Science.gov

Sample records for aceh sumatra indonesia

  1. Intestinal and blood parasites of man in Bireuen and Takengon, Aceh Province, Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Stafford, E E; Joesoef, A

    1976-12-01

    A survey for blood and intestinal parasites was carried out in Aceh Province of North Sumatra, Indonesia. A total of 348 stool specimens were obtained from 167 males and 181 females ranging in age from 6 months to 70 years. Over 98% of the population sampled were found infected with at least one intestinal parasite. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm and Entamoeba coli, in that order, were the most common parasites detected. Other intestinal parasites found less frequently were Entamoeba histolytica, Iodamoeba bütschlii, Entamoeba hartmanni, Endolimax nana and Giardia lamblia, Brugia malayi microfilaraemias were detected in 2% of those examined and only in the coastal villages of Cot Ketapang and Rusip Dayah. No malaria was found. PMID:1030850

  2. Biological control of Black Pod Disease and Seedling Blight of cacao caused by Phytophthora Species using Trichoderma from Aceh Sumatra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cocoa tree, Theobroma cacao L., suffers large yield losses in Aceh Indonesia to the disease black pod rot, caused by Phytophthora spp. Despite having the largest area under cacao production in Sumatra, farmers in the Aceh region have low overall production because of losses to insect pests and b...

  3. Out of Disaster Comes Opportunity: Initial Lessons from Teacher Mentoring in Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesnick, Joy; Schultz, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    On December 26, 2004, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake--the most powerful in more than 40 years--struck deep under the Indian Ocean. It was centered about 100 miles southwest off the coast of Aceh, Indonesia, and triggered massive tsunamis across the coasts of Asia and Africa. In Aceh province, located at the northwest tip of the island of Sumatra in…

  4. Indonesia, Sumatra, Singapore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view shows the area around Northeastern Sumatra, Indonesia (1.0N, 104.0E). The city of Singapore and the Singapore Strait is in the center at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula. The Singapore Strait is the eastern extension of the Strait of Malacca and separates the Malay Peninsula from Sumatra. Large sediment plumes from the rivers attest to the local soil erosion and industrial dumping ofd wastes.

  5. Tsunami damage in Aceh Province, Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The island of Sumatra suffered from both the rumblings of the submarine earthquake and the tsunamis that were generated on December 26, 2004. Within minutes of the quake, the sea surged ashore, bringing destruction to the coasts of northern Sumatra. This pair of natural-color images from Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument shows a small area along the Sumatran coast in Aceh province where the tsunami smashed its way ashore. In this region, the wave cut a swath of near-total destruction 1.5 kilometers (roughly one mile) in most places, but penetrating farther in many others. Some of these deeper paths of destruction can be seen especially dramatically in the larger-area ETM+ images linked to above. (North is up in these larger images.) ETM+ collects data at roughly 30 meter resolution, complimenting sensors like NASA's MODIS (onboard both Terra and Aqua satellites) which observed this area at 250-meter resolution to give a wide view and ultra-high-resolution sensors like Space Imaging's IKONOS, which observed the same region at 4-meter resolution to give a detailed, smaller-area view. NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data provided courtesy of the Landsat 7 Science Project Office

  6. Smoke over Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At least once a year for a period lasting from a week to several months, northern Sumatra is obscured by smoke and haze produced by agricultural burning and forest fires. These data products from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer document the presence of airborne particulates on March 13, 2002, during Terra orbit 11880. On the left is an image acquired by MISR's 70-degree backward-viewing camera. On the right is a map of aerosol optical depth, a measure of the abundance of atmospheric particulates. This product utilized a test version of the MISR retrieval that incorporates an experimental set of aerosol mixtures. The haze has completely obscured northeastern Sumatra and part of the Strait of Malacca, which separates Sumatra and the Malaysian Peninsula. A northward gradient is apparent as the haze dissipates in the direction of the Malaysian landmass. Each panel covers an area of about 760 kilometers x 400 kilometers.

    Haze conditions had posed a health concern during late February (when schools in some parts of North Sumatra were closed), and worsened considerably in the first two weeks of March. By mid-March, local meteorology officials asked residents of North Sumatra's provincial capital, Medan, to minimize their outdoor activities and wear protective masks. Poor visibility at Medan airport forced a passenger plane to divert to Malaysia on March 14, and visibility reportedly ranged between 100 and 600 meters in some coastal towns southeast of Medan.

    The number and severity of this year's fires was exacerbated by dry weather conditions associated with the onset of a weak to moderate El Nino. The governments of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei have agreed to ban open burning in plantation and forest areas. The enforcement of such fire bans, however, has proven to be an extremely challenging task.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra

  7. Shallow shear-wave reflection seismics in the tsunami struck Krueng Aceh River Basin, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Arsyad, I.; Kümpel, H.-J.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the project "Management of Georisk" (MANGEONAD) of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Hanover, high resolution shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam, North Sumatra in cooperation with the Government of Indonesia, local counterparts, and the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hanover. The investigations were expected to support classification of earthquake site effects for the reconstruction of buildings and infrastructure as well as for groundwater exploration. The study focussed on the city of Banda Aceh and the surroundings of Aceh Besar. The shear-wave seismic surveys were done parallel to standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests to support subsequent site specific statistical calibration. They were also partly supplemented by shallow p-wave seismics for the identification of (a) elastic subsurface parameters and (b) zones with abundance of groundwater. Evaluation of seismic site effects based on shallow reflection seismics has in fact been found to be a highly useful method in Aceh province. In particular, use of a vibratory seismic source was essential for successful application of shear-wave seismics in the city of Banda Aceh and in areas with compacted ground like on farm tracks in the surroundings, presenting mostly agricultural land use areas. We thus were able to explore the mechanical stiffness of the subsurface down to 100 m depth, occasionally even deeper, with remarkably high resolution. The results were transferred into geotechnical site classification in terms of the International Building Code (IBC, 2003). The seismic images give also insights into the history of the basin sedimentation processes of the Krueng Aceh River delta, which is relevant for the exploration of new areas for construction of safe foundations of buildings and for identification of fresh water aquifers in the tsunami flooded region.

