SHP inhibits the transcriptional activation of Bhmt and Cth

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic flows sustaining stationary magnetic nulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Vyacheslav S.; Hornig, Gunnar

    2000-09-01

    Exact solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations are derived which describe a stationary incompressible flow near a generic null point of a three-dimensional magnetic field. The properties of the solutions depend on the topological skeleton of the corresponding magnetic field. This skeleton is formed by one-dimensional and two-dimensional invariant manifolds (so-called spine line and fan plane) of the magnetic field. It is shown that configurations of generic null points may always be sustained by stationary field-aligned flows of the stagnation type, where the null points of the magnetic and velocity fields have the same location. However, if the absolute value |j∥| of the current density component parallel to the spine line exceeds a critical value jc, the solution is not unique—there is a second nontrivial solution describing spiral flows with the stagnation point at the magnetic null. The characteristic feature of these new flows is that they cross magnetic field lines but they do not cross the corresponding spine and fan of the magnetic null. Therefore these are nonideal but nonreconnecting flows. The critical value |j∥|=jc coincides exactly with a threshold separating the topological distinct improper radial and spiral nulls. It is shown that this is not an accidental coincidence: the spiral field-crossing flows of the considered type are possible only due to the topological equivalence of the field lines forming the fan plane of the spiral magnetic null. The explicit expression for the pressure distribution of the solution is given and its iso-surfaces are found to be always ellipsoidal for the field-aligned flows, while for the field-crossing flows there are also cases with a hyperboloidal structure.

  12. Analysis of peptides in prohormone convertase 1/3 null mouse brain using quantitative peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, Jonathan H.; Zhang, Xin; Gagnon, Sandra; Castro, Leandro M.; Zhu, Xiaorong; Steiner, Donald F.; Day, Robert; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptides are produced from larger precursors by limited proteolysis, first by endopeptidases and then by carboxypeptidases. Major endopeptidases required for these cleavages include prohormone convertase (PC) 1/3 and PC2. In the present study, quantitative peptidomics analysis was used to characterize the specific role PC1/3 plays in this process. Peptides isolated from hypothalamus, amygdala, and striatum of PC1/3 null mice were compared to those from heterozygous and wild-type mice. Extracts were labeled with stable isotopic tags and fractionated by HPLC, after which relative peptide levels were determined using tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 92 peptides were found, of which 35 were known neuropeptides or related peptides derived from 15 distinct secretory pathway proteins: 7B2, chromogranin A and B, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, procholecystokinin, proenkephalin, promelanin concentrating hormone, proneurotensin, propituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide, proSAAS, prosomatosatin, provasoactive intestinal peptide, provasopressin, secretogranin III, and VGF. Among the peptides derived from these proteins, ~1/3 were decreased in the PC1/3 null mice relative to wild-type mice, ~1/3 showed no change, and ~1/3 increased in PC1/3 null. Cleavage sites were analyzed in peptides that showed no change or that decreased in PC1/3 mice, and these results were compared with peptides that showed no change or decreased in previous peptidomic studies with PC2 null mice. Analysis of these sites showed that while PC1/3 and PC2 have overlapping substrate preferences, there are particular cleavage site residues that distinguish peptides preferred by each PC. PMID:20412386

  13. Three-dimensional null point reconnection regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, E. R.; Pontin, D. I.

    2009-12-15

    Recent advances in theory and computational experiments have shown the need to refine the previous categorization of magnetic reconnection at three-dimensional null points--points at which the magnetic field vanishes. We propose here a division into three different types, depending on the nature of the flow near the spine and fan of the null. The spine is an isolated field line which approaches the null (or recedes from it), while the fan is a surface of field lines which recede from it (or approach it). So-called torsional spine reconnection occurs when field lines in the vicinity of the fan rotate, with current becoming concentrated along the spine so that nearby field lines undergo rotational slippage. In torsional fan reconnection field lines near the spine rotate and create a current that is concentrated in the fan with a rotational flux mismatch and rotational slippage. In both of these regimes, the spine and fan are perpendicular and there is no flux transfer across spine or fan. The third regime, called spine-fan reconnection, is the most common in practice and combines elements of the previous spine and fan models. In this case, in response to a generic shearing motion, the null point collapses to form a current sheet that is focused at the null itself, in a sheet that locally spans both the spine and fan. In this regime the spine and fan are no longer perpendicular and there is flux transfer across both of them.

  14. Collagen VI deficiency reduces muscle pathology, but does not improve muscle function, in the γ-sarcoglycan-null mouse

    PubMed Central

    de Greef, Jessica C.; Hamlyn, Rebecca; Jensen, Braden S.; O'Campo Landa, Raul; Levy, Jennifer R.; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and dystrophic muscle exhibits degeneration and regeneration of muscle cells, inflammation and fibrosis. Skeletal muscle fibrosis is an excessive deposition of components of the extracellular matrix including an accumulation of Collagen VI. We hypothesized that a reduction of Collagen VI in a muscular dystrophy model that presents with fibrosis would result in reduced muscle pathology and improved muscle function. To test this hypothesis, we crossed γ-sarcoglycan-null mice, a model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C, with a Col6a2-deficient mouse model. We found that the resulting γ-sarcoglycan-null/Col6a2Δex5 mice indeed exhibit reduced muscle pathology compared with γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. Specifically, fewer muscle fibers are degenerating, fiber size varies less, Evans blue dye uptake is reduced and serum creatine kinase levels are lower. Surprisingly, in spite of this reduction in muscle pathology, muscle function is not significantly improved. In fact, grip strength and maximum isometric tetanic force are even lower in γ-sarcoglycan-null/Col6a2Δex5 mice than in γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. In conclusion, our results reveal that Collagen VI-mediated fibrosis contributes to skeletal muscle pathology in γ-sarcoglycan-null mice. Importantly, however, our data also demonstrate that a reduction in skeletal muscle pathology does not necessarily lead to an improvement of skeletal muscle function, and this should be considered in future translational studies. PMID:26908621

  15. Impact of nicotine metabolism on nicotine's pharmacological effects and behavioral responses: insights from a Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Jia, Kunzhi; Zhou, Xin; McCallum, Sarah E; Hough, Lindsay B; Ding, Xinxin

    2013-12-01

    Nicotine metabolism is believed to affect not only nicotine's pharmacological effects but also nicotine addiction. As a key step toward testing this hypothesis, we have studied nicotine metabolism and nicotine's pharmacological and behavioral effects in a novel knockout mouse model [named Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null] lacking a number of cytochrome P450 genes known to be or possibly involved in nicotine metabolism, including two Cyp2a and all Cyp2b genes. We found that, compared with wild-type mice, the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice showed >90% decreases in hepatic microsomal nicotine oxidase activity in vitro, and in rates of systemic nicotine clearance in vivo. Further comparisons of nicotine metabolism between Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null and Cyp2a5-null mice revealed significant roles of both CYP2A5 and CYP2B enzymes in nicotine clearance. Compared with the behavioral responses in wild-type mice, the decreases in nicotine metabolism in the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice led to prolonged nicotine-induced acute pharmacological effects, in that null mice showed enhanced nicotine hypothermia and antinociception. Furthermore, we found that the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice developed a preference for nicotine in a conditioned place preference test, a commonly used test of nicotine's rewarding effects, at a nicotine dose that was 4-fold lower than what was required by wild-type mice. Thus, CYP2A/2B-catalyzed nicotine clearance affects nicotine's behavioral response as well as its acute pharmacological effects in mice. This result provides direct experimental support of the findings of pharmacogenetic studies that suggest linkage between rates of nicotine metabolism and smoking behavior in humans.

  16. Impact of nicotine metabolism on nicotine's pharmacological effects and behavioral responses: insights from a Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Jia, Kunzhi; Zhou, Xin; McCallum, Sarah E; Hough, Lindsay B; Ding, Xinxin

    2013-12-01

    Nicotine metabolism is believed to affect not only nicotine's pharmacological effects but also nicotine addiction. As a key step toward testing this hypothesis, we have studied nicotine metabolism and nicotine's pharmacological and behavioral effects in a novel knockout mouse model [named Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null] lacking a number of cytochrome P450 genes known to be or possibly involved in nicotine metabolism, including two Cyp2a and all Cyp2b genes. We found that, compared with wild-type mice, the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice showed >90% decreases in hepatic microsomal nicotine oxidase activity in vitro, and in rates of systemic nicotine clearance in vivo. Further comparisons of nicotine metabolism between Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null and Cyp2a5-null mice revealed significant roles of both CYP2A5 and CYP2B enzymes in nicotine clearance. Compared with the behavioral responses in wild-type mice, the decreases in nicotine metabolism in the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice led to prolonged nicotine-induced acute pharmacological effects, in that null mice showed enhanced nicotine hypothermia and antinociception. Furthermore, we found that the Cyp2a(4/5)bgs-null mice developed a preference for nicotine in a conditioned place preference test, a commonly used test of nicotine's rewarding effects, at a nicotine dose that was 4-fold lower than what was required by wild-type mice. Thus, CYP2A/2B-catalyzed nicotine clearance affects nicotine's behavioral response as well as its acute pharmacological effects in mice. This result provides direct experimental support of the findings of pharmacogenetic studies that suggest linkage between rates of nicotine metabolism and smoking behavior in humans. PMID:24045421

  17. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  18. Granule stores from cellubrevin/VAMP-3 null mouse platelets exhibit normal stimulus-induced release.

    PubMed

    Schraw, Todd D; Rutledge, Tara W; Crawford, Garland L; Bernstein, Audrey M; Kalen, Amanda L; Pessin, Jeffery E; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2003-09-01

    It is widely accepted that the platelet release reaction is mediated by heterotrimeric complexes of integral membrane proteins known as SNAREs (SNAP receptors). In an effort to define the precise molecular machinery required for platelet exocytosis, we have analyzed platelets from cellubrevin/VAMP-3 knockout mice. Cellubrevin/VAMP-3 has been proposed to be a critical v-SNARE for human platelet exocytosis; however, data reported here suggest that it is not required for platelet function. Upon stimulation with increasing concentrations of thrombin, collagen, or with thrombin for increasing time there were no differences in secretion of [3H]-5HT (dense core granules), platelet factor IV (alpha granules), or hexosaminidase (lysosomes) between null and wild-type platelets. There were no gross differences in bleeding times nor in agonist-induced aggregation measured in platelet-rich plasma or with washed platelets. Western blotting of wild-type, heterozygous, and null platelets confirmed the lack of cellubrevin/VAMP-3 in nulls and showed that most elements of the secretion machinery are expressed at similar levels. While the secretory machinery in mice was similar to humans, mice did express apparently higher levels of synaptobrevin/VAMP-2. These data show that the v-SNARE, cellubrevin/VAMP-3 is not a requirement for the platelet release reaction in mice.

  19. Polarization nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-04-01

    We introduce a new concept of nulling interferometer without any achromatic device, using polarization properties of light. This type of interferometer should enable a high rejection ratio in a theoretically unlimited spectral band. We analyze several consequences of the proposed design, notably, the possibility of fast internal modulation.

