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Sample records for aceh forearc basin

  1. Tectonic wedging in the forearc basin - Accretionary prism transition, Lesser Antilles forearc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrini, Rudolph, Jr.; Speed, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes regional structure of the inner forearc of the southern Lesser Antilles, which contains an extensive 50-70 km wide inner forearc deformation belt (IFDB) developed above crystalline basement of the undeformed forearc basin (FAB), close to and perhaps above its probable subduction trace with Atlantic lithosphere. The IFDB is analyzed, with emphasis placed on five transects across the belt, using mainly migrated seismic sections and balanced model cross sections. The IFDB features and its evolution are discussed, with special attention given to the major structures divided by early and late stages of development, paleobathymetric history, event timing, displacement and strain, and alternative tectonic explanations.

  2. Variation in forearc basin development along the Sunda Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Werff, W.

    The present forearc basin configuration along the Sunda Arc initially appears to have been controlled by extension and differential subsidence of basement blocks in response to the late Eocene collision of India with Asia. The late Oligocene increase in convergence between the South-east Asian and Indian Plates associated with a new pulse of subduction, resulted in basement uplift and the formation of a regional unconformity that can be recognized along the entire Sunda Arc. From the early to late Miocene, the Sumba and Savu forearc sectors along the eastern Sunda Arc may have been characterized by forearc extension. Submarine fan deposition on the arcward side of the evolving accretionary prism represents the first phase in forearc basin deposition. These fans were subsequently covered by basin and slope sediments derived from the evolving magmatic arc. Structural response to increased late Miocene compression varied along strike of the Sunda Arc. North of Bali, Lombok and Sumbawa, the incipient collision between Australia and the western Banda Arc caused back-arc thrusting and basin inversion. Towards the south of Java, an increase in both the size of the accretionary prism and convergence rates resulted in uplift and large scale folding of the outer forearc basin strata. Along the west coast of Sumatra, increased compression resulted in uplift along the inner side of the forearc along older transcurrent faults. Uplift of West Sumatra was followed by the deposition of a westward prograding sequence of terrigenous sediments that resulted in the development of a broad shelf. Initial forearc basin subsidence relates to the age of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, on top of which the basin is situated. Along the western Sunda Arc, both fexural loading of the evolving accretionary prism, and across arc strike-slip faulting represent additional factors that result in forearc subsidence.

  3. Evolution of the Izu-Bonin forearc basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.A. )

    1990-06-01

    Three sites within the Izu-Bonin intra-oceanic forearc were drilled during Leg 126; two penetrated basement. The 7 km wide forearc basin, defined by thick (1.5-4 km) sequences of relatively undeformed coarse-grained volcaniclastic and fine-grained hemipelagic strata, occupies a long belt between the Izu-Bonin frontal arc to the west and the outer-arc high to the east. Based on correlations of logging, physical properties measurements, and lithostratigraphic data to regional multichannel seismic surveys, four major seismostratigraphic sequences, representing four major developmental phases, are recognized: (1) Initial mid-Eocene to early Oligocene tholeiitic and boninitic volcanism formed a basement with highly variable acoustic characteristics - basement near the frontal arc high is well defined and lacks coherent reflectors, while nearer the outer-arc high, basement is often seismically stratified and cut by dipping reflectors. (2) Mid-Oligocene rifting of the forearc and late Oligocene volcanism; the lowermost sedimentary units lap out onto basement to the east. Chaotic, subparallel reflectors are capped by strong, continuous reflectors, parallel and conformable to the underlying units, representing coarse, volcaniclastic turbiditic basin in-fill. The entire late Oligocene sequence is extensively faulted. (3) Miocene spreading in Shikoku basin; a volcanic minimum in the forearc region (27- 13 Ma) resulted in dominantly nannofossil-rich hemipelagic sedimentation. (4) Pliocene-Quaternary volcanism, increasing to present maximum; this upper sequence thickens and is downfaulted towards the arc. It consists of many thin packets of strong reflectors, repeatedly interrupted by canyon cutting and filling.

  4. Linkages Between Cretaceous Forearc and Retroarc Basin Development in Southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, D. A.; Laskowski, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Integrated provenance and subsidence analysis of forearc and retroarc foreland basin strata were used to reconstruct the evolution of the southern margin of Eurasia during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The Cretaceous-Eocene Xigaze forearc basin, preserved along ~600 km of the southern Lhasa terrane, formed between the Gangdese magmatic arc and accretionary complex as subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere accommodated the northward motion and subsequent collision of the Indian plate. Petrographic similarities between Xigaze forearc basin strata and Cretaceous-Eocene sedimentary rocks of the northern Lhasa terrane, interpreted as a retroarc foreland basin, were previously interpreted to record N-S trending river systems connecting the retro- and forearc regions during Cretaceous time. New sandstone petrographic and U-Pb detrital zircon provenance analysis of Xigaze forearc basin strata support this hypothesis. Qualitative and statistical provenance analysis using cumulative distribution functions and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) tests show that the forearc basin was derived from either the same source region as or recycled from the foreland basin. Quartz-rich sandstones with abundant carbonate sedimentary lithic grains and rounded, cobble limestone clasts suggests a more distal source than the proximal Gangdese arc. Therefore, we interpret that the northern Lhasa terrane was a significant source of Xigaze forearc detritus and track spatial and temporal variability in the connection between the retro- and forearc basin systems during the Late Cretaceous. A tectonic subsidence curve for the Xigaze forearc basin shows a steep and "kinked" shape similar to other ancient and active forearc basins. Initial subsidence was likely driven by thermal relaxation of the forearc ophiolite after emplacement while additional periods of rapid subsidence likely result from periods of high flux magmatism in the Gangdese arc and changes in plate convergence rate. Comparison of the

  5. Destruction of Luzon forearc basin from subduction to Taiwan arc-continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtzel, Justin; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Reed, Donald; Chen, Liwen; Liu, Char-Shine; Lundberg, Neil

    2009-12-01

    Along offshore to the east of southern Taiwan, different stages of subduction and collision occur simultaneously along strike of the convergent boundary. As a result, the evolution of the Luzon arc and its forearc basin can be studied from the younger subduction zone to the south to the collision zone to the north. Examining more than 8000 km of seismic lines, we analyzed the seismic stratigraphy of strata in a forearc basin and its successive basins in the collision zone, to study the processes related to arc collapse and forearc basin closure. The study area presents three evolutional stages: intra-oceanic subduction, initial arc-continent collision, and arc-continent collision. We divided 9 seismic sequences in the forearc basin and found older, sub-parallel basin-fill sequences (4-9) and younger, divergent sequences (1-3). Isochron maps of the sequences were used to interpret different deformation modes and their areal extends. On the arc side of the basin of the subduction and initial collision zones, we found relatively undisturbed strata, showing little arc deformation. On the trench side, the growth strata in sequences 1 through 3 are the result of recent tectonic wedging along the rear of the accretionary prism. Tectonic wedging and back-thrusts incorporate the forearc strata into the rear of the accretionary prism until they close the forearc basin at a region with a 2200 m basement relief. This relief is not caused by active deformation, as young flat forearc strata lap onto it and mark the transition from initial collision to collision where many growth strata to the north suggest abrupt increase in active arc basement deformation. The (1) deforming basement, (2) back-thrusts, and (3) other sedimentary processes affect the architecture of the successive basins in the collision zone until the arc is juxtaposed to the rear of the fold and thrust belt on land.

  6. Microstructure analysis of marine seismogenic turbidites in Kumano forearc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutsu, N.; Ashi, J.; Omura, A.; Yamaguchi, A.; Suganuma, Y.; Murayama, M.

    2015-12-01

    An elongated depression was located in an ENE-WSW direction between the southern margin of the forearc basin and the outer ridge off Kumano. A terminal basin that captures all sediments supplied from outside is developed within this depression, making it an adequate site to study paleoseismology using seismogenic turbidites. Previous study results reveal the Cs-137 and Pb-210 that the upper 17-cm mud layer was deposited immediately after the 2004 off Kii Peninsula earthquakes (Ashi et al., 2015, JpGU Meeting abstract). We herein investigate the characteristics of marine seismogenic turbidites based on various measurements including their compositions, X-ray CT images, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). We observed a very thin fine-grained sand layer of 6 mm thick at 17 cm below seafloor and a volcanic ash layer of 15 cm thick at 5.1 m. The X-ray CT image shows seven silty clay laminations thinning upwards at 6 -15 cm below seafloor with homogeneous clay based silt above it, and several foraminifera-enriched layer below 1.7 m. The AMS parameters decrease upwards in the interval showing parallel/cross laminations and the lowest value is measured in the overlying silt layer. Moreover, the paleocurrent directions showed the NW-SE flow direction. These results indicate that the upper 17 cm layer beginning from the very fine-grained sand can be interpreted to be formed by a low density reflected gravity flow between the SE and NW dipping slopes of the basin. Structural observations by X-ray CT scanner reveal characteristic structures yielding various orientation oblique to bedding plane at the mud layer 17 cm below seafloor, suggesting that the structure is likely formed by coseismic deformation accompanied by the earthquake in 2004 or earlier ones. Magnetic fabrics derived from AMS measurements and the structure observed by X-ray CT scanner also agree to this picture.

  7. Geodynamics of the Sivas Basin (Turkey): from a forearc basin to a retroarc foreland basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeay, Etienne; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Kergaravat, Charlie; Callot, Jean-Paul; Mohn, Geoffroy; Kavak, Kaan

    2016-04-01

    Anatolia records the consumption of several oceanic basins, from the Northern Neotethys domain, by north-dipping subduction until the end of Mesozoic. The associated obduction event occurred during Campanian, from North to South and from Greece to Oman, leading to the emplacement of ophiolite thrust sheets and associated ophiolitic mélange. In particular, the Sivas Basin in Eastern Anatolia is located at the boundary between the Kırsehir block to the East, Pontide arc to the North and Tauride Platform to the South, sutured by ophiolitic belts. The Sivas Basin formed a Tertiary fold-and-thrust belt, which exhibits mainly north verging thrust in Paleogene deposits, and South verging thrust in oligo-miocene sequence. To understand the northern verging thrust above south verging obduction, it is necessary to zoom out of the basin, and include a set of processes that affect the eastern Anatolia. This study aims to characterize the structural and sedimentary evolution of the Sivas Basin, based on a fieldwork approach, coupled to the interpretation of subsurface data, thermochronology and biostratigraphy. The Sivas Basin was initiated in a forearc setting relatively to the subduction of the Inner-Tauride Ocean while the associated ophiolites are obducted onto the northern passive margin of the Tauride margin. Early Maastrichtian to Paleocene deposits are represented by carbonate platforms located on ophiolitic highs, passing to turbidites and olistostomes toward the North. The early Eocene sediments, mainly composed of ophiolitic clasts, are deposited on a regional unconformity marked along the southern margin of the basin by incisions in response to the emergence of north-verging thrust. The middle Eocene sediments, intensively folded by northward thrusting, are mostly represented by flysch type deposits (olistostromes, mass-flows and turbidites). The onset of the compression is related to the initiation of the Taurus shortening in a retroarc situation, in response to

  8. Basin Evolution of the Cretaceous-Early Eocene Xigaze Forearc, Southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, D. A.; Carrapa, B.; Kapp, P. A.; Gehrels, G. E.; Reiners, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the processes which control the evolution of forearc basins is important for deciphering the tectonic development of a convergent margin prior to continent-continent suturing. This study presents sedimentologic, modal petrographic and geo-thermochronologic data from the Xigaze forearc basin, preserved along ~ 600 km of the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone in southern Tibet. From late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic time, subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the southern margin of Asia accommodated the northward motion of the Indian craton and formed the Xigaze forearc basin. Following collision with India in the early Cenozoic, the basin transitioned from predominantly marine to non-marine sedimentation and was subsequently uplifted to a mean elevation of 5000 m. Thus, the sedimentary record in the Xigaze forearc preserves information regarding the tectonic evolution of the Indo-Asia continental margin prior to and following collision. We present new measured sections and geo-thermochronologic data from Early Cretaceous to Early Eocene clastic and carbonate sedimentary rocks, preserved in two previously unexplored regions of the forearc, (1) at its western most extent, northwest of Saga, and (2) north of Lhatse. In turn, we compare our results with previously published data in order to synthesize our current understanding of forearc evolution. Strata preserved in the Lhaste region record an initial shallow marine phase of forearc sedimentation (Aptian), but quickly transition to deep marine slope and distal fan turbidite facies (Albian-Campanian). In contrast, facies preserved in the Saga region record a younger shoaling upward marine sequence (Maastrichtian-Ypresian), with the uppermost ~ 400 m consisting of fluvial channel sandstones and red-green paleosols. Facies and depositional environments in the Saga region are highly variable along strike, with turbidites, shelf limestones, estuarine siliciclastics and thick paleosols sequences all

  9. Shallow-water limestones within the Paleogene forearc basin of California: Unique paleogeographic indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Whidden, K.J.; Bottjer, D.J.; Lund, S.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    A number of shallow-water limestones have recently been documented in late Mesozoic/Paleogene forearc strata of the Cordilleran continental arc. These limestones occur on two different tectonic blocks which were both developed within the forearc basin and subsequently moved relative to one another due to oblique convergence since Late Cretaceous time. Faunal evidence suggests that these limestones were deposited within the photic zone, at shelfal depths. Each limestone represents part or all of the basal Paleogene sequence; they are intercalated with or overlain by deeper-water strata. One region of outcrops in the western Santa Monica Mountains is latest Paleocene in age, while the other region, in the eastern Santa Ynez Mountains and Wheeler Gorge area, is early Eocene in age. These shallow-water limestones may be used as paleogeographic indicators, as they represent relative topographic highs within the basin. The microplate tectonic reconstruction of Hornafius (1985) suggests that the limestones occur on opposite sides of a north-south trending trough within the overall forearc basin. The Paleocene limestones, which occur along the eastern margin of the trough, are intercalated with marine shales and may represent small fluctuations in relative sea level and/or sediment supply on a topographic high. The Eocene limestones, which occur along the western side of the trough, are always the basal Paleogene unit deposited on tilted Cretaceous strata or Franciscan rocks and overlain by deeper-water shales. The occurrence of Franciscan as basement for limestone deposition implies localized tectonic uplift within the forearc. Each of these limestones probably represents initiation of a single period of relative sea level rise, as the basal shallow-water carbonates were eventually overwhelmed by deeper-water shales. Thus two episodes of carbonate deposition allow for the delineation of two topographic highs within the Paleogene forearc basin.

  10. Subsidence history of Cook Inlet basin, southern Alaska: basement control on forearc basin development

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, A.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Cook Inlet, lying between the Aleutian Trench and the Alaska-Aleutian batholith, has often been cited as a typical forearc basin. Upper (northeast) Cook Inlet Tertiary sediments have produced oil for over 25 years. Lower (southwest) Cook Inlet exploration, however, has been unsuccessful; previous studies have noted extensive zeolitization of potential Jurassic reservoirs. Geohistory analysis (backstripping) of published stratigraphic sections from outcrop and bore holes reveals two different tectonic mechanism of basin development in the lower and upper Cook Inlet. Thermal subsidence coincident with radiometrically determined cooling ages of the Alaska-Aleutian batholith predominated in the lower Cook Inlet during the Jurassic, suggesting that this part of the basin may be underlain by an extension of the batholith. Previous workers have noted a typical arc-unroofing sequence in Jurassic sandstones. The Tertiary section here is relatively thin. In contrast, the upper Cook Inlet has had a more complex history. Accumulation of nearly 5000, m of tertiary sediments over a thin Mesozoic section appears to have resulted from crustal loading, possibly through accretionary thickening of trenchward metasediments. These accreted terranes may extend beneath the upper Cook Inlet basin, resulting in a relatively ductile basement susceptible to load deformation. Published sandstone QFL compositions in the Tertiary indicate mixed or recycled orogene provenances, with source terrains both arcward and trenchward. Local basement type appears to have exerted a strong influence on sediment accumulation and petroleum potential in the Cook Inlet basin. Further study of the basin may thus lead to better understanding of the overall construction and tectonic history of this complex convergent margin.

  11. Subsidence history of Great Valley: forearc basin evolution during Laramide Orogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Moxon, I.W.

    1986-04-01

    Geohistory analysis was performed on 25 surface and subsurface stratigraphic sections from the Sacramento and northern San Joaquin basins. These geohistory curves document in detail the subsidence history of the Great Valley forearc basin, and permit correlation of forearc basin events with plate motion reconstructions and with events in the arc and subduction complex. Furthermore, the geohistory curves present a model that could be integrated with thermal history data to assess maturation of potential source rocks in the basin. Interpretation of the subsidence history curves and sedimentary facies distribution patterns shows five phases of basin evolution, punctuated by tectonic and/or eustatic events. 1) The earliest phase (Tithonian to mid-Cenomanian, 152-95 Ma) consists of distal turbidite sedimentation, but cannot be reliably interpreted due to a paucity of data. 2) Great Valley Group turbidites accumulated during a mid-Cenomanian to latest Campanian (95-74.5 Ma) phase of rapid tectonic subsidence and submarine fan sediment accumulation. The Maestrichtian (74.5-66.4 Ma) represents a transition between the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene phases, with localized gentle uplift of the western basin margin displacing the depocenter progressively eastward. 3) Structural disruption of the basin, locally subaerially exposing the western basin margin and forming a complex intrabasin borderland topography of rapidly subsiding subbasins and stable blocks, characterized the Paleogene phase (66.4-36 Ma). Subsidence curves show two periods of rapid subsidence (60-56 Ma and 52-47 Ma) alternating with basin-filling or uplift periods; these basin evolution signatures may reflect movement along a proto-San Andreas fault. 4) A widespread unconformity, induced partially by eustatic sea level fall, characterized the Oligocene (36-24 Ma). 5) Subbasins continued to evolve separately during the Miocene to holocene phase (24-0 Ma).

  12. Petrofacies and provenance of late mesozoic forearc basin, northern and central California

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, R.V.

    1983-07-01

    Data from the Great Valley Group (sequence) represent the most complete information regarding sandstone petrology of sediment derived from a magmatic arc. This information is useful in documenting tectonic and magmatic events within the arc and related terranes, and forms the basis for the establishment of petrostratigraphic units for mapping and correlation. Sandstone and conglomerate compositions are controlled by changes in provenance, many of which were basinwide and synchronous. Claymineral composition is controlled primarily by burial metamorphism. Careful attention to sample collection, sample preparation, and petrographic techniques is essential for uniform results. Seven petrographic parameters (P/F,Lv/L,M,Qp/Q,Q,F, and L-listed in decreasing importance to petrofacies discrimination) define eight petrofacies (Stony Creek, Platina, Lodoga, Grabast, Boxer, Cortina, Los Gatos and Rumsey-listed in approximate order of decreasing age). As the volcanic cover was stripped off, plutoniclastic and metamorphiclastic detritus from the underlying batholithic terranes was provided in abundance to the forearc basin. Crustal components were more ''continental'' in the southern Sierra Nevada and more ''oceanic'' in the northern Sierra Nevada, as demonstrated by the higher proportions of metamorphiclastic detritus and by the more felsic nature of volcaniclastic detritus to the south. By the middle of the Late Cretaceous, extensive batholithic terranes provided potassium-feldspar-rich arkosic detritus to the entire forearc basin. By the Paleogene, arc magmatism had migrated eastward sufficiently that deeper levels of the California part of the arc were exposed by erosion, tectonic activity decreased in the forearc basin, and the basin was filled to sea level in most parts.

  13. Holocene faulting in the Bellingham forearc basin: upper-plate deformation at the northern end of the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Blakely, Richard J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    The northern Cascadia forearc takes up most of the strain transmitted northward via the Oregon Coast block from the northward-migrating Sierra Nevada block. The north-south contractional strain in the forearc manifests in upper-plate faults active during the Holocene, the northern-most components of which are faults within the Bellingham Basin. The Bellingham Basin is the northern of four basins of the actively deforming northern Cascadia forearc. A set of Holocene faults, Drayton Harbor, Birch Bay, and Sandy Point faults, occur within the Bellingham Basin and can be traced from onshore to offshore using a combination of aeromagnetic lineaments, paleoseismic investigations and scarps identified using LiDAR imagery. With the recognition of such Holocene faults, the northernmost margin of the actively deforming Cascadia forearc extends 60 km north of the previously recognized limit of Holocene forearc deformation. Although to date no Holocene faults are recognized at the northern boundary of the Bellingham Basin, which is 15 km north of the international border, there is no compelling tectonic reason to expect that Holocene faults are limited to south of the international border.

  14. Basin Evolution and Exhumation of the Xigaze Forearc, Southern Tibet: Insight from Sedimentology, Stratigraphy, and Geo-Thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, D. A.; Carrapa, B.; Abbey, A. L.; Kapp, P. A.; Ding, L.

    2012-12-01

    Forearc basins are important data archives for understanding continental dynamics because they preserve the tectono-erosional record of continental margins before collision. This study focuses on the Cretaceous-Eocene Xigaze forearc basin in southern Tibet, which is exposed along ~600 km of the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone between the Indian craton to the south and the Asian Lhasa terrane to the north. From late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic time, subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the southern margin of Asia accommodated the northward motion of the Indian craton and formed the Xigaze forearc basin. Following collision with India in the early Cenozoic, the basin transitioned from predominantly marine to non-marine sedimentation and was subsequently uplifted to a mean elevation of 5000 m. How this transition occurred remains unresolved. This study's overall objective is to decipher forearc-basin and Indo-Asia continental-margin development from field sedimentology and stratigraphy, and detrital geo-thermochronology. We present new stratigraphic sections, totaling 8 km thick, from a previously unexplored ~60 km segment of the Xigaze forearc, ~50 km north-northwest of Saga. These sections are quite different from those known farther east. Sedimentary facies of mid-Cretaceous to early Eocene deposits indicate a shoaling-upward trend consistent with other ancient forearc basins (e.g., Great Valley forearc, California). Middle to late Cretaceous deposits indicate a variety of facies and depositional environments along strike in the study area. Facies include distal marine turbidites, shelf limestones, estuarine siliciclastics, and brown paleosols. In contrast, Eocene depositional environments are transitional from nearshore marine to pericontinental. Facies consist of dirty limestones, packstones, and wackestones, interbedded with terrigenous conglomerates and red-green paleosols. Eocene fauna include abundant foraminifera such as Nummulites-Discocyclina and

  15. Structure and Stratigraphy of the Barbados Accretionary Prism and the Tobago Forearc Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaderton, N. A.; Wood, L. J.; Mann, P.

    2004-12-01

    The relationship between the Lesser Antilles island arc, the Tobago forearc basin, and the Barbados accretionary prism shows classic convergent margin geometry. Barbados is the only emergent part of the accretionary prism with 80% of the island's land area being covered by Pleistocene limestone. Erosion of the limestone cap in the northeastern part of the island exposes older rocks of the prism. A 450-km2 2-D seismic data volume allows extension of these stratigraphic units offshore and definition of a regional structural framework. The relationship between the unit identified onshore as the Early Eocene to Middle Miocene Oceanic Formation and the basal unit, the intensively folded and faulted Eocene prism rocks of the Scotland Group, has long been debated. Previous proposals claim that the Oceanic Formation, consisting of pelagic clays with some ash beds, is allochthonous and has been thrusted into its present position above accreted sediments of the Scotland Group. However, seismic data show no evidence of nappes-the basis for the overthrusting hypothesis. Seismic interpretation presented here supports the opposing view that the Oceanic Formation and its offshore equivalent in the offshore Tobago forearc basin was deposited in situ and onlap the older, more highly deformed rocks of the accretionary prism. Previous workers proposed that the region's extensive mud diapirism (identified onshore as the Joes River Formation) has caused the emergence of Barbados, which continues to rise 0.44 mm/yr. However, seismic lines suggest that the island's emergence and present-day uplift is related to footwall uplift along a large, NE-striking normal fault off the east coast of the island.

  16. A review of tectonics and sedimentation in a forearc setting: Hellenic Thrace Basin, North Aegean Sea and Northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelis, A. G.; Boutelier, D.; Catuneanu, O.; Seymour, K. St.; Zelilidis, A.

    2016-04-01

    Exposure of the forearc region of the North Aegean Sea, Greece, offers insight into evolving convergent margins. The sedimentary fill of the Thrace Basin during the Late Eocene to Oligocene time provides a record of subduction-driven processes, such as growth of magmatic arcs and construction of accretionary complexes. This large sediment repository received sediment from two sources. The southern (outboard) basin margin reflects the active influence of the exhumed accretionary prism (e.g. Pindic Cordillera or Biga peninsula), while the northern (inboard) margin records the effect of the magmatic arc in the Rhodope region. The forearc basin sedimentary fills shoal upward into shallow-marine strata but are dominated mainly by deep-marine facies. The depositional trend and stacking pattern are dominated by progradational patterns. This trend, which is observed in both basin margins, is related to tectonic deformation rather than sea-level fluctuations. Additional evidence for this tectonic uplift comes from the backstripping analysis. The accretionary complex provided material into the forearc basin. This material was transported northeast and formed a sand-rich turbidity system that evolved upslope into shallow-marine deposits. Stratigraphic data indicate that this turbidity system exhibits a successive landward (inboard) migration of the depocenter. Provenance data utilizing sandstone petrography, conglomerate clast composition, and bulk-rock geochemistry suggest that this system reflects an increased influx of mafic material into the basin. Volcanic arc-derived material was transported south and east and accumulated in deep-marine settings. Both stratigraphic and provenance data indicate a seaward (outboard) migration of the basin depocenter and a significant increase in felsic detritus into the forearc.

  17. Using Detrital Geochronologic and Thermochronologic "Double-Dating" to Constrain Depositional Age, Provenance, and Exhumation Signals in Ancient Forearc Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The application of coupled detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and (U-Th)/He thermochronology to sedimentary basins has the potential for unprecedented details about grain provenance, depositional age and source and basin exhumation signals. Although several studies have implored this technique, it is underutilized and may prove useful in geologic settings that are traditionally difficult to explore. For example, constraining the depositional age of strata in ancient forearc basins is challenging as many horizons are devoid of fossils and post-burial diagenesis of limestone beds limits biostratigraphic age control. This study applies U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology to clastic rocks from the Cretaceous-Eocene Xigaze forearc basin in southern Tibet to (1) to determine the provenance of forearc basin strata and (2) to constrain a maximum depositional age of stratigraphic horizons using the youngest distinct age group from a sample. In addition, (U-Th)/He thermochronology was applied to a subset of the detrital zircons on which U-Pb ages were previously determined in order to determine the timing of exhumation of Xigaze forearc strata and its source region. The use of young populations of zircons is a good method for age control in the Xigaze forearc basin because magmatism in the source area was more-or-less continuous and the lag time between the youngest zircons in a sample and the time of that samples deposition is likely relatively small. A total of 2,330 zircon grains yielded ages with acceptable precision and concordance for geochronologic interpretation. Together with sandstone petrography, the detrital zircons indicate that the primary source of detritus in the basin from ~113 to 54 Ma was the Gangdese magmatic arc. Analysis of the youngest age component of individual samples reveals a decrease in the youngest ages upsection, consistent with maximum depositional ages that are close to the likely true depositional age based on intervening tuff layers. Double

  18. Influence of the Amlia fracture zone on the evolution of the Aleutian Terrace forearc basin, central Aleutian subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, Holly F.; Draut, Amy E.; Keranen, Katie M.; Scholl, David W.

    2012-01-01

    During Pliocene to Quaternary time, the central Aleutian forearc basin evolved in response to a combination of tectonic and climatic factors. Initially, along-trench transport of sediment and accretion of a frontal prism created the accommodation space to allow forearc basin deposition. Transport of sufficient sediment to overtop the bathymetrically high Amlia fracture zone and reach the central Aleutian arc began with glaciation of continental Alaska in the Pliocene. As the obliquely subducting Amlia fracture zone swept along the central Aleutian arc, it further affected the structural evolution of the forearc basins. The subduction of the Amlia fracture zone resulted in basin inversion and loss of accommodation space east of the migrating fracture zone. Conversely, west of Amlia fracture zone, accommodation space increased arcward of a large outer-arc high that formed, in part, by a thickening of arc basement. This difference in deformation is interpreted to be the result of a variation in interplate coupling across the Amlia fracture zone that was facilitated by increasing subduction obliquity, a change in orientation of the subducting Amlia fracture zone, and late Quaternary intensification of glaciation. The change in coupling is manifested by a possible tear in the subducting slab along the Amlia fracture zone. Differences in coupling across the Amlia fracture zone have important implications for the location of maximum slip during future great earthquakes. In addition, shaking during a great earthquake could trigger large mass failures of the summit platform, as evidenced by the presence of thick mass transport deposits of primarily Quaternary age that are found in the forearc basin west of the Amlia fracture zone.

  19. Impact of structural and autocyclic basin-floor topography on the depositional evolution of the deep-water Valparaiso forearc basin, central Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laursen, J.; Normark, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    The Valparaiso Basin constitutes a unique and prominent deep-water forearc basin underlying a 40-km by 60-km mid-slope terrace at 2.5-km water depth on the central Chile margin. Seismic-reflection data, collected as part of the CONDOR investigation, image a 3-3.5-km thick sediment succession that fills a smoothly sagged, margin-parallel, elongated trough at the base of the upper slope. In response to underthrusting of the Juan Ferna??ndez Ridge on the Nazca plate, the basin fill is increasingly deformed in the seaward direction above seaward-vergent outer forearc compressional highs. Syn-depositional growth of a large, margin-parallel monoclinal high in conjunction with sagging of the inner trough of the basin created stratal geometries similar to those observed in forearc basins bordered by large accretionary prisms. Margin-parallel compressional ridges diverted turbidity currents along the basin axis and exerted a direct control on sediment depositional processes. As structural depressions became buried, transverse input from point sources on the adjacent upper slope formed complex fan systems with sediment waves characterising the overbank environment, common on many Pleistocene turbidite systems. Mass failure as a result of local topographic inversion formed a prominent mass-flow deposit, and ultimately resulted in canyon formation and hence a new focused point source feeding the basin. The Valparaiso Basin is presently filled to the spill point of the outer forearc highs, causing headward erosion of incipient canyons into the basin fill and allowing bypass of sediment to the Chile Trench. Age estimates that are constrained by subduction-related syn-depositional deformation of the upper 700-800m of the basin fill suggest that glacio-eustatic sea-level lowstands, in conjunction with accelerated denudation rates, within the past 350 ka may have contributed to the increase in simultaneously active point sources along the upper slope as well as an increased

  20. Major variation of paleo-maximum temperature and consolidation state within post Miocene forearc basin, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Takemura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Since forearc-basin evolve associated with development of the accretionary prisms, their geologic structures have clues to understanding the tectonic processes associated with plate subduction. We found a major difference in paleo-geothermal structure and consolidation states between the unconformity in the forearc basin in the Boso Peninsula, central Japan. The geology of the Boso Peninsula, central Japan is divided into three parts; Early Miocene and Late Miocene accretionary prisms in the southern part, the Hayama-Mineoka tectonic belt mainly composed of ophiolite in the middle part, and post-Middle Miocene forearc basin in the northern part. Sediments in the forearc basin are composed of 15-3Ma Miura Group and 3-0.6Ma Kazusa Group. Boundary of the two groups is the Kurotaki Unconformity formed about 3Ma, when convergent direction of the Philippine Sea Plate has been changed (Takahashi, 2006). Vitrinite reflectance (Ro) analyses were conducted and revealed that major variation of paleo-maximum temperature between the Miura and Kazusa groups. The maximum paleo-temperature in the Miura Group is estimated as 70-95˚C, whereas in the lower part of the Kazusa Group is less than 10-35˚C. Given 20˚C/km (Sakai et al, 2011) paleo-geothermal gradient, approximately 2000 m uplifting/erosion of the Miura Group is expected when the unconformity formed. To verify the amount of this uplifting/erosion, we are performing consolidation test of mudstone. [Reference] Takahashi, M., 2006, Tectonic Development of the Japanese Islands Controlled by Philippine Sea Plate Motion, Journal of Geography, 115, 116-123. Sakai R., Munakata M., Kimura H., Ichikawa Y., and Nakamura M., 2011, Study on Validation Method of Regional Groundwater Flow Model : Case Study for Boso Peninsula, JAEA-research 2010(66), 1-20, 1-2.

  1. Episodic Deep Fluid Expulsion at Mud Volcanoes in the Kumano Forearc Basin, SE Offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschmidt, S.; Kopf, A.

    2014-12-01

    Compressional forces at convergent margins govern a variety of processes, most prominently earthquakes, landslides and mud volcanoes in the forearc. Although all seem related to fluid pressure changes, mud volcanoes are not only characterized by expulsion of fluids, but also fluidized mud and clasts that got ripped-up during mud ascension. They hence provide information regarding mobilization depth, diagenetic overprint, and geodynamic pathways. At the Nankai Trough subduction zone, SE offshore Japan, mud volcanism id common and supposed to be related to seismogenic processes. During MARUM Expedition SO-222 with R/V SONNE, mud volcanoes in the Kumano forearc basin were mapped, cored and sampled. By extending the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Kumano transect landwards, 5 new mud volcanoes were identified by multibeam mapping. Cores revealed mud breccia with semi-consolidated silt- to claystone clasts and gaseous fluid escape structures, while the hemipelagic background sediments are characterized by intercalations of turbidites, ash layers and calcareous fossils. Clasts were subject to thin-section analyses, and the cores were sampled for XRD analyses and radiocarbon dating. Clasts showed prominent deformation structures, neomorphism and pores and fractures filled with polycrystalline quartz and/or calcite cement, probably formed during deep burial and early metamorphosis. Illite crystallinity based on XRD measurements varies between 0.24 and 0.38, which implies that the material originates from the Anchizone at depths ≥ 4 km. Radiocarbon dating revealed ages between 4450 and 30300 yr cal. BP, with age reversals occurring not earlier than 17000 yr cal. BP. Radiocarbon dating beneath turbidites and ash layers found at mud volcano #9 points to an episodic occurrence of these earthquake-related features in intervals of ca. 620 yr, while the mud volcano itself remained inactive. In summary, the preliminary results suggest that the mud volcanoes are nurtured

  2. Using Satellite Gravity to Map and Model Forearc Basins and Thickness of Trench Sediment Worldwide: Implications for Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, R. J.; Scholl, D. W.; Wells, R. E.; von Huene, R.; Barckhausen, U.

    2006-12-01

    There is growing evidence that historic great earthquakes (M>8) favor segments of subduction zones that exhibit key geologic factors, such as high sediment influx into the trench (e.g., Ruff, 1989), the presence of young accretionary prisms (von Huene and Scholl, 1991), the presence of trench-slope forearc basins (Wells et al., 2003; Song and Simons, 2003), and the mineralogical structure of the upper plate. The USGS Tsunami Sources Working Group (http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/tsunami/workshop/index.html) recently described and quantified these factors for all eastern Pacific subduction margins. Although the level of knowledge of subduction zones world-wide is highly uneven, free-air gravity anomalies observed at satellite altitudes provide a consistent measure of some of these geologic factors. Satellite gravity demonstrates, for example, that regions of greatest slip during past megathrust earthquakes around the circum-Pacific spatially correlate with forearc basins and their associated deep-sea terrace gravity lows, with amplitudes typically >20 mGal. Basins may evolve because interseismic subsidence, possibly linked to basal erosion of the forearc by the subducting plate, does not fully recover after earthquakes. By inference, therefore, forearc basin gravity lows should be predictors of the location of large moment release during future great earthquakes. Moreover, great earthquakes have a statistical propensity to occur at trenches with excess sediments, in contrast to trenches dominated by horst-and-graben bathymetry. After removing the effects of bathymetric depth, low densities associated with trench fill are evident in satellite gravity anomalies and thus permit identification of trench segments with high sediment influx. Additional studies using satellite gravity anomalies may lead to new avenues in understanding the geologic processes that accompany great megathrust earthquakes, but we must confirm the ability of satellite gravity data to serve as a

  3. Structural Evolution of the Crotone Basin: Successive Shortening and Extension Episodes Parallel to the Calabrian Forearc (South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, M.; Seeber, L.

    2008-12-01

    At 10-12 Ma, the continental fragment of Calabria separated from Sardinia and became the crystalline core of a forearc in a NW-directed subduction system that is being consuming the Mesozoic (Neo-Tethys) oceanic lithosphere. The southeastward rollback of this arc has left in its wake the Tyrrhenian Sea by back-arc spreading. This system is confined between the continental margins of Africa and its Apulian promontory and created matching oblique-collision orogens (Sicilian Maghrebides and Apennines, respectively) along the margins. These progressive collisions shortened the arc because the gap between the margins narrowed to the SE. However, the arc is now lengthening after passing the point of closest approach of Sicily and Apulia, probably in the Quaternary. We seek evidence of this and other neotectonic episodes in the evolution of the forearc in the Crotone basin, which is situated on the accretionary E side of Calabria. A widespread unconformity correlated with the onset of rollback marks a regional foundering controlled by multidirectional extensional growth faults. These faults are consistently capped by the Messinian evaporite sequence. This sequence ends with a widespread unconformity that marks the final desiccation of the Ionian Sea ~5Ma. Mechanical changes due to drop in pore pressure and backward tilting of the accretionary wedge due to flexural unloading may be responsible for the landward emplacement of an accretionary mélange on the NE side of the Crotone Basin and the deposition of a characteristic conglomerate that locally caps the evaporites. After a well known mid-Pliocene basin-forming extensional event, we find evidence for a basin- wide contraction affecting the entire Neogene sequence up to the mid-to-late Pliocene. Vergence ranges from N to NW from east to west across the basin and is consistent with longitudinal shortening of the forearc. The shortening structures are cut or reactivated(?) by extensional faulting which we associate with

  4. Cretaceous stratigraphic sequences of north-central California suggest a discontinuity in the Late Cretaceous forearc basin

    SciTech Connect

    Haggart, J.W.

    1986-10-01

    The Cretaceous sedimentary succession preserved east of Redding, at the northern end of California's Great Valley, indicates that marine deposition was widespread in the region for only two periods during the Late Cretaceous. If it is assumed that there was minimal Cenozoic offset between the northern Sierra Nevada and eastern Klamath Mountains terranes, Cretaceous sedimentation in this region was most likely restricted to a narrow trough and was not a continuation of the wide, Cretaceous forearc basin of central California. The dissimilar depositional histories of the Redding basin and the Hornbrook basin of north-central California suggest that the basins were not linked continuously during the Late Cretaceous. A thick section of Cretaceous strata beneath the southwestern Modoc Plateau is considered unlikely.

  5. Formation of forearc basins by collision between seamounts and accretionary wedges: an example from the New Hebrides subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collot, J.-Y.; Fisher, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Seabeam data reveal two deep subcircular reentrants in the lower arc slope of the New Hebrides island arc that may illustrate two stages in the development of a novel type of forearc basin. The Malekula reentrant lies just south of the partly subducted Bougainville seamount. This proximity, as well as the similarity in morphology between the reentrant and an indentation in the lower arc slope off Japan, suggests that the Malekula reentrant formed by the collision of a seamount with the arc. An arcuate fold-thrust belt has formed across the mouth of the reentrant, forming the toe of a new accretionary wedge. The Efate reentrant may show the next stage in basin development. This reentrant lies landward of a lower-slope ridge that may have begun to form as an arcuate fold-thrust belt across the mouth of a reentrant. This belt may have grown by continued accretion at the toe of the wedge, by underplating beneath the reentrant, and by trapping of sediment shed from the island arc. These processes could result in a roughly circular forearc basin. Basins that may have formed by seamount collision lie within the accretionary wedge adjacent to the Aleutian trenches. -Authors

  6. Upper Paleogene shallow-water events in the Sandino Forearc Basin, Nicaragua-Costa Rica - response to tectonic uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andjic, Goran; Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Baumgartner, Peter O.

    2016-04-01

    The Upper Cretaceous-Neogene Sandino Forearc Basin is exposed in the southeastern Nicaraguan Isthmus and in the northwestern corner of Costa Rica. It consists of an elongated, slightly folded belt (160 km long/30 km wide). During Campanian to Oligocene, the predominantly deep-water pelagic, hemipelagic and turbiditic sequences were successively replaced by shelf siliciclastics and carbonates at different steps of the basin evolution. We have made an inventory of Tertiary shallow-water limestones in several areas of Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica. They always appear as isolated rock bodies, generally having an unconformable stratigraphic contact with the underlying detrital sequences. The presence of these short-lived carbonate shoals can be attributed to local or regional tectonic uplift in the forearc area. The best-preserved exposure of such a carbonate buildup is located on the small Isla Juanilla (0.15 km2, Junquillal Bay, NW Costa Rica). The whole island is made of reef carbonates, displaying corals in growth position, associated with coralline red algae (Juanilla Formation). Beds rich in Larger Benthic Foraminifera such as Lepidocyclina undosa -favosa group permit to date this reef as late Oligocene. A first uplift event affected the Nicaraguan Isthmus, that rose from deep-water to shelfal settings in the latest Eocene-earliest Oligocene. The upper Oligocene Juanilla Formation formed on an anticline that developed during the early Oligocene, contemporaneously with other folds observed in the offshore Sandino Forearc Basin. During the early Oligocene, a period of global sea-level fall, the folded tectonic high underwent deep erosion. During the late Oligocene, a time of overall stable eustatic sea level, tectonic uplift gave way to moderate subsidence, creating accommodation space for reef growth. A 4th or 5th order (Milankovic-type) glacio-eustatic sea level rise, could also have triggered reef growth, but its preservation implies at least moderate

  7. Free gas in Kumano forearc basin associated with methane hydrates and paleo-BSRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J.; Moore, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    A three dimensional (3D) seismic reflection survey shot in Kumano fore-arc basin off the coast of Kii Peninsula, Japan, revealed many subsurface features including the distribution of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) which crosscut dipping strata. A BSR is a seismic reflection caused by the contrast in acoustic impedance of two media, which have been formed by a depth dependent, and hence temperature dependent, process. Gas hydrate related BSRs, distinguished from other diagenetic related BSRs by their negative polarity, are prevalent in Kumano Basin and mark the interface between the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) and top of potential gas saturated sediments. Gas hydrates form as cement in the porespace of sediment, reducing the permeability and providing an excellent trap for any existing free gas beneath. Free gas may accumulate via migration from a source rock at depth as well as by dissociation of existing gas hydrate. Negative polarity paleo-BSRs are present below the current BSR, implying that changes to the thermal regime have occurred, causing the base of GHSZ to move upward. During this process, some gas may have dissociated and accumulated beneath the present BSR. The case for the presence of free gas is supported by well log data in IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) Hole C0002A of Expedition 314 and the observance of DHIs (Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators) within the seismic reflection data. Well log data show a sharp transition at the BSR in resistivity and sonic velocity while the gamma ray, PEF, and neutron porosity logs remain rather consistent. The interval above the BSR is characterized by high resistivity and velocity values, low density, and little effect on gamma ray values; all characteristic of the presence of gas hydrates. The base of this interval is characterized by a sharp decrease in resistivity and velocity and coincides with the interpreted BSR, indicative of a change from gas hydrates to free gas. Amplitude

  8. Tectonic significance of Upper Cretaceous alluvial-fan deposits in the Peninsular Ranges forearc basin complex, Baja California (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Fulford, M.; Busby-Spera, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Recent evidence suggests that forearc basins, previously depicted as broad downwarps, may experience syndepositional faulting and/or folding. The upper Campanian El Gallo Formation, which was deposited along the northern margin of the Rosario embayment of the peninsula Ranges forearc basin complex, records tilting of the underlying arc massif basement contemporaneous with dissection of the arc source terrane. The La Escarpa member at the base of the El Gallo Formation consists of a 100-180-m thick upward-fining sequence, interpreted as a retrogradational proximal to distal alluvial-fan deposit. Overlying the La Escarpa member is the 1,000-m thick El Disecado member, which lies at the top of the El Gallo Formation and consists of sandy fluvial deposits. Conglomerate clast counts from the La Escarpa member and point-count data from sandstones throughout the El Gallo Formation show an upsection increase in granitic and metasedimentary rock fragments relative to volcanic/metavolcanic rock fragments, reflecting unroofing and progressive headward erosion of the source terranes in the Peninsular Ranges. Paleocurrent data from the La Escarpa and El Disecado members suggest a rotation of approximately 110{degree} with time, from west-northwesterly to southerly, reflecting tilting of the basin floor. This may have been accomplished by downdropping along an east-west-trending fault that divided the Rosario embayment into separate subbasins during the Cretaceous.

  9. Seismic reflection and tomographic velocity model constraints on the evolution of the Tofino forearc basin, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Nathan; Calvert, Andrew J.

    2007-02-01

    The Tofino Basin is a sedimentary forearc basin that overlies the continental shelf of the Cascadia margin to the southwest of Vancouver Island. The basin, which contains up to ~4 km of marine clastic sedimentary rocks, formed following accretion in the Early Eocene of the Crescent and Pacific Rim Terranes, and subsequent accretionary wedge basement. Subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate has since been the primary tectonic driving force in the development of the basin's structure. Investigations using coincident seismic reflection profiles, tomographic velocity models and recently reassessed biostratigraphic well data show that basement composition has largely controlled deformation of the overlying Tofino Basin sediments. Anticlinal folds overlying the accretionary wedge exhibit low P-wave velocities at the apex of the fold, which may be related to fracturing of older, more lithified sediments accompanied by fluid expulsion from the accretionary wedge. In contrast the velocity variation across folds over the Crescent Terrane mimics the fold geometry, and does not appear anomalous. A sub-basin (containing up to ~3 km of Oligocene to Holocene sediment) has developed in the central part of the Tofino Basin at the boundary between the Crescent and Pacific Rim Terranes. Seismic interpretation suggests that deposition has increased more rapidly in the Late Miocene to Holocene. Subsidence within the sub-basin is likely to have been controlled by sediment loading, flexure and regional tectonic forces, localized by pre-existing zones of weakness such as the Tofino Fault. The development of the sub-basin may also have been influenced by the displacement landward of part of the lower forearc crust during subduction erosion. Diapiric structures along the axis of the sub-basin suggest that fluid expulsion into the Tofino Basin from the deeper accreted terranes is localized by the terrane-bounding fault. Further seaward, fluid expulsion from the accretionary wedge may be more

  10. Shallow structure and its formation process of an active flexure in the forearc basin of the central Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashi, J.; Ikehara, K.; Omura, A.; Ojima, T.; Murayama, M.

    2013-12-01

    ENE-WSW trending active faults, named Enshu fault system, are developed in the forearc basins of the eastern and central Nankai subduction zone. Three parallel faults developed in the Enshu forearc basin of the eastern Nankai have right lateral slip on the basis of dextral displacement of the canyon axis. Moreover, bathymetry data and side-scan sonar imageries indicate relative uplift of the northern region and the multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles show northward dipping fault planes. In the central Nankai subuduction zone, an ENE-WSW trending step is distributed at the northern part of the Kumano forearc basin and is regarded as the western extension of the Enshu fault system. Although MCS records show deformations including an anticlinal fold beneath the bathymetric step, they have less resolution to identify deformation of basin sequence just below the seafloor. In contrast, deformation seems to reach to the seafloor on a profile by SBP mounted on a mother ship. Investigation of shallow deformation structures is significant for understanding of recent tectonic activity. We carried out deep towed SBP survey by ROV NSS (Navigable Sampling System) during Hakuho-maru KH-11-9 cruise. High resolution mapping of shallow structures was successfully conducted by a chirp SBP system of EdgeTech DW-106. ROV NSS also has capability to take a long core with a pinpoint accuracy around complex topographic region. The Kumano forearc basin is topographically divided into the northern part at a water depth of 2038 m and the other major region at a depth of 2042 m by the ENE-WSW linear step. Three deep towed SBP lines intersected this topographical step and revealed the following structures. This step is composed of 100 m wide gentle slope with an inclination of about 8 degrees. An anticlinal axis is located beneath the upper edge of this slope. Sedimentary layers continue at this slope region without any abut/termination and rapidly increase their thickness toward the

  11. Evolution of subsidence styles in forearc basin: example from Cretaceous of southern Vizcaino Peninsula, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J.; Boles, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc magmatism is represented by volcaniclastic rocks of the Eugenia Formation in the northern Vizcaino Peninsula and by the metamorphosed Cedros-San Andres volcanoplutonic complex, with a dismembered ophiolitic basement, in the southern peninsula. The Vizcaino Peninsula became the site of forearc sedimentation by the Aptian-Albian (late Early Cretaceous), when arc magmatism moved abruptly eastward to the present-day Peninsular Range. On the southern Vizcaino Peninsula, a conformable stratigraphic section, complicated by later faulting, records a gradual transition from a ridged forearc, broken by basement uplifts and grabens (the Aptian-Albian Asunction Formation), to a broadly subsiding, deep marine forearc basin (the Cenomanian Valle Formation). The basal contact of the Asunction formation has irregular relief caused by brecciated basement rocks and talus accumulated along fault zones. An upward-fining sequence several hundred meters thick records abrupt uplift and gradual denudation of adjacent metamorphic basement. Contemporaneous andesite arc volcanism to the east supplied ash and fresh volcanic detritus to the grabens. Angular sand to boulder-size detritus of the Asunction Formation was derived locally, and includes basic to intermediate meta-igneous rock fragments, with epidote, actinolite, and chlorite, as well as serpentine. Abundant calcareous fossils are commonly unbroken, suggesting local sources for these as well. Angular to subrounded, sand to cobble-sized, intermediate to mafic volcanic rock fragments were derived from a more distant island arc to the east, which occasionally provided intermediate to felsic tuffs to the basin. This source is probably represented by the Aptian-Albian Alisitos Group, which forms much of the western wall of the Late Cretaceous Peninsular Range batholith.

  12. Hydrocarbon seep-carbonates of a Miocene forearc (East Coast Basin), North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Kathleen A.; Francis, David A.; Collins, Mike; Gregory, Murray R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Greinert, Jens; Aharon, Paul

    2008-02-01

    An ancient hydrocarbon seep province of 14 isolated, authigenic carbonate deposits has been identified in fine-grained, deep-marine siliciclastic strata of the Miocene East Coast Basin, North Island, New Zealand. These forearc sediments have been uplifted and complexly deformed into accretionary ridges, adjacent to the still-active Hikurangi convergent margin. Older active and passive margin strata (mid-Cretaceous to Oligocene in age) underlie the Neogene sequence, and contain oil- and gas-prone source rocks. Older Mesozoic meta-sedimentary rocks constitute the backstop against which the current phase of subduction-related sedimentation has accumulated (~ 24 Ma-present). The seep-carbonates (up to 10 m thick, 200 m across) archive methane signatures in their depleted carbon isotopes (to δ13C -51.7‰ PDB), and contain chemosynthesis-based paleocommunities (e.g. worm tubes, bathymodioline mussels, and vesicomyid, lucinid and thyasirid bivalves) typical of other Cenozoic and modern seeps. Northern and southern sites are geographically separated, and exhibit distinct lithological and faunal differences. Structural settings are variable. Seep-associated lithologies also are varied, and suggest carbonate development in sub-seafloor, seafloor and physically reworked (diapiric expansion, gas explosion, gravity slide or debris flow) settings, similar to Italian Apennine seep deposits of overlapping ages. Peculiar attributes of the New Zealand Miocene seep deposits are several, including digitate thrombolites of clotted microbial micrite encased in thick, isopachous horizons and botryoids of aragonite. Seep plumbing features are also well-exposed at some sites, displaying probable gas-explosion breccias filled with aragonite, tubular concretions (fluid conduits), and carbonate-cemented, thin sandstone beds and burrows within otherwise impermeable mudstones. A few seeps were large enough to develop talus-debris piles on their flanks, which were populated by lucinid bivalves

  13. Forearc Basin Structure in the Andaman-Nicobar Segment of the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction Zone: Insight from High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeremans, R. E.; Singh, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Andaman-Nicobar subduction is the northernmost segment of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone and marks the western boundary of the Andaman Sea, which is a complex backarc extensional basin. We present the interpretation of a new set of deep seismic reflection data acquired across the Andaman-Nicobar forearc basin, from 8°N to 11°N, to understand the structure and evolution of the forearc basin, focusing on how the obliquity of convergence affects deformation in the forearc, as well as on the Diligent (DF) and Eastern Margin Faults (EMF). Constraining the evolution of this basin, which is strongly related to the collision of India and Eurasia, can help shed light onto present-day deformation processes along this segment of the subduction zone, where convergence is highly oblique and little data is available. We find that he DF is a backthrust and corresponds to the Mentawai (MFZ) and West Andaman Fault (WAF) systems further south, offshore Sumatra. The DF is expressed as a series of mostly landward verging folds and faults, deforming the early to late Miocene sediments. The DF seems to root from the boundary between the accretionary complex and the continental backstop, where it meets the EMF. The EMF marks the western boundary of the forearc basin; it is associated with subsidence and is expressed as a deep piggyback basin, associated with recent Pliocene to Pleistocene subsidence at the western edge of the forearc basin. The eastern edge of the forearc basin is marked by the Invisible Bank (IB), which is thought to be tilted and uplifted continental crustal block. Subsidence along the EMF and uplift and tilting of the IB seem to be related to different opening phases in the Andaman Sea. The sliver Andaman-Nicobar Fault (ANF), which is the active northward extension of the Great Sumatra sliver Fault (GSF), lies to the east of the IB, and marks the boundary between continental crust underlying the forearc basin and crust accreted at the Andaman Sea Spreading

  14. Early Tertiary exhumation of the flank of a forearc basin, southwest Talkeetna Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleick, Heather A.; Till, Alison B.; Bradley, Dwight C.; O’Sullivan, Paul; Wooden, Joe L.; Bradley, Dan B.; Taylor, Theresa A.; Friedman, Sam B.; Hults, Chad P.

    2012-01-01

    New geochronologic and thermochronologic data from rocks near Hatcher Pass, southwest Talkeetna Mountains, Alaska, record earliest Paleocene erosional and structural exhumation on the flank of the active Cook Inlet forearc basin. Cretaceous plutons shed sediments to the south, forming the Paleocene Arkose Ridge Formation. A Paleocene(?)-Eocene detachment fault juxtaposed ~60 Ma metamorphic rocks with the base of the Arkose Ridge Formation. U-Pb (analyzed by Sensitive High Resolution Ion Micro Probe Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP-RG)) zircon ages of the Cretaceous plutons, more diverse than previously documented, are 90.3±0.3 (previously considered a Jurassic unit), 79.1±1.0, 76.1±0.9, 75.8±0.7, 72.5±0.4, 71.9±0.3, 70.5±0.2, and 67.3±0.2 Ma. The cooling of these plutons occurred between 72 and 66 Ma (zircon fission track (FT) closure ~225°C). 40Ar/39Ar analyses of hornblende, white mica, and biotite fall into this range (Harlan and others, 2003). New apatite FT data collected on a west-to-east transect reveal sequential exhumation of fault blocks at 62.8±2.9, 54±2.5, 52.6±2.8, and 44.4±2.2 Ma. Plutonic clasts accumulated in the Paleocene Arkose Ridge Formation to the south. Detrital zircon (DZ) ages from the formation reflect this provenance: a new sample yielded one grain at 61 Ma, a dominant peak at 76 Ma, and minor peaks at 70, 80, 88, and 92 Ma. The oldest zircon is 181 Ma. Our apatite FT ages range from 35.1 to 50.9 Ma. Greenschist facies rocks now sit structurally between the plutonic rocks and the Arkose Ridge Formation. They are separated from plutonic rocks by the vertical Hatcher Pass fault and from the sedimentary rocks by a detachment fault. Ar cooling ages (Harlan and others, 2003) and new zircon FT ages for these rocks are concordant at 61-57 Ma, synchronous with deposition of the Arkose Ridge Formation. A cooling age of ~46 Ma came from one apatite FT sample. The metamorphic protolith (previously considered Jurassic) was deposited at or after

  15. Cenozoic stratigraphic development in the north Chilean forearc: Implications for basin development and uplift history of the Central Andean margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Adrian J.; Evenstar, Laura

    2010-11-01

    Analysis of the Cenozoic stratigraphic development of the forearc of northern Chile between 18°S and 23°30'S, allows constraints to be placed on the timing and nature of basin formation and the uplift history of the Central Andes. Chronostratigraphic charts have been constructed from 20 lithostratigraphic sections distributed throughout the forearc. Sections were taken from the Longitudinal Valley, Central Depression, Calama Basin, Salar de Atacama, Precordillera and the western flank of the Western Cordillera. Correlation and timing of events is largely based on the presence of dated volcanic horizons in all the studied sections. Three chronostratigraphic units are defined based upon the presence of regional unconformities. Deposition of the Late Eocene to Early Miocene chronostratigraphic unit (38-19 Ma) commenced across an irregular unconformity surface between ˜ 38 and 30 Ma with alluvial fan and fluvial sediments derived from the east interbedded with rhyolitic ignimbrites. Aggradation after 25 Ma resulted in development of a large broad basin over much of northern Chile that expanded eastwards through onlap onto basement. Deposition terminated around 19 Ma with the development of an angular unconformity over much, but not all of the study area. During deposition of the Early to Late Miocene chronostratigraphic unit (18-10 Ma) emergent volcanic source areas to the east provided catchments for large fluvial systems that drained westwards into endorheic ephemeral lacustrine basins. Fold growth affected sedimentation restricting accommodation space to small intra-thrust basins in the Precordillera and localised disruption and unconformity development in the Longitudinal Valley. The Late Miocene to present day chronostratigraphic unit (10-0 Ma) followed the development of a regional angular unconformity at 10 Ma. Sedimentation was restricted to a series of thrust-bounded endorheic basins in both the Central Depression and the Precordillera sourced from the east

  16. Longitudinal Strain in the Forearc of a Rollback-Subduction System Forced to Change Length: Structural evolution of the Crotone Basin in NE Calabria, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, M. A.; Seeber, L.

    2009-12-01

    Calabria is a continental fragment incorporated into a forearc overriding the WNW directed subduction system. This system rolled back toward ESE across the central Mediterranean during the Neogene to form the Tyrrhenian Basin. Riding above the megathrust, forearcs seek a dynamic equilibrium between boundary stresses (drag below and lateral containments) with body stress (gravity acting on the shape of the forearc). Changes in boundary conditions are balanced by changes in the shape. The internal deformation history of the forearc, therefore, is expected to reflect changes in subduction tectonics during the evolution of the arc. We analyzed the structure of the Crotone Basin, located in northeastern Calabria, which is located in the exposed part of the forearc closest to the deformation front and to the Apennines. The main purpose was to compare the successive phases of deformation in the basin to the known evolution of the arc. We found four distinct events from the late Tortonian to the present. A widespread unconformity correlated with the onset of rollback marks a regional foundering with multidirectional normal growth faults. Following this pervasive and deeply rooted extension, the Crotone Basin experiences a period of parallel and distal sedimentation (Ponda clay). These sediments mark a relative long period (~5ma) of remarkable tectonic quiescence, even though subduction-rollback is moving the arc rapidly (3-5cm/yr) to the ESE. In addition, the forearc is shortening by progressive collision with Apulia (the Apennines) and Africa (the Maghrebides) during this time, but our study area is still far from the oblique collisions occurring at the ends of the forearc. The Messinian Salinity Crisis (5.3-6Ma) causes major instabilities in the accretion by loading it with evaporite deposits first and then removing the water load. Landward (westward) thrusting of the accretionary complex correlates with the Messinian in the Crotone basin and elsewhere along eastern

  17. Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. )

    1996-01-01

    Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R[sub o] ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally [open quotes]cool[close quotes] basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally [open quotes]cool[close quotes] basin.

  18. Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R{sub o} ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin.

  19. Field and experimental evidence for coseismic ruptures along shallow creeping faults in forearc sediments of the Crotone Basin, South Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, Fabrizio; Aldega, Luca; De Paola, Nicola; Faoro, Igor; Storti, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    Large seismic slip occurring along shallow creeping faults in tectonically active areas represents an unsolved paradox, which is largely due to our poor understanding of the mechanics governing creeping faults, and to the lack of documented geological evidence showing how coseismic rupturing overprints creep in near-surface conditions. In this contribution we integrate field, petrophysical, mineralogical and friction data to characterize the signature of coseismic ruptures propagating along shallow creeping faults affecting unconsolidated forearc sediments of the seismically active Crotone Basin, in South Italy. Field observations of fault zones show widespread foliated cataclasites in fault cores, locally overprinted by sharp slip surfaces decorated by thin (0.5-1.5 cm) black gouge layers. Compared to foliated cataclasites, black gouges have much lower grain size, porosity and permeability, which may have facilitated slip weakening by thermal fluid pressurization. Moreover, black gouges are characterized by distinct mineralogical assemblages compatible with high temperatures (180-200°C) due to frictional heating during seismic slip. Foliated cataclasites and black gouges were also produced by laboratory friction experiments performed on host sediments at sub-seismic (≤ 0.1 m/s) and seismic (1 m/s) slip rates, respectively. Black gouges display low friction coefficients (0.3) and velocity-weakening behaviours, as opposed to high friction coefficients (0.65) and velocity-strengthening behaviours shown by the foliated cataclasites. Our results show that narrow black gouges developed within foliated cataclasites represent a potential diagnostic marker for episodic seismic activity in shallow creeping faults. These findings can help understanding the time-space partitioning between aseismic and seismic slip of faults at shallow crustal levels, impacting on seismic hazard evaluation of subduction zones and forearc regions affected by destructive earthquakes and

  20. Forearc Basin Location Originating From Tectonic Inversion Along an old Ophiolite Suture : the Gulf of Guayaquil-Tumbes Basin (Ecuador-Peru Border)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgois, J.; Witt, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Gulf of Guayaquil-Tumbes basin (GGTB) located along the Andean forearc (Ecuador-Peru border) developed in the tectonic wake of the coastwise, northward migrating North Andean block (NAB). The Industrial multichannel seismic and well data (Witt and Bourgois, in press) document that E-W trending low- angle (10-20°) detachment normal faults accommodated the main basin subsidence steps during the Late Pliocene-Quaternary times (1.8-1.6 Ma to Present). It includes the Posorja Jambeli and the northward dipping Tumbes Zorritos detachment systems (PJDS and TZDS) located respectively along the northern and southern edge of the basin. A major transfer system, the N-S trending Inner Domito Banco Peru fault system bounds the detachment systems to the West. The right lateral transcontinental strike-slip system of the Dolores Guayaquil Megashear bounds the basin to the East. Since the PJDS and TZDS extend 80 to 120 km at seafloor they must penetrate the brittle continental crust, far below the 6-8 km thick sediment accumulation at basin depocenters. We assume that detachments extend deep into the 8-10 km thick brittle crust down to the Nazca-South America plate interface at less than ~20 km beneath sea bottom at site. The active TZDS, which connects landward with the continental structures assumed to be part of the eastern frontier of the NAB is the master detachment fault system controlling the basin evolution through time. Gravimetric and geologic data show that depocenters are located along the 80-60 Ma obduction bounding at depth the Cretaceous ophiolite of northern Andes from the westward underthrusted South America continental basement (Bourgois et al., 1987). Because inference suggests the obduction megathrust to branch upward to the TZDS, we hypothesized that tectonic inversion occurred along the ophiolite suture during the GGTB evolution, at least for the past 1.8-1.6 Myr. The 80-60 Ma ophiolite suture is an old zone of weakness, which reactivation from the NAB

  1. Utility of aeromagnetic studies for mapping of potentially active faults in two forearc basins: Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Blakely, R.J.; Haeussler, P.J.; Wells, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys over forearc basins can detect faults and folds in weakly magnetized sediments, thus providing geologic constraints on tectonic evolution and improved understanding of seismic hazards in convergent-margin settings. Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska, provide two case histories. In each lowland region, shallow-source magnetic anomalies are related to active folds and/or faults. Mapping these structures is critical for understanding seismic hazards that face the urban regions of Seattle, Washington, and Anchorage, Alaska. Similarities in aeromagnetic anomaly patterns and magnetic stratigraphy between the two regions suggest that we can expect the aeromagnetic method to yield useful structural information that may contribute to earth-hazard and energy resource investigations in other forearc basins.

  2. Sedimentologic evolution of a submarine canyon in a forearc basin, Upper Cretaceous Rosario Formation, San Carlos, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.R.; Busby-Spera, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The walls, floor, and fill of a submarine canyon are well-exposed near San Carlos, Mexico, in forecarc strata of the Upper Cretaceous Rosario Formation. The submarine canyon is about 7 km wide and at least 230 m deep and has eroded a minimum of 150 m into underlying fluvial red beds. It is unclear whether subaerial or submarine processes initiated the canyon cutting; however, marine processes, especially debris flows, modified the morphology of the submarine canyon. The submarine canyon fill and overlying slope deposits form two major fining-upward sequences. The first includes a 120 m thick lower conglomerate-sandstone unit (LCSU) at the base of the canyon fill overlain by a 50-110 m thick middle mudstone-sandstone unit (MMSU). The MMSU consists predominantly of mudstone and thin-bedded sandstone, but includes a channel filled with sandstone beds that form a fining- and thinning-upward sequence. This sequence is overlain by the second major sequence, a 0-60 m thick upper conglomerate-sandstone unit (UCSU), which is confined to three channels within the submarine canyon and passes gradationally upward into slope mudstone. Each of the two major fining-upward sequences records a gradual decrease in supply of coarse-grained sediment to the submarine canyon head. The first fining-upward sequence may correspond to a lowstand and subsequent rise in global sea level or, alternatively, may have resulted from local downdropping of the basin. The second fining-upward sequence does not correspond to global sea level fluctuations but is age-correlative with a drop then rise in relative sea level recognized by other workers 300-400 km to the north in the San Diego-Ensenada area. This sea level drop is inferred to have been a regional-scale tectonic event that affect the forearc basin along its length. 18 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Conglomerate facies and processes in shallow to deep-marine Cretaceous forearc basins of Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.; Smith, D.P.; Busby-Spera, C.J.

    1989-04-01

    Detailed studies of slope apron, fan-delta, submarine canyon, and submarine fan deposits from noncontemporaneous Cretaceous forearc subbasins in Baja California provide key criteria for recognizing ancient shallow-marine to deep-marine conglomerate depositional environments.

  4. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane at a Marine Methane Seep in a Forearc Sediment Basin off Sumatra, Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Michael; Krüger, Martin; Teichert, Barbara; Wiedicke, Michael; Schippers, Axel

    2011-01-01

    A cold methane seep was discovered in a forearc sediment basin off the island Sumatra, exhibiting a methane-seep adapted microbial community. A defined seep center of activity, like in mud volcanoes, was not discovered. The seep area was rather characterized by a patchy distribution of active spots. The relevance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) was reflected by 13C-depleted isotopic signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon. The anaerobic conversion of methane to CO2 was confirmed in a 13C-labeling experiment. Methane fueled a vital microbial community with cell numbers of up to 4 × 109 cells cm−3 sediment. The microbial community was analyzed by total cell counting, catalyzed reporter deposition–fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD–FISH), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). CARD–FISH cell counts and qPCR measurements showed the presence of Bacteria and Archaea, but only small numbers of Eukarya. The archaeal community comprised largely members of ANME-1 and ANME-2. Furthermore, members of the Crenarchaeota were frequently detected in the DGGE analysis. Three major bacterial phylogenetic groups (δ-Proteobacteria, candidate division OP9, and Anaerolineaceae) were abundant across the study area. Several of these sequences were closely related to the genus Desulfococcus of the family Desulfobacteraceae, which is in good agreement with previously described AOM sites. In conclusion, the majority of the microbial community at the seep consisted of AOM-related microorganisms, while the relevance of higher hydrocarbons as microbial substrates was negligible. PMID:22207865

  5. Paleomagnetic and geochronological study of Carboniferous forearc basin rocks in the Southern New England Orogen (Eastern Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarevsky, Sergei A.; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Shaanan, Uri; Hoy, Derek; Speranza, Fabio; Mochales, Tania

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a paleomagnetic study from Carboniferous forearc basin rocks that occur at both limbs of the Texas Orocline (New England Orogen, eastern Australia). Using thermal and alternating field demagnetizations, two remanence components have been isolated from rocks sampled from the Emu Creek terrane, in the eastern limb of the orocline. A middle-temperature Component M is post-folding and was likely acquired during low-temperature oxidation at 65-35 Ma. A high-temperature Component H is pre-folding, but its comparison with the paleomagnetic data from coeval rocks in the northern Tamworth terrane on the other limb of Texas Orocline does not indicate rotations around a vertical axis, as expected from geological data. A likely explanation for this apparent discrepancy is that Component H postdates the oroclinal bending, but predates folding in late stages of the 265-230 Ma Hunter Bowen Orogeny. The post-Kiaman age of Component H is supported by the presence of an alternating paleomagnetic polarity in the studied rocks. A paleomagnetic study of volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks in the Boomi Creek area (northern Tamworth terrane) revealed a stable high-temperature pre-folding characteristic remanence, which is dated to c. 318 Ma using U-Pb zircon geochronology. The new paleopole (37.8°S, 182.7°E, A95 = 16.2°) is consistent with previously published poles from coeval rocks from the northern Tamworth terrane. The combination of our new paleomagnetic and geochronological data with previously published results allows us to develop a revised kinematic model of the New England Orogen from 340 Ma to 270 Ma, which compared to the previous model, incorporates a different orientation of the northern Tamworth terrane at 340 Ma.

  6. 3D seismic geomorphology and geologic controls on gas hydrate accumulation mechanism in the Miyazaki-oki forearc basin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Fujii, T.

    2015-12-01

    The stratigraphy of the Miyazaki-oki forearc basin along the Southwest Japan Arc comprises the early Miocene to early Pleistocene Miyazaki Group and the Hyuganada Group. These groups comprise sediments (up to 5000 m) deposited in deep marine to shallow marine environments. Based on characteristics of well data outside seismic exploration area and stratigraphy of land areas, the Miyazaki Group was divided into four seismic units and the Hyuganada Group was divided into two seismic units. In this area, bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) have been widely observed and considered as representing lower boundaries of methane-hydrate-bearing deposits. However, the gas hydrate accumulation mechanism for this area is not yet well understood. We show the relation between sandy sediment distribution identified from the 3D seismic geomorphological analysis and methane hydrate occurrence to identify the accumulation mechanism. A submarine fan system was subdivided into four seismic facies: Submarine canyon complexes; Leveed channel complexes; Submarine fan complexes; Mass transport complexes (MTD). Depositional systems of target layers are characterized by a transition from submarine fan deposits (Miyazaki Group) to channel-levee deposits and MTD (Hyuganada Group). This transition of depositional environments is strongly influenced by global tectonics since early Miocene in the Southwest Japan Arc. A part of channel-fill located around structural wing and middle fan deposits above the BSR is inferred as sediments intercalated with sandy layers. We consider that these deposits contain methane hydrate because the sandy sediment distribution approximately coincides with a high-velocity zone as an indicator of gas hydrate. The comparison of the areal extent of the seismic facies and the mapped structural configuration, suggest that the gas hydrate accumulation represent combination structural-stratigraphic trap.

  7. Quantification of Free Gas in the Kumano Forearc Basin detected from Borehole Physical Properties: IODP NanTroSEIZE drilling Site C0009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, M.; Conin, M.; Henry, P.; Wiersberg, T.; Scientific Team Of Iodp Drilling Leg 319, .

    2010-12-01

    Free gas is easily detected from seismic reflection data. However its quantification is a difficult task in soft sedimentary basins, as S-waves velocities are difficult to extract from sonic data. We used high quality borehole sonic data from IODP NantroSEIZE Site C0009, not only to quantify free gas distribution, but also to discriminate the effects of clay porosity and mineralogy. The Kumano forearc basin, formed by the subduction of the Philippine Sea plate below the Eurasian plate, overlays the Nankai accretionary prism, offshore the Kii peninsula, SW Honshu, Japan. Seismic surveys and boreholes within the framework of the NanTroSEIZE project (Nankai Trough SEIsmogenic Zone Experiment) show evidence of gas hydrates and free gas within the basin. Among the multiple breakthroughs performed while drilliong the IODP Site C0009 with riser technology, is the use of the Schlumberger's SonicScanner sonic too. It provides high quality borehole sonic data, giving even S-wave velocities for poorly consolidated clayish sediments. We use the Brie theory to quantify the gas content. The sonic parameters used in this model are calibrated from laboratory measurements on drill cores. First, we show that sonic data are mainly sensitive to the fluid phase filling the intergranular pores (effective porosity), rather than to the total porosity, which includes water bound to clay minerals. The effective porosity is then compared to lithodensity-derived porosity that constitutes a proxy for total porosity. The combination of the two datasets also provides information to assess the clay mineralogy of the sediments. Second, free gas saturation has been computed. A gas-rich interval lies within a lithological unit characterized by a high abundance of wood fragments and lignite. This unit, at the base of the forearc basin, is a source of gas that should be taken into account in models explaining the gas distribution and the formation of the Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) within the

  8. Fluid flow, gas accumulations, and gas hydrate formation in Kumano forearc basin determined by seismic reflection interpretation and well data correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jessica L.

    A marine three dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data set reveals a gas hydrate related bottom simulating reflector (BSR) within Kumano forearc basin, offshore Japan. Well data collected from Site C0002 within the surveyed area provides information on the physical and chemical properties of basin sediments and allows for correlation with the dipping sedimentary layers imaged in the dataset. Calculation of gas saturations in these horizons based on Archie's Law shows preferential concentrations within sandier horizons. Structural controls such as faults and channels affect the gas distribution and illuminate migration pathways for gas to the BSR. Correlation of the strength of the BSR amplitude with the physical and chemical properties of the dipping stratigraphic horizons that are intersected by the BSR, determined by well log and core data, reveals the applicability of BSR amplitude maps in determining locations of elevated gas hydrate and free gas concentrations away from the wellbore.

  9. Sedimentary fills of Izu-Bonin fore-arc and back-arc rift basins south of Japan, ODP Leg 126

    SciTech Connect

    Rodolfo, K.S. ); Colella, A. ); Hiscott, R.N. ); Janecek, T.; Firth, J. ); Marsaglia, K. ); Nishimura, A. ); Tazaki, K. ); Gill, J.B. ); Kaiho, K. ); Fujioka, K. ); Taylor, B. )

    1990-05-01

    From April to June 1989, Leg 126 of the Ocean Drilling Program successfully drilled the Izu-Bonin intraoceanic arc: Sites 787, 792, and 793 in the eastern, western, and central portions of a 40-70-km-wide fore-arc basin; Sites 790 and 791 on the 2-km-deep floor of the Sumizu back-arc rift; and Site 788 on the eastern rift footwall. Basaltic andesite and andesite basement of the fore-arc basin, initially 4-5 km deep, was produced by rifting or spreading that started 31-34 Ma (middle Oligocene) and has since been uplifted 1-2 km. Volcanism and erosion of surrounding highs provided debris flows and turbidites that began to fill the basin 250-300 m/m.y. Sharply declining volcanism and epiclastic supply are recorded in slowly accumulated Oligocene-Miocene (24-13 Ma) hemipelagic sediments. Regional explosive volcanism, renewed after 13 Ma, has left more than 200 thin ash layers in the uppermost (late Pliocene-Holocene) sediments. Total basin fill is 1.5-4 km thick. The Sumisu began to form 3.56-1.1 Ma. Prerift and present-day volcanism has been dominated by rhyolitic pumice eruptions. The eastern rift footwall, now 1.1 km below sea level, has been uplifted 0.2-1.7 km. Basaltic and arc-pyroclastic rift basement was 2 km deep prior to 1.1 Ma. From 1.1 to 0.235 Ma, 100-400 m of predominantly hemipelagic sediment were deposited, although intrarift basaltic eruptions and rhyolitic eruptions were fairly common. Explosive arc volcanism increased dramatically 250 Ka, leaving 165-428 m of fine to coarse pumiceous sediments in layers that are each 30-50 m thick at Site 790.