  8. Recurrence of great earthquakes and tsunamis, Aceh Province, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, C. M.; Horton, B.; Sieh, K.; Pilarczyk, J.; Hawkes, A. D.; Daly, P.; Kelsey, H. M.; McKinnon, E.; Ismail, N.; Daryono, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The timing and characterization of ancient earthquakes and tsunamis inferred from a variety of geologic studies in Aceh Province, Sumatra, are helping to understand predecessors of the 2004 event in the Indian Ocean region. We report results from three different depositional environments along the western and northern coast of Aceh Province, Sumatra, that illuminate the history of tsunamis through the past several millennia. Within a coastal cave along the western coast is an extraordinary sedimentary deposit that contains a 7,000-year long sequence of tsunami sands separated by bat guano. In two sea cliff exposures along the northern coast of Aceh is evidence for two closely timed predecessors of the giant 2004 tsunami that destroyed communities along the coast about 500 years ago. In addition, coastal wetlands along the western coast document land-level changes and tsunamis associated with the earthquake cycle in the early- to mid-Holocene. Together these records show a marked variability in recurrence of large tsunamis along the Acehnese coast. Time between inundations averages close to 500 years but range from a few centuries to a millennium.

  9. Issues in Indonesia's tsunami disaster management system revealed after the 2004 Sumatra event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Koyama, A.; Sun, H.; Kang, I.; Arakawa, T.; Kobayashi, J.; Nagata, M.; Nakanishi, R.; Nakano, M.; Noguchi, S.

    2014-12-01

    During the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, Indonesia had the largest number of casualties around 170,000. International society has supported tsunami early warning system, disaster management and disaster education for Indonesia. The past ten years saw several tsunamis in Indonesia after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Construction of tsunami early warning system was not in time the 2006 Pangandaran tsunami in Jawa Island. On the other hand, tsunami science has been developed for this decade. Tsunami early warning system has been developed by deep ocean pressure gauges (DART system), coastal tide gauges, GPS buoys and so on. Tsunami folklore has been collected and used education and connected with tsunami deposit. However, the tsunami early warning system and other science application were not widely used at once in Indonesia. GPS buoys were stolen by fishery people. One tsunami evacuation building are not used for evacuation by local people in Aceh Sumatra Island in 2012 though locations of the buildings were selected by scientific numerical simulation. Big panic and trafic accidents occurred by M8.6 earthquake in Aceh in April 2012 and reveal lack of disaster management planning in urban planning during reconstruction (Fig.1: Trafic jam in Banda Aceh, source MSN news photo). In addition to this, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami reveal fragilities tsunami preparedness. How should we decide to use the tsunami science? We research field situation in Aceh the after 10 years past from the 2004 Sumatra event. This presentation discusses issues of the gap between tsunami science and operations through field research in Aceh now.

  10. Potential Sedimentary Evidence of Two Closely Spaced Tsunamis on the West Coast of Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Katrin; Meilianda, Ella; Rushdy, Ibnu; Moena, Abudzar; Yolanda, Irvan P.

    2016-04-01

    Recent research in the coastal regions of Aceh, Indonesia, an area that was largely affected by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami, suggests the possibility that two closely spaced tsunamis occurred at the turn of the 14th to 15th century (Meltzner et al., 2010; Sieh et al., 2015). Here, we present evidence of two buried sand layers in the coastal marshes of West Aceh, possibly representing these penultimate predecessors of the 2004 tsunami. We discovered the sand layers in an until recently inaccessible area of a previously studied beach ridge plain about 15 km North of Meulaboh, West Aceh. Here, the 2004 tsunami left a continuous, typically a few cm thick sand sheet in the coastal hinterland in low-lying swales that accumulate organic-rich deposits and separate the sandy beach ridges. In keeping with the long-term progradation of the coastline, older deposits have to be sought after further inland. Using a hand auger, the buried sand layers were discovered in 3 cores in a flooded and highly vegetated swale in about 1 km distance to the shoreline. The pair of sand layers occurs in 70-100 cm depth and overlies 40-60 cm of dark-brown peat that rests on the basal sand of the beach ridge plain. The lower sand layer is only 1-6 cm thick, whereas the upper layer is consistently thicker, measuring 11-17 cm, with 8-14 cm of peat in between sand sheets. Both layers consist of massive, grey, medium sand and include plant fragments. They show very sharp upper and lower boundaries clearly distinguishing them from the surrounding peat and indicating an abrupt depositional event. A previously developed age model for sediments of this beach ridge plain suggest that this pair of layers could indeed correlate to a nearby buried sand sheet interpreted as tsunamigenic and deposited soon after 1290-1400AD (Monecke et al., 2008). The superb preservation at this new site allows the clear distinction of two depositional events, which, based on a first

  11. Parasitology survey in northern Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Cross, J H; Clarke, M D; Cole, W C; Lien, J C; Partono, F; Joesoef, A; Kosin, E H

    1976-06-01

    A parasitology survey was conducted in five villages in North Sumatra, Indonesia. A total of 3,207 blood smears, 2,066 stool specimens and 969 sera were examined. Sixty (1.9%) inhabitants had malaria (Plasmodium vivax 41, P. falciparum 19), and 20 had Brugia malayi microfilaraemia. The most common intestinal helminths were Trichuris trichiura (87%), Ascaris lumbricoides (75%) and hookworm (58%). Other helminths found in low numbers were Enterobius vermicularis, Strongyloides stercoralis, Taenia sp., Fasciolid, Dicrocoeliid and Echinostoma sp. eggs. Entamoeba coli (25%) was the most common intestinal protozoa followed by Endolimax nana (8%), Entamoeba histolytica (7%), Giardia lamblia (6%), Iodamoeba bütschlii (5%), Entamoeba hartmanni (1%) and Chilomastix mesnili (1%). The amoeba prevalence rate was 31 per cent. Testing of sera for Entamoeba histolytica and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies by the indirect haemagglutination test demonstrated positive reactors in 13 per cent and nine per cent of the population respectively. The greatest number of seropositives for Toxoplasma gondii was at elevations of sea level to five meters and the lowest number at elevations of 5OO-1,000 meters. PMID:950682