  20. Polarization nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-04-01

    We introduce a new concept of nulling interferometer without any achromatic device, using polarization properties of light. This type of interferometer should enable a high rejection ratio in a theoretically unlimited spectral band. We analyze several consequences of the proposed design, notably, the possibility of fast internal modulation. PMID:19516397

  1. Protective Effect of RA on Myocardial Infarction-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis via AT1R/p38 MAPK Pathway Signaling and Modulation of the ACE2/ACE Ratio.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaofeng; Tian, Jingwei; Xu, Yanan; Li, Chunmei; Meng, Xiangjing; Fu, Fenghua

    2016-09-01

    Rosmarinic acid (α-o-caffeoyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid, RA) is a major active constituent of Rosmarinus officinalis Linn. (rosemary) having significant anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and antioxidant effects. However, the cardioprotection of RA is still not understood. The present study was designed, for the first time, to investigate the cardioprotection of RA on myocardial infarction (MI)-induced cardiac fibrosis and to clarify the possible mechanisms. MI was induced in adult rats by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, and animals were then administered RA (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) by gavage. Compared with the model group, RA treatment ameliorated changes in the left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), +dp/dtmax, and -dp/dtmax after 4 weeks. This was associated with attenuation of infarct size, collagen volume fraction (CVF), expression of collagen I, collagen III, alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and hydroxyproline (Hyp) concentrations. RA treatment was also associated with decreased angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and increased ACE2 expression, as well as decreased expression of angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Thus, RA can protect against cardiac dysfunction and fibrosis following MI, likely due to decreasing ACE expression and increasing ACE2 expression via the AT1R/p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:27538767

  2. Combined suppression of the intrarenal and circulating vasoconstrictor renin-ACE-ANG II axis and augmentation of the vasodilator ACE2-ANG 1-7-Mas axis attenuates the systemic hypertension in Ren-2 transgenic rats exposed to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Červenka, L; Bíbová, J; Husková, Z; Vaňourková, Z; Kramer, H J; Herget, J; Jíchová, Š; Sadowski, J; Hampl, V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia would aggravate hypertension in Ren-2 transgenic rats (TGR), a well-defined monogenetic model of hypertension with increased activity of endogenous renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) in conscious rats and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in anesthetized TGR and normotensive Hannover Sprague-Dawley (HanSD) rats were determined under normoxia that was either continuous or interrupted by two weeks´ hypoxia. Expression, activities and concentrations of individual components of RAS were studied in plasma and kidney of TGR and HanSD rats under normoxic conditions and after exposure to chronic hypoxia. In HanSD rats two weeks´ exposure to chronic hypoxia did not alter SBP and MAP. Surprisingly, in TGR it decreased markedly SBP and MAP; this was associated with substantial reduction in plasma and kidney renin activities and also of angiotensin II (ANG II) levels, without altering angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activities. Simultaneously, in TGR the exposure to hypoxia increased kidney ACE type 2 (ACE2) activity and angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7) concentrations as compared with TGR under continuous normoxia. Based on these results, we propose that suppression of the hypertensiogenic ACE-ANG II axis in the circulation and kidney tissue, combined with augmentation of the intrarenal vasodilator ACE2-ANG 1-7 axis, is the main mechanism responsible for the blood pressure-lowering effects of chronic hypoxia in TGR. PMID:25194129

  3. Current progress on TPFI nulling architectures at Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gappinger, Robert O.; Wallace, J. Kent; Bartos, Randall D.; Macdonald, Daniel R.; Brown, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Infrared interferometric nulling is a promising technology for exoplanet detection. Nulling research for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer has been exploring a variety of interferometer architectures at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  4. Adaptive null steering by reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofer, J. W.; Martin, G. P.; Ralph, S. E.

    The feasibility of peforming adaptive null steering by reflector antennas is investigated, and the results are reported. The implementation consists of an array of feed elements located in the focal region. The outputs of all the feeds are weighted in phase and amplitude and summed coherently. After deduction by a receiver, the signal passes to a digital algorithm computer where a decision is made as to how the weights should be adjusted, and interactive perturbational process continues until the system has arrived at an optimal weight combination. The configuration allows for multiple jammers and/or desired signals. Nulls on the order of 35 dB can be achieved with the basic limitation being amplitude and phase balance of the RF weights versus frequency. The system offers simpler, lighter weight more economically than full-phased arrays, much broader bandwidth than sidelobe cancellers, well-understood analysis procedures, and allows cancellation high up on the main beam.

  5. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko

    2006-01-01

    A description of adaptive nulling for Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPFI) is presented. The topics include: 1) Nulling in TPF-I; 2) Why Do Adaptive Nulling; 3) Parallel High-Order Compensator Design; 4) Phase and Amplitude Control; 5) Development Activates; 6) Requirements; 7) Simplified Experimental Setup; 8) Intensity Correction; and 9) Intensity Dispersion Stability. A short summary is also given on adaptive nulling for the TPFI.

  6. Starlight Nulling Technology at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The current interests in extra-solar planet detection and space-based and ground-based interferometry for astronomical observations has led to the development of a number of nulling instrument designs at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and elsewhere. This paper summarizes briefly JPL's efforts in nulling interferometry to date and consists of illustrations of some key nulling activities. Basic layouts of nulling testbeds are described and key applications discussed.

  7. Gap solitons with null-scattering.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Nireekshan; Dutta Gupta, S

    2014-04-15

    In this Letter, we study the excitation of gap solitons under the conditions of coherent perfect absorption. Our system consists of a symmetric periodic structure with alternating Kerr nonlinear and linear layers illuminated from both ends. We show near-total transfer of incident light energy into the gap solitons resulting in null scattering. We also report on the nonlinear super-scattering states. Both the exact and the approximate results, which show good agreement based on nonlinear characteristic matrix methods, are presented.

  8. Gradient moment nulling in fast spin echo.

    PubMed

    Hinks, R S; Constable, R T

    1994-12-01

    The fast spin echo sequence combines data from many echo signals in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill echo train to form a single image. Much of the signal in the second and later echoes results from the coherent addition of stimulated echo signal components back to the spin echo signal. Because stimulated echoes experience no dephasing effects during the time that they are stored as Mz magnetization, they experience a different gradient first moment than does the spin echo. This leads to flow-related phase differences between different echo components and results in flow voids and ghosting, even when the first moment is nulled for the spin echo signal. A method of gradient moment nulling that correctly compensates both spin echo and stimulated echo components has been developed. The simplest solution involves nulling the first gradient moment at least at the RF pulses and preferably at both the RF pulses and the echoes. Phantom and volunteer studies demonstrate good suppression of flow-related artifacts.

  9. System and Method for Null-Lens Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter C. (Inventor); Thompson, Patrick L. (Inventor); Aronstein, David L. (Inventor); Bolcar, Matthew R. (Inventor); Smith, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of measuring aberrations in a null-lens including assembly and alignment aberrations. The null-lens may be used for measuring aberrations in an aspheric optic with the null-lens. Light propagates from the aspheric optic location through the null-lens, while sweeping a detector through the null-lens focal plane. Image data being is collected at locations about said focal plane. Light is simulated propagating to the collection locations for each collected image. Null-lens aberrations may extracted, e.g., applying image-based wavefront-sensing to collected images and simulation results. The null-lens aberrations improve accuracy in measuring aspheric optic aberrations.

  10. Displacing Unpredictable Nulls in Antenna Radiation Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James; Schaefer, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A method of maintaining radio communication despite the emergence of unpredictable fades and nulls in the radiation pattern of an antenna has been proposed. The method was originally intended to be applied in the design and operation of a radio antenna aboard a robotic exploratory vehicle on a remote planet during communication with a spacecraft in orbit around the planet. The method could also be applied in similar terrestrial situations for example, radio communication between two ground vehicles or between a ground vehicle and an aircraft or spacecraft. The method is conceptually simple, is readily adaptable to diverse situations, and can be implemented without adding greatly to the weight, cost, power demand, or complexity of a system to which it may be applied. The unpredictable fades and nulls in an antenna radiation pattern arise because of electromagnetic interactions between the antenna and other objects within the near field of the antenna (basically, objects within a distance of a few wavelengths). These objects can include general vehicle components, masts, robotic arms, other antennas, the ground, and nearby terrain features. Figure 1 presents representative plots of signal strength versus time during a typical pass of a spacecraft or aircraft through the far field of such an antenna, showing typical nulls and fades caused by nearby objects. The traditional approach to ensuring reliability of communication in the presence of deep fades calls for increasing the effective transmitter power and/or reducing the receiver noise figure at the affected ground vehicle, possibly in combination with appropriate redesign of the equipment at the spacecraft or aircraft end of the communication link. These solutions can be expensive and/or risky and, depending on the application, can add significantly to weight, cost, and power demand. The proposed method entails none of these disadvantages.

  11. Clausius entropy for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccetti, Valentina; Visser, Matt

    2014-02-01

    Jacobson’s thermodynamic derivation of the Einstein equations was originally applied only to local Rindler horizons. But at least some parts of that construction can usefully be extended to give meaningful results for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces. As presaged in Jacobson’s original article, this more general construction sharply brings into focus the questions: is entropy objectively ‘real’? Or is entropy in some sense subjective and observer-dependent? These innocent questions open a Pandora’s box of often inconclusive debate. A consensus opinion, though certainly not universally held, seems to be that Clausius entropy (thermodynamic entropy, defined via a Clausius relation {\\rm{d}}S = \\unicode{x111} Q/T) should be objectively real, but that the ontological status of statistical entropy (Shannon or von Neumann entropy) is much more ambiguous, and much more likely to be observer-dependent. This question is particularly pressing when it comes to understanding Bekenstein entropy (black hole entropy). To perhaps further add to the confusion, we shall argue that even the Clausius entropy can often be observer-dependent. In the current article we shall conclusively demonstrate that one can meaningfully assign a notion of Clausius entropy to arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces—effectively defining a ‘virtual Clausius entropy’ for arbitrary ‘virtual (local) causal horizons’. As an application, we see that we can implement a version of the generalized second law (GSL) for this virtual Clausius entropy. This version of GSL can be related to certain (nonstandard) integral variants of the null energy condition. Because the concepts involved are rather subtle, we take some effort in being careful and explicit in developing our framework. In future work we will apply this construction to generalize Jacobson’s derivation of the Einstein equations.

  12. Null Energy Condition in Dynamic Wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, D.; Visser, M.

    1998-07-01

    We extend previous proofs that violations of the null energy condition are a generic and universal feature of traversable wormholes to completely nonsymmetric time-dependent wormholes. We show that the analysis can be phrased purely in terms of local geometry at and near the wormhole throat, and we do not have to make any technical assumptions about asymptotic flatness or other global properties. A key aspect of the analysis is the demonstration that time-dependent wormholes have {ital two} throats, one for each direction through the wormhole, and that the two throats coalesce only for the case of a static wormhole. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Polyhedra in spacetime from null vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiman, Yasha

    2014-01-01

    We consider convex spacelike polyhedra oriented in the Minkowski space. These are the classical analogues of spinfoam intertwiners. We point out a parametrization of these shapes using null face normals, with no constraints or redundancies. Our construction is dimension-independent. In 3+1d, it provides the spacetime picture behind a well-known property of the loop quantum gravity intertwiner space in spinor form, namely that the closure constraint is always satisfied after some SL(2, C) rotation. As a simple application of our variables, we incorporate them in a 4-simplex action that reproduces the large-spin behavior of the Barrett-Crane vertex amplitude.

  14. A Nulling Coronagraph for TPF-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, Bruce Martin; Wallace, James Kent; Orton, Glenn S.; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Lane, Benjamin F.; Seager, Sara; Tolls, Volker; Lyon, Richard G.; Samuele, Rocco; Tenerelli, Domenick J.; Woodruff, Robert; Ge, Jian

    2006-01-01

    The nulling coronagraph is one of 5 instrument concepts selected by NASA for study for potential use in the TPF-C mission. This concept for extreme starlight suppression has two major components, a nulling interferometer to suppress the starlight to 10(sup -10) per airy spot within 2 (lamda)/D of the star, and a calibration interferometer to measure the residual scattered starlight. The ability to work at 2 (lamda)/D dramatically improves the science throughput of a space based coronagraph like TPF-C. The calibration interferometer is an equally important part of the starlight suppression system. It measures the measures the wavefront of the scattered starlight with very high SNR, to 0.05nm in less than 5 minutes on a 5mag star. In addition, the post coronagraph wavefront sensor will be used to measure the residual scattered light after the coronagraph and subtract it in post processing to 12x10(sup -11) to enable detection of an Earthlike planet with a SNR of 510.

  15. Passive reverberation nulling for target enhancement.

    PubMed

    Song, H C; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Sabra, K G; Akal, T; Stevenson, M

    2007-12-01

    Echo-to-reverberation enhancement previously has been demonstrated using time reversal focusing when knowledge of the channel response between a target and the source array elements is available. In the absence of this knowledge, direct focusing is not possible. However, active reverberation nulling still is feasible given observations of reverberation from conventional source array transmissions. For a given range of interest, the response between the source array elements and the dominant sources of boundary reverberation is provided by the corresponding reverberation from this range. Thus, an active transmission can be projected from the source array which minimizes the energy interacting with the boundaries at a given range while still ensonifying the waveguide between the boundaries. As an alternative, here a passive reverberation nulling concept is proposed. In a similar fashion, the observed reverberation defines the response between the source array elements and the dominant sources of boundary reverberation at each range and this is used to drive a range-dependent sequence of projection operators. When these projection operators subsequently are applied to the received data vectors, reverberation can be diminished. The improvement in target detectability is demonstrated using experimental data with an echo repeater simulating the presence of a target.