  10. Long term (since the late palaeogene) tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Lesser Antilles fore-arc at Marie-Galante Basin: a clue for geodynamical behavior at the subduction interfac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Frederic, L.; DeMin, L.; Garrigou, J.; Münch, P.; Léticée, J. L.; Cornée, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Oblique subduction of late cretaceous lithosphere of the Atlantic ocean beneath the thick (25km) crust of the Caribbean plate results in widespread deformation and vertical motions in the Lesser Antilles fore-arc. The present-day deformation includes a major transtensive left lateral fault system along the arc and several forearc transverse basins accommodating lengthening of the fore-arc northward. These deformations result from plate motion partitioning under increasing subduction obliquity from the Marie-Galante Basin (MGB) latitude (central Lesser Antilles) northward. Vertical motions in the fore-arc at a regional scale were interpreted as resulting from the effect of subducting ridges and reliefs. The present day uplift of the fore-arc islands acting since the late(?) Pleistocene is believed to attest for long wavelength bending of the plate under strongly coupled plate interface. Recent GPS data suggests a mostly uncoupled plate interface. To decipher between the models and to understand the long-term evolution of the Lesser Antilles forearc since the Late Palaeogene, we interpret high-resolution bathymetric and seismic data from the MGB, together with the onland geology of shallow water carbonate platforms. The tectonic pattern reveals both inherited and late Neogene structures (re)activated under multidirectional extensive tectonic. The sismo-stratigraphic interpretation of sedimentary deposit displays long-term drowning and flexing of the upper plate similar to that occurring under intensive tectonic erosion at the subduction interface. Several short term period of second order uplift can correlate with sweeping of subducting ridges or transient events at the plate interface. The evolution of the Lesser Antilles fore-arc since the Late Palaeogene is interpreted within the regional geodynamical evolution of the plate boundary following its last major reorganization: collision of the Bahamas Bank and inception of the Greater Antilles strike-slip fault zone.

  11. Does the Great Valley Group contain Jurassic strata? Reevaluation of the age and early evolution of a classic forearc basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Surpless, K.D.; Graham, S.A.; Covault, J.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of Cretaceous detrital zircon in Upper Jurassic strata of the Great Valley Group may require revision of the lower Great Valley Group chronostratigraphy, with significant implications for the Late Jurassic-Cretaceous evolution of the continental margin. Samples (n = 7) collected from 100 km along strike in the purported Tithonian strata of the Great Valley Group contain 20 Cretaceous detrital zircon grains, based on sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe age determinations. These results suggest that Great Valley Group deposition was largely Cretaceous, creating a discrepancy between biostratigraphy based on Buchia zones and chronostratigraphy based on radiometric age dates. These results extend the duration of the Great Valley Group basal unconformity, providing temporal separation between Great Valley forearc deposition and creation of the Coast Range Ophiolite. If Great Valley forearc deposition began in Cretaceous time, then sediment by passed the developing forearc in the Late Jurassic, or the Franciscan subduction system did not fully develop until Cretaceous time. In addition to these constraints on the timing of deposition, pre-Mesozoic detrital zircon age signatures indicate that the Great Valley Group was linked to North America from its inception. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  12. Why the sacramento delta area differs from other parts of the great valley: numerical modeling of thermal structure and thermal subsidence of forearc basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikhailov, V.O.; Parsons, T.; Simpson, R.W.; Timoshkina, E.P.; Williams, C.

    2007-01-01

    Data on present-day heat flow, subsidence history, and paleotemperature for the Sacramento Delta region, California, have been employed to constrain a numerical model of tectonic subsidence and thermal evolution of forearc basins. The model assumes an oceanic basement with an initial thermal profile dependent on its age subjected to refrigeration caused by a subducting slab. Subsidence in the Sacramento Delta region appears to be close to that expected for a forearc basin underlain by normal oceanic lithosphere of age 150 Ma, demonstrating that effects from both the initial thermal profile and the subduction process are necessary and sufficient. Subsidence at the eastern and northern borders of the Sacramento Valley is considerably less, approximating subsidence expected from the dynamics of the subduction zone alone. These results, together with other geophysical data, show that Sacramento Delta lithosphere, being thinner and having undergone deeper subsidence, must differ from lithosphere of the transitional type under other parts of the Sacramento Valley. Thermal modeling allows evaluation of the rheological properties of the lithosphere. Strength diagrams based on our thermal model show that, even under relatively slow deformation (10−17 s−1), the upper part of the delta crystalline crust (down to 20–22 km) can fail in brittle fashion, which is in agreement with deeper earthquake occurrence. Hypocentral depths of earthquakes under the Sacramento Delta region extend to nearly 20 km, whereas, in the Coast Ranges to the west, depths are typically less than 12–15 km. The greater width of the seismogenic zone in this area raises the possibility that, for fault segments of comparable length, earthquakes of somewhat greater magnitude might occur than in the Coast Ranges to the west.

  13. Part I: Neoacadian to Alleghanian foreland basin development and provenance in the central appalachian orogen, pine mountain thrust sheet Part II: Structural configuration of a modified Mesozoic to Cenozoic forearc basin system, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter Benjamin

    Foreland and forearc basins are large sediment repositories that form in response to tectonic loading and lithospheric flexure during orogenesis along convergent plate boundaries. In addition to their numerous valuable natural resources, these systems preserve important geologic information regarding the timing and intensity of deformation, uplift and erosion history, and subsidence history along collisional margins, and, in ancient systems, may provide more macroscopic information regarding climate, plate motion, and eustatic sea level fluctuations. This thesis presents two studies focused in the Paleozoic Appalachian foreland basin system along the eastern United States and in the Mesozoic to Cenozoic Matanuska forearc basin system in south-central Alaska. Strata of the Appalachian foreland basin system preserve the dynamic history of orogenesis and sediment dispersal along the east Laurentian margin, recording multiple episodes of deformation and basin development during Paleozoic time. A well-exposed, >600 m thick measured stratigraphic section of the Pine Mountain thrust sheet at Pound Gap, Kentucky affords one of the most complete exposures of Upper Devonian through Middle Pennsylvanian strata in the basin. These strata provide a window into which the foreland basin's development during two major collisional events known as the Acadian-Neoacadian and the Alleghanian orogenies can be observed. Lithofacies analysis of four major sedimentary successions observed in hanging wall strata record the upward transition from (1) a submarine deltaic fan complex developed on a distal to proximal prodelta in Late Devonian to Middle Mississippian time, to (2) a Middle to Late Mississippian carbonate bank system developed on a slowly subsiding, distal foreland ramp, which was drowned by (3) Late Mississippian renewed clastic influx to a tidally influenced, coastal deltaic complex to fluvial delta plain system unconformably overlain by (4) a fluvial braided river complex

  14. Out-of-sequence thrusting in experimental Coulomb wedges: Implications for the structural development of mega-splay faults and forearc basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Saad S. B.

    2012-10-01

    We have investigated how an arc-ward increase in bulk mechanical strength in an experimental accretionary prism influences the development, timing, and duration of slip on out-of-sequence thrusts. We have monitored the structural development and kinematics, in side-view, during the development of a frontally accreting Coulomb wedge growing out in front of a critically tapered and mechanically stronger inner wedge. The inner-wedge initially behaved as classic backstop to deformation with the most actively slipping thrust occurring near the deformation front on the forward most thrust structures. With continued growth, however, significant out-of-sequence slip on reactivated fore-thrusts occurred in conjunction with slip on newly formed back-thrusts in the inner-wedge. This out-of-sequence deformation resulted in punctuated, rapid uplift of the model forearc basin and a noticeable break in topographic slope in the outer pro-wedge. Cyclical out-of-sequence fore- and back-thrusting, driven by ongoing frontal thrust imbrication, continued with periodic recovery of taper and was followed by additional out-of-sequence faulting and associated basin uplift.

  15. Out-Of-Sequence Thrusting In Coulomb Wedges: Implications For The Structural Development Of Mega-Splay Faults And Forearc Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    By quantifying deformation in frictional analog models we have investigated how an arc-ward increase in bulk mechanical strength in an accretionary prism influences the development, timing, and duration of slip on out-of-sequence thrusts. We have monitored the structural development and kinematics, in side-view, during the development of a frontally accreting Coulomb wedge growing out in front of a critically tapered and mechanically stronger inner wedge. The inner-wedge initially behaved as classic backstop to deformation with the most actively slipping thrust occurring near the deformation front on the forward most thrust structures. With continued growth, however, significant out-of-sequence slip on reactivated fore-thrusts occurred in conjunction with slip on newly formed back-thrusts in the inner-wedge. This out-of-sequence deformation resulted in punctuated, rapid uplift of the model forearc basin and a noticeable break in topographic slope in the outer pro-wedge. Cyclical out-of-sequence fore- and back-thrusting, driven by ongoing frontal thrust imbrication, continued with periodic recovery of taper and was followed by additional out-of-sequence faulting and associated basin uplift.

  16. Composition and spatial evolution of mantle and fluids released beneath the active Southeast Mariana Forearc Rift: do they have arc or backarc basin signatures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. M.; Stern, R. J.; Kelley, K. A.; Ishizuka, O.; Anthony, E. Y.; Ren, M.; Manton, W. I.; Ohara, Y.; Reagan, M. K.; Bloomer, S. H.

    2010-12-01

    Fluids of progressively changing composition are released from the subducting slab. Whereas the composition and effects of deep fluids are understood from studying arcs and backarc basin (BAB) lavas, those released at shallower depths beneath forearcs are less well known. Forearc rifts give us a unique opportunity to study the composition of ultra-shallow subduction-related fluids. At the southern end of the Mariana arc, the S.E. Mariana Forearc Rift (SEMFR), was discovered by HMR-1 sonar swath mapping (Martinez et al. 2000, JGR), and investigated in July 2008 by the manned submersible Shinkai 6500. The rift extends from the trench to the BAB spreading axis, where a magma chamber was recently documented (Becker et al., 2010, G-cubed). SEMFR is opening due to continued widening of the Mariana Trough BAB. Two suites of tholeiitic pillow lavas were recovered from the N.E. flank of the rift (dive 1096; slab depth ~ 30 ± 5 km), indicating recent magmatic activity. Dive 1096 lavas consist of upper primitive basalts (Mg# ≥ 60) and lower fractionated, basaltic andesites (Mg# < 60), separated by a thin sediment layer. Geochemical and isotopic studies show that these lavas were produced by extensive hydrous melting (≥ 15%) of a common depleted MORB-like mantle (Nb/Yb ~ 1, ɛNd ~ 9.3), likely S. Mariana BAB mantle, that interacted with < 3% metasomatic fluids. Thermobarometry constraints (Lee et al., 2009, EPSL) suggest that the primary melts equilibrated with the mantle at ~ 28 km, just above the slab, with a mean temperature ~1230°C. The fluid was enriched in fluid-mobile elements (Rb, Ba, K, U, Sr, Pb, Cs), mobilized from the ultra-shallow slab at low temperature, as well as melt-mobile elements (e.g. Th, LREE), released deeper and hotter. These fluids contribute 100% Cs, 97% Rb, 99% Ba, 69% Th, 74% U, 80% K, 83% Pb, 71% Sr, 45% La, 33% Ce, 20% Nd and 11% Sm to the magma. SEMFR lavas acquired BAB-like deep subduction component as well as arc-like ultra

  17. Part I: Neoacadian to Alleghanian foreland basin development and provenance in the central appalachian orogen, pine mountain thrust sheet Part II: Structural configuration of a modified Mesozoic to Cenozoic forearc basin system, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter Benjamin

    Foreland and forearc basins are large sediment repositories that form in response to tectonic loading and lithospheric flexure during orogenesis along convergent plate boundaries. In addition to their numerous valuable natural resources, these systems preserve important geologic information regarding the timing and intensity of deformation, uplift and erosion history, and subsidence history along collisional margins, and, in ancient systems, may provide more macroscopic information regarding climate, plate motion, and eustatic sea level fluctuations. This thesis presents two studies focused in the Paleozoic Appalachian foreland basin system along the eastern United States and in the Mesozoic to Cenozoic Matanuska forearc basin system in south-central Alaska. Strata of the Appalachian foreland basin system preserve the dynamic history of orogenesis and sediment dispersal along the east Laurentian margin, recording multiple episodes of deformation and basin development during Paleozoic time. A well-exposed, >600 m thick measured stratigraphic section of the Pine Mountain thrust sheet at Pound Gap, Kentucky affords one of the most complete exposures of Upper Devonian through Middle Pennsylvanian strata in the basin. These strata provide a window into which the foreland basin's development during two major collisional events known as the Acadian-Neoacadian and the Alleghanian orogenies can be observed. Lithofacies analysis of four major sedimentary successions observed in hanging wall strata record the upward transition from (1) a submarine deltaic fan complex developed on a distal to proximal prodelta in Late Devonian to Middle Mississippian time, to (2) a Middle to Late Mississippian carbonate bank system developed on a slowly subsiding, distal foreland ramp, which was drowned by (3) Late Mississippian renewed clastic influx to a tidally influenced, coastal deltaic complex to fluvial delta plain system unconformably overlain by (4) a fluvial braided river complex

  18. In situ gas concentrations in the Kumano forearc basin from drilling mud gas monitoring and sonic velocity data (IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 Site C0009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, T.; Doan, M.-L.; Schleicher, A. M.; Horiguchi, K.; Eguchi, N.; Erzinger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Conventional IODP shipboard methods of gas investigations comprise gas sampling from core voids and headspace gas sampling followed by shipboard gas analysis. These methods possibly underestimate the in situ gas concentration due to core degassing during retrieval and handling on deck. In few cases, a Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) was used in the past to overcome this problem, providing gas concentrations one or two order of magnitude higher than headspace gas analysis from corresponding depths. Here, we describe two new techniques applied during IODP NanTroSEIZE Exp. 319 Site C0009 riser drilling in the Kumano forearc basin to estimate in situ gas concentrations without drill core recovery. During riser drilling of site C0009 between 703 to 1594 mbsf, gas was continuously extracted from returing drilling mud and analysed in real-time (drill mud gas monitoring). This method results in information on the gas composition and gas concentration at depth. The chemical (C1-C3) and isotope (δ13C, H/D) composition of hydrocarbons, the only formation-derived gases identified in drill mud, demonstrate a microbial hydrocarbon gas source mixing with small but increasing amounts of thermogenic gas at greater depth. Methane content in drilling mud semi-quantitatively correlates with visible allochtonous material (wood, lignite) in drilling cuttings. In situ gas concentration determination from drill mud gas monitoring based on the assumption that gas is either liberated from the rock into the drilling mud during drilling and ascent with the mud column or remains in the pore space of the drilling cuttings. Drilling mud gas data were calibrated with a defined amount of C2H2 (175 l [STP]) from a carbide test and result in methane concentrations reaching up to 24 lgas/lsediment, in good agreement with findings from other IODP Legs using the PCS. Hydrocarbon gas concentrations in drilling cuttings from C0009 are significantly lower, indicating cuttings outgassing during ascent of the

  19. Pre-and post-Missoula flood geomorphology of the Pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley in the Portland forearc basin, Oregon and Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Curt D.; Minor, Rick; Peterson, Gary L.; Gates, Edward B.

    2011-06-01

    Geomorphic landscape development in the pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley (1-5 km width) in the Portland forearc basin (~ 50 km length) is established from depositional sequences, which pre-date and post-date the glacial Lake Missoula floods. The sequences are observed from selected borehole logs (150 in number) and intact terrace soil profiles (56 in number) in backhoe trenches. Four sequences are widespread, including (1) a vertically aggraded Pleistocene alluvial plain, (2) a steep sided valley that is incised (125-150 m) into the Pleistocene gravel plain, (3) Missoula flood terraces (19-13 ka) abandoned on the sides of the ancestral valley, and (4) Holocene flooding surfaces (11-8 ka) buried at 70-30 m depth in the axial Columbia River Valley. Weathering rims and cementation are used for relative dating of incised Pleistocene gravel units. Soil development on the abandoned Missoula flood terraces is directly related to terrace deposit lithology, including thin Bw horizons in gravel, irregular podzols in sand, and multiple Bw horizons in thicker loess-capping layers. Radiocarbon dating of sand and mud alluvium in the submerged axial valley ties Holocene flooding surfaces to a local sea level curve and establishes Holocene sedimentation rates of 1.5 cm year- 1 during 11-9 ka and 0.3 cm year- 1 during 9-0 ka. The sequences of Pleistocene gravel aggradation, river valley incision, cataclysmic Missoula flooding, and Holocene submergence yield complex geomorphic landscapes in the ancestral lower Columbia River Valley.

  20. Gas in Place Resource Assessment for Concentrated Hydrate Deposits in the Kumano Forearc Basin, Offshore Japan, from NanTroSEIZE and 3D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taladay, K.; Boston, B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are crystalline inclusion compounds that form within the pore spaces of marine sediments along continental margins worldwide. It has been proposed that these NGH deposits are the largest dynamic reservoir of organic carbon on this planet, yet global estimates for the amount of gas in place (GIP) range across several orders of magnitude. Thus there is a tremendous need for climate scientists and countries seeking energy security to better constrain the amount of GIP locked up in NGHs through the development of rigorous exploration strategies and standardized reservoir characterization methods. This research utilizes NanTroSEIZE drilling data from International Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Sites C0002 and C0009 to constrain 3D seismic interpretations of the gas hydrate petroleum system in the Kumano Forearc Basin. We investigate the gas source, fluid migration mechanisms and pathways, and the 3D distribution of prospective HCZs. There is empirical and interpretive evidence that deeply sourced fluids charge concentrated NGH deposits just above the base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS) appearing in the seismic data as continuous bottoms simulating reflections (BSRs). These HCZs cover an area of 11 by 18 km, range in thickness between 10 - 80 m with an average thickness of 40 m, and are analogous to the confirmed HCZs at Daini Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough where the first offshore NGH production trial was conducted in 2013. For consistency, we calculated a volumetric GIP estimate using the same method employed by Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) to estimate GIP in the eastern Nankai Trough. Double BSRs are also common throughout the basin, and BGHS modeling along with drilling indicators for gas hydrates beneath the primary BSRs provides compelling evidence that the double BSRs reflect a BGHS for structure-II methane-ethane hydrates beneath a structure-I methane hydrate phase boundary. Additional drilling

  1. A structurally controlled fan-delta complex at the southern margin of the peninsular range forearc basin complex (Baja California)

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.R.; Busby-Spera, C. )

    1990-05-01

    A confined trunk fan delta and its structurally controlled tributary fan deltas are extremely well exposed along the southern margin of the Rosario embayment. This fan-delta complex consists of nonmarine to deep marine deposits almost continuously exposed for over 20 km in the down-paleoslope direction. Facies and stratal patterns in the fan-delta complex were controlled by local faulting, climatic variation, and eustasy, resulting in relative sea level fluctuations. Basin bathymetry and drainage patterns were controlled by a series of half-grabens that formed along north-south-trending faults that lay along the northern margin of an east-west-trending depression. Breccias were initially shed into the north-south-trending half-grabens; axial drainage systems were later established within the grabens, making up the tributary fan deltas. These tributary fan deltas fed a voluminous trunk fan delta confined to the east-west-trending depression. The trunk and tributary fan delta deposits show two major progradational to retrogradational cycles that record relative sea level fluctuations. Progradation in the shallow-marine environment is represented by conglomerate channels cut into ripple-laminated or bioturbated siltstone and HCS sandstones, overlain by conglomerate mouth bar deposits interstratified with nearshore sandstone deposits. Retrogradation in the shallow marine environment is recorded by either a vertical clastic facies transition or a clastic-carbonate facies transition. The clastic facies transition consists of nearshore sandstone deposits overlain by offshore bioturbated siltstones. The clastic-carbonate facies transition consists of the development of red algal patch reefs and rhodoliths on top of fan-delta conglomeratic lobes, mudstone and sandstone bank channel margins, or paleobasement highs. The clastic-carbonate facies transition reflects low sediment supply controlled by climatic conditions.

  2. Fore-arc mantle peridotites and back-arc basin basalts from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction factory (ODP LEGs 125 and 195): a modern analogue for Mediterranean ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, A.; D'Antonio, M.; Vannucci, R.; Raffone, N.; Spadea, P.

    2009-04-01

    occurring in all IBM forearc peridotites (e.g. crystallisation of late cpx, embayment of opx porphyroclasts), and likely marks the accretion of the mantle sequence to the thermal boundary layer. It was accompanied by the devolopment of transient geochemical gradients in the migrating liquids mainly governed by chromatographic-type chemical exchange with the peridotite. The West Philippine Basin (WPB) is a back-arc basin that opened in the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) between the current position of the Palau-Kyushu Ridge (PKR) and the margin of East Asia. Spreading occurred at the Central Basin Fault (CBF) from 54 to 30 Ma. The PKR was active since ~48 to 35 Ma constituting a single volcanic arc with the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc. ODP Leg 195 Site 1201 is located in the WPB, ~100 km west of the PKR, on 49 Ma basaltic crust formed by NE-SW spreading at the CBF. From ~35 to 30 Ma, pelagic sedimentation at Site 1201 was followed by turbidite sedimentation, fed mostly by early Mariana Arc (PKR)-derived volcanic clasts. These volcanics are calc-alkaline, whereas PKR rocks from literature have mostly boninitic and arc tholeiitic affinity; the WPB basement basalts have MORB to arc-like affinity, as expected for a back-arc basin. Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotope data highlight the Indian Ocean MORB-like character of WPB basement basalts, suggesting an upper mantle domain distinct from that underlying the Pacific Plate. The geochemical and isotopic features of PKR volcanics reflect higher amounts of subduction-derived components, added mostly as siliceous melts, in the source of arc magmas relative to that of basement basalts. In that respect, Site 1201 PKR volcanics resemble calc-alkaline volcanics of the currently active Mariana Arc. In addition, their calc-alkaline affinity, unradiogenic neodymium, and inferred Middle Oligocene age, suggest they might represent an evolved stage of arc volcanism at Palau-Kyushu Ridge, perhaps shortly before the end of its activity.

  3. Continental margin tectonics - Forearc processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, N.; Reed, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of convergent plate margins and the structural development of forearc terranes are summarized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the geometry of accretionary prisms (Coulomb wedge taper and vertical motion in response to tectonic processes), offscraping vs underplating or subduction, the response to oblique convergence, fluids in forearc settings, the thermal framework and the effects of fluid advection, and serpentinite seamounts. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

  4. Results of ODP Leg 125 drilling in the Mariana/Izu-Bonin forearcs

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, P. ); Pearce, J.A. ); Stokking, L. )

    1990-06-01

    ODP Leg 125 drilled a total of nine sites in the Mariana and Izu-Bonin forearcs, the regions between the active volcanic arc and the trench axis. Six sites were located on or adjacent to serpentine seamounts, four of these (Sites 778-781) on Conical Seamount in the Mariana forearc, and two others (783 and 784) on the Torishima Forearc Seamount in the Izu-Bonin forearc. The remaining sites (Sites 782, 785, and 786) were drilled into volcanic sequences along the eastern edge of the Izu-Bonin forearc basin. The principal results of the drilling were to achieve (1) the recovery of the first evidence for Pliocene or younger magmatic activity in an extant intraoceanic forearc terrain; (2) the first deep penetration of the Eocene basement of the Izu-Bonin outer-arc high to recover 650 m of boninite flows and hyaloclastite, andesite-dacite flows, breccias, sills, and dikes; (3) the confirmation that some forearc serpentine seamounts can form by flows of clast-bearing serpentine mud from a central conduit, as do mud volcanoes; (4) the discovery of mafic clasts within the serpentine mud flows that have both IAT and MORB affinities, that are metamorphosed in the low to moderate temperature/pressure regimes; (5) the confirmation of high-pH, low-chlorinity fluids at shallow levels near the summit of the seamount which probably originated beneath the forearc and are subduction-related; (6) the recovery of complex hydrocarbon-rich gases also of probable subduction related origin within the Mariana serpentine seamount; and (7) the identification of numerous ash layers within the Izu-Bonin forearc basin that indicate peaks of volcanic activity in the Eocene-Oligocene and from the late Miocene to the Holocene.

  5. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  6. Management of hospitals in Aceh during the tsunami.

    PubMed

    Kartowisastro, Hermansyur

    2005-01-01

    On December 26th, 2004, Aceh and its vicinity was hit by two natural forces consecutively, an earthquake and a tsunami. Hundreds of thousands of people perished, leaving the remaining of about the same number to become refugees. The writer was assigned by the Ministry of Health to Aceh on duty on the second and third week after the catastrophe, to help the management of Zainoel Abidin General Hospital in Banda Aceh, the province's biggest hospital, revive its operation. PMID:16300161

  7. Interpretation of a leak-off test conducted near the bottom of the Kumano Forearc Basin strata at IODP Site C0002 in the Nankai accretionary complex, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, I.; Huepers, A.; Olcott, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.; Dugan, B.; Strasser, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) is a long-term, multi-stage scientific drilling project launched for investigating fault mechanics and seismogenesis along subduction megathrusts. One main key to the mechanics of the plate boundary is understanding the absolute mechanical strength and the in situ stress along the megathrust. As part of efforts to access the Nankai Trough seismogenic zone, the NanTroSEIZE Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) project began riser-based drilling operations at Site C0002 (Hole C0002F) in 2010 during IODP Expedition 326, with the objective of reaching the plate interface at ~6800 meters below the seafloor (mbsf). The geology in this area is composed of the Kumano Forearc Basin sedimentary strata to ~940 mbsf, underlain by the inner accretionary wedge. IODP Expedition 326 drilled Hole C0002F to 872.5 mbsf, near the bottom of the Kumano Basin, and set a 20-inch casing string to 860.2 mbsf. During IODP Expedition 338 in 2012, the hole was extended to 2005.5 mbsf. At the beginning of the operation, a leak-off test (LOT) was conducted in the interval of 872.5-875.5 mbsf, to define the maximum mud weight for the next stage of logging-while-drilling (LWD). Drilling-out-cement (DOC) at the bottom of the hole prior to the LOT provided a 3-m long, 17-inch diameter open borehole for the LOT. For the LOT, this open hole interval was pressurized with the outer annulus closed by the blow out preventer (BOP) using drilling mud of density of 1100 kg/m3, and mud pressure was measured at the cement pumps. The bottom-hole pressure was calculated by the recorded pressure plus the static pressure of the mud column. The first cycle of pressurization was conducted with injection of drilling mud at 31.8 l/min. However, the leak-off pressure (LOP) was not clearly defined because a large volume of mud was lost. Therefore a second cycle was conducted with a higher drilling mud injection rate (47.7 l /min). The rapid increase in

  8. April 2012 intra-oceanic seismicity off Sumatra boosted by the Banda-Aceh megathrust.

    PubMed

    Delescluse, Matthias; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Cattin, Rodolphe; Fleitout, Luce; Trubienko, Olga; Vigny, Christophe

    2012-10-11

    Large earthquakes nucleate at tectonic plate boundaries, and their occurrence within a plate's interior remains rare and poorly documented, especially offshore. The two large earthquakes that struck the northeastern Indian Ocean on 11 April 2012 are an exception: they are the largest strike-slip events reported in historical times and triggered large aftershocks worldwide. Yet they occurred within an intra-oceanic setting along the fossil fabric of the extinct Wharton basin, rather than on a discrete plate boundary. Here we show that the 11 April 2012 twin earthquakes are part of a continuing boost of the intraplate deformation between India and Australia that followed the Aceh 2004 and Nias 2005 megathrust earthquakes, subsequent to a stress transfer process recognized at other subduction zones. Using Coulomb stress change calculations, we show that the coseismic slips of the Aceh and Nias earthquakes can promote oceanic left-lateral strike-slip earthquakes on pre-existing meridian-aligned fault planes. We further show that persistent viscous relaxation in the asthenospheric mantle several years after the Aceh megathrust explains the time lag between the 2004 megathrust and the 2012 intraplate events. On a short timescale, the 2012 events provide new evidence for the interplay between megathrusts at the subduction interface and intraplate deformation offshore. On a longer geological timescale, the Australian plate, driven by slab-pull forces at the Sunda trench, is detaching from the Indian plate, which is subjected to resisting forces at the Himalayan front.

  9. April 2012 intra-oceanic seismicity off Sumatra boosted by the Banda-Aceh megathrust.

    PubMed

    Delescluse, Matthias; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Cattin, Rodolphe; Fleitout, Luce; Trubienko, Olga; Vigny, Christophe

    2012-10-11

    Large earthquakes nucleate at tectonic plate boundaries, and their occurrence within a plate's interior remains rare and poorly documented, especially offshore. The two large earthquakes that struck the northeastern Indian Ocean on 11 April 2012 are an exception: they are the largest strike-slip events reported in historical times and triggered large aftershocks worldwide. Yet they occurred within an intra-oceanic setting along the fossil fabric of the extinct Wharton basin, rather than on a discrete plate boundary. Here we show that the 11 April 2012 twin earthquakes are part of a continuing boost of the intraplate deformation between India and Australia that followed the Aceh 2004 and Nias 2005 megathrust earthquakes, subsequent to a stress transfer process recognized at other subduction zones. Using Coulomb stress change calculations, we show that the coseismic slips of the Aceh and Nias earthquakes can promote oceanic left-lateral strike-slip earthquakes on pre-existing meridian-aligned fault planes. We further show that persistent viscous relaxation in the asthenospheric mantle several years after the Aceh megathrust explains the time lag between the 2004 megathrust and the 2012 intraplate events. On a short timescale, the 2012 events provide new evidence for the interplay between megathrusts at the subduction interface and intraplate deformation offshore. On a longer geological timescale, the Australian plate, driven by slab-pull forces at the Sunda trench, is detaching from the Indian plate, which is subjected to resisting forces at the Himalayan front. PMID:23023134

  10. Testing Spatial Correlation of Subduction Interplate Coupling and Forearc Morpho-Tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, Chris; Meigs, Andrew; Meigs, Andrew; Kaye, Grant D.; VanLaningham, Sam

    2005-01-01

    Subduction zones that are capable of generating great (Mw greater than 8) earthquakes appear to have a common assemblage of forearc morphologic elements. Although details vary, each have (from the trench landward), an accretionary prism, outer arc high, outer forearc basin, an inner forean: basin, and volcanic arc. This pattern is common in spite of great variation in forearc architecture. Because interseismic strain is known to be associated with a locked seismogenic plate interface, we infer that this common forearc morphology is related, in an unknown way, to the process of interseismic Strain accumulation and release in great earthquakes. To date, however, no clear relationship between the subduction process and the common elements of upper plate form has emerged. Whereas certain elements of the system, i.e. the outer arc high, are reasonably well- understood in a structural context, there is little understanding of the structural or topographic evolution of the other key elements like the inner arc and inner forearc basin, particularly with respect to the coupled zone of earthquake generation. This project developed a model of the seismologic, topographic, and uplift/denudation linkages between forearc topography and the subduction system by: 1) comparing geophysical, geodetic, and topographic data from subduction margins that generate large earthquakes; 2) using existing GPS, seismicity, and other data to model the relationship between seismic cycles involving a locked interface and upper-plate topographic development; and 3) using new GPS data and a range-scale topographic, uplift, and denudation analysis of the presently aseismic Cascadia margin to constrain topographic/plate coupling relationships at this poorly understood margin.

  11. Izu-Bonin-Mariana forearc crust as a modern ophiolite analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Tani, Kenichiro; Reagan, Mark; Kanayama, Kyoko; Umino, Susumu; Harigane, Yumiko

    2013-04-01

    Recent geological and geophysical surveys in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore-arc have revealed the occurrence on the seafloor of oceanic crust generated in the initial stages of subduction and embryonic island arc formation. The observed forearc section is composed of (from bottom to top): (1) mantle peridotite, (2) gabbroic rocks, (3) a sheeted dyke complex, (4) basaltic pillow lavas, (5) boninites and magnesian andesites, and (6) tholeiites and calc-alkaline arc lavas. The oldest magmatism after subduction initiation generated forearc basalts (FAB) between 52 and 48 Ma, and then boninitic and calc-alkaline lavas that collectively make up the extrusive sequence of the forearc oceanic crust. The change from FAB magmatism to flux melting and boninitic volcanism took 2-4 m.y., and the change to flux melting in counter-flowing mantle and "normal" arc magmatism took 7-8 m.y. This evolution from subduction initiation to true subduction occurred nearly simultaneously along the entire length of the IBM subduction system. One important characteristic feature of the common forearc stratigraphy in the IBM forearc is the association of sheeted dykes with basaltic pillow lavas, which strongly implies that the eruption of FAB was associated with seafloor spreading. This is supported by the seismic velocity structure of the Bonin Ridge area (Kodaira et al., 2010), showing it to have a thin ocean-ridge-like crust (< 10km). It appears that the FAB was produced by sea-floor spreading associated with subduction initiation along the length of the IBM forearc. A potential location of subduction nucleation along the Mesozoic-aged crust has been found along the margins of the West Philippine Basin. One possible scenario for subduction initiation at the IBM arc was that it was induced by overthrusting of the Mesozoic arc and backarc or forearc terranes bounding the east side of the Asian Plate over the Pacific Plate, followed by failure of the Pacific plate lithosphere and subduction

  12. Crustal architecture of the cascadia forearc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, A.M.; Asudeh, I.; Brocher, T.M.; Luetgert, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.; Nabelek, J.L.; Nakamura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Seismic profiling data indicate that the thickness of an accreted oceanic terrane of Paleocene and early Eocene age, which forms the basement of much of the forearc beneath western Oregon and Washington, varies by approximately a factor of 4 along the strike of the Cascadia subduction zone. Beneath the Oregon Coast Range, the accreted terrane is 25 to 35 kilometers thick, whereas offshore Vancouver Island it is about 6 kilometers thick. These variations are correlated with variations in arc magmatism, forearc seismicity, and long-term forearc deformation. It is suggested that the strength of the forearc crust increases as the thickness of the accreted terrane increases and that the geometry of the seaward edge of this terrane influences deformation within the subduction complex and controls the amount of sediment that is deeply subducted.

  13. The evolution of forearc structures along an oblique convergent margin, central Aleutian Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Scholl, D. W.

    1989-01-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection data were used to determine the evolutionary history of the forearc region of the central Aleutian Ridge. Since at least late Miocene time this sector of the ridge has been obliquely underthrust 30?? west of orthogonal convergence by the northwestward converging Pacific plate at a rate of 80-90 km/m.y. Our data indicate that prior to late Eocene time the forearc region was composed of rocks of the arc massif thinly mantled by slope deposits. Beginning in latest Miocene or earliest Pliocene time, a zone of outer-arc structural highs and a forearc basin began to form. Initial structures of the zone of outer-arc highs formed as the thickening wedge underran, compressively deformed, and uplifted the seaward edge of the arc massive above a landward dipping backstop thrust. Forearc basin strata ponded arcward of the elevating zone of outer-arc highs. However, most younger structures of the zone of outer-arc highs cannot be ascribed simply to the orthogonal effects of an underrunning wedge. Oblique convergence created a major right-lateral shear zone (the Hawley Ridge shear zone) that longitudinally disrupted the zone of outer-arc highs, truncating the seaward flank of the forearc basin and shearing the southern limb of Hawley Ridge, an exceptionally large antiformal outer-arc high structure. Uplift of Hawley Ridge may be related to the thickening of the arc massif by westward directed basement duplexes. Great structural complexity, including the close juxtaposition of coeval structures recording compression, extension, differential vertical movements, and strike-slip displacement, should be expected, even within areas of generally kindred tectonostratigraphic terranes. -from Authors

  14. The Ophiolite - Oceanic Fore-Arc Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Pearce, J. A.; Stern, R. J.; Ishizuka, O.; Petronotis, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Miyashiro (1973, EPSL) put forward the hypothesis that many ophiolites are generated in subduction zone settings. More recently, ophiolitic sequences including MORB-like basalts underlying boninites or other subduction-related rock types have been linked to near-trench spreading during subduction infancy (e.g., Stern and Bloomer, 1992, GSA Bull.; Shervais, 2001, G-cubed; Stern et al., 2012, Lithos.). These contentions were given strong support by the results of Shinkai 6500 diving in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore-arc (e.g., Reagan et al., 2010, G-cubed; Ishizuka et al., 2011, EPSL; Reagan et al., 2013, EPSL). Based on widely spaced dives and grab sampling at disbursed dive stops, these studies concluded that the most abundant and most submerged volcanic rocks in the IBM fore-arc are MORB-like basalts (fore-arc basalts or FAB), and that these basalts appear to be part of a crustal sequence of gabbro, dolerite, FAB, boninite, and normal arc lavas overlying depleted peridotite. This ophiolitic sequence was further postulated to make up most or all of the IBM fore-arc from Guam to Japan, with similar magmatic ages (52 Ma FAB to 45 Ma arc) north to south, reflecting a western-Pacific wide subduction initiation event. At the time of this writing, IODP Expedition 352 is about to set sail, with a principal goal of drilling the entire volcanic sequence in the Bonin fore-arc. This drilling will define the compositional gradients through the volcanic sequence associated with subduction initiation and arc infancy, and test the hypothesized oceanic fore-arc - ophiolite genetic relationship. A primary goal of this expedition is to illustrate how mantle compositions and melting processes evolved during decompression melting of asthenosphere during subduction initiation to later flux melting of depleted mantle. These insights will provide important empirical constraints for geodynamic models of subduction initiation and early arc development.

  15. Structural expression of forearc crust uplift due to subducting asperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Jean-Marc; Pubellier, Manuel; de Urreiztieta, Marc

    2009-12-01

    New structural observations and mapping of reefal terraces, carried out both on the field and on satellite remote sensing data, indicate that Sumba Island is presently undergoing a large amount of extension, associated with a significant regional uplift. This crustal uplift may have been created by a major thrust emerging in the South of the island. The uplift, which partly accommodated the Australian plate-South West Banda Arc convergence, is associated with the general northeastward tilt of the island. The consequent anomalous positive topography along the southern coast of the island is being compensated by significant tectonic erosion along large-scale curvilinear normal faults in the southeastern half of the island. The most important expression of this gravitational collapse is located at the receding side of an advancing circular dome, showing striking similarities with accretionary wedges being affected by seamount subduction. The part of the forearc basin known as the Savu Basin is moderately deformed (mostly in its central part) and appears to act as a rigid buttress in the convergence between the Banda Arc and the Australian plate. As a result the convergence appears to be transferred northward within the actively-shortening back-arc domain, which goes from the north of the Flores Island to the southwest of the Timor block. The convergent plate boundary shows a transition between a stable domain (West of Sumba) and a tectonized domain (East of Sumba), the latter coinciding with the subduction of the outer Australian passive margin. The subduction of the ocean-continent boundary of the Austral-Indian plate below the Banda arc since the Lower Pliocene may have incorporated some crustal fragments in the plunging Benioff zone. Most likely, the integration of the stretched continental lithosphere in the subduction zone caused the uplift the entire forearc domain, exhibiting inherited structures of the upper plate.

  16. Tsunami damage in Aceh Province, Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The island of Sumatra suffered from both the rumblings of the submarine earthquake and the tsunamis that were generated on December 26, 2004. Within minutes of the quake, the sea surged ashore, bringing destruction to the coasts of northern Sumatra. This pair of natural-color images from Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument shows a small area along the Sumatran coast in Aceh province where the tsunami smashed its way ashore. In this region, the wave cut a swath of near-total destruction 1.5 kilometers (roughly one mile) in most places, but penetrating farther in many others. Some of these deeper paths of destruction can be seen especially dramatically in the larger-area ETM+ images linked to above. (North is up in these larger images.) ETM+ collects data at roughly 30 meter resolution, complimenting sensors like NASA's MODIS (onboard both Terra and Aqua satellites) which observed this area at 250-meter resolution to give a wide view and ultra-high-resolution sensors like Space Imaging's IKONOS, which observed the same region at 4-meter resolution to give a detailed, smaller-area view. NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data provided courtesy of the Landsat 7 Science Project Office

  17. North Chilean forearc tectonics and cenozoic plate kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddin, Tim S.; Stimpson, Ian G.; Williams, Graham D.

    1993-04-01

    The continental forearc of northern Chile has been subjected to contemporaneous extension and compression. Here, cross-sections constructed across the forearc are presented which show that since initial shortening, deformation of the forearc has occurred in two tectonically distinct areas. These inner and outer forearc areas are separated by the strain discontinuity of the Atacama fault system and the tectonically neutral Central Depression. The outer forearc, the Coastal Cordillera, exhibits extensional tectonics, with large (up to 300 m) normal fault scarps preserved. These faults cut the earlier thrusts responsible for the elevation of Jurassic rocks at the coast above their regional elevation. The normal faults have been re-activated, displacing Quaternary salt deposits in the Salar Grande. This re-activation of the basement faults is probably due to the subduction of anomalously thick oceanic crust, producing an isostatic imbalance in the outer forearc. In the inner forearc, cross-sections through the Sierra del Medio and Cordillera de Domeyko show that structures of the Pre-Cordillera are best explained by a thick-skinned thrust system, with localized thin-skinned tectonics controlled by evaporite detachment horizons. Current forearc deformation features indicate a strong degree of correlation between subduction zone geometry and forearc tectonics. The timing of Cenozoic tectonism also fits well with established plate motion parameters, and the spatial and temporal variation in the state of stress of the forearc shows a close relationship throughout the Cenozoic to the plate kinematics and morphology of the subducting Nazca plate.

  18. IODP Expedition 352 (Bonin Forearc): First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. A.; Reagan, M. K.; Stern, R. J.; Petronotis, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    IODP Expedition #352 (Testing Subduction Initiation and Ophiolite Models by Drilling the Outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana Forearc: July 30-Sept. 29, 2014) is just underway at the time of writing. It is testing the Stern-Bloomer hypothesis that subduction initiation (SI) was followed by a strongly extensional period of slab sinking and trench roll-back and then by a transitional period leading to the establishment of significant slab-parallel plate motion and hence normal subduction. The Expedition aims to carry out offset drilling at two sites near 28°30'N in the Bonin forearc. Ideally, these together will give the vertical volcanic stratigraphy needed to trace the geodynamic and petrogenetic processes associated with SI, and provide the complete reference section required for comparison with volcanic sequences of possible SI origin found on land in ophiolite complexes and elsewhere. We predict, but need to confirm, a c. 1.0-1.5km sequence with basal, MORB-like forearc basalts (known as FAB) marking the initial period of extension, boninites characterizing the transitional period, and tholeiitic and calc-alkaline lavas marking the establishment of normal arc volcanism. Study of such a sequence will enable us to understand the chemical gradients within and across these volcanic units, to reconstruct mantle flow and melting processes during the course of SI, and to test the hypothesis that fore-arc lithosphere created during SI is the birthplace of most supra-subduction zone ophiolites. Here, we present the first Expedition results, including (a) the volcanic stratigraphic record and subdivision into lava units, (b) the classifications and interpretations made possible by shipboard (portable XRF and ICP) analyses and down-hole measurements, and (c) the biostratigraphic, magnetic, mineralogical, sedimentary and structural constraints on the geological history of the SI section and the interactions between magmatic, hydrothermal and tectonic activity during its evolution.

  19. Late Cenozoic Basins of northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Tor H.; Clarke, Samuel H.

    1989-12-01

    The late Cenozoic basins of northern California developed in response to both convergent tectonics associated with subduction of the Farallon plate (and its modern representatives, the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates) and transform tectonics associated with northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction and formation of the San Andreas fault system. The modern Eel River basin north of the Mendocino triple junction is an active forearc basin located between the Cascade magmatic arc to the east and the trench at the foot of the continental slope of northern California and Oregon to the west. Five different types of late Cenozoic basins or fragments of basins are preserved in onshore northern California south of the Mendocino triple junction: (1) remnants of a formerly more extensive Neogene forearc basin preserved locally in downdropped blocks within the San Andreas fault system; (2) remnants of slightly older trench-slope basins that generally developed west of but which may locally structurally underlie the younger forearc basin; (3) younger strike-slip-related structural basins that have developed along active right-lateral faults of the San Andreas fault system; (4) broad shallow embayments, perhaps similar to the modern San Francisco Bay, that were connected to the deeper Pacific Ocean to the west; and (5) structurally emplaced remnants of oceanic crust and its overlying sedimentary cover (the King Range terrane). Our preliminary stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies suggest that much of northern California was covered during the Neogene by a forearc basin that may have extended as far south as the San Francisco Bay region and into the southern San Joaquin Valley. As the Mendocino triple junction migrated northward during the late Cenozoic, the southern margin of the forearc basin was uplifted, basin deposits were stripped off by erosion, and the locus of forearc sedimentation shifted progressively northward through time. Preserved but isolated fragments

  20. The Western Solomons Forearc: Independent Inner and Outer Forearc Paleo-Uplift Histories and Relationship to Megathrust Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Lavier, L. L.; Papabatu, A. K.; Toba, T.; Shen, C. C.; Cai, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Solomons forearc has undergone repeated uplifts that probably were coseismic and similar to that during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 megathrust rupture that raised the outer forearc as much as 2.5 m. A parallel swath of the inner forearc subsided ~0.5 m during the 2007 event. The Western Solomons is ideal for crustal motion measurements because both the outer forearc above the seismogenic zone and the inner forearc are occupied by reef-fringed islands enabling land-based measurements of vertical displacements. U-series and 14C dating of uplifted corals and microatolls has provided the ages for a number of paleo-uplift events that we infer to have been coseismic. While the outer forearc has uplifted rapidly in late Holocene time at rates from ~1 to 8 mm/yr, the inner forearc has risen at only 0 - 1.1 mm/yr. It is notable that the inner and outer forearcs are separated by an arc-parallel boundary along which there is little or no net uplift. However, although both the inner and outer forearcs have late Quaternary histories of relatively rapid net uplift, they appear to have quite different uplift histories. The outer forearc has uplifted several times over the past 1000 years by as much as several meters in each event. Although the inner forearc subsided during the 2007 event and should subside during all events that ruptured the seismogenic zone beneath the outer forearc, it also has undergone abrupt late Holocene uplifts that do not correspond to those of the outer forearc. But the most surprising difference between the inner and outer forearcs is that 8-9 ka corals in growth position and emerged solution notches were found in a number of inner forearc sites adjacent to corals of the ~6 ka mid-Holocene high sea level that was a little higher than present sea level. Because sea level at 8-9 ka was 10-20 m lower than present in this region, 10-20 m of uplift is required between 8-9 ka and 6 ka during one or more tectonic events. Some of the 9 ka corals have

  1. Influence of Forearc Structure on the Extent of Great Subduction Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. J.; Llenos, A.

    2007-05-01

    Structural features associated with forearc basins appear to strongly influence the rupture processes of large subduction zone earthquakes. Recent studies demonstrated that a significant percentage of the global seismic moment release on subduction zone thrust faults is concentrated beneath the gravity lows resulting from forearc basins. To better determine the nature of this correlation and examine its effect on rupture directivity and termination, we estimated the rupture areas of a set of Mw 7.5-8.7 earthquakes that occurred in circum-Pacific subduction zones. We compare synthetic and observed seismograms by measuring frequency- dependent amplitude and arrival time differences of the first orbit Rayleigh waves. At low frequencies, the amplitude anomalies primarily result from the spatial and temporal extent of the rupture. We then invert the amplitude and arrival time measurements to estimate the second moments of the slip distribution which describe the rupture length, width, duration and propagation velocity of each earthquake. Comparing the rupture areas to the trench-parallel gravity anomaly (TPGA, Song and Simons 2003) above each rupture, we find that in 12 of the 14 events considered in this study the TPGA increases between the centroid and the limits of the rupture. Thus, local increases in TPGA appear to be related to the physical conditions along the plate interface that favor rupture termination. Owing to the inherently long time scales required for forearc basin formation, the correlation between the TPGA field and rupture termination regions indicates that long-lived material heterogeneity rather than short time-scale stress heterogeneities are responsible for arresting most great subduction zone ruptures.

  2. Out of Disaster Comes Opportunity: Initial Lessons from Teacher Mentoring in Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesnick, Joy; Schultz, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    On December 26, 2004, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake--the most powerful in more than 40 years--struck deep under the Indian Ocean. It was centered about 100 miles southwest off the coast of Aceh, Indonesia, and triggered massive tsunamis across the coasts of Asia and Africa. In Aceh province, located at the northwest tip of the island of Sumatra in…

  3. Rapid response: email, immediacy, and medical humanitarianism in Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Grayman, Jesse Hession

    2014-11-01

    After more than 20 years of sporadic separatist insurgency, the Free Aceh Movement and the Indonesian government signed an internationally brokered peace agreement in August 2005, just eight months after the Indian Ocean tsunami devastated Aceh's coastal communities. This article presents a medical humanitarian case study based on ethnographic data I collected while working for a large aid agency in post-conflict Aceh from 2005 to 2007. In December 2005, the agency faced the first test of its medical and negotiation capacities to provide psychiatric care to a recently amnestied political prisoner whose erratic behavior upon returning home led to his re-arrest and detention at a district police station. I juxtapose two methodological approaches-an ethnographic content analysis of the agency's email archive and field-based participant-observation-to recount contrasting narrative versions of the event. I use this contrast to illustrate and critique the immediacy of the humanitarian imperative that characterizes the industry. Immediacy is explored as both an urgent moral impulse to assist in a crisis and a form of mediation that seemingly projects neutral and transparent transmission of content. I argue that the sense of immediacy afforded by email enacts and amplifies the humanitarian imperative at the cost of abstracting elite humanitarian actors out of local and moral context. As a result, the management and mediation of this psychiatric case by email produced a bureaucratic model of care that failed to account for complex conditions of chronic political and medical instability on the ground. PMID:24788052

  4. Geology and geochemistry of the Izu-Bonin fore-arc region: Results from ODP Leg 26 and the Bonin Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.N.; Nesbitt, R.W. )

    1990-06-01

    One of the main aims of ODP Leg 126 was to investigate the origin, composition, and evolution of the Izu-Bonin fore-arc region. To achieve this, three drill sites were targeted in the hitherto uninvestigated intraoceanic fore-arc basin. Of these, Holes 792E and 793B reached basement, the latter being the deepest DSDP or ODP hole to do so. Hole 792E was located on a frontal arc promontory and drilled through a sequence of arc lavas with calc-alkaline affinities. The deep Hole 793B drilled the center of the fore-arc basin and drilled 280 m of volcanic basement overlain by late Oligocene turbidites. The basement consists of intercalated heterolithic/hyaloclastitic breccias and basaltic andesite flows. Geochemically these lavas have boninitic affinities, with low Ti/Zr and Y/Zr ratios akin to the type locality lavas from the Bonin Islands. A comprehensive study of the boninites from Chich Jima, located on the fore-arc high, has revealed that these lavas are geochemically diverse. A wide range of trace element and isotopic compositions are recognized, which represent combinations of variably depleted mantle and incompatible element enriched component(s). It is clear from the Hole 793B basement that these ingredients of depleted source and enriched additions occurred not only in the mantle wedge closest to the trench, but also beneath the region that is now the forearc basin. In addition, the boninitic signature prevailed in the forearc region from the middle Eocene at least through to late Oligocene times.

  5. Geomorphic Indices in the Assessment of Tectonic Activity in Forearc of the Active Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, K.; Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of GIS techniques and constant advancement of digital elevation models significantly improved the accuracy of extraction of information on active tectonics from landscape features. Numerous attempts were made to quantitatively evaluate recent tectonic activity using GIS and DEMs, and a set of geomorphic indices (GI), however these studies focused mainly on sub-basins or small-scale areal units. In forearc regions where crustal deformation is usually large-scale and do not concentrate only along one specific fault, an assessment of the complete basin is more accurate. We present here the first attempt to implement thirteen GI in the assessment of active tectonics of a forearc region of an active convergent margin using the entire river basins. The GIs were divided into groups: BTAI - basin geomorphic indices (reflecting areal erosion vs. tectonics) and STAI - stream geomorphic indices (reflecting vertical erosion vs. tectonics). We calculated selected indices for 9 large (> 450 km2) drainage basins. Then we categorized the obtained results of each index into three classes of relative tectonic activity: 1 - high, 2 - moderate, and 3 - low. Finally we averaged these classes for each basin to determine the tectonic activity level (TAI). The analysis for the case study area, the Guerrero sector at the Mexican subduction zone, revealed high tectonic activity in this area, particularly in its central and, to a lesser degree, eastern part. This pattern agrees with and is supported by interpretation of satellite images and DEM, and field observations. The results proved that the proposed approach indeed allows identification and recognition of areas witnessing recent tectonic deformation. Moreover, our results indicated that, even though no large earthquake has been recorded in this sector for more than 100 years, the area is highly active and may represent a seismic hazard for the region.

  6. Structure and composition of the Southern Mariana Forearc: new observations and samples from Shinkai 6500 dive studies in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Reagan, M. K.; Ishizuka, O.; Stern, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    The 3000-km long Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Arc system is an outstanding example of an intraoceanic convergent plate margin, and has become the particular focus of Japanese and US efforts to understand the operation of the “Subduction Factory”. In 2006 and 2008, twelve DSV Shinkai 6500 dives (973-977 and 1091-1097) were performed during YK06-12 and YK08-08 Leg 2 cruises along the landward slope of the southern Mariana Trench. The goal was to sample the remaining early arc crust associated with subduction initiation in the IBM system and upper mantle exposed in the forearc in order to gain a clearer understanding of the structure and evolution of Mariana forearc crust and upper mantle. The fruitful results include the recovery of the entire suite of rocks associated with what could be termed a “supra-subduction zone ophiolite” that formed during subduction initiation. An important discovery is that MORB-like tholeiitic basalts crop out over large areas. These “fore-arc basalts” (FAB) underlie boninites and overlie diabasic and gabbroic rocks. Potential origins include eruption at a spreading center before subduction began or eruption during near-trench spreading after subduction began (Reagan et al., 2010, G3). Another important discovery is a region of active forearc rifting at the southern end of the Mariana arc, named SE Mariana Forearc Rift (SEMFR). The SEMFR was firstly mapped with HMR-1 sonar (Martinez et al., 2000, JGR). Two dives at SEMFR recovered less-depleted backarc related peridotites (at Dive 973; Michibayashi et al., 2009, G3), and fresh basalts and basaltic andesites with petrographic characteristics like backarc basin lavas (at Dive 1096; see Ribeiro et al., AGU FM 2010). Although our previous studies have produced a number of important new observations about the geology of the southern Mariana forearc, our understanding of the region is still primitive. We will be conducting another cruise (YK10-12) during late September, 2010 to tackle

  7. [Tsunami in South-East Asia--rapid response deployment in Banda Aceh].

    PubMed

    Streuli, Rolf A

    2008-01-01

    On December 26, 2004 the second largest earthquake ever seismographically registered occurred in South-East Asia. It had a magnitude of 9.3 on Richter's scale and its epicentre was located on sea ground 160 km West of Banda Aceh, the capital of the province of Aceh on the island of Sumatra. The earthquake resulted in a tsunami which almost completely destroyed the city of Banda Aceh. Its death toll on the island of Sumatra was 168,000. The Swiss Humanitarian Aid Unit was deployed within a few days after the catastrophe with an advance team, which had to evaluate the need for supplies and personal in Banda Aceh. In close collaboration with relief forces of the Australian armed forces the team was able to deliver efficient medical and technical support. The most prevalent medical problems were: (1) Tsunami associated aspiration pneumonia; (2) Infected wounds of lower extremities; (3) Open bone fractures of lower extremities; (4) Tetanus infection. PMID:18399180

  8. Emplacement and Growth of Serpentinite Seamounts on the Mariana Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, A. J.; Taylor, B.; Moore, G. F.; Fryer, P.; Morgan, J. K.; Goodliffe, A. M.

    2004-12-01

    Seamounts comprised primarily of serpentinite muds are found on the outer forearc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction system. They represent some of the first material outputs of the recycling process that takes place in subduction zones. Therefore, understanding their evolution is necessary to correctly quantify the flux of material through the subduction system. Serpentinite seamounts have been described as mud diapirs, mud volcanoes, uplifted blocks of mantle material, and a composite of the latter two. Multi-channel seismic (MCS) data collected in 2002 from the outer Mariana forearc imaged, for the first time, the large-scale internal structure of these seamounts. These data, combined with new bathymetry, have provided insight into how the seamounts grow and deform with time and have allowed us to evaluate proposed models for their formation. The serpentinite seamounts rest on faulted and sedimented Mariana forearc basement. Flank flows of serpentinite muds downlap existing forearc substrate, leaving the underlying stratigraphy largely undisturbed. Reflections located 3.5-5 km beneath forearc basement may represent Moho, suggesting that the seamounts are built on anomalously thin forearc crust. A strong reflection at the summit of Big Blue, the largest serpentinite seamount in the Mariana Forearc, represents a collapse structure that has been partially in-filled by younger muds, supporting the idea that serpentinite seamount growth is episodic. Basal thrusts that incorporate forearc sediments at the toe of Turquoise Seamount provide evidence for seamount settling and lateral growth. We are conducting numerical simulations of seamount growth and evolution using the discrete element method (DEM), previously used to examine gravity spreading phenomena in magmatic volcanoes. Simulations employing distinctly low basal and internal friction coefficients provide a good match to the overall morphology of the serpentinite seamounts, and offer insight into their internal

  9. Biological control of Black Pod Disease and Seedling Blight of cacao caused by Phytophthora Species using Trichoderma from Aceh Sumatra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cocoa tree, Theobroma cacao L., suffers large yield losses in Aceh Indonesia to the disease black pod rot, caused by Phytophthora spp. Despite having the largest area under cacao production in Sumatra, farmers in the Aceh region have low overall production because of losses to insect pests and b...

  10. First results from TN273 studies of the SE Mariana Forearc rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. M.; Stern, R. J.; Kelley, K. A.; Shaw, A. M.; Shimizu, N.; Martinez, F.; Ishii, T.; Ishizuka, O.; Manton, W. I.

    2012-12-01

    TN 273 aboard R/V Thomas Thompson (Dec. 22 2011- Jan. 22 2012) studied an unusual region of rifting affecting the southern Mariana forearc S.W. of Guam. The S.E. Mariana Forearc Rift (SEMFR) formed by diffuse tectonic and volcanic deformation (Martinez and Sleeper, this meeting) ~2.7-3.7 Ma ago to accommodate opening of the southernmost Mariana Trough backarc basin. A total of 730 km linear-track of SEMFR seafloor was surveyed with deep-towed side-scan sonar IMI-30. 14 dredges provided samples of SEMFR igneous rocks, analyzed for whole rock (WR) and glass compositions. These new results coupled with results of earlier investigations confirm that SEMFR is dominated by Miocene lavas along with minor gabbro and diabase. SEMFR lavas range in major element composition from primitive basalt to fractionated andesite (Mg# = 0.36-0.73; SiO2 = 50-57 wt%), mainly controlled by crystal fractionation. Rare Earth Element (REE) patterns range from LREE-depleted, N-MORB-like to flat patterns, reflecting different mantle processes (i.e. different sources, degree of melting …). Glassy rinds and olivine-hosted melt inclusions in these lavas contain variable volatile compositions (F = 75-358 ppm, S = 35-1126 ppm, Cl= 74-1400 ppm, CO2 = 15-520 ppm, 0.36-2.36 wt% H2O). SEMFR lavas show spider diagrams with positive anomalies in LILE and negative anomalies in HSFE. SEMFR lavas have backarc basin-like (BAB-like) chemical composition (H2O < 2.5wt%, Ba/Yb~20, Nb/Yb~1 and ɛNd~9) along with stronger enrichment in Rb and Cs than arc and BAB lavas, as demonstrated by their higher Rb/Th and Cs/Ba ratios in WR and glasses, which may reflect the role of the ultra-shallow fluids. Ultra-shallow fluids are derived from the top of the subducting slab, beneath the forearc, where most of the water and the fluid-mobile elements (Rb, Cs, Ba,) are thought to be released (Schmidt and Poli, 1998, EPSL, Savov et al., 2005, G-3). Our results suggest that i) SEMFR lavas formed by metasomatism of a BAB mantle

  11. Mental health in Aceh--Indonesia: A decade after the devastating tsunami 2004.

    PubMed

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Yessi, Sarifah; Aichberger, Marion C; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-02-01

    The province of Aceh has suffered enormously from the perennial armed conflict and the devastating Tsunami in 2004. Despite the waves of external aid and national concern geared toward improving healthcare services as part of the reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts after the Tsunami, mental health services still require much attention. This paper aims to understand the mental healthcare system in Aceh Province, Indonesia; its main focus is on the burden, on the healthcare system, its development, service delivery and cultural issues from the devastating Tsunami in 2004 until the present. We reviewed those published and unpublished reports from the local and national government, from international instances (UN bodies, NGOs) and from the academic literature pertaining to mental health related programs conducted in Aceh. To some extent, mental health services in Aceh have been improved compared to their condition before the Tsunami. The development programs have focused on procurement of policy, improvement of human resources, and enhancing service delivery. Culture and religious beliefs shape the pathways by which people seek mental health treatment. The political system also determines the development of the mental health service in the province. The case of Aceh is a unique example where conflict and disaster serve as the catalysts toward the development of a mental healthcare system. Several factors contribute to the improvement of the mental health system, but security is a must. Whilst the Acehnese enjoy the improvements, some issues such as stigma, access to care and political fluctuations remain challenging.

  12. Mental health in Aceh--Indonesia: A decade after the devastating tsunami 2004.

    PubMed

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Yessi, Sarifah; Aichberger, Marion C; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-02-01

    The province of Aceh has suffered enormously from the perennial armed conflict and the devastating Tsunami in 2004. Despite the waves of external aid and national concern geared toward improving healthcare services as part of the reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts after the Tsunami, mental health services still require much attention. This paper aims to understand the mental healthcare system in Aceh Province, Indonesia; its main focus is on the burden, on the healthcare system, its development, service delivery and cultural issues from the devastating Tsunami in 2004 until the present. We reviewed those published and unpublished reports from the local and national government, from international instances (UN bodies, NGOs) and from the academic literature pertaining to mental health related programs conducted in Aceh. To some extent, mental health services in Aceh have been improved compared to their condition before the Tsunami. The development programs have focused on procurement of policy, improvement of human resources, and enhancing service delivery. Culture and religious beliefs shape the pathways by which people seek mental health treatment. The political system also determines the development of the mental health service in the province. The case of Aceh is a unique example where conflict and disaster serve as the catalysts toward the development of a mental healthcare system. Several factors contribute to the improvement of the mental health system, but security is a must. Whilst the Acehnese enjoy the improvements, some issues such as stigma, access to care and political fluctuations remain challenging. PMID:26957340

  13. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  14. Origin of Izu-Bonin forearc submarine canyons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, Kantaro ); Yoshida, Haruko )

    1990-06-01

    Submarine canyons on the Izu-Bonin forearc are morphologically divided from north to south into four types based on their morphology, long profiles, and seismic profiles: Mikura, Aogashima, Sofu, and Chichijima types, respectively. These types of canyons are genetically different from each other. Mikura group is formed by the faults related to bending of the subducting Philippine Sea Plate. Aogashima type genetically relates to the activity of large submarine calderas that supply large amounts of volcaniclastic material to the consequent forearc slope. The third, Sofu group, is thought to be formed by the large-scale mega mass wasting in relation to the recent movement of the Sofugan tectonic line. The last, Chichijima group, is formed by collision of the Uyeda Ridge and the Ogasawara Plateau on the subducting Pacific Plate with Bonin Arc. Long profiles of four types of submarine canyons also support this.

  15. Composition of the Southeast Mariana Forearc Rift pillow lavas : interaction between adiabatic decompression mantle melting and ultra-shallow slab-derived fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. M.; Stern, R. J.; Kelley, K. A.; Ishizuka, O.; Ren, M.; Ohara, Y.; Reagan, M. K.; Bloomer, S.; Anthony, E.

    2009-12-01

    The Mariana intraoceanic arc system is related to the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the Philippine Sea plate. A northward-propagating forearc rift extending from the southernmost backarc basin spreading ridge to the trench, called the SE Mariana Forearc Rift (SEMFR), has been inferred by regional HMR-1 bathymetric and backscatter mapping south of Guam (see Martinez & Stern abstract). SEMFR formed by lateral stretching as a result of slab rollback and collision of the Caroline ridge with the IBM arc. This forearc rift provides an unusual opportunity to study melts generated very shallow (~ 40 km deep) above a subduction zone. Forearc rifts are extensional zones occurring in subduction settings providing the opportunity to sample rocks produced by adiabatic asthenosphere decompression and fluid-metasomatized mantle melting. During YK08-08 in July 2008, manned submersible Shinkai 6500 Dive 1096 dived in SEMFR and sampled a 663 m thick section of fresh tholeiitic pillow lavas. These lavas are composed of upper primitive basalts (Mg# = 61 - 67) and lower basaltic andesites (Mg# = 49 - 51). The upper series phenocrysts are olivine (Fo85-87), diopside, and plagioclase (An80-83) with scattered olivine xenocrysts (3 mm, Fo92) hosting Cr-spinel (Cr# = 68 - 69). Lower series lavas contain phenocrysts of olivine (Fo76-79), augite and two plagioclases (An66-71 and An80-86), perhaps indicating magma mixing. Flat REE patterns, and high Mg# ( > 60) of the upper basalts indicate generation by fractional melting of spinel peridotite. LA-ICP-MS analysis show that lower series clinopyroxenes formed in equilibrium with more REE-enriched melts than their host rock, also supporting an interpretation of magma mixing. Discrimination diagrams using Th-Ba-Nb-Yb systematics (Pearce, 2008, Lithos, v. 100; Pearce and Stern, 2006, Geophysical Monograph Series 166, AGU) show that both series lavas have composition similar to that of Mariana backarc basin but with higher Ba/Nb content

  16. Assessment of health-related needs after tsunami and earthquake--three districts, Aceh Province, Indonesia, July-August 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-02-01

    On December 26, 2004, an earthquake measuring 9.2 on the Richter scale off the northwest coast of the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, produced a tsunami that caused the deaths of an estimated 230,000 persons in India, Indonesia, the Maldives, Somalia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The majority of casualties were in Aceh Province (population 4.5 million) in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, where an estimated 130,000 persons died. In addition, 500,000 persons were displaced from their homes, and 37,000 remain unaccounted for in the province. In the Aceh Province districts of Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar, an estimated 90,000 persons died; approximately 75% of health workers in Banda Aceh either died or were displaced from their homes. On March 28, 2005, a second major earthquake, measuring 8.7 on the Richter scale, caused large-scale damage to the islands of Simeulue and Nias off the western Sumatra coast; approximately 300 persons died, and thousands were displaced. The international community responded to these events with the largest relief measures ever undertaken for a natural disaster. To determine the health and nutrition status of the affected populations and to evaluate the effectiveness of relief interventions 7 months after the tsunami and 3 months after the second earthquake, Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere, Inc. (CARE) International Indonesia and CDC conducted surveys in three districts of Aceh Province (Aceh Besar, Banda Aceh, and Simeulue). This report summarizes the results of those surveys, which identified routine vaccinations and provision of toilets or latrines as particular areas for improvement and revealed no significant difference in health indicators between internally displaced persons (IDPs) and nondisplaced populations. The relief response in Aceh Province should target areas needing improvement with programs that serve both IDPs and nondisplaced persons, as measures are implemented to rebuild the public health infrastructure.

  17. Evaluating the influence of aseismic ridge subduction and accretion(?) on detrital modes of forearc sandstone: an example from the Kronotsky Peninsula in the Kamchatka Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsaglia, Kathleen M.; Mann, Paul; Hyatt, Ronda J.; Olson, Hilary C.

    1999-01-01

    The Kronotsky Peninsula, in the forearc region of the Kamchatka magmatic arc, lies on trend with the Emperor Seamount chain situated on the currently subducting Pacific tectonic plate. Detrital modes of volcaniclastic sandstone interbedded with mafic Eocene(?) basement rocks and within the overlying sedimentary sequence provide insight into the late Cenozoic geologic history of this area. Eocene(?) and basal Miocene sandstones are primarily composed of variably altered mafic volcanic debris. Their detrital modes are similar to those of Emperor Seamount sandstones and Hawaiian beach sands. Although aspects of the stratigraphy and volcaniclastic sand composition are consistent with a seamount setting, there is no physical evidence for an accretion event, and the suggested Eocene age for this unit makes an Emperor Seamount origin unlikely. A seamount origin cannot be ruled out for older Kronotsky basement complexes, however. A Miocene lull in Kronotsky volcanism was followed by rapid basin subsidence and influx of arc-derived turbidites from the west. Detrital modes of these sandstones are typical of a moderately evolved continental or micro-continental arc. An anomalously high proportion of sedimentary lithic fragments is the only possible compositional fingerprint attributable to seamount or ridge subduction.

  18. Gravity anomalies, forearc morphology and seismicity in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, D.; Watts, A. B.; Das, S.

    2012-12-01

    We apply spectral averaging techniques to isolate and remove the long-wavelength large-amplitude trench-normal topographic and free-air gravity anomaly "high" and "low" associated with subduction zones. The residual grids generated illuminate the short-wavelength structure of the forearc. Systematic analysis of all subduction boundaries on Earth has enabled a classification of these grids with particular emphasis placed on topography and gravity anomalies observed in the region above the shallow seismogenic portion of the plate interface. The isostatic compensation of these anomalies is investigated using 3D calculations of the gravitational admittance and coherence. In the shallow region of the megathrust, typically within 100 km from the trench, isolated residual anomalies with amplitudes of up to 2.5 km and 125 mGal are generally interpreted as accreted/subducting relief in the form of seamounts and other bathymetric features. While most of these anomalies, which have radii < 50km, are correlated with areas of reduced seismicity, several in regions such as Japan and Java appear to have influenced the nucleation and/or propagation of large magnitude earthquakes. Long-wavelength (500 - >1000 km) trench-parallel forearc ridges with residual anomalies of up to 1.5 km and 150 mGal are identified in approximately one-third of the subduction zones analyzed. Despite great length along strike, these ridges are less than 100 km wide and several appear uncompensated. A high proportion of arc-normal structure and the truncation/morphological transition of trench-parallel forearc ridges is explained through the identification and tracking of pre-existing structure on the over-riding and subducting plates into the seismogenic portion of the plate boundary. Spatial correlations between regions with well-defined trench-parallel forearc ridges and the occurrence of large magnitude interplate earthquakes, in addition to the uncompensated state of these ridges, suggest links

  19. The offshore basement of Perú: Evidence for different igneous and metamorphic domains in the forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Darwin; Valencia, Kiko; Alarcón, Pedro; Peña, Daniel; Ramos, Victor A.

    2013-03-01

    As a result of new studies carried out in the offshore of Perú during the exploration and hydrocarbon evaluation of the forearc basins, new U-Pb SHRIMP and TIMS in zircons and some Ar-Ar data were obtained in the metamorphic and igneous basement. The understanding of this basement was critical to evaluate different hypotheses that have been proposed for the tectonic evolution of pre-Andean crust of Perú. Recent research performed in the basement rocks of the Marañón Massif in northern Perú, claimed that west of this area was a basement-free region in the Paleozoic, where the arc and forearc were developed in a mafic quasi-oceanic crust. However, petrographic studies and new preliminary ages indicate, for the first time, the nature and age of this sialic basement. Reconnaissance studies were performed in several offshore islands, as the Las Hormigas de Afuera Island west of Lima, and Macabí and Lobera islands along the edge of the continental platform. These data were complemented with the studies of some cutting samples obtained in recent exploration wells in northern Perú. The results of the present work show two large crustal domains in the Peruvian offshore forearc. A northern domain contains late Paleozoic igneous rocks that appear to be the southern offshore continuation of the Amotape-Tahuin block, which is interpreted as the southernmost remnant of the Laurentia Alleghenian orogen. The central offshore domain, known as the Paracas High, corresponds to the outer shelf high of previous studies. It contains orthogneisses of Grenville-age, probably recrystallized during an Ordovician magmatic episode. The new results show that the central offshore of Perú is an extension of the Grenville-age basement affected by Famatinian, early Paleozoic magmatism, well exposed in the southern domain in the Arequipa Massif along the coast of southern Perú.

  20. Gravity anomalies, crustal structure, and seismicity at subduction zones: 2. Interrelationships between fore-arc structure and seismogenic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Dan; Watts, Anthony B.

    2015-05-01

    An ensemble-averaging technique is used to remove the long-wavelength topography and gravity field associated with subduction zones. Short-wavelength residual anomalies are attributed to the tectonic structure of subducting and overthrusting plates. A paired (positive-negative) fore-arc anomaly is observed consisting of a long (>1000 km), linear, trench-parallel ridge landward of the deep-sea-terrace basin. Ridges have amplitudes of 1500-3000 m and 160-240 mGal, wavelengths of 150-200 km, and high gravity anomaly to topography ratios (50-75 mGal km-1). The ridge crests correlate with the downdip limit of coseismic slip and strong interplate coupling and in Cascadia, the updip limit of tremor epicenters. The ridge crest may be interpreted as defining the boundary between the velocity-weakening and seismogenic region of the subduction interface and the downdip frictional transition zone. In Tonga-Kermadec, the Kuril Islands and Chile landward ridges are associated with extinct volcanic arcs. Paired anomalies are attributed to the preferential subduction erosion of the outer fore arc and a spatially varying combination of (a) lower crustal underplating beneath the inner fore arc, (b) the transformation of interseismic strain into permanent geologic strain via faulting, folding, or buckling of the inner fore arc, and (c) the relative trenchward migration of extinct volcanic arcs in regions operating with a net crustal deficit. Along-strike transitions in fore-arc morphology and seismogenic behavior are related to preexisting crustal structure of subducting and overthrusting plates. Fore arcs have the added potential of recording the time-integrated response of the upper plate to subduction processes, and fore-arc structure should be considered in tandem with seismological observations.

  1. The role of students' activities in Indonesian realistic mathematics education in primary schools of Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubainur, Cut Morina; Veloo, Arsaythamby; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to explore the implementation of the Indonesian Realistic Mathematics Education (PMRI) in Aceh primary schools, Indonesia. This study investigates the students' mathematics activities involved in the implementation of PMRI and for this purpose; students' mathematics activities in the classroom were observed. Students were observed three times within five weeks during mathematics class, based on PMRI. A total of 25 year five students from a public school participated in this study. Observation check list was used in this study based on ten items. The observation conducted was based on two different time periods which were 105 minutes for group A and 70 minutes for group B. The observation was conducted every 5 minutes. The results show that PMRI is being practised in Aceh, but not completely. This study shows that mathematics activities for those who were taught using PMRI are higher than for those using the traditional approach. Overall, the findings showed that the number of student activities undertaken in PMRI achieved 90.56%. The higher percentage of activities suggests that the Aceh Education Office expands the implementation of PMRI in all primary schools so that learning of mathematics is more effective. This indirectly increases the mathematics achievement of students in Aceh to a higher level on par with Indonesia's national achievement.

  2. Surviving Women's Learning Experiences from the Tsunami in Aceh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teng, Yan Fang Jane; Yusof, Qismullah

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated surviving women's learning experiences from the 2004 tsunami in Aceh. Women were the majority of casualties and the most vulnerable after the tsunami. Almost a decade later, we used a conceptual framework of experiential learning, critical reflection, and transformative learning to understand the surviving women's…

  3. "The Fruit Caught between Two Stones": The Conflicted Position of Teachers within Aceh's Independence Struggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes Cardozo, Mieke T.A.; Shah, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the challenging situation faced by teachers as professionals and members of the community in Aceh, Indonesia during the province's civil war. It reveals how teachers' sense of agency during this period was deeply influenced by the economic/material, political and socio-cultural condition at that time -- conditions and…

  4. A paleotsunami record from marshlands in West Aceh Province, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, K.; Finger, W.; Kongko, W.; McAdoo, B.; Moore, A. L.; Sudrajat, S. U.