  12. Space Radar Image of Central Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the central part of the island of Sumatra in Indonesia that shows how the tropical rainforest typical of this country is being impacted by human activity. Native forest appears in green in this image, while prominent pink areas represent places where the native forest has been cleared. The large rectangular areas have been cleared for palm oil plantations. The bright pink zones are areas that have been cleared since 1989, while the dark pink zones are areas that were cleared before 1989. These radar data were processed as part of an effort to assist oil and gas companies working in the area to assess the environmental impact of both their drilling operations and the activities of the local population. Radar images are useful in these areas because heavy cloud cover and the persistent smoke and haze associated with deforestation have prevented usable visible-light imagery from being acquired since 1989. The dark shapes in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image are a chain of lakes in flat coastal marshes. This image was acquired in October 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Environmental changes can be easily documented by comparing this image with visible-light data that were acquired in previous years by the Landsat satellite. The image is centered at 0.9 degrees north latitude and 101.3 degrees east longitude. The area shown is 50 kilometers by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  13. Petroleum geology of South Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, P.R.

    1987-05-01

    The South Sumatra basin resulted from horst-graben structures formed from the end of Cretaceous to the early Tertiary. During the Pliocene-Pleistocene orogeny, prominent northwest-trending folds and strike-slip faults were formed within the basin. The depositional history of South Sumatra is similar to the prolific Central Sumatra basin; however, the reservoir sandstone facies in South Sumatra are less well developed. Four major orogenic events resulted in the present framework of the South Sumatra basin. These events occurred during (1) a mid-Mesozoic orogeny which metamorphosed, faulted, and uplifted previously deposited sediments into blocks; (2) the Late Cretaceous-early Oligocene tectonic event with resultant horsts and grabens that controlled Eocene sedimentation; (3) the late Oligocene-Miocene, a period of isostatic subsidence until its tectonic quiescence was broken by middle Miocene diastrophism in the Barisan Mountains and by minor structural movements; and (4) the widespread Pliocene-Pleistocene orogeny reflected in the shallow structures in the Tertiary sediments. The southwestern part of Sumatra corresponds to the uplifted range that folded during the Miocene. Only the Tertiary Lahat (Lamat) and Talang Akar formations were deposited in rugged pre-Tertiary topography. The contact between the Sumatra block and the Sunda-Java block is a north-south-trending right-lateral wrench fault. The anticlines within the South Sumatra basin can be grouped into three groups of anticlinal features. The major anticlinora consist of over 150 individual anticlines. To date, about 50 of the 100 structures tested have proved production. Shales in the upper Oligocene-lower Miocene Talang Akar and lower-middle Miocene Gumai (Telisa) Formations show excellent potential for oil generation.

  14. Penultimate predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Aceh, Sumatra: Stratigraphic, archeological, and historical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, Kerry; Daly, Patrick; Edwards McKinnon, E.; Pilarczyk, Jessica E.; Chiang, Hong-Wei; Horton, Benjamin; Rubin, Charles M.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Ismail, Nazli; Vane, Christopher H.; Feener, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present stratigraphic, archeological and historical evidence for two closely timed predecessors of the giant 2004 tsunami on the northern coast of Aceh, northern Sumatra. This is the first direct evidence that a tsunami played a role in a fifteenth century cultural hiatus along the northern Sumatran portion of the maritime silk route. One seacliff exposure on the eastern side of the Lambaro headlands reveals two beds of tsunamigenic coral rubble within a small alluvial fan. Radiocarbon and Uranium-Thorium disequilibrium dates indicate emplacement of the coral rubble after 1344 ± 3 C.E. Another seacliff exposure, on the western side of the peninsula, contains evidence of nearly continuous settlement from ~1240 C.E. to soon after 1366 ± 3 C.E., terminated by tsunami destruction. At both sites, the tsunamis are likely coincident with sudden uplift of coral reefs above the Sunda megathrust 1394 ± 2 C.E., evidence for which has been published previously. The tsunami (or tsunami pair) appears to have destroyed a vibrant port community and led to the temporary recentering of marine trade dominance to more protected locations farther east. The reestablishment of vibrant communities along the devastated coast by about 1500 CE set the stage for the 2004 disaster.

  15. Mental health in Aceh--Indonesia: A decade after the devastating tsunami 2004.

    PubMed

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Yessi, Sarifah; Aichberger, Marion C; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-02-01

    The province of Aceh has suffered enormously from the perennial armed conflict and the devastating Tsunami in 2004. Despite the waves of external aid and national concern geared toward improving healthcare services as part of the reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts after the Tsunami, mental health services still require much attention. This paper aims to understand the mental healthcare system in Aceh Province, Indonesia; its main focus is on the burden, on the healthcare system, its development, service delivery and cultural issues from the devastating Tsunami in 2004 until the present. We reviewed those published and unpublished reports from the local and national government, from international instances (UN bodies, NGOs) and from the academic literature pertaining to mental health related programs conducted in Aceh. To some extent, mental health services in Aceh have been improved compared to their condition before the Tsunami. The development programs have focused on procurement of policy, improvement of human resources, and enhancing service delivery. Culture and religious beliefs shape the pathways by which people seek mental health treatment. The political system also determines the development of the mental health service in the province. The case of Aceh is a unique example where conflict and disaster serve as the catalysts toward the development of a mental healthcare system. Several factors contribute to the improvement of the mental health system, but security is a must. Whilst the Acehnese enjoy the improvements, some issues such as stigma, access to care and political fluctuations remain challenging. PMID:26957340

  16. Analysis of rupture area of aftershocks caused by twin earthquakes (Case study: 11 April 2012 earthquakes of Aceh-North Sumatra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diansari, Angga Vertika; Purwana, Ibnu; Subakti, Hendri

    2015-04-01

    The 11 April 2012 earthquakes off-shore Aceh-North Sumatra are unique events for the history of Indonesian earthquake. It is unique because that they have similar magnitude, 8.5 Mw and 8.1 Mw; close to epicenter distance, similar strike-slip focal mechanism, and occuring in outer rise area. The purposes of this research are: (1) comparing area of earthquakes base on models and that of calculation, (2) fitting the shape and the area of earthquake rupture zones, (3) analyzing the relationship between rupture area and magnitude of the earthquakes. Rupture area of the earthquake fault are determined by using 4 different formulas, i.e. Utsu and Seki (1954), Wells and Coppersmith (1994), Ellsworth (2003), and Christophersen and Smith (2000). The earthquakes aftershock parameters are taken from PGN (PusatGempabumiNasional or National Earthquake Information Center) of BMKG (Indonesia Agency Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics). The aftershock epicenters are plotted by GMT's software. After that, ellipse and rectangular models of aftershock spreading are made. The results show that: (1) rupture areas were calculated using magnitude relationship which are larger than the the aftershock distributions model, (2) the best fitting model for that earthquake aftershock distribution is rectangular associated with Utsu and Seki (1954) formula, (3) the larger the magnitude of the earthquake, the larger area of the fault.