  16. Comprehensive Analysis of the 16p11.2 Deletion and Null Cntnap2 Mouse Models of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    He, Dansha; Cox, Kimberly; Thiede, Lucinda; Hanania, Taleen; Sabath, Emily; Alexandrov, Vadim; Saxe, Michael; Peles, Elior; Mills, Alea; Spooren, Will; Ghosh, Anirvan; Feliciano, Pamela; Benedetti, Marta; Luo Clayton, Alice; Biemans, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder comprises several neurodevelopmental conditions presenting symptoms in social communication and restricted, repetitive behaviors. A major roadblock for drug development for autism is the lack of robust behavioral signatures predictive of clinical efficacy. To address this issue, we further characterized, in a uniform and rigorous way, mouse models of autism that are of interest because of their construct validity and wide availability to the scientific community. We implemented a broad behavioral battery that included but was not restricted to core autism domains, with the goal of identifying robust, reliable phenotypes amenable for further testing. Here we describe comprehensive findings from two known mouse models of autism, obtained at different developmental stages, using a systematic behavioral test battery combining standard tests as well as novel, quantitative, computer-vision based systems. The first mouse model recapitulates a deletion in human chromosome 16p11.2, found in 1% of individuals with autism. The second mouse model harbors homozygous null mutations in Cntnap2, associated with autism and Pitt-Hopkins-like syndrome. Consistent with previous results, 16p11.2 heterozygous null mice, also known as Del(7Slx1b-Sept1)4Aam weighed less than wild type littermates displayed hyperactivity and no social deficits. Cntnap2 homozygous null mice were also hyperactive, froze less during testing, showed a mild gait phenotype and deficits in the three-chamber social preference test, although less robust than previously published. In the open field test with exposure to urine of an estrous female, however, the Cntnap2 null mice showed reduced vocalizations. In addition, Cntnap2 null mice performed slightly better in a cognitive procedural learning test. Although finding and replicating robust behavioral phenotypes in animal models is a challenging task, such functional readouts remain important in the development of therapeutics and we

  17. Off-Axis Nulling Transfer Function Measurement: A First Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedova, G. Dalla; Menut, J.-L.; Millour, F.; Petrov, R.; Cassaing, F.; Danchi, W. C.; Jacquinod, S.; Lhome, E.; Lopez, B.; Lozi, J.; Marcotto, A.; Parisot, J.; Reess, J.-M.

    2013-01-01

    We want to study a polychromatic inverse problem method with nulling interferometers to obtain information on the structures of the exozodiacal light. For this reason, during the first semester of 2013, thanks to the support of the consortium PERSEE, we launched a campaign of laboratory measurements with the nulling interferometric test bench PERSEE, operating with 9 spectral channels between J and K bands. Our objective is to characterise the transfer function, i.e. the map of the null as a function of wavelength for an off-axis source, the null being optimised on the central source or on the source photocenter. We were able to reach on-axis null depths better than 10(exp -4). This work is part of a broader project aiming at creating a simulator of a nulling interferometer in which typical noises of a real instrument are introduced. We present here our first results.

  18. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-01

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects.

  19. Nulling Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 m), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied.

  20. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-01

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects. PMID:19421271

  1. String spectra near some null cosmological singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Madhu, Kallingalthodi; Narayan, K.

    2009-06-15

    We construct cosmological spacetimes with null Kasner-like singularities as purely gravitational solutions with no other background fields turned on. These can be recast as anisotropic plane-wave spacetimes by coordinate transformations. We analyze string quantization to find the spectrum of string modes in these backgrounds. The classical string modes can be solved for exactly in these time-dependent backgrounds, which enables a detailed study of the near-singularity string spectrum, (time-dependent) oscillator masses, and wave functions. We find that for low-lying string modes (finite oscillation number), the classical near-singularity string mode functions are nondivergent for various families of singularities. Furthermore, for any infinitesimal regularization of the vicinity of the singularity, we find a tower of string modes of ultrahigh oscillation number which propagate essentially freely in the background. The resulting picture suggests that string interactions are non-negligible near the singularity.

  2. Spatiotemporal disorder in the axial skeleton development of the Mesp2-null mouse: a model of spondylocostal dysostosis and spondylothoracic dysostosis.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yuji; Takahashi, Yu; Tanabe, Rieko; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Haraikawa, Mayu; Hamagaki, Miwako; Hata, Kenji; Kanno, Jun; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Saga, Yumiko; Goseki-Sone, Masae; Kaneko, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Iimura, Tadahiro

    2013-03-01

    Spondylocostal dysostosis (SCDO) is a genetic disorder characterized by severe malformation of the axial skeleton. Mesp2 encodes a basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor that is required for somite formation. Its human homologue, Mesp2, is a gene affected in patients with SCDO and a related vertebral disorder, spondylothoracic dysostosis (STDO). This work investigated how the loss of Mesp2 affects axial skeleton development and causes the clinical features of SCDO and STDO. We first confirmed, by three-dimensional computed tomography scanning, that Mesp2-null mice exhibited mineralized tissue patterning resembling the radiological features of SCDO and STDO. Histological observations and in situ hybridization probing for extracellular matrix molecules demonstrated that the developing vertebral bodies in Mesp2-null mice were extensively fused with rare insertions of intervertebral tissue. Unexpectedly, the intervertebral tissues were mostly fused longitudinally in the vertebral column, instead of exhibiting extended formation, as was expected based on the caudalized properties of Mesp2-null somite derivatives. Furthermore, the differentiation of vertebral body chondrocytes in Mesp2-null mice was spatially disordered and largely delayed, with an increased cell proliferation rate. The quantitative three-dimensional immunofluorescence image analyses of phospho-Smad2 and -Smad1/5/8 revealed that these chondrogenic phenotypes were associated with spatially disordered inputs of TGF-β and BMP signaling in the Mesp2-null chondrocytes, and also demonstrated an amorphous arrangement of cells with distinct properties. Furthermore, a significant delay in ossification in Mesp2-null vertebrae was observed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The current observations of the spatiotemporal disorder of vertebral organogenesis in the Mesp2-null mice provide further insight into the pathogenesis of SCDO and STDO, and the physiological development of the axial

  3. Technology Advancement of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Thompson, Patrick; Bolcar, Matt; Madison, Timothy; Woodruff, Robert; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The critical high contrast imaging technology for the Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) mission concept is the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC). EPIC would be capable of imaging jovian planets, dust/debris disks, and potentially super-Earths and contribute to answering how bright the debris disks are for candidate stars. The contrast requirement for EPIC is 10(exp 9) contrast at 125 milli-arseconds inner working angle. To advance the VNC technology NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin, previously developed a vacuum VNC testbed, and achieved narrowband and broadband suppression of the core of the Airy disk. Recently our group was awarded a NASA Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions to achieve two milestones: (i) 10(exp 8) contrast in narrowband light, and, (ii) 10(ecp 9) contrast in broader band light; one milestone per year, and both at 2 Lambda/D inner working angle. These will be achieved with our 2nd generation testbed known as the visible nulling testbed (VNT). It contains a MEMS based hex-packed segmented deformable mirror known as the multiple mirror array (MMA) and coherent fiber bundle, i.e. a spatial filter array (SFA). The MMA is in one interferometric arm and works to set the wavefront differences between the arms to zero. Each of the MMA segments is optically mapped to a single mode fiber of the SFA, and the SFA passively cleans the sub-aperture wavefront error leaving only piston, tip and tilt error to be controlled. The piston degree of freedom on each segment is used to correct the wavefront errors, while the tip/tilt is used to simultaneously correct the amplitude errors. Thus the VNT controls both amplitude and wavefront errors with a single MMA in closed-loop in a vacuum tank at approx.20 Hz. Herein we will discuss our ongoing progress with the VNT.

  4. Pharmacological targeting of VEGFR signaling with axitinib inhibits Tsc2-null lesion growth in the mouse model of lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Abramova, Elena; James, Melane L; Rue, Ryan; Liu, Amy Y; Ersumo, Nathan Tessema; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Gow, Andrew J; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2015-12-15

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare progressive lung disease associated with mutations of the tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (Tsc2) tumor suppressor gene, manifests by neoplastic growth of LAM cells, induction of cystic lung destruction, and respiratory failure. LAM severity correlates with upregulation in serum of the prolymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor D (VEGF-D) that distinguishes LAM from other cystic diseases. The goals of our study was to determine whether Tsc2 deficiency upregulates VEGF-D, and whether axitinib, the Food and Drug Administration-approved small-molecule inhibitor of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) signaling, will reduce Tsc2-null lung lesion growth in a mouse model of LAM. Our data demonstrate upregulation of VEGF-D in the serum and lung lining in mice with Tsc2-null lesions. Progressive growth of Tsc2-null lesions induces recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells and increased nitric oxide production. Recruited cells isolated from the lung lining of mice with Tsc2-null lesions demonstrate upregulated expression of provasculogenic Vegfa, prolymphangiogenic Figf, and proinflammatory Nos2, Il6, and Ccl2 genes. Importantly, axitinib is an effective inhibitor of Tsc2-null lesion growth and inflammatory cell recruitment, which correlates with reduced VEGF-D levels in serum and lung lining. Our data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of VEGFR signaling with axitinib inhibits Tsc2-null lesion growth, attenuates recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells, and reduces VEGF-D levels systemically and in the lung lining. Our study suggests a potential therapeutic benefit of inhibition of VEGFR signaling for treatment of LAM.

  5. Null mutations at the p66 and bradykinin 2 receptor loci induce divergent phenotypes in the diabetic kidney

    PubMed Central

    Vashistha, Himanshu; Singhal, Pravin C.; Malhotra, Ashwani; Husain, Mohammad; Mathieson, Peter; Saleem, Moin A.; Kuriakose, Cyril; Seshan, Surya; Wilk, Anna; DelValle, Luis; Peruzzi, Francesca; Giorgio, Marco; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Smithies, Oliver; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Kakoki, Masao; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Candidate genes have been identified that confer increased risk for diabetic glomerulosclerosis (DG). Mice heterozygous for the Akita (Ins2+/C96Y) diabetogenic mutation with a second mutation introduced at the bradykinin 2 receptor (B2R−/−) locus express a disease phenotype that approximates human DG. Src homology 2 domain transforming protein 1 (p66) controls mitochondrial metabolism and cellular responses to oxidative stress, aging, and apoptosis. We generated p66-null Akita mice to test whether inactivating mutations at the p66 locus will rescue kidneys of Akita mice from disease-causing mutations at the Ins2 and B2R loci. Here we show null mutations at the p66 and B2R loci interact with the Akita (Ins2+/C96Y) mutation, independently and in combination, inducing divergent phenotypes in the kidney. The B2R−/− mutation induces detrimental phenotypes, as judged by increased systemic and renal levels of oxidative stress, histology, and urine albumin excretion, whereas the p66-null mutation confers a powerful protection phenotype. To elucidate the mechanism(s) of the protection phenotype, we turned to our in vitro system. Experiments with cultured podocytes revealed previously unrecognized cross talk between p66 and the redox-sensitive transcription factor p53 that controls hyperglycemia-induced ROS metabolism, transcription of p53 target genes (angiotensinogen, angiotensin II type-1 receptor, and bax), angiotensin II generation, and apoptosis. RNA-interference targeting p66 inhibits all of the above. Finally, protein levels of p53 target genes were upregulated in kidneys of Akita mice but unchanged in p66-null Akita mice. Taken together, p66 is a potential molecular target for therapeutic intervention in DG. PMID:23019230

  6. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-07-10

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  7. Visual and Plastic Arts in Teaching Literacy: Null Curricula?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakeland, Robin Gay

    2010-01-01

    Visual and plastic arts in contemporary literacy instruction equal null curricula. Studies show that painting and sculpture facilitate teaching reading and writing (literacy), yet such pedagogy has not been formally adopted into USA curriculum. An example of null curriculum can be found in late 19th - early 20th century education the USA…

  8. Exact null controllability of degenerate evolution equations with scalar control

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Vladimir E; Shklyar, Benzion

    2012-12-31

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for the exact null controllability of a degenerate linear evolution equation with scalar control are obtained. These general results are used to examine the exact null controllability of the Dzektser equation in the theory of seepage. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  9. Logarithmic corrections to gravitational entropy and the null energy condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Maulik; Svesko, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Using a relation between the thermodynamics of local horizons and the null energy condition, we consider the effects of quantum corrections to the gravitational entropy. In particular, we find that the geometric form of the null energy condition is not affected by the inclusion of logarithmic corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  10. Null hypersurfaces in generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Matias; Palmas, Oscar; Solis, Didier A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the geometry of null hypersurfaces M in generalized Robertson-Walker spacetimes. First we characterize such null hypersurfaces as graphs of generalized eikonal functions over the fiber and use this characterization to show that such hypersurfaces are parallel if and only if their fibers are also parallel. We further use this technique to construct several examples of null hypersurfaces in both de Sitter and anti de Sitter spaces. Then we characterize all the totally umbilical null hypersurfaces M in a Lorentzian space form (viewed as a quadric in a semi-Euclidean ambient space) as intersections of the space form with a hyperplane. Finally we study the totally umbilical spacelike hypersurfaces of null hypersurfaces in space forms and characterize them as planar sections of M.