    2007-12-01

    Constraining the frequency and magnitude of large events in the Indian Ocean region is critical to assess and mitigate tsunami risk along this densely populated coastline in the future. As historical records of large tsunamis in the area are sparse, the geological record provides the best evidence of recurrence rates and size of ancient tsunamis. Based on sediment data from coastal marshland deposits we present a paleotsunami record for West Aceh Province, Indonesia, an area immediately adjacent to the seismic source that was severely affected by the December 2004 tsunami. The recent tsunami deposited a distinct, typically 10-20 cm thick sand sheet up to 2 km inland within a prograding beach ridge plain. Sediment cores from swales in between beach ridges revealed three older sand layers, up to 10 cm thick, and intercalated within organic-rich marshland deposits. At least two of the older sand layers can be followed for several hundred meters along shore normal transects. Coring sites of different transects can be laterally correlated by following pronounced older beach ridges running parallel to the shoreline. The three individual sand layers occur at different distances to the shoreline, with the youngest sand layer at ~500 m distance from the present coast and the oldest one between 1500 m to 2000 m inland within older beach ridge complexes. The spatial distributions as well as grain size trends suggest landward directed flows over a prograding beach ridge plain, which can be best explained by ancient tsunamis. Radiocarbon dating of these deposits indicate three events occurring around 1000 AD, between 1350AD-1550AD, and after 1800AD, with the latter potentially correlating with a historically reported event in 1907AD.

  5. Structure of the Lesser Antilles subduction forearc and backstop from 3D seismic refraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, Mikael; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Laigle, Mireille; Kopp, Heidrun; Bécel, Anne; Weinzierl, Wolfgang; Hirn, Alfred; Flueh, Ernst R.; Gallart, Josep

    2013-09-01

    In 2007 the Sismantilles II experiment was conducted to constrain structure and seismicity in the central Lesser Antilles subduction zone. The seismic refraction data recorded by a network of 27 OBSs over an area of 65 km × 95 km provide new insights on the crustal structure of the forearc offshore Martinique and Dominica islands. The tomographic inversion of first arrival travel times provides a 3D P-wave velocity model down to 15 km. Basement velocity gradients depict that the forearc is made up of two distinct units: A high velocity gradient domain named the inner forearc in comparison to a lower velocity gradient domain located further trenchward named the outer forearc. Whereas the inner forearc appears as a rigid block uplifted and possibly tilted as a whole to the south, short wavelength deformations of the outer forearc basement are observed, beneath a 3 to 6 km thick sedimentary pile, in relation with the subduction of the Tiburon Ridge and associated seafloor reliefs. North, offshore Dominica Island, the outer forearc is 70 km wide. It extends as far as 180 km to the east of the volcanic front where it acts as a backstop on which the accretionary wedge developed. Its width decreases strongly to the south to terminate offshore Martinique where the inner forearc acts as the backstop. The inner forearc is likely the extension at depth of the Mesozoic magmatic crust outcropping to the north in La Désirade Island and along the scarp of the Karukera Spur. The outer forearc could be either the eastern prolongation of the inner forearc, but the crust was thinned and fractured during the past tectonic history of the area or by recent subduction processes, or an oceanic terrane more recently accreted to the island arc.

  6. Is the Record of Crustal Strain in the Pacific Northwest in the Holocene, as Revealed by Paleoseismic Investigations, Consistent with Regional Clockwise Rotation in the Cascadia Backarc and Forearc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, H. M.; Blakely, R. J.; Staisch, L.; Sherrod, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Both paleomagnetic and GPS observations document clockwise rotation of the forearc and backarc of the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). The similarity in observations for the long-term (since middle Miocene) geologic record and present-day GPS measurements raises the question to what extent is the paleoseismic record of Holocene crustal deformation in the forearc and backarc consistent with clockwise rotation? Because paleoseismic investigations typically target sites of identifiable ground deformation or subsidence in the Holocene (100-10,000 years before present), these studies only provide an incomplete window into the pattern of near-surface crustal strain that may be more apparent over a longer time scale. I provide an overview of the pattern of strain available from paleoseismic studies of the forearc and backarc of Cascadia. Conclusions are that near the coast where the crust predominantly responds to accumulation and release of strain on the megathrust, the proximal subduction zone signal is well defined within the paleoseismic history of earthquakes over many cycles. However, paleoseismic data do not entirely clarify whether Holocene deformation in the forearc and backarc of the CSZ is consistent with clockwise rotation of the forearc and backarc. Most of the individual faults that have ruptured Earth's surface in the Holocene are consistent with clockwise rotation; and the general pattern of north-directed compression in both the forearc and backarc is, again, not inconsistent with secular clockwise rotation. But the paleoseismic record of near surface deformation is consistent with clockwise rotation only by recognizing that other important tectonic variables may account for the pattern of individual fault ruptures. These contributing factors include inherited (i.e. predate plate-margin-induced clockwise rotation) zones of structural weakness in rocks, inherited crustal-scale structures such as basins or long standing structural highs and partitioning of

  7. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Aleutian convergent-margin basins - ridge crest to trench floor

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, D.W.; Ryan, H.F.; Geist, E.L.; Vallier, T.L.; Stevenson, A.J.; Childs, J.R. )

    1988-02-01

    The Aleutian Ridge lies along nearly 2000 km of the north Pacific's obliquely converging plate boundary with North America. Since middle Eocene time, convergent-margin basins have repeatedly formed here, typically as summit basins along the ridge crest, and as forearc basins on the landward trench slope. Summit and forearc basins formed as a consequence of plate-boundary coupling and the application of compressional and right-lateral shear stresses to the arc massif. Basins typically evolved along shear zones in response to transtensional processes, and as trailing-edge grabens behind rotating blocks of arc massif. In the late Cenozoic, high rates of trench sedimentation led to the growth of an accretionary complex that underthrust forearc basement. Wedging and improved plate coupling elevated and laterally shifted blocks of outer forearc rocks, creating much of the structural framework of the regionally extensive Aleutian Terrace forearc basin. Changes in plate-boundary conditions that affected the ridge's volcanic activity and regional elevation importantly influenced basinal sedimentation. Changes of greatest significance were a major shift in convergence direction and rate about 42 Ma (reduced volcanism), ridge underthrusting by increasingly younger ocean crust in Oligocene and Miocene time (arc elevation), and the combination of more orthogonal underthrusting and the subduction of a dead spreading center 5-10 Ma (arc subsidence).

  8. Northward migration of the Cascadia forearc in the northwestern U.S. and implications for subduction deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.; Simpson, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    Geologic and paleomagnetic data from the Cascadia forearc indicate long-term northward migration and clockwise rotation of an Oregon coastal block with respect to North America. Paleomagnetic rotation of coastal Oregon is linked by a Klamath Mountains pole to geodetically and geologically determined motion of the Sierra Nevada block to derive a new Oregon Coast-North America (OC-NA) pole of rotation and velocity field. This long-term velocity field, which is independent of Pacific Northwest GPS data, is interpreted to be the result of Basin-Range extension and Pacific-North America dextral shear. The resulting Oregon Coast pole compares favorably to those derived solely from GPS data, although uncertainties are large. Subtracting the long-term motion from forearc GPS velocities reveals ENE motion with respect to an OC reference frame that is parallel to the direction of Juan de Fuca-OC convergence and decreases inland. We interpret this to be largely the result of subduction-related deformation. The adjusted mean GPS velocities are generally subparallel to those predicted from elastic dislocation models for Cascadia, but more definitive interpretations await refinement of the present large uncertainty in the Sierra Nevada block motion. Copyright ?? The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS); The Seismological Society of Japan; The Volcanological Society of Japan; The Geodetic Society of Japan; The Japanese Society for Planetary Sciences.

  9. Active shortening of the Cascadia forearc and implications for seismic hazards of the Puget Lowland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Blakely, R.J.; Stephenson, W.J.; Dadisman, S.V.; Fisher, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Margin-parallel shortening of the Cascadia forearc is a consequence of oblique subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath North America. Strike-slip, thrust, and oblique crustal faults beneath the densely populated Puget Lowland accommodate much of this north-south compression, resulting in large crustal earthquakes. To better understand this forearc deformation and improve earthquake hazard, assessment, we here use seismic reflection surveys, coastal exposures of Pleistocene strata, potential-field data, and airborne laser swath mapping to document and interpret a significant structural boundary near the City of Tacoma. This boundary is a complex structural zone characterized by two distinct segments. The northwest trending, eastern segment, extending from Tacoma to Carr Inlet, is formed by the broad (??? 11.5 km), southwest dipping (??? 11??-2??) Rosedale monocline. This monocline raises Crescent Formation basement about 2.5 km, resulting in a moderate gravity gradient. We interpret the Rosedale monocline as a fault-bend fold, forming above a deep thrust fault. Within the Rosedale monocline, inferred Quaternary strata thin northward and form a growth triangle that is 4.1 to 6.6 km wide at its base, suggesting ??? 2-3 mm/yr of slip on the underlying thrust. The western section of the >40-km-long, north dipping Tacoma fault, extending from Hood Canal to Carr Inlet, forms the western segment of the Tacoma basin margin. Structural relief on this portion of the basin margin may be several kilometers, resulting in steep gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies. Quaternary structural relief along the Tacoma fault is as much as 350-400 m, indicating a minimum slip rate of about 0.2 mm/yr. The inferred eastern section of the Tacoma fault (east of Carr Inlet) crosses the southern part of the Seattle uplift, has variable geometry along strike, and diminished structural relief. The Tacoma fault is regarded as a north dipping backthrust to the Seattle fault, so that slip on a

  10. Morphology of submarine canyon system and geotechnical properties of surficial sediments across the Peru-Chile forearc

    SciTech Connect

    Bergersen, D.D.; Coulbourn, W.T.; Moberly, R.

    1989-03-01

    During August 1987, a SeaMARC II side-scan and sampling survey was conducted across the Peru-Chile forearc from 17/degrees/30'S to 19/degrees/30'S. Side-scan images reveal a complex submarine canyon system. Incised canyons meander across the Arequipa basin; their sinuosity results from erosion and cutbank slumping of the basin sediments. Lenticular packets of strata visible in reprocessed digital single-channel seismic profiles are interpreted to be buried channels. Tributary canyons coalesce into a single canyon at the structural high that deviates from its north-south course to a northeast-southwest course as a result of stream piracy. A dendritic drainage basin forming on the midslope may be the rejuvenation of an abandoned channel. Sediment properties were measured on 42 free-fall cores and 7 piston cores recovered both in and around the submarine canyon. Olive-gray (5Y 3/2) hemipelagic mud is the predominant sediment across the forearc. Most cores exhibit a small degree of bioturbation and thin laminae of sand; the number of sand laminae increases as the distance away from the canyon decreases. Shear strengths, averaged over a 1-m core length, decrease slightly with water depth. Carbonate content in all samples from this area is negligible with the exception of one piston core recovered from the upper reaches of the canyon, the bottom of which is composed of gravel- and sand-size shell fragments. Bulk mineralogy, determined from semiquantitative analysis of x-ray diffraction patterns, shows a decrease in relative feldspar percent and an increase in total clay content with increasing water depth. Preliminary analysis of core tops shows a mean grain size in the medium to very fine silt class, with increasing grain size toward the canyon. Smear slide counts generally show a surprisingly low abundance of volcanic glass and biogenic material, particularly diatoms.

  11. Helium as a tracer for fluids released from Juan de Fuca lithosphere beneath the Cascadia forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, P. A.; Constantz, J. E.; Hunt, A. G.; Blair, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Helium isotopic ratios (3He/4He) observed in 25 mineral springs and wells above the Cascadia forearc provide a marker for fluids derived from Juan de Fuca lithosphere. This exploratory study documents a significant component of mantle-derived helium within forearc springs and wells, and in turn, documents variability in helium enrichment across the Cascadia forearc. Sample sites arcward of the forearc mantle corner generally yield significantly higher ratios (˜1.2-4.0 RA) than those seaward of the corner (˜0.03-0.7 RA). 3He detected above the inner forearc mantle wedge may represent a mixture of both oceanic lithosphere and forearc mantle sources, whereas 3He detected seaward of the forearc mantle corner likely has only an oceanic source. The highest ratios in the Cascadia forearc coincide with slab depths (˜40-45 km) where metamorphic dehydration of young oceanic lithosphere is expected to release significant fluid and where tectonic tremor occurs, whereas little fluid is expected to be released from the slab depths (˜25-30 km) beneath sites seaward of the corner. These observations provide independent evidence that tremor is associated with deep fluids, and further suggest that high pore pressures associated with tremor may serve to keep fractures open for 3He migration through the ductile upper mantle and lower crust.

  12. Fault Scarp Degradation in the North Chilean Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. S.; Isacks, B. L.; Hoke, G. D.

    2001-12-01

    A new digital elevation model (DEM) with 20 m resolution of the forearc region of northern Chile highlights the remarkable system of fault scarps disrupting the low relief Paleogene surface of the Coastal Cordillera. The scarps range in height from tens to hundreds of meters (up to 300 m) and appear sharp and youthful. However, the hyper-arid climate of the region may lead to long-term preservation of older, currently inactive structures. Field examination of a sampling of the scarps reveals some highly weathered bedrock outcrops near the top but mainly debris slopes close to the angle of repose. The scarp faces are relatively smooth with rounded tops, with only occasional widely spaced rills on the slopes, all suggesting little development of an advective erosional system; instead, the evidence implies the dominance of transport-limited, diffusive processes. Profiles extracted from the digital topographic dataset are integrated with scarp profiles measured in the field to assess DEM accuracy. Landscape development is studied at the regional scale from DEM profiles and at the hillslope scale from field profiles. We apply diffusion modeling on scarp profiles to determine constraints for the ages of faulting. We document the relative ages of tectonic landforms based on the degrees of degradation; older landforms are expected to be smoother than younger landforms. These relative ages are then compared with apparent cross cutting relationships from overhead imagery which has implications for the sequence of faulting in the forearc.

  13. A serpentinite-hosted ecosystem in the Southern Mariana Forearc.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Yasuhiko; Reagan, Mark K; Fujikura, Katsunori; Watanabe, Hiromi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Teruaki; Stern, Robert J; Pujana, Ignacio; Martinez, Fernando; Girard, Guillaume; Ribeiro, Julia; Brounce, Maryjo; Komori, Naoaki; Kino, Masashi

    2012-02-21

    Several varieties of seafloor hydrothermal vents with widely varying fluid compositions and temperatures and vent communities occur in different tectonic settings. The discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal field in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge has stimulated interest in the role of serpentinization of peridotite in generating H(2)- and CH(4)-rich fluids and associated carbonate chimneys, as well as in the biological communities supported in highly reduced, alkaline environments. Abundant vesicomyid clam communities associated with a serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal vent system in the southern Mariana forearc were discovered during a DSV Shinkai 6500 dive in September 2010. We named this system the "Shinkai Seep Field (SSF)." The SSF appears to be a serpentinite-hosted ecosystem within a forearc (convergent margin) setting that is supported by fault-controlled fluid pathways connected to the decollement of the subducting slab. The discovery of the SSF supports the prediction that serpentinite-hosted vents may be widespread on the ocean floor. The discovery further indicates that these serpentinite-hosted low-temperature fluid vents can sustain high-biomass communities and has implications for the chemical budget of the oceans and the distribution of abyssal chemosynthetic life. PMID:22323611

  14. A serpentinite-hosted ecosystem in the Southern Mariana Forearc

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Yasuhiko; Reagan, Mark K.; Fujikura, Katsunori; Watanabe, Hiromi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Teruaki; Stern, Robert J.; Pujana, Ignacio; Martinez, Fernando; Girard, Guillaume; Ribeiro, Julia; Brounce, Maryjo; Komori, Naoaki; Kino, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Several varieties of seafloor hydrothermal vents with widely varying fluid compositions and temperatures and vent communities occur in different tectonic settings. The discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal field in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge has stimulated interest in the role of serpentinization of peridotite in generating H2- and CH4-rich fluids and associated carbonate chimneys, as well as in the biological communities supported in highly reduced, alkaline environments. Abundant vesicomyid clam communities associated with a serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal vent system in the southern Mariana forearc were discovered during a DSV Shinkai 6500 dive in September 2010. We named this system the “Shinkai Seep Field (SSF).” The SSF appears to be a serpentinite-hosted ecosystem within a forearc (convergent margin) setting that is supported by fault-controlled fluid pathways connected to the decollement of the subducting slab. The discovery of the SSF supports the prediction that serpentinite-hosted vents may be widespread on the ocean floor. The discovery further indicates that these serpentinite-hosted low-temperature fluid vents can sustain high-biomass communities and has implications for the chemical budget of the oceans and the distribution of abyssal chemosynthetic life. PMID:22323611

  15. A serpentinite-hosted ecosystem in the Southern Mariana Forearc.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Yasuhiko; Reagan, Mark K; Fujikura, Katsunori; Watanabe, Hiromi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Teruaki; Stern, Robert J; Pujana, Ignacio; Martinez, Fernando; Girard, Guillaume; Ribeiro, Julia; Brounce, Maryjo; Komori, Naoaki; Kino, Masashi

    2012-02-21

    Several varieties of seafloor hydrothermal vents with widely varying fluid compositions and temperatures and vent communities occur in different tectonic settings. The discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal field in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge has stimulated interest in the role of serpentinization of peridotite in generating H(2)- and CH(4)-rich fluids and associated carbonate chimneys, as well as in the biological communities supported in highly reduced, alkaline environments. Abundant vesicomyid clam communities associated with a serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal vent system in the southern Mariana forearc were discovered during a DSV Shinkai 6500 dive in September 2010. We named this system the "Shinkai Seep Field (SSF)." The SSF appears to be a serpentinite-hosted ecosystem within a forearc (convergent margin) setting that is supported by fault-controlled fluid pathways connected to the decollement of the subducting slab. The discovery of the SSF supports the prediction that serpentinite-hosted vents may be widespread on the ocean floor. The discovery further indicates that these serpentinite-hosted low-temperature fluid vents can sustain high-biomass communities and has implications for the chemical budget of the oceans and the distribution of abyssal chemosynthetic life.

  16. Grassroots development and upwards accountabilities: tensions in the reconstruction of Aceh's fishing industry.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Rowan; McGregor, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the tensions between aid funding and grassroots development goals in the context of post-disaster fisheries reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia. We argue that both short- and long-term grassroots goals are distorted by upward accountability requirements which lead to unsatisfactory aid outcomes. Our analysis employs the concept of aid webs and draws on fifty-one formal interviews with stakeholders in Aceh in 2007/2008. The findings initially concentrate on the impacts of upward accountability on project cycles, with a particular focus on the problematic incorporation of private boat-building contractors and commercial values during the implementation phase. We then discuss the more subtle, long-term impacts of upward accountability on the professionalization of community institutions — in this case, the Panglima Laot Lhok. We conclude with a few observations about the hybrid institutions — combining elements of local and development cultures — that are produced within the current political economy of aid. PMID:22235491

  17. Crustal Structure of the Northern Chilean Forearc from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, D.; Carrizo, D.; Roecker, S. W.; Peyrat, S.; Arriaza, R.; Chi, R. K.; Baeza, S.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to being an excellent venue for investigating the tectonics of the Andean margin, northern Chile is of particular interest to seismologists because of its potential for an imminent megathrust earthquake. Such events often trigger destructive seismic activity in the populated forearc, as demonstrated for example in the aftermath of the 2010 Maule event. To investigate the nature of deformation in the forearc, we generated high resolution images of the subsurface from Rayleigh wave dispersion curves derived from cross correlation of ambient noise. The ambient noise data were recorded over a period of three years by 60 stations from three different networks of broad band stations. Because of the proximity of the stations to the Pacific Ocean, we estimated the bias in the estimated Green's functions caused by the asymmetry of the noise distribution using a technique based on that described by Yao and van der Hilst (2009). Our results suggest that this bias can be as large as 5% for some station pairs. The unbiased times are then used to refine phase velocity maps, from which we derived transit times to generate a 3D image of shear wavespeed (Vs) from the surface to about 50 km depth. To first order, low-Vs anomalies correlate well with the geometry of the Atacama Bench Structure (western foreland basin) where leaching processes are related to large incisions in the Atacama Desert (north of 19ºS). In addition, high Vs anomalies correlate with the locations of fossil magmatic arcs developed as trench-parallel belts from the coast to the Altiplano. For example, high Vs correlates with the Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatic arc along the coast, the Paleocene-Oligocene magmatic arc in the central depression, and the Eocene-Oligocene magmatic arc in the Frontal Cordillera. A continuous seismic anomaly of low-Vs, located between 15 - 25 km depth, may be evidence of a weak and/or hydrated zone within the lower continental crust, related to slab-linked upper plate

  18. Magnetic and gravity constraints on forearc upper crustal structure and composition, offshore northeast Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, C.

    1994-01-01

    Marine magnetic and gravity data from the northeast Japan forearc offer insight to the subsurface structure, density and magnetization from which geologic interpretations and tectonic reconstructions can be made. Positive marine magnetic anomalies, on-land geology, drill hole data, and 2-1/2-dimensional models reveal that Kitakami plutons and possibly their associated volcanic rocks constitute part of the modern forearc basement and lie 100-150 km further east than previously thought. A method to create magnetization and density contrast maps was employed to produce a three-dimensional picture of the forearc basement rock properties averaged over a 14-km thickness. -Author

  19. Fore-arc migration in Cascadia and its neotectonic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Neogene deformation, paleomagnetic rotations, and sparse geodetic data suggest the Cascadia fore arc is migrating northward along the coast and breaking up into large rotating blocks. Deformation occurs mostly around the margins of a large, relatively aseismic Oregon coastal block composed of thick, accreted seamount crust. This 400 km long block is moving slowly clockwise with respect to North America about a Euler pole in eastern Washington, thus increasing convergence rates along its leading edge near Cape Blanco, and creating an extensional volcanic arc on its trailing edge. Northward movement of the block breaks western Washington into smaller, seismically active blocks and compresses them against the Canadian Coast Mountains restraining bend. Arc-parallel transport of fore-arc blocks is calculated to be up to 9 mm/yr, sufficient to produce damaging earthquakes in a broad deformation zone along block margins.

  20. Can slabs melt beneath forearcs in hot subduction zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J.; Maury, R.; Gregoire, M.

    2015-12-01

    At subduction zones, thermal modeling predict that the shallow part of the downgoing oceanic crust (< 80 - 100 km depth to the slab) is usually too cold to cross the water-rich solidus and melts beneath the forearc. Yet, the occasional occurrence of adakites, commonly considered as slab melts, in the forearc region challenges our understanding of the shallow subduction processes. Adakites are unusual felsic rocks commonly associated with asthenospheric slab window opening or fast subduction of young (< 25 Ma) oceanic plate that enable slab melting at shallow depths; but their genesis has remained controversial. Here, we present a new approach that provides new constraints on adakite petrogenesis in hot subduction zones (the Philippines) and above an asthenospheric window (Baja California, Mexico). We use amphibole compositions to estimate the magma storage depths and the composition of the parental melts to test the hypothesis that adakites are pristine slab melts. We find that adakites from Baja California and Philippines formed by two distinct petrogenetic scenarios. In Baja California, hydrous mantle melts mixed/mingled with high-pressure (HP) adakite-type, slab melts within a lower crustal (~30 km depth) magma storage region before stalling into the upper arc crust (~7-15 km depth). In contrast, in the Philippines, primitive mantle melts stalled and crystallized within lower and upper crustal magma storage regions to produce silica-rich melts with an adakitic signature. Thereby, slab melting is not required to produce an adakitic geochemical fingerprint in hot subduction zones. However, our results also suggest that the downgoing crust potentially melted beneath Baja California.

  1. Metasomatic hydration of the Oeyama forearc peridotites: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the widely recognized aspects of serpentinization, initial stages of hydration and tectonic processes of unserpentinized peridotites are still unclear, but have important implications for understanding the lithospheric architecture of supra-subduction zones. This study provides petrological evidence from the Oeyama ophiolite, SW Japan, of the effects of high-temperature metasomatic hydration immediately before the cooling and ductile deformation of forearc peridotites. Key findings in this study are: 1) complex association of high-temperature metasomatic minerals: tremolitic amphibole, cummingtonite, phlogopite, chlorite, olivine and orthopyroxene in veins and in mylonites; 2) the systematic variation in Si and Na + K contents of the tremolitic amphibole, corresponding to its mode of occurrence and mineral association; and 3) the presence of thin (< 0.7 mm) veins of fine-grained olivine accompanied by a narrow diffusion zone of the host primary olivine. On the basis of petrography and mineral chemistry, the temporal sequence of hydration and deformation of the Oeyama ophiolite is considered as follows: 1) infiltration of slab-derived fluids, causing decomposition of primary pyroxene and chemical modification of primary olivine, 2) metasomatic formation of variable modal amounts of amphibole, phlogopite, chlorite, vein-forming olivine and secondary orthopyroxene at 650-750 °C; 3) early-stage mylonitization of the hydrous peridotites in localized shear zones; and 4) syntectonic serpentinization at 400-600 °C to form serpentinite mylonites. Paragenesis and amphibole compositions suggest comparable temperature conditions for metasomatism and early-stage mylonitization. Mylonitization occurred exclusively in hydrous peridotites, and the peridotite mylonites were preferentially overprinted by syntectonic serpentinization. Diffusion profiles of olivine cut by a vein suggest rapid cooling immediately after the metasomatic fluid infiltration. From these

  2. Age and Geochemistry of Central American Forearc Basement Rocks (DSDP Leg 67 and 84) Reveal a Complex Geodynamic History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hoernle, K. A.; Hauff, F.; Kluegel, A.; Bogaard, P. V.

    2006-12-01

    The wide shelf between Costa Rica and southern Mexico hosts an unusually broad forearc basin. Geophysical investigations imply that the entire forearc basement is composed of ophiolitic rocks similar to exposed terranes of the widespread Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). Various geodynamic models have been suggested for the origin of the CLIP including its formation above the Galápagos plume head. Besides it's origin, the spatial extent and duration of CLIP volcanism are controversial. During DSDP Leg 67 and 84 the forearc basement was drilled and various igneous rocks including basalts, dolerites, gabbros and serpentinized peridotites were recovered. We present 40Ar/39Ar laser age and geochemical data (including major- and trace elements and Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotope ratios) of the drilled samples in order to determine if the igneous forearc basement represents old Pacific ocean crust, ancient arc volcanism, and/or accreted intraplate volcanic rocks possibly related to the CLIP? The igneous forearc basement can be subdivided into two groups: a geochemically strongly depleted group and an underlying geochemically enriched group. Mafic rocks of the depleted group have tholeiitic to basaltic andesitic compositions and display a strong depletion in incompatible elements but distinct enrichments of fluid-mobile elements such as Rb, Ba, U, K, Pb and Sr characteristic of arc volcanism. In contrast, alkali basaltic to hawaiitic rocks of the enriched group exhibit enriched incompatible element signatures with marked depletions in K, Pb and heavy rare earth elements similar to Ocean Island Basalt (OIB). Consistent with the trace element division, both groups form two separate fields in Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopic space with the depleted group showing isotopically depleted initial compositions (low 206Pb/204Pb=17.93-18.48 and 207Pb/204Pb=15.49-15.53 but elevated ^{143}Nd/^{144}Nd= 0.51294-0.51318 and ^{176}Hf/^{177}Hf= 0.28304-0.28316) and the enriched group having

  3. Relationship between outer forearc subsidence and plate boundary kinematics along the Northeast Japan convergent margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalla, Christine; Fisher, Donald M.; Kirby, Eric; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-12-01

    Tectonic erosion along convergent plate boundaries, whereby removal of upper plate material along the subduction zone interface drives kilometer-scale outer forearc subsidence, has been purported to explain the evolution of nearly half the world's subduction margins, including part of the history of northeast Japan. Here, we evaluate the role of plate boundary dynamics in driving forearc subsidence in northeastern Japan. A synthesis of newly updated analyses of outer forearc subsidence, the timing and kinematics of upper plate deformation, and the history of plate convergence along the Japan trench demonstrate that the onset of rapid fore-arc tectonic subsidence is contemporaneous with upper plate extension during the opening of the Sea of Japan and with an acceleration in convergence rate at the trench. In Plio-Quaternary time, relative uplift of the outer forearc is contemporaneous with contraction across the arc and a decrease in plate convergence rate. The coincidence of these changes across the forearc, arc, backarc system appears to require an explanation at the scale of the entire plate boundary. Similar observations along other western Pacific margins suggest that correlations between forearc subsidence and major changes in plate kinematics are the rule, rather than the exception. We suggest that a significant component of forearc subsidence at the northeast Japan margin is not the consequence of basal tectonic erosion, but instead reflects dynamic changes in plate boundary geometry driven by temporal variations in plate kinematics. If correct, this model requires a reconsideration of the mass balance and crustal recycling of continental crust at nonaccretionary margins.

  4. An Integrated Study of the Kinematics and Evolution of Fault Systems in the Hellenic Margin, Crete, Greece: Insight into Forearc Development above a Retreating Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, S. F.; Wegmann, K. W.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Accommodating ~ 36 mm/yr of convergence between the African and Eurasian tectonic plates the Hellenic Subduction zone is the largest, fastest and most seismically active subduction zone in the Mediterranean. Long-lived Cenozoic subduction of the African slab has resulted in the construction of a large south-facing subduction wedge. Rollback of the African slab likely initiated sometime in the Eocene and continues today. This geodynamic setting has given rise to a forearc characterized by a series of dramatic 2-4 km high topographic escarpments south of the Island of Crete; one of the few subaerial forearc highs along the Hellenic margin. It is generally agreed that these escarpments represent the surface expression of large intra-crust faults, yet the kinematics of faulting remains contentious in contemporary scientific literature. Different geologic and geophysical datasets have been used to argue that these structures accommodate either shortening due to continued plate convergence or extension driven by processes related to slab rollback. Resolving the debate over the kinematics of the large-scale structures embedded in the Hellenic forearc is paramount to our understanding of seismic hazards, the development of forearc basins, and the geodynamic processes operating in this region. We present results from a study of the tectonic geomorphology and structural geology of the south-central coastline of Crete that constrain the kinematics and evolution of one of the aforementioned fault systems that is related to the construction of a large forearc basin known as the Ptolemy trough. Field surveys and geochronology of marine terraces reveal the pattern of late Quaternary uplift along the south-central coastline. Two large south-dipping extensional faults, which extend offshore into the Ptolemy trough, are found to offset Pleistocene marine terraces and are inferred to be active with average slip rates of ca. 0.5 mm/yr. The hanging walls and footwalls of these faults

  5. Basin evolution during change from convergent to transform continental margin in Central California

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.A.; Hitzman, M.; McCloy, C.; Turner, R.; Ward, R.

    1984-03-01

    Miocene nonmarine and shallow marine strata exposed east of San Francisco Bay record a change from convergent-margin tectonics to transform margin tectonics. During the middle Miocene, the East Bay area occupied the oceanward side of a shelved forearc basin that was progressively incorporated in the evolving San Andreas strike-slip orogene. Patterns of deposition in the broad forearc basin were relatively simple: andesitic arc-derived detritus was transported the full width of the forearc basin from the Sierras to the East Bay area. In contrast, the wrench-tectonic regime produced complex patterns of sedimentation displaying greater local variability. On the basis of stratigraphic data, we infer that the west-facing slope of the forearc basin in the East Bay area was reversed about 13 Ma with uplift of the area between the eventual traces of the San Andreas and Hayward faults on the site of the present bay. A fluvial clastic wedge was shed eastward into the East Bay area from this uplifted terrane of Mesozoic subduction complex and forearc basin rocks. Initial rupturing along the Hayward fault trend followed the uplift at about 10 Ma. Loci of basaltic volcanism (10-7 Ma) along these fractures interfinger with the clastic wedge. A similar pattern of uplift and drainage reversal apparently presaged the onset of wrenching along the nearby Calaveras trend from 8-6 Ma. Expansion of the strike-slip orogene segmented the outer forearc basin into local basins, some characterized by episodic lacustrine deposition and probable internal drainage. By the end of the Miocene, Sierran arc volcanism waned at the latitude of San Francisco Bay, and arc-derived volcaniclastics were fully supplanted by recycled Coast Range-derived detritus in the East Bay area. Certain of these Coast Range sediment sources, particularly blueschist-bearing Franciscan terranes, permit an estimate of 7-27 km (4-17 mi) of total right slip on the Hayward fault.

  6. Fluid flow and water-rock interaction across the active Nankai Trough subduction zone forearc revealed by boron isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüpers, Andre; Kasemann, Simone A.; Kopf, Achim J.; Meixner, Anette; Toki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Wheat, C. Geoffrey; You, Chen-Feng

    2016-11-01

    Compositional changes, dehydration reactions and fluid flow in subducted sediments influence seismogenesis and arc magmatism in subduction zones. To identify fluid flow and water-rock interaction processes in the western Nankai Trough subduction zone (SW Japan) we analyzed boron concentration and boron isotope composition (δ11B) of pore fluids sampled across the subduction zone forearc from depths of up to ∼922 m below seafloor during four Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions. The major structural regimes that were sampled by coring include: (1) sedimentary inputs, (2) the frontal thrust zone, (3) the megasplay fault zone, and (4) the forearc basin. From mass balance consideration we find that consumption of boron (B) by ash alteration and desorption of B from the solid phase, mediated by organic matter degradation, produces a net decrease in B concentrations with depth down to ∼120 μM and variable δ11B values in the range of ∼+20‰ and +49‰. Interstitial water in sediments on the incoming oceanic plate are influenced by more efficient mobilization of exchangeable B from the solid phase due to higher temperatures and alteration of the oceanic crust that acts as a sink for 10B. At the tip of the megasplay fault zone, elevated B concentration and B isotopic composition suggest that underthrust coarse-grained slope sediments provide a pathway for fluids out of the upper (<2 km) accretionary prism. Silt and sand layers in the underthrust section of the downgoing plate favor fluid escape in seaward direction from depths equivalent to the temperature range of 60-150 °C. At both locations the δ11B signature evolves during updip migration through re-adsorption. Mass balance considerations suggest a shallower fluid source depth compared to pore fluids sampled previously near the décollement zone along the central portion of the Nankai margin.

  7. Detrital zircon provenance analysis of the Great Valley Group, California: Evolution of an arc-forearc system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeGraaff-Surpless, K.; Graham, S.A.; Wooden, J.L.; McWilliams, M.O.

    2002-01-01

    The improved resolution of sediment provenance from detrital zircon analysis of Great Valley stratigraphy enables recognition of previously undocumented arc magmatism and the evolution of regional drainage systems within the Cretaceous arc-forearc system related to uplift, magmatism, and structure in the arc. Great Valley detrital zircon age data confirm previous studies that indicate that the locus of the sediment source in the southern Sierra Nevada arc migrated east with the active volcanic front and suggest rapid rates of uplift and unroofing of the southern arc. Sacramento Valley detrital zircon age data indicate a more complex history of drainage in the northern Klamath-Sierran arc than previously documented. Detrital zircon age distributions from the Cache Creek section of the Great Valley Group broaden through time from nearly unimodal age distributions to signatures with multiple age peaks. This transition to more broadly distributed detrital zircon age spectra likely results from a combination of (1) expanding subaerial drainage systems from highly localized to more broadly distributed catchments; (2) changing shelf and submarine-canyon morphology with rising sea level and/or basin subsidence; (3) increased degree of dissection of the Klamath-Sierran arc; and (4) potential drainage capture and redirection within the arc. Sacramento Valley detrital zircon age data also record a pulse of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous magmatism in the northwestern Sierra Nevada arc, an age of Cordilleran magmatism and deformation represented by limited exposure in the modern Sierra Nevada. These results offer significant new insights into the evolution of a well-studied arc-forearc system.

  8. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Aleutian convergent-margin basins - Ridge crest to trench floor

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, D.W.; Ryan, H.F.; Geist, E.L.; Vallier, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Aleutian Ridge lies along nearly 2,000 km of the north Pacific's obliquely converging plate boundary with North America. Since middle Eocene time, convergent-margin basins have repeatedly formed here, typically as summit basins along the ridge crest, and as forecarc basins on the landward trench slope. Thick (1-4 km) sequences of terrigenous, hemipelagic, and biogenic debris have accumulated in these depressions, which are mostly intra-arc structures floored by arc-basement rocks. Summit and forearc basins formed as a consequence of plate-boundary coupling and the application of compressional and right-lateral shear stresses to the arc massif. Basins typically evolved along shear zones in response to transtensional processes, and as trailing-edge grabens behind rotating blocks of arc massif. In the late Cenozoic, high rates of trench sedimentation led to the growth of an accretionary complex that underthrust forearc basement. Wedging and improved plate coupling elevated and laterally shifted blocks of outer forearc rocks, creating much of the structural framework of the regionally extensive Aleutian Terrace forearc basin. Changes in plate-boundary conditions that affected the ridge's volcanic activity and regional elevation importantly influenced basinal sedimentation. Changes of greatest significant were a major shift in convergence direction and rate about 42 Ma (reduced volcanism), ridge underthrusting by increasingly younger ocean crust in Oligocena and Miocene time (arc elevation), and the combination of more orthogonal underthrusting and the subduction of a dead spreading center 5-120 Ma (arc subsidence).

  9. Velocity structure along the Ogasawara Ridge fore-arc region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Yamashita, M.; Kodaira, S.; Kaiho, Y.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; No, T.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Ogasawara Ridge is known as one of oldest arc on the Philippine Sea Plate. This Ridge has very complex structure. According to refraction survey crossing the ridge, the ridge has a very thin granitic layer with velocity of approximately 6 km/s, an andesitic layer with a velocity of 6.4-6.6 km/s and gabbroic layer with a velocity of 7.0-7.2 km/s (Takahashi et al., 2009). On the other hand, the thin crust with a thickness less than 10 km distributes beneath the shallowest topographic peak (Kodaira et al., 2012). According to geologic studies, boninites, fore-arc basalts, gabbros and peridotites were collected by Shinkai 6500 dives on the trench slope (Ishizuka et al., 2006). The observation is expected to be helpful for subduction initiation studies because these geological sequences are similar characteristics of ophiolite. Therefore, we carried out refraction survey using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) along the strike of the Ogasawara Ridge to detect such geological sequences using seismic imaging technique as one of site surveys for IBM drilling. This survey was carried by using R/V "Kairei" of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) in 2011 and we collected not only OBSs data but also multi-channel reflection data (MCSs) on a seismic line with a length of 250 km. Total 43 OBSs were deployed at an interval of 5 km and the airgun shooting with a total capacity of 7800 cu.in. was 200 m interval. First arrivals on OBS records are traced to offsets of 40-60 km, and the data is generally noisy suggesting complexity of fore-arc structure. If there is peridotite layer in the hanging wall side, the refractions with apparent velocity of about 8 km/s are identified, and discontinuous jump of the first arrivals should be at far side due to subducting oceanic crust. The observed refractions, however, have apparent velocities between 6.0-7.5 km/s to far side. Refractions with an apparent velocity of 8 km/s seem to be limited in narrow area. In

  10. Helium as a Tracer for Fluids Released from Juan de Fuca Lithosphere Beneath the Cascadia Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, P. A.; Constantz, J. E.; Hunt, A. G.; Blair, J. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Helium isotopic ratios (3He/4He) observed in mineral springs above the Cascadia forearc provide a marker for fluids derived from Juan de Fuca lithosphere. Sample sites arcward of the forearc mantle corner generally yield significantly higher ratios (~1.5-4.0 R/RA) than those seaward of the corner (~0.3-0.6 R/RA). 3He detected above the inner forearc mantle wedge may represent a mixture of both oceanic lithosphere and forearc mantle sources, whereas 3He detected seaward of the forearc mantle corner likely has only an oceanic source. The highest ratios in the forearc coincide with slab depths (~40-45 km) where metamorphic dehydration of young, warm oceanic lithosphere is expected to release significant fluid and where tectonic tremor occurs, whereas little fluid is expected to be released from the slab (~ 25-30 km depth) beneath sites seaward of the corner.High helium ratios are also observed in springs and wells in the Nankai and Hikurangi forearcs above the region where tremor and slow slip events are detected. This correlation provides independent evidence that tremor and slow slip are associated with deep fluids, and further suggests that high pore pressures associated with tremor may also serve to keep fractures open for 3He migration through the crust.Even though our preliminary results document mantle-derived helium in surface waters of the Cascadia forearc, these results are based on sparse data from sample locations that are not optimally distributed. We have recently identified additional sample sites to investigate whether specific crustal structures in the Cascadia forearc might serve as conduits to speed the ascent of mantle-derived helium. Finally, the possibility of a 3He source related to westward flow of arc-derived fluids through the forearc mantle cannot be ruled out for some of the sites, nonetheless, the highest ratio (4.0 R/RA) is found >130 km from the nearest Cascade Arc volcano making a magmatic source unlikely.

  11. Slab roll-back and trench retreat as controlling factor for basin subsidence in southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    Slab roll-back and trench retreat are important factors for basin subsidence, magma generation and volcanism in arc-trench systems. Based on the sedimentary and tectonic record of the southern Central American island-arc we conclude that repeated phases of slab roll-back and trench retreats occurred the arc-trench system since the Late Cretaceous. These trench retreats were most probably related to the subduction of oceanic plateaus and seamounts and effected both the fore-arc and back-arc evolution. We used numerical basin modelling techniques to analyse the burial history of fore-arc and back-arc basins in Central America and combined the results with field data of the sedimentological evolution of the basin-fills. From the basin models, geohistory curves were extracted for the fore-arc and back-arc basins to derive the subsidence evolution. The Sandino Fore-arc Basin is characterized by low subsidence during the first 40 Myr. Since the Late Cretaceous the basin has a linear moderate subsidence with a phase of accelerated subsidence in the Oligocene. In the North and South Limón Back-arc Basin, subsidence started at approximately the same time as in the Sandino Fore-arc Basin. The North and South Limón Basins show a linear subsidence trend in the Paleocene and Eocene. Evidence for trench retreats is given by pulses of uplift in the outer-arc area, followed by subsidence in both the fore-arc and back-arc basins. The first slab roll-back probably occurred during the Early Paleocene. This is indicated by the collapse of carbonate platforms, and the re-deposition of large carbonate blocks into deep-water turbidites. A new pulse of uplift or decreased subsidence, respectively during the Late Eocene is attributed to subduction of rough crust. A subsequent slab detachment and the establishment of a new subduction zone further westward was described by Walther et al. (2000). Strong uplift affected the entire fore-arc area, which led to the deposition of very coarse

  12. Structure and tectonics of a Lower Ordovician forearc ophiolite in central western Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzer, L.M.; Dilek, Y. . Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1993-03-01

    The Lower Ordovician Boil Mountain ophiolite complex (BMO) in central western Maine occurs in the Gander tectonic zone, nearly 100 km SE of the main Appalachian ophiolite belt, and represents part of the Iapetus oceanic domain. It is exposed in an ENE trending narrow zone immediately south of the Precambrian Chain Lakes massif (CLM). The contact between the CLM and the BMO is characterized by a steeply to vertically south-dipping shear zone composed of several fault planes, which display subhorizontal slickenside lineations with sinistral sense of shearing and counterclockwise rotated porphyroclasts. The BMO consists mainly of pyroxenite, gabbro, diorite, plagiogranite, autobreccia, mafic to felsic volcanic, volcaniclastic, and hemipelagic sedimentary rocks, and contacts between these lithologic units are commonly vertical and faulted. Autobreccia outcrops containing clasts and blocks of serpentinite, diabase, pillowed basalt, and radioalarian chert in a medium-grained hemipelagic matrix indicates deposition penecontemporaneous with ocean floor tectonism during evolution of the ophiolite. Extrusive rocks include basaltic, massive to pillow-lava flows, and andesites, dacites, and rhyolites and are commonly metamorphosed up to a lower-greenschist facies. The BMO is overlain to the SE by a melange-flysch sequence composed mainly of metapelite, metagraywacke, phyllite, and slate with abundant volcanic material suggesting alternated shallow- and deep-water sedimentation in a forearc basin. These relations and the observed structures in the ophiolite indicate its development in an oceanic environment with a low magma budget and active vertical tectonism. The available geochemical data show low Ti, Zr, Y, Cr, and REE contents of volcanic rocks suggesting a depleted magma source in a suprasubduction zone tectonic setting for the ophiolite.

  13. Community Willingness to Participate in a Dengue Study in Aceh Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Samsul; Bustaman, Aslam; Radiansyah, Arsil; Angraini, Pradiba; Fasli, Riny; Salwiyadi, Salwiyadi; Bastian, Reza Akbar; Oktiviyari, Ade; Akmal, Imaduddin; Iqbalamin, Muhammad; Adil, Jamalul; Henrizal, Fenni; Darmayanti, Darmayanti; Pratama, Rovy; Fajar, Jonny Karunia; Setiawan, Abdul Malik; Imrie, Allison; Kuch, Ulrich; Groneberg, David Alexander; Sasmono, R. Tedjo; Dhimal, Meghnath; Müller, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection is the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease in the world. Essential research on dengue virus transmission and its prevention requires community participation. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the factors that are associated with the willingness of communities in high prevalence areas to participate in dengue research. The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with the willingness of healthy community members in Aceh province, Indonesia, to participate in dengue research that would require phlebotomy. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out in nine regencies and municipalities of Aceh from November 2014 to March 2015. Interviews using a set of validated questionnaires were conducted to collect data on demography, history of dengue infection, socioeconomic status, and knowledge, attitude and practice regarding dengue fever. Two-step logistic regression and Spearman’s rank correlation (rs) analysis were used to assess the influence of independent variables on dependent variables. Among 535 participants, less than 20% had a good willingness to participate in the dengue study. The factors associated with good willingness to participate were being female, working as a civil servant, private employee or entrepreneur, having a high socioeconomic status and good knowledge, attitude and practice regarding dengue. Good knowledge and attitude regarding dengue were positive independent predictors of willingness to participate (OR: 2.30 [95% CI: 1.36–3.90] and 3.73 [95% CI: 2.24–6.21], respectively). Conclusion/Significance The willingness to participate in dengue research is very low among community members in Aceh, and the two most important associated factors are knowledge and attitude regarding dengue. To increase participation rate, efforts to improve the knowledge and attitude of community members regarding dengue fever and dengue-related research is required

  14. Three-dimensional finite-element models on the deformation of forearcs caused by aseismic ridge subduction: The role of ridge shape, friction coefficient of the plate interface and mechanical properties of the forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Geological and geophysical data show that the forearc of subduction zones experiences strong deformation during the subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges. In order to better understand ridge-related forearc deformation patterns, we performed a series of three-dimensional finite-element models, in which we varied the ridge shape, the friction coefficient of the plate interface and the mechanical strength of the forearc. Experiments were carried out for migrating/non-migrating ridges and accretive/erosive margins, respectively. Our results show that the subducting ridge uplifts the forearc and induces horizontal displacements that alter the strain regime of both erosive and accretive forearcs. Generally, shortening prevails in front of the ridge, while domains of shortening and extension exist above the ridge. Models with stationary ridges show high uplift rates only above the ridge tip, whereas the forearc above migrating ridges experiences uplift above the leading ridge flank and subsequent subsidence above the trailing flank. The height and width of the ridge as well as the friction coefficient of the plate interface have the largest effect on the forearc deformation patterns, whereas the mechanical strength of the forearc plays a lesser role. Forearc indentation at the trench is largest for high and broad ridges, high friction coefficients and/or weak forearc material. Shortening and extension of the forearc above the ridge are more intense for high and narrow ridges. Our model results provide information about the distribution of ridge-induced displacements and strain fields and hence help to identify deformation patterns caused by subducting aseismic ridges in nature.

  15. An alternative explanation for forearc subsidence along the Northeast Japan "erosive" margin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalla, C.; Fisher, D. M.; Furlong, K. P.; Kirby, E.

    2011-12-01

    New data from the northeast Japan erosive margin demonstrate that variations in vertical motions of the upper plate are temporally linked with changes in lower plate convergence rate. Nearly half the world's subduction zones are non-accretionary and are characterized by long-term forearc subsidence. Subsidence along these margins has been interpreted to be the result of basal tectonic erosion, in which removal of upper plate material along the subduction zone interface drives mass loss and subsidence of the outer forearc. The processes and mechanisms that initiate and sustain forearc subsidence along these erosive margins, however, are not well understood. Here, we evaluate the relationship between deformation within the upper plate along the northeastern Japan convergent margin and temporal variations in relative plate convergence. The initiation of shortening along reverse faults in the forearc is constrained by new and existing U-Pb ages from tephras in pre-growth and growth strata that bracket the initiation of thrust displacement to ~5.6 to ~3.9 Ma for the Futaba fault and 5.9 to 4.8 Ma for the Oritsume fault. In addition, the hanging walls of both structures are characterized by thick sequences of Miocene sediments that are absent in the footwall, suggesting that these structures are reactivated Miocene normal faults. A regional synthesis of deformation reveals that the timing of deformation along these forearc structures is part of a margin-wide reorganization deformation. In addition, published subsidence histories from offshore sediments exhibit a similar transition, from Miocene subsidence to Plio-Quaternary uplift in the outer forearc. Updated analyses of Pacific-Honshu plate convergence rates during the Cenozoic reveals that the initiation of forearc extension and subsidence is coeval with a two to three fold increase in margin-perpendicular convergence rate between 30-20 Ma, and that the transition to compression during the Pliocene occurred during a

  16. Determining Proportion of Exfoliative Vaginal Cell during Various Stages of Estrus Cycle Using Vaginal Cytology Techniques in Aceh Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Siregar, Tongku N.; Melia, Juli; Rohaya; Thasmi, Cut Nila; Masyitha, Dian; Wahyuni, Sri; Rosa, Juliana; Nurhafni; Panjaitan, Budianto; Herrialfian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the period of estrus cycle in aceh cattle, Indonesia, based on vaginal cytology techniques. Four healthy females of aceh cattle with average weight of 250–300 kg, age of 5–7 years, and body condition score of 3-4 were used. All cattle were subjected to ultrasonography analysis for the occurrence of corpus luteum before being synchronized using intramuscular injections of PGF2 alpha 25 mg. A vaginal swab was collected from aceh cattle, stained with Giemsa 10%, and observed microscopically. Period of estrus cycle was predicted from day 1 to day 24 after estrus synchronization was confirmed using ultrasonography analysis at the same day. The result showed that parabasal, intermediary, and superficial epithelium were found in the vaginal swabs collected from proestrus, metestrus, and diestrus aceh cattle. Proportions of these cells in the particular period of estrus cycle were 36.22, 32.62, and 31.16 (proestrus); 21.33, 32.58, and 46.09 (estrus); 40.75, 37.58, and 21.67 (metestrus); and 41.07, 37.38, and 21.67 (diestrus), respectively. In conclusion, dominant proportion of superficial cell that occurred in estrus period might be used as the base for determining optimal time for insemination. PMID:26977335

  17. BOLIVAR Project: A New Model for Grenada and Tobago Basin Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, G. L.; Mann, P.; Escalona, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Grenada basin, located in the SE Caribbean, is bounded to the northwest by the Aves Ridge and to the southeast by the Lesser Antilles Arc and Tobago basin. Existing tectonic models for Grenada basin evolution are based on the assumption that the Grenada basin fits into the traditional backarc model, with the Grenada basin formed by rifting of the Lesser Antilles arc away from the Aves Ridge. However our analysis of new seismic reflection and refraction data, acquired during the 2004 BOLIVAR program, suggests that the Grenada and Tobago basins were connected as a single basin during the Paleogene. Uplift of the Lesser Antilles arc and associated platform initiated during early to middle Miocene; the arc formed a barrier to sedimentation between the two basins by the late Miocene. We suggest a new tectonic model for evolution of these basins: 1) Paleogene extension of at least 70 km of the preexisting forearc of the Great Arc of the Caribbean (Aves Ridge) by the mechanisms of slab rollback and flexural subsidence. 2) Flexural and thermal subsidence ceases in the middle Eocene, producing a wide, deep-marine forearc basin encompassing the present-day Grenada and Tobago basins. 3) Oblique plate convergence between the Caribbean and South American plates causes a backthrust response in the weakened and thinned crust of the Grenada/Tobago forearc basin during the late Oligocene to middle Miocene. 4) Magmatism in the Lesser Antilles arc builds a ridge on the inverted forearc that becomes a major sediment barrier between the Grenada and Tobago basins during post-middle Miocene.

  18. Intra-arc basins

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Convergent-margin tectonic models feature forearc and back-arc basins and generally portray the arc itself as structurally static. However, intra-arc tectonics not only control distribution and petrology of extrusives and plutons, but also generate basins along the magmatic axis. Magma withdrawal and crustal loading by volcanic edifices contribute to subsidence, but most intra-arc basins are grabens or half-grabens indicative of extension. Grabens are isolated or continuous along long segments of the arc. Basin development may alternate with periods of arc uplife. No unique set of conditions causes intra-arc extension; numerous scenarios may initiate extension and subsidence of thermally weakened arc crust. Transtension related to oblique convergence contributed to the formation of most modern intra-arc basins. Andean basins may result from gravitational spreading of an unusually highstanding arc. Intra-arc basin sediment traps may starve arc-adjacent basins from coarse volcaniclastic detritus. Terrestrial intra-arc basins accommodate thick volcanic and volcaniclastic sediment sections, including lacustrine sequences. Marine intra-arc basins include bounding carbonate shelves, marginal and local intrabasinal submarine fans and aprons, and basin plains receiving pelagic and hemipelagic sediments. Structural patterns are appropriate for trapping hydrocarbons, source rocks are commonly present, and high heat flow favors early maturation. Reservoir quality is typically poor because of volcaniclastic diagenesis, but secondary porosity from dissolution of framework feldspars and carbonate or laumontite cements, and the known productivity of some volcanic reservoirs, suggest the potential for hydrocarbon accumulations. Geothermal resources and modest coal potential have also been recognized.

  19. Cascadia subducting plate fluids channelled to fore-arc mantle corner: ETS and silica deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, R. D.; McCrory, P. A.; Wech, A.; Kao, H.; Ague, J.

    2015-06-01

    In this study we first summarize the constraints that on the Cascadia subduction thrust, there is a 70 km gap downdip between the megathrust seismogenic zone and the Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) that lies further landward; there is not a continuous transition from unstable to conditionally stable sliding. Seismic rupture occurs mainly offshore for this hot subduction zone. ETS lies onshore. We then suggest what does control the downdip position of ETS. We conclude that fluids from dehydration of the downgoing plate, focused to rise above the fore-arc mantle corner, are responsible for ETS. There is a remarkable correspondence between the position of ETS and this corner along the whole margin. Hydrated mineral assemblages in the subducting oceanic crust and uppermost mantle are dehydrated with downdip increasing temperature, and seismic tomography data indicate that these fluids have strongly serpentinized the overlying fore-arc mantle. Laboratory data show that such fore-arc mantle serpentinite has low permeability and likely blocks vertical expulsion and restricts flow updip within the underlying permeable oceanic crust and subduction shear zone. At the fore-arc mantle corner these fluids are released upward into the more permeable overlying fore-arc crust. An indication of this fluid flux comes from low Poisson's Ratios (and Vp/Vs) found above the corner that may be explained by a concentration of quartz which has exceptionally low Poisson's Ratio. The rising fluids should be silica saturated and precipitate quartz with decreasing temperature and pressure as they rise above the corner.

  20. Dividing disasters in Aceh, Indonesia: separatist conflict and tsunami, human rights and humanitarianism.

    PubMed

    Zeccola, Paul

    2011-04-01

    This paper examines the interface between human rights and humanitarian action in the context of the conflict and tsunami in Aceh, Indonesia, between 1998 and 2007. It looks at the challenges international humanitarian non-governmental organisations (NGOs) faced as they engaged in human rights work in the conflict period and in conflict-related activities in the post-tsunami period. The paper argues that many large NGOs may have compromised what some would hold to be essential principles for humanitarian action because of domestic political concerns, donor restrictions and resistance among certain NGO chiefs. In contrast with the pre-tsunami period, in which NGOs worked for years amid military operations, in the post-tsunami period NGOs were decidedly apolitical, neglecting the conflict in their tsunami response--despite significant developments that permitted greater political engagement in Aceh's post-conflict transformation. The evidence suggests that NGOs are challenged in contextualising humanitarian responses and that there is a need to underscore donor flexibility and independence in humanitarian action.

  1. Improving health services to displaced persons in Aceh, Indonesia: a balanced scorecard

    PubMed Central

    Parco, Kristin B; Sihombing, Melva E; Tredwell, Susan P; O'Rourke, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Problem After the Indian Ocean tsunami in December 2004, the International Organization for Migration constructed temporary health clinics to provide medical services to survivors living in temporary accommodation centres throughout Aceh, Indonesia. Limited resources, inadequate supervision, staff turnover and lack of a health information system made it challenging to provide quality primary health services. Approach A balanced scorecard was developed and implemented in collaboration with local health clinic staff and district health officials. Performance targets were identified. Staff collected data from clinics and accommodation centres to develop 30 simple performance measures. These measures were monitored periodically and discussed at meetings with stakeholders to guide the development of health interventions. Local setting Two years after the tsunami, 34 000 displaced persons continued to receive services from temporary health clinics in two districts of Aceh province. From March to December 2007, the scorecard was implemented in seven temporary health clinics. Relevant changes Interventions stimulated and tracked by the scorecard showed measurable improvements in preventive medicine, child health, capacity building of clinic staff and availability of essential drugs. By enhancing communication, the scorecard also led to qualitative benefits. Lessons learnt The balanced scorecard is a practical tool to focus attention and resources to facilitate improvement in disaster rehabilitation settings where health information infrastructure is poor. Introducing a mechanism for rapid improvement fostered communication between nongovernmental organizations, district health officials, clinic health workers and displaced persons. PMID:20865077

  2. Overriding plate deformation and variability of fore-arc deformation during subduction: Insight from geodynamic models and application to the Calabria subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, João. C.

    2015-10-01

    In nature, subducting slabs and overriding plate segments bordering subduction zones are generally embedded within larger plates. Such large plates can impose far-field boundary conditions that influence the style of subduction and overriding plate deformation. Here we present dynamic laboratory models of progressive subduction in three-dimensional space, in which the far-field boundary conditions at the trailing edges of the subducting plate (SP) and overriding plate (OP) are varied. Four configurations are presented: Free (both plates free), SP-Fixed, OP-Fixed, and SP-OP-Fixed. We investigate their impact on the kinematics and dynamics of subduction, particularly focusing on overriding plate deformation. The results indicate that the variation in far-field boundary conditions has an influence on the slab geometry, subduction partitioning, and trench migration partitioning. Our models also indicate that in natural (narrow) subduction zones, assuming a homogeneous overriding plate, the formation of back-arc basins (e.g., Tyrrhenian Sea, Aegean Sea, and Scotia Sea) is generally expected to occur at a comparable location (250-700 km from the trench), irrespective of the boundary condition. In addition, our models indicate that the style of fore-arc deformation (shortening or extension) is influenced by the mobility of the overriding plate through controlling the force normal to the subduction zone interface (trench suction). Our geodynamic model that uses the SP-OP-Fixed setup is comparable to the Calabria subduction zone with respect to subduction kinematics, slab geometry, trench curvature, and accretionary configuration. Furthermore, the model can explain back-arc and fore-arc extension at the Calabria subduction zone since the latest middle Miocene as a consequence of subduction of the narrow Calabrian slab and the immobility of the subducting African plate and overriding Eurasian plate. This setting induced strong trench suction, driving fore-arc extension, and

  3. Potential Sedimentary Evidence of Two Closely Spaced Tsunamis on the West Coast of Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Katrin; Meilianda, Ella; Rushdy, Ibnu; Moena, Abudzar; Yolanda, Irvan P.

    2016-04-01

    Recent research in the coastal regions of Aceh, Indonesia, an area that was largely affected by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami, suggests the possibility that two closely spaced tsunamis occurred at the turn of the 14th to 15th century (Meltzner et al., 2010; Sieh et al., 2015). Here, we present evidence of two buried sand layers in the coastal marshes of West Aceh, possibly representing these penultimate predecessors of the 2004 tsunami. We discovered the sand layers in an until recently inaccessible area of a previously studied beach ridge plain about 15 km North of Meulaboh, West Aceh. Here, the 2004 tsunami left a continuous, typically a few cm thick sand sheet in the coastal hinterland in low-lying swales that accumulate organic-rich deposits and separate the sandy beach ridges. In keeping with the long-term progradation of the coastline, older deposits have to be sought after further inland. Using a hand auger, the buried sand layers were discovered in 3 cores in a flooded and highly vegetated swale in about 1 km distance to the shoreline. The pair of sand layers occurs in 70-100 cm depth and overlies 40-60 cm of dark-brown peat that rests on the basal sand of the beach ridge plain. The lower sand layer is only 1-6 cm thick, whereas the upper layer is consistently thicker, measuring 11-17 cm, with 8-14 cm of peat in between sand sheets. Both layers consist of massive, grey, medium sand and include plant fragments. They show very sharp upper and lower boundaries clearly distinguishing them from the surrounding peat and indicating an abrupt depositional event. A previously developed age model for sediments of this beach ridge plain suggest that this pair of layers could indeed correlate to a nearby buried sand sheet interpreted as tsunamigenic and deposited soon after 1290-1400AD (Monecke et al., 2008). The superb preservation at this new site allows the clear distinction of two depositional events, which, based on a first

  4. Seismic evidence for widespread serpentinized forearc upper mantle along the Cascadia margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Parsons, T.; Trehu, A.M.; Snelson, C.M.; Fisher, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Petrologic models suggest that dehydration and metamorphism of subducting slabs release water that serpentinizes the overlying forearc mantle. To test these models, we use the results of controlled-source seismic surveys and earthquake tomography to map the upper mantle along the Cascadia margin forearc. We find anomalously low upper-mantle velocities and/or weak wide-angle reflections from the top of the upper mantle in a narrow region along the margin, compatible with recent teleseismic studies and indicative of a serpentinized upper mantle. The existence of a hydrated forearc upper-mantle wedge in Cascadia has important geological and geophysical implications. For example, shearing within the upper mantle, inferred from seismic reflectivity and consistent with its serpentinite rheology, may occur during aseismic slow slip events on the megathrust. In addition, progressive dehydration of the hydrated mantle wedge south of the Mendocino triple junction may enhance the effects of a slap gap during the evolution of the California margin.

  5. How do subduction processes contribute to forearc Andean uplift? Insights from numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinod, J.; Regard, V.; Letourmy, Y.; Henry, H.; Hassani, R.; Baratchart, S.; Carretier, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present numerical models to study how changes in the process of subduction may explain the observed Quaternary uplift of the Andean forearc region. Indeed, most segments of the South American Pacific coasts between 16 and 32° S have been uplifting since the Lower Pleistocene, following a period of stability of the forearc region. Models confirm that local uplift is expected to occur above ridges, this phenomenon being predominant in central Peru where the Nazca Ridge is subducting. We investigate the effects of slab pull, interplate friction and convergence velocity on the vertical displacements of the overriding plate. We propose that the global tendency to coastal uplift is accompanying the deceleration of the Nazca-South America convergence that occurred in the Pleistocene. In contrast, forearc subsidence may accompany increasing convergence velocities, as suggested by the subsidence history of the South America active margin.

  6. Studies of the Southern Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Forearc using Shinkai 6500: Watery Glimpses of an In Situ Forearc Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Reagan, M. K.; Bloomer, S. H.; Fryer, P.; Fuji, A.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Imoto, H.; Ishii, T.; Ishizuka, O.; Johnson, J.; Michibayashi, K.; Ribiero, J.; Stern, R. J.; Uehara, S.

    2008-12-01

    Two expeditions with research submersible Shinkai 6500 and R/V Yokosuka (YK06-12 and YK08-08-2) studied the lithospheric structure of the Mariana forearc south of Guam. Igneous crustal and mantle rocks are well exposed along the inner trench wall because of the great depth of the trench, low sediment flux, and recent shearing and extension along N-S and E-W faults. A total of 12 dives studied crust between 6500 and 2000 mbsl along ~500km of the forearc. West Santa Rosa Bank Fault (WSRBF), a major N-S fault at ~144°10'E above a tear in the subducted slab, marks an important lithospheric boundary, with very thin crust to the west and thicker crust to the east. 3 of 4 dives west of WSRBF recovered peridotite and a fourth (#1096) sampled a scarp between 6100 and 5400m depth exposing multiple flows of fresh basalt. This may mark a previously unknown, N-S oriented forearc rift (W. Santa Rosa Terrane, WSRT). The zone of thin crust and shallow peridotite continues west as far as ~143°07'E, as demonstrated by the fact that 3 out of 4 Shinkai dives and 15 out of 18 total bottom samplings in this region recovered peridodite; thicker crust lies west of this. The concentration of shallow (<25km deep) seismicity between 143- 144°E further indicates a broad zone of crustal extension in the SE part of the Mariana Trough encompassing the WSRT. In contrast, peridotite was not recovered from 8 dives east of WSRBF and only recovered in 3 out of 19 total samplings; these peridotites may sample incipient serpentinite mud volcanoes forming along the disrupted outer forearc. Diabase was recovered from 3 out of 8 Shinkai dives east of the WSRBF and 4 out of 19 total samplings, indicating that dikes or sills are exposed at depths accessible to Shinkai, consistent with what is likely to be exposed for Mariana inner forearc crustal thicknesses of ~20-25 km. Gabbro and pyroxenite is reasonably common among samples from west of WSRBF (0 of 4 Shinkai dives; 7 of 26 total samples) and scarcer

  7. The Structural Evolution of the Calabrian Forearc: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Investigating Time-Transgressive Deformation in a Subduction-Rollback System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Margaret A.

    This dissertation investigates the temporal and spatial variations in deformation of the Calabrian forearc during the evolution of the subduction-rollback system. In addition to contributing new data to the area, I develop three strategies for understanding recent and active deformation by linking long-term structural data with short-term geomorphological data. First, setting a "baseline" of deformation is important when studying plate boundaries. Through the structural mapping of an uplifted forearc basin, I conclude that rapid rollback is characterized by tectonic quiescence in the Calabrian forearc when it is located far from collision (from ~12 Ma -- ~5 Ma). This "baseline" provides a framework from which I interpret younger phases of deformation. In the middle Pliocene (~5-4 Ma), an arc-parallel shortening event characterizes the first stage of forearc collision in my field area. These folded sediments are later tilted, but structural data from the field cannot constrain the age or structure responsible for this youngest phase of deformation. The Neto River dissects this tilted surface opening up the possibly of linking structural data with geomorphic data from river erosion. I collected a transect of river sediment samples for 10Be analysis to determine variation in catchment-wide erosion rates through the modern day deformation. I, then, developed a numerical model that describes changes in erosion rate through time with the structural growth of the tilted surface. The model is the first of its kind to use catchment-wide erosion rates to constrain a structural model. The model results constrain the age of the beginning of deformation to 850 ka and suggest that a fold with a migrating hinge caused tilting of the surface. The model provides the basis for my hypothesis that the forearc is experiencing an arc-perpendicular shortening strain, which contradicts conclusions from GPS data and the well-documented extension in the western part of the forearc. To

  8. GPS Constraints on Lesser Antilles Forearc Motion and Rigid Caribbean Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, A. M.; Stein, S.; Sella, G.; Dixon, T. H.; Calais, E.; Jansma, P. E.

    2005-05-01

    We are using a decade of Global Positioning System data to address two tectonic problems of the Caribbean (CA) plate; 1) Whether a forearc sliver exists along the Lesser Antilles forearc and if so what is its dynamics and location, and 2) Whether the Caribbean plate is deforming internally. We approach this problem by developing GPS-derived velocity vectors at sites within the CA plate and its boundaries and comparing them to four decades of earthquake data. In a number of subduction zones, misfits between slip vectors and predicted convergence azimuths from Euler vectors suggest the presence of a forearc sliver, where trench-parallel motion is accommodated along a strike-slip fault system. Such a situation may be occurring at the eastern boundary of the CA plate along the Lesser Antilles (LA) forearc, where the North America (NA) plate subducts obliquely. Comparing slip vectors of shallow (0-60 km) thrust events to the predicted motions of GPS-based Euler vectors show a systematic northerly misfit, suggesting a trench-parallel component of motion taken up by the forearc sliver. This possibility can be tested with GPS data from the forearc. In addition, we use new GPS data to constrain the internal rigidity of the plate. Previous GPS work yielded a possible upper bound on internal deformation of 4-6 mm/yr. With an expansion in the data set on critically located stations in the CA plate (SANA, ROJO, CRO1 and AVES), we have computed new sets of Euler vector pairs for the CA-NA and CA-South America plate pairs.

  9. Multi-Channel Seismic Images of the Mariana Forearc: EW0202 Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, A. J.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Taylor, B.; Moore, G. F.; Fryer, P.

    2002-12-01

    During the Spring of 2002, the Mariana Subduction Factory was surveyed using multi-channel seismics (MCS) as the first major phase of a US-Japanese collaborative NSF-MARGINS funded project. The resulting geophysical transects extend from the Pacific Plate to the West Mariana remnant arc. For details of this survey, including the results from the back-arc, refer to Taylor et al. (this session). The incoming Pacific Plate and its accompanying seamounts are deformed by plate flexure, resulting in extension of the upper crust as it enters the subduction zone. The resultant trench parallel faults dominate the bathymetry and MCS data. Beneath the forearc, in the southern transects near Saipan, the subducting slab is imaged to a distance of 50-60 km arcward. In addition to ubiquitous trench parallel normal faulting, a N-S transect of the forearc clearly shows normal faults perpendicular to the trench resulting from N-S extension. On the east side of the Mariana Ridge, thick sediment packages extend into the forearc. Directly east of Saipan and Tinian, a large, deeply scouring slide mass is imaged. Several serpentine mud volcanoes (Big Blue, Turquoise and Celestial) were imaged on the Mariana Forearc. Deep horizontal reflectors (likely original forearc crust) are imaged under the flanks of some of these seamounts. A possible "throat" reflector is resolved on multiple profiles at the summit of Big Blue, the northern-most seamount in the study area. The flanks of Turquoise seamount terminate in toe thrusts that represent uplift and rotation of surrounding sediments as the volcano grows outward. These thrusts form a basal ridge around the seamount similar to that previously noted encircling Conical Seamount. Furthermore, MCS data has revealed that some forearc highs previously thought to be fault blocks are in actuality mud volcanoes.

  10. Fragility of Forearc Stresses as a Consequence of Extreme Weakness of Megathrust Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Brown, L. N.; He, J.; Sun, T.

    2015-12-01

    There is mounting evidence that subduction megathrusts are extremely weak. The weakness is based on a spatial and temporal average. Spatially, a seismogenic megathrust may host interspersed stronger and weaker patches due to variations in pore fluid pressure, gouge properties, and fault zone structure. In the 2011 M=9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, one strong patch underwent a local stress drop of several tens of MPa, although the rupture-zone average of the stress drop is less than 5 MPa on the basis of all the (> 20) published rupture models for this earthquake that we have examined. Temporally, megathrust strength fluctuates in earthquake cycles, punctuated by coseismic weakening or strengthening of different patches. Using finite element modeling, we demonstrate that the weakness of the megathrust leads to a fragile state of stress in the overlying forearc wedge, where compression due to plate coupling and tension due to gravity are in a subtle balance that can be tipped by small perturbations. Prior to the Tohoku-oki earthquake, the Japan Trench forearc was predominantly under margin-normal compression, a state that can be modeled using an effective friction coefficient of 0.032 for the megathrust. In a coseismic deformation model, an average stress drop of about 4 MPa on the megathrust changes the offshore forearc into tension. This is consistent with the observed stress reversal in this region as a result of the Tohoku-oki earthquake. The same level of coseismic stress drop would not cause the observed forearc stress reversal if the megathrust was assumed to have a higher strength such as 0.045. The state of stress in the offshore forearc is so fragile that large changes can be caused by other seemingly benign perturbing factors. For example, without the ocean water compressing the continental slope, much of the offshore forearc would no longer be in compression even if the megathrust strength were twice the value of 0.032. If the slope angle of the continental

  11. Active and long-lived permanent forearc deformation driven by the subduction seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron Melo, Felipe Alejandro

    I have used geological, geophysical and engineering methods to explore mechanisms of upper plate, brittle deformation at active forearc regions. My dissertation particularly addresses the permanent deformation style experienced by the forearc following great subduction ruptures, such as the 2010 M w8.8 Maule, Chile and 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquakes. These events triggered large, shallow seismicity on upper plate normal faults above the rupture reaching Mw7.0. First I present new structural data from the Chilean Coastal Cordillera over the rupture zone of the Maule earthquake. The study area contains the Pichilemu normal fault, which produced the large crustal aftershocks of the megathrust event. Normal faults are the major neotectonic structural elements but reverse faults also exist. Crustal seismicity and GPS surface displacements show that the forearc experiences pulses of rapid coseismic extension, parallel to the heave of the megathrust, and slow interseismic, convergence-parallel shortening. These cycles, over geologic time, build the forearc structural grain, reactivating structures properly-oriented respect to the deformation field of each stage of the interplate cycle. Great subduction events may play a fundamental role in constructing the crustal architecture of extensional forearc regions. Static mechanical models of coseismic and interseismic upper plate deformation are used to explore for distinct features that could result from brittle fracturing over the two stages of the interplate cycle. I show that the semi-elliptical outline of the first-order normal faults along the Coastal Cordillera may define the location of a characteristic, long-lived megathrust segment. Finally, using data from the Global CMT catalog I analyzed the seismic behavior through time of forearc regions that have experienced great subduction ruptures >Mw7.7 worldwide. Between 61% and 83% of the cases where upper plate earthquakes exhibited periods of increased seismicity

  12. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  13. Cenozoic evolution of San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bartow, J.A.

    1988-03-01

    The Neogene San Joaquin basin in the southern part of the 700-km long Great Valley of California is a successor to a late Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary forearc basin. The transition from forearc basin to the more restricted Neogene marine basin occurred principally during the Paleogene as the plate tectonic setting changed from oblique convergence to normal convergence, and finally to the initiation of tangential (transform) movement near the end of the Oligocene. Regional-scale tectonic events that affected the basin include: (1) clockwise rotation of the southernmost Sierra Nevada, and large-scale en echelon folding in the southern Diablo Range, both perhaps related to Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary right slip on the proto-San-Andreas fault; (2) regional uplift of southern California in the Oligocene that resulted from the subduction of the Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge: (3) extensional tectonism in the Basin and Range province, particularly in the Miocene; (4) wrench tectonism adjacent to the San Andreas fault in the Neogene; (5) northeastward emplacement of a wedge of the Franciscan complex at the west side of the Sierran block, with associated deep-seated thrusting in the late Cenozoic; and (6) the accelerated uplift of the Sierra Nevada beginning in the late Miocene. Neogene basin history was controlled principally by the tectonic effects of the northwestward migration of the Mendocino triple junction along the California continental margin and by the subsequent wrench tectonism associated with the San Andreas fault system. East-west compression in the basin, resulting from extension in the Basin and Range province was an important contributing factor to crustal shortening at the west side of the valley. Analysis of the sedimentary history of the basin, which was controlled to some extent by eustatic sea level change, enables reconstruction of the basin paleogeography through the Cenozoic.

  14. Intestinal and blood parasites of man in Bireuen and Takengon, Aceh Province, Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Stafford, E E; Joesoef, A

    1976-12-01

    A survey for blood and intestinal parasites was carried out in Aceh Province of North Sumatra, Indonesia. A total of 348 stool specimens were obtained from 167 males and 181 females ranging in age from 6 months to 70 years. Over 98% of the population sampled were found infected with at least one intestinal parasite. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm and Entamoeba coli, in that order, were the most common parasites detected. Other intestinal parasites found less frequently were Entamoeba histolytica, Iodamoeba bütschlii, Entamoeba hartmanni, Endolimax nana and Giardia lamblia, Brugia malayi microfilaraemias were detected in 2% of those examined and only in the coastal villages of Cot Ketapang and Rusip Dayah. No malaria was found. PMID:1030850

  15. Obliquely convergent plate motion and its relation with forearc sliver movement, El Salvador volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoff, B.; DeMets, C.; Garibaldi, N.; Hernandez, W.; Hernandez, D.