  17. Analysis of rupture area of aftershocks caused by twin earthquakes (Case study: 11 April 2012 earthquakes of Aceh-North Sumatra)

    SciTech Connect

    Diansari, Angga Vertika Purwana, Ibnu; Subakti, Hendri

    2015-04-24

    The 11 April 2012 earthquakes off-shore Aceh-North Sumatra are unique events for the history of Indonesian earthquake. It is unique because that they have similar magnitude, 8.5 Mw and 8.1 Mw; close to epicenter distance, similar strike-slip focal mechanism, and occuring in outer rise area. The purposes of this research are: (1) comparing area of earthquakes base on models and that of calculation, (2) fitting the shape and the area of earthquake rupture zones, (3) analyzing the relationship between rupture area and magnitude of the earthquakes. Rupture area of the earthquake fault are determined by using 4 different formulas, i.e. Utsu and Seki (1954), Wells and Coppersmith (1994), Ellsworth (2003), and Christophersen and Smith (2000). The earthquakes aftershock parameters are taken from PGN (PusatGempabumiNasional or National Earthquake Information Center) of BMKG (Indonesia Agency Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics). The aftershock epicenters are plotted by GMT’s software. After that, ellipse and rectangular models of aftershock spreading are made. The results show that: (1) rupture areas were calculated using magnitude relationship which are larger than the the aftershock distributions model, (2) the best fitting model for that earthquake aftershock distribution is rectangular associated with Utsu and Seki (1954) formula, (3) the larger the magnitude of the earthquake, the larger area of the fault.

  18. Rapid response: email, immediacy, and medical humanitarianism in Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Grayman, Jesse Hession

    2014-11-01

    After more than 20 years of sporadic separatist insurgency, the Free Aceh Movement and the Indonesian government signed an internationally brokered peace agreement in August 2005, just eight months after the Indian Ocean tsunami devastated Aceh's coastal communities. This article presents a medical humanitarian case study based on ethnographic data I collected while working for a large aid agency in post-conflict Aceh from 2005 to 2007. In December 2005, the agency faced the first test of its medical and negotiation capacities to provide psychiatric care to a recently amnestied political prisoner whose erratic behavior upon returning home led to his re-arrest and detention at a district police station. I juxtapose two methodological approaches-an ethnographic content analysis of the agency's email archive and field-based participant-observation-to recount contrasting narrative versions of the event. I use this contrast to illustrate and critique the immediacy of the humanitarian imperative that characterizes the industry. Immediacy is explored as both an urgent moral impulse to assist in a crisis and a form of mediation that seemingly projects neutral and transparent transmission of content. I argue that the sense of immediacy afforded by email enacts and amplifies the humanitarian imperative at the cost of abstracting elite humanitarian actors out of local and moral context. As a result, the management and mediation of this psychiatric case by email produced a bureaucratic model of care that failed to account for complex conditions of chronic political and medical instability on the ground. PMID:24788052

  19. Remote sensing-based neural network mapping of tsunami damage in Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, Matthew J; Lumsdon, Parivash; Miller, David R

    2007-09-01

    In addition to the loss of human life, the tsunami event of 26 December 2004 caused extensive damage to coastal areas. The scale of the disaster was such that remote sensing may be the only way to determine its effects on the landscape. This paper presents the results of a neural network-based mapping of part of the region of Aceh, Sumatra. Before-and-after satellite imagery, combined with a novel neural network methodology, enabled a characterisation of landscape change. The neural network technique used a threshold of acceptance for identification, in combination with a bootstrapped identification method for identifying problem pixels. Map analysis allowed identification of urban areas that were inaccessible by road, and which aid agencies could therefore only reach by air or sea. The methods used provide a rapid and effective mapping ability and would be a useful tool for aid agencies, insurance underwriters and environmental monitoring. PMID:17714164

  20. April 2012 intra-oceanic seismicity off Sumatra boosted by the Banda-Aceh megathrust.

    PubMed

    Delescluse, Matthias; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Cattin, Rodolphe; Fleitout, Luce; Trubienko, Olga; Vigny, Christophe

    2012-10-11

    Large earthquakes nucleate at tectonic plate boundaries, and their occurrence within a plate's interior remains rare and poorly documented, especially offshore. The two large earthquakes that struck the northeastern Indian Ocean on 11 April 2012 are an exception: they are the largest strike-slip events reported in historical times and triggered large aftershocks worldwide. Yet they occurred within an intra-oceanic setting along the fossil fabric of the extinct Wharton basin, rather than on a discrete plate boundary. Here we show that the 11 April 2012 twin earthquakes are part of a continuing boost of the intraplate deformation between India and Australia that followed the Aceh 2004 and Nias 2005 megathrust earthquakes, subsequent to a stress transfer process recognized at other subduction zones. Using Coulomb stress change calculations, we show that the coseismic slips of the Aceh and Nias earthquakes can promote oceanic left-lateral strike-slip earthquakes on pre-existing meridian-aligned fault planes. We further show that persistent viscous relaxation in the asthenospheric mantle several years after the Aceh megathrust explains the time lag between the 2004 megathrust and the 2012 intraplate events. On a short timescale, the 2012 events provide new evidence for the interplay between megathrusts at the subduction interface and intraplate deformation offshore. On a longer geological timescale, the Australian plate, driven by slab-pull forces at the Sunda trench, is detaching from the Indian plate, which is subjected to resisting forces at the Himalayan front. PMID:23023134