  11. Estimating Relatedness in the Presence of Null Alleles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Ritland, Kermit; Dunn, Derek W; Qi, Xiaoguang; Guo, Songtao; Li, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetics and ecology often require estimates of relatedness coefficients based on genetic marker data. However, with the presence of null alleles, an observed genotype can represent one of several possible true genotypes. This results in biased estimates of relatedness. As the numbers of marker loci are often limited, loci with null alleles cannot be abandoned without substantial loss of statistical power. Here, we show how loci with null alleles can be incorporated into six estimators of relatedness (two novel). We evaluate the performance of various estimators before and after correction for null alleles. If the frequency of a null allele is <0.1, some estimators can be used directly without adjustment; if it is >0.5, the potency of estimation is too low and such a locus should be excluded. We make available a software package entitled PolyRelatedness v1.6, which enables researchers to optimize these estimators to best fit a particular data set.

  12. The first mecp2-null zebrafish model shows altered motor behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pietri, Thomas; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Guyon, Nicolas; Romano, Sebastián A.; Washbourne, Philip; Moens, Cecilia B.; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G.; Sumbre, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder and one of the most common causes of mental retardation in affected girls. Other symptoms include a rapid regression of motor and cognitive skills after an apparently early normal development. Sporadic mutations in the transcription factor MECP2 has been shown to be present in more than 90% of the patients and several models of MeCP2-deficient mice have been created to understand the role of this gene. These models have pointed toward alterations in the maintenance of the central nervous system rather than its development, in line with the late onset of the disease in humans. However, the exact functions of MeCP2 remain difficult to delineate and the animal models have yielded contradictory results. Here, we present the first mecp2-null allele mutation zebrafish model. Surprisingly and in contrast to MeCP2-null mouse models, mecp2-null zebrafish are viable and fertile. They present nonetheless clear behavioral alterations during their early development, including spontaneous and sensory-evoked motor anomalies, as well as defective thigmotaxis. PMID:23874272

  13. Wormholes minimally violating the null energy condition

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Lobo, Francisco S N; Martín-Moruno, Prado E-mail: fslobo@fc.ul.pt

    2014-11-01

    We consider novel wormhole solutions supported by a matter content that minimally violates the null energy condition. More specifically, we consider an equation of state in which the sum of the energy density and radial pressure is proportional to a constant with a value smaller than that of the inverse area characterising the system, i.e., the area of the wormhole mouth. This approach is motivated by a recently proposed cosmological event, denoted {sup t}he little sibling of the big rip{sup ,} where the Hubble rate and the scale factor blow up but the cosmic derivative of the Hubble rate does not [1]. By using the cut-and-paste approach, we match interior spherically symmetric wormhole solutions to an exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and analyse the stability of the thin-shell to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations around static solutions, by choosing suitable properties for the exotic material residing on the junction interface radius. Furthermore, we also consider an inhomogeneous generalization of the equation of state considered above and analyse the respective stability regions. In particular, we obtain a specific wormhole solution with an asymptotic behaviour corresponding to a global monopole.

  14. Null fluid collapse in brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2014-03-01

    The brane world description of our Universe entails a large extra dimension and a fundamental scale of gravity that may be lower than the Planck scale by several orders of magnitude. An interesting consequence of this scenario occurs in the nature of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to the brane gravitational field equations, which often have properties quite distinct from the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. In this paper, the spherically symmetric collapse on the brane world of four types of null fluid, governed by the barotropic, polytropic, strange quark "bag" model and Hagedorn equations of state, is investigated. In each case, we solve the approximate gravitational field equations, obtained in the high-density limit, determine the equation which governs the formation of apparent horizons and investigate the conditions for the formation of naked singularities. Though, naively, one would expect the increased effective energy density on the brane to favor the formation of black holes over naked singularities, we find that, for the types of fluid considered, this is not the case. However, the black hole solutions differ substantially from their general-relativistic counterparts and brane world corrections often play a role analogous to charge in general relativity. As an astrophysical application of this work, the possibility that energy emission from a Hagedorn fluid collapsing to form a naked singularity may be a source of GRBs in the brane world is also considered.

  15. Null cosmological singularities and free strings: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, K.

    2011-01-01

    In arXiv:0909:4731 , we argued that the free string lightcone Schrodinger wavefunctional in the vicinity of null Kasner-like cosmological singularities has nonsingular time-dependence if the Kasner exponents satisfy certain relations. These backgrounds are anisotropic plane waves with singularities. We first show here that only certain singularities admit a Rosen-Kasner frame with exponents satisfying relations leading to a wavefunctional with nonsingular time-dependence. Then we build on the (Rosen) description further and study various physical observables for a time-dependent harmonic oscillator toy model and then the free string, reconciling this with the corresponding description in the conventional plane wave variables. We find that observables containing no time derivatives are identical in these variables while those with time derivatives are different. Various free string observables are still divergent, perhaps consistent with string oscillator states becoming light in the vicinity of the singularity.

  16. Identification of cytochrome P450 enzymes critical for lung tumorigenesis by the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK): insights from a novel Cyp2abfgs-null mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Megaraj, Vandana; Wei, Yuan; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes encoded by the mouse Cyp2abfgs gene cluster are preferentially expressed in the respiratory tract. Previous studies have demonstrated that pulmonary P450-mediated bioactivation is necessary for lung tumorigenesis induced by the tobacco-specific lung procarcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and that CYP2A5 mediates a noteworthy fraction, but not all, of NNK bioactivation in the lung. The aim of this study was to determine whether other P450s encoded by the Cyp2abfgs gene cluster also play significant roles in NNK lung tumorigenesis. A novel Cyp2abfgs-null mouse was generated, in which all Cyp2a, 2b, 2g, 2f and 2s genes are deleted. The Cyp2abfgs-null mouse was viable, fertile and without discernible physiological abnormalities or compensatory increases in the expression of other P450s. NNK bioactivation in vitro and NNK-induced DNA adduction and lung tumorigenesis in vivo were determined for wild-type (WT) and Cyp2abfgs-null mice; the results were compared with previous findings from Cyp2a5-null mice. The Cyp2abfgs-null mice exhibited significantly lower rates of NNK bioactivation in lung and liver microsomes, compared with either WT or Cyp2a5-null mice. The levels of lung O(6)-methyl guanine DNA adduct were also substantially reduced in Cyp2abfgs-null mice, compared with either WT or Cyp2a5-null mice. Moreover, the Cyp2abfgs-null mice were largely resistant to NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis at both low (50mg/kg) and high (200mg/kg) NNK doses, in contrast to the WT or Cyp2a5-null mice. These results indicate for the first time that, collectively, the CYP2A, 2B, 2F, 2G, and 2S enzymes are indispensable for NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis.

  17. Molecular basis for the CAT-2 null phenotype in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Bethards, L.A.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have described several maize lines whose developmental patterns of catalase gene expression vary from the typical maize line, W64A. Among these variants are the lines A16 and A338, both found to be null for the CAT-2 protein. Identification of a third CAT-2 null line, designated A340, is described. RNA blots and S1 nuclease protection analysis, using (/sup 32/P)-labeled dCTP, indicate that all three CAT-2 null lines produce a similarly shortened Cat2 transcript. The molecular basis for this aberrant Cat2 transcript is discussed.

  18. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.; Smith, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  19. BAX and tumor suppressor TRP53 are important in regulating mutagenesis in spermatogenic cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; Vogel, Kristine S; McMahan, C Alex; Herbert, Damon C; Walter, Christi A

    2010-12-01

    During the first wave of spermatogenesis, and in response to ionizing radiation, elevated mutant frequencies are reduced to a low level by unidentified mechanisms. Apoptosis is occurring in the same time frame that the mutant frequency declines. We examined the role of apoptosis in regulating mutant frequency during spermatogenesis. Apoptosis and mutant frequencies were determined in spermatogenic cells obtained from Bax-null or Trp53-null mice. The results showed that spermatogenic lineage apoptosis was markedly decreased in Bax-null mice and was accompanied by a significantly increased spontaneous mutant frequency in seminiferous tubule cells compared to that of wild-type mice. Apoptosis profiles in the seminiferous tubules for Trp53-null were similar to control mice. Spontaneous mutant frequencies in pachytene spermatocytes and in round spermatids from Trp53-null mice were not significantly different from those of wild-type mice. However, epididymal spermatozoa from Trp53-null mice displayed a greater spontaneous mutant frequency compared to that from wild-type mice. A greater proportion of spontaneous transversions and a greater proportion of insertions/deletions 15 days after ionizing radiation were observed in Trp53-null mice compared to wild-type mice. Base excision repair activity in mixed germ cell nuclear extracts prepared from Trp53-null mice was significantly lower than that for wild-type controls. These data indicate that BAX-mediated apoptosis plays a significant role in regulating spontaneous mutagenesis in seminiferous tubule cells obtained from neonatal mice, whereas tumor suppressor TRP53 plays a significant role in regulating spontaneous mutagenesis between postmeiotic round spermatid and epididymal spermatozoon stages of spermiogenesis.

  20. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure

    PubMed Central

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Incorporating these processes fundamentally alters the structure of communities expected due to chance, with speciation leading to phylogenetic overdispersion compared to a classical statistical null model assuming equal probabilities of community membership. Applying this method to bird and primate communities in South America we show that patterns of phylogenetic overdispersion – often attributed to negative biotic interactions – are instead consistent with a species neutral model of allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Our findings provide a new null expectation for phylogenetic community patterns and highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the dynamic history of assembly when testing the mechanisms governing community structure. PMID:25560516

  1. A null-steering viewpoint of interferometric SAR

    SciTech Connect

    BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-05-02

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) extends the two-dimensional imaging capability of traditional synthetic aperture radar to three-dimensions by using an aperture in the elevation plane to estimate the 3-D structure of the target. The operation of this additional aperture can be viewed from a null-steering point of view, rather than the traditional phase determination point of view. Knowing that IFSAR can be viewed from the null-steering perspective allows one to take advantage of the mathematical foundation developed for null-steering arrays. In addition, in some problems of interest in IFSAR the null-steering perspective provides better intuition and suggests alternative solutions. One example is the problem of estimating building height where layover is present.

  2. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure.

    PubMed

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-02-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Incorporating these processes fundamentally alters the structure of communities expected due to chance, with speciation leading to phylogenetic overdispersion compared to a classical statistical null model assuming equal probabilities of community membership. Applying this method to bird and primate communities in South America we show that patterns of phylogenetic overdispersion - often attributed to negative biotic interactions - are instead consistent with a species neutral model of allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Our findings provide a new null expectation for phylogenetic community patterns and highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the dynamic history of assembly when testing the mechanisms governing community structure.