    2012-12-01

    The magmatic arc in El Salvador is interpreted to result from the subduction of the Cocos plate underneath the Caribbean plate along the Middle America trench. In addition, El Salvador contains a fore-arc sliver that moves 11 mm/yr westward relative to the back-arc. Well-defined strike-slip faults along the magmatic arc accommodate forearc sliver motion, but are offset at several locations by en echelon pull-apart step-overs with abundant normal faults. All basaltic-andesitic magmatic centers (San Miguel, San Vincente, San Salvador, Santa Ana) are located within these step-overs, while the two major rhyolitic calderas (Ilopango, Coatepeque) occur directly along the strike-slip faults. There are two puzzling aspects about the strike-slip tectonism. First, a silicic, shallow magma body that intrudes the San Miguel fault zone (part of the El Salvador fault system) was emplaced syn-tectonically (sigmoidal field and magnetic foliations, subhorizontally plunging magnetic lineations and dextral shear at the microscale). Within the dextrally sheared portion of the intrusion, an obsidian band with a 40Ar/39Ar age of 7.46 Ma indicates that dextral strike-slip tectonism in the Salvadoran arc has been an ongoing process for ~7.5 Ma. This casts significant doubt on whether Cocos ridge subduction (that started ~1 Ma ago) is the cause of the ongoing forearc movement. The potentially more significant problem is that the fore-arc sliver in El Salvador moves 11 mm/yr westward relative to the back-arc despite a nearly orthogonal angle of convergence (with a convergence rate of ~77 mm/yr) near El Salvador and absence of significant frictional coupling along the subduction interface. Further, GPS indicates that the Nicaraguan and Salvadoran forearcs define a semi-rigid sliver moving at nearly the same trench-parallel rates despite along-trench changes in the subduction angle. Consequently, it is tempting to attribute the movement of both forearc slivers to Cocos ridge subduction

  16. Controls on the fore-arc CO2 flux along the Central America margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Barry, P. H.; Ramirez, C. J.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Patel, B. S.; Virrueta, C.; Blackmon, K.

    2015-12-01

    The subduction of carbon to the deep mantle via subduction zones is interrupted by outputs via the fore-arc, volcanic front, and back-arc regions. Whereas output fluxes for arc and back-arc locales are well constrained for the Central America Volcanic Arc (CAVA) [1-2], the fore-arc flux via cold seeps and ground waters is poorly known. We present new He and CO2 data (isotopes and relative abundances) for the volcanic front and inner fore-arc of western Panama to complement on-going studies of fore-arc C-fluxes in Costa Rica [3-4] and to determine tectonic controls on the fore-arc C-outgassing fluxes. Helium isotope (3He/4He) values at Baru, La Yeguada, and El Valle volcanoes are high (5-8RA), consistent with results for other Central America volcanoes. However, CO2/3He values are variable (from > 1012 to < 108). Baru has an arc-like δ13C of - 4‰, whereas the other volcanoes have δ13C < -10 ‰. Cold seeps collected in the coastal fore-arc of Panama show a trend of decreasing He-isotopes from west (~6RA) to east (~1RA). This trend is mirrored by δ13C (-5‰ to <-20‰) values. CO2/3He values of the seeps are also variable and fall between 106 and 1012. Using CO2/3He-δ13C mixing plots with conventional endmember values for Limestone, Organic Sediment and Mantle CO2, we show that several Panama samples have been extensively modified by crustal processes. Nevertheless, there are clear west-to east trends (both volcanoes and coastal seeps), whereby L dominates the CO2 inventory in the west, similar to Costa Rica, and S-derived CO2 increases eastward towards central Panama. Previously [4], we limited the Costa Rica subaerial fore-arc flux to ~ 6 × 107 gCkm-1yr-1, or ~ 4% of the total incoming sedimentary C-load. This flux diminishes to zero within ~400 km to the east of Baru volcano. The transition from orthogonal subduction of the Cocos Plate to oblique subduction of the Nazca Plate, relative to the common over-riding Caribbean Plate, is the major impediment to

  17. Quaternary Tectonic and Climatic Processes shaping the Central Andean hyperarid forearc (southern Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Benavente, Carlos; Zerathe, Swann; Saillard, Marianne; Hall, Sarah R.; Farber, Daniel L.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the forearc structure and processes related to Quaternary evolution and uplift of the Western Andean Cordillera remains an outstanding scientific issue. Models of Andean Plateau evolution based on Tertiary volcanic stratigraphy since 5Ma suggest that the deformation was focused along the eastern margin of the plateau and that minimal uplift occurred along the Pacific margin. On the contrary, new tectonic data and Quaternary surface 10Be dating highlight the presence of recently active deformation, incision and alluvial processes within the upper Andean forearc together with a regional uplift of the coastal zone. Additionally, the high obliquity observed in the northern Arica Bend region makes it an ideal target to discuss whether partitioning of the oblique convergence is accommodated by the neotectonic features that dissect the Quaternary forearc. Our goals are both to decipher the Quaternary tectonic and climatic processes shaping the hyperarid forearc along strike and across strike. Finally, we aim to quantify the respective influence of these factors in the overall uplift of the Western Andes. Indeed, sequences of pediment surfaces, landslide products, paleolake deposits and marine terraces found along the oblique Peruvian margin are a unique set of datable markers that can be used to quantify the rates of Quaternary processes. In this study, we focus on the southern Peru hyperarid Atacama area where regional surfaces and tectonic markers (scarps, folds, temporary streams and paleolake levels offsets…) are well preserved for the Quaternary timescale. Numerous landsliding events align on the major fault segments and reflect Plio-Pleistocene climatic and tectonic activity together with filled and strath terraces. As the present day sea-level is one of the highest levels recorded for Quaternary time span, any emerged marine terrace is preserved by tectonic coastal uplift. In particular, the geomorphic and chronologic correlation between marine and

  18. Lower Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolites formed in the Gangdese forearc: Evidence from paleomagnetism, sediment provenance, and stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wentao; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Maffione, Marco; Orme, Devon A.; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Guilmette, Carl; Ding, Lin; Guo, Zhaojie; Kapp, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The India-Asia suture zone of southern Tibet exposes Lower Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolites and radiolarian cherts, and time-equivalent Asian-derived clastic forearc sedimentary rocks (Xigaze Group). These ophiolites have been interpreted to have formed in the forearc of the north-dipping subduction zone below Tibet that produced the Gangdese magmatic arc around 15-20°N, or in the forearc of a sub-equatorial intra-oceanic subduction zone. To better constrain the latitude of the ophiolites, we carried out an integrated paleomagnetic, geochronologic and stratigraphical study on epi-ophiolitic radiolarites (Chongdui and Bainang sections), and Xigaze Group turbiditic sandstones unconformably overlying the ophiolite's mantle units (Sangsang section). Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology of tuffaceous layers from the Chongdui section and sandstones of the Xigaze Group at the Sangsang section provides maximum depositional ages of 116.5 ± 3.1 Ma and 128.8 ± 3.4 Ma, respectively, for the Chongdui section and an Asian provenance signature for the Xigaze Group. Paleomagnetic analyses, integrated with rock magnetic experiments, indicate significant compaction-related inclination 'shallowing' of the remanence within the studied rocks. Two independent methods are applied for the inclination shallowing correction of the paleomagnetic directions from the Sangsang section, yielding consistent mean paleolatitudes of 16.2°N [13°N, 20.9°N] and 16.8°N [11.1°N, 23.3°N], respectively. These results are indistinguishable from recent paleolatitude estimates for the Gangdese arc in southern Tibet. Radiolarites from the Chongdui and Bainang sections yield low paleomagnetic inclinations that would suggest a sub-equatorial paleolatitude, but the distribution of the paleomagnetic directions in these rocks strongly suggests a low inclination bias by compaction. Our data indicate that spreading of the Xigaze ophiolite occurred in the Gangdese forearc, and formed the basement of the forearc

  19. Hydrocarbon habitat of the Tuz Golu basin, central Anatolia, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    More, C.; Bird, P.R.; Clark-Lowes, D.D. )

    1988-08-01

    The Tuz Golu basin (TGB) of central Anatolia has been interpreted as a northwest-southeast-aligned terraced forearc basin that accumulated a Maastrichtian to Holocene, predominantly terrigenous, sedimentary succession. Evidence is presented from an integrated study incorporating all seismic, gravity, and well data for the following basin evolution. (1) Late Cretaceous sedimentation on the west of the Kirsehir block with a diverse assemblage of facies including terrestrial, possible sabkha, shallow marine carbonate and turbidite deposits; (2) eastward subduction of Neotethys beginning in the Maastrichtian and development of the Tuz Golu as a forearc basin; (3) deposition of a thick Paleocene to Eocene flysch succession; (4) late Eocene inversion of the thick flysch section along the central axis of the basin and development of flanking shallow basins; (5) late Eocene-Oligocene emergence with deposition of evaporites and red beds in a restricted basin, followed by suturing of continental blocks, uplift, and erosion; (6) dextral displacement along the Kochisar fault; (7) Oligocene-Miocene diapirism of Eocene salt along major faults in the western shallow basin; and (8) terrestrial and lacustrine sedimentation in the neotectonic TGB. Of the 22 wells drilled in the TGB, four contained oil or gas shows from formations of Paleocene to Miocene age. Potential shale source rocks occur in the Upper Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene sections. Cretaceous rudist reefs and Paleocene/Eocene sandstones provide target reservoirs, while Eocene salt represents an ideal seal. Late Eocene deformation created the major trap-forming structures of the basin.

  20. Impacts of soil and groundwater salinization on tree crop performance in post-tsunami Aceh Barat, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marohn, C.; Distel, A.; Dercon, G.; Wahyunto; Tomlinson, R.; Noordwijk, M. v.; Cadisch, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004 had far reaching consequences for agriculture in Aceh province, Indonesia, and particularly in Aceh Barat district, 150 km from the seaquake epicentre. In this study, the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of soil and groundwater salinity and their impact on tree crops were monitored in Aceh Barat from 2006 to 2008. On 48 sampling points along ten transects, covering 40 km of coastline, soil and groundwater salinity were measured and related to mortality and yield depression of the locally most important tree crops. Given a yearly rainfall of over 3000 mm, initial groundwater salinity declined rapidly from over 10 to less than 2 mS cm-1 within two years. On the other hand, seasonal dynamics of the groundwater table in combination with intrusion of saline water into the groundwater body led to recurring elevated salinity, sufficient to affect crops. Tree mortality and yield depression in the flooded area varied considerably between tree species. Damage to coconut (65% trees damaged) was related to tsunami run-up height, while rubber (50% trees damaged) was mainly affected by groundwater salinity. Coconut yields (-35% in average) were constrained by groundwater Ca2+ and Mg2+, while rubber yields (-65% on average) were related to groundwater chloride, pH and soil sodium. These findings have implications on planting deep-rooted tree crops as growth will be constrained by ongoing oscillations of the groundwater table and salinity.

  1. Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

  2. Forearc kinematics in obliquely convergent margins: Examples from Nicaragua and the northern Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Henry L., III

    In this study, I use surface velocities derived from GPS geodesy, elastic half-space dislocation models, and modeled Coulomb stress changes to investigate deformation in the over-riding plate at obliquely convergent margins at the leading and trailing edges of the Caribbean plate. The two principal study areas are western Nicaragua, where the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate, and the northern Lesser Antilles, where the North American plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate. In Nicaragua, plate convergence is rapid at 84 mm yr1 with a small angle of obliquity of 10° along a slightly concave portion of the Middle America Trench. GPS velocities for the period from 2000 to 2004 from sites located in the Nicaraguan forearc confirmed forearc sliver motion on the order of ˜14 mm yr1 in close agreement with the value predicted by DeMets (2001). These results are presented here in Chapter 3 and were reported in Geophysical Research Letters (Turner et al., 2007). GPS observations made on sites located in the interior and on the eastern coast of Nicaragua during the same time period were combined with new data from eastern Honduras to help better constrain estimates of rigid Caribbean plate motion (DeMets et al., 2007). Slip approaching the plate convergence rate along the Nicaraguan and El Salvadoran sections of the Middle America Trench was quantitatively demonstrated by finite element modeling of this section of the plate interface using GPS velocities from our Nicaraguan network together with velocities from El Salvador and Honduras as model constraints (Correa-Mora, 2009). The MW 6.9 earthquake that ruptured the seismogenic zone offshore Nicaragua on October 9, 2004 resulted in coseismic displacements and post-seismic motion at GPS sites in the central part of the Nicaraguan forearc that currently prevent extension of interseismic time-series in this region. An elastic half-space dislocation model was used to estimate coseismic displacements at these

  3. Thallium as a tracer of fluid-rock interaction in the shallow Mariana forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Sune G.; Klein, Frieder; Kading, Tristan; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Wickham, Katie

    2015-11-01

    Fluids driven off the subducting Pacific plate infiltrate the shallow Mariana forearc and lead to extensive serpentinization of mantle peridotite. However, the sources, pathways, and chemical modifications of ascending, slab-derived fluids remain poorly constrained and controversial. In this study, we use thallium (Tl) concentrations and isotopic ratios of serpentinized peridotite and rodingitized diabase from the South Chamorro and Conical Seamounts to discriminate between potential fluid sources with distinct Tl isotope compositions. Serpentinite samples from the Mariana forearc all display ε205 Tl > - 0.5 (where ε205 Tl = 10 , 000 × (205Tl /Tl203sample -205Tl /SRM 997 203Tl) / (205Tl / - 0.5 and, therefore, we interpret the heavy Tl isotope signatures as signifying that the serpentinizing fluids were derived from subducting pelagic sediments. A rodingitized diabase from Conical Seamount was found to have an ε205 Tl of 0.8, suggesting that sediment-sourced serpentinization fluids could also affect diabase and other mafic lithologies in the shallow Mariana forearc. Forearc rodingitization of diabase led to a strong depletion in Tl content and a virtually complete loss of K, Na and Rb. The chemical composition of hybrid fluids resulting from serpentinization of harzburgite with concomitant rodingitization of diabase can be highly alkaline, depleted in Si, yet enriched in Ca, Na, K, and Rb, which is consistent with the composition of fluids emanating from mud volcanoes in the Mariana forearc. Our study suggests that fluid-rock interactions between sedimentary, mafic, and

  4. Using 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating to determine the evolution of the Purgatorio active fault in the Andean forearc, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Benavente; Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Fabrizio, Delgado; Marianne, Saillard; Sarah, Hall R.; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Active transpressive deformation has been occurring along the Andean hyperarid forearc for the last 3 Myrs but many of these faults are still not described even if able to produce large damaging earthquakes. Active faulting along the northern part of the Arica Bend can be recognized due to the presence of well-preserved and sharp fault scarps indicating recent surface slip. During the Mio-Pliocene, deposition within the forearc continental basins resulted in the formation of vast fan deposits and conglomerates of the Moquegua Formation, which can be considered as bedrock in this exposure study (~45-4 Ma; Tosdal et al., 1984; Sebrier et al., 1988a; Roperch et al., 2006). The typical vertical Purgatorio fault scarps offset both the Moquegua bedrock and several younger geomorphic features associated with <300kyrs climatic and 400 years old volcanic extreme events. This study focus on quantifying slip rate variations in time along a 5-meters high vertical fault scarp to understand how the fault is evolving. These results are achieved via surface exposure dating of the sampled seismically broken cobbolds of the Moquegua formation outcroping vertically along the fault scarp. These samples are well-suited to the application of in situ produced cosmogenic radionuclides for surface exposure dating, as the hyperarid region has extremely low erosion rates. We sampled the scarp away from any significant drainage so as to avoid possibly disturbed areas. The sampling did involve extracting quarzite conglomeratic material along the bedrock scarp and on the upper surrounding crests. The aim has been to measure Berylium-20 TCN (Terrestrial in situ Cosmogenic Nuclides) concentrations to determine exposure age as a function of height on the scarp. This has been successfully employed on one scarp in Italy based on Chlorine-36 TCN (Palumbo et al., 2004). However, slow faults behaviour remains unclear and more contributions are needed. Quaternary activity of the Purgatorio fault system

  5. Heterogeneous density-structure of the northern Chile marine fore-arc and its relation to the rupture of the 2014 Mw8.2 Iquique earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, Andrei; Ruiz, Javier; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    gravity and the northern limit of the earthquake correlates with the location of a relatively high local gravity anomaly. This local gravity high corresponds to the southern border of the well developed Arica marine forearc basin. The models show that the frontal portion of the continental wedge in the studied area is formed by low density material that is interpreted as fractured rock. The location of the foreshocks suggests that the presence of this highly fractured material is related to the location of the rupture updip and the stress accommodation process after the earthquake. The results show that detailed studies of the forearc gravity signal provide information of the structures that can play a key role in the earthquakes along the current seismic gaps to the north and to the south of Iquique earthquake.

  6. Subduction-zone magnetic anomalies and implications for hydrated forearc mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Brocher, T.M.; Wells, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Continental mantle in subduction zones is hydrated by release of water from the underlying oceanic plate. Magnetite is a significant byproduct of mantle hydration, and forearc mantle, cooled by subduction, should contribute to long-wavelength magnetic anomalies above subduction zones. We test this hypothesis with a quantitative model of the Cascadia convergent margin, based on gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies and constrained by seismic velocities, and find that hydrated mantle explains an important disparity in potential-field anomalies of Cascadia. A comparison with aeromagnetic data, thermal models, and earthquakes of Cascadia, Japan, and southern Alaska suggests that magnetic mantle may be common in forearc settings and thus magnetic anomalies may be useful in mapping hydrated mantle in convergent margins worldwide. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  7. Utilization of the Local Government Health Insurance Scheme (JKA) for Maternal Health Services Among Women Living in Underdeveloped Areas of Aceh Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kesuma, Zurnila Marli; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi

    2015-04-01

    Aceh province of Indonesia created its own health coverage scheme called Jaminan Kesehatan Aceh (JKA) to cover Aceh's populations who were not registered under insurance for the poor (Jamkesmas). This study aims to compare the utilization rate of maternal health care (MHC) services and contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) before JKA, during the transition period, and after JKA had been established. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted from June 2011 to July 2012. Utilization of MHC services and CPR during the 3 periods was assessed using a questionnaire. The Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) test was used to examine the association between period and coverage. Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used to examine utilization and type of service, period of service, and type of scheme. Coverage of utilization of skilled birth attendants significantly improved among the JKA holders (odds ratio = 1.84; 95% confidence interval = 1.18-2.89). JKA, thus, has shown its positive impact.

  8. Deformation across the forearc of the Cascadia subduction zone at Cape Blanco, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Prescott, W.H.; Murray, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    Over the interval 1992-1999 the U.S. Geological Survey measured the deformation of a geodetic array extending N880°E (approximate direction of plate convergence) from Cape Blanco on the Oregon coast to the volcanic arc near Newberry Crater (55 and 350 km, respectively, from the deformation front). Within about 150 km from the deformation front, the forearc is being compressed arcward (N80°E) by coupling to the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. Dislocation modeling of the observed N80°E compression suggests that the main thrust zone (the locked portion of the Juan de Fuca-forearc interface) is about 40 km wide in the downdip direction. The transverse (N10°W) velocity component of the forearc measured with respect to the fixed interior of North America decreases with distance from the deformation front at a rate of about 0.03 mm yr-1 km-1. That gradient appears to be a consequence of rigid rotation of the forearc block relative to fixed interior North America (Euler vector of 43.4°±0.1° N, 120.0°±0.4° W, and -1.67±0.17° (m.y.)-1; quoted uncertainties are standard deviations). The rotation rate is similar to the paleomagnetically measured rotation rate (-1.0±0.2° (m.y.)-1) of the 15 Ma lava flows along the Columbia River 250 km farther north. The back arc does not appear to participate in this rotation but rather is migrating at a rate of about 3.6 mm yr-1northward with respect to fixed North America. That migration could be partly an artifact of an imperfect tie of our reference coordinate system to the interior of North America.

  9. Heterogeneous Oxidation in Supra-Subduction Settings: Evidence from Forearc Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, S.; Warren, J. M.; Cottrell, E.; Davis, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    The forearc region of subduction zones record the magmatic processes associated with subduction initiation. Volcanics from these regions are well studied, but the forearc lithospheric mantle is less well understood, partly due to the limited number of locations with peridotite exposed in situ. The Tonga and Mariana trenches are non-accretionary convergent margins where peridotites have been collected from the wall of the over-riding plate. These forearc peridotites present a unique opportunity to study the processes associated with subduction initiation from an in-situ source. Forearc peridotites from both localities show distinct chemical heterogeneity. While all samples are extremely refractory, as evidenced by low modal abundances of clinopyroxene, they differ significantly in terms of mineral compositions and accessory phases. Minerals present in a subset of samples include plagioclase, amphibole, and sulfides. Samples also vary significantly in spinel Cr# and wt% TiO2. We used the spinel peridotite oxygen barometer of Bryndzia and Wood (1990) to calculate the oxygen fugacity of the samples, calculating Fe3+/ΣFe ratio in spinels using Mössbauer-calibrated electron microprobe analysis. Samples from Mariana as well as one dredge from Tonga record elevated fO2 (1-2 log units above the QFM buffer), similar to results seen from subduction xenoliths. However, three other dredges from Tonga do not show this signature of oxidation, instead trending to high Cr# at a more ridge-like oxidation state (slightly below QFM). We interpret these non-oxidized values to be representative of primary mantle at the earliest stages of subduction, suggesting that sub-arc mantle is not oxidized prior to arc initiation. Elevated oxidation signatures then develop once this primary mantle interacts with arc-like melts and fluids related to dehydration of the subducting slab.

  10. A Numerical Study of Strain Partitioning and the Development of Forearc Slivers at Obliquely Convergent Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, K. L.; Haq, S. S.; Flesch, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oblique relative plate motion is common at convergent margins, often with a significant component of margin-parallel motion. At such margins, relative plate motion is often accommodated as spatially distinct margin-normal thrusting and margin-parallel shear, leading to the development of fore-arc slivers. These crustal slivers are bounded trench-ward by thrust faults and arc-ward by a well developed margin-parallel strike-slip fault and are observed in about half of all modern convergent boundaries. Some modestly oblique convergent settings are known to develop fore-arc slivers while some higher obliquity margins fail to effectively partition the margin-parallel component of plate motion in a distinct zone. Analog modeling has shown that pure frictional wedges only produce fore-arc like sliver motion at very high obliquities, however, the presence of ductile layers at depth can localize shear at lower obliquities. We have performed finite-element numerical simulations of oblique convergent wedges, over a wide range of obliquities, governed by viscous behavior at depth in which we solve force-balance equations for Stokes flow using COMSOL Multiphysics to quantify the magnitude and style of stress. Our numerical models reproduce topographic profiles and surface velocity fields of similarly parameterized analog experiments and demonstrate a progressive localization of margin-parallel shear with wedge growth. We also observe the onset and localization of shear in all wedges of non-zero obliquity, which we quantify by comparing the magnitudes of principal compressional and extensional stress tensor axes to constrain the timing of the transition between intermediate and high partitioning of strain in evolving wedges. These results suggest, in conjunction with analog models, that viscous behavior at depth and increase in topography during convergence both work to localize margin-parallel shear in obliquely convergent wedges and gives a mechanism for the development of

  11. New insights into the North American Cordillera forearc: Cretaceous to Eocene tectonic evolution of the Leech River Schist, Southern Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Johannes; Johnston, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The Leech River Complex on southern Vancouver Island is a part of the Pacific Rim Terrane of the North American Cordillera and comprises a series of fault-bounded slices of mainly meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous rocks of Triassic to Cretaceous age. The tectono-metamorphic history of this unit provides important constraints on the history of terrane accretion and the paleogeographic and tectonic evolution of the western North American forearc region. Our focus is on the structures and tectonic fabrics that developed within the western most part of the Leech River Schist from ~88 Ma through ~37 Ma. Similar syn- and post-instrusive structures that developed during emplacement of the ~88 Ma Jordan River meta-granodiorite and the ~51 Ma Walker Creek Intrusions respectively, indicate a consistent stress field during >35 m.y. of northward translation of the outboard Cordilleran terranes. A regional high temperature, Staurolite-Andalusite-grade metamorphic event is recorded in the meta-sedimentary rocks. Subcretion of the Crescent terrane beneath the Leech River Schist at ~51 Ma caused folding of the metamorphic rocks, the development of a system of dextral and sinistral brittle shears, and normal faulting. Related extension to the northwest resulted in the opening of Barkley Sound and the more westerly marine Tofino basin. These multi-faceted deformational structures are most likely a direct consequence of the subcretion of the Crescent terrane and the linked development of the Southern Vancouver Island Orocline. The deposition of sandstones and conglomerates of the Sooke Formation began at ca. 37 Ma. This siliciclastic sequence unconformably overlies the Leech River Schist, records rapid subsidence of the forearc following a preceding uplift and exhumation event, and may be a record of a younger subcretion event.

  12. Forearc deformation and megasplay fault system of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S.; Yeh, Y.; Sibuet, J.; Tsai, C.; Doo, W.

    2011-12-01

    A great tsunami caused by a subduction earthquake had struck south Ryukyu islands and killed ~12000 people in 1771. Here we report the existence of a megasplay fault system along the south Ryukyu forearc. Analyses of deep multi-channel seismic reflection profiles indicate that the megasplay fault system is rising from the summit of a ~1 km high mount sitting on a ~5° landward dipping subducted plate interface. The fault system has accumulated large strain as evidenced by the active and widespread normal faults in the inner wedge. The along-trench length of the megasplay fault system is estimated to be ~450 km. The origin of this south Ryukyu megasplay fault system is linked to the subduction of elevated ridges parallel to the fracture zones. In contrast, no similar splay fault system is found in the west of 125. 5°E where the oblique subduction has produced shear zones along the south Ryukyu forearc. We infer that the megasplay fault system is responsible for the 1771 south Ryukyu tsunami. Likewise, after a quiescence of ~240 years, a near-future great earthquake and tsunami is anticipated as the extensional feature is strongly widespread over the south Ryukyu forearc.

  13. Long-term and Short-term Vertical Deformation Rates across the Forearc in the Central Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.; Gaidzik, K.; Forman, S. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial scales of the earthquake cycle, from rapid deformation associated with earthquake rupture to slow deformation associated with interseismic and transient slow-slip behavior, span from fractions of a meter to thousands of kilometers (plate boundaries). Similarly, temporal scales range from seconds during an earthquake rupture to thousands of years of strain accumulation between earthquakes. The complexity of the multiple physical processes operating over this vast range of scales and the limited coverage of observations leads most scientists to focus on a narrow space-time window to isolate just one or a few process. We discuss here preliminary results on the vertical crustal deformation associated with both slow and rapid crustal deformation along a profile across the forearc region of the central Mexican subduction zone on the Guerrero sector, where the Cocos plate underthrusts the North American plate. This sector of the subduction zone is characterized by a particular slab geometry (with zones of rapid bending-unbending of the slab), irregular distributed seismicity, exceptionally large slow slip events (SSE) and non-volcanic tremors (NVT). We used the river network and geomorphic features of the Papagayo River to assess Quaternary crustal deformation. The Papagayo drainage network is strongly controlled by Late Cenozoic tectonic, Holocene and recent earthquake cycle processes. This is particularly true for the southern section of the drainage basin; from the dam in La Venta to the river mouth, where W-E structures commonly offset the course of the main river. River terraces occur along the course of the river at different elevations. We measured the height of a series of terraces and obtained OSL ages on quartz extracts to determine long-term rates of deformation. Finally, we discuss associations of the topography and river characteristics with the Cocos slab geometry, slow earthquakes, crustal deformation, and interseismic deformation.

  14. Forearc hyperextension by detachment faulting and ophiolite dismemberment: examples from the Yarlung Tsangpo Suture Zone (Southern Tibet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffione, M.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Huang, W.; Koornneef, L.; Guilmette, C.; Borneman, N.; Hodges, K. V.; Kapp, P. A.; Lin, D.

    2014-12-01

    The broad deformation zone of the Himalayan belt and Tibetan plateau is largely the product of continent-continent collision between India and Eurasia plates since the Early Eocene. Ophiolites exposed along the Yarlung Tsangpo Suture Zone (southern Tibet) demonstrate that a long-lasting intra-oceanic subduction zone must have played a significant role in accommodating closure of the >7500 km wide Neotethyan Ocean before continental collision. Their study can provide key constraints on the initial history of the Neotethyan subduction systems, and the following formation and emplacement of the ophiolite. Paleomagnetic analyses of the sheeted dykes complex of ophiolites have been successfully applied in the past to reconstruct the initial geometry of the spreading system associated to the ophiolite formation. Furthermore, oceanic detachment faults, structures widely occurring in modern magma-poor (slow-spreading) mid-ocean ridges, have been recently recognized also in ophiolites (i.e., Mirdita ophiolite of Albania), and (if present) their study may provide unique insights into the geodynamics and geometry of the associated spreading system. The YZSZ ophiolites form a 2500 km long belt mainly composed of dismembered ultramafic massifs locally covered by a crustal sequence and oceanic sediments, underlying a regionally continuous clastic Xigaze sedimentary basin interpreted as the Tibetan forearc. Our study focused along a ~250 km transect within the eastern sector of the YZSZ between the Sangsang and Xigatze ophiolite. Paleomagnetic, structural geological, and geochemical analyses evidenced the presence of fossil oceanic detachment faults that locally (Sangsang) exposed the lowermost units (mantle) directly at the seafloor. Based on this evidence, and the reconstructed rotation pattern of the region we propose a tectonic evolutionary model characterized by the interplay between magmatic crustal accretion and trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular tectonic extension

  15. Geology of the Eel River basin and adjacent region: implications for late Cenozoic tectonics of the southern Cascadia subduction zone and Mendocino triple junction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    Two upper Cenozoic depositional sequences of principally marine strata about 4000m thick overlie accreted basement terranes of the Central and Coastal belts of the Franciscan Complex in the onshore-offshore Eel River basin of northwestern California. The older depositional sequence is early to middle Miocene in age and represents slope basin and slope-blanket deposition, whereas the younger sequence, late Miocene to middle Pleistocene in age, consists largely of forearc basin deposits. -from Author

  16. Quantifying Strain Budgets in the Cascadia Forearc Using a Catalog of Quaternary Crustal Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, P. A.

    2002-12-01

    Comparing geologic strain rates with geodetic and plate kinematic rates provides a useful method of separating crustal strain from the much larger interplate strain. Current geodetic models of the Cascadia subduction boundary attempt to separate observed crustal velocities into two components: (1) westward motion attributed to a locked megathrust and (2) northward motion attributed to translation of forearc crustal blocks. Owing to sparse spatial observations, these models treat forearc motion as a continuum defined by rotation about an Euler pole. Yet a significant portion of this motion is localized on crustal faults that occur as narrow zones within the forearc. The current resolution of geodetic measurements is insufficient to resolve the strain associated with these faults. Therefore, cataloging active crustal faults in the Pacific Northwest is crucial for assessing the seismic hazard and identifying areas with differential motion that might benefit from denser geodetic observations. For example, the Oregon Coast Range (OCR) block translates northward at ~8 mm/y in coastal Washington and a fault zone at its NW boundary converts 2-3 mm/y of this translation into permanent crustal shortening. The remaining 5-6 mm/y of differential motion may be accommodated in the Olympic Mountains which are uplifting as much as ~3 mm/y, or as broad-scale buckling of the OCR basement beneath southern Washington. These geologic, geodetic, and kinematic comparisons are also essential for investigating aseismic displacement and constraining its contribution to observed strain. For example, plate convergence at the southern end of the Cascadia forearc is ~45 mm/y. About 15 mm/y of this relative convergence is observed geodetically onshore. Crustal fault slip accounts for ~10 mm/y of the measured contraction, suggesting that only 5 mm/y is accumulating on the megathrust and leaving as much as 30 mm/y to be accounted for as aseismic slip. These two examples demonstrate the complexity

  17. Constraining the Fore-Arc Flux Along the Central America Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Barry, P. H.; Ramirez, C. J.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Patel, B. S.; Blackmon, K.

    2014-12-01

    The transport of carbon to the deep mantle via subduction zones is interrupted by outputs via the fore-arc, volcanic front, and back-arc regions. Whereas output fluxes for the front and back-arc locales are well constrained for Central America (CA) [1], the fore-arc flux via cold seeps and groundwaters is virtually unknown. We present new He and CO2 data for the inner fore-arc of Costa Rica and western Panama to complement our study [2] of offshore CO2fluxes on the outer-forearc. On the Nicoya Peninsula, the Costa Rica Pacific coastline (including the Oso Peninsula) and the Talamanca Mountain Range, as well as coastal seeps in Panama, coupled CO2-He studies allow recognition of mantle (3He/4He up to 6RA) and crustal inputs to the volatile inventory. We associate the crustal component with CO2 derived from limestone (L) and organic sediments (S) on the subducting slab, and see a decrease in the L/S ratio trench-ward with the lowest values akin to those of diatomaceous ooze in the uppermost sequence of the subducting sediment package. This observation is consistent with the removal of the uppermost organic-rich sediment from deep subduction by under-plating. As the input carbon fluxes of the individual sedimentary layers are well constrained [3], we can limit the potential steady-state flux of carbon loss at the subaerial fore-arc to ~ 6 × 107 gCkm-1yr-1, equivalent to ~88% of the input flux of C associated with the ooze, or <4% of the total incoming sedimentary C. This study confirms that the greatest loss of slab-derived carbon at the CA margin occurs at the volcanic front with recycling efficiencies between 12% (Costa Rica) and 29% (El Salvador) of the sedimentary input [1]. It also demonstrates the utility of the coupled He-CO2approach for mass balance studies at subduction zones. [1] De Leeuw et al., EPSL, 2007; [2] Furi et al., G-cubed, 2010; [3] Li and Bebout, JGR, 2005.

  18. A permanent record of subduction zone earthquake cycle deformation in the northern Chilean forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, J. P.; Allmendinger, R. W.; Pritchard, M. E.; González, G.

    2006-12-01

    Patterns of faulting in the northern Chilean forearc are consistent with modeled stress fields resulting from the subduction zone earthquake cycle. We define positive Coulomb stress change as encouraging normal faulting motion on steeply-dipping planes striking approximately parallel to the plate boundary, as shown by fault kinematic data collected in the field. Simulations show that coastal regions experience positive Coulomb stress changes due to interseismic strain accumulation on the subduction interface. This is compatible with the structural character of the forearc, typified by 100 m-scale scarps constructed by normal faulting. Conversely, the best-constrained models of interplate slip associated with the 1995 Mw 8.0 Antofagasta earthquake indicate that near-surface coastal areas experienced either zero or negative coseismic stress change, implying that subduction zone earthquakes may be capable of driving reverse motion on these structures if the absolute stress level is sufficiently low. Field exposures show minor amounts of reverse reactivation of some normal faults, expressed both through bedrock exposure and scarp morphology. The consistency between deformation fields related to the seismic cycle and permanent strain demonstrated by observable structures argues for the long-term influence of the earthquake cycle on the structural evolution of the forearc. The distribution of normal and reverse faulting as well as open cracks can thus be used to gain insight into the plate boundary processes that drive the evolution of structures. The change in strike and eastward step of the Atacama Fault System around the latitude of the Mejillones Peninsula (23°S) coincides with a change in subduction zone locking depth from ~35 km south of the peninsula to ~50 km to the north as determined through analyses of teleseismic, local seismic, and GPS data. Dense arrays of open cracks in several forearc localities show mean strikes consistent with static extension axes

  19. Emplacement, growth, and gravitational deformation of serpentinite seamounts on the Mariana forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, A. J.; Taylor, B.; Fryer, P.; Moore, G. F.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Morgan, J. K.

    2007-08-01

    Serpentinite seamounts, representing some of the first material outputs of the recycling process that takes place in subduction zones, are found on the outer Mariana forearc. Multichannel seismic (MCS) and bathymetric data collected in 2002 image the large-scale structures of five seamounts, as well as the pre-seamount basement geometry and sediment stratigraphy. We present data from three edifices that provide insights into seamount growth and internal deformation processes and allow us to support the interpretation that serpentinite mud volcanoes are formed by the episodic eruption of mud flows from a central region. The presence of thrust faulting at the base of Turquoise and Big Blue Seamounts, along with the low surface slopes (5°-18°) of all the seamounts studied, lead us to infer that these edifices spread laterally and are subject to gravitational deformation as they grow. Numerical simulations using the discrete element method (DEM) were used to model their growth and the origins of features that we see in MCS sections, such as basal thrusts, inward-dipping reflections and mid-flank benches. The DEM simulations successfully reproduced many of the observed features. Simulations employing very low basal and internal friction coefficients (~0.1 and ~0.4, respectively) provide the best match to the overall morphology and structures of the serpentinite seamounts. However the simulations do not capture all of the processes involved in seamount growth, such as withdrawal of material from a central conduit leading to summit deflation; compaction, dewatering and degassing of mud flows; mass wasting in the form of sector collapse and growth upon a dipping substrate. A strong reflection beneath the summit of Big Blue, the largest serpentinite seamount on the Mariana forearc, represents the floor of a summit depression that has been partially in-filled by younger muds, supporting the idea that serpentinite seamounts grow by episodic mud volcanism. Boundaries of mud

  20. Outbreak of tetanus cases following the tsunami in Aceh Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Aceh Province in Indonesia was the area most severely affected by the tsunami of 26 December 2004. Extensive loss of life, property, and livelihood left a large segment of the population without basic needs and vulnerable to epidemic-prone diseases. Following the tsunami, a surveillance/early warning and response system was implemented to detect, investigate, and respond to outbreaks of communicable diseases. Fixed and mobile clinics, hospitals, and laboratories, operating all over the affected areas, reported weekly figures and daily alerts. Over 1 month following the tsunami, 106 cases of clinically diagnosed tetanus were reported. Most cases occurred among adults. The case fatality ratio was 18.9%, higher among older patients and among those with short incubation periods. No other major outbreaks occurred in the acute phase of the emergency. This series of tetanus cases was the largest cluster reported following a natural disaster or mass casualty event, overtaken only by the recent earthquake in the Kashmir (139 cases reported), and reflects the high number of injuries which occurred during the tsunami and poor prior immunization status of the population. In the context of natural disasters, preventive measures against tetanus, including wound cleaning and active and passive immunization, should be routinely conducted. Immediate disaster relief should include supplies for the management of wounds and cases of tetanus.

  1. Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami wave impact in west Aceh

    PubMed Central

    Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos; Marohn, Carsten; Dercon, Gerd; Dewi, Sonya; Piepho, Hans Peter; Joshi, Laxman; van Noordwijk, Meine; Cadisch, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In a tsunami event human casualties and infrastructure damage are determined predominantly by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. On land, wave energy is attenuated by gravitation (elevation) and friction (land cover). Tree belts have been promoted as “bioshields” against wave impact. However, given the lack of quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, tree belts have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. This study used 180 transects perpendicular to over 100 km on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia to analyze the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the impact of the 2004 tsunami. Satellite imagery; land cover maps; land use characteristics; stem diameter, height, and planting density; and a literature review were used to develop a land cover roughness coefficient accounting for the resistance offered by different land uses to the wave advance. Applying a spatial generalized linear mixed model, we found that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of impact (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. In contrast, dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. Debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. For sustainable and effective coastal risk management, location of settlements is essential, while the protective potential of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement, should be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bioshield. PMID:22065751

  2. Uplift and subsidence associated with the great Aceh-Andaman earthquake of 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meltzner, A.J.; Sieh, K.; Abrams, M.; Agnew, D.C.; Hudnut, K.W.; Avouac, J.-P.; Natawidjaja, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Rupture of the Sunda megathrust on 26 December 2004 produced broad regions of uplift and subsidence. We define the pivot line separating these regions as a first step in defining the lateral extent and the downdip limit of rupture during that great Mw ??? 9.2 earthquake. In the region of the Andaman and Nicobar islands we rely exclusively on the interpretation of satellite imagery and a tidal model. At the southern limit of the great rupture we rely principally on field measurements of emerged coral microatolls. Uplift extends from the middle of Simeulue Island, Sumatra, at ??? 2.5??N, to Preparis Island, Myanmar (Burma), at ??? 14.9??N. Thus the rupture is ??? 1600 km long. The distance from the pivot line to the trench varies appreciably. The northern and western Andaman Islands rose, whereas the southern and eastern portion of the islands subsided. The Nicobar Islands and the west coast of Aceh province, Sumatra, subsided. Tilt at the southern end of the rupture is steep; the distance from 1.5 m of uplift to the pivot line is just 60 km. Our method of using satellite imagery to recognize changes in elevation relative to sea surface height and of using a tidal model to place quantitative bounds on coseismic uplift or subsidence is a novel approach that can be adapted to other forms of remote sensing and can be applied to other subduction zones in tropical regions. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Penultimate predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Aceh, Sumatra: Stratigraphic, archeological, and historical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, Kerry; Daly, Patrick; Edwards McKinnon, E.; Pilarczyk, Jessica E.; Chiang, Hong-Wei; Horton, Benjamin; Rubin, Charles M.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Ismail, Nazli; Vane, Christopher H.; Feener, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present stratigraphic, archeological and historical evidence for two closely timed predecessors of the giant 2004 tsunami on the northern coast of Aceh, northern Sumatra. This is the first direct evidence that a tsunami played a role in a fifteenth century cultural hiatus along the northern Sumatran portion of the maritime silk route. One seacliff exposure on the eastern side of the Lambaro headlands reveals two beds of tsunamigenic coral rubble within a small alluvial fan. Radiocarbon and Uranium-Thorium disequilibrium dates indicate emplacement of the coral rubble after 1344 ± 3 C.E. Another seacliff exposure, on the western side of the peninsula, contains evidence of nearly continuous settlement from ~1240 C.E. to soon after 1366 ± 3 C.E., terminated by tsunami destruction. At both sites, the tsunamis are likely coincident with sudden uplift of coral reefs above the Sunda megathrust 1394 ± 2 C.E., evidence for which has been published previously. The tsunami (or tsunami pair) appears to have destroyed a vibrant port community and led to the temporary recentering of marine trade dominance to more protected locations farther east. The reestablishment of vibrant communities along the devastated coast by about 1500 CE set the stage for the 2004 disaster.

  4. Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami wave impact in west Aceh.

    PubMed

    Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos; Marohn, Carsten; Dercon, Gerd; Dewi, Sonya; Piepho, Hans Peter; Joshi, Laxman; van Noordwijk, Meine; Cadisch, Georg

    2011-11-15

    In a tsunami event human casualties and infrastructure damage are determined predominantly by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. On land, wave energy is attenuated by gravitation (elevation) and friction (land cover). Tree belts have been promoted as "bioshields" against wave impact. However, given the lack of quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, tree belts have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. This study used 180 transects perpendicular to over 100 km on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia to analyze the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the impact of the 2004 tsunami. Satellite imagery; land cover maps; land use characteristics; stem diameter, height, and planting density; and a literature review were used to develop a land cover roughness coefficient accounting for the resistance offered by different land uses to the wave advance. Applying a spatial generalized linear mixed model, we found that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of impact (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. In contrast, dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. Debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. For sustainable and effective coastal risk management, location of settlements is essential, while the protective potential of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement, should be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bioshield.

  5. Outbreak of tetanus cases following the tsunami in Aceh Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Aceh Province in Indonesia was the area most severely affected by the tsunami of 26 December 2004. Extensive loss of life, property, and livelihood left a large segment of the population without basic needs and vulnerable to epidemic-prone diseases. Following the tsunami, a surveillance/early warning and response system was implemented to detect, investigate, and respond to outbreaks of communicable diseases. Fixed and mobile clinics, hospitals, and laboratories, operating all over the affected areas, reported weekly figures and daily alerts. Over 1 month following the tsunami, 106 cases of clinically diagnosed tetanus were reported. Most cases occurred among adults. The case fatality ratio was 18.9%, higher among older patients and among those with short incubation periods. No other major outbreaks occurred in the acute phase of the emergency. This series of tetanus cases was the largest cluster reported following a natural disaster or mass casualty event, overtaken only by the recent earthquake in the Kashmir (139 cases reported), and reflects the high number of injuries which occurred during the tsunami and poor prior immunization status of the population. In the context of natural disasters, preventive measures against tetanus, including wound cleaning and active and passive immunization, should be routinely conducted. Immediate disaster relief should include supplies for the management of wounds and cases of tetanus. PMID:19153905

  6. Crisis into opportunity: setting up community mental health services in post-tsunami Aceh.

    PubMed

    Jones, L M; Ghani, H A; Mohanraj, A; Morrison, S; Smith, P; Stube, D; Asare, J

    2007-01-01

    The Asian Tsunami killed more than 130,000 people and made 400,000 homeless in Aceh, an area in Indonesia already affected by over thirty years of conflict. This paper examines an approach taken by an International Non-Governmental Organisation (INGO) to address emergency mental health and psychosocial needs in an integrated way, by providing a continuum of care incorporating psychosocial support for the wider community and clinical services for the more severely affected. The model included outreach to the indigenous system. Psychosocial activities were developed in partnership with the local communities. Community-based clinical mental health services were established by identifying and building locally-based capacity at the primary health care level, and potentially sustainable services were established in collaboration with the Ministry of Health. By December 2005, four hundred and eighty three patients had been seen. More than one third suffered from serious mental disorders that predated the Tsunami. Thus, crisis provided an opportunity to address longstanding community mental health needs. The lessons learned from this approach are also discussed.

  7. Rebuilt risk: involuntary return, voluntary migration, and socioeconomic segregation in post-tsunami Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, Jamie; Daly, Patrick; Mundzir, Ibnu; Mahdi, Saiful; Patt, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    In light of growing coastal populations and rising relative sea levels, understanding the consequences of infrequent, high-impact coastal hazards for human migration is a key ingredient for meeting the challenges of sustainable development. Using new quantitative and qualitative evidence from 1160 households and 121 village leaders, we examine longer-term migration in the city of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, following the devastating 2004 tsunami and an international aid response that offered most survivors only resettlement back in the tsunami-affected area. While many survivors wanted to return, some preferred to relocate further from the coast but did not have the chance to do so. Since that time, selective out-migration by those with the means and socioeconomic sorting of newcomers have led to a new socioeconomic segregation of the tsunami-affected parts of the city. More broadly, these findings suggest that short-distance socioeconomic sorting into and out from vulnerable areas may be an important migratory response to a newly recognized risk.

  8. Embedded wisdom or rooted problems? Aid workers' perspectives on local social and political infrastructure in post-tsunami Aceh.

    PubMed

    Daly, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    This paper analyses the role of local social, cultural, and political institutions in post-disaster reconstruction projects. It contends that such institutions are important considerations within community-driven reconstruction initiatives, but are often viewed with ambivalence by external aid organisations. This paper draws upon in-depth qualitative interviews with aid workers involved in the post-tsunami reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia, to establish: (i) what roles community institutions were suited to play in the reconstruction; (ii) what were the limitations of community institutions when engaging with external aid agencies; (iii) how did external aid agencies engage with local community institutions; and (iv) how did external aid agencies perceive community institutions.

  9. Searching for conditions of observation of subduction seismogenic zone transients on Ocean Bottom Seismometers deployed at the Lesser Antilles submerged fore-arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bécel, Anne; Laigle, Mireille; Diaz, Jordi; Hirn, Alfred; Flueh, Ernst; Charvis, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    different instruments deployments, it provided diverse views, as through different glasses. This ultimately proved valuable to help extract the harder facts from their diverse appearances when seen through different instruments and in different types of sites. After analyzing the data for spurious and instrument-related peculiarities, and possible interpretation pitfalls, it remains that the noise level shows an overwhelming influence of the marine domain due to both its own sources, hydrosphere motions, and to meteorological-climatological actions. As well, the response of the laterally variable fore-arc basin on top of which measurements have to be made is much adverse to quality recording, with respect to seismological observatories on land which can be buried deep into basement rocks. The study of this noise itself may allow us to initiate a discussion of the interactions of the oceanic and atmospheric processes with the Solid Earth. Transients at depth in the subduction zone have been tentatively discussed in terms of its seismogenic evolution. If such transient events would indeed have a component over a very broad spectral range from NVT to LP and ULP events as it has been suggested very recently in Japan (Ide et al., 2008), the conditions and the best observation windows in which they can be best searched for are now documented for ocean bottom recording in the case of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone.

  10. Evidence for formation of a flexural backarc basin by compression and crustal thickening in the central Alaska peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, G.C.; Lewis, S.D.; Taber, J.; Steckler, M.S.; Kominz, M.A. )

    1988-12-01

    The North Aleutian Basin is a large, Cenozoic sedimentary basin in the northern part of the central Alaska Peninsula and the southern Bering shelf. The gravity anomaly pattern, the geometry, and the structure of the basin suggest that if formed by downward flexure of the backarc lithosphere. Basin modeling suggests that the flexure was driven by the emplacement of surface and subsurface loads having densities comparable to those of oceanic crust and mantle rocks, at approximately the position of the present-day volcanic arc and forearc. The authors suggest that the inferred loads consist of tectonically thickened mafic crustal materials lying beneath the arc and forearc of the central Alaska Peninsula. The crustal thickening may have occurred within a dominantly transpressional regime resulting from oblique convergence between the North American and Pacific plates during the Cenozoic.

  11. The Great 2006 and 2007 Kuril Earthquakes, Forearc Segmentation and Seismic Activity of the Central Kuril Islands Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, B. V.; Ivashchenko, A. I.; Dozorova, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a structural study of the Central Kuril Islands forearc region, where the great megathrust tsunamigenic earthquake ( M w 8.3) occurred on November 15, 2006. Based on new bathymetry and seismic profiles obtained during two research cruises of R/V Akademik Lavrentiev in 2005 and 2006, ten crustal segments with along-arc length ranging from 30 to 100 km, separated by NS- and NW-trending transcurrent faults were identified within the forearc region. The transcurrent faults may serve as barriers impeding stress transfer between the neighboring segments, so that stress accumulated within separate forearc segments is usually released by earthquakes of moderate-to-strong magnitudes. However, the great November 15, 2006 earthquake ruptured seven of the crustal segments probably following a 226-year gap since the last great earthquake in 1780. The geographic extent of earthquake rupture zones, aftershock areas and earthquake clusters correlate well with forearc crustal segments identified using the geophysical data. Based on segmented structure of the Central Kuril Islands forearc region, we consider and discuss three scenarios of a great earthquake occurrence within this area. Although the margin is segmented, we suggest that a rupture could occupy the entire seismic gap with a total length of about 500 km. In such a case, the earthquake magnitude M w might exceed 8.5, and such an event might generate tsunami waves significantly exceeding in height to those produced by the great 2006-2007 Kuril earthquakes.

  12. Basin-centered asperities in great subduction zone earthquakes: A link between slip, subsidence, and subduction erosion?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.; Blakely, R.J.; Sugiyama, Y.; Scholl, D. W.; Dinterman, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Published areas of high coseismic slip, or asperities, for 29 of the largest Circum-Pacific megathrust earthquakes are compared to forearc structure revealed by satellite free-air gravity, bathymetry, and seismic profiling. On average, 71% of an earthquake's seismic moment and 79% of its asperity area occur beneath the prominent gravity low outlining the deep-sea terrace; 57% of an earthquake's asperity area, on average, occurs beneath the forearc basins that lie within the deep-sea terrace. In SW Japan, slip in the 1923, 1944, 1946, and 1968 earthquakes was largely centered beneath five forearc basins whose landward edge overlies the 350??C isotherm on the plate boundary, the inferred downdip limit of the locked zone. Basin-centered coseismic slip also occurred along the Aleutian, Mexico, Peru, and Chile subduction zones but was ambiguous for the great 1964 Alaska earthquake. Beneath intrabasin structural highs, seismic slip tends to be lower, possibly due to higher temperatures and fluid pressures. Kilometers of late Cenozoic subsidence and crustal thinning above some of the source zones are indicated by seismic profiling and drilling and are thought to be caused by basal subduction erosion. The deep-sea terraces and basins may evolve not just by growth of the outer arc high but also by interseismic subsidence not recovered during earthquakes. Basin-centered asperities could indicate a link between subsidence, subduction erosion, and seismogenesis. Whatever the cause, forearc basins may be useful indicators of long-term seismic moment release. The source zone for Cascadia's 1700 A.D. earthquake contains five large, basin-centered gravity lows that may indicate potential asperities at depth. The gravity gradient marking the inferred downdip limit to large coseismic slip lies offshore, except in northwestern Washington, where the low extends landward beneath the coast. Transverse gravity highs between the basins suggest that the margin is seismically segmented and

  13. The Sumba enigma: Is Sumba a diapiric fore-arc nappe in process of formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audley-Charles, M. G.

    1985-10-01

    The anomalous updomed morphological expression of Sumba island, its enigmatic lack of strong Neogene deformation and the northward morphological indentation of southern Sumbawa and Flores require explanation. The stratigraphy of Sumba may be correlated with the Cretaceous to Miocene part of the Timor allochthon. The sedimentary and eruptive rock succession in Sumba shows remarkable similarities with the allochthonous Palelo, Wiluba and Cablac deposits of Timor. In both islands the Cretaceous parts of these sequences are regarded as characteristic of fore-arc deposits built on thin continental crust. The Timor nappe is interpreted as a 5 km thick tectonic flake of the Banda fore-arc thrust onto the Australian continental margin in the mid-Pliocene collision. The postulated Sumba nappe has not yet been thrust onto the Australian margin which, in the Sumba region, has not yet converged as close to the arc as in the Timor area. The postulated Sumba nappe is interpreted as a diapiric elongated dome of the Sunda fore-arc that is being squeezed by the converging margin of Australia against the volcanic islands of Sumbawa and Flores. The absence of indications on the seismic reflection profiles for the presence of the thrust fault of the Sumba nappe may perhaps be explained by the thrusts being nearly horizontal within flat-lying strata. The Savu thrust is correlated with the probably older (pre-Late Pliocene) Wetar Suture as a major southward dipping lithospheric rupture. East of 124°E, this suture does not seem to have moved much since the mid-Pliocene collision that emplaced the nappes on Timor. However, microearthquake data suggest some activity is continuing.

  14. Forearc structure beneath southwestern British Columbia: A three-dimensional tomographic velocity model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramachandran, K.; Dosso, S.E.; Spence, G.D.; Hyndman, R.D.; Brocher, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional compressional wave velocity model of the forearc crust and upper mantle and the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath southwestern British Columbia and the adjoining straits of Georgia and Juan de Fuca. The velocity model was constructed through joint tomographic inversion of 50,000 first-arrival times from earthquakes and active seismic sources. Wrangellia rocks of the accreted Paleozoic and Mesozoic island arc assemblage underlying southern Vancouver Island in the Cascadia forearc are imaged at some locations with higher than average lower crustal velocities of 6.5-7.2 km/s, similar to observations at other island arc terranes. The mafic Eocene Crescent terrane, thrust landward beneath southern Vancouver Island, exhibits crustal velocities in the range of 6.0-6.7 km/s and is inferred to extend to a depth of more than 20 km. The Cenozoic Olympic Subduction Complex, an accretionary prism thrust beneath the Crescent terrane in the Olympic Peninsula, is imaged as a low-velocity wedge to depths of at least 20 km. Three zones with velocities of 7.0-7.5 km/s, inferred to be mafic and/or ultramafic units, lie above the subducting Juan de Fuca plate at depths of 25-35 km. The forearc upper mantle wedge beneath southeastern Vancouver Island and the Strait of Georgia exhibits low velocities of 7.2-7.5 km/s, inferred to correspond to ???20% serpentinization of mantle peridotites, and consistent with similar observations in other warm subduction zones. Estimated dip of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath southern Vancouver Island is ???11??, 16??, and 27?? at depths of 30, 40, and 50 km, respectively. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Mariana Forearc Serpentine Mud Volcanoes Harbor Novel Communities of Extremophilic Archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, A. C.; Moyer, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    Since the Eocene (45 Ma) the Pacific Plate has been subducting beneath the Philippine Plate in the western Pacific ocean. This process has given rise to the Mariana Islands. As a direct result of this non-accretionary subduction, the Mariana Island Arc contains a broad forearc zone of serpentinite mud volcanoes located between the island chain and the trench. Forearc faulting, due to high pressure and low temperature build-up, produce slurries of mud and rock that mix with slab derived fluids and rise in conduits. Due to dehydration of the overlying mantle, native rock is converted to serpentinite, which squeezes out at fractures along the sea floor. This results in giant mud volcanoes (~30 km diameter and ~2 km high) that form a chain between 50 and 150 km behind the trench axis. Microbial samples were collected using Jason II from seven mud volcanoes along the length of the forearc and community fingerprinting was applied to genomic DNA using terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The resulting data were compared with traditional clone library and sequence analysis from samples obtained from the southernmost mud volcano, South Chamorro, site 1200, holes D and E, sampled during ODP Leg 195. The dominant archaeal phylotypes found clustered into two groups within the Methanobacteria, a class of anaerobic methanogens and methylotrophs. These phylotypes were detected at three of the seven mud volcanoes sampled and comprised 61% of the archaeal clone library from 1200 E. The first group was most closely related to the order Methanobacteriales, however, these novel phylotypes had similarity values of up to 0.90 at best with some resulting at 0.48. The second novel group of phylotypes were most closely related to order Methanosarcinales, with similarity values in the range of 0.50 to 0.22, indicating a relatively weak association with known phylotypes. At 1200 D, phylotypes associated with non-thermophilic Marine Group I Crenarchaeota were detected

  16. Design and testing of fish drier system utilizing geothermal energy resource in Ie Suum, Aceh Besar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarak, Amir Zaki; Maulana, M. Ilham; Syuhada, Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    In an effort to increase the value of fish produced by the community in Krueng Raya Sub-district, it has been designed and tested a fish drier system utilizing geothermal energy resource in IeSuum Village, Krueng Raya Sub-district, Aceh Besar District. The geothermal energy is in the form of hot water with the temperature range is between 86 and 86.4 °C. Based on the design consideration, it is used a terraced rack type drier system. The drier system consists of a heat exchanger, drying chamber, and a blower to blow the air. Hot water from the geothermal source is passed into the heat exchanger to increase the air temperature outside it. The air is then blown into the drying chamber. Based on the design analysis is obtained that to dry 200 kg of fish in 24 hour, it is required a drying chamber with 1m long, 1 m width and 0.4 m high, the temperature of hot water entering the exchanger is 80 °C and the temperature of the air entering the drying chamber is maintained at 60°C. The average time required to dry fish till 10% of water level is 18-20 jam. The research is then continued by developing and testing the drying system with three layer rack to put in the fish. From the experimental result is obtained that the average water temperature flows out of the chamber is in the range of 76-78 °C and the temperature in the chamber is in the range of 57-62 °C. In addition, the weight of the fish, which initially is 20 kg, becomes12 kg in average after 18 hours drying process.

  17. Spawning seasons of Rasbora tawarensis (Pisces: Cyprinidae) in Lake Laut Tawar, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rasbora tawarensis is an endemic freshwater fish in Lake Laut Tawar, Aceh Province, Indonesia. Unfortunately, its status is regarded as critical endangered with populations decreasing in recent years. To date no information on the spawning activities of the fish are available. Therefore, this study provides a contribution to the knowledge on reproductive biology of R. tawarensis especially on spawning seasons as well as basic information for conservation of the species. Methods Monthly sampling was conducted from April 2008 to March 2009 by using selective gillnets. The gonadosomatic index, size composition and sex ratio were assessed. The gonadal development was evaluated based on macroscopic and microscopic examinations of the gonads. Results The gonadosomatic index (GSI) varied between 6.65 to 18.16 in female and 4.94 to 8.56 for male. GSI of the female R. tawarensis was higher in March, September and December indicating the onset of reproductive seasons, the GSI and oocyte size being directly correlated with gonadal development stages. Although, a greater proportion of mature male than female was detected during the study, the sex ratio showed that the overall number of female was higher than male. The ovaries had multiple oocyte size classes at every stage of gonadal development, thus R. tawarensis can be classified as a group synchronous spawner or a fractional multiple spawner. Conclusion The spawning seasons of R. tawarensis were three times a year and September being the peak of the reproductive season and the female was the predominant sex. This species is classified as a group synchronous spawner. PMID:20482777

  18. Predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in a coastal cave, Aceh Province, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarczyk, J.; Rubin, C. M.; Sieh, K.; Horton, B.; Daly, P.; Majewski, J.; Ismail, N.

    2013-12-01

    Geological studies of coral reefs and coastal plains have uncovered short and incomplete records of predecessors for the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Here we present a longer and more-complete mid- to late Holocene tsunami history from an extraordinary sedimentary deposit in northwestern Aceh Province, Sumatra. We exposed clastic sediment in six trenches up to 2 m deep within a sheltered limestone cave 200 m from the present coastline. The trim line of the 2004 tsunami is about 25 m above sea level and 15 m above the top of the 10-m high entrance to the cave. Within the cave, the deposits of 2004 comprise a 15 - 20 cm thick, laterally continuous sand sheet. Beneath this youngest tsunami sand is a <3-cm thick bed rich in guano dropped by insect feeding bats (Microchiroptera). Many similar couplets of sand and bat guano occur lower in the stratigraphic sequence. The sands have many diagnostic features of the 2004 deposit, namely a distinctly marine geochemical signature, high-diversity foraminiferal assemblages that include offshore species, normal grading, basal rip-up clasts, lenticular laminations, and articulated bivalves. Minor, local, non-tectonic normal and decollement faults that break the layers at several locations are likely due to strong ground shaking. Radiocarbon dating of charcoal and molluscs establish a mid- to late Holocene age range for the tsunami sands. Other than the 2004 deposit, layers younger than about 2,000 years are absent, because by about 2,000 years ago, accommodation space beneath the level of the rocky entrance to the cave had been filled. Pending analyses will reveal whether three clay layers within the sequence are of marine or of freshwater origin.

  19. Effects of subduction parameters on geothermal gradients in forearcs with an application to Franciscan subduction in California

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, T.A. )

    1991-01-10

    Geothermal gradients in forearcs are often suppressed below normal values because of the cooling effect of the relatively cold downgoing plate. In this paper, finite difference thermal modeling is used to evaluate the influence on forearc gradients of variations in six potentially important subduction zone parameters: radiogenic heat production; thermal conductivity of forearc rocks; subduction angle; subduction rate; frictional heat production; and presubduction geothermal gradients. Pressure-temperature conditions of blueschist-facies metamorphism in the Franciscan subduction complex of California are easily explained with typical subduction rates and slab ages with plate contact shear stresses of the order of 10 MPa, but stresses within the range zero to a few tens of megapascals are probably permitted by the thermal constraints. Speculative application of the modeling results assuming a shear stress of 4% of lithostatic pressure to plate motion reconstructions for the Franciscan forearc suggests that forearc gradients were about 8C/km around 85 Ma when the subducting slab was perhaps 145 m.y. old and the subduction rate was perhaps 95 km/m.y. Gradients increased moderately through the latest Cretaceous to middle Tertiary as subduction became slower and the subducting slab became younger, reaching about 16C/km at 28 Ma when the slab age was about 11 m.y. and the subduction rate was about 48 km/m.y. The slab age, subduction rate, and forearc gradient then remained fairly constant until 5 Ma, when subduction slowed to about 32 km/m.y. and the slab age decreased to about 8 m.y., causing gradients to rise to about 20C/km.

  20. Forearc oceanic crust in the Izu-Bonin arc - new insights from active-source seismic survey -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Noguchi, N.; Takahashi, N.; Ishizuka, O.; Kaneda, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Petrological studies have suggested that oceanic crust is formed in forearc areas during the initial stage of subduction. However, there is little geophysical evidence for the formation of oceanic crust in those regions. In order to examine crustal formation process associated with a subduction initiation process, we conducted an active-source seismic survey at a forearc region in the Izu-Bonin intra-oceanic arc. The resultant seismic image shows a remarkably thin crust (less than 10 km) at the northern half of the Bonin ridge (at the north of the Chichi-jima) and abrupt thickening the crust (~ 20 km thick) toward the south (at the Haha-jima). Comparison of velocity-depth profiles of the thin forearc crust of the Bonin ridge with those of typical oceanic crusts showed them to be seismologically identical. The observed structural variation also well corresponds to magmatic activities along the forearc. Boninitic magmatism is evident in the area of thin crust and tholeiitic-calcalkaline andesitic volcanism in the area of thick crust. Based on high precision dating studies of those volcanic rocks, we interpreted that the oceanic-type thin crust associated with boninitic volcanism has been created soon after the initiation of subduction (45-48 Ma) and and that the nonoceanic thick crust was created by tholeiitic-calcalkaline andesitic magmatism after the boninitic magmatism was ceased. The above seismological evidences strongly support the idea of forearc oceanic crust (or phiolite) created by forearc spreading in the initial stage of subduction along the intra-oceanic arc.

  1. Interplate and Intraplate Decoupling: A 3D View from Surface Geology and Seismicity, Eastern Hellenic Forearc, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinspehn, K. L.; Russo, R. M.

    2003-12-01

    Shallow active seismicity and neotectonic structures reveal important changes in the degree of interplate and intraplate coupling along the convergent Hellenic plate boundary from Crete to Rhodes. The onshore/offshore Pliocene-Holocene surface geology of the Hellenic forearc records three different deformation states: 1) A western segment (western Crete) where incipient continent-continent collision produces shortening under strong interplate coupling; 2) a central segment (central-eastern Crete) partly coupled to Africa where oblique convergence is partitioned into sinistral strike slip and orthogonal shortening which is confined to the accretionary wedge; and 3) an eastern trantensional segment (Rhodes), mechanically decoupled from African oblique convergence, instead reflecting slab rollback and Aegea's southward motion relative to Anatolia. Such along-strike heterogeneity of neotectonic structures suggests each segment should also display distinct crustal-scale stress patterns. Abundant earthquake focal mechanisms provide a means to gauge stress regimes. Shallowly plunging P (compression) and T (tension) axes of crustal events differ systematically along the three forearc segments. Above the brittle-ductile transition (<13 km), the western segment records N-S P axes and E-W T axes. In the central Crete transition zone, P and T axes vary, whereas sparse P axes in the decoupled eastern forearc (Rhodes) parallel the NNE plate margin. Below the brittle-ductile transition (13 < h < 40 km), P axes beneath western Crete trend N-S normal to the subduction trace, signifying interplate coupling given their similarity to plate-convergence vectors. T axes trend WNW consistent with margin-parallel extension at depth due to Africa's northward convergence. Stress patterns reverse for the wrench-dominated transition zone: P axes trend WNW-ESE and T axes trend N-S, indicating that northward convergence is less important than slab roll back. In the transtensional forearc east of

  2. Multi-phase Uplift of the Indo-Burman Ranges and Western Thrust Belt of Minbu Sub-basin (West Myanmar): Constraints from Apatite Fission Track Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Qiu, H.; Mei, L.

    2015-12-01

    The forearc regions in active continental margins are important keys to analysis geodynamic processes such as oceanic crust oblique subduction, mechanism of subduction zone, and sediments recycling. The West Myanmar, interpreted as forearc silver, is the archetype example of such forearc regions subordinate to Sunda arc-trench system, and is widely debated when and how its forearc regions formed. A total of twenty-two samples were obtained from the Indo-Burman Ranges and western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin along Taungup-Prome Road in Southwestern Myanmar (Figure 1), and five sandstone samples of them were performed at Apatite to Zircon, Inc. Three samples (M3, M5, and M11) collected from Eocene flysch and metamorphic core at the Indo-Burman Ranges revealed apatite fission track (AFT) ages ranging from 19 to 9 Ma and 6.5 to 2 Ma. Two samples (M20 and M21) acquired from the western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin yielded AFT ages ranging from 28 to 13.5 Ma and 7.5 to 3.5 Ma. Time-temperature models based on AFT data suggest four major Cenozoic cooling episodes, Late Oligocene, Early to Middle Miocene, Late Miocene, and Pliocene to Pleistocene. The first to third episode, models suggest the metamorphic core of the Indo-Burman Ranges has experienced multi-phase rapidly uplifted during the early construction of the forearc regions. The latest episode, on which this study focused, indicated a fast westward growth of the Palaeogene accretionary wedge and a eastward propagation deformation of folding and thrusting of the western thrust belt of Minbu Sub-basin. We argued that above multi-phase uplifted and deformation of the forearc regions were results of India/West Burma plate's faster oblique convergence and faster sedimentation along the India/Eurasia suture zone.

  3. Early Eocene uplift of southernmost San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.; Cox, B.F.

    1989-04-01

    Stratigraphic studies in the southern San Joaquin basin and in the El Paso Mountains of the southwestern Great Basin corroborate a hypothesized early Eocene regional uplift event. Eocene uplift and erosion of the southernmost San Joaquin basin south of Bakersfield were recently proposed because an early Paleogene fluviodeltaic sequence in the El Paso Mountains (Goler Formation) apparently had no seaward counterpart to the southwest. New microfossil data (coccoliths) indicate that marine deposits near the top of the Goler Formation are uppermost Paleocene (nannofossil zone CP8) rather than lower Eocene, as reported previously. These data (1) confirm that the oldest known Tertiary strata south of Bakersfield (Eocene Tejon Formation) are younger than the uppermost Goler Formation and (2) seem to restrict uplift to the earliest Eocene. The authors propose that the uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene deposits were eroded and the Mushrush trough was cut and filled mainly in response to earliest Eocene uplift. The uplift was transverse to the northwest-trending forearc basin. Thus, it was distinct from late early Eocene (pre-Comengine Formation) regional tilting and uplift, which produced northwest-trending structures. Early Eocene uplift probably played only a minor role in the southward termination of pre-Maastrichtian parts of the forearc basin, which they instead attribute to massive uplift of the southernmost Sierra Nevada during the early(.) Late Cretaceous.

  4. Pervasive cracking of the northern Chilean Coastal Cordillera: New evidence for forearc extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, John P.; Hoke, Gregory D.; Allmendinger, Richard W.; González, Gabriel; Isacks, Bryan L.; Carrizo, Daniel A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite convergence across the strongly coupled seismogenic interface between the South American and Nazca plates, the dominant neotectonic signature in the forearc of northern Chile is arc-normal extension. We have used 1 m resolution IKONOS satellite imagery to map nearly 37,000 cracks over an area of 500 km2 near the Salar Grande (21°S). These features, which are best preserved in a ubiquitous gypcrete surface layer, have both nontectonic and tectonic origins. However, their strong preferred orientation perpendicular to the plate convergence vector suggests that the majority owe their formation to approximate east-west extension associated with plate boundary processes such as interseismic loading, coseismic and postseismic strain, and long-term instability resulting from subduction erosion. Similar structures were formed during or shortly after the 1995 Mw = 8.0 earthquake near the city of Antofagasta, south of Salar Grande, and in conjunction with the 2001 Mw = 8.2 8.4 Arequipa, Peru, event. Cracks such as these may form in other forearcs but remain largely unexposed because of vegetative cover or marked fluvial erosion—factors that are absent in northern Chile as a result of its hyperarid climate.

  5. Microseismic reflection imaging of the Precordillera crust, forearc of the North-Chilean subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, C.; Kummerow, J.; Wigger, P.; Reshetnikov, A.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    With the motivation to study large-scale fault zones in the Central Andean forearc system, a dense seismological array was deployed around the West Fissure Fault System (Precordillera, North Chile, around 21°S 69°W). The observed shallow microseismicity shows a particular distribution characterized by a sharp westward dipping lower seismicity limit at around 10-25 km depth. This boundary dips in sense opposite to the North-Chilean subduction zone and appears to be closely linked to the shallow rheologic and/or tectonic structure of the forearc. With the aim to image the structure of the upper Precordillera crust (depth < 35 km), we processed the P-wave and S-wave coda of several hundred microseismic recordings using signal processing and imaging techniques adapted from active seismic-reflection surveying. Key data processing steps involved precise arrival time picking and hypocenter localization, removing signal variations due to varying source radiation patterns, and identification and separation of reflections from coherent noise. Then, we mapped the processed waveform amplitudes to their reflection-point locations in the subsurface. The resultant microseismic-reflection images reveal a 15-degree westward dipping reflector in around 5-25 km depth that largely coincides with the distinct lower seismicity boundary. To our knowledge, these sections with horizontal extensions of around 50 km represent the first crustal-scale seismic-reflection images derived from passive seismic data.

  6. Possible emplacement of crustal rocks into the forearc mantle of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.J.; Fisher, M.A.; Ramachandran, K.; Trehu, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles shot across the Cascadia forearc show that a 5-15 km thick band of reflections, previously interpreted as a lower crustal shear zone above the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, extends into the upper mantle of the North American plate, reaching depths of at least 50 km. In the extreme western corner of the mantle wedge, these reflectors occur in rocks with P wave velocities of 6750-7000 ms-1. Elsewhere, the forearc mantle, which is probably partially serpentinized, exhibits velocities of approximately 7500 ms-1. The rocks with velocities of 6750-7000 ms-1 are anomalous with respect to the surrounding mantle, and may represent either: (1) locally high mantle serpentinization, (2) oceanic crust trapped by backstepping of the subduction zone, or (3) rocks from the lower continental crust that have been transported into the uppermost mantle by subduction erosion. The association of subparallel seismic reflectors with these anomalously low velocities favours the tectonic emplacement of crustal rocks. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Atmospheric Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the Earth's surface by forearc recycling.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Suzanne L; Das, J P

    2015-11-17

    In subduction zones, sediments, hydrothermally altered lithosphere, fluids, and atmospheric gases are transported into the mantle, where ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism takes place. However, the extent to which atmospheric noble gases are trapped in minerals crystallized during UHP metamorphism is unknown. We measured Ar and Ne trapped in phengite and omphacite from the youngest known UHP terrane on Earth to determine the composition of Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the surface by forearc recycling. An (40)Ar/(39)Ar age [7.93 ± 0.10 My (1σ)] for phengite is interpreted as the timing of crystallization at mantle depths and indicates that (40)Ar/(39)Ar phengite ages reliably record the timing of UHP metamorphism. Both phengite and omphacite yielded atmospheric (38)Ar/(36)Ar and (20)Ne/(22)Ne. Our study provides the first documentation, to our knowledge, of entrapment of atmospheric Ar and Ne in phengite and omphacite. Results indicate that a subduction barrier for atmospheric-derived noble gases does not exist at mantle depths associated with UHP metamorphism. We show that the crystallization age together with the isotopic composition of nonradiogenic noble gases trapped in minerals formed during subsolidus crystallization at mantle depths can be used to unambiguously assess forearc recycling of atmospheric noble gases. The flux of atmospheric noble gas entering the deep Earth through subduction and returning to the surface cannot be fully realized until the abundances of atmospheric noble gases trapped in exhumed UHP rocks are known. PMID:26542683

  8. Atmospheric Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the Earth's surface by forearc recycling.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Suzanne L; Das, J P

    2015-11-17

    In subduction zones, sediments, hydrothermally altered lithosphere, fluids, and atmospheric gases are transported into the mantle, where ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism takes place. However, the extent to which atmospheric noble gases are trapped in minerals crystallized during UHP metamorphism is unknown. We measured Ar and Ne trapped in phengite and omphacite from the youngest known UHP terrane on Earth to determine the composition of Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the surface by forearc recycling. An (40)Ar/(39)Ar age [7.93 ± 0.10 My (1σ)] for phengite is interpreted as the timing of crystallization at mantle depths and indicates that (40)Ar/(39)Ar phengite ages reliably record the timing of UHP metamorphism. Both phengite and omphacite yielded atmospheric (38)Ar/(36)Ar and (20)Ne/(22)Ne. Our study provides the first documentation, to our knowledge, of entrapment of atmospheric Ar and Ne in phengite and omphacite. Results indicate that a subduction barrier for atmospheric-derived noble gases does not exist at mantle depths associated with UHP metamorphism. We show that the crystallization age together with the isotopic composition of nonradiogenic noble gases trapped in minerals formed during subsolidus crystallization at mantle depths can be used to unambiguously assess forearc recycling of atmospheric noble gases. The flux of atmospheric noble gas entering the deep Earth through subduction and returning to the surface cannot be fully realized until the abundances of atmospheric noble gases trapped in exhumed UHP rocks are known.