  1. Malaria prevalence in Nias District, North Sumatra Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Syafruddin, Din; Asih, Puji BS; Wahid, Isra; Dewi, Rita M; Tuti, Sekar; Laowo, Idaman; Hulu, Waozidohu; Zendrato, Pardamean; Laihad, Ferdinand; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2007-01-01

    Background The Nias district of the North Sumatra Province of Indonesia has long been known to be endemic for malaria. Following the economic crisis at the end of 1998 and the subsequent tsunami and earthquake, in December 2004 and March 2005, respectively, the malaria control programme in the area deteriorated. The present study aims to provide baseline data for the establishment of a suitable malaria control programme in the area and to analyse the frequency distribution of drug resistance alleles associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. Methods Malariometric and entomology surveys were performed in three subdistricts. Thin and thick blood smears were stained with Giemsa and examined under binocular light microscopy. Blood blots on filter paper were also prepared for isolation of parasite and host DNA to be used for molecular analysis of band 3 (SAO), pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr, and dhps. In addition, haemoglobin measurement was performed in the second and third surveys for the subjects less than 10 years old. Results Results of the three surveys revealed an average slide positivity rate of 8.13%, with a relatively higher rate in certain foci. Host genetic analysis, to identify the Band 3 deletion associated with Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis (SAO), revealed an overall frequency of 1.0% among the 1,484 samples examined. One hundred six Plasmodium falciparum isolates from three sub-districts were successfully analysed. Alleles of the dhfr and dhps genes associated with resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, dhfr C59R and S108N, and dhps A437G and K540E, were present at frequencies of 52.2%, 82.5%, 1.18% and 1.18%, respectively. The pfmdr1 alleles N86Y and N1042D, putatively associated with mefloquine resistance, were present at 31.4% and 2%, respectively. All but one sample carried the pfcrt 76T allele associated with chloroquine resistance. Entomologic surveys identified three potential anopheline vectors in the area, Anopheles

  2. Community Willingness to Participate in a Dengue Study in Aceh Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Samsul; Bustaman, Aslam; Radiansyah, Arsil; Angraini, Pradiba; Fasli, Riny; Salwiyadi, Salwiyadi; Bastian, Reza Akbar; Oktiviyari, Ade; Akmal, Imaduddin; Iqbalamin, Muhammad; Adil, Jamalul; Henrizal, Fenni; Darmayanti, Darmayanti; Pratama, Rovy; Fajar, Jonny Karunia; Setiawan, Abdul Malik; Imrie, Allison; Kuch, Ulrich; Groneberg, David Alexander; Sasmono, R. Tedjo; Dhimal, Meghnath; Müller, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection is the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease in the world. Essential research on dengue virus transmission and its prevention requires community participation. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the factors that are associated with the willingness of communities in high prevalence areas to participate in dengue research. The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with the willingness of healthy community members in Aceh province, Indonesia, to participate in dengue research that would require phlebotomy. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out in nine regencies and municipalities of Aceh from November 2014 to March 2015. Interviews using a set of validated questionnaires were conducted to collect data on demography, history of dengue infection, socioeconomic status, and knowledge, attitude and practice regarding dengue fever. Two-step logistic regression and Spearman’s rank correlation (rs) analysis were used to assess the influence of independent variables on dependent variables. Among 535 participants, less than 20% had a good willingness to participate in the dengue study. The factors associated with good willingness to participate were being female, working as a civil servant, private employee or entrepreneur, having a high socioeconomic status and good knowledge, attitude and practice regarding dengue. Good knowledge and attitude regarding dengue were positive independent predictors of willingness to participate (OR: 2.30 [95% CI: 1.36–3.90] and 3.73 [95% CI: 2.24–6.21], respectively). Conclusion/Significance The willingness to participate in dengue research is very low among community members in Aceh, and the two most important associated factors are knowledge and attitude regarding dengue. To increase participation rate, efforts to improve the knowledge and attitude of community members regarding dengue fever and dengue-related research is required

  3. Cholera in Indonesia: epidemiologic studies of transmission in Aceh Province.

    PubMed

    Glass, R I; Alim, A R; Eusof, A; Snyder, J D; Jusuf, B; Anwar, S; Bakri, Z; Helmi, C; Winardi, B

    1984-09-01

    To determine the modes of transmission of cholera in the regency of Pidie, Indonesia, and to consider strategies for its control, we set up a laboratory to identify Vibrio cholerae 01 from patients with severe diarrhea in all government clinics in the regency and questioned culture-positive cases and neighborhood controls about possible exposures to V. cholerae 01. Between 12 July and 15 August 1982, 63 of 138 suspected cholera cases were confirmed by the laboratory; 53 of these patients were seen and followed up. We were unable to identify a single, indisputable mode of transmission for cholera which was amenable to immediate control. Nonetheless, a number of factors, including exposure to water from the Tiro-Sigli River and consumption of ice, were associated with disease. Other findings bring into question the value of current practices of chlorinating dugwells and disinfecting homes with Lysol during a cholera outbreak. The case-control approach to investigating the mode of transmission of cholera has distinct limitations when applied in endemic setting where there may not be a single predominant vehicle of transmission, or where the vehicle such as river water is used by all and is only periodically contaminated. PMID:6486303

  4. Dividing disasters in Aceh, Indonesia: separatist conflict and tsunami, human rights and humanitarianism.

    PubMed

    Zeccola, Paul

    2011-04-01

    This paper examines the interface between human rights and humanitarian action in the context of the conflict and tsunami in Aceh, Indonesia, between 1998 and 2007. It looks at the challenges international humanitarian non-governmental organisations (NGOs) faced as they engaged in human rights work in the conflict period and in conflict-related activities in the post-tsunami period. The paper argues that many large NGOs may have compromised what some would hold to be essential principles for humanitarian action because of domestic political concerns, donor restrictions and resistance among certain NGO chiefs. In contrast with the pre-tsunami period, in which NGOs worked for years amid military operations, in the post-tsunami period NGOs were decidedly apolitical, neglecting the conflict in their tsunami response--despite significant developments that permitted greater political engagement in Aceh's post-conflict transformation. The evidence suggests that NGOs are challenged in contextualising humanitarian responses and that there is a need to underscore donor flexibility and independence in humanitarian action. PMID:21054497

  5. Sedimentary deposits of the 26 December 2004 tsunami on the northwest coast of Aceh, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, A.; Nishimura, Y.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Kamataki, T.; Triyono, R.