  3. Alteration of medial-edge epithelium cell adhesion in two Tgf-β3 null mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Del Río, Aurora; Barrio, Carmen; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; Garcillán, Beatriz; Amorós, María; Fuerte, Tamara; Fernández, Álvaro; Trinidad, Eva; Rabadán, M Ángeles; López, Yamila; Martínez, M Luisa; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2008-01-01

    Although palatal shelf adhesion is a crucial event during palate development, little work has been carried out to determine which molecules are responsible for this process. Furthermore, whether altered palatal shelf adhesion causes the cleft palate presented by Tgf-β3 null mutant mice has not yet been clarified. Here, we study the presence/distribution of some extracellular matrix and cell adhesion molecules at the time of the contact of palatal shelves in both wild-type and Tgf-β3 null mutant palates of two strains of mice (C57/BL/6J (C57), and MF1) that develop cleft palates of different severity. We have performed immunohistochemistry with antibodies against collagens IV and IX, laminin, fibronectin, the α5- and β1-integrins, and ICAM-1; in situ hybridization with a Nectin-1 riboprobe; and palatal shelf cultures treated or untreated with TGF-β3 or neutralizing antibodies against fibronectin or the α5-integrin. Our results show the location of these molecules in the wild-type mouse medial edge epithelium (MEE) of both strains at the time of the contact of palatal shelves; the heavier (C57) and milder (MF1) alteration of their presence in the Tgf-β3 null mutants; the importance of TGF-β3 to restore their normal pattern of expression; and the crucial role of fibronectin and the α5-integrin in palatal shelf adhesion. We thus provide insight into the molecular bases of this important process and the cleft palate presented by Tgf-β3 null mutant mice. PMID:18431835

  4. Alteration of medial-edge epithelium cell adhesion in two Tgf-beta3 null mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Del Río, Aurora; Barrio, Carmen; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; Garcillán, Beatriz; Amorós, María; Fuerte, Tamara; Fernández, Alvaro; Trinidad, Eva; Rabadán, María Angeles; López, Yamila; Martínez, María Luisa; Martínez-Alvarez, Concepción

    2008-04-01

    Although palatal shelf adhesion is a crucial event during palate development, little work has been carried out to determine which molecules are responsible for this process. Furthermore, whether altered palatal shelf adhesion causes the cleft palate presented by Tgf-beta3 null mutant mice has not yet been clarified. Here, we study the presence/distribution of some extracellular matrix and cell adhesion molecules at the time of the contact of palatal shelves in both wild-type and Tgf-beta3 null mutant palates of two strains of mice (C57/BL/6J (C57), and MF1) that develop cleft palates of different severity. We have performed immunohistochemistry with antibodies against collagens IV and IX, laminin, fibronectin, the alpha5- and beta1-integrins, and ICAM-1; in situ hybridization with a Nectin-1 riboprobe; and palatal shelf cultures treated or untreated with TGF-beta3 or neutralizing antibodies against fibronectin or the alpha5-integrin. Our results show the location of these molecules in the wild-type mouse medial edge epithelium (MEE) of both strains at the time of the contact of palatal shelves; the heavier (C57) and milder (MF1) alteration of their presence in the Tgf-beta3 null mutants; the importance of TGF-beta3 to restore their normal pattern of expression; and the crucial role of fibronectin and the alpha5-integrin in palatal shelf adhesion. We thus provide insight into the molecular bases of this important process and the cleft palate presented by Tgf-beta3 null mutant mice.

  5. Antimultipath communication by injecting tone into null in signal spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A transmitter for digital radio communication creates a null by balanced encoding of data modulated on an RF carrier, and inserts a calibration tone within the null. This is accomplished by having the calibration tone coincide in phase and frequency with the transmitted radio frequency output, for coherent demodulation of data at the receiver where the tone calibration signal is extracted and used for multipath fading compensation.

  6. Another Nulling Hall-Effect Current-Measuring Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibodeau, Phillip E.; Sullender, Craig C.

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power circuit provides noncontact measurement of alternating or direct current of many ampheres in main conductor. Advantages of circuit over other nulling Hall-effect current-measuring circuits is stability and accuracy increased by putting both analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters in nulling feedback loop. Converters and rest of circuit designed for operation at sampling rate of 100 kHz, but rate changed to alter time or frequency response of circuit.

  7. Experimental Progress and Results of a Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuele, Rocco; Wallace, J. Kent; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Shao, Mike; Levine, B. Martin; Fregoso, Santos

    2007-01-01

    The crux of visible exoplanet detection is overcoming significant star-planet contrast ratios on the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -10)-at very small angular separations. We are developing an interferometric nulling coronagraph designed to achieve a 10(exp -6) contrast ratio at a working science bandpass of 20% visible light. Achieving large, broadband suppression requires a pseudo-achromatic phase flip, while maintaining a strict error budget. Recent results from our nulling interferometer testbed yield contrast ratios at the 1.05x10(exp -6) level, with a 15% visible bandpass. This result is at 65% of our final bandpass requirement, although limitations of our current configuration make major hardware changes essential to broadening the bandpass. We make the argument that broadening the bandpass should not necessarily adversely affect the null depth until beyond the 20% visible light level. Using the same setup we are able to reach monochromatic null depths of 1.11x10(exp -7) (?= 638 nm)averaged over three seconds. This paper will describe our experimental approach for achieving deep broadband nulls, as well as error considerations and limitations, and the most recent results for our nulling coronagraph testbed.

  8. Measurement Via Optical Near-Nulling and Subaperture Stitching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Greg; De Vries, Gary; Murphy, Paul; Brophy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    A subaperture stitching interferometer system provides near-nulling of a subaperture wavefront reflected from an object of interest over a portion of a surface of the object. A variable optical element located in the radiation path adjustably provides near-nulling to facilitate stitching of subaperture interferograms, creating an interferogram representative of the entire surface of interest. This enables testing of aspheric surfaces without null optics customized for each surface prescription. The surface shapes of objects such as lenses and other precision components are often measured with interferometry. However, interferometers have a limited capture range, and thus the test wavefront cannot be too different from the reference or the interference cannot be analyzed. Furthermore, the performance of the interferometer is usually best when the test and reference wavefronts are nearly identical (referred to as a null condition). Thus, it is necessary when performing such measurements to correct for known variations in shape to ensure that unintended variations are within the capture range of the interferometer and accurately measured. This invention is a system for nearnulling within a subaperture stitching interferometer, although in principle, the concept can be employed by wavefront measuring gauges other than interferometers. The system employs a light source for providing coherent radiation of a subaperture extent. An object of interest is placed to modify the radiation (e.g., to reflect or pass the radiation), and a variable optical element is located to interact with, and nearly null, the affected radiation. A detector or imaging device is situated to obtain interference patterns in the modified radiation. Multiple subaperture interferograms are taken and are stitched, or joined, to provide an interferogram representative of the entire surface of the object of interest. The primary aspect of the invention is the use of adjustable corrective optics in the

  9. Susceptibility of Nrf2-Null Mice to Steatohepatitis and Cirrhosis upon Consumption of a High-Fat Diet Is Associated with Oxidative Stress, Perturbation of the Unfolded Protein Response, and Disturbance in the Expression of Metabolic Enzymes but Not with Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Paul J.; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Sharma, Ritu S.; Ashford, Fiona B.; Walsh, Shaun V.; McCrimmon, Rory J.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Dillon, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Mice lacking the transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) develop more severe nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), with cirrhosis, than wild-type (Nrf2+/+) mice when fed a high-fat (HF) diet for 24 weeks. Although NASH is usually associated with insulin resistance, HF-fed Nrf2−/− mice exhibited better insulin sensitivity than HF-fed Nrf2+/+ mice. In livers of HF-fed mice, loss of Nrf2 resulted in greater induction of lipogenic genes, lower expression of β-oxidation genes, greater reduction in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) levels, and diminished acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase phosphorylation than in the wild-type livers, which is consistent with greater fatty acid (FA) synthesis in Nrf2−/− livers. Moreover, primary Nrf2−/− hepatocytes displayed lower glucose and FA oxidation than Nrf2+/+ hepatocytes, with FA oxidation partially rescued by treatment with AMPK activators. The unfolded protein response (UPR) was perturbed in control regular-chow (RC)-fed Nrf2−/− mouse livers, and this was associated with constitutive activation of NF-κB and JNK, along with upregulation of inflammatory genes. The HF diet elicited an antioxidant response in Nrf2+/+ livers, and as this was compromised in Nrf2−/− livers, they suffered oxidative stress. Therefore, Nrf2 protects against NASH by suppressing lipogenesis, supporting mitochondrial function, increasing the threshold for the UPR and inflammation, and enabling adaptation to HF-diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24958099

  10. lagC-null and gbf-null cells define key steps in the morphogenesis of Dictyostelium mounds.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, S; Brown, J M; Firtel, R A; McNally, J G

    1998-08-01

    The transition to multicellularity is a key feature of the Dictyostelium life cycle, and two genes, gbf and lagC, are known to play pivotal roles in regulating this developmental switch. lagC-null and gbf-null cells fail to induce cell-type-specific genes ordinarily expressed during multicellular development. The null mutants also share a similar morphological phenotype: mutant cells repeatedly aggregate to form a loose mound, disperse, and reform a mound, rather than proceeding to form a tip. To characterize defects in morphogenesis in these mutants, we examined cell motion in the mutant mounds. In analogy with the failed transition in gene expression, we found that lagC-null and gbf-null mounds failed to make a morphogenetic transition from random to rotational motion normally observed in the parent strain. One reason for this was the inability of the mutant mounds to establish a single, dominant signaling-wave center. This defect of lagC-null or gbf-null cells could be overcome by the addition of adenosine, which alters cAMP signaling, but then even in the presence of apparently normal signaling waves, cell motility was still aberrant. This motility defect, as well as the signaling-wave defect, could be overcome in lagC-null cells by overexpression of GBF, suggesting that lagC is dispensable if GBF protein levels are high enough. This set of morphogenetic defects that we have observed helps define key steps in mound morphogenesis. These include the establishment of a dominant signaling-wave center and the capacity of cells to move directionally within the cell mass in response to guidance cues.

  11. Juvenile manifestation of ultrasound communication deficits in the neuroligin-4 null mutant mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Ju, Anes; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Tantra, Martesa; Krueger, Dilja; Brose, Nils; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-08-15

    Neuroligin-4 (Nlgn4) is a member of the neuroligin family of postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function mutations of NLGN4 are among the most frequent, known genetic causes of heritable autism. Adult Nlgn4 null mutant (Nlgn4(-/-)) mice are a construct valid model of human autism, with both genders displaying a remarkable autistic phenotype, including deficits in social interaction and communication as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors. In contrast to adults, autism-related abnormalities in neonatal and juvenile Nlgn4(-/-) mice have not been reported yet. The present study has been designed to systematically investigate in male and female Nlgn4(-/-) pups versus wildtype littermates (WT, Nlgn4(+/+)) developmental milestones and stimulus-induced ultrasound vocalization (USV). Neonatal development, followed daily from postnatal days (PND) 4 to 21, including physical development, neurological reflexes and neuromotor coordination, did not yield any differences between Nlgn4(-/-) and their WT littermates. USV in pups (PND8-9) in response to brief separation from their mothers revealed remarkable gender effects, and a genotype influence in females regarding latency to first call. In juveniles (PND22-23), USV monitoring upon exposure to an anesthetized female intruder mouse uncovered a clear genotype effect with reduced USV in Nlgn4(-/-) mice, and again a more prominent phenotype in females. Together, these data support an early manifestation of communication deficits in Nlgn4(-/-) mice that appear more pronounced in immature females with their overall stronger USV as compared to males.

  12. Epidermal growth factor impairs palatal shelf adhesion and fusion in the Tgf-β 3 null mutant.

    PubMed

    Barrio, M Carmen; Del Río, Aurora; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; López-Gordillo, Yamila; Paradas-Lara, Irene; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Catón, Javier; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    The cleft palate presented by transforming growth factor-β3 (Tgf-β3) null mutant mice is caused by altered palatal shelf adhesion, cell proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation and cell death. The expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1) and muscle segment homeobox-1 (Msx-1) is modified in the palates of these knockout mice, and the cell proliferation defect is caused by the change in EGF expression. In this study, we aimed to determine whether this change in EGF expression has any effect on the other mechanisms altered in Tgf-β3 knockout mouse palates. We tested the effect of inhibiting EGF activity in vitro in the knockout palates via the addition of Tyrphostin AG 1478. We also investigated possible interactions between EGF, Tgf-β1 and Msx-1 in Tgf-β3 null mouse palate cultures. The results show that the inhibition of EGF activity in Tgf-β3 null mouse palate cultures improves palatal shelf adhesion and fusion, with a particular effect on cell death, and restores the normal distribution pattern of Msx-1 in the palatal mesenchyme. Inhibition of TGF-β1 does not affect either EGF or Msx-1 expression.