  9. Thermal evolution of sedimentary basins in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, Mark J.; Howell, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The complex tectonic collage of Alaska is reflected in the conjunction of rocks of widely varying thermal maturity. Indicators of the level of thermal maturity of rocks exposed at the surface, such as vitrinite reflectance and conodont color alteration index, can help constrain the tectonic evolution of such complex regions and, when combined with petrographic, modern heat flow, thermogeochronologic, and isotopic data, allow for the detailed evaluation of a region?s burial and uplift history. We have collected and assembled nearly 10,000 vitrinite-reflectance and conodont-color-alteration index values from the literature, previous U.S. Geological Survey investigations, and our own studies in Alaska. This database allows for the first synthesis of thermal maturity on a broadly regional scale. Post-accretionary sedimentary basins in Alaska show wide variability in terms of thermal maturity. The Tertiary interior basins, as well as some of the forearc and backarc basins associated with the Aleutian Arc, are presently at their greatest depth of burial, with immature rocks exposed at the surface. Other basins, such as some backarc basins on the Alaska Peninsula, show higher thermal maturities, indicating modest uplift, perhaps in conjunction with higher geothermal gradients related to the arc itself. Cretaceous ?flysch? basins, such as the Yukon-Koyukuk basin, are at much higher thermal maturity, reflecting great amounts of uplift perhaps associated with compressional regimes generated through terrane accretion. Many sedimentary basins in Alaska, such as the Yukon-Koyukuk and Colville basins, show higher thermal maturity at basin margins, perhaps reflecting greater uplift of the margins in response to isostatic unloading, owing to erosion of the hinterland adjacent to the basin or to compressional stresses adjacent to basin margins.

  10. Heavy Oil and Natural Bitumen Resources in Geological Basins of the World

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Richard F.; Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Heavy oil and natural bitumen are oils set apart by their high viscosity (resistance to flow) and high density (low API gravity). These attributes reflect the invariable presence of up to 50 weight percent asphaltenes, very high molecular weight hydrocarbon molecules incorporating many heteroatoms in their lattices. Almost all heavy oil and natural bitumen are alteration products of conventional oil. Total resources of heavy oil in known accumulations are 3,396 billion barrels of original oil in place, of which 30 billion barrels are included as prospective additional oil. The total natural bitumen resource in known accumulations amounts to 5,505 billion barrels of oil originally in place, which includes 993 billion barrels as prospective additional oil. This resource is distributed in 192 basins containing heavy oil and 89 basins with natural bitumen. Of the nine basic Klemme basin types, some with subdivisions, the most prolific by far for known heavy oil and natural bitumen volumes are continental multicyclic basins, either basins on the craton margin or closed basins along convergent plate margins. The former includes 47 percent of the natural bitumen, the latter 47 percent of the heavy oil and 46 percent of the natural bitumen. Little if any heavy oil occurs in fore-arc basins, and natural bitumen does not occur in either fore-arc or delta basins.

  11. High-frequency cyclicity in quaternary fan-delta deposits of the Andean fore-arc: Relative sea level changes and aseismic ridge subduction

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S. ); Jolley, E.J.; Turner, P.; Williams, G.D.; Buddin, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The coast of northern Chile comprises Mesozoic magmatic rocks and Cenozoic-Holocene shallow-marine and alluvial fan/fan-delta sediments. The structure, landform development, and sedimentary response of the coast between Antofagasta in the south and Arica (600 km to the north) have been investigated to evaluate the influence of Nazca plate subduction on sea level changes over Quaternary to Holocene times. At Arica the coastal range is in net extension characterized by extensional normal faulting and subsidence, similar to much of Chile. South of Arica, uplift is recorded by marine terrace development and incision of alluvial fan surfaces; uplift reaches a maximum south of Iquiqui. The boundary between regions in net subsidence and net uplift is marked by north-facing neotectonic normal fault scarps. Variations in apparent uplift and subsidence are consistent with recently published oceanographic records on relative sea level changes over a 30 yr period. The authors data suggest that these regionally variable patterns of coastal uplift along the north Chilean coast are controlled by the subduction of an aseismic ridge, which overprints the effect of eustatic sea level fluctuations. Subduction of oceanic plate heterogeneities may provide a mechanism for producing cyclicity in sedimentary sequences at a frequency equal to or higher than glacio-eustacy in fore-arc and possibly back-arc sedimentary basins. These sequences will be neither of global extent nor of global synchroneity.

  12. Sedimentary deposits of the 26 December 2004 tsunami on the northwest coast of Aceh, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, A.; Nishimura, Y.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Kamataki, T.; Triyono, R.

    2006-01-01

    The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman tsunami flooded coastal northern Sumatra to a depth of over 20 m, deposited a discontinuous sheet of sand up to 80 cm thick, and left mud up to 5 km inland. In most places the sand sheet is normally graded, and in some it contains complex internal stratigraphy. Structures within the sand sheet may record the passage of up to 3 individual waves. We studied the 2004 tsunami deposits in detail along a flow-parallel transect about 400 m long, 16 km southwest of Banda Aceh. Near the shore along this transect, the deposit is thin or absent. Between 50 and 400 m inland it ranges in thickness from 5 to 20 cm. The main trend in thickness is a tendency to thicken by filling low spots, most dramatically at pre-existing stream channels. Deposition generally attended inundation - along the transect, the tsunami deposited sand to within about 40 m of the inundation limit. Although the tsunami deposit contains primarily material indistinguishable from material found on the beach one month after the event, it also contains grain sizes and compositions unavailable on the current beach. Along the transect we studied, these grains become increasingly dominant both landward and upward in the deposit; possibly some landward source of sediment was exposed and exploited by the passage of the waves. The deposit also contains the unabraded shells of subtidal marine organisms, suggesting that at least part of the deposit came from offshore. Grain sizes within the deposit tend to fine upward and landward, although individual units within the deposit appear massive, or show reverse grading. Sorting becomes better landward, although the most landward sites generally become poorly sorted from the inclusion of soil clasts. These sites commonly show interlayering of sandy units and soil clast units. Deposits from the 2004 tsunami in Sumatra demonstrate the complex nature of the deposits of large tsunamis. Unlike the deposits of smaller tsunamis, internal stratigraphy is

  13. Stress interaction between subduction earthquakes and forearc strike-slip faults: Modeling and application to the northern Caribbean plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.; Lin, J.

    2004-01-01

    Strike-slip faults in the forearc region of a subduction zone often present significant seismic hazard because of their proximity to population centers. We explore the interaction between thrust events on the subduction interface and strike-slip faults within the forearc region using three-dimensional models of static Coulomb stress change. Model results reveal that subduction earthquakes with slip vectors subparallel to the trench axis enhance the Coulomb stress on strike-slip faults adjacent to the trench but reduce the stress on faults farther back in the forearc region. In contrast, subduction events with slip vectors perpendicular to the trench axis enhance the Coulomb stress on strike-slip faults farther back in the forearc, while reducing the stress adjacent to the trench. A significant contribution to Coulomb stress increase on strike-slip faults in the back region of the forearc comes from "unclamping" of the fault, i.e., reduction in normal stress due to thrust motion on the subduction interface. We argue that although Coulomb stress changes from individual subduction earthquakes are ephemeral, their cumulative effects on the pattern of lithosphere deformation in the forearc region are significant. We use the Coulomb stress models to explain the contrasting deformation pattern between two adjacent segments of the Caribbean subduction zone. Subduction earthquakes with slip vectors nearly perpendicular to the Caribbean trench axis is dominant in the Hispaniola segment, where the strike-slip faults are more than 60 km inland from the trench. In contrast, subduction slip motion is nearly parallel to the Caribbean trench axis along the Puerto Rico segment, where the strike-slip fault is less than 15 km from the trench. This observed jump from a strike-slip fault close to the trench axis in the Puerto Rico segment to the inland faults in Hispaniola is explained by different distributions of Coulomb stress in the forearc region of the two segments, as a result

  14. Tectonic controls on sedimentation in Mesozoic convergent margin basin of Baja California (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J.; Smith, D.P.; Morris, W.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Mesozoic rocks of the Baja California peninsula form one of the most extensive, best exposed, oldest (160 m.y.), and least-tectonized and metamorphosed convergent margin basin complexes in the world. Much of the fill of these basins consist of coarse-grained volcaniclastic and epiclastic sequences that directly reflect the tectonic evolution of the region. The early history of the convergent margin was dominated by sedimentation in small, steep-sided basins within oceanic island arc systems. The Triassic and Jurassic convergent margin basins probably represent proto-Pacific terranes that traveled from another area. These terranes were assembled by the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, and underlie the forearc region of a medial Cretaceous oceanic island arc system. Tbis system fringed the Mesoamerican continental margin and underwent regional-scale extension during subduction of old, dense lithosphere. The latest phases of sedimentation in the convergent margin occurred in broad, relatively stable forearc basins of a mature continental arc, during the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene. Nonetheless, intrabasinal faults provided some controls on depositional systems and bathymetry. The authors speculate that these faults formed in response to oblique convergence which ultimately resulted in 10-19{degree} northward displacement of Baja California relative to the North American craton, from the latitude of Central America to northern Mexico. The fill of oceanic island arc basins in Baja California is dominated by coarse-grained marine wedges including (1) arc apron deposits, consisting of pyroclastic and/or volcanic epiclastic debris deposited in intra-arc or back-arc basins, and (2) slope apron deposits, consisting of epiclastic debris shed from local fault scarps and more distally derived arc volcaniclastics, deposited in forearc basins.

  15. Fluid Origins, Thermal Regimes, and Fluid and Solute Fluxes in the Forearc of Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, M.; Solomon, E. A.; Harris, R. N.; Torres, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    An in-depth analysis and synthesis of published and newly acquired data on the chemical and isotopic composition of forearc fluids, fluid fluxes, and the associated thermal regimes in five well-studied, representative erosional and accretionary subduction zone (SZ) forearcs will be presented. Evidence of large-scale fluid flow, primarily focused along faults, is manifested by widespread seafloor venting, associated biological communities, authigenic carbonate formation, chemical and isotopic anomalies in pore-fluid depth-profiles, and thermal anomalies. The nature of fluid venting seems to differ at the two types of SZs. At both, fluid and gas venting sites are primarily associated with faults. At accretionary SZs, the décollement and underthrust coarser-grained stratigraphic horizons are the main fluid conduits, whereas at non-accreting and erosive margins, the fluids from compaction and dehydration reactions are to a great extent partitioned between the décollement and focused conduits through the prism. The measured fluid output fluxes at seeps are high, ~15-40 times the amount that can be produced through local steady-state compaction, suggesting additional fluid sources or non-steady-state fluid flow must be involved. Recirculation of seawater must be an important component of the overall forearc output fluid flux. The most significant chemical and isotopic characteristics of the expelled fluids relative to seawater are: Cl dilution, sulfate, Ca and Mg depletions, and enrichments in Li, B, Si, Sr, alkalinity, and hydrocarbon concentrations; they often have distinctive δ18O, δD, δ7Li, δ11B, and δ37Cl values, and variable Sr isotope ratios. These characteristics provide key insights on the source of the fluid and the temperature at the source. Using our best fluid output flux estimate and considering an ocean volume of 1340 × 106 km3, the global ocean residence time in SZs is ~100 Myr. This value is five times faster than previous estimates for SZs and

  16. Snow Peak, Oregon: Latest Miocene low-K tholeiite volcanism in the Cascadia forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, A. K.; Nielsen, R. L.; Kent, A. J. R.; Rowe, M. C.; Duncan, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Snow Peak, Oregon, is a moderate size basaltic shield volcano (50-52 wt.% SiO2, > 7.4 km3) located within the forearc of the Cascadia subduction zone, ~ 50 km west of the current arc front. Herein we present new whole rock geochemistry, mineral chemistry and 11 new 40Ar/39Ar ages, together with petrologic modeling that allow us to constrain the timing and origin of volcanism. In contrast to previous K-Ar ages that suggested volcanism occurred at ~ 3 Ma, our new 40Ar/39Ar ages show that Snow Peak formed between 5.3 and 6 million years ago. The volcano lies unconformably on ~ 30 Ma volcanic rocks of the Western Cascades. Volcanism occurred over a total duration of < 0.5-1 Ma, and at eruption rates (~ 0.008-0.013 km3/ka), lower than those observed in large Cascade shield volcanoes. Snow Peak lavas derived from a single, or restricted set of primary magma compositions and evolved via crystal fractionation of olivine + pyroxene + plagioclase over a range of pressures equivalent to crustal depths of ~ 3-35 km, consistent with fractionation occurring primarily during crustal transit or residence. The most evolved Snow Peak lava can be produced by ~ 50% crystallization from a primary magma with > 14 wt.% MgO. Snow Peak lavas have trace element characteristics transitional between the calc-alkaline basalt (CAB) and low-K tholeiite (LKT) primary magma types recognized throughout the Cascade Range, but are closer to LKT and are classified as such. Estimates based on phase equilibria models and plagioclase hygrometers suggest that the primary magmas contained moderate amounts of water (1.5-2 wt.%), consistent with LILE/HFSE ratios that are greater than MORB values. Snow Peak is part of a widespread suite of LKT magmas that erupted between 5-8 Ma throughout the central Oregon Cascade Range in response to intra-arc rifting, and Snow Peak shows that LKT magmatism at this time extended well into the forearc of the central Oregon Cascade Range. Overall LKT magmas of this age occur

  17. The Role of Parameters Controlling Tectonically Erosive and Accretive Forearcs - Results of 2D Sandbox Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohrmann, J.; Kukowski, N.; Adam, J.; Oncken, O.

    2001-12-01

    In this study, we attempt to identify and quantify the influence of the mechanical parameters controlling the mass transfer modes in the brittle part of tectonically erosive and accretive forearc settings. With scaled analogue sandbox experiments we studied the influence of the amount of sediment supply, the presence of mechanically weak layers as potential detachment, the properties of the subduction interface as well as the distribution of the vertical load in the wedge on both systems, the tectonically erosive and accretive. The results of the experiments without any backward material loss lead to a hierarchical control of the investigated parameters. Sediment supply is the main parameter: As soon as sediments enter the trench on top of the oceanic plate, accretive mass transfer will occur under any mechanical constraints. A non-accretive mass transfer occurs in the case of no sediment supply. Basal properties, i.e. friction and roughness of the basal subduction interface, exert a major influence on both, the accretive and the erosive systems: They determine the capability to underthrust material beneath the wedge. In non-accretive systems, significant roughness of the basal interface and therewith a high basal friction leads to tectonic erosion, whereas a smooth basal interface produces stagnant mass transfer. The presence of a weak layer has a different influence on the accretive and non-accretive mode: In an accretive system, a weak layer in the incoming sediment pile changes the mass transfer pattern from a purely frontally or dominantly basally accretive mode to contemporaneous frontal and basal accretion. In the case of tectonic erosion, the presence of a weak layer leads to higher rates of basal erosion and arcward material transport, but it does not change the general mass transfer pattern. The distribution of vertical load only influences secondary features of the forearc architecture: Topographic highs and lows in the forearc wedge, i.e. a deviation of

  18. Finite Strain in the Forearc Mantle: Testing the B-type Fabric Anisotropy Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, E. A.; van Keken, P.; Karato, S.; Park, J.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic observations from many subduction zones show that the seismically fast direction is perpendicular to the direction of convergence. This is opposite of what is expected from models that assume flow is parallel to plate motion and the seismically fast axis of olivine [100] aligns sub-parallel to the shear direction (A-type fabric). Recent deformation experiments on olivine aggregates show that under low-temperature and high-stress conditions, the fast axis of olivine aligns sub-perpendicular to the shear direction (B-type fabric)(Jung and Karato, 2001; Katayama et al., 2004). B-type fabric has potential to explain convergence-perpendicular anisotropy in subduction zones with flow parallel to plate motion. Kneller et al. (2005) used combined data from deformation experiments on olivine aggregates and dynamical models of subduction zones to predict the distribution of B-type fabric in the mantle wedge. This study predicted that the forearc mantle has suitable thermal and stress conditions for B-type fabric and a rapid transition toward the backarc to conditions more suitable for other olivine fabrics. A vertical projection of the volcanic arc into the mantle wedge is predicted to mark the fabric transition between B-type and A-, E-, or C-type fabrics depending on water content. An important aspect not thoroughly investigated by our previous research is finite strain accumulation across the predicted fabric transition. In this study we present finite strain calculation for non-Newtonian subduction zone models with composite water-dependent rheology. This composite rheology includes experimentally based Peierls, dislocation, and diffusion creep. We predict greater than 100 % strain accumulation across 75 km for material traveling into the forearc mantle. This strain accumulation may be sufficient to produce a well developed B-type fabric. Furthermore, material enters the forearc mantle from a low-strain-rate thermal boundary layer at the base of the overriding

  19. Degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge of Kyushu subduction zone: quantitative evaluations from seismic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaohong; Sun, Jinlong; Huang, Haibo

    2015-09-01

    Serpentinization is an important phenomenon for understanding the water cycle and geodynamics of subduction zones in the upper mantle. In this study, we evaluate quantitatively the degree of serpentinization using the seismic velocity. The results show that serpentinization mainly occurs in the forearc mantle wedge along the subducted oceanic crust, and the degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge of Kyushu is strongly heterogeneous and varies from 0 to 12 %, containing about 0-1.8 % water contents. In general, the degree of serpentinization gradually decreases with depth from 40 to 80 km and the largest degree usually occur in about 40-50 km depth. Localized high anomalies of serpentinization are revealed in the northern and southern portions of Kyushu, respectively. We suggest that in the northern portion of the forearc mantle wedge, the water contents are relatively large, which might result from the abundant fractures and cracks with more fluids in the subducting slab because of the subduction of Kyushu-Palau ridge and the sudden change in its subduction angle of Philippine Sea lithosphere. But the high degree of serpentinization in the southern portion is closely associated with the active left-lateral shear zone revealed by global positioning system site velocities and earthquake focal mechanisms. In addition, the present results also display that the low degree of serpentinization in the central domain of the forearc mantle wedge is consistent with the location of anomalous arc volcano. The distribution of water contents is closely associated with the degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge.

  20. The Portland Basin: A (big) river runs through it

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Wells, Ray E.; Madin, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    Metropolitan Portland, Oregon, USA, lies within a small Neogene to Holocene basin in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system. Although the basin owes its existence and structural development to its convergent-margin tectonic setting, the stratigraphic architecture of basin-fill deposits chiefly reflects its physiographic position along the lower reaches of the continental-scale Columbia River system. As a result of this globally unique setting, the basin preserves a complex record of aggradation and incision in response to distant as well as local tectonic, volcanic, and climatic events. Voluminous flood basalts, continental and locally derived sediment and volcanic debris, and catastrophic flood deposits all accumulated in an area influenced by contemporaneous tectonic deformation and variations in regional and local base level.

  1. The Boring Volcanic Field of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: tectonically anomalous forearc volcanism in an urban setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 small volcanoes are scattered throughout the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. These volcanoes constitute the Boring Volcanic Field, which is centered in the Neogene Portland Basin and merges to the east with coeval volcanic centers of the High Cascade volcanic arc. Although the character of volcanic activity is typical of many monogenetic volcanic fields, its tectonic setting is not, being located in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system well trenchward of the volcanic-arc axis. The history and petrology of this anomalous volcanic field have been elucidated by a comprehensive program of geologic mapping, geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and paleomag-netic studies. Volcanism began at 2.6 Ma with eruption of low-K tholeiite and related lavas in the southern part of the Portland Basin. At 1.6 Ma, following a hiatus of ~0.8 m.y., similar lavas erupted a few kilometers to the north, after which volcanism became widely dispersed, compositionally variable, and more or less continuous, with an average recurrence interval of 15,000 yr. The youngest centers, 50–130 ka, are found in the northern part of the field. Boring centers are generally monogenetic and mafic but a few larger edifices, ranging from basalt to low-SiO2 andesite, were also constructed. Low-K to high-K calc-alkaline compositions similar to those of the nearby volcanic arc dominate the field, but many centers erupted magmas that exhibit little influence of fluids derived from the subducting slab. The timing and compositional characteristics of Boring volcanism suggest a genetic relationship with late Neogene intra-arc rifting.

  2. Noble gas isotopes in mineral springs within the Cascadia Forearc, Wasihington and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Constantz, James E.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey report presents laboratory analyses along with field notes for a pilot study to document the relative abundance of noble gases in mineral springs within the Cascadia forearc of Washington and Oregon. Estimates of the depth to the underlying Juan de Fuca oceanic plate beneath the sample sites are derived from the McCrory and others (2012) slab model. Some of these springs have been previously sampled for chemical analyses (Mariner and others, 2006), but none currently have publicly available noble gas data. Helium isotope values as well as the noble gas values and ratios presented below will be used to determine the sources and mixing history of these mineral waters.

  3. Preliminary study on detection sediment contamination in soil affected by the Indian Ocean giant tsunami 2004 in Aceh, Indonesia using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Nasrullah; Ramli, Muliadi; Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik

    2016-03-01

    This work is intended to asses the capability of LIBS for the detection of the tsunami sediment contamination in soil. LIBS apparatus used in this work consist of a laser system and an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) system. The soil sample was collected from in Banda Aceh City, Aceh, Indonesia, the most affected region by the giant Indian Ocean tsunami 2004. The laser beam was focused onto surface of the soil pellet using a focusing lens to produce luminous plasma. The experiment was conducted under air as surrounding gas at 1 atmosphere. The emission spectral lines from the plasma were detected by the OMA system. It was found that metal including heavy metals can surely be detected, thus implying the potent of LIBS technique as a fast screening tools of tsunami sediment contamination.

  4. Subduction-related cryptic metasomatism in fore-arc to nascent fore-arc Neoproterozoic mantle peridotites beneath the Eastern Desert of Egypt: mineral chemical and geochemical evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdy, Mohamed; Salam Abu El-Ela, Abdel; Hassan, Adel; Kill, Youngwoo; Gamal El Dien, Hamed

    2013-04-01

    Mantle spinel peridotites beneath the Arabian Nubian Shield (ANS) in the Eastern Desert (ED) of Egypt were formed in arc stage in different tectonic setting. Thus they might subject to exchange with the crustal material derived from recycling subducting oceanic lithosphere. This caused metasomatism enriching the rocks in incompatible elements and forming non-residual minerals. Herein, we present mineral chemical and geochemical data of four ophiolitic mantle slice serpentinized peridotites (W. Mubarak, G. El-Maiyit, W. Um El Saneyat and W. Atalla) widely distributed in the ED. These rocks are highly serpentinized, except some samples from W. Mubarak and Um El-Saneyat, which contain primary olivine (Fo# = 90-92 mol %) and orthopyroxene (En# = 86-92 mol %) relics. They have harzburgite composition. Based on the Cr# and Mg# of the unaltered spinel cores, all rocks formed in oceanic mantle wedge in the fore-arc setting, except those from W. Atalla formed in nascent fore-arc. This implies that the polarity of the subduction during the arc stage was from the west to the east. These rocks are restites formed after partial melting between 16.58 in W. Atalla to 24 % in G-El Maiyit. Melt extraction occurred under oxidizing conditions in peridotites from W. Mubarak and W. Atalla and under reducing conditions in peridotites from G. El-Maiyit and Um El-Saneyat. Cryptic metasomatism in the studied mantle slice peridotites is evident. This includes enrichment in incompatible elements in minerals and whole rocks if compared with the primitive mantle (PM) composition and the trend of the depletion in melt. In opx the Mg# doesn't correlate with TiO2, CaO, MnO, NiO and Cr2O3concentrations. In addition, in serpentinites from W. Mubarak and W. Atalla, the TiO2spinel is positively correlated with the TiO2 whole-rock, proposing enrichment by the infiltration of Ti-rich melts, while in G. El- Maiyit and Um El-Saneyat serpentinites they are negatively correlated pointing to the reaction

  5. Franciscan olistoliths in Upper Cretaceous conglomerate deposits, Western Transverse Ranges, California: Implications for basin morphology and tectonic history

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W.E.; Campbell, M.D. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Compositional analyses reveal that Upper Cretaceous sediments exposed in the Western Transverse Ranges of CA were deposited in submarine fan systems in a forearc basin. Point count data suggest a magmatic arc/recycled orogen as the dominant provenance for these sediments. Paleocurrent measurements from conglomerates in these sediments yield a northerly transport direction. Removal of ca. 90[degree] of clockwise rotation and 70 km of right-lateral slip restore this section to a position west of the San Diego area. The forearc basin would have had a N-S orientation, with the bulk of sediments supplied by the Peninsular Ranges to the east. Evidence of the erosion of the accretionary wedge is provided by the presence of large, internally stratified olistoliths of Franciscan material interbedded with and surrounded by upper Cretaceous conglomerate. Petrographic, quantitative SEM, and microprobe analyses indicate the presence of diagnostic Franciscan mineralogy, including glaucophane, riebeckite, lawsonite, and serpentine. Olistoclasts of chert, jadeitic graywacke, serpentine, and blueschist are found intermixed with the conglomerates in close association with the olistoliths. This association provides strong field evidence that recirculation of melange material within the subduction zone was active and well-established by late Cretaceous time. Inferences regarding the forearc system morphology can be drawn from these observations. The occurrence of coarse, easterly-derived conglomerates surrounded by large, stratified, but sheared, westerly-derived Franciscan debris, suggests a narrow, relatively steep-sided basin. Paleocurrent measurements gave no indication of axial transport within the basin. This morphology suggests that, in late Cretaceous time, the forearc basin was youthful, with a narrow arc-trench gap. Thus, relative convergence rates between the North American and Pacific plates were possibly slower than Tertiary convergence rates.

  6. Postseismic Deformations of the Aceh, Nias and Benkulu Earthquakes and the Viscoelastic Properties of the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleitout, L.; Garaud, J.; Cailletaud, G.; Vigny, C.; Simons, W. J.; Ambrosius, B. A.; Trisirisatayawong, I.; Satirapod, C.; Geotecdi Song

    2011-12-01

    The giant seism of Aceh (december 2004),followed by the Nias and Bengkulu earthquakes, broke a large portion of the boundary between the Indian ocean and the Sunda block. For the first time in history, the deformations associated with a very large earthquake can be followed by GPS, in particular by the SEAMERGE (far-field) and SUGAR (near-field) GPS networks. A 3D finite element code (Zebulon-Zset) is used to model both the cosismic and the postseismic deformations. The modeled zone is a large portion of spherical shell around Sumatra extanding over more than 60 degrees in latitude and longitude and from the Earth's surface to the core-mantle boundary. The mesh is refined close to the subduction zone. First, the inverted cosismic displacements on the subduction plane are inverted for and provide a very good fit to the GPS data for the three seisms. The observed postseismic displacements, non-dimensionalized by the cosismic displacements, present three very different patterns as function of time: For GPS stations in the far-field, the total horizontal post-seismic displacement after 4 years is as large as the cosismic displacement. The velocities vary slowly over 4 years. A large subsidence affects Thailand and Malaysia. In the near-field, the postseismic displacement reaches only some 15% of the cosismic displacement and it levels off after 2 years. In the middle-field (south-west coast of Sumatra), the postseismic displacement also levels-off with time but more slowly and it reaches more than 30% of the cosismic displacement after four years. In order to fit these three distinct displacement patterns, we need to invoke both viscoelastic deformation in the asthenosphere and a low-viscosity wedge: Neither the vertical subsidence nor the amplitude of the far-field horizontal velocities could be explained by postseismic sliding on the subduction interface. The low viscosity wedge permits to explain the large middle-field velocities. The viscoelastic properties of the

  7. Investigating Forearc Strength by Triaxial Testing of Marine Sediments from the Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (IODP Expeditions 334 and 344)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipp, M.; Kurzawski, R. M.; Doose, R.; Schulte-Kortnack, D.

    2015-12-01

    Forearc stability and inherent tectonic failure processes at active continental margins very much depend on the strength of the composing sediments. Forearc sediments can either be prone to fracturing and more localized deformation or alternatively to creep and distributed deformation. Strength and deformation behavior can vary significantly depending on small differences in composition and fabric of the sediments as has been shown in a similar study on samples from the Nankai trench and forearc (Stipp et al., 2013). Cylindrical core samples with diameters of 30 and 50 mm recovered during IODP Expeditions 334 and 344 from a depth range of 7-788 m below sea floor were experimentally deformed in two different triaxial deformation apparatus under consolidated and undrained conditions at confining pressures of 0.4-20 MPa, room temperature, variable axial displacement rates of ~0.01-0.5 mm/min, and up to axial compressive strains of ~50%. Experimental results show great differences in the consolidation state and the related mechanical behavior of upper plate and incoming plate sediments. Similar to previous findings from the Nankai trench and forearc, structurally weak and structurally strong samples can be distinguished. One sample from shallow depth in the incoming plate shows a transition from structurally strong to structurally weak behavior with increasing confining pressure that has not been observed for Nankai samples. The differences in mechanical behavior may be the key for strain localization, faulting and surface breakage at active erosive as well as accretionary continental margins. Reference: Stipp, M., Rolfs, M., Kitamura, Y., Behrmann, J.H., Schumann, K., Schulte-Kortnack, D. and Feeser, V. (2013). - Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 14/11, doi: 10.1002/ggge.20290.

  8. Petrology and provenance of modern sands from Cascade Range Forearc and Canadian Rocky Mountain fold-thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Kretchmer, A.G.; Ingersoll, R.V.

    1987-05-01

    The Cascade Range volcanic arc and forearc, and the Canadian Rocky Mountain fold-thrust belt represent the two sides of a continental margin arc-trench system. Sands from these areas show clear compositional differences. The most significant discriminating parameters are volcanic lithic grains, metamorphic lithic grains, plagioclase-to-feldspar ratio, and quartz. Variable sediment composition is also evident within each setting. Cascade sands are volcaniclastic and have high plagioclase-to-feldspar ratios. They divide into three categories (volcanic arc, alluvial forearc, and coastal forearc) that differ in their lithic contents and plagioclase-to-feldspar ratios. These changes reflect the attrition of volcanic lithics with distance from the arc and the input of recycled sediment and subduction-complex lithologies. Rocky Mountain sands are sedimenticlastic. They are of two types, a miogeocline-shelf provenance and a clastic-wedge provenance. These linear belts differ in clastic-carbonate content, plagioclase-to-feldspar ratio, and quartz content. The compositional differences reflect interstratified petrofacies of fold-thrust belts. Just as they can use detrital modes of modern sands to characterize provenance and tectonic setting, modes of ancient sandstones help up to recognize provenance terranes and reconstruct paleotectonic settings.

  9. Alteration and mineralization of an oceanic forearc and the ophiolite-ocean crust analogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Teagle, D.A.H.; Brewer, T.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Halliday, A.

    1998-01-01

    Mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic (O, C, S, and Sr) analyses were performed on minerals and bulk rocks from a forearc basement section to understand alteration processes and compare with mid-ocean ridges (MOR) and ophiolites. Ocean Drilling Program Hole 786B in the Izu-Bonin forearc penetrates 103 m of sediment and 725 m into volcanic flows, breccias, and basal dikes. The rocks comprise boninites and andesites to rhyolites. Most of the section was affected by low-temperature (<100??C) seawater alteration, with temperatures increasing downward. The rocks are partly (5-25%) altered to smectite, Fe-oxyhydroxide, calcite, and phillipsite, and exhibit gains of K, Rb, and P, loss of Ca, variable changes in Si, Na, Mg, Fe, Sr, and Y, and elevated ??18O and 87Sr/86Sr. Higher temperatures (???150??C) in the basal dikes below 750 m led to more intense alteration and formation of chlorite-smectite, corrensite, albite, K-feldspar, and quartz (??chlorite). A 5 m thick hydrothermally altered and pyritized zone at 815 m in the basal dikes reacted with mixtures of seawater and hydrothermal fluids to Mg-chlorite, albite, and pyrite, and gained Mg and S and lost Si and Ca. Focused flow of hydrothermal fluids produced sericitization halos (Na-K sericite, quartz, pyrophyllite, K-feldspar, and pyrite) along quartz veins at temperatures of 200??-250??C. High 87Sr/86Sr ratios of chloritized (???0.7055) and sericitized (???0.7065) rocks indicate involvement of seawater via mixing with hydrothermal fluids. Low ??34S of sulfide (???2 to -5.5???) and sulfate (12.5???) are consistent with input of magmatic SO2 into hydrothermal fluids and disproportionation to sulfide and sulfate. Alteration processes were generally similar to those at MORs, but the arc section is more intensively altered, in part because of the presence of abundant glassy rocks and mafic phases. The increase in alteration grade below 750 m and the mineralization in the basal dikes are analogous to changes that occur near

  10. Strain partitioning and the formation of forearc slivers at oblique convergent margins: Insight from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Kelvin

    Oblique relative plate motion is ubiquitous at convergent margins, often resulting in a significant component of motion parallel to the margin. Partitioning of relative plate motion can result in deformation that is accommodated as spatially distinct margin-parallel shear and margin-normal thrusting, and lead to the development and migration of crustal slivers. These slivers, bounded by thrust faults at the trench and arc-ward by a well-developed margin-parallel strike-slip fault, are observed at about half of all modern convergent boundaries. Some modestly oblique settings have developed fore-arc slivers while other margins, with higher obliquities, have failed to effectively partition plate motion into distinct zones suggesting mechanisms other than obliquity are important in partitioning. Analog modeling has shown that pure frictional wedges always partition deformation but produce sliver like motion and structures at only very high obliquities. The presence of ductile layers at depth in some analog models, however, can localize shear at much lower obliquities. In light of this, we have performed, for a wide range of obliquities, finite-element numerical simulations of convergent wedges with similar geometries and distributions in strength as layered analog models, with a basal ductile layer. For these models, we solve force-balance equations for Stokes flow using COMSOL Multiphysics in order to quantify the magnitude and style of stress. Our numerical models display a similar distribution of cross-sectional topography and surface velocity fields compared to their counter part oblique analog experiments. The numerical models also demonstrate a progressive localization of margin-parallel shear with the growth of wedge topography. All wedges with a non-zero obliquity eventually show the onset and localization of shear indicative of strike-slip deformation, which we quantify by calculating the principal horizontal stress field, as well as, the margin-normal and

  11. A Method to Estimate Friction Coefficient from Orientation Distribution of Meso-scale Faults: Applications to Faults in Forearc Sediment and Underplated Tectonic Mélange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.

    2015-12-01

    Friction coefficients along faults control the brittle strength of the earth's upper crust, although it is difficult to estimate them especially of ancient geological faults. Several previous studies tried to determine the friction coefficient of meso-scale faults from their orientation distribution as follows. Fault-slip analysis through stress tensor inversion techniques gives principal stress axes and a stress ratio, which allows us to draw a normalized Mohr's circle. Assuming that a faulting occurs when the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on it, i.e., the slip tendency, exceeds the friction coefficient, one can find a linear boundary of distribution of points corresponding to faults on Mohr diagram. The slope of the boundary (friction envelope) provides the friction coefficient. This method has a difficulty in graphically and manually recognizing the linear boundary of distribution on the Mohr diagram. This study automated the determination of friction coefficient by considering the fluctuations of fluid pressure and differential stress. These unknown factors are expected to make difference in density of points representing faults on the Mohr diagram. Since the density is controlled by the friction coefficient, we can optimize the friction coefficient so as to explain the density distribution. The method was applied to two examples of natural meso-scale faults. The first example is from the Pleistocene Kazusa Group, central Japan, which filled a forearc basin of the Sagami Trough. Stress inversion analysis showed WNW-ENE trending tensional stress with a low stress ratio. The friction coefficient was determined to be around 0.66, which is typical value for sandstone. The Second example is from an underplated tectonic mélange in the Cretaceous to Paleogene Shimanto accretionary complex in southwest Japan along the Nankai Trough. The stress condition was determined to be an axial compression perpendicular to the foliation of shale matrix. The friction

  12. Constraining porosity of the shallow forearc and plate interface offshore Nicaragua with marine electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naif, S.; Key, K.; Constable, S.; Evans, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    We imaged the electrical resistivity structure of the incoming plate and outer forearc across the Middle America Trench with 2-D inversion of marine controlled-source electromagnetic data. The inverted data reveal a high conductivity channel that is congruent with the geometry of the plate interface, which we infer to be subducted sediments. We used the resistivity model to estimate the porosity of the upper plate and underthrust sediments. The sediment porosity decays exponentially as it is subducted along the plate interface, in good agreement with existing constraints from compaction studies. The plate interface is overlain by an upper plate that is one to two orders of magnitude more resistive, requiring low porosities (<15%) that are consistent with a non-accreting margin composed of crystalline basement or lithified sediments.At 18 to 23 km landward of the trench, the conductive channel diverges from the plate interface and extends 1-2 km into the overlying plate below a cluster of active seafloor seeps. The location of the anomaly at depth is synonymous with a rapid steepening of the seafloor slope. The steepened slope occurs at 15 to 25 km landward of the trench and is extensive, persisting for more than 100 km along the margin. This correlation leads us to conclude that the cause of the conductive feature is sediment underplating. The implications for the 1992 tsunami earthquake will be discussed.

  13. Subduction of very rugged seafloor topography imposes stronger interplate coupling and elevated mean stress levels at the Western Solomon Islands forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F. W.; Lavier, L. L.; Bevis, M. G.; Frohlich, C. A.; Grand, S.; Papabatu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Recent large thrusting earthquakes in the context of paleoseismicity and GPS data indicate that only ~ 50 per cent of Australian plate convergence at the Western Solomon Islands forearc is accommodated by megathrust rupture. No instrumentally recorded events larger than M ~7.0 occurred in this region until the Mw 8.1 event of April 2007 and a Mw 7.1 event in January 2010. The 2007 event apparently ruptured to the base of the seismogenic zone with typical uplift of the outer forearc and subsidence of islands located greater than 40 km from the trench. The Mw 7.1 event of 2010 occurred to the east at the adjacent segment very near the trench where the Coleman seamount is impinging on the forearc. Just arcward of the epicenter, Rendova and Tetepare Islands subsided indicating that all of the coseismic slip occurred beneath the ~15 km strip separating these islands from the trench. This movement is opposite in direction to the geologic record of episodic uplifts of these islands at mean rates up to 7-8 mm/yr. Thus both the 2007 and 2010 earthquakes may have transferred stress to the deeper seismogenic zone arcward of the 2010 earthquake. The extremely rugged and young subducting seafloor at this margin resists subduction very strongly and induces very strong interplate coupling. Thus we propose that this margin operates at an elevated stress level. Such strong coupling impedes subduction and thus megathrust rupture occurs more rarely than if coupling were weaker. Forearc deformation as well as occasional megathrust ruptures may combine to accommodate plate convergence. We propose that initiation of rapid forearc uplift marked the beginning of the current episode of very strong interplate coupling and elevated forearc stress when some combination of seamounts and ridges on the downgoing plate began to impinge more forcefully on the forearc backstop.

  14. How much does it cost to achieve coverage targets for primary healthcare services? A costing model from Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Asnawi; Hort, Krishna; Abidin, Azwar Zaenal; Amin, Fadilah M

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant investment in improving service infrastructure and training of staff, public primary healthcare services in low-income and middle-income countries tend to perform poorly in reaching coverage targets. One of the factors identified in Aceh, Indonesia was the lack of operational funds for service provision. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and transparent costing tool that enables health planners to calculate the unit costs of providing basic health services to estimate additional budgets required to deliver services in accordance with national targets. The tool was developed using a standard economic approach that linked the input activities to achieving six national priority programs at primary healthcare level: health promotion, sanitation and environment health, maternal and child health and family planning, nutrition, immunization and communicable diseases control, and treatment of common illness. Costing was focused on costs of delivery of the programs that need to be funded by local government budgets. The costing tool consisting of 16 linked Microsoft Excel worksheets was developed and tested in several districts enabled the calculation of the unit costs of delivering of the six national priority programs per coverage target of each program (such as unit costs of delivering of maternal and child health program per pregnant mother). This costing tool can be used by health planners to estimate additional money required to achieve a certain level of coverage of programs, and it can be adjusted for different costs and program delivery parameters in different settings.

  15. The prevalence of long-term post-traumatic stress symptoms among adolescents after the tsunami in Aceh.

    PubMed

    Agustini, E N; Asniar, I; Matsuo, H

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify long-term post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Aceh 4.5 years after the tsunami and to examine whether certain factors affected the severity of PTSD symptoms among adolescents. The PTSD symptoms of 482 adolescents aged 11 to 19 years were assessed according to the Child Post-Traumatic Stress Reaction Index (CPTSD-RI). The severity of the disaster was identified by the Traumatic Exposure Severity Scale (TESS). Of the adolescents who completed the questionnaire, 54 (11.2%), 124 (25.7%), 196 (40.7%), 103 (21.4%) and 5 (1%), respectively, reported none, mild, moderate, severe and very severe symptoms on CPTSD-RI. Gender, loss of parents, somatic response and support level were significantly associated with the total score on CPTSD-RI (P < 0.05). The TESS-Occurrence Scale and CPTSD-RI were significantly correlated (r= 0.33, P < 0.05). The TESS-Distress Scale was significantly correlated with CPTSD-RI (r= 0.48, P < 0.05). The study indicated that the symptoms of PTSD, ranging from very severe to moderate, could persist for a long time after the tsunami and be affected by gender, loss of parents, somatic response, support level and severity of the disaster.

  16. Tsunami damage reduction performance of a mangrove forest in Banda Aceh, Indonesia inferred from field data and a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, H.; Koshimura, S.; Miyagi, T.; Imamura, F.

    2010-06-01

    Since the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the role of mangrove forests as natural defenses protecting coastal communities from tsunami disaster has been highlighted. However, some mangrove forests were destroyed by that tsunami. They are expected to have lost their protective functions. In this study, we develop a fragility function to assess the mangrove trees' vulnerability, expressed as the damage probability of mangrove trees, based on field surveys and numerical modeling of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Based on the fragility function, we reconstruct a numerical model of tsunami inundation including the performance of mangrove forests in terms of reducing tsunami damage. The model reveals that a 10 year old mangrove forest in a 500 m wide area can reduce a tsunami's hydrodynamic force by approximately 70% for an incident wave of 3.0 m inundation depth and a wave period of 40 min at the shoreline. The model also shows, for a tsunami inundation depth of greater than 4 m, that a 10 year old mangrove forest would be mostly destroyed and that it would lose its force reduction capacity. Moreover, approximately 80% of a 30 year old mangrove forest would survive a 5 m tsunami and absorb 50% of the tsunami's hydrodynamic force.

  17. Post Disaster Governance, Complexity and Network Theory: Evidence from Aceh, Indonesia After the Indian Ocean Tsunami 2004.

    PubMed

    Lassa, Jonatan A

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to understand the organizational network typology of large--scale disaster intervention in developing countries and to understand the complexity of post--disaster intervention, through the use of network theory based on empirical data from post--tsunami reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia, during 2005/-2007. The findings suggest that the ' degrees of separation' (or network diameter) between any two organizations in the field is 5, thus reflecting 'small- world' realities and therefore making no significant difference with the real human networks, as found in previous experiments. There are also significant loops in the network reflecting the fact that some actors tend to not cooperate, which challenges post- disaster coordination. The findings show the landscape of humanitarian actors is not randomly distributed. Many actors were connected to each other through certain hubs, while hundreds of actors make 'scattered' single 'principal--client' links. The paper concludes that by understanding the distribution of degree, centrality, 'degrees of separation' and visualization of the network, authorities can improve their understanding of the realities of coordination, from macro to micro scales.

  18. An evaluation of public, private, and mobile health clinic usage for children under age 5 in Aceh after the tsunami: implications for future disasters

    PubMed Central

    Rassekh, Bahie Mary; Shu, Winnie; Santosham, Mathuram; Burnham, Gilbert; Doocy, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aceh, Indonesia, was the hardest-hit area in the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, with more than 500,000 people displaced, 120,000 people dead, and total damages and losses estimated at $4.5 billion. The relief effort following the tsunami was also immense. Objectives: This study aimed to determine and assess utilization patterns of formal public versus private and mobile health services for children under age 5 with diarrhea, cough and difficulty breathing, fever, or skin disease and to identify determinants of care usage. Methods: A household survey of 962 households was administered to caretakers of children aged 1–5 years. A sample of clusters within Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar were selected and those caretakers within the cluster who fit the inclusion criteria were interviewed. Results: Of those caretakers who utilized formal health services as the first line of care for their sick child, 62% used a public health facility, 30% used a private health facility, and 8% used a mobile clinic. In terms of significant factors associated with public, private, and mobile care utilization, mobile clinics were at one side of the spectrum and private clinics were at the other side overall, with public care somewhere in between. This was true for several variables. Mobile clinic users reported the lowest cost of services and medicine and the highest perceived level of accessibility, and private care users reported the highest perceived level of satisfaction. Conclusions: Utilization of formal health services for children was quite high after the tsunami. The caretaker's perceived satisfaction with public health services could have been improved. Mobile clinics were an accessible source of health care and could be used in future disaster relief efforts to target those populations that seek less care for their sick children, including displaced populations, and those children whose parents have died. PMID:25750788

  19. Forearc Structure and Fault Slip Near the Epicenter of the April 1, 2007, Megathrust Earthquake (Mw 8.1) and Tsunami in the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. A.; Scholl, D. W.; Geist, E. L.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.; Reiss, C.; Mann, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    We reprocessed three multichannel seismic-reflection (MCS) lines collected by the USGS (1982, 1984) near the epicenter of the 2007 Mw-8.1 megathrust earthquake that struck the Solomon Islands. Near the epicenter, several bathymetric and tectonic elements, including an active spreading ridge and a transform fault, are being subducted at the New Britain Trench. These subducted elements affected fault slip during the earthquake, as indicated by two finite fault models (Yagi, 2007; Ji, 2007). Slip began around the epicenter, southeast of where the spreading ridge enters the subduction zone. Slip was reduced directly over the ridge, and northwest of the ridge, slip resumed with increased, possibly maximum amplitude. Fault rupture propagated northwestward at about 1.95 km/s (Yagi, 2007). The Woodlark spreading ridge, with its irregular bathymetry and probable high heat flow, injects a strong three-dimensionality into the analysis of fault slip along the interplate thrust. MCS data show smooth reflections from the interplate decollement that can be followed for about 40 km east of the trench, and hypocenters locally recorded during 1998 (Yoneshima et al., 2005) trace the plate interface deep into the subduction zone. The downgoing plate dips ~30° northeast through the zone of highest 1998 seismic activity, which occurs below 20 km depth. Although young oceanic crust is being subducted eastward along the New Britain Trench, the subducting plate bends sharply downward and dips steeply (30° to 45°) into the mantle. Teleseismic data place the 2007 earthquake epicenter near the trench axis, close to the up-dip limit of the seismogenic zone indicated by the 1998 seismicity. Under the upper slope of the island arc south of the epicenter, strong reflections suggest a mixed volcanic and carbonate-rock framework of the island arc. Down slope of where the strong reflections end, seaward-verging thrust faults deform several small forearc basins. Deformation occurred episodically

  20. Link between the northward extension of Great Sumatra Fault and continental rifting in the Andaman Sea: new results from seismic reflection studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Moeremans, R. E.; McArdle, J.; Johansen, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Great Sumatra Fault (GSF) traverses the main land Sumatra from Sunda Strait in the southeast to Banda Aceh in the northwest for about 1900 km, and defines the present day plate boundary between the Sunda Plate in the north and Burmese Sliver Plate in the south. It is formed due to the oblique subduction of the Indo-Australian Plate beneath the Sunda Plate. It has been well studied on land but is poorly studied north of Banda Aceh in the Andaman Sea. Its study is further complicated by the presence of volcanic arc in its vicinity and its interaction with the West Andaman Fault (WAF) further north. Here we present deep seismic reflection images along the northward extension of the GSF over 700 km until it joins the Andaman Spreading Centre and interpret these images in the light of earthquake, gravity and bathymetry data. We find that the GSF has two strands between Banda Aceh and Nicobar Island: a transpression in the south and a deep narrow active rift basin in the north dotted with volcanoes in the center, suggesting that the volcanic arc is coincident with the rifting. Further north of Nicobar Island, an active strike-slip fault cuts through a deep rifted basin until its intersection with Andaman Sea Spreading Centre. The volcanic arc lies just east of the basin. The western margin of this basin seems to be a rifted continental margin, tilted westward flooring the Andaman-Nicobar forearc basin, which was once a part of Malaya Peninsula, suggesting that a significant parts of the Andaman-Nicobar forearc system is underlain by the Sunda continental crust. The Andaman-Nicobar forearc basin is bounded in the west by backthrusts, similar to the West Andaman and Mentawai faults bounding the Aceh and Mentawai forearc basins in the south. The cluster of seismicity after the 2004 great Andaman-Sumatra earthquake just north of Nicobar Island coincides with the intersection of two NW-SE and N-S trending strike-slip fault systems. Some of hypocentre of these earthquakes

  1. Local thickening of the Cascadia forearc crust and the origin of seismic reflectors in the uppermost mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.J.; Ramachandran, K.; Kao, H.; Fisher, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles from three different surveys of the Cascadia forearc are interpreted using P wave velocities and relocated hypocentres, which were both derived from the first arrival travel time inversion of wide-angle seismic data and local earthquakes. The subduction decollement, which is characterized beneath the continental shelf by a reflection of 0.5 s duration, can be traced landward into a large duplex structure in the lower forearc crust near southern Vancouver Island. Beneath Vancouver Island, the roof thrust of the duplex is revealed by a 5–12 km thick zone, identified previously as the E reflectors, and the floor thrust is defined by a short duration reflection from a − 1. We suggest that these relatively low velocities indicate the presence of either crustal rocks from the oceanic plate that have been underplated to the continent or crustal rocks from the forearc that have been transported downward by subduction erosion. The absence of seismicity from within the E reflectors implies that they are significantly weaker than the overlying crust, and the reflectors may be a zone of active ductile shear. In contrast, seismicity in parts of the D reflectors can be interpreted to mean that ductile shearing no longer occurs in the landward part of the duplex. Merging of the D and E reflectors at 42–46 km depth creates reflectivity in the uppermost mantle with a vertical thickness of at least 15 km. We suggest that pervasive reflectivity in the upper mantle elsewhere beneath Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia arises from similar shear zones.

  2. Ultramafic clasts from the South Chamorro serpentine mud volcano reveal a polyphase serpentinization history of the Mariana forearc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Jöns, Niels; Bach, Wolfgang; Klein, Frieder; Alt, Jeffrey C.

    2015-06-01

    Serpentine seamounts located on the outer half of the pervasively fractured Mariana forearc provide an excellent window into the forearc devolatilization processes, which can strongly influence the cycling of volatiles and trace elements in subduction zones. Serpentinized ultramafic clasts recovered from an active mud volcano in the Mariana forearc reveal microstructures, mineral assemblages and compositions that are indicative of a complex polyphase alteration history. Petrologic phase relations and oxygen isotopes suggest that ultramafic clasts were serpentinized at temperatures below 200 °C. Several successive serpentinization events represented by different vein generations with distinct trace element contents can be recognized. Measured in situ Rb/Cs ratios are fairly uniform ranging between 1 and 10, which is consistent with Cs mobilization from sediments at lower temperatures and lends further credence to the low-temperature conditions proposed in models of the thermal structure in forearc settings. Late veins show lower fluid mobile element (FME) concentrations than early veins, suggesting a decreasing influence of fluid discharge from the subducting slab on the composition of the serpentinizing fluids. The continuous microfabric and mineral chemical evolution observed in the ultramafic clasts may have implications as to the origin and nature of the serpentinizing fluids. We hypothesize that opal and smectite dehydration produce quartz-saturated fluids with high FME contents and Rb/Cs between 1 and 4 that cause the early pervasive serpentinization. The partially serpentinized material may then be eroded from the basal plane of the suprasubduction mantle wedge. Serpentinization continued but the interacting fluids did not carry a pronounced sedimentary signature, either because FMEs were no longer released from the slab, or due to an en route loss of FMEs. Late chrysotile veins that document the increased access of fluids in a now fluid-dominated regime are

  3. Determining the Controlling Factors of Coastal Development along an Active Margin - A Case Study from Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Katrin; Meilianda, Ella; Hill, Emma; McAdoo, Brian; Qiang, Qui; Storms, Joep; Walstra, Dirk-Jan; Setiawan, Agus; Masputri, Aisha S.; Mayasari, Cut D.; Riandi, Indra; Nasir, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the recovery of shorelines after catastrophic events is crucial for sustainable coastal development and future hazard mitigation. Here, we present post-seismic coastal development data from West Aceh, Indonesia, an area that was severely affected by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami. Using a combined approach of spatial data analysis, field surveys and numerical modeling, we reconstruct the build-up of a new beach ridge along a 10 kilometer long stretch of the western Acehnese coast after the complete destruction of the beach in 2004. The coastline of West Aceh can be characterized as a microtidal, wave dominated environment with the wave climate being controlled by the monsoon seasons reaching a significant wave height of Hs = 1.2 m during the more energetic West Monsoon from April to September. Waves approach the shoreline at a very low angle resulting in minor and variable longshore sediment transport. The beach has an average foreshore slope of 0.07 and is composed of well sorted medium sand. Recently obtained bathymetric data indicates a steep upper shoreface with a slope of 0.03. Further offshore the slope decreases to 0.01 with 14 m water depth being reached in about 700 m distance to the shoreline. Grab samples obtained in 10 m water depth are composed of fine to medium sand but lenses of medium to coarse sand with abundant shell debris do also occur. Beach ridges can be traced up to 2 km inland and indicate long-term coastal progradation and abundant sediment supply to the littoral zone. The western Acehnese shoreline parallels the Sunda trench and subsided 50 to 100 cm during the 2004 rupture. Modeled land elevation changes as a result of afterslip and viscoelastic mantle relaxation, indicate rapid post-seismic uplift of 4.4 cm/year in the year following the earthquake, but more moderate uplift rates of 1.4 cm/year since mid-2006. In 2004, co-seismic subsidence and tsunami scouring caused the coastline to

  4. Health diplomacy through collaboration and a story of hope in tsunami-ravaged Banda Aceh, Indonesia: A U.S. Public Health Service nurse officer perspective.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    As a registered nurse, I have witnessed the powerful influence of bedside care for > 10 years. Yet my experience aboard the USNS Mercy--the first interagency deployment designed to provide humanitarian assistance to tsunami-stricken Indonesia--revealed a direct link between individual bedside care and health diplomacy. Despite desperate medical and humanitarian needs in the province of Banda Aceh, the Mercy was met with suspicion and resistance by the Indonesian government. In the first few days, it seemed uncertain that the Mercy would be asked to assist in any humanitarian capacity. The Mercy crew and staff agreed only to assist at the request of the Indonesian government. Ultimately it was the emergent medical needs of a 10-year-old survior, evacuated to the ship by Australian and German organizations, which established the seeds of health diplomacy between the United States and Indonesia. This article explores the ways in which health diplomacy can be fostered by individual medical and nursing care, through the story of one young survivor of the East Asian tsunami. My experience of compassionate and culturally centered care aboard the USNS Mercy touched the hearts and minds of care providers and, ultimately, won the trust of local government officials and the people of Banda Aceh.

  5. Health diplomacy through collaboration and a story of hope in tsunami-ravaged Banda Aceh, Indonesia: A U.S. Public Health Service nurse officer perspective.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    As a registered nurse, I have witnessed the powerful influence of bedside care for > 10 years. Yet my experience aboard the USNS Mercy--the first interagency deployment designed to provide humanitarian assistance to tsunami-stricken Indonesia--revealed a direct link between individual bedside care and health diplomacy. Despite desperate medical and humanitarian needs in the province of Banda Aceh, the Mercy was met with suspicion and resistance by the Indonesian government. In the first few days, it seemed uncertain that the Mercy would be asked to assist in any humanitarian capacity. The Mercy crew and staff agreed only to assist at the request of the Indonesian government. Ultimately it was the emergent medical needs of a 10-year-old survior, evacuated to the ship by Australian and German organizations, which established the seeds of health diplomacy between the United States and Indonesia. This article explores the ways in which health diplomacy can be fostered by individual medical and nursing care, through the story of one young survivor of the East Asian tsunami. My experience of compassionate and culturally centered care aboard the USNS Mercy touched the hearts and minds of care providers and, ultimately, won the trust of local government officials and the people of Banda Aceh. PMID:17447623

  6. Geochemistry of the Bonin Fore-arc Volcanic Sequence: Results from IODP Expedition 352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Ryan, J. G.; Shervais, J. W.; Whattam, S. A.; Sakuyama, T.; Kirchenbaur, M.; Li, H.; Nelson, W. R.; Prytulak, J.; Pearce, J. A.; Reagan, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin-Mariana intraoceanic arc system, in the western Pacific, results from ~52 My of subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the eastern margin of the Philippine Sea plate. Four sites were drilled south of the Bonin Islands during IODP Expedition 352 and 1.22 km of igneous basement was cored upslope to the west of the trough. These stratigraphically controlled igneous suites allow study of the earliest stages of arc development from seafloor spreading to convergence. We present the preliminary results of a detailed major and trace element (ICPMS) study on 128 igneous rocks drilled during Expedition 352. Mainly basalts and basaltic andesites were recovered at the two deeper water sites (U1440 and U1441) and boninites at the two westernmost sites (U1439 and U1442). Sites U1440 and U1441 basaltic suites are trace element depleted (e.g. Yb 4-6 x PM); they have fractionated REE patterns (LREE/HREE = 0.2-0.4 x C1-chondrites) compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts. They have compositions overlapping that of previously sampled Fore-Arc Basalts (FAB) series. They are characterized also by an increase in LILE contents relative to neighboring elements up-section (e.g. Rb/La ranging from <1 to 3-7 x PM at Site U1440) suggesting a progressive contamination of their source by fluids. This process in turn may have favored melting and efficient melt extraction from the source and thus its extreme depletion. Boninites are depleted in moderately incompatible elements with a decrease in their contents up-section (e.g. Yb = ~6.2 to 2.8 x C1-chondrite at Site U1439). These changes in trace element contents are associated with the development of a positive Zr-Hf anomaly relative to neighboring elements and a strong increase in LILE (e.g., Zr/Sm=~1 to 2.6 x PM and Rb/La=1-2 to 10-18). The progressive upward depletion of boninitic lavas could reveal the incorporation of harzburgitic residues from FAB generation into their mantle source.

  7. Forearc Morphotectonics and Megathrust Earthquakes Along the Middle America Convergent Margin, Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. S.; Spotila, J. A.; Gardner, T.; Protti, M.; LaFromboise, E. J.; Morrish, S.; Robinson, M.; Barnhart, A.; Butcher, A.; Khaw, F.; Piestrzeniewicz, P.; Ritzinger, B.; Utick, J.; Wellington, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica forms a prominent morphologic high along the Middle America forearc where the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate at 8.5 cm/yr. This emergent coastal landmass lies directly above the megathrust along a seismogenic zone that produces frequent major earthquakes. Along the Nicoya coast, Quaternary marine and fluvial terraces record net uplift in a pattern that shadows the peninsula's overall topographic form. Terrace mapping, surveying, and age dating (14C, OSL, TCN) reveal uplift variations that coincide with three contrasting domains of subducting seafloor (EPR, CNS-1, CNS-2). Uplift rates vary between 0.1-0.2 m/ky inboard of older EPR crust in the north; 0.2-0.5 m/ky inboard of younger CNS-1 crust along the central coast; and 1.5-2.5 m/ky inboard of CNS-2 seamounts impacting the peninsula's southern tip. GIS digital terrain analysis reveals a deformation pattern consistent with field geomorphic and geologic observations. The two largest Nicoya earthquakes in the past century (1950 Mw7.8; 2012 Mw7.6) each generated decimeter-scale coseismic uplift along the central coast. The 2012 uplift pattern coincides with the area of pre-event locking, mainshock slip, prior 1950 rupture, and 1950 coseismic uplift. Most of the 1950 uplift was recovered by gradual interseismic subsidence during six decades of strain accumulation leading to the 2012 rupture. Paleoseismic sediment coring in Nicoya coastal wetlands reveals fragmentary stratigraphic evidence consistent with earlier Holocene earthquake induced changes in land level. While elastic strain accumulation and release produce short-term cycles of uplift and subsidence, long-term net uplift results in gradual coastal emergence and the growth of topographic relief. Net uplift along the central Nicoya segment may be the product of irrecoverable seismic cycle strain (shortening), coupled with tectonic erosion near the trench and subsequent underplating of eroded material at depth

  8. On the Rock Magnetic Properties of Some Serpentinized Peridotites in the Southern Mariana Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Bervera, E.; Martinez, F.; Fryer, P. B.; Ohara, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties of 12 peridotite samples recovered during the JAMSTEC Cruise of the R/V Yokosuka YK10-12 and collected on Shinkai 6500 dive 1234 in the Shinkai See Field (SSF) located in the deep (~5700 m) outer forearc (11°39.10'N, 143°02.94'E). We conducted remanence and induced experiments on the samples to determine degree of serpentinization. Stepwise alternating field (AF) and thermal demagnetization experiments from 2.5 to 70 mT and from 28 to 575°C, respectively, yield univectorial diagrams showing the removal of secondary components (e.g., VRM, IRM, CRM etc) by isolating a Characteristic Remanent Magnetization (ChRM) at low fields and temperatures. The normalized intensity of demagnetization J/Jo shows the decrease of the magnetization of the specimens where about 50% of the original magnetization is lost at about 5 mT and 100°C (i.e. Median Destructive Field). The stereograms show magnetic stability of the specimens by determining the directional behavior after 4 demagnetization steps (from 7.5-10 mT fields and low temps). Induced magnetization such as magnetic granulometry tests, sIRM's, hysteresis saturation loops and back-fields were performed. Diagnostic values of Mrs/Ms and Hrc/Hc determine the domain structure of a magnetic sample. The magnetic grain sizes were determined using the protocol of Dunlop [2002 a and b]. Most of the samples are distributed over the Pseudo-Single Domain (PSD) range with a certain degree of clustering. Curie points were obtained by measuring their low-field susceptibility vs. temperature (k-T) from 28 °C up to 700 °C in an Argon atmosphere showing a minimum of 1-4 magnetic mineral phases with temperatures ranging from ~100°C up to 640°C, which are predominantly Ti-poor and Ti-rich magnetites and magnetite. Samples recovered by the Shinkai 6500 show appreciable variation in bulk susceptibility (22.3 x 10-3 to 142 x 10-6 SI units). The samples appear to be modestly to moderately serpentinized

  9. Atmospheric Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the Earth’s surface by forearc recycling

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Suzanne L.; Das, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    In subduction zones, sediments, hydrothermally altered lithosphere, fluids, and atmospheric gases are transported into the mantle, where ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism takes place. However, the extent to which atmospheric noble gases are trapped in minerals crystallized during UHP metamorphism is unknown. We measured Ar and Ne trapped in phengite and omphacite from the youngest known UHP terrane on Earth to determine the composition of Ar and Ne returned from mantle depths to the surface by forearc recycling. An 40Ar/39Ar age [7.93 ± 0.10 My (1σ)] for phengite is interpreted as the timing of crystallization at mantle depths and indicates that 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages reliably record the timing of UHP metamorphism. Both phengite and omphacite yielded atmospheric 38Ar/36Ar and 20Ne/22Ne. Our study provides the first documentation, to our knowledge, of entrapment of atmospheric Ar and Ne in phengite and omphacite. Results indicate that a subduction barrier for atmospheric-derived noble gases does not exist at mantle depths associated with UHP metamorphism. We show that the crystallization age together with the isotopic composition of nonradiogenic noble gases trapped in minerals formed during subsolidus crystallization at mantle depths can be used to unambiguously assess forearc recycling of atmospheric noble gases. The flux of atmospheric noble gas entering the deep Earth through subduction and returning to the surface cannot be fully realized until the abundances of atmospheric noble gases trapped in exhumed UHP rocks are known. PMID:26542683

  10. Mineral chemistry and petrology of mantle peridotites from the Guleman ophiolite (SE Anatolia, Turkey): Evidence of a forearc setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizeli, Mustafa Eren; Beyarslan, Melahat; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Bingöl, A. Feyzi

    2016-11-01

    The mantle section of Guleman ophiolite, southeast (SE) Turkey consists mainly of harzburgites and dunite lenses and large chromitite pods. The average Cr ratio = [100 × Cr/(Cr + Al) atomic ratio] of Cr-spinels in harzburgites and dunites is remarkably high (>63). The forsterite (Fo) content of olivine is between 90.9 and 92.3 in harzburgites and dunites. These features indicate that the harzburgites and dunites resulted from >35% of partial melting of a depleted mantle source. Discriminant geochemical diagrams based on the mineral chemistry of harzburgites indicate a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) origin. Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene from the Guleman harzburgites have low CaO, Al2O3 and TiO2 contents, resembling those of depleted harzburgites from modern forearcs and contrasting with moderately depleted abyssal peridotites. Consequently, we propose that the Guleman peridotites formed in a forearc setting during the subduction initiation that developed as a result of northward subduction of the southern branch of the Neo-Tethys in response to the convergence between the Arabian and Anatolian plates.

  11. Fore-arc deformation at the transition between collision and subduction: results from first 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Oncken, O.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Cruden, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    3-D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments of arc-continent collision investigate the deformation of the fore-arc at the transition between collision and subduction. The deformation of the plates in the collision area propagates into the subduction-collision transition zone via along-strike coupling of the neighboring segments of the plate boundary. The largest along-strike gradient of trench-perpendicular compression produced by a passive margin turning by 90 degrees does not generate sufficiently localized shear strain in the transition zone to cause a strike-slip system because of the fast propagation of arc lithosphere failure. Deformation is thus continuous along-strike, but the deformation mechanism is three-dimensional and progressive structural variations arise because the coupling between neighboring segment induces either advanced or delayed failure of the arc lithosphere and passive margin. During the initial stage of collision, the accretionary wedge is partially subducted, the interplate zone is lubricated, and shear traction drops. Thus large convergence obliquity does not produce a migrating fore-arc sliver. Instead, the fore-arc motion is due to the pressure force generated by subduction of the buoyant continental crust. It follows that convergence obliquity does not yield trench-parallel deformation of the fore-arc and its influence on the collision process is limited. However, convergence obliquity may have shaped the active margin during the stage of oceanic subduction stage, prior to collision, and inherited structures may impact the propagation mechanism.

  12. The Plio-Pleistocene evolution of the Crotone Basin (southern Italy): Interplay between sedimentation, tectonics and eustasy in the frame of Calabrian Arc migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecchin, Massimo; Caffau, Mauro; Civile, Dario; Critelli, Salvatore; Di Stefano, Agata; Maniscalco, Rosanna; Muto, Francesco; Sturiale, Giovanni; Roda, Cesare

    2012-12-01

    The Crotone Basin is the exposed part of a larger Neogene forearc basin developed in the Ionian Sea in the frame of the SE-ward migration of the Calabrian Arc, which led to the subduction of the Ionian lithosphere and the spreading of the Tyrrhenian back-arc Basin (central Mediterranean). Taking into account the geologic context that accompanied its accumulation, the Plio-Pleistocene part of the Crotone Basin succession is exceptionally well preserved, and consists of a suite of continental, paralic, shallow-marine and deep-marine deposits organized to form unconformity bounded stratal units that in turn compose two main tectono-stratigraphic cycles. The unconformities separating these units are well recognizable along the basin margin and tend to vanish basinwards, and they record phases of basin reorganization linked to large-scale tectonics. In particular, the basin evolution was characterized by a cyclic pattern consisting of an alternation between longer subsidence phases, that favored the accumulation of stratal units, and uplift phases that led to base-level falls and the generation of unconformities. These phases were strictly related to an alternation between active subduction of the Ionian lithosphere below the Calabrian Arc, accompanied by the spreading of the Tyrrhenian back-arc Basin and by extension and subsidence in the forearc basin, and regional-scale compressional and transpressional events, during which the Arc migration temporarily stopped. The younger uplift of the basin, started during middle Pleistocene and still active, was characterized by extensional tectonics, and its interplay with glacio-eustasy controlled the formation of marine terraces. Since the Plio-Pleistocene tectonic episodes affecting the Calabrian Arc during its SE-ward migration seem to be all recorded in the Crotone Basin, the recognition of their effects on the basin fill and their time constraint become both critical, representing a reference to develop a clearer picture

  13. Deformation of forearcs caused by subduction of aseismic ridges: The role of ridge orientation and convergence direction investigated with 3D finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Hampel, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Subduction of aseismic oceanic ridges causes considerable deformation of the forearc region. To investigate the role of ridge orientation relative to the margin and convergence direction on the style of forearc deformation, we developed a series of 3D finite-elemente models, in which a rigid oceanic plate carrying the model ridge subducts beneath a deformable forearc wedge. Experiments were carried out for angles of 30°, 60° and 90° between the ridge axis and the trench and for different convergence directions. In the experiments, in which the ridge axis is parallel to the convergence direction, the ridge is stationary; in all other experiments, the ridge migrates along the margin and thus affects different regions of the forearc. Our results show that the ridge indents and uplifts the forearc in all models. For obliquely subducting ridges the displacement and strain fields become highly asymmetric regardless if the ridge is stationary or migrates along the forearc. Only if the ridge is stationary and oriented perpendicular to the margin, the deformation is symmetric relative to the ridge axis. Stationary ridges show uplift only above the ridge tip, whereas a migrating ridge causes a wave of uplift above the leading flank of the ridge followed by subsidence above the trailing flank. Horizontal strain components show domains of both extension and shortening, with extension occurring above the ridge tip and shortening above the ridge flanks. To compare our results with natural case studies, we computed additional models reflecting the setting of the stationary Cocos Ridge subducting beneath southern Costa Rica and of the Nazca Ridge, which migrates along the Peruvian margin. The results of these adjusted models are in good agreement with field observations. For the model of the Cocos Ridge the highest degree of shortening occurs normal to the margin, which coincides with the location of a thrust belt in the forearc of Costa Rica with its maximum shortening inboard

  14. Geological characteristics of the Shinkai Seep Field, a serpentinite-hosted ecosystem in the Southern Mariana Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Stern, R. J.; Martinez, F.; Michibayashi, K.; Reagan, M. K.; Fujikura, K.; Watanabe, H.; Ishii, T.; Kelley, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Most hydrothermal vents along mid-ocean spreading ridges are high-temperature, sulfide-rich, and low pH (acidic environments). For this reason, the discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge has stimulated interest in the role of serpentinization of peridotite in generating H2- and CH4-rich fluids and associated carbonate chimneys, as well as in the biological communities adapted to highly reduced, alkaline environments. A new serpentinite-hosted ecosystem, the Shinkai Seep Field (SSF), was discovered by a Shinkai 6500 dive in the inner trench slope of the southern Mariana Trench, near the Challenger Deep, during YK10-12 cruise of R/V Yokosuka in September 2010. Abundant chemosynthetic biological communities, principally consisting of vesicomyid clams are associated with serpentinized peridotite in the SSF. Serpentinization beneath several hydrothermal sites on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is controlled by interacting seawater and peridotite, variably influenced by magmatic heat. In contrast, the SSF is located in a deep inner trench slope where magmatic heat contribution is unlikely. Instead, serpentinization reactions feeding the SSF may be controlled by persistent fluid flow from the subducting slab. Slab-derived fluid flow is probably controlled by flow through fractures because no serpentinite mud volcano can be discerned along the southern Mariana forearc. Deep-towed IMI-30 sonar backscatter imaging during TN273 cruise of R/V Thomas G. Thompson in January 2012 indicates that the SSF is associated with a small, low backscatter feature that may be a small mound. There are 20 or more of these features in the imaged area, the size of which is ~200 m width and ~200 m to ~700 m long. Since the southern Mariana forearc is heavily faulted, with a deep geology that is dominated by peridotite, more SSF-type seeps are likely to exist along the forearc above the Challenger Deep. The discovery of the SSF suggests that serpentinite-hosted vents may

  15. Stable isotope compositions of serpentinite seamounts in the Mariana forearc: Serpentinization processes, fluid sources and sulfur metasomatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2006-01-01

    The Mariana and Izu-Bonin arcs in the western Pacific are characterized by serpentinite seamounts in the forearc that provide unique windows into the mantle wedge. We present stable isotope (O, H, S, and C) data for serpentinites from Conical seamount in the Mariana forearc and S isotope data for Torishima seamount in the Izu-Bonin forearc in order to understand the compositions of fluids and temperatures of serpentinization in the mantle wedge, and to investigate the transport of sulfur from the slab to the mantle wedge. Six serpentine mineral separates have a restricted range of ??18O (6.5-8.5???). Antigorite separates have ??D values of -29.5??? to -45.5??? that reflect serpentinization within the mantle wedge whereas chrysotile has low ??D values (-51.8??? to -84.0???) as the result of re-equilibration with fluids at low temperatures. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between serpentine and magnetite indicate serpentinization temperatures of 300-375 ??C. Two late cross-fiber chrysotile veins have higher ??18O values of 8.9??? to 10.8??? and formed at lower temperatures (as low as ???100 ??C). Aqueous fluids in equilibrium with serpentine at 300-375 ??C had ??18O = 6.5-9??? and ??D = -4??? to -26???, consistent with sediment dehydration reactions at temperatures <200 ??C in the subducting slab rather than a basaltic slab source. Three aragonite veins in metabasalt and siltstone clasts within the serpentinite flows have ??18O = 16.7-24.5???, consistent with the serpentinizing fluids at temperatures <250 ??C. ??13C values of 0.1-2.5??? suggest a source in subducting carbonate sediments. The ??34S values of sulfide in serpentinites on Conical Seamount (-6.7??? to 9.8???) result from metasomatism through variable reduction of aqueous sulfate (??34S = 14???) derived from slab sediments. Despite sulfur metasomatism, serpentinites have low sulfur contents (generally < 164 ppm) that reflect the highly depleted nature of the mantle wedge. The serpentinites are mostly

  16. Variation in Crustal Structure and Deformation along the Tonga-Kermadec Forearc: Temporal and Spatial Changes in the Structure and Morphology of the Subducting Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funnell, M.

    2015-12-01

    Pacific oceanic lithosphere has been subducting along the Tonga-Kermadec Trench for at least 28 Myr. Variations in the sediment thickness, subduction angle and roughness of the subducting plate over this time have controlled deformation along the forearc. This constant process of forearc evolution has been punctuated since at least 7 Ma by the subduction of seamounts, as the trench-oblique Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) migrates southward along the trench. The subduction of these seamounts is associated with accelerated tectonic erosion, the tilting of sedimentary units and 80 km of forearc shortening north of the present-day collision zone at 26°S. South of this collision zone, the overriding and subducting plates exhibit structures expected of normal Pacific plate subduction. In 2011, a series of integrated geophysical profiles were acquired to image the crustal and upper mantle structure along the Tonga-Kermadec subduction system and LSC, with the aim of: a) establishing the nature of major structural variations along the forearc; b) resolving the flexural state of the overriding and underthrusting plates in regions of normal subduction and at the point of LSC-collision; and from these c) determining the primary influences on the flexural behaviour and nature of deformation in the underthrusting and overriding plates along the Tonga-Kermadec subduction system. From the 2011 acquisition, we present multichannel reflection and wide-angle refraction seismic data that reveal the dominant structural differences between the Kermadec forearc and the raised Tonga Platform. Superimposed on these are structures associated with differing modes and extents of tectonic deformation that have occurred more recently along the margin. Most notably, the increased crustal strength around the seamounts results in an ~2 km shallowing of the trench and the development of an ~100 km-wide complex network of faulting on the overriding plate in the area of seamount collision.

  17. Methane Production In Forearc Sediments At The Costa Rican Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Morris, J. D.; Peacock, A.; White, D. C.