    2006-01-01

    The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman tsunami flooded coastal northern Sumatra to a depth of over 20 m, deposited a discontinuous sheet of sand up to 80 cm thick, and left mud up to 5 km inland. In most places the sand sheet is normally graded, and in some it contains complex internal stratigraphy. Structures within the sand sheet may record the passage of up to 3 individual waves. We studied the 2004 tsunami deposits in detail along a flow-parallel transect about 400 m long, 16 km southwest of Banda Aceh. Near the shore along this transect, the deposit is thin or absent. Between 50 and 400 m inland it ranges in thickness from 5 to 20 cm. The main trend in thickness is a tendency to thicken by filling low spots, most dramatically at pre-existing stream channels. Deposition generally attended inundation - along the transect, the tsunami deposited sand to within about 40 m of the inundation limit. Although the tsunami deposit contains primarily material indistinguishable from material found on the beach one month after the event, it also contains grain sizes and compositions unavailable on the current beach. Along the transect we studied, these grains become increasingly dominant both landward and upward in the deposit; possibly some landward source of sediment was exposed and exploited by the passage of the waves. The deposit also contains the unabraded shells of subtidal marine organisms, suggesting that at least part of the deposit came from offshore. Grain sizes within the deposit tend to fine upward and landward, although individual units within the deposit appear massive, or show reverse grading. Sorting becomes better landward, although the most landward sites generally become poorly sorted from the inclusion of soil clasts. These sites commonly show interlayering of sandy units and soil clast units. Deposits from the 2004 tsunami in Sumatra demonstrate the complex nature of the deposits of large tsunamis. Unlike the deposits of smaller tsunamis, internal stratigraphy is

  6. Assessment of shale-oil resources of the Central Sumatra Basin, Indonesia, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 459 million barrels of shale oil, 275 billion cubic feet of associated gas, and 23 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Central Sumatra Basin, Indonesia.

  7. Determining the Controlling Factors of Coastal Development along an Active Margin - A Case Study from Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Katrin; Meilianda, Ella; Hill, Emma; McAdoo, Brian; Qiang, Qui; Storms, Joep; Walstra, Dirk-Jan; Setiawan, Agus; Masputri, Aisha S.; Mayasari, Cut D.; Riandi, Indra; Nasir, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the recovery of shorelines after catastrophic events is crucial for sustainable coastal development and future hazard mitigation. Here, we present post-seismic coastal development data from West Aceh, Indonesia, an area that was severely affected by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami. Using a combined approach of spatial data analysis, field surveys and numerical modeling, we reconstruct the build-up of a new beach ridge along a 10 kilometer long stretch of the western Acehnese coast after the complete destruction of the beach in 2004. The coastline of West Aceh can be characterized as a microtidal, wave dominated environment with the wave climate being controlled by the monsoon seasons reaching a significant wave height of Hs = 1.2 m during the more energetic West Monsoon from April to September. Waves approach the shoreline at a very low angle resulting in minor and variable longshore sediment transport. The beach has an average foreshore slope of 0.07 and is composed of well sorted medium sand. Recently obtained bathymetric data indicates a steep upper shoreface with a slope of 0.03. Further offshore the slope decreases to 0.01 with 14 m water depth being reached in about 700 m distance to the shoreline. Grab samples obtained in 10 m water depth are composed of fine to medium sand but lenses of medium to coarse sand with abundant shell debris do also occur. Beach ridges can be traced up to 2 km inland and indicate long-term coastal progradation and abundant sediment supply to the littoral zone. The western Acehnese shoreline parallels the Sunda trench and subsided 50 to 100 cm during the 2004 rupture. Modeled land elevation changes as a result of afterslip and viscoelastic mantle relaxation, indicate rapid post-seismic uplift of 4.4 cm/year in the year following the earthquake, but more moderate uplift rates of 1.4 cm/year since mid-2006. In 2004, co-seismic subsidence and tsunami scouring caused the coastline to

  8. Outbreak of tetanus cases following the tsunami in Aceh Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Aceh Province in Indonesia was the area most severely affected by the tsunami of 26 December 2004. Extensive loss of life, property, and livelihood left a large segment of the population without basic needs and vulnerable to epidemic-prone diseases. Following the tsunami, a surveillance/early warning and response system was implemented to detect, investigate, and respond to outbreaks of communicable diseases. Fixed and mobile clinics, hospitals, and laboratories, operating all over the affected areas, reported weekly figures and daily alerts. Over 1 month following the tsunami, 106 cases of clinically diagnosed tetanus were reported. Most cases occurred among adults. The case fatality ratio was 18.9%, higher among older patients and among those with short incubation periods. No other major outbreaks occurred in the acute phase of the emergency. This series of tetanus cases was the largest cluster reported following a natural disaster or mass casualty event, overtaken only by the recent earthquake in the Kashmir (139 cases reported), and reflects the high number of injuries which occurred during the tsunami and poor prior immunization status of the population. In the context of natural disasters, preventive measures against tetanus, including wound cleaning and active and passive immunization, should be routinely conducted. Immediate disaster relief should include supplies for the management of wounds and cases of tetanus. PMID:19153905

  9. A melt inclusion study of the Toba Tuffs, Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesner, Craig A.; Luhr, James F.