  13. Compensation for PKMζ in long-term potentiation and spatial long-term memory in mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Tsokas, Panayiotis; Hsieh, Changchi; Yao, Yudong; Lesburguères, Edith; Wallace, Emma Jane Claire; Tcherepanov, Andrew; Jothianandan, Desingarao; Hartley, Benjamin Rush; Pan, Ling; Rivard, Bruno; Farese, Robert V; Sajan, Mini P; Bergold, Peter John; Hernández, Alejandro Iván; Cottrell, James E; Shouval, Harel Z; Fenton, André Antonio; Sacktor, Todd Charlton

    2016-05-17

    PKMζ is a persistently active PKC isoform proposed to maintain late-LTP and long-term memory. But late-LTP and memory are maintained without PKMζ in PKMζ-null mice. Two hypotheses can account for these findings. First, PKMζ is unimportant for LTP or memory. Second, PKMζ is essential for late-LTP and long-term memory in wild-type mice, and PKMζ-null mice recruit compensatory mechanisms. We find that whereas PKMζ persistently increases in LTP maintenance in wild-type mice, PKCι/λ, a gene-product closely related to PKMζ, persistently increases in LTP maintenance in PKMζ-null mice. Using a pharmacogenetic approach, we find PKMζ-antisense in hippocampus blocks late-LTP and spatial long-term memory in wild-type mice, but not in PKMζ-null mice without the target mRNA. Conversely, a PKCι/λ-antagonist disrupts late-LTP and spatial memory in PKMζ-null mice but not in wild-type mice. Thus, whereas PKMζ is essential for wild-type LTP and long-term memory, persistent PKCι/λ activation compensates for PKMζ loss in PKMζ-null mice.

  14. Compensation for PKMζ in long-term potentiation and spatial long-term memory in mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsokas, Panayiotis; Hsieh, Changchi; Yao, Yudong; Lesburguères, Edith; Wallace, Emma Jane Claire; Tcherepanov, Andrew; Jothianandan, Desingarao; Hartley, Benjamin Rush; Pan, Ling; Rivard, Bruno; Farese, Robert V; Sajan, Mini P; Bergold, Peter John; Hernández, Alejandro Iván; Cottrell, James E; Shouval, Harel Z; Fenton, André Antonio; Sacktor, Todd Charlton

    2016-01-01

    PKMζ is a persistently active PKC isoform proposed to maintain late-LTP and long-term memory. But late-LTP and memory are maintained without PKMζ in PKMζ-null mice. Two hypotheses can account for these findings. First, PKMζ is unimportant for LTP or memory. Second, PKMζ is essential for late-LTP and long-term memory in wild-type mice, and PKMζ-null mice recruit compensatory mechanisms. We find that whereas PKMζ persistently increases in LTP maintenance in wild-type mice, PKCι/λ, a gene-product closely related to PKMζ, persistently increases in LTP maintenance in PKMζ-null mice. Using a pharmacogenetic approach, we find PKMζ-antisense in hippocampus blocks late-LTP and spatial long-term memory in wild-type mice, but not in PKMζ-null mice without the target mRNA. Conversely, a PKCι/λ-antagonist disrupts late-LTP and spatial memory in PKMζ-null mice but not in wild-type mice. Thus, whereas PKMζ is essential for wild-type LTP and long-term memory, persistent PKCι/λ activation compensates for PKMζ loss in PKMζ-null mice. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14846.001 PMID:27187150

  15. Interferometric nulling of four channels with integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Errmann, Ronny; Minardi, Stefano; Labadie, Lucas; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2015-08-20

    Nulling interferometry has been identified as a competitive technique for the detection of extrasolar planets. In its basic form, the technique consists of combining out-of-phase a single pair of telescopes to effectively null the light of a bright star and reveal the dim glow of the companion. However, in order to mitigate the effect of the stellar leaks through the interferometer, a broad angular central null is required. The hierarchical combination of several pairs of telescopes can accomplish this task. We have manufactured and tested with monochromatic light an integrated optics component, which combines a linear array of four telescopes in the nulling mode envisaged by Angel and Woolf [Astroph. J.475, 373-379 (1997).10.1086/apj.1997.475.issue-1ASJOAB0004-637X]. By simulating in the laboratory the motion of a star in the sky, we could measure the expected angular transmission of the four-telescope nuller. Moreover, the tests have demonstrated a broad nulling scaling as the fourth power of the baseline delay.

  16. Ballooning modes localized near the null point of a divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.

    2014-04-15

    The stability of ballooning modes localized to the null point in both the standard and snowflake divertors is considered. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics is used. A series expansion of the flux function is performed in the vicinity of the null point with the lowest, non-vanishing term retained for each divertor configuration. The energy principle is used with a trial function to determine a sufficient instability threshold. It is shown that this threshold depends on the orientation of the flux surfaces with respect to the major radius with a critical angle appearing due to the convergence of the field lines away from the null point. When the angle the major radius forms with respect to the flux surfaces exceeds this critical angle, the system is stabilized. Further, the scaling of the instability threshold with the aspect ratio and the ratio of the scrape-off-layer width to the major radius is shown. It is concluded that ballooning modes are not a likely candidate for driving convection in the vicinity of the null for parameters relevant to existing machines. However, the results place a lower bound on the width of the heat flux in the private flux region. To explain convective mixing in the vicinity of the null point, new consideration should be given to an axisymmetric mixing mode [W. A. Farmer and D. D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 20, 092117 (2013)] as a possible candidate to explain current experimental results.

  17. Do Null Subjects (mis-)Trigger Pro-drop Grammars?

    PubMed

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-12-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [−pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing their grammars to a [−pro] setting. Mack et al. (J Memory Lang 67(1):211-223, 2012) showed that sentences with noise covering the subject are analyzed as having null subjects more often with a first person pronoun and with a present tense--properties correlated with more predictable referents--compared to a third person pronoun and past tense. However, those results might in principle have been due to reporting null subjects for verbs that often occur with null subjects. An experiment is reported here in which comparable results are found for sentences containing nonsense verbs. Participants preferred a null subject more often for first person present tense sentences than for third person past tense sentences. The results are as expected if participants are responding to predictability, the likelihood of reduction, rather than to lexical statistics. The results are argued to be important in removing a class of mis-triggering examples from the language acquisition problem.

  18. Visible Nulling Coronagraphy Testbed Development for Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Chen, Andrew; Petrone, Peter; Booth, Andrew; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Three of the recently completed NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept (ASMC) studies addressed the feasibility of using a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) as the prime instrument for exoplanet science. The VNC approach is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted aperture telescope systems and thus spans the space of potential ASMC exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance the this approach and the technologies associated with it. Herein we report on the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under high bandwidth closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible light nulling milestones of sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D and ultimately culminate in spectrally broadband (>20%) high contrast imaging. Each of the milestones, one per year, is traceable to one or more of the ASMC studies. The VNT uses a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, modified with a modified "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. Discussed will be the optical configuration laboratory results, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  19. Interferometric nulling of four channels with integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Errmann, Ronny; Minardi, Stefano; Labadie, Lucas; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Pertsch, Thomas

    2015-08-20

    Nulling interferometry has been identified as a competitive technique for the detection of extrasolar planets. In its basic form, the technique consists of combining out-of-phase a single pair of telescopes to effectively null the light of a bright star and reveal the dim glow of the companion. However, in order to mitigate the effect of the stellar leaks through the interferometer, a broad angular central null is required. The hierarchical combination of several pairs of telescopes can accomplish this task. We have manufactured and tested with monochromatic light an integrated optics component, which combines a linear array of four telescopes in the nulling mode envisaged by Angel and Woolf [Astroph. J.475, 373-379 (1997).10.1086/apj.1997.475.issue-1ASJOAB0004-637X]. By simulating in the laboratory the motion of a star in the sky, we could measure the expected angular transmission of the four-telescope nuller. Moreover, the tests have demonstrated a broad nulling scaling as the fourth power of the baseline delay. PMID:26368784

  20. Achromatic phase shifts utilizing dielectric plates for nulling interferometery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, R. M.; Burge, J. M.

    1998-12-01

    Schemes for detecting planets around other stars using interferometery have been developed which rely on a half wave phase delay to shift the central constructive fringe of an interferometer to a deep, destructive null fringe. To achieve the sensitivity and spectroscopy desired for exo-planets observations, such a null must be achromatic over a broad spectral region. One method for creating such a half wave phase delay achromatically involves the use of pairs of dielectric, plane parallel plates, analogous to the use of two types of glass in an achromatic lens. An analysis of the technique is presented with solutions using single plates to achieve null fringes to a cancellation of 10 exp -4 in the visible, near infrared, and mid infrared for null. Solutions using two matched materials show that nulls to a depth of 10 exp -6 are achievable in 2 um bands in the 7-17 um regime, or to a depth of 10 exp -5 over the entire 7-17 um band. Experimental results using a single plate of BK7 in the visible spectrum verify the technique.

  1. Do Null Subjects (mis-)Trigger Pro-drop Grammars?

    PubMed

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-12-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [−pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing their grammars to a [−pro] setting. Mack et al. (J Memory Lang 67(1):211-223, 2012) showed that sentences with noise covering the subject are analyzed as having null subjects more often with a first person pronoun and with a present tense--properties correlated with more predictable referents--compared to a third person pronoun and past tense. However, those results might in principle have been due to reporting null subjects for verbs that often occur with null subjects. An experiment is reported here in which comparable results are found for sentences containing nonsense verbs. Participants preferred a null subject more often for first person present tense sentences than for third person past tense sentences. The results are as expected if participants are responding to predictability, the likelihood of reduction, rather than to lexical statistics. The results are argued to be important in removing a class of mis-triggering examples from the language acquisition problem. PMID:25086703

  2. Gsta4 Null Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Exhibit Enhanced Sensitivity to Oxidants: Role of 4-Hydroxynonenal in Oxidant Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    McElhanon, Kevin E.; Bose, Chhanda; Sharma, Rajendra; Wu, Liping; Awasthi, Yogesh C.; Singh, Sharda P.

    2013-01-01

    The alpha class glutathione s-transferase (GST) isozyme GSTA4–4 (EC2.5.1.18) exhibits high catalytic efficiency to-wards 4-hydroxynon-2-enal (4-HNE), a major end product of oxidative stress induced lipid peroxidation. Exposure of cells and tissues to heat, radiation, and chemicals has been shown to induce oxidative stress resulting in elevated concentrations of 4-HNE that can be detrimental to cell survival. Alternatively, at physiological levels 4-HNE acts as a signaling molecule conveying the occurrence of oxidative events initiating the activation of adaptive pathways. To examine the impact of oxidative/electrophilic stress in a model with impaired 4-HNE metabolizing capability, we disrupted the Gsta4 gene that encodes GSTA4–4 in mice. The effect of electrophile and oxidants on embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) isolated from wild type (WT) and Gsta4 null mice were examined. Results indicate that in the absence of GSTA4–4, oxidant-induced toxicity is potentiated and correlates with elevated accumulation of 4-HNE adducts and DNA damage. Treatment of Gsta4 null MEF with 1,1,4-tris(acetyloxy)-2(E)-nonene [4-HNE(Ac)3], a pro-drug form of 4-HNE, resulted in the activation and phosphorylation of the c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK 1/2) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) accompanied by enhanced cleavage of caspase-3. Interestingly, when recombinant mammalian or invertebrate GSTs were delivered to Gsta4 null MEF, activation of stress-related kinases in 4-HNE(Ac)3 treated Gsta4 null MEF were inversely correlated with the catalytic efficiency of delivered GSTs towards 4-HNE. Our data suggest that GSTA4–4 plays a major role in protecting cells from the toxic effects of oxidant chemicals by attenuating the accumulation of 4-HNE. PMID:24353929

  3. Phase closure nulling: results from the 2009 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvert, Gilles; Malbet, Fabien; Chelli, Alain; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Monnier, John D.; Schaefer, Gail H.