    2004-12-01

    Plate tectonics creates suitable habitats for deep biosphere organisms, affecting the distribution of biological communities on Earth. Subduction zones, where crustal materials return to the planetary interior through plate convergence, expose active microbial communities in subducting seafloor sediments to a fresh chemical inventory as diagenesis, metamorphic reactions, and tectonically-induced fluid flow alter sediments and surrounding porewaters. The plate interface (the decollement) experiences persistent geochemical flux of light hydrocarbon- and metal-bearing fluids from depth. This project (1) examines the habitability of the decollement zone at the Costa Rican convergent margin from a geochemical perspective, (2) uses lipid biomarkers to describe biomass distribution in sediment samples adjacent to and within the decollement, and (3) cites methanogenesis as a likely metabolic strategy employed by the resident microbial community. Sterile plugs of sediment were recovered from cores taken during Leg 205 of the Ocean Drilling Program, in the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. Samples are from the incoming carbonate section of Site 1253 at 370-437 meters below seafloor (mbsf), in the forearc sedimentary wedge at Site 1255 at 134-145 mbsf, and around an upper fault (153-220 mbsf) and in the decollement zone (305-366 mbsf) at Site 1254. Drilling mud and fluid were sampled to monitor potential microbial contamination. Samples were immediately frozen at -80ºC. Prior to analysis, samples were freeze-dried in preparation for serial extraction of DNA and lipids. DNA was identified by fluorometry in 13 of 26 samples tested. The DNA was screened for methanogens by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), employing ME1 and ME2 primers that amplify a 0.75-kb region of the alpha-subunit gene for methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR). Methanogen-specific genes were detected in DNA extracted from one Site 1253 sample (at 436.9 mbsf in the basal carbonates) and four Site

  18. Source Evolution After Subduction Initiation as Recorded in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Fore-arc Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Reagan, M. K.; Pearce, J. A.; Shimizu, K.

    2015-12-01

    Drilling in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore-arc during IODP Expedition 352 and DSDP Leg 60 recovered consistent stratigraphic sequences of volcanic rocks reminiscent of those found in many ophiolites. The oldest lavas in these sections are "fore-arc basalts" (FAB) with ~51.5 Ma ages. Boninites began eruption approximately 2-3 m.y. later (Ishizuka et al., 2011, EPSL; Reagan et al., 2013, EPSL) and further from the trench. First results from IODP Expedition 352 and preliminary post-cruise data suggest that FAB at Sites U1440 and U1441 were generated by decompression melting during near-trench sea-floor spreading, and that fluids from the subducting slab were not involved in their genesis. Temperatures appear to have been unusually high and pressures of melting appear to have been unusually low compared to mid-ocean ridges. Spreading rates at this time appear to have been robust enough to maintain a stable melt lens. Incompatible trace element abundances are low in FAB compared to even depleted MORB. Nd and Hf Isotopic compositions published before the expedition suggest that FAB were derived from typical MORB source mantle. Thus, their extreme deletion resulted from unusually high degrees of melting immediately after subduction initiation. The oldest boninites from DSDP Site 458 and IODP Sites U1439 and U1442 have relatively high concentrations of fluid-soluble elements, low concentrations of REE, and light depleted REE patterns. Younger boninites, have even lower REE concentrations, but have U-shaped REE patterns. Our first major and trace element compositions for the FAB through boninite sequence suggests that melting pressures and temperatures decreased through time, mantle became more depleted though time, and spreading rates waned during boninite genesis. Subduction zone fluids involved in boninite genesis appear to have been derived from progressively higher temperatures and pressures over time as the subducting slab thermally matured.

  19. Highly refractory peridotites in Songshugou, Qinling orogen: Insights into partial melting and melt/fluid-rock reactions in forearc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Song, Shuguang; Su, Li; Jung, Haemyeong; Niu, Yaoling

    2016-05-01

    The Songshugou ultramafic massif is located in the eastern segment of the Qinling orogenic belt, central China. It is a large spinel peridotite body dominated by coarse-grained, porphyroclastic, and fine-grained dunite with minor harzburgite, olivine clinopyroxenite, and banded/podiform chromitite. The compositions of the bulk-rock dunite and harzburgite, and the constituent olivine and spinel, together with the textures and chemical characteristics of multiphase mineral inclusions, point to the highly refractory nature of these rocks with complex histories of high-temperature boninite melt generation and boninitic melt-rock reaction, probably in a young, warm, and volatile-rich forearc lithospheric mantle setting. Additionally, a subsequent low-temperature fluid-rock reaction is also recorded by TiO2-rich spinel with Ti solubility/mobility enhanced by chloride- or fluoride-rich subduction-zone fluids as advocated by Rapp et al. (2010). The olivine clinopyroxenite, on the other hand, was likely crystallized from a residual boninitic melt that had reacted with harzburgitic residues. The ubiquitous occurrences of hydrous minerals, such as anthophyllite, tremolite, Cr-chlorite, and serpentine (stable at lower P-T crustal conditions) in the matrix, suggest that further low-temperature fluid-rock reaction (or retrograde metamorphism) has affected the original volatile-poor peridotites either in a mature and cool subduction zone, or in a continental crust during their exhumation into the Qinling collisional orogeny at early Paleozoic era, or both. The prolonged and intense ductile/brittle deformation can decrease the mineral grain size through dynamic recrystallization and fracturing, and thus aid the fluid-rock reaction or retrograde metamorphism and mineral chemical re-equilibration processes. Therefore, the Songshugou peridotites present a good example for understanding the petrogenesis and evolution of the mantle wedge, with the emphasis on the complex partial

  20. Unroofing of fore-arc ranges along the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand: Constraints from low-temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Ruohong; Seward, Diane; Little, Timothy A.; Kohn, Barry P.

    2015-08-01

    The Axial Ranges of North Island, New Zealand, parallel the Hikurangi subduction margin. They consist of uplifted and exhumed Mesozoic meta-sedimentary basement rocks of the overriding Australian Plate, beneath which the Pacific Plate has been subducting since at least the Late Oligocene. We investigate the unroofing histories of these fore-arc mountains during the evolution of the Hikurangi Margin, based on new and previous zircon and apatite fission-track, and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He data which we interpret based on inverse modelling. The results suggest that the exhumation of rocks in the Axial Ranges initiated in the west and migrated trench-wards towards the east. Onsets of accelerated exhumation in different parts of the ranges indicate significant eastwards thrusting on the margin-parallel Ngamatea Fault before ~ 20-17 Ma and on the Wellington-Mohaka Fault before ~ 10-7 Ma. The exhumation rate has varied significantly along-strike since the Late Miocene, lower in the central part of the Axial Ranges and significantly higher to the south. Since the Late Miocene, the increasing exhumation rate from the central to southern Axial Ranges is consistent with the clockwise vertical-axis rotation of eastern North Island relative to the Australian Plate. In the Hikurangi Margin, although underplating of subducted material at the basal upper plate may have contributed to localised rock uplift (e.g., in the Raukumara Range), we suggest that the shortening of the fore-arc upper plate was the chief driver of unroofing of the (proto-) Axial Ranges.

  1. Along-Strike Electrical Conductivity Variations in the Incoming Plate and Shallow Forearc of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, K.; Bedrosian, P.; Egbert, G. D.; Livelybrooks, D.; Parris, B. A.; Schultz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetotelluric Observations of Cascadia using a Huge Array (MOCHA) experiment was carried out to study the nature of the seismogenic locked zone and the down-dip transition zone where episodic tremor and slip (ETS) originates. This amphibious magnetotelluric (MT) data set consists of 8 offshore and 15 onshore profiles crossing from just seaward of the trench to the western front of the Cascades, with a north-south extent spanning from central Oregon to central Washington. The 71 offshore stations and the 75 onshore stations (red triangles in the image below) fit into the broader context of the more sparsely sampled EarthScope MT transportable array (black triangles) and other previous and pending MT surveys (other symbols). These data allows us to image variations in electrical conductivity along distinct segments of the Cascadia subduction zone defined by ETS recurrence intervals. Since bulk conductivity in this setting depends primarily on porosity, fluid content and temperature, the conductivity images created from the MOCHA data offer unique insights on fluid processes in the crust and mantle, and how the distribution of fluid along the plate interface relates to observed variations in ETS behavior. This abstract explores the across- and along-strike variations in the incoming plate and the shallow offshore forearc. In particular we examine how conductivity variations, and the inferred fluid content and porosity variations, are related to tectonic segmentation, seismicity and deformation patterns, and arc magma variations along-strike. Porosity inferred in the forearc crust can be interpreted in conjunction with active and passive seismic imaging results and may provide new insights on the origin of recently observed extremely high heat flow values. A companion abstract (Parris et al.) examines the deeper conductivity structure of the locked and ETS zones along the plate interface in order to identify correlations between ETS occurrence rates and inferred

  2. Potential seismic hazards and tectonics of the upper Cook Inlet basin, Alaska, based on analysis of Pliocene and younger deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, P.J.; Bruhn, R.L.; Pratt, T.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Cook Inlet basin is a northeast-trending forearc basin above the Aleutian subduction zone in southern Alaska. Folds in Cook Inlet are complex, discontinuous structures with variable shape and vergence that probably developed by right-transpressional deformation on oblique-slip faults extending downward into Mesozoic basement beneath the Tertiary basin. The most recent episode of deformation may have began as early as late Miocene time, but most of the deformation occurred after deposition of much of the Pliocene Sterling Formation. Deformation continued into Quaternary time, and many structures are probably still active. One structure, the Castle Mountain fault, has Holocene fault scarps, an adjacent anticline with flower structure, and historical seismicity. If other structures in Cook Inlet are active, blind faults coring fault-propagation folds may generate Mw 6-7+ earthquakes. Dextral transpression of Cook Inlet appears to have been driven by coupling between the North American and Pacific plates along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone, and by lateral escape of the forearc to the southwest, due to collision and indentation of the Yakutat terrane 300 km to the east of the basin.

  3. Uncovering the factors that can support and impede post-disaster EIA practice in developing countries: The case of Aceh Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, Tom; Fischer, Thomas B.

    2014-01-15

    The close relationship between environmental degradation and the occurrence and severity of disaster events has in recent years raised the profile of environmental assessment (EA) in the disaster management field. EA has been identified as a potentially supportive tool in the global effort to reduce disaster risk. As a component of this, attention has been brought specifically to the importance of the application of EA in the aftermath of disaster events in order to help prevent recurrence and promote sustainability. At the same time, however, it has also been recognised that post-disaster environments may be unfavourable to such practices. Looking at the practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA), this paper reports on a study which sought to identify more specifically the factors which can both support and hinder such practice following disaster events in a developing country context. Analysing the situation in Aceh Province, Indonesia, after the impact of two tsunamigenic earthquakes in late 2004 and early 2005, it is concluded that if EIA is to have a central role in the post-disaster period, pre-disaster preparation could be a key. -- Highlights: • Close relationship between environmental degradation and occurrence/severity of disaster events has raised profile of EA. • EA as a potentially supportive tool in the global effort to reduce disaster risk • Application of EA in the aftermath of disaster events to help prevent recurrence and promote sustainability • The paper looks at factors which can both support and hinder EA following disaster events in a developing country context. • We analyse the situation in Aceh Province, Indonesia, after the impact of two tsunamigenic earthquakes in 2004 and 2005.

  4. Plastic Deformation and Seismic Properties in Fore-arc Mantles: A Petrofabric Analysis of the Yushigou Harzburgites, North Qilian Suture Zone, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Jung, H.; Song, S.; Park, M.; Jung, S.; Lee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The fore-arc mantle above a subducting slab is a unique site where complex partial melting, melt/fluid-rock interaction, and deformation of mantle rocks occur. To constrain these processes, we analyzed the deformation microstructures, crystal preferred orientations (CPO), and water content in natural harzburgites that occur as exhumed massifs in the North Qilian suture zone, NW China. These harzburgites are very fresh, and have mineral assemblages of olivine ( 81‒87 vol.%), orthopyroxene ( 11‒17 vol.%), clinopyroxene ( 1‒2 vol. %), and spinel ( 1 vol.%). Detailed analyses of mineral textures, CPO patterns, and rotation axis distributions suggested that the plastic deformation of olivine and pyroxene were accommodated by activating a series of slip systems of dislocation. The olivine (A-/D-type fabric) showed dominant (010)[100] and/or (001)[100] slip systems, as well as other minor [100]-glide, {0kl}[100], and [001]-glide slip systems. The orthopyroxene showed dominant (100)[001] and subordinate (010)[001] slip systems, with minor (100)[010], (100)[0vw] slip systems. The water content was extremely low in the orthopyroxene (38‒44 wt. ppm), equilibrated olivine (4‒7 wt. ppm), and bulk-rock samples (9‒14 wt. ppm). Integrated with the previously reported refractory mineral and whole-rock compositions (Song et al., 2009), as well as the estimated low pressure ( 1‒2 GPa), high temperature ( 1100‒1300 °C), low stress ( 1‒4 MPa), and water-poor conditions of deformation, it is concluded that these harzburgites represent a remnant of a fossil fore-arc lithospheric mantle which was probably both formed and deformed in a young and warm fore-arc mantle setting (i.e. infant subduction zone). Based on these results, a refined schematic model of olivine fabric distributions in subduction zones was proposed. In this model, the opposing polarizing directions of A-/D-type olivine fabrics (prevalent in the fore-arc lithospheric mantle) with other underlying

  5. Exploring the tecto-sedimentary history of the lower Kumano basin: insights from 3D seismic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, S. G.; Gulick, S. P.; Hayman, N. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Nankai accretionary margin is seismically active, representing a hazard for the people living along the southwestern Japanese shores. In an effort to better understand its behavior, 3D seismic and well data have been acquired in the area. We are using such data in order to address open research topics such as: the conditions for forearc basin initiation, the role of former slope basins and slope cover sediments in the formation of forearc basins and the role of changes in sedimentation as a major controlling factor in forearc basin evolution. New 3D maps of key surfaces that bound and lie within the lower Kumano basin help us illuminate these topics. The lower bounding surface, UC4, represents missing section between 5.6-3.8 Ma. Toward the SE UC4 is relatively undeformed, with some structures approximately parallel to the modern-day trench. In contrast, toward the NW UC4 is intensely deformed with two main synforms whose hinges are oriented 15 degrees to the modern-trench. The two synforms have similar wavelengths and amplitudes and define the thickest sediment accumulations in the lower Kumano basin. We hypothesize that UC4 had a protracted evolution with early synform (thrust-bound slope-basins?) followed by a change in the maximum strain/plate convergence direction. This change caused the structural trend observed to the SE. This interpretation is in agreement with previous independent estimations of block rotation based on paleomagnetic analysis of samples from core recovered in the area. The upper bounding surface of the lower Kumano basin, UC2, underlies 1.6 Ma and younger sediments. Its morphology resembles a much smoother and less deformed version of UC4. It is slightly tilted landward. Seaward, it pinches out against UC4. Between the two bounding surfaces we recognized a major unconformity that we called UC3a and that we were able to track through most of the studied part of the seismic volume. Morphologically, UC3a is very similar to UC2. We interpret

  6. Tsunamis as geomorphic crises: Lessons from the December 26, 2004 tsunami in Lhok Nga, West Banda Aceh (Sumatra, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Raphaël; Wassmer, Patrick; Sartohadi, Junun; Lavigne, Franck; Barthomeuf, Benjamin; Desgages, Emilie; Grancher, Delphine; Baumert, Philippe; Vautier, Franck; Brunstein, Daniel; Gomez, Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Large tsunamis are major geomorphic crises, since they imply extensive erosion, sediment transport and deposition in a few minutes and over hundreds of kilometres of coast. Nevertheless, little is known about their geomorphologic imprints. The December 26, 2004 tsunami in Sumatra (Indonesia) was one of the largest and deadliest tsunamis in recorded human history. We present a description of the coastal erosion and boulder deposition induced by the 2004 tsunami in the Lhok Nga Bay, located to the West of Banda Aceh (northwest Sumatra). The geomorphological impact of the tsunami is evidenced by: beach erosion (some beaches have almost disappeared); destruction of sand barriers protecting the lagoons or at river mouths; numerous erosion escarpments typically in the order of 0.5-1.5 m when capped by soil and more than 2 m in dunes; bank erosion in the river beds (the retreat along the main river is in the order of 5-15 m, with local retreats exceeding 30 m); large scars typically 20-50 cm deep on slopes; dislodgement of blocks along fractures and structural ramps on cliffs. The upper limit of erosion appears as a continuous trimline at 20-30 m a.s.l., locally reaching 50 m. The erosional imprints of the tsunami extend to 500 m from the shoreline and exceed 2 km along riverbeds. The overall coastal retreat from Lampuuk to Leupung was 60 m (550,000 m 2) and locally exceeded 150 m. Over 276,000 m 3 of coastal sediments were eroded by the tsunami along the 9.2 km of sandy coast. The mean erosion rate of the beaches was ~ 30 m 3/m of coast and locally exceeded 80 m 3/m. The most eroded coasts were tangent to the tsunami wave train, which was coming from the southwest. The fringing reefs were not efficient in reducing the erosional impact of the tsunami. The 220 boulders measured range from 0.3 to 7.2 m large (typically 0.7-1.5 m), with weights from over 50 kg up to 85 t. We found one boulder, less than 1 m large, at 1 km from the coastline, but all the others were

  7. Deformation and sedimentation along a developing terrane suture: Eastern Sunda forearc, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.L.; Silver, E.A.; Prasetyo, H.; Meyer, A.W.

    1986-12-01

    The collision of the eastern Sunda arc with northwest Australia has resulted in the development of a suture between the Sumba ridge and Sawu-Timor terranes along a zone of intraforearc convergence. The developing suture varies from the low-angle Sawu thrust, with attendant mud diapirs in the Sumba basin, to high-angle reverse faults near a basement high of the underthrust Sumba ridge terrane. Bottom currents, associated with the flow of Pacific Ocean deep water into the Indian Ocean, have eroded the terranes and subsequently deposited the detritus in an assemblage of contourites along the suture. This study reveals the high structural variability of a terrane suture and the oceanographic influence on the deposition of overlap assemblages.

  8. Experimental constraints on the serpentinization rate of fore-arc peridotites: Implications for the upwelling condition of the slab-derived fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, T.; Nakamura, M.

    2016-08-01

    To constrain the water circulation in subduction zones, the hydration rates of peridotites were investigated experimentally in fore-arc mantle conditions. Experiments were conducted at 400-580°C and 1.3 and 1.8 GPa, where antigorite is expected to form as a stable serpentine phase. Crushed powders of olivine ± orthopyroxene and orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene were reacted with 15 wt % distilled water for 4-19 days. The synthesized serpentine varieties were lizardite and aluminous lizardite (Al-lizardite) in all experimental conditions except those of 1.8 GPa and 580°C in the olivine + orthopyroxene system, in which antigorite was formed. In the olivine + orthopyroxene system, the reactions were interface-controlled except for the reaction at 400°C, which was transport-controlled. The corresponding reaction rates were 7.0 × 10-12 to 1.5 × 10-11 m s-1 at 500-580°C and 7.5 × 10-16 m2 s-1 at 400°C for the interface and transport-controlled reactions, respectively. Based on a simple reaction-transport model including these hydration rates, we infer that penetration of the slab-derived fluid all the way through a water-unsaturated fore-arc mantle is allowed only when focused flow occurs with a spacing larger than 77-229 km in hot subduction zones such as Nankai and Cascadia. However, the necessary spacing is only 2.3-4.6 m in intermediate-temperature subduction zones such as Kyushu and Costa Rica. These calculations imply that fluid leakage in hot subduction zones may occur after the fore-arc mantle is totally hydrated, whereas in intermediate-temperature subduction zones, leakage through a water-unsaturated fore-arc mantle may be facilitated.

  9. Characteristics of Middle and Deep Crustal Expression of an Arc - Forearc Boundary Strike-Slip Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeske, S.; Mulcahy, S. R.; McClelland, W.; Cain, J.

    2008-12-01

    Strike-slip faults below the seismogenic zone are commonly assumed to widen with depth into broad region of distributed strain or flatten into subhorizontal shear zones within the middle crust. While this may occur in some continental strike-slip systems, we propose that strike-slip faults at a major rheologic boundary, such as an arc-forearc transition, remain relatively narrow at depth, with localized high strain zones separating discrete packages of less-deformed metamorphic rock. Strain localization allows for greater displacements and explains the juxtaposition of significantly different crustal levels exposed in such strike-slip systems. We present metamorphic and geochronologic evidence for the initiation of one such strike slip system in western Argentina. The Valle Fertil, Desaguadero-Bermejo lineament is a prominent high angle lineament which currently accommodates significant shortening in the western Sierra Pampeanas of Argentina. The lineament is characterized geophysically as a high-angle to steeply east-dipping boundary with denser and more magnetic rocks on the east. The fault zone is bounded by the Cambrian-Ordovician Famatina arc, an intermediate composition batholith, to the east and an arc-forearc package of predominantly metasedimentary rocks intruded by Ordovician mafic to intermediate composition plutonic rocks to the west. The two packages currently expose markedly different crustal levels; those to the east expose rocks metamorphosed at 2-8 kbar, while those to the west expose rocks metamorphosed 11-14 kbar. Both units experienced high-grade metamorphism and granulite facies migmatization between ~470-450 Ma. Separate isolated packages within the fault/ shear zone record separate histories from those exposed to the east and west of the lineament. Low grade-limestone as well as 1.1 Ga and 845 Ma granitoids are overprinted by low-grade shear zones and show no significant thermal effect of the Ordovician magmatism and metamorphism. Regional

  10. Tectonosedimentary evolution of the Crotone basin, Italy: Implications for Calabrian Arc geodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Smale, J.L. ); Rio, D. ); Thunell, R.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Analysis of outcrop, well, and offshore seismic data has allowed the Neogene tectonosedimentary evolution of an Ionian Sea satellite basin to be outlined. The Crotone basin contains a series of postorogenic sediments deposited since Serravallian time atop a complex nappe system emplaced in the early Miocene. The basin's evolution can be considered predominantly one of distension in a fore-arc setting punctuated by compressional events. The earliest sediments (middle-late Miocene) consist of conglomerates, marls, and evaporites infilling a rapidly subsiding basin. A basin-wide Messinian unconformity and associated intraformational folding mark the close of this sedimentary cycle. Reestablishment of marine conditions in the early Pliocene is documented by sediments which show a distinct color banding and apparent rhythmicity, which may represent the basin margin to lowermost Pliocene marl/limestone rhythmic couplets present in southern Calabria. A bounding unconformity surface of middle Pliocene age (3.0 Ma), which corresponds to a major northwest-southeast compressional event, closes this depositional sequence. The basin depocenter shifted markedly toward the southeast, and both chaotic and strong subparallel reflector seismic facies of wide-ranging thicknesses fill the depositional topography created during this tectonic episode. Basin subsidence decreases dramatically in the late Pliocene and cessates in response to basin margin uplift in the early Pleistocene. The chronostratigraphic hierarchy of these depositional sequences allows them to constrain the deformational history of the basin. In addition, similar depositional hierarchies in adjacent basins (i.e., Paola, Cefalu, and Tyrrhenian Sea) allow them to tie the stratigraphy and evolution of the Crotone basin to the geodynamic evolution of the Calabrian arc system.

  11. Along-strike structure of the Costa Rican convergent margin from seismic a refraction/reflection survey: Evidence for underplating beneath the inner forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Clair, J.; Holbrook, W. S.; Van Avendonk, H. J. A.; Lizarralde, D.

    2016-02-01

    The convergent margin offshore Costa Rica shows evidence of subsidence due to subduction erosion along the outer forearc and relatively high rates of uplift (˜3-6 mm/yr) along the coast. Recently erupted arc lavas exhibit a low 10Be signal, suggesting that although nearly the entire package of incoming sediments enters the subduction zone, very little of that material is carried directly with the downgoing Cocos plate to the magma generating depths of the mantle wedge. One mechanism that would explain both the low 10Be and the coastal uplift is the underplating of sediments, tectonically eroded material, and seamounts beneath the inner forearc. We present results of a 320 km long, trench-parallel seismic reflection and refraction study of the Costa Rican forearc. The primary observations are (1) margin perpendicular faulting of the basement, (2) thickening of the Cocos plate to the northwest, and (3) two weak bands of reflections in the multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection image with travel times similar to the top of the subducting Cocos plate. The modeled depths to these reflections are consistent with an ˜40 km long, 1-3 km thick region of underplated material ˜15 km beneath some of the highest observed coastal uplift rates in Costa Rica.

  12. Origin of Siletzia, an Accreted Large Igneous Province in the Cascadia Forearc, and the Early History of the Yellowstone Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. E.; Bukry, D.; Friedman, R. M.; Pyle, D. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Haeussler, P. J.; Wooden, J.

    2014-12-01

    Siletzia as named by Irving (1979) is a Paleogene large igneous province forming the oceanic basalt basement of coastal OR, WA and S. BC that was accreted to North America in the early Eocene. U-Pb (magmatic, detrital zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar ages constrained by mapping, global coccolith (CP) zones, and magnetic polarities permit correlation of basalts with the geomagnetic polarity time scale of Gradstein et al. (2012). Siletzia was rapidly erupted 56-49 Ma (Chron 25-22), and accretion was completed between 51 and 49 Ma in Oregon. Magmatism continued until ca. 46 Ma with emplacement of a basalt sill complex during or shortly after accretion. Siletzia's great crustal thickness, rapid eruption, and timing of accretion are consistent with formation as an oceanic plateau. Eight m.y. after accretion, margin-parallel extension and regional dike swarms mark the Tillamook magmatic episode in the forearc (41.6 Ma; CP zone 14a; Chron 19r). We examined the origin of Siletzia and the possible role of a long-lived Yellowstone hotspot (YHS) in an open source plate modeling program. In most reference frames, the YHS is on or near an inferred northeast-striking Kula- Farallon and/or Resurrection-Farallon ridge 60 to 50 Ma. The YHS thus could have provided a 56-49 Ma source on the Farallon plate for Siletzia, which accreted to North America by 50 Ma. A sister plateau, the Eocene basalt basement of the Yakutat terrane, now in Alaska, formed on the adjacent Kula (or Resurrection) plate and accreted to coastal British Columbia at about the same time. Following accretion of Siletzia, the leading edge of North America overrode the YHS ca. 42 Ma. The encounter with an active YHS may explain the voluminous high-Ti tholeiitic to alkalic magmatism of the 42-34 Ma Tillamook episode and extension in the forearc. Clockwise rotation of western Oregon about a pole in the backarc has since moved the Tillamook center and underlying Siletzia northward ~250 km from the probable hotspot track on North

  13. Polyphase serpentinization history of Mariana forearc mantle: observations on the microfabric of ultramafic clasts from ODP Leg 195, Site 1200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Jöns, Niels; Bach, Wolfgang; Klein, Frieder

    2013-04-01

    In the forearc of the Mariana subduction zone system, a number of seamounts form from extrusion of blueschist and serpentine mud. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 195 drilled the South Chamorro seamount, where ultramafic clasts occur within the mud matrix. These clasts show a complex serpentinization history, which bears the potential for tracking the alteration history during uplift and cooling of mantle wedge rocks to the seafloor. Moreover, the microfabrics of the highly serpentinized harzburgite and dunite clasts exhibit evidence for multiple fracturing events in the forearc mantle. These, in turn, lead to fluid influx and varied styles of serpentinization of harzburgite and dunite. The serpentinized ultramafic clasts exhibit a variety of microfabrics that range from virtually undeformed to strongly deformed samples. Pervasively serpentinized harzburgites feature either an equigranular fabric of serpentinized olivine and orthopyroxene crystals, or different vein generations related to multiple stages of serpentinization. Several types of fluid pathways in harzburgites are present: (i) veins containing brucite and iron oxides, developed linearly without marked conformance with the rock fabric. In places, these veins developed mm-cm wide halos with finger-shaped serpentinization fronts. Veins of type (i) are either developed as syntaxial veins from a single crack-seal event with large magnetite crystals growing from one wall to the other (as confirmed with high-resolution X-ray microtomography), or formed by multiple fluid events. (ii) serpentine veins that encompass regions of marginally serpentinized, microgranular olivine and large orthopyroxene crystals. (iii) extensional serpentine veins (known as "Frankenstein" type). In the clasts studied, their occurrence is restricted to the halo region of type (i) veins. (iv) as a late-stage feature, extensional veins documenting multiple crack-seal events can be present in the serpentinites (either in undeformed regions with

  14. Origin of Siletzia, a Large Igneous Province in the Cascadia Forearc, and the Early History of the Yellowstone Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. E.; Bukry, D.; Friedman, R. M.; Pyle, D. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Siletzia is a Paleogene large igneous province (LIP) forming the oceanic basement of coastal OR, WA and S. BC that was accreted to North America (NAM) in the early Eocene. Crustal thickness from seismic refraction ranges from 10 to 32 km, with 16 km of pillow and subaerial basalt exposed on the Olympic Peninsula. At 1.7-2.4 x 106 km3, Siletzia is at least 10 times the volume of the Columbia River flood basalts. U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar ages, global coccolith (CP) zones, and magnetostratigraphy allow correlation of Siletzia with the 2012 geomagnetic polarity time scale. Siletzia was erupted 56-49 Ma (Chron 25-22), and accretion was completed between 51 and 49 Ma in Oregon. Siletzia's composition, great crustal thickness, rapid eruption, and timing of accretion are consistent with formation as an oceanic plateau. Eight m.y. after accretion, margin-parallel extension and regional dike swarms accompanied the voluminous tholeiitic to highly alkalic Tillamook magmatic episode in the forearc (41.6 Ma; CP14a; Chron 19r). We examined the origin of Siletzia and the possible role of a long-lived Yellowstone hotspot (YHS) in GPlates. In most reference frames, the YHS is ~ 500km offshore S. OR, near an inferred northeast-striking Kula- Farallon and/or Resurrection-Farallon ridge 60 to 50 Ma. The YHS could have provided the 56-49 Ma source on the Farallon plate for Siletzia, which in the model accretes to NAM by 50 Ma. A sister plateau, the Eocene basalt basement of the Yakutat terrane, now in Alaska, may have formed on the adjacent Kula (or Resurrection) plate and accreted to British Columbia at about the same time. Following accretion, the leading edge of NAM overrode the YHS ca. 42 Ma. The encounter with an active YHS may explain the voluminous 42-34 Ma Tillamook episode and forearc extension. Clockwise rotation of western Oregon about a pole in the backarc has since moved the Tillamook center and underlying Siletzia northward ~250 km from the likely hotspot track on NAM.

  15. Tectono-sedimentary architecture of Marie-Galante basin (Lesser Antilles fore arc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, Jean-Frédéric; Cornée, Jean-Jacques; Münch, Philippe; Guennoc, Pol

    2010-05-01

    Marie-Galante basin in the Lesser Antilles fore arc has experienced high amplitude (up to several thousand meters) vertical movements in response to both local tectonic in the fore-arc (trench perpendicular extensional tectonic) and geodynamical events at the plate interface, such as, long term interplate coupling changes, or ridges subduction or alternating period of under-platting/basal erosion... During the KaShallow cruises, we acquired ca. 3500km of high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data (sparker and miniGI airgun sources), together with HR multibeam bathymetric (50m gridspacing DTM with ±2m depth precision) in the basin and over the shallow-water carbonate platforms surrounding the fore-arc islands. This geophysical dataset completes already existing seismic reflection data of lower resolution but deeper penetration. A systematic rock sampling using piston and rock corers and 2 ROV dives along remarkable cliffs, together with old dredge samples, provided petrological and sedimentary facies description, and datation (radiochronology and Micro/Nanno fossils) of the main stratigraphic series identified in seismic reflection through the basin. The basin divides into 3 sedimentary environments. We identify the architecture of the offshore carbonate platforms around the fore arc island and between them. Seismic profiles reveal the platforms prograding systems at their boundaries. This allows attempting a correlation between all the onshore/offshore archipelago platforms. Particularly, we evidence that the early Pleistocene upper series outcropping onshore extends offshore, and late Pleistocene/Holocene erosional surfaces are revealed. The "deep bassin", gently deepens southeastward from the volcanic arc islands of Basse-Terre and Dominica to the deep (5000m bsl) forearc basin at the accretionnary prism. Seismic profiles reveal the turbiditic infill of the basin. ROV dives permit to sample early Miocene pelagic sediments, and cores sample the late

  16. Deformation within the Pisco Basin sedimentary record (southern Peru): Stratabound orthogonal vein sets and their impact on fault development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustichelli, Andrea; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Bianucci, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This outcrop-based study reports diffuse joints and veins, normal to strike-slip fault zones and minor folds that developed, from Miocene to Quaternary, within the clastic to siliceous sedimentary record of the forearc Pisco Basin of southern Peru. Patterns, orientations, dimensional parameters and other outcrop-scale characteristics of the various deformation features are illustrated and their genetic mechanisms and timing of development are inferred. These new structural data and interpretations allow a better constraint of the structural style and evolution of the Pisco Basin, and can represent useful guidelines for characterizing the outcrop-scale deformation affecting similar forearc basins along the Peruvian coast. Major results of this study are that the development of the documented deformation features, their patterns, dimensional parameters and kinematics seem influenced by local perturbations of the paleostress field by mechanic processes partly independent of plate tectonics forces. These processes include strain localization on both pre-existing and progressively forming new structural discontinuities, and cyclic switches of the horizontal, principal stress axes σ2 and σ3. In particular, we discuss how different normal fault patterns, from sub-parallel to multidirectional/polygonal, could form in a same deformation phase in response of the local σ2/σ3 magnitude ratio, as an evolution of stratabound, mutually orthogonal vein sets.

  17. Three-dimensional velocity structure of Siletzia and other accreted terranes in the Cascadia forearc of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Wells, R.E.; Fisher, M.A.; Flueh, E.; ten Brink, U.S.

    1999-01-01

    Eocene mafic crust with high seismic velocities underlies much of the Oregon and Washington forearc and acts as a backstop for accretion of marine sedimentary rocks from the obliquely subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Arc-parallel migration of relatively strong blocks of this terrane, known as Siletzia, focuses upper crustal deformation along block boundaries, which are potential sources of earthquakes. In a three-dimensional velocity model of coastal Washington, we have combined surface geology, well data, and travel times from earthquakes and controlled source seismic experiments to resolve the major boundaries of the Siletz terrane with the adjacent accreted sedimentary prism and volcanic arc. In southern Washington and northern Oregon the Siletz terrane appears to be a thick block (???20 km) that extends west of the coastline and makes a high-angle contact with the offshore accreted sedimentary prism. On its east flank the high-velocity Siletz terrane boundary coincides with an en echelon zone of seismicity in the arc. In northern Washington the western edge of Siletzia makes a lower-angled, fault-bound contact with the accretionary prism. In addition, alternating, east-west trending uplifts and downwarps of the Siletz terrane centered on the antiformal Olympic Mountains may reflect focusing of north-south compression in the northern part of the Siletz terrane. This compressional strain may result from northward transport and clockwise rotation of the Siletz terrane into the relatively fixed Canadian Coast Mountains restraining bend along the coast.

  18. A fore-arc setting of the Gerf ophiolite, Eastern Desert, Egypt: Evidence from mineral chemistry and geochemistry of ultramafites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Karim, Abdel-Aal M.; Ali, Shehata; Helmy, Hassan M.; El-Shafei, Shymaa A.

    2016-10-01

    The Gerf ophiolite is the largest mantle-derived complex in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). This ophiolitic complex extends for tens of kilometers in the south Eastern Desert (SED) of Egypt as part of the Allaqi-Heiani and Oneib-Sol Hamed suture zones. The ultramafic section of the Gerf ophiolite comprises serpentinites, serpentinized peridotites and minor pyroxenites. All rocks contain relics of original magmatic phases. The elevated Cr# (> 0.84) of Cr-spinels indicates that these rocks represent highly-depleted mantle residues after high degrees of melt extraction. Mineral and bulk-rock chemistry show that the Gerf ophiolite suite represents fragments of oceanic lithosphere that developed in fore-arc setting in a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) environment. The pyroxenites have a LREE-enriched pattern relative to the serpentinites while the serpentinized peridotites display depleted patterns [average (La/Yb)n = 0.56)]. Modeling of LREE suggests that the LREE-enriched pyroxenites and serpentinites could have been produced via contamination of their mantle source by crustal material and/or subduction-related slab fluids during the mantle evolution in a SSZ setting or soon after ophiolite assemblage obduction onto the continental crust. In contrast, the LREE-depleted serpentinized peridotites could have been generated through MORB melt/mantle rock reaction.

  19. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution and exhumation of the Haymana basin: Unravelling the subduction and collision history of Neotethys in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülyüz, Erhan; Özkaptan, Murat; Lefebvre, Côme; Kaymakci, Nuretdin; Persano, Cristina; Stuart, Finlay M.

    2014-05-01

    The Haymana basin straddles the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan Suture Zone (IAESZ) in the north and Intra-Tauride Suture Zone (ITSZ) in the south. The two suture zones developed in response to the subduction and demise of Neotethys Ocean in Turkey during the late Cretaceous to early Tertiary; the tectonic significance of the basin and its relationship with the ITSZ are still poorly constrained. In order to unravel subduction and subsequent collision history of the Neotethys in the region, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Haymana basin infill and, using a combination of palaeomagnetic and thermochronometric data we have unravelled its structural evolution since its formation. The basin developed on the IAESZ and comprises fore-arc late Cretaceous to foreland Middle Eocene sedimentary sequences. The analysis of the sedimentogical facies and depositional environments indicate four Late Cretaceous to Paleogene key sequences in the basin. These sequences grade laterally and vertically into each other and are continuous from the late Cretaceous to Eocene whereas local progressive syn-sedimentary unconformities and frequent depocenter migrations are common. Late Cretaceous sequences fine upward whereas coarsening upwards sequences are common in the later units. These characteristics possibly reflect the response to local uplift and subsidence in front of south-verging thrust faults associated with the transition from fore-arc to foreland basin settings, following the terminal subduction of the Neotethys at the end of Cretaceous. About 4000 paleomagnetic and magnetostratigraphic data from the basin infill units and the Neogene cover indicate large clockwise vertical axes rotations in the NW and counter-clockwise rotations in the SE part of the basin. We suggest that these rotations are related to the northward movement and indentation of the Gondwana-derived continental blocks into Eurasia. A model of southward thrust propagation

  20. The age and composition of the deep crust exposed in the Mariana forearc south of Guam, implications for the scale of Middle Eocene volcanism and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. K.; McClelland, W.; Ohara, Y.; Girard, G.; Goff, K.; Peate, D. W.; Stern, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    The sequence of lithologies exposed in the Mariana forearc southeast of Guam is similar to that of many ophiolites and includes widespread basaltic pillow lavas (termed forearc basalts or FAB; Reagan et al., 2010, G-cubed) that are thought to result from decompression melting associated with subduction initiation (SI). Ishizuka et al. (2011, EPSL) showed that the forearc lithologies east of the Bonin Islands were essentially identical to those of the Mariana forearc, and that the basaltic to gabbroic sections had ages of 51-52 Ma. Here, we report geochemistry and geochronology for deep crust lithologies collected during one Shinkai 6500 dive (6K-1229) in the Mariana forearc south of Guam. Gabbros at this location have compositions relating them to FAB and Zircon U-Pb ages of 51.5+/-0.7 Ma, exactly synchronous with similar rocks from the Bonin forearc 1,600 km to the north. Further south in the western Pacific, the Tonga-Kermadec forearc has an ophiolite-like assemblage with compositions and ages similar to those of the equivalent rocks in the IBM system (Bloomer and Fisher, 1987, J. Geol.; Acland, 1996, PhD Thesis, Durham; Todd et al., 2012, EPSL; Michibayashi et al. this meeting). To the north, the record of arc magmatism stretches back to at least 46 Ma in the western Aleutians (Jicha et al., 2006, Geology). Thus, SI could have occurred nearly simultaneously along much of the western margin of the Pacific plate. If so, then the resulting volume of basalt erupted near western Pacific trenches between 52 and 49 Ma would have been globally significant, perhaps exceeding the volumes of the largest igneous provinces. Another global event at about 51 Ma was the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). This age marked the time when atmospheric CO2 values and thus global atmospheric temperatures were likely at or near their Cenozoic maxima (Zachos et al., 2008, Nature). The rise in δ18O for seawater toward the EECO began at about 58 Ma and the decline after ~51 Ma

  1. Extensional Basins in a Convergent Margin: Oligocene-Early Miocene Salar de Atacama and Calama basins, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. E.; Mpodozis, C.; Blanco, N.; Pananont, P.; Dávila, F.

    2004-12-01

    The Salar de Atacama Basin (SdAB) is the largest and most persistent sedimentary basin of northern Chile, accumulating nonmarine sediment from Cretaceous to modern times. Its northwestern neighbor, the Calama, was a Cenozoic basin. Although SdAB was in the backarc zone early in the Andean orogeny, both are now forearc basins. Others demonstrated that the basins overlie anomalously cold, strong, and dense crust and lithosphere. We focus on an extensional Oligocene basin stage. Interpretation of the basin-controlling faults is based on seismic reflection studies supported by field relations. The SdAB is limited to the west by the NNE-trending, steeply east-dipping, Paciencia Fault (PF). The PF experienced 5-7 km of down-to-the-east offset during the Oligocene-early Miocene. Syntectonic strata, an arid succession of siliciclastics and evaporites, are asymmetric, with thicknesses of 5000 m and abundant halite adjacent to the PF, and of 1000 m with fine detrital clastic strata 25 km farther east. Relations in conglomeratic growth strata that overlap the PF also demonstrate normal displacement during sediment accumulation. Seismic data reveal that a buried normal fault with 1-1.5 km down-to-the-east displacement limits the western margin of the Oligocene-Miocene Calama siliciclastic basin fill. Regionally, Oligocene-early Miocene margin-parallel strike-slip deformation dominated northwest of the basins, contributing sinistral offset (West Fissure Fault) to the northern segment of the long-lived Domeyko Fault System. The new SdAB and Calama data reveal that a 20,000 km2 domain of extensional basins existed within the dominantly strike-slip region. Even if PF and the fault in the Calama Basin were transtensional, the proportion of extension to strike-slip displacement is much greater in these basins than elsewhere in northern Chile. Further study is required to understand what combination of factors caused this kinematic distinction as well as delayed the onset of CVZ

  2. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  3. Tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of the Western Alboran Sea basin since the last 25 Myrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Couto, Damien; Gorini, Christian; Jolivet, Laurent; Lebret, Noëmie; Augier, Romain; Gumiaux, Charles; D'Acremont, Elia; Ammar, Abdellah; Auxietre, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    The Western Alboran Basin (WAB) formation has always been a matter of debate and was either considered as a backarc or a forearc basin. Based on stratigraphic analysis of high-resolution 2D seismic profiles mostly located offshore Morocco, the tectonic and stratigraphic history of the WAB is clarified. A thick pre-rift sequence is observed beneath the Miocene basin and interpreted as the topmost Malaguide/Ghomaride complex composing the Alboran domain. The structural position of this unit compared with the HP-LT exhumed Alpujarride/Sebtide metamorphic basement, leads us to link the Early Miocene subsidence of the basin with an extensional detachment. Above the Early Miocene, a thick Serravallian sequence marked by siliciclastic deposits is nearly devoid of extensional structures. Its overall landward to basinward onlap geometry indicates that the WAB has behaved as a sag basin during most of its evolution, from the Serravallian to the Late Tortonian. Tectonic reconstructions in map view and cross-section further suggest that the basin has always represented a strongly subsiding topographic low without internal deformation that has migrated westward together with the retreating slab. We propose that the subsidence of the WAB was controlled by the pull of the dipping subducting lithosphere explaining the large thickness (10 km) of the mostly undeformed sedimentary infill.

  4. Tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of the Western Alboran Sea Basin in the last 25 Myrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Couto, Damien; Gorini, Christian; Jolivet, Laurent; Lebret, Noëmie; Augier, Romain; Gumiaux, Charles; d'Acremont, Elia; Ammar, Abdellah; Jabour, Haddou; Auxietre, Jean-Luc

    2016-05-01

    The Western Alboran Basin (WAB) formation has always been the subject of debate and considered either as a back-arc or a forearc basin. Stratigraphic analyses of high-resolution 2D seismic profiles mostly located offshore Morocco, enabled us to clarify the tectonic and stratigraphic history of the WAB. The thick pre-rift sequence located beneath the Miocene basin is interpreted as the topmost Malaguide/Ghomaride complex composing the Alboran domain. The structural position of this unit compared with the HP-LT exhumed Alpujarride/Sebtide metamorphic basement, leads us to link the Early Miocene subsidence of the basin with an extensional detachment. Above the Early Miocene, a thick Serravallian sequence marked by siliciclastic deposits is nearly devoid of extensional structures. Its overall landward to basinward onlap geometry indicates that the WAB has behaved as a sag basin during most of its evolution from the Serravallian to the late Tortonian. Tectonic reconstructions in map view and in cross section further suggest that the basin has always represented a strongly subsiding topographic low without internal deformation that migrated westward together with the retreating slab. We propose that the subsidence of the WAB was controlled by the pull of the dipping subducting lithosphere hence explaining the considerable thickness (10 km) of the mostly undeformed sedimentary infill.

  5. Contribution of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to reconstruct flooding characteristics of a 4220 BP tsunami from a thick unconsolidated structureless deposit (Banda Aceh, Sumatra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmer, Patrick; Gomez, Christopher; Iskandasyah, T. Yan W. M.; Lavigne, Franck; Sartohadi, Junun

    2015-07-01

    One of the main concerns of deciphering tsunami sedimentary records along seashore is to link the emplaced layers with marine high energy events. Based on a combination of morphologic features, sedimentary figures, grain size characteristics, fossils content, microfossils assemblages, geochemical elements, heavy minerals presence; it is, in principle, possible to relate the sedimentary record to a tsunami event. However, experience shows that sometimes, in reason of a lack of any visible sedimentary features, it is hard to decide between a storm and a tsunami origin. To solve this issue, the authors have used the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to evidence the sediment fabric. The validity of the method for reconstructing flow direction has been proved when applied on sediments in the aftermath of a tsunami event, for which the behaviour was well documented (2004 IOT). We present herein an application of this method for a 56 cm thick paleo-deposit dated 4220 BP laying under the soil covered by the 2004 IOT, SE of Banda Aceh, North Sumatra. We analysed this homogenous deposit, lacking of any visible structure, using methods of classic sedimentology to confirm the occurrence of a high energy event. We then applied AMS technique that allowed the reconstruction of flow characteristics during sediment emplacement. We show that all the sequence was emplaced by uprush phases and that the local topography played a role on the re-orientation of a part of the uprush flow, creating strong reverse current. This particular behaviour was reported by eyewitnesses during the 2004 IOT event.

  6. Analysis of rupture area of aftershocks caused by twin earthquakes (Case study: 11 April 2012 earthquakes of Aceh-North Sumatra)

    SciTech Connect

    Diansari, Angga Vertika Purwana, Ibnu; Subakti, Hendri

    2015-04-24

    The 11 April 2012 earthquakes off-shore Aceh-North Sumatra are unique events for the history of Indonesian earthquake. It is unique because that they have similar magnitude, 8.5 Mw and 8.1 Mw; close to epicenter distance, similar strike-slip focal mechanism, and occuring in outer rise area. The purposes of this research are: (1) comparing area of earthquakes base on models and that of calculation, (2) fitting the shape and the area of earthquake rupture zones, (3) analyzing the relationship between rupture area and magnitude of the earthquakes. Rupture area of the earthquake fault are determined by using 4 different formulas, i.e. Utsu and Seki (1954), Wells and Coppersmith (1994), Ellsworth (2003), and Christophersen and Smith (2000). The earthquakes aftershock parameters are taken from PGN (PusatGempabumiNasional or National Earthquake Information Center) of BMKG (Indonesia Agency Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics). The aftershock epicenters are plotted by GMT’s software. After that, ellipse and rectangular models of aftershock spreading are made. The results show that: (1) rupture areas were calculated using magnitude relationship which are larger than the the aftershock distributions model, (2) the best fitting model for that earthquake aftershock distribution is rectangular associated with Utsu and Seki (1954) formula, (3) the larger the magnitude of the earthquake, the larger area of the fault.

  7. Efficient post-disaster patient transportation and transfer: experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue in Aceh after the 2004 Asian tsunami.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Hui; Zheng, Jing-Chen

    2014-08-01

    This descriptive study aimed to present experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue after the 2004 Asian tsunami in terms of transportation and transfer of patients and coordination of medical rescue forces. After the tsunami, numerous rescue institutions and international organizations rushed to Aceh province to aid in the rescue work. To coordinate various aspects of medical rescue efforts, an airport-based joint patient transfer center was developed. Within the framework of the joint transport center, rescue teams, militaries, and international institutions worked together to jointly triage, rapidly treat, and transfer patients. As members of the Chinese International Search and Rescue team, we were involved in the rescue efforts in the joint patient transfer center, and treated and transferred a total of 217 injured patients, the majority of whom were triaged as level II, followed by level III, and level I. The top three diseases were trauma/wound infection, respiratory system disease, and digestive system disease. The airport-based joint patient transfer center provided an efficient mechanism for successfully coordinating various aspects of the medical rescue efforts to transfer patients. Large-scale air transport, available health resources, and effective triage criteria also played an essential role in patient transportation and transfer. PMID:25102536

  8. Efficient post-disaster patient transportation and transfer: experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue in Aceh after the 2004 Asian tsunami.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Hui; Zheng, Jing-Chen

    2014-08-01

    This descriptive study aimed to present experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue after the 2004 Asian tsunami in terms of transportation and transfer of patients and coordination of medical rescue forces. After the tsunami, numerous rescue institutions and international organizations rushed to Aceh province to aid in the rescue work. To coordinate various aspects of medical rescue efforts, an airport-based joint patient transfer center was developed. Within the framework of the joint transport center, rescue teams, militaries, and international institutions worked together to jointly triage, rapidly treat, and transfer patients. As members of the Chinese International Search and Rescue team, we were involved in the rescue efforts in the joint patient transfer center, and treated and transferred a total of 217 injured patients, the majority of whom were triaged as level II, followed by level III, and level I. The top three diseases were trauma/wound infection, respiratory system disease, and digestive system disease. The airport-based joint patient transfer center provided an efficient mechanism for successfully coordinating various aspects of the medical rescue efforts to transfer patients. Large-scale air transport, available health resources, and effective triage criteria also played an essential role in patient transportation and transfer.

  9. Oil and gas basins of the Pacific margin of the Soviet Union: Proven and probable

    SciTech Connect

    Khain, V.E.; Burlin, Yu.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The Pacific margin of the Soviet Union comprises a large number of sedimentary basins, many of rather small size, but some more extensive, of which five contain already proven hydrocarbon reserves: Sakhalin, Tartar Strait, West Kamchatka, Khatyrka, and Anadyr. The intensely folded and partly metamorphosed basement of the sedimentary basins of the region consists of Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks, accreted in the late Mesozoic and Paleogene to the ancient, Precambrian continental blocks of Arctica (Hyerborea), Siberia, Bureya-Khanka continents and comprising Okhotsk and Central Kamchatka microcontinents. The sedimentary infill of the basin is represented mainly by terrigeneous and siliceous deposits of Late Cretaceous and, principally, of Cenozoic age, with some addition of volcaniclastic material. The thickness of sediments attains many thousands meters. By their geodynamic nature, the sedimentary basins of the Pacific margin of the Soviet Union belong to different types of basins recognized in active margin environment. Some are of the fore-arc type, among them Navarin Khatyrka, and North and East Sakhalin; others are of the back-arc type: West Kamchatka, Tartar Strait, and others. In the rear part of the margin the authors recognize the northern continuation of a huge continental rift system which includes the North China Bohai Bay and Sunliao basins. In the Soviet Union, this system comprises the Zeya-Bureya, Middle Amur, North Okhotsk, Markovo, and Anadyr basins. The basal strata of the basin's sedimentary infill, as a rule, gets younger from the mainland to the ocean. These sedimentary basins were subjected to rather moderate folding and high-angle faulting, which occurred mainly in the Pliocene and even the Pleistocene, and involved all the sequence of the basin infill. The traps are mostly structural, anticlinal or fault bounded. Reservoir rocks are represented by sandstones or fractured siliceous shales.

  10. Late Cretaceous - Paleogene forearc sedimentation and accretion of oceanic plateaus and seamounts along the Middle American convergent margin (Costa Rica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Peter O.; Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Andjic, Goran

    2016-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous-Paleogene sedimentation pattern in space and time along the Middle American convergent margin was controlled by the accretion of Pacific plateaus and seamounts. The accretion of more voluminous plateaus must have caused the temporary extinction of the arc and tectonic uplift, resulting in short lived episodes of both pelagic and neritic biogenic sedimentation. By the Late Eocene, shallow carbonate environments became widespread on a supposed mature arc edifice, that is so far only documented in arc-derived sediments. In northern Costa Rica forearc sedimentation started during the Coniacian-Santonian on the Aptian-Turonian basement of the Manzanillo Terrane. The arrival and collision of the Nicoya Terrane (a CLIP-like, 139-83 Ma Pacific plateau) and the Santa Elena Terrane caused the extinction of the arc during late Campanian- Early Maastrichtian times, indicated by the change to pelagic limestone sedimentation (Piedras Blancas Formation) in deeper areas and shallow-water rudistid - Larger Benthic Foraminfera limestone on tectonically uplifted areas of all terranes. Arc-derived turbidite sedimentation resumed in the Late Maastrichtian and was again interrupted during the Late Paleocene - Early Eocene, perhaps due to the underplating of a yet unknown large seamount. The extinction of the arc resulted in the deposition of the siliceous pelagic Buenavista Formation, as well as the principally Thanetian Barra Honda carbonate platform on a deeply eroded structural high in the Tempisque area. In southern Costa Rica the basement is thought to be the western edge of the CLIP. It is Santonian-Campanian in age and is only exposed in the southwestern corner of Herradura. Cretaceous arc-forearc sequences are unknown, except for the Maastrichtian-Paleocene Golfito Terrane in southeastern Costa Rica. The distribution and age of shallow/pelagic carbonates vs. arc-derived detrital sediments is controlled by the history of accretion of Galápagos hot spot

  11. Teleseismic constraints on the geological environment of deep episodic slow earthquakes in subduction zone forearcs: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, Pascal; Kim, YoungHee

    2016-02-01

    More than a decade after the discovery of deep episodic slow slip and tremor, or slow earthquakes, at subduction zones, much research has been carried out to investigate the structural and seismic properties of the environment in which they occur. Slow earthquakes generally occur on the megathrust fault some distance downdip of the great earthquake seismogenic zone in the vicinity of the mantle wedge corner, where three major structural elements are in contact: the subducting oceanic crust, the overriding forearc crust and the continental mantle. In this region, thermo-petrological models predict significant fluid production from the dehydrating oceanic crust and mantle due to prograde metamorphic reactions, and their consumption by hydrating the mantle wedge. These fluids are expected to affect the dynamic stability of the megathrust fault and enable slow slip by increasing pore-fluid pressure and/or reducing friction in fault gouges. Resolving the fine-scale structure of the deep megathrust fault and the in situ distribution of fluids where slow earthquakes occur is challenging, and most advances have been made using teleseismic scattering techniques (e.g., receiver functions). In this paper we review the teleseismic structure of six well-studied subduction zones (three hot, i.e., Cascadia, southwest Japan, central Mexico, and three cool, i.e., Costa Rica, Alaska, and Hikurangi) that exhibit slow earthquake processes and discuss the evidence of structural and geological controls on the slow earthquake behavior. We conclude that changes in the mechanical properties of geological materials downdip of the seismogenic zone play a dominant role in controlling slow earthquake behavior, and that near-lithostatic pore-fluid pressures near the megathrust fault may be a necessary but insufficient condition for their occurrence.

  12. Collapse of the northern Jalisco continental slope:Subduction erosion, forearc slivering, or subduction beneath the Tres Marias escarpment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandy, W. L.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Ortiz-Zamora, G.; Ortega-Ramirez, J.; Galindo Dominguez, R. E.; Ponce-Núñez, F.; Pérez-Calderón, D.; Rufino-Contreras, I.; Valle-Hernández, S.; Pérez-González, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Jalisco subduction zone exhibits several interesting characteristics. Among these is that convergence between the Rivera and North American plate is highly oblique, especially north of 20N, the obliquity progressively increasing to the NW. By analogy to other better studied subduction zones, this distribution of forces should produce a NW-SE extension in the overriding plate, especially north of 20N. This has led to the proposal that the trench perpendicular Bahia de Banderas is an expression of this extension [Kostoglodov and Bandy, JGR, vol. 100, 1995]. To further investigate this proposal, multibeam bathymetric data and seafloor backscatter images, seismic reflection sub-bottom profiles and marine magnetic data were collected during the MORTIC08 campaign of the B.O. EL PUMA in March 2009. The bathymetric data provides for 100% coverage (20 to 200 meter spacing of the actual measured depth value depending on the water depth) of the continental slope and trench areas north of 20N. These data indicate that a marked change occurs in the morphology of the continental slope at 20N. To the north the slope consists of a broad, fairly flat plain lying between a steep lower inner trench slope to the west and a steep, concave seaward, escarpment to the east. In contrast, to the south the continental slope exhibits a more gradual deepening until the steep lower inner trench slope. A prominent submarine canyon deeply incises the continental slope between these two morphotectonic domains. This canyon appears to represent the boundary between two NW-SE diverging forearc blocks or slivers, consistent with the presence of oblique convergence. In contrast, the broad, fairly flat plain is better explained by subsidence induced by subduction erosion (i.e. erosion of the base of the overriding plate underneath the continental slope area). The shoaling of the trench axis northward towards the Puerto Vallarta Graben and subsequent deepening may be related to subduction of the

  13. Late Quaternary uplift rate inferred from marine terraces, Muroto Peninsula, southwest Japan: Forearc deformation in an oblique subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsu'ura, Tabito

    2015-04-01

    Tectonic uplift rates across the Muroto Peninsula, in the southwest Japan forearc (the overriding plate in the southwest Japan oblique subduction zone), were estimated by mapping the elevations of the inner edges of marine terrace surfaces. The uplift rates inferred from marine terraces M1 and M2, which were correlated by tephrochronology with marine isotope stages (MIS) 5e and 5c, respectively, include some vertical offset by local faults but generally decrease northwestward from 1.2-1.6 m ky- 1 on Cape Muroto to 0.3-0.7 m ky- 1 in the Kochi Plain. The vertical deformation of the Muroto Peninsula since MIS 5e and 5c was interpreted as a combination of regional uplift and folding related to the arc-normal offshore Muroto-Misaki fault. A regional uplift rate of 0.46 m ky- 1 was estimated from terraces on the Muroto Peninsula, and the residual deformation of these terraces was attributed to fault-related folding. A mass-balance calculation yielded a shortening rate of 0.71-0.77 m ky- 1 for the Muroto Peninsula, with the Muroto-Misaki fault accounting for 0.60-0.71 m ky- 1, but these rates may be overestimated by as much as 10% given variations of several meters in the elevation difference between the buried shoreline angles and terrace inner edges in the study area. A thrust fault model with flat (5-10° dip) and ramp (60° dip) components is proposed to explain the shortening rate and uplift rate of the Muroto-Misaki fault since MIS 5e. Bedrock deformation also indicates that the northern extension of this fault corresponds to the older Muroto Flexure.

  14. Utilization of formal health services for children aged 1–5 in Aceh after the 2004 tsunami: Which children did not receive the health care they needed? Implications for other natural disaster relief efforts

    PubMed Central

    Rassekh, Bahie Mary; Santosham, Mathuram

    2014-01-01

    Aceh, Indonesia, was the hardest-hit area in the December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, with more than 500,000 people displaced, 120,000 people dead, and total damages and losses estimated at $4.5 billion. The relief effort following the tsunami was also immense, with billions of dollars of aid pledged to this province alone. Since then, there have been several natural disasters, including Typhoon Haiyan, which have caused great loss of life and displacement and for which these results are applicable. This study aimed to determine and assess utilization patterns of health services for children under the age of five with diarrhea, cough and difficulty breathing, fever, or skin disease and to identify determinants of formal and non-formal healthcare usage. A household survey of 1439 households was administered to caretakers of children aged 1–5 years. A sample of clusters within Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar were selected and those caretakers within the cluster who fit the inclusion criteria were interviewed. In the two weeks prior to the survey, 78.3% of respondents utilized formal health services as the first line of care for their child's illness episode. Factors significantly associated with decreased formal healthcare usage for the sick children were if the children were living in a displaced household, if the children's mother or father were not living, and if the children's caretaker was not the mother. Although utilization of formal health services for children was quite high after the tsunami, there were certain children who received significantly less care, including those who were displaced, those who were being cared for by someone other than their mother, and those for whom one or both parents had died. Among the recommendations are suggestions to target these children to ensure that they receive the health care they need. PMID:25750772

  15. Water Release from Cold Serpentinized Forearc Mantle During Subduction Associated with Changes in Incoming Oceanic Plate Thermal Structure and Plate Boundary Kinematics: New Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Kirby, Wang, and Brocher (Earth Planets and Space, 2014) recently showed how the change in kinematics of the California margin from subduction motion to continental transform motion with the birth and growth of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) beginning at about 33 Ma BP likely led to a warming of the former forearc mantle and the release of water by serpentinite dehydration. Such discharges from serpentinized mantle increase fluid pressures along the SAFS under the Coast Ranges and this gives insights into both the low sliding resistance for the SAFS and the mobilization and ascent of some serpentinized mantle peridotites through the crust. Thermal modeling by others has also shown that changes in the incoming plate age and subduction rate can also lead to warming of the forearc mantle during subduction. This development gives insights into the Mesozoic and Paleogene ages of emplacement of some, but not all, California serpentinites. Recent mineralogical and geochemical observations of serpentinized blocks in serpentinize mélange bodies in the San Francisco Bay Area (Uno and Kirby, 2015; Lewis and Kirby, 2015, this session) suggest that these rocks sustained multiple stages of serpentinization that are broadly consistent with the model of Kirby et al. (2014). Previous studies of localized late-stage silica-carbonate-water alteration of serpentinite bodies in California by carbonated water suggest that this alteration occurred largely in Neogene time when the highest rate of water release from the former forearc mantle probably happened. I also suggest that the occurrence of serpentinite belts emplaced in Cenozoic time during changing plate-boundary kinematics, such as the Cenozoic closing of the Tethys Ocean bordering Eurasia and arc reversal and decreasing convergence rates under the Greater Antilles, may give insights into the serpentinite belts in those regions.

  16. Multibeam bathymetric survey of the Ipala Submarine Canyon, Jalisco, Mexico (20°N): The southern boundary of the Banderas Forearc Block?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urías Espinosa, J.; Bandy, W. L.; Mortera Gutiérrez, C. A.; Núñez Cornú, Fco. J.; Mitchell, N. C.

    2016-03-01

    The Middle America Trench bends sharply northward at 20°N. This, along with the close proximity of the Rivera-North America Euler pole to the northern end of this trench, sharply increases the obliquity of subduction at 20°N. By analogy with other subduction zones with similar sharply changing obliquity, significant trench parallel extension is expected to exist in the forearc region near the bend. To evaluate this possibility, multibeam bathymetric, seafloor backscatter and sub-bottom seismic reflection data were collected in this area during the MORTIC08 campaign of the B.O. El Puma. These data image in detail a large submarine canyon (the Ipala Canyon) extending from the coast at 20°05‧N to the Middle America Trench at 19°50‧N. This canyon is 114 km long and is fed by sediments originating from two, possibly three, small rivers: the Ipala, Tecolotlán and Maria Garza. This canyon deeply incises (up to 600 m) the entire continental slope and at least the outer part of the shelf. Within the canyon, we observe meanders and narrow channels produced by turbidity flows indicating that the canyon is active. In the marginal areas of the canyon slumps, rills, and uplifts suggest that mass movements and fluid flow have had a major impact on the seafloor morphology. The seafloor bathymetry, backscatter images and sub-bottom reflection profiles evidence the tectonic processes occurring in this area. Of particular interest, the canyon is deflected by almost 90° at three locations, the deflections all having a similar azimuth of between 125° and 130°. Given the prominence and geometry of this canyon, along with its tectonic setting, we propose that the presence of the canyon is related to extension produced by the sharp change in the plate convergence. If so, the canyon may lie along the southeast boundary of a major forearc block (the Banderas Forearc Block).

  17. Timing and mechanism of uplift from cosmogenic radionuclides and structural data: a case study from an actively uplifting forearc, Calabria, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckler, M. S.; Reitz, M. A.; Seeber, L.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Calabrian Arc is a subduction-rollback system that has experienced remarkably peaceful forearc tectonics during the last 12 My of rollback, even with 780 km of backarc extension. In contrast, during the Middle Pleistocene rollback slowed and the forearc experienced a surge of tectonic activity including 15-20° of clockwise rotation, arc-parallel extension, and widespread uplift. This rapid and continuous uplift (1-1.2 mm/yr) has affected the entire forearc and is striking because subduction is presumed to be ongoing. No discernable structure or mechanism has been identified to account for all phenomena. We combine structural mapping and erosion rates from 10Be concentrations in river sediment to model river erosion into the Sila Massif, the most prominent highland in northern Calabria. Interfluves between river gorges on the east side of the Sila Massif preserve a tilted paleosurface, which we interpret as subhorizontal until post-Early Pliocene. We reconstruct uplift and river incision using a forward model that is calibrated using the current erosion rates and the elevation of the paleosurface above the Neto River bed. The model tests two end-member structural growth models of uplift: tilting a fixed hinge and tilting from a propagating hinge. The propagating hinge model generates a better fit with the modern river profile and the modern erosion rates. We independently constrain uplift to beginning between 800 ka and 900 ka, consistent with the Late Pleistocene tectonic upheaval. In addition, the results show the Sila Massif grew via tilting with a propagating hinge. This method can be applied to other tectonic regions as a new way to quantify and identify young and active structures.

  18. Influence of the Density Structure of the Caribbean Plate Forearc on the Static Stress State and Asperity Distribution along the Costa Rican Seismogenic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Gutknecht, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the forearc region along the Central American Subduction Zone shows a series of trench-parallel, positive gravity anomalies with corresponding gravity lows along the trench and toward the coast. These features extend from Guatemala to northern Nicaragua. However, the Costa Rican segment of the forearc does not follow this pattern. In this region, the along-trench gravity low is segmented, the coastal low is absent, and the forearc gravity high is located onshore at the Nicoya Peninsula which overlies the seismogenic zone. Geodetic and seismological studies along the Costa Rican Subduction Zone suggest the presence of coupled areas beneath the Nicoya Peninsula prior to the 2012, magnitude Mw 7.6 earthquake. These areas had previously been associated with asperities. Previous publications have proposed a mechanical model for the generation of asperities along the Chilean convergent margin based on the structure of the overriding plate above the seismogenic zone in which dense igneous bodies disturb the state of stress on the seismogenic zone and may influence seismogenic processes. In Costa Rica, surface geology and gravity data indicate the presence of dense basalt/gabbro crust overlying the seismogenic zone where the coupling is present. Bouguer anomaly values in this region reach up to 120×10-5 m/s2, which are the highest for Costa Rica. In this work, the state of stress on the Cocos-Caribbean plate interface is calculated based on the geometry and mass distribution of a 3D density model of the subduction zone as interpreted from gravity data from combined geopotential models. Results show a correlation between the coupled areas at the Nicoya Peninsula and the presence of stress anomalies on the plate interface. The stress anomalies are calculated for the normal component of the vertical stress on the seismogenic zone and are interpreted as being generated by the dense material which makes up the forearc in the area. The dense material of the Nicoya

  19. Multibeam Bathymetric Survey of the Ipala Submarine Canyon, Jalisco. Mexico (20°N): The Southern Boundary of the Banderas Forearc Block?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urias Espinosa, J.; Bandy, W. L.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Mitchell, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle America Trench bends sharply northward at 20°N. This, along with the close proximity of the Rivera-North America Euler pole (e.g., Suárez et al., 2103) to the northern end of the Middle American trench (the Jalisco Subduction Zone), produces a sharp increase in the obliquity of subduction at 20°N. By analogy with other subduction zones where this situation occurs,a significant trench parallel extensional stress field is expected to exist in the forearc region near the bend. Given the poor bathymetric coverage previously existing in this area, to verify that such stresses are present in the forearc area of the Jalisco Subduction Zone, multibeam bathymetric, seafloor backscatter and sub-bottom seismic reflection data were collected during the MORTIC08 campaign of the B.O. EL PUMA using the Kongsberg EM300 multibeam system and TOPAS sub-bottom profiler. Consistent with the analogy, these data image in detail a large submarine canyon extending from the coast at 20°05'N to the Middle America Trench at 19°50'N. This canyon, which we call the Ipala canyon (the canyon head lies offshore of the town of Ipala, Jalisco) is approximately 120km in length and is most likely fed by two, possibly three, small rivers, namely: the Ipala, Tecolotlán and Maria Garza rivers. . The seafloor and subbottom seismic reflection images also expose the tectonic processes that are actively influencing the present day geomorphology of the canyon region. Specifically, the new information indicates that much of the physical geography of seafloor is the result of active tectonic deformation of the plate margin, including uplift, erosion along structural lineaments and faulting. Of particular interest, the canyon is deflected by almost 90° at three locations, the deflections all having a similar azimuth of between 125° and 130°. Given the prominence and geometry of this canyon, along with its tectonic setting, we propose that this canyon is the result of extensional stresses

  20. Fluid migration pathways, sediment subduction, and the source of fluids escaping along the forearc seafloor revealed offshore Nicaragua with marine electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naif, S.; Key, K.; Constable, S.; Evans, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    The subduction of sediments and hydrated oceanic plates transports the primary flux of water into the interior of the Earth. As an oceanic plate sinks, water is progressively released by compaction and chemical dehydration reactions, a significant fraction of which is released during the initial stages of subduction. In order to map the flux of fluids at the Middle America Trench, we collected marine magnetotelluric and controlled-source electromagnetic data along a 280-km profile that spans the offshore component of the Nicaraguan margin. Fluids and volatiles present in the crust and mantle can decrease the bulk electrical resistivity by up to several orders of magnitude, making electromagnetic methods an ideal exploration tool for quantifying fluids along convergent margins. Our joint two-dimensional electrical resistivity model provides new constraints on the cycling of fluids at crustal depths. We image a variety of conductive channels that are indicative of: (1) crustal hydration along bending-induced normal faults at the outer rise, (2) the complete subduction of water-rich sediments, and (3) the vertical migration of fluids from the plate interface to the forearc seafloor. We estimate porosity from electrical resistivity using Archie's law to show that the porosity of the lower crust is increased by 115% at the outer rise compared with the abyssal plain, suggesting that more pore water is being subducted than previously thought. At the margin toe, we observe the porosity of the underthrust sediment layer to decay exponentially with increasing depth of burial to 10-km inland of the trench, which agrees well with laboratory studies of compaction driven porosity loss. At 23-km into the forearc, our data reveal an anomalous conductor that extends from the plate interface into the overlying forearc crust, terminating 1-2-km below a high density region of active fluid seeps and mud mounds that have previously been mapped. The temperature and pressure regime in the

  1. Characterization of gas fields by petroleum system, Sacramento Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B.; Valin, Z.C.; Reid, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Sacramento Basin, a north-trending forearc basin, contains Late Jurassic to Holocene sedimentary rocks that thicken to the south. The basin fill is about 300 km long, 80 km wide, and as much as 16 km thick. Because the 157 gas fields with original reserves of 9.14 tcf (1012 ft3) cover a large area, a change in chemical composition due to migration from wet gas to pure methane is recorded. On the basis of the carbon-isotopic composition of methane and stratigraphic occurrence, two petroleum systems have been identified in the Sacramento Basin. The Dobbins-Forbes(?) gas system, which contained about 2.25 tcf of recoverable gas, underlies the Winters-Domengine(?) gas system, which contained about 6.89 tcf of recoverable gas. Gas migrated laterally to the north as far as 200 km in the Dobbins-Forbes(?) system, whereas in the Winters-Domengine(?) system, gas first migrated vertically and then crossed the Midland Fault to the east for as far as 40 km. In both systems, depth of gas production is less than 3 km. By applying the petroleum-system concept and available information about the geology and geochemistry of this province, our study provides a new testable hypothesis for the origin, migration, and accumulation of gas in the Sacramento Basin. By reinterpreting some of the natural-gas information, along with data on gas wetness, gas-oil ratio, vectors of migration, hydrocarbon volume, and thermal history, two gas systems have been identified.

  2. Characterization of gas fields by petroleum system, Sacramento Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B.; Valin, Z.C. ); Reid, R.A. )

    1996-01-01

    The Sacramento Basin, a north-trending forearc basin, contains Late Jurassic to Holocene sedimentary rocks that thicken to the south. The basin fill is about 300 km long, 80 km wide, and as much as 16 km thick. Because the 157 gas fields with original reserves of 9.14 tcf (1012 ft3) cover a large area, a change in chemical composition due to migration from wet gas to pure methane is recorded. On the basis of the carbon-isotopic composition of methane and stratigraphic occurrence, two petroleum systems have been identified in the Sacramento Basin. The Dobbins-Forbes( ) gas system, which contained about 2.25 tcf of recoverable gas, underlies the Winters-Domengine( ) gas system, which contained about 6.89 tcf of recoverable gas. Gas migrated laterally to the north as far as 200 km in the Dobbins-Forbes( ) system, whereas in the Winters-Domengine( ) system, gas first migrated vertically and then crossed the Midland Fault to the east for as far as 40 km. In both systems, depth of gas production is less than 3 km. By applying the petroleum-system concept and available information about the geology and geochemistry of this province, our study provides a new testable hypothesis for the origin, migration, and accumulation of gas in the Sacramento Basin. By reinterpreting some of the natural-gas information, along with data on gas wetness, gas-oil ratio, vectors of migration, hydrocarbon volume, and thermal history, two gas systems have been identified.

  3. Structure and geologic history of late Cenozoic Eel River basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.H. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    The Eel River basin formed as a late Cenozoic forearc basin floored by late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic allochthonous terranes (central and coastal belts of the Franciscan complex). Regionally, basement rocks are unconformably overlain on land by a sedimentary sequence as much as about 4200 m thick that comprises the Bear River Formation (early and middle Miocene) and the Wildcat Group (late Miocene to middle Pleistocene) and offshore by broadly coeval upper Tertiary and Quaternary deposits as much as 3300 m thick. Offshore, the southern part of the basin is typified by the seaward extensions of youthful northeast-dipping thrust and reverse faults and northwest-trending anticlines. The latest period of deformation in this part of the basin began during the middle Pleistocene and probably reflects north-northwestward migration of the Mendocino triple junction and encroachment of the Pacific plate. Farther north, the western basin margin and adjacent upper continental slope are separated from the axial part of the offshore basin by a narrow zone of north-northwest-trending, right-stepping en echelon folds. These folds indicate that northeast-southwest compression characteristic of the southern part of the basin is accompanied toward the north by right-lateral shear between the accretionary complex to the west and the basin to the east. The northeastern margin of the offshore basin is cut by north to north-northwest-trending high-angle reverse faults that vertically offset basement rocks as much as 1300 m, west side down. These faults, which may merge northward, coincide with older terrane boundaries and locally show evidence of late Cenozoic reactivation with possible right-lateral slip.