    2010-11-01

    The Toba Caldera in Northern Sumatra, Indonesia is the site of Earth's largest Quaternary volcanic eruption. This eruption, dated at 74 ka, produced the 2800 km 3 Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) and ash-fall. Quartz-bearing silicic pumices ranging from 68 to 77 wt.% SiO 2 indicate that the YTT magma was zoned compositionally and mineralogically. Prior to the YTT eruption, two other silicic quartz-bearing tuffs known as the Middle Toba Tuff (MTT) and the Oldest Toba Tuff (OTT) were erupted from Toba at 0.501 Ma and 0.840 Ma respectively. Although the volatile contents of the Toba magmas are poorly constrained, aerosols generated by the YTT eruption are generally thought to have caused a global volcanic winter. An evaluation of the pre-eruptive dissolved gas contents of the YTT magma is fundamental to understanding the global effects of this eruption. We used melt inclusions in quartz crystals to determine the dissolved H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl, and F contents of the YTT, MTT, and OTT magmas. Quartz crystals selected from pumice blocks and welded tuffs that spanned the compositional ranges of the three units were chosen for study. Major and trace element analyses of melt inclusions were also conducted to characterize melt evolution and provide context to the volatile data. Melt inclusions from the YTT, MTT, and OTT are rhyolitic in composition (73-77 wt.% SiO 2) and have overlapping, indistinguishable major element trends. Inclusions from the large eruptions (YTT and OTT) have similar geochemical relationships where the most evolved melt inclusions occur in the least silicic bulk rock samples and are more evolved than their matrix glasses. In contrast, the least evolved melt inclusions occur in the most silicic samples and either overlap with, or are less evolved than their matrix glasses. These patterns can be explained if quartz crystals in the least silicic magmas were inherited from more evolved melt, while those in the most silicic melt formed in-situ. Several lines of

  10. Impacts of soil and groundwater salinization on tree crop performance in post-tsunami Aceh Barat, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marohn, C.; Distel, A.; Dercon, G.; Wahyunto; Tomlinson, R.; Noordwijk, M. v.; Cadisch, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004 had far reaching consequences for agriculture in Aceh province, Indonesia, and particularly in Aceh Barat district, 150 km from the seaquake epicentre. In this study, the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of soil and groundwater salinity and their impact on tree crops were monitored in Aceh Barat from 2006 to 2008. On 48 sampling points along ten transects, covering 40 km of coastline, soil and groundwater salinity were measured and related to mortality and yield depression of the locally most important tree crops. Given a yearly rainfall of over 3000 mm, initial groundwater salinity declined rapidly from over 10 to less than 2 mS cm-1 within two years. On the other hand, seasonal dynamics of the groundwater table in combination with intrusion of saline water into the groundwater body led to recurring elevated salinity, sufficient to affect crops. Tree mortality and yield depression in the flooded area varied considerably between tree species. Damage to coconut (65% trees damaged) was related to tsunami run-up height, while rubber (50% trees damaged) was mainly affected by groundwater salinity. Coconut yields (-35% in average) were constrained by groundwater Ca2+ and Mg2+, while rubber yields (-65% on average) were related to groundwater chloride, pH and soil sodium. These findings have implications on planting deep-rooted tree crops as growth will be constrained by ongoing oscillations of the groundwater table and salinity.

  11. Remittances and circulation behavior in the livelihood process: transmigrant families in South Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Leinbach, T R; Watkins, J F

    1998-01-01

    The impact of migrant remittances in Indonesia is examined using data gathered in interviews undertaken in 21 households and with village leaders participating in the transmigration program in Cinta Karya, Sumatra, Indonesia. "Our findings illustrate that remittance behavior is spatially controlled and temporally variable, as families balance their labor and capital resources among farm production, local industry and investments, and the often unpredictable nature of circulation employment and remittances. We emphasize the linked and recursive nature of elements in the livelihood process and the related importance of temporal family dynamics in decision-making strategies." PMID:12321332

  12. Increasing potential of biomass burning over Sumatra, Indonesia induced by anthropogenic tropical warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartika Lestari, R.; Watanabe, Masahiro; Imada, Yukiko; Shiogama, Hideo; Field, Robert D.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Kimoto, Masahide

    2014-10-01

    Uncontrolled biomass burning in Indonesia during drought periods damages the landscape, degrades regional air quality, and acts as a disproportionately large source of greenhouse gas emissions. The expansion of forest fires is mostly observed in October in Sumatra favored by persistent droughts during the dry season from June to November. The contribution of anthropogenic warming to the probability of severe droughts is not yet clear. Here, we show evidence that past events in Sumatra were exacerbated by anthropogenic warming and that they will become more frequent under a future emissions scenario. By conducting two sets of atmospheric general circulation model ensemble experiments driven by observed sea surface temperature for 1960-2011, one with and one without an anthropogenic warming component, we found that a recent weakening of the Walker circulation associated with tropical ocean warming increased the probability of severe droughts in Sumatra, despite increasing tropical-mean precipitation. A future increase in the frequency of droughts is then suggested from our analyses of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 model ensembles. Increasing precipitation to the north of the equator accompanies drier conditions over Indonesia, amplified by enhanced ocean surface warming in the central equatorial Pacific. The resultant precipitation decrease leads to a ˜25% increase in severe drought events from 1951-2000 to 2001-2050. Our results therefore indicate the global warming impact to a potential of wide-spreading forest fires over Indonesia, which requires mitigation policy for disaster prevention.

  13. Spawning seasons of Rasbora tawarensis (Pisces: Cyprinidae) in Lake Laut Tawar, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rasbora tawarensis is an endemic freshwater fish in Lake Laut Tawar, Aceh Province, Indonesia. Unfortunately, its status is regarded as critical endangered with populations decreasing in recent years. To date no information on the spawning activities of the fish are available. Therefore, this study provides a contribution to the knowledge on reproductive biology of R. tawarensis especially on spawning seasons as well as basic information for conservation of the species. Methods Monthly sampling was conducted from April 2008 to March 2009 by using selective gillnets. The gonadosomatic index, size composition and sex ratio were assessed. The gonadal development was evaluated based on macroscopic and microscopic examinations of the gonads. Results The gonadosomatic index (GSI) varied between 6.65 to 18.16 in female and 4.94 to 8.56 for male. GSI of the female R. tawarensis was higher in March, September and December indicating the onset of reproductive seasons, the GSI and oocyte size being directly correlated with gonadal development stages. Although, a greater proportion of mature male than female was detected during the study, the sex ratio showed that the overall number of female was higher than male. The ovaries had multiple oocyte size classes at every stage of gonadal development, thus R. tawarensis can be classified as a group synchronous spawner or a fractional multiple spawner. Conclusion The spawning seasons of R. tawarensis were three times a year and September being the peak of the reproductive season and the female was the predominant sex. This species is classified as a group synchronous spawner. PMID:20482777