    2010-07-01

    We present here a new observational technique, Phase Closure Nulling (PCN), which has the potential to obtain very high contrast detection and spectroscopy of faint companions to bright stars. PCN consists in measuring closure phases of fully resolved objects with a baseline triplet where one of the baselines crosses a null of the object visibility function. For scenes dominated by the presence of a stellar disk, the correlated flux of the star around nulls is essentially canceled out, and in these regions the signature of fainter, unresolved, scene object(s) dominates the imaginary part of the visibility in particular the closure phase. We present here the basics of the PCN method, the initial proof-of-concept observation, the envisioned science cases and report about the first observing campaign made on VLTI/AMBER and CHARA/MIRC using this technique.

  4. Statefinder hierarchy: An extended null diagnostic for concordance cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Sahni, Varun

    2011-02-15

    We show how higher derivatives of the expansion factor can be developed into a null diagnostic for concordance cosmology ({Lambda}CDM). It is well known that the Statefinder - the third derivative of the expansion factor written in dimensionless form, a{sup (3)}/aH{sup 3}, equals unity for {Lambda}CDM. We generalize this result and demonstrate that the hierarchy, a{sup (n)}/aH{sup n}, can be converted to a form that stays pegged at unity in concordance cosmology. This remarkable property of the Statefinder hierarchy enables it to be used as an extended null diagnostic for the cosmological constant. The Statefinder hierarchy combined with the growth rate of matter perturbations defines a composite null diagnostic which can distinguish evolving dark energy from {Lambda}CDM.

  5. Null-steering techniques for application to large array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockham, G. A.; Cho, C.; Parr, J. C.; Wolfson, R. I.

    A multimode waveguide can be employed to design an antenna which produces a beam for each propagating mode. A dual-beam waveguide slot array is particularly attractive. The antenna is compact, highly efficient, and has lower sidelobe-level performance than can be achieved with conventional monopulse techniques. Adaptive phase steering for jammer nulling is considered, taking into account a large phased array using a series feed system. The considered configuration was selected for computer simulation. A description is presented of a multiple beam antenna with independent steerable nulls. The multiple beam low-sidelobe antenna configuration has the ability to provide a radiation pattern with multiple and independently-located nulls, with minimal effect on the sidelobes of the unperturbed pattern.

  6. Null but not void: considerations for hypothesis testing.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Pamela A; Proschan, Michael A

    2013-01-30

    Standard statistical theory teaches us that once the null and alternative hypotheses have been defined for a parameter, the choice of the statistical test is clear. Standard theory does not teach us how to choose the null or alternative hypothesis appropriate to the scientific question of interest. Neither does it tell us that in some cases, depending on which alternatives are realistic, we may want to define our null hypothesis differently. Problems in statistical practice are frequently not as pristinely summarized as the classic theory in our textbooks. In this article, we present examples in statistical hypothesis testing in which seemingly simple choices are in fact rich with nuance that, when given full consideration, make the choice of the right hypothesis test much less straightforward. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22807023

  7. A linear voltage-tunable distributed null device.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, H. F.; Mattauch, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A linear voltage-tunable null device was predicted, fabricated, and tested. This filter is conceptually a distributed parameter RC representation of the channel of a MOSFET in a network configuration with a second MOSFET that is treated as a variable resistor. Classical transmission-line theory is used to predict a linear tuning curve with applied bias for the device. This concept was used to design a null device having a null that is linearly tunable in the range of 100 kHz. Such devices were fabricated and tested. Typical MOS processing steps were used and the resulting structures are compatible with the planar technology. The compatibility leads towards extension of this work to different frequency ranges for other specific applications.

  8. Unicorns do exist: a tutorial on "proving" the null hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Streiner, David L

    2003-12-01

    Introductory statistics classes teach us that we can never prove the null hypothesis; all we can do is reject or fail to reject it. However, there are times when it is necessary to try to prove the nonexistence of a difference between groups. This most often happens within the context of comparing a new treatment against an established one and showing that the new intervention is not inferior to the standard. This article first outlines the logic of "noninferiority" testing by differentiating between the null hypothesis (that which we are trying to nullify) and the "nill" hypothesis (there is no difference), reversing the role of the null and alternate hypotheses, and defining an interval within which groups are said to be equivalent. We then work through an example and show how to calculate sample sizes for noninferiority studies. PMID:14733457

  9. Magnetoacoustic Waves in Stratified Atmospheres with a Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic fields strongly modify the propagation of MHD waves from the photosphere to the low corona, as can be shown exactly for the most simple case of a uniform magnetic field and isothermally stratrified atmosphere. For slightly more realistic scenarios, where both the atmospheric parameters and the magnetic field vary spatially, the linear MHD equations typically cannot be solved analytically. We use the Lagrangian Remap code--a nonlinear, shock-capturing MHD code--to study the propagation of initially acoustic wavepackets through a model 2D atmosphere that includes a gravitationally stratified chromosphere, transition region, and low corona. The magnetic field is formed by three photospheric concentrations and includes a single magnetic null point, resulting in an inhomogeneous system with a magnetic dome topology. A portion of an introduced wavepacket will refract toward the null due to the varying Alfven speed. Waves incident on the equipartition contour surrounding the null, where the sound and Alfven speeds coincide, partially transmit, reflect, and mode convert between branches of the local dispersion relation. Outward propagating slow modes generated during conversion become strongly concentrated along the set of field lines passing near the null. Acoustic energy is beamed back downwards towards each photospheric foot point, and upwards along one separatrix that exits the top of the numerical domain. Changes in the dominant restoring force for the wavepacket, between the Lorentz and pressure gradient forces, lead to a buildup of current density along topologically important features of the system (the null point and its four separatrices) and can drive reconnection at the null point itself. Ohmic dissipation of the currents locally heats the plasma. We find that the amount of current accumulation depends on where the centroid of a wavepacket initial crosses the photosphere, but does not simply coincide with regions of open versus closed magnetic field or

  10. Interpreting null findings from trials of alcohol brief interventions.

    PubMed

    Heather, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of alcohol brief intervention (ABI) has been established by a succession of meta-analyses but, because the effects of ABI are small, null findings from randomized controlled trials are often reported and can sometimes lead to skepticism regarding the benefits of ABI in routine practice. This article first explains why null findings are likely to occur under null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) due to the phenomenon known as "the dance of the p-values." A number of misconceptions about null findings are then described, using as an example the way in which the results of the primary care arm of a recent cluster-randomized trial of ABI in England (the SIPS project) have been misunderstood. These misinterpretations include the fallacy of "proving the null hypothesis" that lack of a significant difference between the means of sample groups can be taken as evidence of no difference between their population means, and the possible effects of this and related misunderstandings of the SIPS findings are examined. The mistaken inference that reductions in alcohol consumption seen in control groups from baseline to follow-up are evidence of real effects of control group procedures is then discussed and other possible reasons for such reductions, including regression to the mean, research participation effects, historical trends, and assessment reactivity, are described. From the standpoint of scientific progress, the chief problem about null findings under the conventional NHST approach is that it is not possible to distinguish "evidence of absence" from "absence of evidence." By contrast, under a Bayesian approach, such a distinction is possible and it is explained how this approach could classify ABIs in particular settings or among particular populations as either truly ineffective or as of unknown effectiveness, thus accelerating progress in the field of ABI research.

  11. Retention of crab larvae in a coastal null zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilburg, Charles E.; Dittel, Ana I.; Epifanio, Charles E.

    2007-05-01

    Alongshelf transport in the southern Middle Atlantic Bight is forced by buoyancy-driven currents originating in three large estuaries along the bight. These currents are strongest in the coastal ocean near the southern terminus of each estuary, while the analogous region on the northern side is characterized by weak subtidal flow. We used a combination of field observations and numerical modeling to test the hypothesis that these regions of weak subtidal flow are coastal null zones that serve as retention areas for larvae. The field study consisted of a four-day, shipboard investigation of the distribution of blue crab larvae ( Callinectes sapidus) near the mouth of Delaware Bay (˜39°N, 75°W) in late summer, 2004. Hydrographic surveys of the study site were conducted with a hull-mounted, surface-measuring system. Results showed a sharp boundary between the null zone and the buoyancy-driven current to the south. Blue crab larvae were collected in surface plankton tows along a 30-km transect that encompassed these two areas. Stations with higher densities of larvae were clustered in the null zone during both ebb and flood tides. A numerical model was used to examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed distribution. Model results agreed with the field survey and showed that simulated larvae are aggregated in the null zone. The simulations also demonstrated that larvae spawned within the null zone have a much greater probability of settling in juvenile nursery habitat within the bay. The close agreement between field and model results provides consistent support for the hypothesis that coastal null zones associated with the buoyancy-driven circulation of large estuaries may allow retention of larvae in the vicinity of the natal spawning population.

  12. Biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mammary epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Daniel; Kittrell, Frances S.; Shepard, Anne; Stephens, L. Clifton; Jiang, Cheng; Lu, Junxuan; Allred, D. Craig; McCarthy, Maureen; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The absence of the tumor suppressor gene p53 confers an increased tumorigenic risk for mammary epithelial cells. In this report, we describe the biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mouse mammary epithelium in a p53 wild-type environment. Mammary epithelium from p53 null mice was transplanted serially into the cleared mammary fat pads of p53 wild-type BALB/c female to develop stable outgrowth lines. The outgrowth lines were transplanted for 10 generations. The outgrowths were ductal in morphology and progressed through ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ before invasive cancer. The preneoplastic outgrowth lines were immortal and exhibited activated telomerase activity. They are estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive, and aneuploid, and had various levels of tumorigenic potential. The biological and genetic properties of these lines are distinct from those found in most hyperplastic alveolar outgrowth lines, the form of mammary preneoplasia occurring in most traditional models of murine mammary tumorigenesis. These results indicate that the preneoplastic cell populations found in this genetically engineered model are similar in biological properties to a subset of precurser lesions found in human breast cancer and provide a unique model to identify secondary events critical for tumorigenicity and invasiveness.

  13. Lingual deficits in neurotrophin double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nosrat, Irina V; Agerman, Karin; Marinescu, Andrea; Ernfors, Patrik; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2004-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) are members of the neurotrophin family and are expressed in the developing and adult tongue papillae. BDNF null-mutated mice exhibit specific impairments related to innervation and development of the gustatory system while NT-3 null mice have deficits in their lingual somatosensory innervation. To further evaluate the functional specificity of these neurotrophins in the peripheral gustatory system, we generated double BDNF/NT-3 knockout mice and compared the phenotype to BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. Taste papillae morphology was severely distorted in BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice compared to single BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. The deficits were found throughout the tongue and all gustatory papillae. There was a significant loss of fungiform papillae and the papillae were smaller in size compared to BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. Circumvallate papillae in the double knockouts were smaller and did not contain any intraepithelial nerve fibers. BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice exhibited additive losses in both somatosensory and gustatory innervation indicating that BDNF and NT-3 exert specific roles in the innervation of the tongue. However, the additional loss of fungiform papillae and taste buds in BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice compared to single BDNF knockout mice indicate a synergistic functional role for both BDNF-dependent gustatory and NT-3-dependent somatosensory innervations in taste bud and taste papillae innervation and development. PMID:16217617

  14. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko; Lay, Oliver P.; Peters, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    Deep, stable starlight nulls are needed for the direct detection of Earth-like planets and require careful control of the intensity and phases of the beams that are being combined. We are testing a novel compensator based on a deformable mirror to correct the intensity and phase at each wavelength and polarization across the nulling bandwidth. We have successfully demonstrated intensity and phase control using a deformable mirror across a 100nm wide band in the near-IR, and are in the process of conducting experiments in the mid-IR wavelengths. This paper covers the current results and in the mid-IR.