  4. Basins and thrust belts in western Turkey: Tectonic history and hydrocarbons potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, P.R.; Johns, C.C.; Clark-Lowes, D.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Western Turkey consists of a number of tectonic terranes joined together by a network of suture zones. The terranes originated as microcontinental plates that rifted away from the continental margins forming the northern and southern boundaries of the Tethyan sea. These micro-continents were united by a series of collisions beginning in the Late Triassic and ending in the Miocene, with the final closure of the Tethyan sea. The sedimentary cover of the microcontinents consists of Paleozoic and Mesozoic passive margin and rift basin sequences containing numerous potential source and reservoir intervals. Most of these sequences show affinities with Gondwanaland, with the notable exception of the Istanbul nappe, which is strongly Laurasian in character. Forearc basin sequences were also deposited on the margins of the microcontinents during early Tertiary plate convergence. Ensuing continental collisions resulted in compressional deformation of sedimentary cover sequences. The intensity of deformation ranged from basin inversion producing numerous potential hydrocarbon traps, to large-scale overthrusting. Following continental suturing, continued compression in eastern Turkey has been accommodated since the Miocene by westward escape of continental lithosphere between the North and South Anatolian transform faults. Neotectonic pull-apart basins formed in response to these movements, accumulating large thicknesses of Miocene-Pliocene carbonates and clastic sediments. Potential reservoirs in the Neotectonic basins may be sourced either in situ or from underlying Paleozoic and Mesozoic source rocks that remain within the hydrocarbon generating window today.

  5. Two petroleum systems in the Sacramento Basin, California - A basis for new discoveries

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B. ); Castano, J.R. ); Lillis, P. ); Mackevett, N.H.; Naeser, N. )

    1994-04-01

    The Sacramento basin is a north-trending fore-arc basin that contains Lat Jurassic to Holocene sedimentary rocks that become thicker to the south and are overpressured at depth. The basin fill is about 300 km long, 80 km wide, and as much as 16 km thick. Two petroleum systems occur in the Sacramento basin. The Dobbins-Forbes( ) gas system, which contained about 2.25 tcf (10[sup 12]ft[sup 3]) of recoverable gas, underlies the Winters-Domingine( ) gas system, which contained about 6.89 tcf of recoverable gas. Gas migrated laterally and to the north as much as 200 km in the Dobbins-Forbes( ) system, whereas in the Winters-Domingine( ) system, gas first migrated vertically and then crossed the Midland fault to the east for up to 40 km. For both systems, depth of gas production from reservoir rocks of Lake Cretaceous to Oligocene in different trap types is less than 3 km. By applying the petroleum-system concept and information about the geology and geochemistry available for this province, this study- provides a new testable hypthesis for the origin, migration, and accumulation of gas in the Sacramento basin. By reinterpreting some of the natural gas information, gas wetness, gas-oil ratio, vectors of migration, hydrocarbon volume, and thermal history, two petroleum systems are identified. Understanding of the origin of known accumulations in this province provides a basis for new plays that should lead to discoveries with substantial reserves.

  6. Record of Plio-Pleistocene extreme event in the Lesser Antilles fore-arc basin. Example of Grande-Terre (Guadeloupe, French West Indies).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanlèn, L.; Philippon, M. M.; Randrianasolo, A.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Cornée, J. J.; Münch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Guadeloupe archipelago is part of the Lesser Antilles active volcanic arc and is therefore subjected to both enhanced seismic and volcanic activity related to the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, along which the Atlantic plate is subducted westward bellow the Caribbean plate. The volcanic arc is composed of several immerged volcanic islands (St Kitts, Nevis Montserrat, Basse Terre, Dominica, Martinique, St Lucia, Grenada) and submerged volcanoes (Kick em'Jenny). These volcanoes are known to be explosives and when they are entering in an eruptive cycle, debris flow could potentially initiate a tsunami and generate peculiar deposits within the sedimentary record recognized as tsunami deposits (or tsunamite). Subduction- related earthquakes might also initiate slope instabilities and trigger debris flow. Another controlling factor of slope (in-)-stabilities and debris flow is massive rainfalls. During cyclonic season (June to December), massive rainfalls are recorded in the area, which moreover is located on the trajectory of Atlantic Hurricanes that are responsible for numerous landslides. As a consequence, tsunami deposit are described and well studied in the Lesser Antilles arc as the islands shoreline and coastal plain are perpetually re-shaped by hurricanes responsible for tempestite deposits. However, the report of these deposit concern recent to actual events, for example present-day deposits consisting of large (metric) boulders, more or less aligned, located in the supralittoral fringe can be observed along Guadeloupe shore. In this study, we investigate the Plio-pleistocene sedimentary sequence of Grande Terre carbonate platform (Guadeloupe), and track the presence of such extreme-event related deposits and discuss our findings in the frame of the Lesser Antilles geological context.

  7. Ophiolitic basement to the Great Valley forearc basin, California, from seismic and gravity data: Implications for crustal growth at the North American continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godfrey, N.J.; Beaudoin, B.C.; Klemperer, S.L.; Levander, A.; Luetgert, J.; Meltzer, A.; Mooney, W.; Trehu, A.

    1997-01-01

    The nature of the Great Valley basement, whether oceanic or continental, has long been a source of controversy. A velocity model (derived from a 200-km-long east-west reflection-refraction profile collected south of the Mendocino triple junction, northern California, in 1993), further constrained by density and magnetic models, reveals an ophiolite underlying the Great Valley (Great Valley ophiolite), which in turn is underlain by a westward extension of lower-density continental crust (Sierran affinity material). We used an integrated modeling philosophy, first modeling the seismic-refraction data to obtain a final velocity model, and then modeling the long-wavelength features of the gravity data to obtain a final density model that is constrained in the upper crust by our velocity model. The crustal section of Great Valley ophiolite is 7-8 km thick, and the Great Valley ophiolite relict oceanic Moho is at 11-16 km depth. The Great Valley ophiolite does not extend west beneath the Coast Ranges, but only as far as the western margin of the Great Valley, where the 5-7-km-thick Great Valley ophiolite mantle section dips west into the present-day mantle. There are 16-18 km of lower-density Sierran affinity material beneath the Great Valley ophiolite mantle section, such that a second, deeper, "present-day" continental Moho is at about 34 km depth. At mid-crustal depths, the boundary between the eastern extent of the Great Valley ophiolite and the western extent of Sierran affinity material is a near-vertical velocity and density discontinuity about 80 km east of the western margin of the Great Valley. Our model has important implications for crustal growth at the North American continental margin. We suggest that a thick ophiolite sequence was obducted onto continental material, probably during the Jurassic Nevadan orogeny, so that the Great Valley basement is oceanic crust above oceanic mantle vertically stacked above continental crust and continental mantle.

  8. Active tectonics of the Atacama Basin area, northern Chile: Implications for distribution of convergence across the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yi-Rung; Lin, Yen-Sheng; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2013-04-01

    The central Andes in South America is formed as the Nazca plate subducts northeastward beneath the South American plate along the Peru-Chile trench, parallel to the coastline. It has been shown that the convergence rate between the two plates is ~70-80 mm/yr, and about 10-15 mm/yr of the convergence is absorbed in the sub-Andean belt, east of the active volcanic arc. However, the convergence in the forearc region is still not well constrained. In order to understand how much convergence is absorbed in the forearc region, we analyzed the active tectonic characteristics of the Atacama Basin, just west of the active volcanic arc. With the help of various remote sensing datasets such as 30-m and 90-m resolution digital elevation models (DEM) produced from SRTM data, thermal infrared radiometer (TIR) ASTER images, Landsat, and Google Earth images, we identified many N-S trending compressional structures around the Atacama Basin. The active structures are found mainly in the northern and southern part of the basin. The structures in the north deformed many volcanic rocks at the surface, such as ignimbrites and several lava flows. Structures may extend southward to San Pedro de Atacama, the largest town in the Atacama Basin, and produced tectonic scarps inside the town. River terraces also formed in the hanging-wall block of the structures, north of San Pedro. From field surveys, we measured the offset amount of the structures and collected volcanic rocks in order to constrain the age of the deformation. These results enabled us to calculate the long-term deformation rate of the structures. Our results indicate that the long-term slip rate of the structures in the southern part of the basin is quite low, in the order of 10-1 mm/yr. Furthermore, we obtained detailed topographic profiles across the structures. In the south, the profiles were surveyed by using real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS. Together with the attitudes of bedding planes, we constructed the subsurface geometry

  9. A review on earthquake and tsunami hazards of the Sumatran plate boundary: Observing expected and unexpected events after the Aceh-Andaman Mw 9.15 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natawidjaja, D.

    2013-12-01

    The 600-km Mentawai megathrust had produced two giant historical earthquakes generating big tsunamies in 1797 and 1833. The SuGAr (Sumatran GPS continuous Array) network, first deployed in 2002, shows that the subduction interface underlying Mentawai Islands and the neighboring Nias section in the north are fully locked, thus confirming their potential hazards. Outreach activities to warn people about earthquake and tsunamies had been started since 4 months prior to the 26 December 2004 in Aceh-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.15). Later in March 2005, the expected megathrust earthquake (Mw 8.7) hit Nias-Simelue area and killed about 2000 people, releasing the accumulated strain since the previous 1861 event (~Mw 8.5). After then many Mw 7s and smaller events occured in Sumatra, filling areas between and around two giant ruptures and heighten seismicities in neighboring areas. In March 2007, the twin earthquake disaster (Mw 6.3 and Mw 6.4) broke two consecutive segments of the transcurrent Sumatran fault in the Singkarak lake area. Only six month later, in September 2007, the rapid-fire-failures of three consecutive megathrust patches (Mw 8.5, Mw 7.9 and Mw 7.0) ruptured a 250-km-section of the southern part of the Mentawai. It was a big surprise since this particular section is predicted as a very-low coupled section from modelling the SuGAr data, and hence, bypassing the more potential fully coupled section of the Mentawai in between the 2005 and 2007 ruptures. In September 2009, a rare unexpected event (Mw 7.6) suddenly ruptured an intracrustal fault in the subducted slab down under Padang City and killed about 500 people. Padang had been in preparation for the next tsunami but not for strong shakes from near by major earthquake. This event seems to have remotely triggered another Mw 6.7 on the Sumatran fault near kerinci Lake, a few hundred kilometers south of Padang, in less than a day. Just a year later, in November 2010, again an unexpected large slow-slip event of

  10. Estimates of minimum shaking intensity required to induce liquefaction and sediment redistribution in southern Cascadia forearc lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, A. E.; Meigs, A.; Gavin, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary sequences from several southern Cascadia forearc lakes near the California/Oregon border contain anomalous deposits suspected to have formed as the result of strong ground motions in great earthquakes. We compared the sedimentary sequences from two pairs of lakes that lie ~30 km above the subduction interface, to determine the impact of shaking on deposit characteristics. We find that disturbance event deposit characteristics depend on the geomorphologic and geologic setting of each lake, and thick minerogenic layers occur in lakes with deltas or slides through which source water flows. Proximal lake pair (~140 km from the trench): These lakes are cirque lakes ~20 km from one another. One lake has visible silty clay layers, and the other only has slight changes in density and mineral content not visually apparent. Deposits may be preceded by, or coincident with, a layer of coarse plant macrofossils. Distal lake pair (~185 km from the trench): These lakes were created by the same landslide and contain thick disturbance event deposits with a high percentage of minerogenic sediment. The smaller lake contains a record of pseudo-annual flood deposits that have been interpreted as a time series of erosion magnitudes (see poster by Gavin et al. also in this session). The thickest of these events fall above a strongly linear relationship, suggesting a separate process (such as earthquakes). The thick deposits grade from organic-rich to mineral-rich, and are capped by a thin layer of fine-grained silty clay. A sequence of progressively thinner deposits follows each thick layer, and may reflect post-earthquake erosional events. The larger of the two landslide-dammed lakes contains thick minerogenic deposits with normal grading, and appear to be coeval with the thickest layers in the smaller lake. The upper portion of this record is well-dated, and likely contains a deposit resulting from the 1700AD earthquake. We hypothesize that strong ground motions cause

  11. Forearc deformation processes inferred from drowned shorelines in the Arauco Bay, Southern Chile (37°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Muñoz, Julius; Melnick, Daniel; Bernhardt, Anne; Argandoña, Boris; Gonzalez-Acuña, Javiera; Strecker, Manfred

    2015-04-01

    Relict drowned landscapes often constitute preserved snapshots of terrestrial environments prior to flooding episodes during the Quaternary. Forearc deformation processes are usually recorded by coastal landforms, such as paleo-shorelines or marine terraces reflecting pronounced vertical movements. Similarly, drowned coastal landscapes represent past sea-level positions that can be used as tracers of tectonic deformation and sea-level change. In this study we present hitherto unrecognized drowned Quaternary shorelines in the Arauco Bay of southern Chile. The Arauco Bay lies inland of the Santa Maria Fault and is surrounded by densely populated areas, many devastated by the tsunami following the 2010 M 8.8 Maule earthquake. The shorelines are folded, apparently as a result of slip along the Santa Maria Fault, a blind splay-fault system rooted in the Nazca-South America plate-boundary zone, documenting protracted tectonic activity. We mapped and used these drowned geomorphic markers using high-resolution bathymetry (2.5 m) to infer rates and style of deformation along the Santa Maria splay fault. For this purpose we used surface classification models, observations from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), and sedimentology of sea-bottom samples. High roughness areas correspond to well-exposed bedrock outcrops. The enclosed patches were studied in detail and compared with LiDAR data from emerged and actively forming marine platforms from nearby areas. Three levels of drowned shorelines were identified: at ~110 m, ~40 and ~60 m depth, respectively. The shallower two shorelines are distributed as fringes parallel to the coastline of the Arauco Bay and deepen towards the trench. We selected the shallowest level as an exploratory target for a ROV dive obtaining video and still images of micromorphologic features; a sampling target was selected at 45 m where professional divers collected samples of bedrock and sediments. Chronologic correlation was performed based on global

  12. Boron desorption in subduction forearcs: Systematics and implications for the origin and transport of deeply-sourced fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffer, D. M.; Kopf, A.

    2015-12-01

    At many subduction zones, pore water geochemical anomalies at seafloor seeps and in shallow boreholes indicate upward fluid flow and chemical transport from depths of several km. Identifying the source regions and flow pathways of these fluids is a key step toward quantifying volatile fluxes through forearcs, and in understanding their potential connection to loci of excess pore pressure along the plate boundary. Here, we focus on observations of pore water freshening (reported in terms of [Cl]), elevated [B], and light δ11B. Pore water freshening is generally thought to result from clay dehydration, whereas the B and δ11B signatures are interpreted to reflect desorption of isotopically light B from pelitic sediments with increasing temperature. We develop a model to track the coupled effects of B desorption, smectite dehydration, and progressive consolidation within the underthrusting sediment section. Our model incorporates established kinetic models of clay dehydration, and experimental data that define the temperature-dependent distribution coefficient (Kd) and fractionation of B in marine sediments. A generic sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the relative timing of heating and consolidation is a dominant control on pore water composition. For cold slabs, freshening is maximized because dehydration releases bound water into low porosity sediment, whereas B concentrations and isotopic signatures are modest because desorption is only partially complete. For warmer slabs, [B] and [Cl] signals are smaller, because heating and desorption occur shallower and into larger porosities, but the predicted δ11B signal is larger. The former scenario is typical of non-accretionary margins where the insulating sediment layer on the subducting plate is commonly <1 km thick. This result provides a quantitative explanation for the global observation that [Cl] depletion and [B] enrichment signals are generally strongest at non-accretionary margins. Application of our multi

  13. Age estimates and uplift rates for Late Pleistocene marine terraces: Southern Oregon portion of the Cascadia Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Miller, Gifford H.; Kennedy, George L.; Whelan, Joseph F.; McInelly, Galan W.

    1990-05-01

    Marine terraces are prominent landforms along the southern Oregon coast, which forms part of the forearc region of the Cascadia subduction zone. Interest in the Cascadia subduction zone has increased because recent investigations have suggested that slip along plates at certain types of convergent margins is characteristically accompanied by large earthquakes. In addition, other investigations have suggested that convergent margins can be broadly classified by the magnitude of their uplift rates. With these hypotheses in mind, we generated new uranium series, amino acid, and stable isotope data for southern Oregon marine terrace fossils. These data, along with terrace elevations and two alternative estimates of sea level at the time of terrace formation, allow us to determine terrace ages and uplift rates. Uranium series analysis of fossil coral yields an age of 83±5 ka for the Whisky Run terrace at Coquille Point in Bandon, Oregon. A combination of amino acid and oxygen isotope data suggest ages of about 80 and 105 ka for the lowest two terraces at Cape Blanco. These ages indicate uplift rates of 0.45-1.05 and 0.81-1.49 m/kyr for Coquille Point and Cape Blanco, respectively. Late Quaternary uplift rates of marine terraces yield information about deformation in the overriding plate, but it is unclear if such data vary systematically with convergent margin type. In order to assess the utility of the southern Oregon uplift rates for predicting the behavior of the Cascadia subduction zone, we compared late Quaternary uplift rates derived from terrace data from subduction zones around the world. On the basis of this comparison the southern Oregon rates of vertical deformation are not unusually high or low. Furthermore, late Quaternary uplift rates show little relationship to the type of convergent margin. These observations suggest that local structures may play a large role in uplift rate variability. In addition, while the type of convergent margin may place an

  14. The “zircon effect” as recorded by the chemical and Hf isotopic compositions of Lesser Antilles forearc sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, Marion; Chauvel, Catherine; Maury, René C.; Mattielli, Nadine

    2009-09-01

    Oceanic sediments contain the products of erosion of continental crust, biologic activity and chemical precipitation. These processes create a large diversity of their chemical and isotopic compositions. Here we focus on the influence of the distance from a continental platform on the trace element and isotopic compositions of sediments deposited on the ocean floor and highlight the role of zircons in decoupling high-field strength elements and Hf isotopic compositions from other trace elements and Nd isotopic compositions. We report major and trace element concentrations as well as Sr and Hf isotopic data for 80 sediments from the Lesser Antilles forearc region. The trace-element characteristics and the Sr and Hf isotopic compositions are generally dominated by detrital material from the continental crust but are also variably influenced by chemical or biogenic carbonate and pure biogenic silica. Next to the South American continent, at DSDP Site 144 and on Barbados Island, sediments, coarse quartz arenites, exhibit marked Zr and Hf excesses that we attribute to the presence of zircon. In contrast, the sediments from DSDP Site 543, which were deposited farther away from the continental platform, consist of fine clay and they show strong deficiencies in Zr and Hf. The enrichment or depletion of Zr-Hf is coupled to large changes in Hf isotopic compositions (- 30 < ɛHf < + 4) that vary independently from the Nd isotopes. We interpret this feature as a clear expression of the "zircon effect" suggested by Patchett and coauthors in 1984. Zircon-rich sediments deposited next to the South American continent have very low ɛHf values inherited from old zircons. In contrast, in detrital clay-rich sediments deposited a few hundred kilometers farther north, the mineral fraction is devoid of zircon and they have drastically higher ɛHf values inherited from finer, clay-rich continental material. In the two DSDP sites, average Hf isotopes are very unradiogenic relative to

  15. S-Local-Wave Seismic Anisotropy in the Forearc Above the Subducted Nazca Plate Between 33°S and 34.5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacif, Silvina; Triep, Enrique G.

    2016-04-01

    S-wave splitting from local earthquakes within the Nazca plate that are deeper than the interplate seismogenic zone enabled the determination of the fast velocity direction, Φ, and the lag time, δt, in the forearc of the overriding plate. Data were collected from 20 seismic stations, most of which were temporary, deployed between ~33.5°S and ~34.5°S and included part of the normal subduction section to the south and part of the transitional section to flat subduction to the north. The fast velocity direction has a complex pattern with three predominant directions northwest-southeast, north-south and northeast-southwest and relatively high δt. A quality evaluation of the highest measurements enabled us to identify possible cycle skipping in some of the measurements, which could be responsible for the large observed lag time. We consider that most of the anisotropy that was observed in the forearc is probably located in the mantle wedge, and a minor part is located in the crust. The complex pattern of splitting parameters when the anisotropy is associated at the mantle wedge could be the result of three-dimensional variations in the subducting Nazca plate at these latitudes. Also, similarities between the splitting parameters and the principal compressional stress direction from Pliocene and Quaternary rocks suggest that the anisotropy in the crust could originate by tectonic local stress.

  16. Paleogene palaeogeography and basin evolution of the Western Carpathians, Northern Pannonian domain and adjoining areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Michal; Plašienka, Dušan; Soták, Ján; Vojtko, Rastislav; Oszczypko, Nestor; Less, György; Ćosović, Vlasta; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Králiková, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    The data about the Paleogene basin evolution, palaeogeography, and geodynamics of the Western Carpathian and Northern Pannonian domains are summarized, re-evaluated, supplemented, and newly interpreted. The presented concept is illustrated by a series of palinspastic and palaeotopographic maps. The Paleogene development of external Carpathian zones reflects gradual subduction of several oceanic realms (Vahic, Iňačovce-Kričevo, Szolnok, Magura, and Silesian-Krosno) and growth of the orogenic accretionary wedge (Pieniny Klippen Belt, Iňačovce-Kričevo Unit, Szolnok Belt, and Outer Carpathian Flysch Belt). Evolution of the Central Western Carpathians is characterized by the Paleocene-Early Eocene opening of several wedge-top basins at the accretionary wedge tip, controlled by changing compressional, strike-slip, and extensional tectonic regimes. During the Lutetian, the diverging translations of the northward moving Eastern Alpine and north-east to eastward shifted Western Carpathian segment generated crustal stretching at the Alpine-Carpathian junction with foundation of relatively deep basins. These basins enabled a marine connection between the Magura oceanic realm and the Northern Pannonian domain, and later also with the Dinaridic foredeep. Afterwards, the Late Eocene compression brought about uplift and exhumation of the basement complexes at the Alpine-Carpathian junction. Simultaneously, the eastern margin of the stretched Central Western Carpathians underwent disintegration, followed by opening of a fore-arc basin - the Central Carpathian Paleogene Basin. In the Northern Hungarian Paleogene retro-arc basin, turbidites covered a carbonate platform in the same time. During the Early Oligocene, the rock uplift of the Alpine-Carpathian junction area continued and the Mesozoic sequences of the Danube Basin basement were removed, along with a large part of the Eocene Hungarian Paleogene Basin fill, while the retro-arc basin depocentres migrated toward the east

  17. Petroleum systems in the Sacramento Basin, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B.; Valin, Z.C.; Lillis, P.G.

    1996-08-01

    The Sacramento Basin, a north-trending forearc basin that contains Late Jurassic to Holocene sedimentary rocks which thicken to the south, is primarily a gas province with minor occurrences of oil, comprising four petroleum systems, two of gas and two of oil. The Dobbins-Forbes(?) gas system, which contained about 2.2 5 tcf (10{sup 12} ft{sup 3}) of recoverable gas, underlies the Winters-Domengine(?) gas system, which contained about 6.89 tcf of recoverable gas. Gas migrated laterally to the north as far as 200 km in the Dobbins-Forbes(?) system, whereas in the Winters-Domengine(?) system, gas first migrated vertically and then crossed the Midland Fault to the east for as far as 40 km. In both systems, depth of gas production is less than 3 km. On the basis of petroleum geochemistry of the oils, two unnamed oil systems have been identified. Oil recovered from cinnabar mines, a gold mine, seeps, and a few wells along the northwest flank of the basin are all similar and constitute one oil system. The provenance of this oil type is a Cretaceous source rock. The oil from the Brentwood and Livermore Oil Fields at the south end of the province, which constitute the other oil system, is thought to originate from the Kreyenhagen Formation of Eocene age. By applying the petroleum-system concept and available information about the geology and geochemistry of this province, our study provides a new testable hypothesis for the origin, migration, and accumulation of petroleum in the Sacramento Basin.

  18. Active and passive seismic imaging of the Precordilleran crust, fore-arc of the North-Chilean subduction zone (Central Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenske, Ina; Hellwig, Olaf; Buske, Stefan; Wigger, Peter; Shapiro, Serge A.

    2014-05-01

    In the fore-arc of the Chilean subduction zone the prominent trench-parallel fault systems can be traced for several thousand kilometers in the north-south direction. These fault systems possibly crosscut parts or the entire crust and are expected to have a close relationship to transient processes of the subduction earthquake cycle. With the motivation to image and characterize the structural inventory and the processes that occur in the vicinity of these large-scale fault zones, we are currently performing a combined analysis of active and passive seismic data sets. The active-seismic data analysis is intended to provide images of the faults at depth and allow linking surface information to subsurface structures. The correlation of the active seismic data with the observed seismicity around these fault systems complements the image and potentially reveals the origin and the nature of the seismicity (including tremors) bound to these fault systems. In 1996, an approximately 350 km long, west-east running reflection seismic profile was acquired to image the entire crust of the Central Andean fore-arc system (North Chile; ANCORP96 seismic line). Several features such as the downgoing plate (Nazca reflector) and the Quebrada Blanca Bright Spot at mid-crustal level were clearly imaged using both standard CMP processing and Kirchhoff prestack depth migration. The latter proved to be more successful in coping with the low data coverage and varying data quality. However, the original images did not provide conclusive information on the upper crust (< 10 km depth) due to the sparse acquisition geom- etry and the insufficient removal of source-generated noise. The major goal of our current re-processing of the ANCORP96 reflection seismic data set is to provide improved images of the upper and middle crust, Thereby, resolving the shallow and perhaps steeply dipping segments of the major fault systems, which were not detected by the original processing. This is done by using

  19. Forearc structure from legacy multichannel seismic data linked to mechanical variability and rupture segmentation on the central Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, E. C.; von Huene, R.; Miller, J.; Haeussler, P. J.; Scholl, D. W.; Ryan, H. F.; Kirby, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    The historical earthquake record, geodetic observations, and modern interseismic seismicity patterns indicate along-strike variability in the mechanical behavior of the subduction zone extending from the central Alaska peninsula west to the eastern Aleutian Islands. This region spans the rupture areas of several historical megathrust earthquakes, including the 1938 M8.3 Semidi Islands event, the 1946 M8.5 earthquake near Unimak Pass, and the 1957 M8.6 Andreanof Islands earthquake. Each of these events produced tsunamis that affected Alaska and/or far-field coastal regions in Hawaii and the mainland U.S. The '38 and '46 rupture areas are separated by a segment of the subduction zone in the vicinity of the Shumagin Islands where, based on plate velocities from GPS, plate coupling decreases from nearly fully locked in the east, to very low coupling in the western Shumagins, indicating an important change in seismic style along-strike. Changes in the degree of interseismic coupling are often attributed to variability in the mechanical strength of the thrust interface, influenced by heterogeneity in the material properties and subducted topographic relief. Furthermore, the expression of forearc structural features along the margin may indicate the width and up-dip limit of the locked zone. We explore structural characteristics of the shallow portion of the subduction system related to variations in the mechanical properties of the megathrust and interseismic coupling using legacy multichannel seismic (MCS) data from several segments along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone. Critical images were reprocessed with modern seismic processing systems. We characterize structural features of the downgoing plate and forearc, including the variation in thickness and character of subducted sediment, the geometry of the upper plate wedge, the distribution of imbricate thrust faults, the transition from outer prism to margin rock framework and extensional faulting. These

  20. Interseismic Strain Along the Sumatra Subduction Zone: A Case for a Locked Fault Portion Extending Well Below the Forearc Moho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoes, M.; Avouac, J.; Cattin, R.; Henry, P.; Natawidjaja, D. H.

    2003-12-01

    A current and most accepted view about the seismogenic zone along subduction zones is that the downdip extent of the locked fault portion would correspond either to the 350° C isotherm if this temperature is reached above the Moho, or to the intersection with the forearc Moho for colder subduction zones [Oleskevich et al., 1999]. This limit would reflect the transition from slip-weakening friction to aseismic stable-sliding, or else ductile flow. In the first case, when the downdip end of the locked zone is temperature-controlled, stable-sliding of quartzo-feldspathic rocks would be the controlling factor, while the systematic presence of serpentinite or other hydrated minerals is advocated to explain aseismic interplate slip in the mantle at temperatures much less that the 750° C needed for ductile flow of mantle rocks [Peacock and Hyndman, 1999]. Here, we consider the case of the Sumatra subduction zone where the ~53 Myr Indian oceanic crust subducts below an island-arc characterized by a relatively thin crust, with a Moho depth estimated to ~23 km. We model interseismic deformation from a creeping dislocation embedded in an elastic half-space, using the back-slip approach. In addition to recently published GPS velocities, we take advantage of recent data on the pattern and rate of interseismic uplift that have been obtained from the study of coral growth [Natawidjaja, 2003; Sieh et al., 1999]. These data are found to put tight constraints on the horizontal position of the downdip limit of the locked fault zone, at 127 +/- 4/2 km from the trench. This position corresponds to a depth between 40 and 58 km and to a temperature of 269° C +/- 155° C, when compared with thermal modeling. So, in this particular setting, the locked fault portion extends well into the mantle. However, temperature is not high enough to advocate stable sliding or ductile flow of unaltered or altered mantle rocks. This case appeals to some reappraisal of the physical control on the depth

  1. Subsurface geometry and evolution of the Seattle fault zone and the Seattle Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Molzer, P.C.; Fisher, M.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Bucknam, R.C.; Parsons, T.; Crosson, R.S.; Creager, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Seattle fault, a large, seismically active, east-west-striking fault zone under Seattle, is the best-studied fault within the tectonically active Puget Lowland in western Washington, yet its subsurface geometry and evolution are not well constrained. We combine several analysis and modeling approaches to study the fault geometry and evolution, including depth-converted, deep-seismic-reflection images, P-wave-velocity field, gravity data, elastic modeling of shoreline uplift from a late Holocene earthquake, and kinematic fault restoration. We propose that the Seattle thrust or reverse fault is accompanied by a shallow, antithetic reverse fault that emerges south of the main fault. The wedge enclosed by the two faults is subject to an enhanced uplift, as indicated by the boxcar shape of the shoreline uplift from the last major earthquake on the fault zone. The Seattle Basin is interpreted as a flexural basin at the footwall of the Seattle fault zone. Basin stratigraphy and the regional tectonic history lead us to suggest that the Seattle fault zone initiated as a reverse fault during the middle Miocene, concurrently with changes in the regional stress field, to absorb some of the north-south shortening of the Cascadia forearc. Kingston Arch, 30 km north of the Seattle fault zone, is interpreted as a more recent disruption arising within the basin, probably due to the development of a blind reverse fault.

  2. Shallow subsurface morpho-tectonics at the Northern offshore Sumatra subduction system using high resolution reflection and refraction seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, D.; Dibakar Ghosal*, S. C. Singh, A. P. S. Chauhan, H. Carton, N. D. Hananto

    2011-12-01

    The oblique subduction of Indo-Australian plate below the Eurosian plate regulates the subsurface geology of the Sumatra subduction system from south to north. Although many geological, geophysical and geodetic studies have been carried over since several decades nevertheless a high resolution subsurface image describing the detailed structural features over the Northern Sumatra is still missing. To scrutinize the northern part of this subduction system we had carried out a multi channel seismic (MCS) and OBS survey using a 12 km long streamer and 56 ocean bottom seismometers in 2006 and procured a high resolution deep seismic reflection and refraction data over a 500 km long profile mapping the whole subduction setting from the subduction front, forearc high and basin, Sumatra platform, Sumatra fault and volcanic arc. The acoustic basement along the profile is very complex because of its extremities lies in a range of 300 m to 5000 m. In order to overcome the imaging-intricacies caused due to the abrupt changes of water depth, we have downward continued the 12 km streamer data to the seafloor, which provides refraction arrivals from near zero offsets to 12 km, and subsequently a high-resolution travel time tomography keeping node spacing of 50m x 50m has accomplished to procure a detail velocity structure along the profile. We have conducted our analysis in two important areas at northern offshore Sumatra: (1) subduction front and accretionary settings and (2) forearc high and West Anadman Fault. Our main goal lies to observe the nature of shallow subsurface velocity distribution over these regions. Tomographic result of the subduction front demonstrates the changes in velocity gradient along up-dip. The 1D velocity gradients become shallower toward the subduction trench inferring the fact of lithification of accreted sediments around the accretionary wedge. At the forearc high adjacent to the Aceh basin a pile of 1 km thick low velocity sediments is underlain by

  3. The impact of education programs on smoking prevention: a randomized controlled trial among 11 to 14 year olds in Aceh, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background School-based smoking prevention programs have been shown to increase knowledge of the negative effects of smoking and prevent tobacco smoking. The majority of evidence on effectiveness comes from Western countries. This study investigated the impact of school-based smoking prevention programs on adolescents’ smoking knowledge, attitude, intentions and behaviors (KAIB) in Aceh, Indonesia. Methods We conducted a 2 × 2 factorial randomized controlled trial among 7th and 8th grade students aged 11 to 14 years. Eight schools were randomly assigned to a control group or one of three school-based programs: health-based, Islamic-based, or a combined program. Students in the intervention groups received eight classroom sessions on smoking prevention education over two months. The KAIB impact of the program was measured by questionnaires administered one week before and one week after the intervention. Results A total of 477 students participated (58% female, 51% eighth graders). Following the intervention, there was a significant main effect of the Health based intervention for health knowledge scores (β = 3.9 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). There were significant main effects of the Islamic-based intervention in both health knowledge (β = 3.8 ± 0.6, p < 0.001) and Islamic knowledge (β = 3.5 ± 0.5, p < 0.001); an improvement in smoking attitude (β = −7.1 ± 1.5, p < 0.001). The effects of Health and Islam were less than additive for the health and Islamic factors for health knowledge (β = −3.5 ± 0.9, p < 0.01 for interaction) and Islamic knowledge (β = −2.0 ± 0.8, p = 0.02 for interaction). There were no significant effects on the odds of intention to smoke or smoking behaviors. Conclusions Both Health and Islamic school-based smoking prevention programs provided positive effects on health and Islamic related knowledge respectively among adolescents in Indonesia. Tailoring program interventions with

  4. Subducting oceanic high causes compressional faulting in southernmost Ryukyu forearc as revealed by hypocentral determinations of earthquakes and reflection/refraction seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Lallemand, Serge

    2009-03-01

    Absolute earthquake hypocenter locations have been determined in the area offshore eastern Taiwan, at the Southernmost Ryukyu subduction zone. Location process is run within a 3D velocity model by combining the Taiwanese and neighboring Japanese networks and using the 3D MAXI technique. The study focuses on the most active seismic cluster in the Taiwan region that occurs in the forearc domain offshore eastern Taiwan. Earthquakes distribute mainly along 2 active planes. The first one aligns along the subduction interface and the second one, shallower affects the overriding margin. Focal mechanisms within the shallow group indicate that nodal planes are either compatible with high-angle back-thrusts or low-angle thrusts. The active seismic deformation exclusively indicates reverse faulting revealing that the forearc basement undergoes trench-perpendicular strong compression. By integrating the seismological image into the regional context, we favor the hypothesis in which the dense seismicity occurring offshore marks the activity of en-échelon high-angle reverse faults accommodating the uplift of a broken piece of Ryukyu Arc basement, called Hoping Basement Rise. The uplift is inferred to be caused by the subduction of an oceanic relief, either exotic block, seamount or oceanic crust sliver. Our favored solution satisfies the narrowness of epicenter's cluster along the Hoping Canyon, and the observation of high-angle active faults on seismic lines crossing the area. Furthermore, this solution is compatible with the active uplift of the Hoping Rise demonstrated from morphological and sedimentological data. We do not exclude the branching of the high-angle reverse faults system onto a splay fault connected with the subduction interface but further investigations are needed to map precisely the 3D distribution of active faults that break the margin.

  5. A kinematic model for the formation of the Siletz-Crescent forearc terrane by capture of coherent fragments of the Farallon and Resurrection plates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Wilson, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    The volcanic basement of the Oregon and Washington Coast ranges has been proposed to represent a pair of tracks of the Yellowstone hotspot formed at a mid-ocean ridge during the early Cenozoic. This interpretation has been questioned on many grounds, especially that the range of ages does not match the offshore spreading rates and that the presence of continental coarse clastic sediments is difficult to reconcile with fast convergence rates between the oceanic plates and North America. Updates to basement geochronology and plate motion history reveal that these objections are much less serious than when they were first raised. Forward plate kinematic modeling reveals that predicted basement ages can be consistent with the observed range of about 55–49 Ma, and that the entire basement terrane can form within about 300 km of continental sources for clastic sediments. This kinematic model indicates that there is no firm reason to reject the near-ridge hotspot hypothesis on the basis of plate motions. A novel element of the model is the Resurrection plate, previously proposed to exist between the Farallon and Kula plates. By including the defunct Resurrection plate in our reconstruction, we are able to model the Farallon hotspot track as docking against the Oregon subduction margin starting about 53 Ma, followed by docking of the Resurrection track to the north starting about 48 Ma. Accretion of the Farallon plate fragment and partial subduction of the Resurrection fragment complicates the three-dimensional structure of the modern Cascadia forearc. We interpret the so-called “E” layer beneath Vancouver Island to be part of the Resurrection fragment. Our new kinematic model of mobile terranes within the Paleogene North American plate boundary allows reinterpretation of the three-dimensional structure of the Cascadia forearc and its relationship to ongoing seismotectonic processes.

  6. Location and extent of Tertiary structures in Cook Inlet Basin, Alaska, and mantle dynamics that focus deformation and subsidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Subduction of the buoyant Yakutat microplate likely caused deformation to be focused preferentially in upper Cook Inlet. The upper Cook Inlet region has both the highest degree of shortening and the deepest part of the Neogene basin. This forearc region has a long-wavelength magnetic high, a large isostatic gravity low, high conductivity in the lower mantle, low p-wave velocity (Vp), and a high p-wave to shear-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs). These data suggest that fluids in the mantle wedge caused serpentinization of mafic rocks, which may, at least in part, contribute to the long-wavelength magnetic anomaly. This area lies adjacent to the subducting and buoyant Yakutat microplate slab. We suggest the buoyant Yakutat slab acts much like a squeegee to focus mantle-wedge fluid flow at the margins of the buoyant slab. Such lateral flow is consistent with observed shear-wave splitting directions. The additional fluid in the adjacent mantle wedge reduces the wedge viscosity and allows greater corner flow. This results in focused subsidence, deformation, and gravity anomalies in the forearc region.

  7. Evidence of Crustal Faulting and Deformation in the Muckleshoot Basin, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, J.; Wolf, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Muckleshoot basin of western Washington, sandwiched between the Seattle Uplift on the west and the Cascade Range on the east, is deforming under north-south shortening and clockwise rotation of the north Cascadia forearc. Accommodating the regional strain are crustal faults in the Puget Lowland that cluster around three azimuths: east-west, northwest-southeast, and north-northwest-south-southeast. Evidence for all three groups appears on the periphery of the Muckleshoot basin. In this study, we add gravity measurements to an existing database to better define the geometry of the Muckleshoot basin and its relation to previously mapped faults appearing on the basin margins. A northwest-trending gravity high bisects the basin into two sub-basins, a larger one to the south and a smaller one to the north. We suggest that the gravity high is associated with a deep basement structure and its orientation is consistent with northward-directed crustal shortening. Regional-residual separation methods and derivative maps show pronounced magnetic lineations that extend faults expressed along the basin margins to east-west trending faults that cross the Puget Sound. Three intersecting cross-sectional models produced for this study are consistent with the following hypotheses: (1) the northwest-trending White River and Green River faults mapped on the eastern basin margin appear as south-verging, steeply dipping reverse faults in the central basin; (2) the north-northwest trending Franklin fault, mapped previously as a strike-slip fault, projects into the basin and shows little vertical offset in the single profile it crosses, and (3) the northwest trajectory of both the White River and Green River faults appears to curve southward as the faults traverse the Muckleshoot basin, following east-west oriented gravity and magnetic anomalies that cross the Puget Sound. Results from the study suggest that the faults and folds in Muckleshoot basin are actively interacting with other

  8. Eocene extension in Idaho generated massive sediment floods into Franciscan trench and into Tyee, Great Valley, and Green River basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumitru, Trevor A.; Ernst, W.G.; Wright, James E.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Wells, Ray E.; Farmer, Lucia P.; Kent, Adam J.R.; Graham, Stephan A.

    2013-01-01

    The Franciscan Complex accretionary prism was assembled during an ∼165-m.y.-long period of subduction of Pacific Ocean plates beneath the western margin of the North American plate. In such fossil subduction complexes, it is generally difficult to reconstruct details of the accretion of continent-derived sediments and to evaluate the factors that controlled accretion. New detrital zircon U-Pb ages indicate that much of the major Coastal belt subunit of the Franciscan Complex represents a massive, relatively brief, surge of near-trench deposition and accretion during Eocene time (ca. 53–49 Ma). Sediments were sourced mainly from the distant Idaho Batholith region rather than the nearby Sierra Nevada. Idaho detritus also fed the Great Valley forearc basin of California (ca. 53–37 Ma), the Tyee forearc basin of coastal Oregon (49 to ca. 36 Ma), and the greater Green River lake basin of Wyoming (50–47 Ma). Plutonism in the Idaho Batholith spanned 98–53 Ma in a contractional setting; it was abruptly superseded by major extension in the Bitterroot, Anaconda, Clearwater, and Priest River metamorphic core complexes (53–40 Ma) and by major volcanism in the Challis volcanic field (51–43 Ma). This extensional tectonism apparently deformed and uplifted a broad region, shedding voluminous sediments toward depocenters to the west and southeast. In the Franciscan Coastal belt, the major increase in sediment input apparently triggered a pulse of massive accretion, a pulse ultimately controlled by continental tectonism far within the interior of the North American plate, rather than by some tectonic event along the plate boundary itself.

  9. Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the North Cuba Basin, Cuba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Petroleum generation in the North Cuba Basin is primarily the result of thrust loading of Jurassic and Cretaceous source rocks during formation of the North Cuba fold and thrust belt in the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene. The fold and thrust belt formed as Cuban arc-forearc rocks along the leading edge of the Caribbean plate translated northward during the opening of the Yucatan Basin and collided with the passive margin of southern North America in the Paleogene. Petroleum fluids generated during thrust loading migrated vertically into complex structures in the fold and thrust belt, into structures in the foreland basin, and possibly into carbonate reservoirs along the margins of the Yucatan and Bahama carbonate platforms. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defined a Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) and three assessment units (AU)-North Cuba Fold and Thrust Belt AU, North Cuba Foreland Basin AU, and the North Cuba Platform Margin Carbonate AU-within this TPS based mainly on structure and reservoir type (fig. 1). There is considerable geologic uncertainty as to the extent of petroleum migration that might have occurred within this TPS to form potential petroleum accumulations. Taking this geologic uncertainty into account, especially in the offshore area, the mean volumes of undiscovered resources in the composite TPS of the North Cuba Basin are estimated at (1) 4.6 billion barrels of oil (BBO), with means ranging from an F95 probability of 1 BBO to an F5 probability of 9 BBO; and (2) 8.6 trillion cubic feet of of gas (TCFG), of which 8.6 TCFG is associated with oil fields, and about 1.2 TCFG is in nonassociated gas fields in the North Cuba Foreland Basin AU.

  10. Delayed triggering of the 2012 Mw 8.6 Wharton Basin earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuti, S. S.; Barbot, S.

    2014-12-01

    The April 2012 Mw 8.6 Wharton Basin earthquake, followed by a magnitude 8.2 aftershock, is the largest ever instrumentally recorded strike-slip earthquake. The large magnitude event culminated a sustained strike-slip seismic activity in the diffuse boundary between the Indian and Australian plates and it reactivated some fracture zones of the Wharton Basin, previously simple structural discontinuities, into active faults. Previous studies (Delescluse et al., 2012; Wiseman and Burgmann et al., 2012) have shown the importance of the static Coulomb stress change due to the 2004 Mw 9.2 Aceh-Andaman and the 2005 Mw 8.6 Nias earthquakes in the triggering of the 2012 main shock. However, the mechanism responsible for the 7-year delay remains unclear. Here, we investigate the role of viscoelastic relaxation in the oceanic asthenosphere and aseismic slip on the N-S oriented reactivated fracture zones in the Wharton basin to explain the triggering mechanism. The deformation in the oceanic plate transitions from localized frictional sliding in the lithosphere to more distributed flow in the asthenosphere. There, the time-dependent deformation following large stress perturbations may induce significant stress changes at larger distances than coseismically. Similarly, if some fracture zones in the Wharton Basin have been reactivated into active faults, they may serve as efficient stress guides between the Sunda megathrust and the epicentral area of the 2012 event. To test these hypotheses, we use Relax (Barbot & Fialko, 2010), a numerical method that can evaluate coseismic and postseismic stress evolution using a realistic representation of the Sumatra subduction zone geometry and the Wharton Basin fracture zones, and rheological parameters inferred from laboratory experiments. Using typical parameters for power-law flow (Brace & Kohlstedt, 1980) and rate-strengthening friction (Marone et al, 1991), we infer the changes in confining pressure, shear stress and Coulomb stress

  11. Pre- to syncollisional sedimentation in the Middle Jurassic to Cretaceous Methow-Tyaughton Basin, northern Washington, southwestern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Garver, J.I. ); Umhoefer, P.J. ); McGroder, M.F. ); Bourgeois, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Palinspastic reconstruction of Cretaceous to Tertiary dextral-slip faults restores the Methow-Tyaughton basin to a 300+ km-long basin that contains Middle Jurassic to middle Cretaceous strata. Sedimentary rocks and structures within the basin record a transition from sedimentation on the western margin of the intermontane terrane to sedimentation within an actively deforming collision zone along the Intermontane and Insular terrane boundary in the middle Cretaceous. Following Middle Jurassic terrane amalgamation, the Methow-Tyaughton was a short-lived fore-arc basin in the Callovian. Oxfordian-Valanginian sedimentation was marked by low depositional rates of volcanic and plutonic debris, probably along a transform-rift margin. Hauterivian-Aptian sedimentary rocks are generally fine-grained turbidite packages with minor interbedded tuffs, and volcanic rocks are interbedded at the western basin margin. Hauterivian rocks reflect a change to a back-arc basin setting. Albian contraction within the basement Bridge River and Cadwallader terranes resulted in an intrabasinal uplift that supplied chert-rich detritus to two flanking subbasins. At the same time, west-derived, volcanic detritus shed off the volcanic cover to the Insular terrane, and east-derived arkosic sediment shed off the Omineca Crystalline belt. Tectonic subsidence and basin infilling occurred from about 110 to 95 Ma, capped by a thick sequence of nonmarine clastic rocks and andesites. Intrabasin deformation occurred from about 100 to 85 ma. After the termination of andesitic volcanism and contractional deformation the basin was cut by dextral-slip faults (post 85 Ma) that likely were driven by oblique Kula-North America interaction.

  12. A tectonically controlled basin-fill within the Valle del Cauca, West-Central Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Rine, J.M.; Keith, J.F. Jr.; Alfonso, C.A.; Ballesteros, I.; Laverde, F.; Sacks, P.E.; Secor, D.T. Jr. ); Perez, V.E.; Bernal, I.; Cordoba, F.; Numpaque, L.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Tertiary strata of the Valle del Cauca reflect a forearc/foreland basin tectonic history spanning a period from pre-uplift of the Cordillera Central to initiation of uplift of the Cordillera Occidental. Stratigraphy of the Valle del Cauca begins with Jurassic-Cretaceous rocks of exotic and/or volcanic provenance and of oceanic origin. Unconformably overlying these are Eocene to Oligocene basal quartz-rich sandstones, shallow marine algal limestones, and fine-grained fluvial/deltaic mudstones and sandstones with coalbeds. These Eocene to Oligocene deposits represent a period of low tectonic activity. During late Oligocene to early Miocene, increased tectonic activity produced conglomeratic sediments which were transported from east to west, apparently derived from uplift of the Cordillera Central, and deposited within a fluvial to deltaic setting. East-west shortening of the Valle del Cauca basin folded the Eocene to early Miocene units, and additional uplift of the Cordillera Central during the later Miocene resulted in syn-tectonic deposition of alluvial fans. After additional fold and thrust deformation of the total Eocene-Miocene basin-fill, tectonic activity abated and Pliocene-Quaternary alluvial and lacustrine strata were deposited. Within the framework of this depositional and tectonic history of the Valle del Cauca, hydrocarbon exploration strategies can be formulated and evaluated.

  13. Evolution of the late Paleozoic accretionary complex and overlying forearc-magmatic arc, south central Chile (38°-41°S): Constraints for the tectonic setting along the southwestern margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Mark W.; Kato, Terence T.; Rodriguez, Carolina; Godoy, Estanislao; Duhart, Paul; McDonough, Michael; Campos, Alberto

    1999-08-01

    lithologies from Late Triassic shallow marine to continental deposits suggests that substantial uplift also affected the inner forearc and magmatic arc region during the D2 event. We propose that dextral-oblique convergence, initiated during the middle Permian along this segment of the Gondwana margin, resulted in the transpressional uplift and juxtaposition of high pressure/temperature (P/T) Western Series against low P/T Eastern Series lithologies and culminated with deposition of Late Triassic, continental to shallow marine, coarse clastic sedimentary rocks in fault-bounded strike-slip basins adjacent to the exhumed Western Series. Large-scale dextral transpression and northward displacement of the accretionary complex during Late Permian to Late Triassic time along the Chilean margin of Gondwana are synchronous and kinematically compatible with widespread regional transpression, extension, and silicic magmatism inboard of the southern Gondwana margin at this time. We thank C. Mpodozis, M. Gardeweg, and J. Muñoz of the Servicio de Geología y Minería de Chile (SERNAGEOMIN) for their support of this work. Fruitful discussions with N. Blanco, F. Hervé, H. Moreno, C. Mpodozis, and F. Munizaga have aided in our understanding of the geology of the region. The hard work by the staff of SERNAGEOMIN's Puerto Varas office is graciously appreciated. We thank J.D. Walker and W.R. Van Schmus at the University of Kansas for allowing MWM use of their U-Pb and mass spectrometer facilities and J. Vargas and the staff of SERNAGEOMIN's geochemistry laboratory for their assistance in this project. F. Munizaga allowed us to cite an unpublished 40Ar-39Ar date. We thank G. Ya˜nez for access to aeromagnetic data. T. Kato wishes to thank W. G. Ernst. Comments by I. Dalziel, S. Kay, and V. Ramos helped clarify ideas presented in this paper and are greatly appreciated. This work is dedicated to our friend and colleague Alberto Campos C., who died in a climbing accident on Calbuco Volcano, 1996.

  14. Active seismic and microseismic reflection imaging of the Precordilleran crust, fore-arc of the North-Chilean subduction zone (Central Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenske, Ina; Hellwig, Olaf; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Buske, Stefan; Kummerow, Jörn; Wigger, Peter; Shapiro, Serge A.

    2013-04-01

    In the fore-arc of the Chilean subduction zone, prominent trench-parallel fault systems can be traced for more than thousand kilometers in north-south direction. These fault systems possibly crosscut parts or the entire crust and are expected to have a close relationship to transient processes of the subduction earthquake cycle. With the motivation to image and characterize the structural inventory and the processes that occur in the vicinity of these large-scale fault zones, we are currently performing a combined analysis of active and passive seismic data sets. The active-seismic data analysis is intended to provide images of the faults at depth and allow linking surface information to subsurface structures. The correlation of the active seismic data with the observed seismicity around these fault systems complements the imaging and potentially reveals the origin and the nature of the seismicity (incl. tremors) bound to these fault systems. Furthermore, reflection information extracted from passive-seismic waveform data has the potential to complement the active seismic imaging. In 1996, an approximately 350 km long west-east running reflection seismic profile was acquired to image the entire crust of the Central Andean fore-arc system (North Chile; ANCORP96 seismic line). Several features such as the downgoing plate (Nazca reflector) and the Quebrada Blanca Bright Spot at mid-crustal level were clearly imaged using both standard CMP processing and Kirchhoff prestack depth migration. The latter proved to be more successful in coping with the low data coverage and varying data quality. However, the original images were not providing conclusive information on the upper crust (< 10 km depth) due to the sparse acquisition geometry and the partly insufficient removal of source-generated noise. The major goal of our current re-processing of the ANCORP96 reflection seismic data set using adapted noise-suppression schemes and a novel prestack depth migration technique

  15. Evaluating upper versus lower crustal extension through structural reconstructions and subsidence analysis of basins adjacent to the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, eastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz, Guy; Mann, Paul

    2013-06-01

    The D'Entrecasteaux Island (DEI) gneiss domes are fault-bounded domes with ~2.5 km of relief exposing ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) and high-pressure (HP) metamorphic gneisses and migmatites exhumed in an Oligocene-Miocene arc-continent collision and subduction zone subject to late Miocene to recent continental extension. Multichannel seismic reflection data and well data show the Trobriand basin formed as a fore-arc basin caused by southward Miocene subduction at the Trobriand trench. Subduction slowed at ~8 Ma as the margin transitioned to an extensional tectonic environment. Since then, the Trobriand basin has subsided 1-2.5 km as a broad sag basin with few normal faults deforming the basin fill. South of the DEI, the Goodenough rift basin developed after extension began (~8 Ma) as the hanging wall of the north-dipping Owen-Stanley normal fault that bounds the basin's southern margin. The lack of upper crustal extension accompanying subsidence in the Trobriand and Goodenough basins suggests depth-dependent lithospheric extension since 8 Ma has accompanied uplift of the DEI gneiss domes. Structural reconstructions of seismic profiles show 2.3-13.4 km of basin extension in the upper crust, while syn-rift basin subsidence values indicate at least 20.7-23.6 km of extension occurred in the entire crust since ~8 Ma. Results indicating thinning is preferentially accommodated in the lower crust surrounding the DEI are used to constrain a schematic model of uplift of the DEI domes involving vertical exhumation of buoyant, postorogenic lower crust, far-field extension from slab rollback, and an inverted two-layer crustal density structure.

  16. Forearc deformation and strain partitioning during growth of a continental magmatic arc: The northwestern margin of the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žák, Jiří; Dragoun, František; Verner, Kryštof; Chlupáčová, Marta; Holub, František V.; Kachlík, Václav

    2009-04-01

    The Late Devonian subduction followed by the Early Carboniferous continental collision of the Saxothuringian and overriding upper-crustal Teplá-Barrandian units led to the growth of a large magmatic arc (the ˜ 354-337 Ma Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex) in the central part of the Bohemian Massif. Far-field tectonic forces resulting from the collision produced ˜WNW-ESE to ˜NW-SE regional shortening across the forearc upper crust above the subduction zone; the shortening was accommodated by predominantly top-to-the-ESE tectonic transport along the southeastern flank of the Teplá-Barrandian unit. Approaching the magmatic arc margin, the regional structural pattern changes and exhibits significant across- and along-strike variations interpreted as a result of strain partitioning, where the Saxothuringian/Teplá-Barrandian convergence interacted in different ways with the intruding magma pulses. Around the voluminous, northeasterly ˜ 354 Ma Sázava pluton the principal shortening was at high angle to the forearc-facing intrusive contact and the host rocks were significantly thermally softened. The regional top-to-the-ESE tectonic transport converted here into arc-parallel ductile flow within the structural aureole around and above the pluton. In contrast, a narrow to nonexistent ductile strain aureole is preserved in the host rocks around discordant sheet-like plutons (the southwesterly pre-354 (?) Ma Marginal granite and the Milín granodiorite of unknown radiometric age). Our AMS study of the Marginal granite and Milín granodiorite, and mapping of mesoscopic magmatic foliations and lineations in another neighboring sheet-like pluton (the ˜ 346 Ma Kozárovice granodiorite), reveals sigmoidal map-scale fabric patterns consistent with dextral transpression. We thus suggest that the thin sheet-like plutons were oriented obliquely to the principal shortening and were rheologically weaker than the host rocks prior to final crystallization, producing dextral

  17. Zircon U-Pb age of the Pescadero felsite: A late Cretaceous igneous event in the forearc, west-central California Coast Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ernst, W.G.; Martens, U.C.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Clark, J.C.; Moore, Diane E.

    2011-01-01

    forearc units of the Transverse Ranges. Based on zircon U-Pb ages, geologic and petrographic relations, the Pescadero felsite and a capping, sheared metaconglomerate underlie the Pigeon Point Formation. We infer that the magma formed by anatexis of Franciscan or Great Valley clastic sedimentary rocks originating from a parental Mesozoic Sierran-Mojave-Salinian calcalkaline arc. The felsite erupted during Late Cretaceous time, was metamorphosed to pumpellyite-prehnite grade within the subduction zone, and then was rapidly exhumed, weakly zeolitized, and exposed before Pigeon Point forearc deposition. Pescadero vol canism apparently reflects a previously unrecognized ca. 86-90 Ma felsic igneous event in the accretionary margin. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  18. Reserves in Western Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of overpressured tight (OPT) gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins. These are the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB), Uinta Basin and Piceance Basin. By documenting productive characteristics in these basins and characterizing the nature of the vast gas resources in place, the reserves potential may be understood and quantified. Through this understanding, it is hoped that the oil and gas industry will be encouraged to pursue exploitation of this resource. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and the final report submitted for publication. Work on the Uinta basin has just commenced and work on the Piceance basin will commence next year. Since the GGRB portion of this project has been completed, further discussion centers upon this Basin.

  19. Sequence stratigraphy, tectonics and hydrocarbon trap geometries of Middle Tertiary strata in the southern San Joaquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.; Hewlett, J.S.; Bazeley, W.J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Tectonic evolution of the southern San Joaquin basin exerted a fundamental control on Cenozoic sequence boundary development, reservoir, source and seal facies distribution, and hydrocarbon trap development. Spatial and temporal variations in Tertiary sequence architecture across the basin reflect differences in eastside versus westside basin-margin geometries and deformation histories. Deposition of Tertiary sequences initiated in a forearc basin setting, bounded on the east by a ramp-margin adjacent to the eroded Sierran arc complex and on the west by the imbricated accretionary wedge of the Coast Ranges thrust. The major stages of Cenozoic basin evolution are: (1) Episodic compressional folding and thrusting associated with oblique convergence of the Farallon and North American plates (Late Cretaceous to Oligocene), (2) localized folding and onset of basin subsidence related to Pacific Plate reorganization, microplate formation and rotation (Oligocene to Early Miocene), (3) transtensional faulting, folding basin subsidence associated with initiation of the San Andreas transform and continued microplate rotation (Micocene to Pliocene), and (4) compressional folding, extensional and strike- slip faulting related to evolution of the Pacific-North American transform boundary (Plio- Pleistocene). Complex stratigraphic relationships within Eocene to Middle Miocene rocks provide examples of tectonic influences on sequence architecture. These include development of: (1) Tectonically enhanced sequence boundaries (Early Eocene base Domengine unconformity) and local mid-sequence angular unconformities, (2) westside-derived syntectonic {open_quotes}lowstand{close_quotes} systems (Yokut/Turitella Silt wedge and Leda Sand/Cymric/Salt Creek wedge), (3) regional seals associated with subsidence-related transgressions (Round Mountain Silt), and (4) combination traps formed by structural inversion of distal lowstand delta reservoirs (e.g. Coalinga East Extension field).

  20. Sequence stratigraphy, tectonics and hydrocarbon trap geometries of Middle Tertiary strata in the southern San Joaquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.; Hewlett, J.S. ); Bazeley, W.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Tectonic evolution of the southern San Joaquin basin exerted a fundamental control on Cenozoic sequence boundary development, reservoir, source and seal facies distribution, and hydrocarbon trap development. Spatial and temporal variations in Tertiary sequence architecture across the basin reflect differences in eastside versus westside basin-margin geometries and deformation histories. Deposition of Tertiary sequences initiated in a forearc basin setting, bounded on the east by a ramp-margin adjacent to the eroded Sierran arc complex and on the west by the imbricated accretionary wedge of the Coast Ranges thrust. The major stages of Cenozoic basin evolution are: (1) Episodic compressional folding and thrusting associated with oblique convergence of the Farallon and North American plates (Late Cretaceous to Oligocene), (2) localized folding and onset of basin subsidence related to Pacific Plate reorganization, microplate formation and rotation (Oligocene to Early Miocene), (3) transtensional faulting, folding basin subsidence associated with initiation of the San Andreas transform and continued microplate rotation (Micocene to Pliocene), and (4) compressional folding, extensional and strike- slip faulting related to evolution of the Pacific-North American transform boundary (Plio- Pleistocene). Complex stratigraphic relationships within Eocene to Middle Miocene rocks provide examples of tectonic influences on sequence architecture. These include development of: (1) Tectonically enhanced sequence boundaries (Early Eocene base Domengine unconformity) and local mid-sequence angular unconformities, (2) westside-derived syntectonic [open quotes]lowstand[close quotes] systems (Yokut/Turitella Silt wedge and Leda Sand/Cymric/Salt Creek wedge), (3) regional seals associated with subsidence-related transgressions (Round Mountain Silt), and (4) combination traps formed by structural inversion of distal lowstand delta reservoirs (e.g. Coalinga East Extension field).

  1. Meso- and microscale vein structures in fore-arc basalts and boninites related to post-magmatic tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quandt, Dennis; Micheuz, Peter; Kurz, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 352 aimed to drill through the entire volcanic sequence of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc. Two drill sites are situated on the outer fore arc composed of fore arc basalts (FAB) whereas two more sites are located on the upper trench slope penetrating the younger boninites. First results from IODP Expedition 352 and preliminary post-cruise data suggest that FAB were generated by decompression melting during near-trench sea-floor spreading, and that fluids from the subducting slab were not involved in their genesis. Subduction zone fluids involved in boninite genesis appear to have been derived from progressively higher temperatures and pressures over time as the subducting slab thermally matured. Structures within the drill cores combined with borehole and site survey seismic data indicate that tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc is mainly post-magmatic associated with the development of syn-tectonic sedimentary basins. Within the magmatic basement deformation was accommodated by shear along cataclastic fault zones and the formation of tension fractures, shear fractures and hybrid (tension and shear) fractures. Veins form by mineral filling of tension or hybrid fractures and show no or limited observable macroscale displacement along the fracture plane. (Low Mg-) Calcite and/or various types of zeolite are the major vein constituents, where the latter are considered to be alteration products of basaltic glass. Micrite contents vary significantly and are related to neptunian dikes. In boninites calcite develops mainly blocky shapes but veins with fibrous and stretched crystals also occur in places indicating antitaxial as well as ataxial growth, respectively. In FAB calcite forms consistently blocky crystals without any microscopic identifiable growth direction suggesting precipitation from a highly supersaturated fluid under dropping fluid pressure conditions. However, fluid pressure

  2. A slow-slipping active fold and thrust system at the SE corner of the Atacama basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Shyu, J. H.; González, G.

    2009-12-01

    The western South American offshore is one of the major active convergent plate boundaries in the world, where the Nazca plate is subducting northeastward beneath the South American plate at a rate of about 84 mm/yr. Despite of this rapid plate convergence, the forearc region of western Andes does not seem to undergo large deformation at present. In order to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of active forearc deformation related to the plate convergence, we investigated tectono-geomorphic features in the area of Tilocalar, near the SE margin of the Atacama Basin in northern Chile, where active structures have been previously identified. To map topographic features produced by active structures, we used a combination of several remote-sensing data sets, including digital elevation models (DEM) made from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM), as well as higher resolution ASTER and QuickBird satellite images. Detailed geomorphic surveys using real time kinematic (RTK) GPS are carried out in the field to obtain high-resolution topographic profiles across these features. We also performed 40Ar/39Ar dating of deformed volcanic rocks in order to determine the long-term slip rates of the active structures. The hyper-aridity of the Atacama Basin results in extremely low erosion and sedimentation rates in the area. As a result, the present relief of land surface is mostly produced by neotectonic activity, and can be used as deformation marker. In the Tilocalar area, several N-S trending ridges are present. These ridges, generally several tens of meters high, are likely formed by asymmetric anticlines or monoclines with steep forelimbs facing east, and these folds are likely fault-propagation folds produced by underlying thrust faults. We suggest that these faults merge at depth to become a major active thrust system. From 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, we found that the surface ignimbrites mostly deposited in latest Pliocene (2.3~4.3 Ma). If the structures have been

  3. Deep long-period earthquakes west of the volcanic arc in Oregon: evidence of serpentine dehydration in the fore-arc mantle wedge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vidale, John E.; Schmidt, David A.; Malone, Stephen D.; Hotovec-Ellis, Alicia J.; Moran, Seth C.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Houston, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Here we report on deep long-period earthquakes (DLPs) newly observed in four places in western Oregon. The DLPs are noteworthy for their location within the subduction fore arc: 40–80 km west of the volcanic arc, well above the slab, and near the Moho. These “offset DLPs” occur near the top of the inferred stagnant mantle wedge, which is likely to be serpentinized and cold. The lack of fore-arc DLPs elsewhere along the arc suggests that localized heating may be dehydrating the serpentinized mantle wedge at these latitudes and causing DLPs by dehydration embrittlement. Higher heat flow in this region could be introduced by anomalously hot mantle, associated with the western migration of volcanism across the High Lava Plains of eastern Oregon, entrained in the corner flow proximal to the mantle wedge. Alternatively, fluids rising from the subducting slab through the mantle wedge may be the source of offset DLPs. As far as we know, these are among the first DLPs to be observed in the fore arc of a subduction-zone system.

  4. Results from SCS Profiling of the Sumatra accretionary prism: insights into tsnamigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D.; Mosher, D.; Austin, J.; Gulick, S.; Moran, K.; Masterlark, T.

    2007-12-01

    The SEATOS high resolution single-channel seismic reflection survey of the Sumatran accretionary prism depicts a landward-vergent thrust front, with active folding characterizing part of the December 2004 Mw9.2 earthquake rupture zone. Structure and bathymetry co-vary at distinct wavelengths along a 220-km-long profile crossing the prism and the Aceh (forearc) Basin. At the largest wavelength (tens of kms), the prism surface is defined by a steep (8-12 degrees), 55-km-wide outer slope, a 110-km-wide upper slope forming a broad depression between two forearc highs, and a 25 km-wide, steep inner slope between the landward high and the forearc basin. Anticlinal ridges spaced ~13 km apart display landward- and seaward-vergent folds along the inner and outer slopes, respectively; symmetric folding occurs across the upper slope. We suggest that the long-wavelength variations are consistent with the existence of a strong inner wedge beneath the upper slope. The ~13 km anticline spacing implies deformation of a slope apron deforming independently of this stronger wedge interior. Seismic profiles crossing the toe of the prism image a series of landward vergent, fault-related folds, suggesting that the shallow fill of the Sunda Trench is delaminated from the predominantly seaward-vergent plate boundary system and is uptilted along a triangle zone. Profiles crossing the seaward flank of the Aceh Basin reveal a near- vertical, undulatory deformation front that appears to mark the location of the West Andaman-Mentawai right- lateral strike-slip fault zone. Our model for prism architecture based on these geophysical results involves advance of the strong inner wedge during great earthquakes like the 2004 event, which then peels up shallower and less competent trench fill, deforming the toe and the upper slope of the forearc, producing massive uplift that is likely tsunamigenic. Seismic rupture was limited to the megathrust westward of the West Andaman fault and ROV observations

  5. Devonian shelf basin, Michigan basin, Alpena region

    SciTech Connect

    Gutschick, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    This biostratigraphic study involves the Devonian paleogeography-paleoecology-paleobathymetry of the transition from carbonate platform shelf margin to basinal sedimentation for the northern part of the Michigan basin in the Alpena region. Shelf-basin analysis is based on lithofacies, rock colors, concretion, biostratigraphy, paleoecology of faunas - especially microfaunas and trace fossils - stratified water column, eustasy, and application of Walther's Law. Field observations were made on Partridge Point along Lake Huron, where type sections of the Middle Devonian Thunder Bay Limestone and Late Devonian Squaw Bay Limestone are exposed; and the Antrim black shale at Paxton quarry. The Thunder Bay Limestone evolved as a carbonate platform, subtidal shelf-margin aerobic environment dominated by sessile benthic coralline organisms and shelly fauna, but not reef framework. The Squaw Bay Limestone is transitional shelf to basin, with aspects of slope environment and deeper water off-platform, pelagic organic biostromal molluscan-conodont carbonate deposited during the onset of a stratified water column (dysaerobic benthos-polychaete. agglutinated tubes, sulfides) and pycnocline. The Antrim Shale, in an exceptional black shale exposure in the Paxton quarry, represents deep-water basinal deposition whose bottom waters lacked oxygen. Faunas (conodonts, styliolines, radiolarians) and floras (tasmanitids, calamitids, palynomorphs) are from the aerobic pelagic realm, as indicated from concretions and shale fossil evidence. A benthos is lacking, except for bioturbation from organisms introduced by entrained oxygenated distal turbidite dispersion into the barren bottom black muds. Basinal hydrocarbon source rocks are abundant and updip carbonate reservoirs rim the basin. The Antrim Shale sequence contains the interval of Frasnian-Famennian faunal extinction.

  6. Origin of cratonic basins

    SciTech Connect

    de V. Klein, G.; Hsui, A.T.

    1987-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520-460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530-500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation, histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian supercontinent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

  7. The stratigraphy, geochronology and paleophysiography of a Miocene fresh-water interarc basin, southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, M.; Emparan, C.

    1995-01-01

    During Miocene time, the Andean region between 38° and 39°S was an area where active volcanoes, lakes and rivers formed under a temperate to cold humid climate. The volcanic products and sedimentary deposits which accumulated in lakes and rivers adjacent to the volcanoes constitute the Cura-Mallín Formation. The deep roots of the volcanic chain are represented by middle to late Miocene granitoids which formed a north-south trending belt that separated a marine fore-arc basin (Temuco basin) to the west from the continental sedimentary deposits of the Cura-Mallín Formation to the east. Twenty-three KAr dates ranging between 20 and 11 Ma, constrain the age of the Cura-Mallin Formation to the early to middle Miocene. The alternation of pyroclastic strata and lava flows in the Guapitrío Member of the Cura-Mallín Formation suggests the former existence of strato-volcanoes, whilst the presence of ignimbrites suggests caldera formation. A major lacustrine basin ( >100 km long) represented by some facies of the Rio Pedregoso Member of the Cura-Mallín Formation existed from at least 17.5 ± 0.6 to 13 ± 1.6 Ma. Lacustrine accumulations terminated during the progradation of deltas and infilling of volcanic material. The Cura-Mallín Formation lakes could have been formed, in part, by intra-arc extension, by the damming of rivers caused by volcanic products and/or by the filling of calderas. The occurrence of Gilbert-type delta complexes in the Rio Pedregoso Member may indicate a steep basin margin generated by faulting and/or volcanic accretion.

  8. Northwest Basin and Range tectonic deformation observed with the Global Positioning System, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, W.C.; Thatcher, W.

    2005-01-01

    We use geodetic velocities obtained with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to quantify tectonic deformation of the northwest Basin and Range province of the western United States. The results are based on GPS data collected in 1999 and 2003 across five new quasi-linear networks in northern Nevada, northeast California, and southeast Oregon. The velocities show ???3 mm/yr westward movement of northern Nevada with respect to stable North America. West of longitude 119??W the velocities increase and turn northwest, parallel to Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate motion, and similar to velocities previously obtained to the south. The observations are explained by a kinematic model with three domains that rotate around Euler poles in eastern Oregon and western Idaho. Northeast California experiences internal dextral shear deformation (11.2 ?? 3.6 nstrain/yr) subparallel to Pacific/North America motion. Relative motions of the domains imply 2-5 mm/yr approximately east-west extension in northwest Nevada and 1-4 mm/yr approximately north-south contraction near the California/Oregon border. The northward decreasing approximately east-west extension in northwest Nevada is consistent with the northern termination of Basin and Range deformation, faulting and characteristic topography. No significant extension is detected in the Oregon Basin and Range. The Oregon Cascade arc moves north at ???3.5 mm/yr and is possibly influenced by the approximately eastward motion of the Juan de Fuca plate. These results disagree with secular northwest trenchward motion of the Oregon forearc inferred from paleomagnetic rotations. South of latitude 43??, however, trenchward motion exists and is consistent with block rotations, approximately east-west Basin and Range extension, and northwest Sierra Nevada translation. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Structural characteristics of an active fold-and-thrust system in the southeastern Atacama Basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Sheng; Chuang, Yi-Rung; Shyu, J. Bruce H.; González, Gabriel; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lo, Ching-Hua; Liou, Ya-Hsuan

    2016-08-01

    The western South American margin is one of the most active plate boundaries in the world. Using various remote sensing data sets, we mapped the neotectonic characteristics of an area at the southeastern corner of the Atacama Basin, northern Chile, in the Andean forearc. There, one major N-S trending ridge is clearly visible both in the satellite images and in the field. This ridge reaches 250 m above the basin floor in its middle part and is asymmetrical, with a steep eastern slope and a much gentler western slope. The geometry of the ridge indicates that it formed as an asymmetrical anticline. This anticline is likely formed as a shear fault-bend fold, with a major décollement at a depth of about 2.5 km in the Naranja Formation. We suggest that this décollement is a major structure of the Atacama Basin area. From the ages of the ignimbrites and lake deposits that were deformed by this anticline, we obtained a long-term shortening rate of the major underlying structure at about 0.2 mm/yr. This thin-skinned fold-and-thrust system appears to be active since at least about 3 Ma, and could be as long as since middle Miocene. Therefore, crustal structures may play important roles in the Neogene development of the western Andean margin.

  10. Origin of cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev. Klein, George; Hsui, Albert T.

    1987-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520 460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530 500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Resurgent Permian rifting in the Illinois Basin is inferred because of intrusion of well-dated Permian alnoites; such intrusive rocks are normally associated with rifting processes. The process of formation of these cratonic basins remains controversial. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation (around 550 to 500 Ma), histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian super-continent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

  11. Interplay between regional uplift and glacio-eustasy in the Crotone Basin (Calabria, southern Italy) since 0.45 Ma: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecchin, Massimo; Caffau, Mauro; Ceramicola, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    During the last 0.45 Ma, the Crotone Basin, a forearc basin located on the Ionian side of Calabria, southern Italy, experienced a phase of uplift that persists today. The transition from subsidence to uplift occurred close to the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 (ca. 0.4 Ma). The subsequent progressive emergence of the area was punctuated by several marine transgressions linked to high-frequency, high-magnitude glacio-eustatic changes, which are recorded as coastal terraces. These high-frequency sequences show a variable stacking pattern due to the interplay between glacio-eustasy, uplift and local physiography. In particular, a progressive SE-ward migration of the shoreline is documented in the study area since MIS 11. This trend was enhanced during the MIS 5.5 to MIS 2 time interval, due to the combined effect of uplift and lowering glacio-eustatic sea level until the Last Glacial Maximum. Moreover, the regional uplift also led to a physiographic change from relatively low-gradient to high-gradient settings between MIS 7.1 and MIS 5.5. A comparison between the late Quaternary geological record of the Crotone Basin and that of other basins is crucial to improve the present knowledge on past sea levels related to MISs. This ultimately will help to better understand the Holocene sea-level history and the human contribution to sea-level change, in order to predict future scenarios.

  12. Paleozoic evolution of active margin basins in the southern Central Andes (northwestern Argentina and northern Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.; Breitkreuz, C.

    originated as an extensional structure at the continental margin of Gondwana. Independent lines of evidence imply that basin evolution was not connected to subduction. Thus, the basin could not have been in a fore-arc position as previously postulated. Above the folded Devonian-Early Carboniferous strata, a continental volcanic arc developed from the Late Carboniferous to the Middle Triassic. It represents the link between the Choiyoi Province in central Chile and Argentina, and the Mitu Group rift in southern Peru. The volcanic arc succession is characterized by the prevalence of silicic lavas and tuffs and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks. During the latest Carboniferous, a thick ostracod-bearing lacustrine unit formed in an extended lake in the area of the Depresión Preandina. This lake basin originated in an intra-arc tensional setting. During the Early Permian, marine limestones were deposited on a marine platform west and east of the volcanic arc, connected to the depositional area of the Copacabana Formation in southern Peru.

  13. Reserves in western basins

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  14. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, S.S.N.; Umino, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ???30?? at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  15. Southward trench migration at ∼130-120 Ma caused accretion of the Neo-Tethyan forearc lithosphere in Tibetan ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Griffin, William L.; Zheng, Jian-Ping; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Pearson, Norman J.; Xu, Bo; Belousova, Elena A.

    2016-03-01

    The preservation of ultrahigh-pressure and super-reduced phases (diamond, moissanite, etc.) in the harzburgites and chromitites of the Yarlung Zangbo ophiolites (South Tibet, China) has major implications for mantle recycling and lithosphere evolution in the tectonic system related to the closing of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. However, important aspects of the genesis of these enigmatic ophiolites and the related geodynamic evolution are still unclear. In the Zedang ophiolite of the eastern Yarlung Zangbo Suture, detailed mineral chemical data reveal that the harzburgite domain in the east [spinel Cr# (mole Cr3+/(Cr3+ + Al3+) = 0.62-0.33] is more depleted than the lherzolite domain in the west (spinel Cr# = 0.30-0.17) and shows much lower equilibration temperatures (by ∼250-150 °C) than the lherzolites. Clinopyroxene trace-element compositions indicate that the harzburgites underwent pervasive metasomatism after melt extraction, while the lherzolites did not. New zircon U-Pb ages show that the harzburgites were intruded by dolerite dykes with chilled margins at ∼130-128 Ma, consistent with the widespread mafic magmatism at ∼130-120 Ma in the Yarlung Zangbo ophiolites. Nd-Hf isotopic data indicate that the Zedang lherzolites subcreted the pre-emplaced harzburgites concurrently with the intrusion of the dolerite dykes into the harzburgites, and that the lherzolites and dolerites both were derived from upwelling asthenosphere with minor slab input. Available zircon geochronology and Hf-isotope data show that juvenile magmatism in the adjacent Gangdese Arc was almost completely interrupted from ∼130-120 Ma. We suggest that the extension of the overlying harzburgitic lithosphere, subcretion of lherzolites, intrusion of mafic dykes, and the waning of Gangdese-Arc magmatism all reflect a southward trench migration in the Neo-Tethyan subduction system from the Gangdese Arc to the oceanic forearc lithosphere. This magmatic relocation and tectonic linkage are inferred to

  16. Offshore double-planed shallow seismic zone in the NE Japan forearc region revealed by sP depth phases recorded by regional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, Shantha S. N.; Umino, Norihito; Hasegawa, Akira; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2009-07-01

    We detected the sP depth phase at small epicentral distances of about 150 km or more in the seismograms of shallow earthquakes in the NE Japan forearc region. The focal depths of 1078 M > 3 earthquakes that occurred from 2000 to 2006 were precisely determined using the time delay of the sP phase from the initial P-wave arrival. The distribution of relocated hypocentres clearly shows the configuration of a double-planed shallow seismic zone beneath the Pacific Ocean. The upper plane has a low dip angle near the Japan Trench, increasing gradually to ~30° at approximately 100 km landward of the Japan Trench. The lower plane is approximately parallel to the upper plane, and appears to be the near-trench counterpart of the lower plane of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The distance between the upper and lower planes is 28-32 km, which is approximately the same as or slightly smaller than that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. Focal mechanism solutions of the relocated earthquakes are determined from P-wave initial motion data. Although P-wave initial motion data for these offshore events are not ideally distributed on the focal sphere, we found that the upper-plane events that occur near the Japan Trench are characterized by normal faulting, whereas lower-plane events are characterized by thrust faulting. This focal mechanism distribution is the opposite to that of the double-planed deep seismic zone beneath the land area. The characteristics of these focal mechanisms for the shallow and deep doubled-planed seismic zones can be explained by a bending-unbending model of the subducting Pacific plate. Some of relocated earthquakes took place in the source area of the 1933 Mw8.4 Sanriku earthquake at depths of 10-23 km. The available focal mechanisms for these events are characterized by normal faulting. Given that the 1933 event was a large normal-fault event that occurred along a fault plane dipping landward, the

  17. Mesozoic fault systems, deformation and fault block rotation in the Andean forearc: a crustal scale strike-slip duplex in the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. K.; Grocott, J.; Pope, A.; Randall, D. E.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the evolution and tectonic significance of the Mesozoic trench-parallel fault systems which affected the Coastal Cordillera and their relation to magmatism and crustal rotation. The oldest, extensional, fault system separates basement from rift-related Late Triassic and younger sedimentary units. This system [I] subsequently developed into a wider extensional fault system which acted as the locus of magma ascent and emplacement of the Coastal Batholith during much of the Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous period. This extensional fault system defined the forearc sliver during this period and was the consequence of a retreating subduction boundary. During the Early Cretaceous (c. 132-125 Ma) the kinematics of this fault system changed to transtension [II] and accommodated a major component of left-lateral strike-slip motion, the principal fault being the Atacama Fault Zone along which plutons continued to be emplaced. The final phase of pluton emplacement within the Coastal Cordillera appears to be c. 106 Ma, after which this magmatic arc and fault system was abandoned. An Late Cretaceous arc and fault system [III] developed some 20 Ma later and located some 50 km to the east in what is now the Central Valley of northern Chile. This paper seeks to show that the Coastal Cordillera was deformed as a whole by this Late Cretaceous fault system [III] which formed a crustal-scale left-lateral transpressional duplex. During this deformation the thermally weakened crust was dissected into a series of large-scale blocks bounded by NW-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults which merge into a NNE-SSW fault zone which forms the eastern boundary to the duplex. We term this eastern boundary zone the Central Valley Fault Zone (CVFZ) and this together with the NW-trending faults defines the duplex system which we refer to as a whole as the Coastal Cordillera Fault System (CCFS) [III]. We have traced the CCFS duplex between 25°S and 29°S and suspect that it

  18. Petrochemical Results for Volcanic Rocks recovered from SHINKAI 6500 diving on the Bonin Ridge (27°15'N-28°25'N): submarine extension of Ogasawara forearc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, S. H.; Kimura, J.; Stern, R. J.; Ohara, Y.; Ishii, T.; Ishizuka, O.; Haraguchi, S.; Machida, S.; Reagan, M.; Kelley, K.; Hargrove, U.; Wortel, M.; Li, Y. B.

    2004-12-01

    Four SHINKAI 6500 submersible dives (dive #823 to #826) were performed along the Bonin Ridge escarpment west of Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands in the West Pacific during May 2004, in the hopes of finding exposures of lower crust of the IBM forearc. The Ogasawara Islands are located on the Bonin ridge, exposing 48-40 Ma boninites on Chichi-jima and depleted arc tholeiite lavas of the same age on Haha-jima. These extremely depleted lavas are believed to have been generated when subduction began beneath the Izu-Bonin-Mariana oceanic arc system. Subsequent rifting (35-30 Ma) formed the Bonin Trough and a 350 km long N-S trending eastern escarpment (Bonin Ridge), where we concentrated our dives. We observed lavas and volcaniclastic sequences by the four SHINKAI dives along the escarpment, and 16 fresh basaltic to andesitic lava samples have been recovered. The first three dives appear to have sampled volcanic constructs, of presumed Oligocene age, along the escarpment, whereas the last dive sampled exposures similar to Eocene rocks of the Bonin islands, including nummulitic limestone. The lava samples were analyzed by ICP-MS at Shimane University for 30 incompatible trace elements. All samples show arc-like chemical signatures, including elevated concentrations of LIL elements, depletions in Ta and Nb, and spikes in Pb, Sr, and Li. All samples show modest enrichments in LREE. A lava sample from the northernmost dive #824 is identical with the depleted tholeiite from Haha-jima Islands at the southernmost end of the Bonin Ridge in terms of trace element characteristics. Other lava samples from northern three dives (#823, #824, #825) have tholeiitic affinities with more elevated highly incompatible elements. This suggests derivation of the series of lavas by different degree of partial melting of a similar source mantle. Samples from southernmost dive site #826, immediately northwest of Chichi-jima Islands, are boninites with U-shaped REE patterns and relatively enriched Zr and

  19. River basin administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Management of international rivers and their basins is the focus of the Centre for Comparative Studies on (International) River Basin Administration, recently established at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Water pollution, sludge, and conflicting interests in the use of water in upstream and downstream parts of a river basin will be addressed by studying groundwater and consumption of water in the whole catchment area of a river.Important aspects of river management are administrative and policy aspects. The Centre will focus on policy, law, planning, and organization, including transboundary cooperation, posing standards, integrated environmental planning on regional scale and environmental impact assessments.

  20. Tertiary Basins of Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, Peter F.; Dabrio, Cristino J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Tertiary, Spain suffered compressional collision between France and Africa, and its Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts have been further modified by extensional rifting. Because it includes sectors of two separate foreland basins, and an intervening craton with basins that have been influenced by extensional and strikeSHslip deformation, Spain provides excellent material for the development and testing of theories on the study of sedimentary basin formation and filling. This book is one of the few studies available in English of the important Tertiary geology of Spain.

  1. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  2. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  3. Transition of magma genesis estimated by change of chemical composition of Izu-bonin arc volcanism associated with spreading of Shikoku Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, S.; Ishii, T.

    2006-12-01

    Arc volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara arc is separated into first and latter term at the separate of Shikoku Basin. Middle to late Eocene early arc volcanism formed a vast terrane of boninites and island arc tholeiites that is unlike active arc systems. A following modern-style arc volcanism was active during the Oligocene, along which intense tholeiitic and calc-alkaline volcanism continued until 29Ma, before spreading of the back- arc basin. The recent arc volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara arc have started in the middle Miocene, and it is assumed that arc volcanism were decline during spreading of back-arc basin. In the northern Kyushu-Palau Ridge, submarine bottom materials were dredged during the KT95-9 and KT97-8 cruise by the R/V Tansei-maru, Ocean Research Institute, university of Tokyo, and basaltic to andesitic volcanic rocks were recovered during both cruise except for Komahashi-Daini Seamount where recovered acidic plutonic rocks. Komahashi-Daini Seamount tonalite show 37.5Ma of K-Ar dating, and this age indicates early stage of normal arc volcanism. These volcanic rocks are mainly cpx basalt to andesite. Two pyroxene basalt and andesite are only found from Miyazaki Seamount, northern end of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge. Volcanic rocks show different characteristics from first term volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara forearc rise and recent arc volcanism. The most characteristic is high content of incompatible elements, that is, these volcanics show two to three times content of incompatible elements to Komahashi-Daini Seamount tonalite and former normal arc volcanism in the Izu outer arc (ODP Leg126), and higher content than recent Izu arc volcanism. This characteristic is similar to some volcanics at the ODP Leg59 Site448 in the central Kyushu- Palau Ridge. Site448 volcanic rocks show 32-33Ma of Ar-Ar ages, which considered beginning of activity of Parece Vela Basin. It is considered that the dredged volcanic rocks are uppermost part of volcanism before spreading of

  4. Oceanic crust of the Grenada Basin in the Southern Lesser Antilles Arc Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speed, R. C.; Walker, J. A.

    1991-03-01

    Seismic refraction data permit the southern Lesser Antilles arc and surrounding regions to be divided by the velocity of their basement. We propose that high-velocity basement of the arc platform beneath the Grenadine islands and below a part of the Tobago Trough forearc basin is oceanic and continuous and was originally connected with oceanic crust of the Grenada Basin. Low-velocity basements of the Tobago terrane and the arc platform from St. Vincent north lie south and north, respectively, of the high-velocity basement of the arc platform. An oceanic origin of this high-velocity crust in the Grenadines is argued to be more plausible than an origin as unroofed lower arc crust. The segment of probable oceanic crust in the arc platform was greatly uplifted during development of the present island arc, mainly in late Neogene time, relative to the Grenada Basin and Tobago Trough. Accepting the proposition of shallow oceanic crust in the Grenadines, early middle Eocene and possibly older pillow basalts of Mayreau, the oldest rock unit of the southern Lesser Antilles arc platform, may be an exposure of such basement. Major and minor element compositions of Mayreau Basalt are indicative of a spreading rather than arc origin. The stratigraphy of the pillow basalts indicates extrusion in an open marine environment, distant or shielded from sources of arc or continental sediment, followed by a period of pelagic sedimentation above the carbonate compensation depth. The Eocene basalt and pelagic cover formed a relatively deep floor of a marine basin in which arc-derived turbidites and pelagic sediments accumulated over the succeeding 25-30 ma. Such basalts thus indicate a probable spreading origin of the Grenada Basin and an age of cessation of spreading in the region of Mayreau in Eocene time. The configuration of the Eocene basin and the direction of spreading, however, are unknowns. Regional structural relationships imply the spreading was probably backarc, an origin also

  5. Water Release from Cold Serpentinized Forearc Mantle During Subduction Associated with Changes in Incoming Oceanic Plate Thermal Structure and Plate Boundary Kinematics: New Insights into Serpentinite Belts and Plate-Boundary Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Kirby, Wang, and Brocher (Earth Planets and Space, 2014) recently showed how the change in kinematics of the California margin from subduction motion to continental transform motion with the birth and growth of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) beginning at about 33 Ma BP likely led to a warming of the former forearc mantle and the release of water from serpentinized mantle by dehydration and a likely increase in fluid pressures along the SAFS. Such a mantle source of pressurized water gives insights into both the low sliding resistance for the SAFS and the mobilization and ascent of some serpentinized mantle peridotites through the crust. Thermal modeling by others has also shown that changes in the incoming plate age and subduction rate can also lead to warming of the forearc mantle during subduction. This development gives insights into the Mesozoic and Paleogene ages of emplacement of some, but not all, California serpentinites. Recent mineralogical and geochemical observations of serpentinite blocks in serpentinize mélange bodies in the San Francisco Bay Area (Uno and Kirby, 2014 AGU Meeting and Lewis and Kirby, 2015 AGU Meeting) suggest that these rocks sustained multiple stages of serpentinization that are broadly consistent with the model of Kirby et al. (2014). A new development comes from interpretation of investigations in the literature of localized late-stage silica-carbonate-water alteration of serpentinite bodies in California that this alteration occurred largely in Neogene time when the highest rates of water release from the former forearc mantle probably occurred. This presentation also suggests that the occurrence of serpentinite belts emplaced in Cenozoic time during changing plate-boundary kinematics, such as the Cenozoic closing of the Tethys Ocean bordering Eurasia by subduction and collision and arc reversal and decreasing convergence rates under the Greater Antilles and Colombia and New Guinea, may give insights into the serpentinite

  6. Late Cenozoic geomorphologic signal of Andean forearc deformation and tilting associated with the uplift and climate changes of the Southern Atacama Desert (26°S 28°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Rodrigo; Hérail, Gérard; Martinod, Joseph; Charrier, Reynaldo; Darrozes, José

    2007-05-01

    We analyze remarkable examples of the large (˜ 10,000 km 2) and local-scale (˜ 100 km 2) landscape forms related to Late Cenozoic geomorphologic evolution of the Andean forearc region in the Southern Atacama Desert. We also consider the continental sedimentary deposits, so-called "Atacama Gravels", which are related to the degradation of the landscape during the Neogene. Our analysis integrates 1:50,000 field cartography, Landsat TM images observations, ˜ 1:1000 sedimentary logging data, and 50 m horizontal resolution topographic data to reconstruct the Late Cenozoic geomorphologic evolution of this region and discuss the factors that control it, i.e., Miocene aridification of the climate and Neogene Central Andean uplift. We determine that the Precordillera was already formed in the Oligocene and most of the present-day altitude of the Precordillera was reached before that time. Afterward, five episodes of geomorphologic evolution can be differentiated: (1) the development of an Oligocene deep incised drainage system cutting the uplifted Precordillera (up to 2000 m of vertical incision) and connecting it to the Ocean; followed by (2) the infilling of deep incised valleys by up to 400 m of Atacama Gravels. This infill started in the Early Miocene with the development of fluvial deposition and finished in the Middle Miocene with playa and playa lake depositions. We propose that playa-related deposition occurs in an endorheic context related to tectonic activity of the Atacama Fault System and Coastal Cordillera uplift. However, the upward sedimentologic variation in the Atacama Gravels evidences a progressive aridification of the climate. Subsequently, we have identified the effects of the Middle-Upper Miocene slow tectonic deformation: the Neogene Andean uplift is accommodated by a tilting or flexuring of the inner-forearc (Central Depression and Precordillera) related to some hundreds of meters of uplift in the Precordillera. This tilting or flexuring results

  7. The junction of Hellenic and Cyprus arcs: the Bey Daglari lineament, offshore termination of the Antalya Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogacz, A.; Hall, J.; Çifçi, G.; Yaşar, D.; Küçük, M.; Yaltırak, C.; Aksu, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Antalya Basin is one of a series of basins that sweep along the Cyprus Arc in the forearc region between the (formerly) volcanic Tauride Mountains on Turkey in the north and the subduction zone and associated suture between the African plate and the Aegean-Anatolian microplate in the eastern Mediterranean, south of Cyprus. Miocene contraction occurs widely on southwest verging thrusts. Pliocene-Quaternary structures vary from extension/transtension in the northeast, adjacent to the Turkish coastline, to transpression in the southwest, farther offshore. All these structures are truncated at the northwest end of the Antalya Basin by a broad zone of NNE-SSW-trending transverse structure that appears to represent a prolongation of the extreme easterly transform end of the Hellenic arc. Our mapping suggests that this broad zone links the Hellenic Arc with the Isparta Angle in southern Turkey, which we suggest is an earlier location of the junction of Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs: the junction migrated to the southwest over time, as the Hellenic Arc rolled back. The Turkish coastline turns from parallel to the Antalya Basin structures in the east to a N-S orientation, cutting across the trend of the Antalya Basin. The Antalya Complex and the Bey Dağlari Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop to this edge of the offshore basin. Somewhere offshore lies the structural termination of the Antalya Basin. In 2001, we acquired around 400 km of high-resolution multi-channel seismic reflection data across the western end of the Antalya Basin to explore the nature of the termination, which we call the Bey Dağlari lineament. We present a selection of the seismic profiles with interpretation of the nature and Neogene history of the lineament. Landward of the N-S-trending coastline, ophiolites of the Antalya Complex are exposed in a series of westerly-verging thrust slivers that extend to the carbonate sequences of the Bey Dağlari Mountains. Our seismic data indicate that N

  8. The Junction of Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs: the Bey Daglari Lineament, Offshore Termination of the Antalya Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogacz, A.; Hall, J.; Cifci, G.; Yasar, D.; Kucuk, M.; Yaltirak, C.; Aksu, A.

    2009-05-01

    The Antalya Basin is one of a series of basins that sweep along the Cyprus Arc in the forearc region between the (formerly) volcanic Tauride Mountains on Turkey in the north and the subduction zone and associated suture between the African plate and the Aegean-Anatolian microplate in the eastern Mediterranean, south of Cyprus. Miocene contraction occurs widely on southwest verging thrusts. Pliocene-Quaternary structures vary from extension/transtension in the northeast, adjacent to the Turkish coastline, to transpression in the southwest, farther offshore. All these structures are truncated at the northwest end of the Antalya Basin by a broad zone of NNE-SSW-trending transverse structure that appears to represent a prolongation of the extreme easterly transform end of the Hellenic arc. Our mapping suggests that this broad zone links the Hellenic Arc with the Isparta Angle in southern Turkey, which we suggest is an earlier location of the junction of Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs: the junction migrated to the southwest over time, as the Hellenic Arc rolled back. The Turkish coastline turns from parallel to the Antalya Basin structures in the east to a N-S orientation, cutting across the trend of the Antalya Basin. The Antalya Complex and the Bey Dağları Mountains provide a spectacular backdrop to this edge of the offshore basin. Somewhere offshore lies the structural termination of the Antalya Basin. In 2001, we acquired around 400 km of high-resolution multi-channel seismic reflection data across the western end of the Antalya Basin to explore the nature of the termination, which we call the Bey Dağları lineament. We present a selection of the seismic profiles with interpretation of the nature and Neogene history of the lineament. Landward of the N-S-trending coastline, ophiolites of the Antalya Complex are exposed in a series of westerly-verging thrust slivers that extend to the carbonate sequences of the Bey Dağları Mountains. Our seismic data indicate that N

  9. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  10. River basin management

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.H.; Edwards, A.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The quality of water is of paramount importance in the management of water resources - including marine waters. A quantitative knowledge of water quality and the factors governing it is required to formulate and implement strategies requiring an inter-disciplinary approach. The overall purpose of this conference was to bring together the latest work on water quality aspects of river basin management. These proceedings are structured on the basis of five themes: problems in international river basins; the contribution of river systems to estuarial and marine pollution; the setting of standards; monitoring; and practical water quality management including use of mathematical models. They are followed by papers from the workshop on advances in the application of mathematical modelling to water quality management, which represent some of the current thinking on the problems and concepts of river basin management.

  11. Delaware River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    Assessing the quality of water in every location of the Nation would not be practical. Therefore, NAWQA investigations are conducted within 59 selected areas called study units (fig. 1). These study units encompass important river and aquifer systems in the United States and represent the diverse geographic, waterresource, land-use, and water-use characteristics of the Nation. The Delaware River Basin is one of 15 study units in which work began in 1996. Water-quality sampling in the study unit will begin in 1999. This fact sheet provides a brief overview of the NAWQA program, describes the Delaware River Basin study unit, identifies the major water-quality issues in the basin, and documents the plan of study that will be followed during the study-unit investigation.

  12. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de )

    1994-02-07

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  13. The open scars of Latin America: The Bolivian Orocline as a basament-related hinge, and the influence of accreted terranes on the paleomagnetic rotational patterns of the Chilean forearc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Gomez, M. A.; Arriagada, C.; Gómez, I.; Roperch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    We made a paleomagnetic study in two separate zones of the Chilean forearc, between 18-22ºS and between 28-32ºS, sampling igneous and sedimentary rocks with ages ranging from Triassic to Miocene. More than 500 samples showed a stable magnetization, with hematite and magnetite being the principal carriers of magnetism. The rotation pattern obtained, added to previously published paleomagnetic data, show a continuous database for the Chilean forearc, between 19 and 35ºS, allowing us to separate distinct patterns in 4 major rotational zones: (1) Between 18-19.5ºS there is a strong anticlockwise rotational pattern, in agreement with the data known in southern Peru. (2) Between 19.5-22.5ºS, there is little to no rotation, with the southern limit being related to a major structural feature: The Antofagasta-Calama Lineament. (3) Between 22.5-29ºS there is a strong clockwise rotation pattern of nearly 30º. (4) Between 29-32ºS there is again a little to non-rotational pattern, in the area of the Pampean flat-slab. Overlapping these zones and the recognized accreted terranes boundaries shows a clear spatial relation between these and the limits of the rotated zones. We propose that the limits of this rotational domains can be linked to basament hinge-like weakness zones that helped to create the margin curvatures observed today. Under this model, the bolivian orocline would be the result of the opening of a hinge, helped by other geodynamics features like sea mountains and ridges, at the limit between the old accreted paleozoic terranes of Antofalla and Arequipa.

  14. Trinity river basin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ulery, Randy L.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Crossfield, Allison S.

    1993-01-01

    In 1991 the Trinity River Basin National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) will include assessments of surface-water and ground-water quality. Initial efforts have focused on identifying water-quality issues in the basin and on the environmental factors underlying those issues. Physical characteristics described include climate, geology, soils, vegetation, physiography, and hydrology. Cultural characteristics discussed include population distribution, land use and land cover, agricultural practices, water use, an reservoir operations. Major water-quality categories are identified and some of the implications of the environmental factors for water quality are presented.

  15. Taunton River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John R.; Willey, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    This report presents in tabular form selected records of wells, test wells, and borings collected during a study of the basin from 1966 to 1968 in cooperation with the Massachusetts Water Resources Commission, and during earlier studies. This report is released in order to make available to the public and to local, state, and federal agencies basic ground-water information that may aid in planning water-resources development. Basic records contained in this report will complement an interpretative report on the Taunton River basin to be released at a later date.

  16. The Talara Basin province of northwestern Peru: cretaceous-tertiary total petroleum system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, Debra K.

    2004-01-01

    More than 1.68 billion barrels of oil (BBO) and 340 billion cubic feet of gas (BCFG) have been produced from the Cretaceous-Tertiary Total Petroleum System in the Talara Basin province, northwestern Peru. Oil and minor gas fields are concentrated in the onshore northern third of the province. Current production is primarily oil, but there is excellent potential for offshore gas resources, which is a mostly untapped resource because of the limited local market for gas and because there are few pipelines. Estimated mean recoverable resources from undiscovered fields in the basin are 1.71 billion barrels of oil (BBO), 4.79 trillion cubic feet of gas (TCFG), and 255 million barrels of natural gas liquids (NGL). Of this total resource, 15 percent has been allocated to onshore and 85 percent to offshore; volumes are 0.26 BBO and 0.72 TCFG onshore, and 1.45 BBO and 4.08 TCFG offshore. The mean estimate of numbers of undiscovered oil and gas fields is 83 and 27, respectively. Minimum size of fields that were used in this analysis is 1 million barrels of oil equivalent and (or) 6 BCFG. The Paleocene Talara forearc basin is superimposed on a larger, Mesozoic and pre-Mesozoic basin. Producing formations, ranging in age from Pennsylvanian to Oligocene, are mainly Upper Cretaceous through Oligocene sandstones of fluvial, deltaic, and nearshore to deep-marine depositional origins. The primary reservoirs and greatest potential for future development are Eocene sandstones that include turbidites of the Talara and Salinas Groups. Additional production and undiscovered resources exist within Upper Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Oligocene formations. Pennsylvanian Amotape quartzites may be productive where fractured. Trap types in this block-faulted basin are mainly structural or a combination of structure and stratigraphy. Primary reservoir seals are interbedded and overlying marine shales. Most fields produce from multiple reservoirs, and production is reported commingled. For this

  17. Geology of the Eel River basin and adjacent region: Implications for late Cenozoic tectonics of the southern Cascadia subduction zone and Mendocino triple junction

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.H. Jr. )

    1992-02-01

    Two upper Cenozoic depositional sequences of principally marine strata about 4,000 m thick overlie accreted basement terranes of the Central and Coastal belts of the Franciscan Complex in the onshore-offshore Eel River basin of northwestern California. The older depositional sequence is early to middle Miocene in age and represents slope basin and slope-blanket deposition, whereas the younger sequence, later Miocene to middle Pleistocene in age, consists largely of forearc basin deposits. Youthful tectonic activity related to Gorda-North American plate convergence indicates an active Cascadia subduction zone and strong partial coupling between these plates. Structures of the northeastern margin of the Eel River basin are principally north-northwest-trending, east-northeast-dipping thrust and reverse faults that form imbricate thrust fans. The Coastal belt fault, the early Tertiary accretionary suture between the Franciscan Central and Coastal belts, can be traced from Arcata Bay northward offshore to the southern Oregon border. It is tentatively extended farther northward based on aeromagnetic data to an offshore position west of Cape Blanco. Thereafter, it may coincide with the offshore Fulmar fault. The Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) does not join the Mendocino transform fault at the commonly depicted offshore location of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ). Instead, the CSZ extends southeastward around the southern Eel River basin and shoreward along Mendocino Canyon to join the Petrolia shear zone. Similarly, the Mendocino fault may extend shoreward via Mattole Canyon and join the Cooskie shear zone. These two shear zones intersect onshore north of the King Range, and the area of their intersection is the probable location of the MTJ.

  18. Sedimentary basins and crustal thickening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobbold, P. R.; Davy, P.; Gapais, D.; Rossello, E. A.; Sadybakasov, E.; Thomas, J. C.; Tondji Biyo, J. J.; de Urreiztieta, M.

    1993-07-01

    We consider the development of sedimentary basins in a tectonic context dominated by horizontal shortening and vertical thickening of the crust. Well-known examples are foreland basins; others are ramp basins and buckle basins. We have reproduced various styles of compressional basins in experiments, properly scaled for gravity. A multilayered model lithosphere, with brittle and ductile layers, floats on a model asthenosphere. A computer-driven piston provides shortening and thickening, synchronous with erosion and sedimentation. After a first stage of lithospheric buckling, thrust faults appear, mainly at inflection points. Slip on an isolated reverse fault is accompanied by flexure. Footwall flexure results in a foreland basin and becomes accentuated by sedimentation. Hangingwall flexure is less marked, but may become accentuated by erosion. Motion on a fault leads to hangingwall collapse at the surface. Either footwall sedimentation or hangingwall erosion tends to prolong the active life of a reverse fault. Slip on any pair of closely spaced reverse faults of opposite vergence results in a ramp basin. Simultaneous slip produces a symmetric ramp basin, whereas alternating slip results in a butterfly-shaped basin, with superposed foredeeps. Some well-developed ramp basins become pushed down, until bounding faults meet at the surface and the basin disappears from view. At this stage, the basin depth is equivalent to 15 km or more. Slip on any pair of widely spaced reverse faults of opposite vergence results in a pronounced central anticline, between two distinct foredeeps. In Central Asia and in Western Europe, Cenozoic crustal thickening is due to continental collision. For Central Asia (Western China, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan), we have compiled a regional structure-contour map on the base of the Tertiary, as well as 4 regional sections. Foreland basins and ramp basins are numerous and associated with Cenozoic thrusts. Large basins (Tarim, Junggar

  19. Cenozoic basin development in Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-04-01

    Four distinct generations of Cenozoic basins have developed in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) as a result of collisional or strike-slip interactions between the North America and Caribbean plates. First generation basins formed when the north-facing Hispaniola arc collided with the Bahama platform in the middle Eocene; because of large post-Eocene vertical movements, these basins are preserved locally in widely separated areas but contain several kilometers of arc and ophiolite-derived clastic marine sediments, probably deposited in thrust-loaded, flexure-type basins. Second generation basins, of which only one is exposed at the surface, formed during west-northwesterly strike-slip displacement of southern Cuba and northern Hispaniola relative to central Hispaniola during the middle to late Oligocene; deposition occurred along a 5-km (3-mi) wide fault-angle depression and consisted of about 2 km (1 mi) of submarine fan deposits. Third generation basins developed during post-Oligocene convergent strike-slip displacement across a restraining bend formed in central Hispaniola; the southern 2 basins are fairly symmetrical, thrust-bounded ramp valleys, and the third is an asymmetrical fault-angle basin. Fourth generation basins are pull-aparts formed during post-Miocene divergent strike-slip motion along a fault zone across southern Hispaniola. As in other Caribbean areas, good source rocks are present in all generations of basins, but suitable reservoir rocks are scarce. Proven reservoirs are late Neogene shallow marine and fluvial sandstones in third generation basins.

  20. Natural frequency of regular basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjandra, Sugih S.; Pudjaprasetya, S. R.

    2014-03-01

    Similar to the vibration of a guitar string or an elastic membrane, water waves in an enclosed basin undergo standing oscillatory waves, also known as seiches. The resonant (eigen) periods of seiches are determined by water depth and geometry of the basin. For regular basins, explicit formulas are available. Resonance occurs when the dominant frequency of external force matches the eigen frequency of the basin. In this paper, we implement the conservative finite volume scheme to 2D shallow water equation to simulate resonance in closed basins. Further, we would like to use this scheme and utilizing energy spectra of the recorded signal to extract resonant periods of arbitrary basins. But here we first test the procedure for getting resonant periods of a square closed basin. The numerical resonant periods that we obtain are comparable with those from analytical formulas.

  1. Buried-euxenic-basin model sets Tarim basin potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.J. )

    1994-11-28

    The Tarim basin is the largest of the three large sedimentary basins of Northwest China. The North and Southwest depressions of Tarim are underlain by thick sediments and very thin crust. The maximum sediment thickness is more than 15 km. Of the several oil fields of Tarim, the three major fields were discovered during the last decade, on the north flank of the North depression and on the Central Tarim Uplift. The major targets of Tarim, according to the buried-euxenic-basin model, should be upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic reservoirs trapping oil and gas condensates from lower Paleozoic source beds. The paper describes the basin and gives a historical perspective of exploration activities and discoveries. It then explains how this basin can be interpreted by the buried-euxenic-basin model. The buried-euxenic-basin model postulates four stages of geologic evolution: (1) Sinian and early Paleozoic platform sedimentation on relic arcs and deep-marine sedimentation in back-arc basins in Xinjiang; (2) Late Paleozoic foreland-basin sedimentation in north Tarim; (3) Mesozoic and Paleogene continental deposition, subsidence under sedimentary load; and (4) Neogene pull-apart basin, wrench faulting and extension.

  2. Canada Basin revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosher, David C.; Shimeld, John; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Chian, D; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Jackson, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    More than 15,000 line-km of new regional seismic reflection and refraction data in the western Arctic Ocean provide insights into the tectonic and sedimentologic history of Canada Basin, permitting development of new geologic understanding in one of Earth's last frontiers. These new data support a rotational opening model for southern Canada Basin. There is a central basement ridge possibly representing an extinct spreading center with oceanic crustal velocities and blocky basement morphology characteristic of spreading centre crust surrounding this ridge. Basement elevation is lower in the south, mostly due to sediment loading subsidence. The sedimentary succession is thickest in the southern Beaufort Sea region, reaching more than 15 km, and generally thins to the north and west. In the north, grabens and half-grabens are indicative of extension. Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge is a large igneous province in northern Amerasia Basin, presumably emplaced synchronously with basin formation. It overprints most of northern Canada Basin structure. The seafloor and sedimentary succession of Canada Basin is remarkably flat-lying in its central region, with little bathymetric change over most of its extent. Reflections that correlate over 100s of kms comprise most of the succession and on-lap bathymetric and basement highs. They are interpreted as representing deposits from unconfined turbidity current flows. Sediment distribution patterns reflect changing source directions during the basin’s history. Initially, probably late Cretaceous to Paleocene synrift sediments sourced from the Alaska and Mackenzie-Beaufort margins. This unit shows a progressive series of onlap unconformities with a younging trend towards Alpha and Northwind ridges, likely a response to contemporaneous subsidence. Sediment source direction appeared to shift to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago margin for the Eocene and Oligocene, likely due to uplift of Arctic islands during the Eurekan Orogeny. The final

  3. Sandstone provenance and diagenesis in relation to Late Cretaceous regional depositional systems and paleogeography, Sacramento Basin, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, K.A. Jr. ); Nilsen, T.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Petrographic modal analyses of sandstone samples from the Upper Cretaceous Guinda, Forbes, Kone, Marsh Creek, Chico, Starky, Winters, and Mokelumne River formations of the Sacramento basin reveal that samples are dominated by plutoniclastic and volcaniclastic detritus, have intermediate plagioclase-to-total=feldspar ratios (0.48-0.65), and have high but variable L{sub v}/L ratios (0.51-0.80). Forbes/Kione sandstones, in comparison to Starkey/Winters samples, have higher proportions of volcaniclastic (plagioclase) to plutoniclastic (Q{sub m}, K) detritus and higher W{sub p}/total Q and L{sub m}/L{sub v} ratios. The Chico Formation, like the Starkey/Winters, is dominated by plutoniclastic material; in comparison to Forbes/Kione samples, the Chico has higher total lithic values (L{sub t}), especially in the L{sub m} fraction. These data strongly support derivation of the sands from the Cordilleran magmatic arc system to the north and east. Sandstones from the Chico, Starkey, Winters, and Mokelumne River formations were derived primarily from the dissected Sierran magmatic arc complex to the east, with a minor but significant secondary source in foothill belt metamorphic complexes. Forbes and Kione sandstones, in contrast, appear to have been derived from the Idaho Batholith and Blue Mountain regions of Idaho/Oregon to the north and northeast. When corrections are applied to account for significant diagenetic dissolution of plagioclase and compactional alteration of lithic fragments (especially L{sub v}), the dissected or transitional arc provenance for most samples is strengthened. Modal data and paleogeographic reconstructions suggest that during the early and middle Campanian, most detritus in the Sacramento basin was derived from the north/northeast (erosion of the Idaho batholith arc system), reflecting southward progradation of the Kion/Forbes delta-submarine fan system into the longitudinal forearc basin.

  4. Architecture and Late Pliocene to recent evolution of outer-arc basins of the Hellenic subduction zone (south-central Crete, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterek, Andreas; Schwarze, Jochen

    2004-08-01

    The Island of Crete is situated in the subaerially exposed part of the Hellenic fore-arc and was uplifted up to 1000-2000 m during Middle Pliocene to recent time. The onset of the overall emergence and northward tilting of central Crete was accompanied by the deposition of the continental Agia Galini Formation ( AGF) during early Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene time. The basin evolution during that time was probably related to sinistral wrench tectonics along ENE-WSW faults, which might have been active during an early stage of the incipient collision of the Hellenic fore-arc with the edge of the African continental plate at the longitude of western Crete. The development of the pronounced relief of south-central Crete strongly profits from a second stage of accelerated uplift and differential block movement starting not earlier than Early Pleistocene time or even later (post-AGF). Synchronously, the modern Timbaki basin and the extensive Messara basin (Messara plain) became striking elements in the study area. Across the study area, differences in both the morphostructural features and the amount of extension are obvious from the west to the east. Most likely, they reflect regional differences in the Pleistocene subduction process, due to the incipient continental collision at the longitude of western Crete. In the western part of the study area, arc-normal extension is driven primarily by the accumulation of high gravitational potential energy that results from the rapid uplift of the region. In the eastern part, the NW-SE to NNW-SSE regional extensional stress field is induced by the ongoing subduction of the oceanic African plate and the roll-back resulting in an arc-normal extensional component, and the extrusion of the Anatolian plate. The latter and the lengthening of the Hellenic arc, which is caused by the southward migration of the central part of the arc, support an arc-parallel extensional component. The Psiloritis Southern Escarpment Fault ( PSEF

  5. Albuquerque Basin seismic network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaksha, Lawrence H.; Locke, Jerry; Thompson, J.B.; Garcia, Alvin

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has recently completed the installation of a seismic network around the Albuquerque Basin in New Mexico. The network consists of two seismometer arrays, a thirteen-station array monitoring an area of approximately 28,000 km 2 and an eight-element array monitoring the area immediately adjacent to the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory. This report describes the instrumentation deployed in the network.

  6. Petroleum basin studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, P.M. ); Naylor, D. )

    1989-01-01

    This book reviews the tectonic setting, basin development and history of exploration of a number of selected petroleum provinces located in a variety of settings in the Middle East, North Sea, Nigeria, the Rocky Mountains, Gabon and China. This book illustrates how ideas and models developed in one area may be applied to other regions. Regional reviews and the reassessment of petroleum provinces are presented.

  7. Dimension of fractal basin boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Park, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    In many dynamical systems, multiple attractors coexist for certain parameter ranges. The set of initial conditions that asymptotically approach each attractor is its basin of attraction. These basins can be intertwined on arbitrary small scales. Basin boundary can be either smooth or fractal. Dynamical systems that have fractal basin boundary show final state sensitivity of the initial conditions. A measure of this sensitivity (uncertainty exponent {alpha}) is related to the dimension of the basin boundary d = D - {alpha}, where D is the dimension of the phase space and d is the dimension of the basin boundary. At metamorphosis values of the parameter, there might happen a conversion from smooth to fractal basin boundary (smooth-fractal metamorphosis) or a conversion from fractal to another fractal basin boundary characteristically different from the previous fractal one (fractal-fractal metamorphosis). The dimension changes continuously with the parameter except at the metamorphosis values where the dimension of the basin boundary jumps discontinuously. We chose the Henon map and the forced damped pendulum to investigate this. Scaling of the basin volumes near the metamorphosis values of the parameter is also being studied for the Henon map. Observations are explained analytically by using low dimensional model map.

  8. Great Basin Paleontological Bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, Robert B.; Zhang, Ning; Hofstra, Albert H.; Morrow, Jared R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This work was conceived as a derivative product for 'The Metallogeny of the Great Basin' project of the Mineral Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. In the course of preparing a fossil database for the Great Basin that could be accessed from the Internet, it was determined that a comprehensive paleontological bibliography must first be compiled, something that had not previously been done. This bibliography includes published papers and abstracts as well as unpublished theses and dissertations on fossils and stratigraphy in Nevada and adjoining portions of California and Utah. This bibliography is broken into first-order headings by geologic age, secondary headings by taxonomic group, followed by ancillary topics of interest to both paleontologists and stratigraphers; paleoecology, stratigraphy, sedimentary petrology, paleogeography, tectonics, and petroleum potential. References were derived from usage of Georef, consultation with numerous paleontologists and geologists working in the Great Basin, and literature currently on hand with the authors. As this is a Web-accessible bibliography, we hope to periodically update it with new citations or older references that we have missed during this compilation. Hence, the authors would be grateful to receive notice of any new or old papers that the readers think should be added. As a final note, we gratefully acknowledge the helpful reviews provided by A. Elizabeth J. Crafford (Anchorage, Alaska) and William R. Page (USGS, Denver, Colorado).

  9. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2002-11-10

    The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

  10. Age, distribution, and stratigraphic relationship of rock units in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 5 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The San Joaquin Basin is a major petroleum province that forms the southern half of California’s Great Valley, a 700-km-long, asymmetrical basin that originated between a subduction zone to the west and the Sierra Nevada to the east. Sedimentary fill and tectonic structures of the San Joaquin Basin record the Mesozoic through Cenozoic geologic history of North America’s western margin. More than 25,000 feet (>7,500 meters) of sedimentary rocks overlie the basement surface and provide a nearly continuous record of sedimentation over the past ~100 m.y. Further, depositional geometries and fault structures document the tectonic evolution of the region from forearc setting to strike-slip basin to transpressional margin. Sedimentary architecture in the San Joaquin Basin is complicated because of these tectonic regimes and because of lateral changes in depositional environment and temporal changes in relative sea level. Few formations are widespread across the basin. Consequently, a careful analysis of sedimentary facies is required to unravel the basin’s depositional history on a regional scale. At least three high-quality organic source rocks formed in the San Joaquin Basin during periods of sea level transgression and anoxia. Generated on the basin’s west side, hydrocarbons migrated into nearly every facies type in the basin, from shelf and submarine fan sands to diatomite and shale to nonmarine coarse-grained rocks to schist. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources and future additions to reserves in the San Joaquin Valley of California (USGS San Joaquin Basin Province Assessment Team, this volume, chapter 1). Several research aims supported this assessment: identifying and mapping the petroleum systems, modeling the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, and defining the volumes of rock to be analyzed for additional resources. To better understand the three dimensional

  11. Geohistorical analysis of Paradox Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, L.D.

    1985-05-01

    The Paradox basin is an elongate sedimentary basin, asymmetric in profile, extending across common corners of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Subsidence of the basin began in Desmoinesian time and was coincident with the development of the ancestral Rocky Mountains. The Uncompahgre uplift formed the northeast boundary of the basin during Pennsylvanian and Permian times. Formation thickness and lithologies were obtained from lithologic and radioactivity logs from various parts of the basin. The stratigraphic column at each well, restored through the Upper Cretaceous, was back-stripped and decompacted to reconstruct its depositional history. Decompacted geohistory diagrams and residual (tectonic) subsidence curves were then generated for each well. The Mobil 1 McCormick well, drilled in 1977, penetrates Pennsylvanian strata beneath reverse-faulted granitic basement; this indicates that the basin was flexed down in response to pennsylvanian and Permian thrust faulting along the flank of the Uncompahgre uplift. However, close correspondence of the residual subsidence curves to theoretical thermal subsidence curves indicates that the basin formed by crustal extension. Consequently, development of the basin may have involved crustal stretching (transtensional.) beneath the basin floor, followed by thrusting (transpressional.) along the flank of the Uncompahgre uplift.

  12. Great Basin paleontological database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, N.; Blodgett, R.B.; Hofstra, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has constructed a paleontological database for the Great Basin physiographic province that can be served over the World Wide Web for data entry, queries, displays, and retrievals. It is similar to the web-database solution that we constructed for Alaskan paleontological data (www.alaskafossil.org). The first phase of this effort was to compile a paleontological bibliography for Nevada and portions of adjacent states in the Great Basin that has recently been completed. In addition, we are also compiling paleontological reports (Known as E&R reports) of the U.S. Geological Survey, which are another extensive source of l,egacy data for this region. Initial population of the database benefited from a recently published conodont data set and is otherwise focused on Devonian and Mississippian localities because strata of this age host important sedimentary exhalative (sedex) Au, Zn, and barite resources and enormons Carlin-type An deposits. In addition, these strata are the most important petroleum source rocks in the region, and record the transition from extension to contraction associated with the Antler orogeny, the Alamo meteorite impact, and biotic crises associated with global oceanic anoxic events. The finished product will provide an invaluable tool for future geologic mapping, paleontological research, and mineral resource investigations in the Great Basin, making paleontological data acquired over nearly the past 150 yr readily available over the World Wide Web. A description of the structure of the database and the web interface developed for this effort are provided herein. This database is being used ws a model for a National Paleontological Database (which we am currently developing for the U.S. Geological Survey) as well as for other paleontological databases now being developed in other parts of the globe. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  13. Apollo Basin, Moon: Estimation of Impact Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echaurren, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    The Apollo Basin is a, pre-Nectarian, multi-ring basin located within the large South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA). Multispectral data from both Galileo and Clementine showed that the composition of materials in Apollo is distinct…

  14. Hydrocarbon associations in evaporite basins

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.

    1988-01-01

    Evaporite deposition today is not representative of the diversity of scale of evaporites of the past. Ancient evaporites were deposited in two main settings: platform wide or basin wide. Platform evaporites were composed of relatively thin stratiform units (usually <5-10 m thick) deposited on either ramps or behind rimmed shelves. Basinal evaporites were deposited as thick bedded units 10s to 100s of m thick, and laid down in 4 main tectonic settings--rift, collision, transform, and intracratonic. Basins could be further subdivided into three main depositional settings: deep basin-shallow water, deep basin-deep water, and shallow basin-shallow water. Thick basinal salts were remobilized into salt structures in all tectonic settings except intracratonic. Salt flow was due to inherent instability and differential loading in tectonically active settings. Hydrocarbon accumulations associated with these various platforms and basins followed a predictable, but not mutually exclusive, pattern related to the classification of evaporite settings presented in this paper. Reservoirs in platform and ramp settings tended to be of two types--depositional and diagenetic--with most of the diagenesis following patterns predicted by the porosity and plumbing established at or soon after evaporite emplacement. Ramp reservoirs were almost always found in Zone Y, while shelf reservoirs were most common in the grainstone shoals associated with rim or island-crest facies, or their dolomitized equivalents. Reservoirs associated with basinal evaporites were also depositional or diagenetic. Depositional reservoirs were almost all related to topography present during deposition of the carbonates in the basin, often immediately preceding or just beginning evaporitic conditions in the basin.

  15. Atlantic marginal basins of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.T.

    1988-02-01

    The over 10,000-km long Atlantic margin of Africa is divisible into thirty basins or segments of the margin that collectively contain over 18.6 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 3/ of syn-breakup and post-breakup sediments. Twenty of these basins contain a sufficiently thick volume of sediments to be considered prospects. These basins lie, at least partially, within the 200 m isobath. The distribution of source rocks is broad enough to give potential to each of these basins. The sedimentation patterns, tectonics, and timing of events differ from basin to basin and are related directly to the margin's complex history. Two spreading modes exist: rift and transform. Rifting dates from Late Triassic-Early Jurassic in the northwest to Early Cretaceous south of the Niger Delta. A complex transform fault system separated these two margins. Deep-water communication between the two basins became established in the middle Cretaceous. This Mesozoic-Cenozoic cycle of rifting and seafloor spreading has segmented the margin and where observable, basins tend to be bounded by these segments.

  16. Foreland basins and fold belts

    SciTech Connect

    Macqueen, R.W.; Leckie, D.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The papers in this book describe six foreland basins and fold belts in terms of their regional setting, stratigraphy, tectonics, and structure, and their oil and gas systems. All of the basins show general similarities, but each differs significantly in detail from the others, posing something of a problem in terms of arriving at a 'typical' foreland basin and fold belt. Some are major hydrocarbon producers; others are not. The major characteristics of the six foreland basins and fold belts are summarized in Tables 1 through 5, which provide a convenient means of comparing and contrasting these basins and their hydrocarbon resources. The Western Canada foreland basin and fold belt serves as the type example for several reasons. These include: its setting and clear relationship to a major orogene of Mesozoic-Cenozoic age; the fact that it is uncomplicated by later overprinting, segmentation, or cover rocks unlike the Ouachita, Eastern Venezuela, and U.S. Rocky Mountain foreland basins and fold belts); the fact that there is a large volume of publicly available data on the basin and an active exploration and research community; and the fact that it has reasonable oil and gas reserves in a well-defined stratigraphic framework.

  17. Hydrocarbon associations in evaporite basins

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.

    1988-02-01

    Evaporite deposition today is not representative of the diversity or scale of evaporites of the past. Ancient evaporites were deposited in two main settings: platform wide or basin wide. Platform evaporites were composed of relatively thin stratiform units (usually <5-10 m thick) deposited on either ramps or behind rimmed shelves. Basinal evaporites were deposited as thick bedded units 10s to 100s of m thick, and laid down in 4 main tectonic settings - rift, collision, transform, and intracratonic. Basins could be further subdivided into three main depositional settings: deep basin-shallow water, deep basin-deep water, and shallow basin-shallow water. Thick basinal salts were remobilized into salt structures in all tectonic settings except intracratonic. Salt flow was due to inherent instability and differential loading in tectonically active settings. Hydrocarbon accumulations associated with these various platforms and basins followed a predictable, but not mutually exclusive, pattern related to the classification of evaporite settings presented in this paper. Reservoirs in platform and ramp settings tended to be of two types - depositional and diagenetic - with most of the diagenesis following patterns predicted by the porosity and plumbing established at or soon after evaporite emplacement.

  18. Ichnofabric and basin analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottjer, D.J. ); Droser, M.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Utilization of ichnofabric indices for measuring recorded extent of bioturbation allows comparative studies of ichnofabric between different facies. In vertical sequences, measurements of ichnofabric indices can be normalized to percent of the total thickness measured for each ichnofabric index. These data can be presented as histograms, or ichnograms, when measurements are from strata deposited in a single genetically-defined sedimentary environment. Ichnograms can be used in conjunction with ichnofacies analysis to present a more complete summary of bioturbation in a sedimentary unit. Using a knowledge of the factors which contribute towards producing ichnofabric in different sedimentary environments, the range of possible ichnograms for any environment can be modeled. In addition to ichnograms, an average ichnofabric index also can be calculated as a useful summary characterization of the extent of bioturbation recorded in a sedimentary unit. Through measurement of ichnofabric indices, construction of ichnograms, and calculation of average ichnofabric index, broad-scale summary data are produced that can allow a more complete understanding of the physical and biological dynamics of sedimentary basins, especially when employed in conjunction with other basin analysis approaches.

  19. New Maturin basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.R. )

    1989-09-01

    The Maturin basin of eastern Venezuela is an outstanding example of the historical logic of exploration concepts progressively woven into large-scale commercial development. Exploitation of natural asphalt in the basin started with the end of the 19th century. Geological reconnaissance in a systematic way started in 1911; first oil field, Guanoco, was discovered August 15, 1913; first seismic survey was shot in 1934; first giant oil field, Quiriquire, was discovered June 1, 1928. A well completed January 6, 1936, went through a very heavy and viscous tar interval, non-exploitable at the time, the first in the Orinoco Belt field; the preliminary geological evaluation of the 13,000 km{sup 2} accumulation started in 1967, but was done in earnest during 1979-1983. Only one well had been drilled deeper than 5,200 m in 1985, but then for the contrast, the El Furrial trend with many deep giant light crude oil fields was discovered in 1986.

  20. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  1. Estancia Basin dynamic water budget.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Richard P.

    2004-09-01

    The Estancia Basin lies about 30 miles to the east of Albuquerque, NM. It is a closed basin in terms of surface water and is somewhat isolated in terms of groundwater. Historically, the primary natural outlet for both surface water and groundwater has been evaporation from the salt lakes in the southeastern portion of the basin. There are no significant watercourses that flow into this basin and groundwater recharge is minimal. During the 20th Century, agriculture grew to become the major user of groundwater in the basin. Significant declines in groundwater levels have accompanied this agricultural use. Domestic and municipal use of the basin groundwater is increasing as Albuquerque population continues to spill eastward into the basin, but this use is projected to be less than 1% of agricultural use well into the 21st Century. This Water Budget model keeps track of the water balance within the basin. The model considers the amount of water entering the basin and leaving the basin. Since there is no significant surface water component within this basin, the balance of water in the groundwater aquifer constitutes the primary component of this balance. Inflow is based on assumptions for recharge made by earlier researchers. Outflow from the basin is the summation of the depletion from all basin water uses. The model user can control future water use within the basin via slider bars that set values for population growth, water system per-capita use, agricultural acreage, and the types of agricultural diversion. The user can also adjust recharge and natural discharge within the limits of uncertainty for those parameters. The model runs for 100 years beginning in 1940 and ending in 2040. During the first 55 years model results can be compared to historical data and estimates of groundwater use. The last 45 years are predictive. The model was calibrated to match to New Mexico Office of State Engineer (NMOSE) estimates of aquifer storage during the historical period by

  2. Thermal history of Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cercone, K.R.

    1984-02-01

    The elevated organic maturity observed in shallowly buried units from the Michigan basin implies that higher temperatures and thicker overburdens once existed in the basin. Evidence from sediment-accumulation rates, regional dips, and maturity of Pennsylvanian-age coals suggests that up to 1,000 m of sediment were removed by erosion prior to the Late Jurassic, when the basin became stable. Geothermal gradients during Paleozoic basin subsidence probably ranged from 35/sup 0/ to 45/sup 0/ C/ km in contrast to the average present value of 25/sup 0/ C/km. Depths to the top of the oil window ranged from 1,900 to 2,300 m during the Paleozoic. Post-Pennsylvanian erosional uplift and further thermal maturation of the basin have combined to raise the top of the oil window to its present level of 500 m.

  3. Stratigraphic modeling of sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Aigner, T. ); Lawrence, D.T. )

    1990-11-01

    A two-dimensional stratigraphic forward model has been successfully applied and calibrated in clastic, carbonate, and mixed clastic/carbonate regimes. Primary input parameters are subsidence, sea level, volume of clastics, and carbonate growth potential. Program output includes sequence geometries, facies distribution lithology distribution, chronostratigraphic plots, burial history plots, thermal and maturity histories, and crossplots. The program may be used to predict reservoir distribution, to constrain interpretations of well and seismic data, to rapidly test exploration scenarios in frontier basins, and to evaluate the fundamental controls on observed basin stratigraphy. Applications to data sets from Main Pass (US Gulf Coast), Offshore Sarawak (Malaysia), Rub'al Khali basin (Oman), Paris basin (France), and Baltimore Canyon (US East Coast) demonstrate that the program can be used to simulate stratigraphy on a basin-wide scale as well as on the scale of individual prospects.

  4. The deep Ionian Basin revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugend, Julie; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Arsenikos, Stavros; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique; Blanpied, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The deep Eastern Mediterranean Basins (Ionian and Herodotus) are characterized by thick sedimentary sequences overlying an extremely thinned basement evidenced from different geophysical methods. Yet, the nature of the crust (continental or oceanic) and the timing of the extreme crustal and lithosphere thinning in the different sub-basins remain highly controversial, casting doubts on the tectonic setting related to the formation of this segment of the North Gondwana paleo-margin. We focus on the Ionian Basin located at the western termination of the Eastern Mediterranean with the aim of identifying, characterizing and mapping the deepest sedimentary sequences. We present tentative age correlations relying on calibrations and observations from the surrounding margins and basins (Malta shelf and Escarpment, Cyrenaica margin, Sirte Basin, Apulian Platform). Two-ship deep refraction seismic data (Expanding Spread Profiles from the PASIPHAE cruise) combined with reprocessed reflection data (from the ARCHIMEDE survey) enabled us to present a homogeneous seismic stratigraphy across the basin and to investigate the velocity structure of its basement. Based on our results, and on a review of geological and geophysical observations, we suggest an Upper Triassic-Early Dogger age for the formation of the deep Ionian Basin. The nature of the underlying basement remains uncertain, both highly-thinned continental and slow-spreading type oceanic crust being compatible with the available constraints. The narrow size and relatively short-lived evolution of the Ionian Basin lead us to suggest that it is more likely the remnant of an immature oceanic basin than of a stable oceanic domain. Eventually, upscaling these results at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean Basins highlights the complex interaction observed between two propagating oceans: The Central Atlantic and Neo-Tethys.

  5. Basement blocks and basin inversion structures mapped using reprocessed Gulfrex 2D seismic data, Caribbean-South American oblique collisional zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalona, A.; Sena, A.; Mann, P.

    2003-12-01

    We have reprocessed and reinterpreted more than 10,000 km of "Gulfrex" multi-channel 2D seismic reflection lines collected by Gulf Oil Corporation in 1972 along the northern margin of South America (offshore Venezuela and Trinidad). These digital data were donated to the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics and represent the largest single, digital reflection survey of the region. Reprocessing of these data included: format correction, filtering, post-stack multiple suppression, and fk migration. Reprocessed data were loaded and interpreted on a workstation. The data straddle a 2,000,000 km2 zone of Paleocene-Recent, time-transgressive, oblique collision between the Caribbean arc system and the passive continental margin of northern South America. Free-air, satellite gravity data shows the remarkable 1000-km-scale continuity of four basement ridges between the uncollided part of the Caribbean arc system (NS-trending Lesser Antilles arc) and the EW-trending collisional area north of Venezuela. The basement ridges involved in the Venezuelan collisional zone include: 1) Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao ridge that can be traced as a continuous feature to the Aves ridge remnant arc of the Lesser Antilles; 2) the partially inverted Blanquilla-Bonaire basin that can be traced into the Grenada back-arc basin; 3) Margarita-Los Testigos platform that can be traced to the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc; and 4) foreland basins and fold-thrust belts of eastern Venezuela (Serrania del Interior and Maturin basin) that can be traced to the Tobago forearc basin and Barbados accretionary prism. Gulfrex data document the progressive change of basinal fault systems from NS-striking normal faults formed in extensional, Lesser Antilles intra-arc settings to rotated and inverted, NE and EW-striking normal faults deformed in the collisional area north of Venezuela. Age of initial shortening of basinal areas and inversion of normal faults setting does not follow the simple, expected pattern of

  6. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to

  7. Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary depositional environments of the northern Sacramento basin revealed by seismic-stratigraphic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Damuth, J.E.; Link, M.H.; Gabay, S.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Seismic-stratigraphic analysis of regional seismic data across the Willows-Beehive Bend gas field reveals a prograding shelf-slope depositional sequence, including basic submarine-fan, slope, and shelf deltaic deposits, that progressively infilled the northern Sacramento forearc basin during the Campanian. The base of the Forbes Formation and the base of the Princeton Gorge fill form the lower and upper boundaries, respectively, of this sequence. Upper Cretaceous submarine-fan and basin-plain deposit form the strata between the Sierran basement and the base of the Forbes and progressively onlap the basement from west to east. The lower to middle Forbes Formation is characterized by high-amplitude discontinuous reflections and consists of mud-rich submarine-fan deposit with laterally restricted, sand-prone channel/levee complexes and broader depositional lobes. In contrast the upper Forbes consist of mud-rich slope deposits characterized by broad, southward-dipping clinoforms. Submarine-canyon/gully fills are common and return discordant hummocky to chaotic reflections. The overlying Kione Formation consists of sand-rich, delta-front deposits that return high amplitude, gently dipping subparallel reflections and are transitional into the slope deposits of the uppermost Forbes. The Kione was partially eroded during cutting of the Princeton Gorge submarine canyon in the early Tertiary. The lower (Eocene) Princeton Gorge fill shows highly variable reflection character and seismic facies that suggest multiple episodes of submarine erosion and deposition. At least three northwest-southeast-striking fault zones, including the Willows fault, disrupt these formations and appear to have strike-slip components.

  8. Late Cretaceous and Paleogene sedimentation along east side of San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    Depositional systems of the Late Cretaceous contrast with those of the Paleogene in the subsurface along the east side of the San Joaquin basin between Bakersfield and Fresno, California. Upper Cretaceous deposits include thick fan-delta and submarine fan facies of the Moreno and Panoche Formations, whereas the paleogene contains extensive nearshore, shelf, slope, and submarine fan deposits of the Lodo, Domengine, and Kreyenhagen Formations. These sediments were deposited on a basement surface having several west-trending ridges and valleys. West-flowing streams draining an ancestral Sierra Nevada of moderate relief formed prograding fan deltas that filled the valleys with thick wedges of nonmarine channel deposits, creating a bajada along the shoreline. Detrital material moved rapidly from the shoreline through a narrow shelf, into a complex of submarine fans in the subduction trough. During the early Eocene, a low sea level stand plus an end of Sierra Nevada uplift resulted in the erosion of the range to a peneplain. Stream-fed fan deltas were replaced by a major river system, which flowed west on about the present course of the Kern River. Following a rapid sea level increase, sand from the river system was deposited on the now broad shelf along a wide belt roughly coincident with California Highway 99. The river was also the point source for sand in a submarine fan northwest of Bakersfield. Both Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene depositional systems probably continue north along the east edge of the Great Valley. This proposed scenario for the east side of the San Joaquin is analogous to forearc deposits in the San Diego area, including the Cretaceous Rosario fan-delta and submarine fan system and the Eocene La Jolla and Poway nearshore, shelf, and submarine fan systems.

  9. Aleutian basin oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christeson, Gail L.; Barth, Ginger A.

    2015-01-01

    We present two-dimensional P-wave velocity structure along two wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer profiles from the Aleutian basin in the Bering Sea. The basement here is commonly considered to be trapped oceanic crust, yet there is a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features within the basin that might reflect later processes. Line 1 extends ∼225 km from southwest to northeast, while Line 2 extends ∼225 km from northwest to southeast and crosses the observed change in magnetic lineation orientation. Velocities of the sediment layer increase from 2.0 km/s at the seafloor to 3.0–3.4 km/s just above basement, crustal velocities increase from 5.1–5.6 km/s at the top of basement to 7.0–7.1 km/s at the base of the crust, and upper mantle velocities are 8.1–8.2 km/s. Average sediment thickness is 3.8–3.9 km for both profiles. Crustal thickness varies from 6.2 to 9.6 km, with average thickness of 7.2 km on Line 1 and 8.8 km on Line 2. There is no clear change in crustal structure associated with a change in orientation of magnetic lineations and gravity features. The velocity structure is consistent with that of normal or thickened oceanic crust. The observed increase in crustal thickness from west to east is interpreted as reflecting an increase in melt supply during crustal formation.

  10. K-Basins design guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

  11. KE Basin Sludge Flocculant Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Sue

    2004-06-23

    In the revised path forward and schedule for the K Basins Sludge Retrieval and Disposal Project, the sludge in K East (KE) Basin will be moved from the floor and pits and transferred to large, free-standing containers located in the pits (so as to isolate the sludge from the basin). When the sludge is pumped into the containers, it must settle fast enough and clarify sufficiently that the overflow water returned to the basin pool will not cloud the water or significantly increase the radiological dose rate to the operations staff as a result of increased suspended radioactive material. The approach being evaluated to enhance sludge settling and speed the rate of clarification is to add a flocculant to the sludge while it is being transferred to the containers. In February 2004, seven commercial flocculants were tested with a specific K Basin sludge simulant to identify those agents that demonstrated good performance over a broad range of slurry solids concentrations. From this testing, a cationic polymer flocculant, Nalco Optimer 7194 Plus (7194+), was shown to exhibit superior performance. Related prior testing with K Basin sludge and simulant in 1994/1996 had also identified this agent as promising. In March 2004, four series of jar tests were conducted with 7194+ and actual KE Basin sludge (prepared by combining selected archived KE sludge samples). The results from these jar tests show that 7194+ greatly improves settling of the sludge slurries and clarification of the supernatant.

  12. Basin development and petroleum potential of offshore Otway basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, P.E.; O'Brien, G.W.; Swift, M.G.; Scherl, A.S.; Marlow, M.S.; Exon, N.F.; Falvey, D.A.; Lock, J.; Lockwood, K.

    1987-05-01

    The Bass Strait region in southeastern Australia contains three sedimentary basins, which are, from east to west, the Gippsland, Bass, and Otway basins. The offshore Gippsland basin is Australia's most prolific petroleum-producing province and supplies over 90% of the country's production. In contrast, exploration has been unsuccessful in the offshore portion of the Otway basin; 17 wells have been drilled, and although shows of oil and gas have been common, no commercial discoveries have been made. Many of these wells, drilled in the 1960s and 1970s, were sited using poor-quality seismic data and, as a consequence, were frequently off structure. Seismic data quality has, however, improved significantly in recent years. The present study by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources (BMR) involved the collection, in the offshore Otway basin, of 3700 km of high-quality, 48-channel seismic reflection data by the BMR research vessel R/V Rig Seismic. These data have been integrated with existing industry seismic data, well data, limited dredged material, and geohistory analyses in a framework study of basin development and hydrocarbon potential in this under-explored area. The offshore Otway basin extends 500 km along the southern coastline and is typically 50 km wide in water depths of less than 200 m. It contains up to 10 km of predominantly late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic sediments, which are overlain by a thin sequence of middle to late Tertiary shelf carbonates. It has been divided into three main structural elements: the Mussel Platform in the east, the central Voluta Trough, and the Crayfish Platform in the west. The basin was initiated at the end of the Jurassic as part of the Bassian rift. Up to 6 km of Lower Cretaceous sediments were deposited prior to breakup at the end of the Early Cretaceous and the onset of sea-floor spreading between Australia and Antarctica.

  13. Deformation History of the Haymana Basin: Structural Records of Closure-Collision and Subsequent Convergence (Indentation) Events at the North-Central Neotethys (Central Anatolia, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülyüz, Erhan; Özkaptan, Murat; Kaymakcı, Nuretdin

    2016-04-01

    Gondwana- (Tauride Platfrom and Kırşehir Block) and Eurasia (Pontides) - derived continental blocks bound the Haymana basin, in the south and north, respectively. Boundaries between these blocks are signed by İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan and debatable Intra-Tauride Suture zones which are straddled by the Haymana Basin in the region. In this regard, deformation recorded in the upper Cretaceous to middle Eocene deposits of the basin is mainly controlled by the relative movements of these blocks. Therefore, understanding the structural evolution of the Haymana Basin in a spatio-temporal concept is crucial to shed some light on some debatable issues such as ; (1) timing of late stage subduction histories of various branches of Neotethys and subsequent collision events, (2) effects of post-collisional tectonic activity in the Haymana region. Fault kinematic analyses (based on 623 fault-slip data from 73 stations) indicate that the basin was subjected to initially N-S to NNE-SSW extension until middle Paleocene and then N-S- to NNE-SSW- directed continuous compression and coeval E-W to ESE-WNW extension up to middle Miocene. These different deformation phases correspond to the fore-arc (closure) and foreland (collision and further convergence) stages of the basin. Additionally, fold analyses (based on 1017 bedding attitudes) and structural mapping studies show that development of folds and major faults are coeval and they can be explained by principle stress orientations of the second deformation phase. The Haymana basin is, based on the trends of E-W- and WNW-ESE- directed structures at the south-eastern and the north-western parts of the basin, respectively, divided into two structural segments. The balanced cross-sections also indicate ~4% and ~25% shortening at the north-western and south-eastern segments, respectively. The differences in amounts of shortenings are explained by reduce in effectiveness zone of basin-bounding thrust faults towards west. On the other hand

  14. Tectonic framework of Turkish sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, P.O. )

    1988-08-01

    Turkey's exploration potential primarily exists in seven onshore (Southeast Turkey platform, Tauride platform, Pontide platform, East Anatolian platform, Interior, Trace, and Adana) basins and four offshore (Black Sea, Marmara Sea, Aegean Sea, and Mediterranean Sea) regional basins formed during the Mesozoic and Tertiary. The Mesozoic basins are the onshore basins: Southeast Turkey, Tauride, Pontide, East Anatolian, and Interior basins. Due to their common tectonic heritage, the southeast Turkey and Tauride basins have similar source rocks, structural growth, trap size, and structural styles. In the north, another Mesozoic basin, the Pontide platform, has a much more complex history and very little in common with the southerly basins. The Pontide has two distinct parts; the west has Paleozoic continental basement and the east is underlain by island-arc basement of Jurassic age. The plays are in the upper Mesozoic rocks in the west Pontide. The remaining Mesozoic basins of the onshore Interior and East Anatolian basins are poorly known and very complex. Their source, reservoir, and seal are not clearly defined. The basins formed during several orogenic phases in mesozoic and Tertiary. The Cenozoic basins are the onshore Thrace and Adana basins, and all offshore regional basins formed during Miocene extension. Further complicating the onshore basins evolution is the superposition of Cenozoic basins and Mesozoic basins. The Thrace basin in the northwest and Adana basin in the south both originate from Tertiary extension over Tethyan basement and result in a similar source, reservoir, and seal. Local strike-slip movement along the North Anatolian fault modifies the Thrace basin structures, influencing its hydrocarbon potential.

  15. Principles of Sedimentary Basin Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Robert J., Jr.

    Basin analysis is the ultimate act of synthesis in stratigraphy. Its objective is to weave together the diverse strands of information in order to portray the tectonic evolution of a basin, its filling with sediments in a broad range of depositional environments, the subsequent diagenesis and lithification of these sediments, and the localization therein of mineral and petroleum resources. Thus, although the primary emphasis in basin analysis is stratigraphic and sedimentologic in nature, paleontologic, tectonic, and geophysical data, among others, are also integral components of the effort. It is scientifically challenging and, in practical terms, forms the foundation for the exploration for strata-bound resources. The wide range of topics that must be incorporated into a basin analysis requires that it be a group project of specialists and means that it is a difficult subject to teach or to present in a book.

  16. What do Great Subduction Earthquakes tell us About Continental Deformation of the Upper Plate in the Central Andes Forearc? Insights From Seismotectonics, Continental Deformation and Coulomb Modelisation Along Southern Peru Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, L.; Perfettini, H.; Tavera, H.

    2007-05-01

    Calientes Fault system (parallel to the trench) and a crustal depth of about 20km. Such a magnitud and crustal depth in the area correlates perfectly with the Quaternary geomorphic evidences of tectonic activity along the Sama-Calientes thrust fault in the forearc in Southern Peru. Some questions are raised by the occurrence of such continental seismicity, just after a major subduction event, as none has been registered in the area since more than 40 years. Continental fault systems constitute a key to the understanding of the forearc deformation in the Arica Elbow, where the Andes obliquity with respect to the Nazca plate convergence direction. Also these results suggest that continental deformation should give us clues to define the pattern of segmentation of the subduction zone by studying seismotectonics and its relation to the segmentation of the upper continental plate.

  17. Mid-Pleistocene to present stratigraphic responses in a tectonically-driven depositional setting: Eel River Basin, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Robert Lawrence

    The Eel River Basin of northern California is an actively deforming forearc basin, affected today by Gorda-North America Plate convergence, northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction, glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations that periodically exposed the continental shelf, and high rates of sediment input. A high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection survey of the shelf and upper slope has been conducted as part of the Office of Naval Research STRATAFORM initiative, with the goal of understanding processes affecting sediment dispersal and preservation in this complex continental margin setting. Interpretations of the seismic images indicate that, although tectonism strongly overprints preserved sequence morphologies, glacioeustacy is of primary importance in the distribution and preservation of sediments along this margin. On the shelf, stacked sequences dominated by interpreted highstand marine sediment are separated by prominent ravinement surfaces formed during sea-level transgressions. Folding and faulting locally modify sequence morphologies. At the south end of the seismic grid, localized uplift attributed to Mendocino Triple Junction encroachment overrides the glacioeustatic stacking pattern dominant over the rest of the shelf, inducing shelf incision and preferential preservation of vertically stacked channel-fills. An abrupt shift in shelf sequence morphology ˜500 ka suggests that the triple junction began to affect the southern basin at that time, by decreasing accommodation space marginwide. On the adjacent slope, effects of tectonism and glacioeustacy can also be discerned. In the south, the Humboldt Slide is identified as a long-lived masswasting feature, likely triggered by triple junction-related uplift and associated seismicity ˜450--500 ka. However, a cyclical succession of contrasting lithologies is also apparent in the deformed slide sequences, which I attribute to glacioeustatic cyclicity. To the north, effects of regional

  18. Provenance and basin evolution, Zhada basin, southwestern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, J.; Decelles, P.; Gehrels, G.; Kapp, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Zhada basin is a late Miocene - Pliocene intermontane basin situated at high elevations in the Himalayan hinterland. The fluvial and lacustrine sediments of the Zhada formation are undeformed and sit in angular unconformity above the deformed Tethyan Sedimentary Sequence (TSS). The basin sits just south of the Indus suture in a structural position occupied elsewhere in the Himalayan orogen by some of the highest mountains on earth, including Everest. The occurrence of a basin at this location demands explanation. Currently, the Sutlej River flows parallel to the structural grain of the Himalaya, westward through the basin, towards the Leo Pargil (Qusum) range. Near the range front it takes a sharp southward turn, cuts across the structural grain of the Himalaya and out into the Gangetic foreland. Palaeocurrent indicators in the lower part of the Zhada formation show that the basin originated as a northwest flowing axial river. Palaeocurrent indicators are consistently northwest oriented, even to within to within 10 km of the Leo Pargil range front in the north-western end of the basin. This implies that at the onset of sedimentation in Zhada basin the Leo Pargil range was not a barrier as it is today. In the upper part of the Zhada formation, palaeocurrent indicators are generally directed towards the centre of the basin. In the central and southern portions of the basin this indicates a transition from an axial, northwest flowing river to prograding fluvial and alluvial fans. However, in the north-western part of the basin the change between lower and upper Zhada formation involves a complete drainage reversal. This change in palaeocurrent orientation is also reflected in the detrital zircon signal from basin sediments. Low in the Zhada formation the detrital zircon signal is dominated by zircons from the Kailash (Gangdese) batholith (or associated extrusives, see below). However, higher in the sections, a local source, either from the TSS or the core of the

  19. 77 FR 45653 - Yakima River Basin Conservation Advisory Group; Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Yakima River Basin Conservation Advisory Group; Yakima River Basin Water... on the structure, implementation, and oversight of the Yakima River Basin Water Conservation Program... of the Water Conservation Program, including the applicable water conservation guidelines of...

  20. Flexural analysis of two broken foreland basins; Late Cenozoic Bermejo basin and Early Cenozoic Green River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Flemings, P.B.; Jordan, T.E.; Reynolds, S.

    1986-05-01

    Lithospheric flexure that generates basin in a broke foreland setting (e.g., the Laramide foreland of Wyoming) is a three-dimensional system related to shortening along basin-bounding faults. The authors modeled the elastic flexure in three dimensions for two broken foreland basins: the early Cenozoic Green River basin and the analogous late Cenozoic Bermejo basin of Argentina. Each basin is located between a thrust belt and a reverse-fault-bounded basement uplift. Both basins are asymmetric toward the basement uplifts and have a central basement high: the Rock Springs uplift and the Pie de Palo uplift, respectively. The model applies loads generated by crustal thickening to an elastic lithosphere overlying a fluid mantle. Using the loading conditions of the Bermejo basin based on topography, limited drilling, and reflection and earthquake seismology, the model predicts the current Bermejo basin geometry. Similarly, flexure under the loading conditions in the Green River basin, which are constrained by stratigraphy, well logs, and seismic profiling and summed for Late Cretaceous (Lance Formation) through Eocene (Wasatch Formation), successfully models the observed geometry of the pre-Lance surface. Basin depocenters (> 4 km for the Green River basin; > 7 km for the Bermejo basin) and central uplifts are predicted to result from constructive interference of the nonparallel applied loads. Their Bermejo model implies that instantaneous basin geometry is successfully modeled by crustal loading, whereas the Green River basin analysis suggests that basin evolution can be modeled over large time steps (e.g., 20 Ma). This result links instantaneous basin geometry to overall basin evolution and is a first step in predicting stratigraphic development.

  1. Crustal structure of the eastern Algerian continental margin and adjacent deep basin: implications for late Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyahiaoui, B.; Sage, F.; Abtout, A.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Yelles-Chaouche, K.; Schnürle, P.; Marok, A.; Déverchère, J.; Arab, M.; Galve, A.; Collot, J. Y.

    2015-06-01