  15. Differential expression of pancreatic protein and chemosensing receptor mRNAs in NKCC1-null intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Emily M; Vairamani, Kanimozhi; Shull, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intestinal functions of the NKCC1 Na+-K+-2Cl cotransporter (SLC12a2 gene), differential mRNA expression changes in NKCC1-null intestine were analyzed. METHODS: Microarray analysis of mRNA from intestines of adult wild-type mice and gene-targeted NKCC1-null mice (n = 6 of each genotype) was performed to identify patterns of differential gene expression changes. Differential expression patterns were further examined by Gene Ontology analysis using the online Gorilla program, and expression changes of selected genes were verified using northern blot analysis and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. Histological staining and immunofluorescence were performed to identify cell types in which upregulated pancreatic digestive enzymes were expressed. RESULTS: Genes typically associated with pancreatic function were upregulated. These included lipase, amylase, elastase, and serine proteases indicative of pancreatic exocrine function, as well as insulin and regenerating islet genes, representative of endocrine function. Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that differential expression of exocrine pancreas mRNAs was specific to the duodenum and localized to a subset of goblet cells. In addition, a major pattern of changes involving differential expression of olfactory receptors that function in chemical sensing, as well as other chemosensing G-protein coupled receptors, was observed. These changes in chemosensory receptor expression may be related to the failure of intestinal function and dependency on parenteral nutrition observed in humans with SLC12a2 mutations. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that loss of NKCC1 affects not only secretion, but also goblet cell function and chemosensing of intestinal contents via G-protein coupled chemosensory receptors. PMID:26909237

  16. Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Deletion Impairs Glucose Tolerance and Exacerbates Hyperglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic MiceS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Reisman, Scott A.; Yeager, Ronnie L.; Goedken, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) induces a battery of cytoprotective genes after oxidative stress. Nrf2 aids in liver regeneration by altering insulin signaling; however, whether Nrf2 participates in hepatic glucose homeostasis is unknown. Compared with wild-type mice, mice lacking Nrf2 (Nrf2-null) have lower basal serum insulin and prolonged hyperglycemia in response to an intraperitoneal glucose challenge. In the present study, blood glucose, serum insulin, urine flow rate, and hepatic expression of glucose-related genes were quantified in male diabetic wild-type and Nrf2-null mice. Type 1 diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose (200 mg/kg) of streptozotocin (STZ). Histopathology and serum insulin levels confirmed depleted pancreatic β-cells in STZ-treated mice of both genotypes. Five days after STZ, Nrf2-null mice had higher blood glucose levels than wild-type mice. Nine days after STZ, polyuria occurred in both genotypes with more urine output from Nrf2-null mice (11-fold) than wild-type mice (7-fold). Moreover, STZ-treated Nrf2-null mice had higher levels of serum β-hydroxybutyrate, triglycerides, and fatty acids 10 days after STZ compared with wild-type mice. STZ reduced hepatic glycogen in both genotypes, with less observed in Nrf2-null mice. Increased urine output and blood glucose in STZ-treated Nrf2-null mice corresponded with enhanced gluconeogenesis (glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase)- and reduced glycolysis (pyruvate kinase)-related mRNA expression in their livers. Furthermore, the Nrf2 activator oltipraz lowered blood glucose in wild-type but not Nrf2-null mice administered STZ. Collectively, these data indicate that the absence of Nrf2 worsens hyperglycemia in type I diabetic mice and Nrf2 may represent a therapeutic target for reducing circulating glucose levels. PMID:20086057

  17. The Dual Status of the Null Object in Chinese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Yanfeng

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the status of the null object in Mandarin Chinese. It proposes that if an object is topicalized, the empty category in the object position should be analyzed as a variable. If it is not topicalized, it is a "pro." It is argued that a pro resembles an overt pronoun in obeying Condition B, but differs from the latter in being…

  18. Circumpulsar Asteroids: Inferences from Nulling Statistics and High Energy Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Cordes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    We have proposed that some classes of radio pulsar variability are associated with the entry of neutral asteroidal material into the pulsar magnetosphere. The region surrounding neutron stars is polluted with supernova fall-back material, which collapses and condenses into an asteroid-bearing disk that is stable for millions of years. Over time, collisional and radiative processes cause the asteroids to migrate inward until they are heated to the point of ionization. For older and cooler pulsars, asteroids ionize within the large magnetospheres and inject a sufficient amount of charged particles to alter the electrodynamics of the gap regions and modulate emission processes. This extrinsic model unifies many observed phenomena of variability that occur on time scales that are disparate with the much shorter time scales associated with pulsars and their magnetospheres. One such type of variability is nulling, in which certain pulsars exhibit episodes of quiescence that for some objects may be as short as a few pulse periods, but, for others, is longer than days. Here, in the context of this model, we examine the nulling phenomenon. We analyze the relationship between in-falling material and the statistics of nulling. In addition, as motivation for further high energy observations, we consider the relationship between the nulling and other magnetospheric processes.

  19. White-Light Nulling Interferometers for Detecting Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Shao, Michael; Levine, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    A report proposes the development of a white-light nulling interferometer to be used in conjunction with a singleaperture astronomical telescope that would be operated in outer space. When such a telescope is aimed at a given star, the interferometer would suppress the light of that star while passing enough light from planets (if any) orbiting the star, to enable imaging or spectroscopic examination of the planets. In a nulling interferometer, according to the proposal, scattered light would be suppressed by spatial filtering in an array of single-mode optical fibers rather than by requiring optical surfaces to be accurate within 1/4,000 wavelength as in a coronagraph or an apodized telescope. As a result, angstrom-level precision would be needed in only the small nulling combiner, and not in large, meter-sized optics. The nulling interferometer could work as an independent instrument in space or in conjunction with a coronagraphic system to detect planets outside our solar system.

  20. Progress in broadband infrared nulling technology for TPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Brown, Ken; Bartos, Randall; Gappinger, Robert; Loya, Frank; Macdonald, Dan; Moser, Steve; Negron, John

    2005-01-01

    TPF-I has set for itself a host of challenging technical milestones along its path to demonstrating the feasibility of infrared nulling for planet detection Progress in each of these areas of technical development will be reviewed as well as progress in meeting the overarching technical milestones.

  1. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not.

  2. Traversable wormholes: Minimum violation of the null energy condition revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2007-08-15

    It was argued in literature that traversable wormholes can exist with an arbitrarily small violation of null energy conditions. I show that if the amount of exotic material near the wormhole throat tends to zero, either this leads to a horn instead of a wormhole or the throat approaches the horizon in such a way that infinitely large stresses develop on the throat.

  3. Null Objects in Second Language Acquisition: Grammatical vs. Performance Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyzik, Eve C.

    2008-01-01

    Null direct objects provide a favourable testing ground for grammatical and performance models of argument omission. This article examines both types of models in order to determine which gives a more plausible account of the second language data. The data were collected from second language (L2) learners of Spanish by means of four oral…

  4. Null Lens Assembly for X-Ray Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a null lens assembly that allows laser interferometry of 60 deg. slumped glass mirror segments used in x-ray mirrors. The assembly consists of four lenses in precise alignment to each other, with incorporated piezoelectric nanometer stepping actuators to position the lenses in six degrees of freedom for positioning relative to each other.

  5. Waves and null congruences in a draining bathtub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, David; Dolan, Sam R.

    2016-04-01

    We study wave propagation in a draining bathtub: a black hole analogue in fluid mechanics whose perturbations are governed by a Klein-Gordon equation on an effective Lorentzian geometry. Like the Kerr spacetime, the draining bathtub geometry possesses an (effective) horizon, an ergosphere and null circular orbits. We propose here that a ‘pulse’ disturbance may be used to map out the light-cone of the effective geometry. First, we apply the eikonal approximation to elucidate the link between wavefronts, null geodesic congruences and the Raychaudhuri equation. Next, we solve the wave equation numerically in the time domain using the method of lines. Starting with Gaussian initial data, we demonstrate that a pulse will propagate along a null congruence and thus trace out the light-cone of the effective geometry. Our new results reveal features, such as wavefront intersections, frame-dragging, winding and interference effects, that are closely associated with the presence of null circular orbits and the ergosphere.

  6. DARWIN nulling interferometer breadboard I: System engineering and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatscher, Reinhold; Sodnik, Zoran; Ergenzinger, Klaus; Johann, Ulrich; Vink, Rob

    2003-10-01

    The presented work has been funded by ESA under ESTEC/Contract No. 14827/00/NL/CK and Astrium Germany has been awarded with this first ESA breadboarding towards nulling interferometry. Astrium designed and manufactured a nulling breadboard operating in the near infrared. The selected concept is fully transferable to the mid infrared. The interferometer is based on a highly symmetric Sagnac core. A dispersive phase shifter or a periscope system maintains the required phase shift of π. Two different source simulators have been built to test the interferometer's performance. They provide two point sources simulating a typical star and a planet signal. Angular separation of the point sources and intensity can be adapted to both operation modes, nulling and imaging. The OPD is actively stabilized to a gray fringe at a shorter wavelength without wobbling the system's OPD. The best results obtained with a diode laser source were a star suppression of 408,000 and a suppression of 32,000 using a broad-band ASE source. A stable deep null with a star suppression of 50,000 to 70,000 could be achieved over half an hour.

  7. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not. PMID:24737768

  8. Testing the null hypothesis: the forgotten legacy of Karl Popper?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Testing of the null hypothesis is a fundamental aspect of the scientific method and has its basis in the falsification theory of Karl Popper. Null hypothesis testing makes use of deductive reasoning to ensure that the truth of conclusions is irrefutable. In contrast, attempting to demonstrate the new facts on the basis of testing the experimental or research hypothesis makes use of inductive reasoning and is prone to the problem of the Uniformity of Nature assumption described by David Hume in the eighteenth century. Despite this issue and the well documented solution provided by Popper's falsification theory, the majority of publications are still written such that they suggest the research hypothesis is being tested. This is contrary to accepted scientific convention and possibly highlights a poor understanding of the application of conventional significance-based data analysis approaches. Our work should remain driven by conjecture and attempted falsification such that it is always the null hypothesis that is tested. The write up of our studies should make it clear that we are indeed testing the null hypothesis and conforming to the established and accepted philosophical conventions of the scientific method.

  9. Do Null Subjects (Mis-)Trigger Pro-Drop Grammars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Native speakers of English regularly hear sentences without overt subjects. Nevertheless, they maintain a [[superscript -]pro] grammar that requires sentences to have an overt subject. It is proposed that listeners of English recognize that speakers reduce predictable material and thus attribute null subjects to this process, rather than changing…

  10. A dynamical system's approach to Schwarzschild null geodesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belbruno, Edward; Pretorius, Frans

    2011-10-01

    The null geodesics of a Schwarzschild black hole are studied from a dynamical system's perspective. Written in terms of Kerr-Schild coordinates, the null geodesic equation takes on the simple form of a particle moving under the influence of a Newtonian central force with an inverse-cubic potential. We apply a McGehee transformation to these equations, which clearly elucidates the full phase space of solutions. All the null geodesics belong to one of the four families of invariant manifolds and their limiting cases, further characterized by the angular momentum L of the orbit: for |L| > |Lc|, (1) the set that flow outward from the white hole, turn around, and then fall into the black hole, (2) the set that fall inward from past null infinity, turn around outside the black hole to continue to future null infinity, and for |L| < |Lc|, (3) the set that flow outward from the white hole and continue to future null infinity and (4) the set that flow inward from past null infinity and into the black hole. The critical angular momentum Lc corresponds to the unstable circular orbit at r = 3M, and the homoclinic orbits associated with it. There are two additional critical points of the flow at the singularity at r = 0. Though the solutions of geodesic motion and Hamiltonian flow we describe here are well known, what we believe is that a novel aspect of this work is the mapping between the two equivalent descriptions, and the different insights each approach can give to the problem. For example, the McGehee picture points to a particularly interesting limiting case of the class (1) that move from the white to black hole: in the L → ∞ limit, as described in Schwarzschild coordinates, these geodesics begin at r = 0, flow along t = constant lines, turn around at r = 2M, and then continue to r = 0. During this motion they circle in azimuth exactly once, and complete the journey in zero affine time.

  11. The appearance, motion, and disappearance of three-dimensional magnetic null points

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Parnell, Clare E.; Haynes, Andrew L.

    2015-10-15

    While theoretical models and simulations of magnetic reconnection often assume symmetry such that the magnetic null point when present is co-located with a flow stagnation point, the introduction of asymmetry typically leads to non-ideal flows across the null point. To understand this behavior, we present exact expressions for the motion of three-dimensional linear null points. The most general expression shows that linear null points move in the direction along which the magnetic field and its time derivative are antiparallel. Null point motion in resistive magnetohydrodynamics results from advection by the bulk plasma flow and resistive diffusion of the magnetic field, which allows non-ideal flows across topological boundaries. Null point motion is described intrinsically by parameters evaluated locally; however, global dynamics help set the local conditions at the