  14. Basin modeling of Jambi Subbasin, South Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Halik, N. ); Wu, C. )

    1994-07-01

    The Jambi Subbasin is part of the South Sumatra Basin, a Tertiary back-arc basin formed by the collision between the Sundaland and Indian Plate. The Oligocene synrift Lahat Formation, and the Miocene postrift Talang Akar, Batu Raja, Gumai, and Air Benakat formations are stratigraphic intervals for potential hydrocarbon exploration. Most of the hydrocarbons have been produced from the Talang Akar and Air Benakat formations. Detailed age-depth relationship, paleobathymetry, and eustatic sea level were studied for 11 wells. Degrees of transgression and regression, and relative movement of fault blocks were predicted from rates of total and tectonic subsidence. The structural evolution of the Jambi Subbasin was reconstructed using the backstripping method. Results from the burial history modeling have helped in predicting thermal maturity, hydrocarbon generation, and structural development of the Jambi Subbasin. The timing of basement uplifting started from middle-late Miocene and reached the maximum in Pliocene-Pleistocene. Two hydrocarbon migration and accumulation mechanisms were proposed. In the depocenter, hydrocarbons were generated, migrated upward along faults, and trapped in the middle Miocene Air Benakat Formation, whereas in the basin flanks, hydrocarbons were migrated laterally from the depocenter and trapped in the Oligocene Talang Akar Formation. The methodology of this study can be applied to other subbasins in South Sumatra.

  15. Processes of inclusion and adverse incorporation: oil palm and agrarian change in Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2010-01-01

    Changes in globalised agriculture raise critical questions as rapid agricultural development leads to widespread social and environmental transformation. With increased global demand for vegetable oils and biofuel, in Indonesia the area under oil palm has doubled over the last decade. This paper presents a case study of how micro-processes that are linked to wider dynamics shape oil palm related agrarian change in villages in Sumatra, Indonesia. It pursues related questions regarding the impact of agribusiness-driven agriculture, the fate of smallholders experiencing contemporary agrarian transition, and the impact of increased demand for vegetable oils and biofuels on agrarian structures in Sumatra. It argues that the paths of agrarian change are highly uneven and depend on how changing livelihood strategies are enabled or constrained by economic, social and political relations that vary over time and space. In contrast to simplifying narratives of inclusion/exclusion, it argues that outcomes depend on the terms under which smallholders engage with oil palm. Distinguishing between exogenous processes of agribusiness expansion and endogenous commodity market expansion, it finds each is associated with characteristic processes of change. It concludes that the way successive policy interventions have worked with the specific characteristics of oil palm have cumulatively shaped the space where agrarian change occurs in Sumatra. PMID:20873030

  16. Paleoenvironmental conditions in the late Paleogene, Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'shea, Natalie; Arthur Bettis, E.; Zaim, Yahdi; Rizal, Yan; Aswan, Aswan; Gunnell, Gregg F.; Zonneveld, John-Paul; Ciochon, Russell L.

    2015-11-01

    A stratified paleosol sequence exposed in an open pit mine in central Sumatra provides a record of the paleoenvironmental conditions in the lower reaches of a large river system in the late Paleogene (latest Eocene or Oligocene). Morphological, geochemical, and stable isotope data suggest that the sequence represents a mosaic of local environmental conditions changing from estuarine to riverine up section. Weakly expressed soils formed on low-lying estuary surfaces, while more well expressed soils formed on higher, better drained surfaces. Peatlands (coal) with clayey subsoils were along the estuary margins. Well-expressed soils with evidence of clay translocation and chemical weathering become more common higher in the section where alluvial deposits associated with a meandering river are dominant. Stable carbon isotope ratios support a paleolandscape dominated by C3 plants with input by C4 vegetation limited to a few intervals. Finally, whole-rock geochemistry suggests moderate chemical weathering consistent with a tropical locality. This multi-proxy paleoenvironmental reconstruction suggests a highly productive lowland forest environment at this locality in the late Paleogene and provides the first direct examination of the terrestrial environment in Sumatra at this time. The limited fossil record in Island Southeast Asia during this time period is likely a result of poor bone and shell preservation in tropical forest environments combined with a general lack of systematic prospecting. However, our continuing work in this area has produced a relatively diverse assemblage of fossil vertebrates, now including fishes, amphibians, turtles, crocodiles, and mammals, as well as a growing diversity of fossil plants.

  17. Utilization of the Local Government Health Insurance Scheme (JKA) for Maternal Health Services Among Women Living in Underdeveloped Areas of Aceh Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kesuma, Zurnila Marli; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi

    2015-04-01

    Aceh province of Indonesia created its own health coverage scheme called Jaminan Kesehatan Aceh (JKA) to cover Aceh's populations who were not registered under insurance for the poor (Jamkesmas). This study aims to compare the utilization rate of maternal health care (MHC) services and contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) before JKA, during the transition period, and after JKA had been established. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted from June 2011 to July 2012. Utilization of MHC services and CPR during the 3 periods was assessed using a questionnaire. The Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) test was used to examine the association between period and coverage. Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used to examine utilization and type of service, period of service, and type of scheme. Coverage of utilization of skilled birth attendants significantly improved among the JKA holders (odds ratio = 1.84; 95% confidence interval = 1.18-2.89). JKA, thus, has shown its positive impact. PMID:24566605

  18. Parathelphusa pardus, a new species of lowland freshwater crab from swamps in central Sumatra, Indonesia (Crustacea: Brachyura: Gecarcinucidae).

    PubMed

    Ng, Peter K L; Riady, Rikhi; Windarti, Windarti

    2016-01-01

    A new species of gecarcinucid freshwater crab of the genus Parathelphusa H. Milne Edwards, 1853, is described from freshwater swamp habitats in Pekanbaru, Riau Province, in central-eastern Sumatra, Indonesia. Parathelphusa pardus sp. nov., has a very distinctive colour pattern, and in this respect, resembles P. maindroni (Rathbun, 1902) from Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia; P. batamensis Ng, 1992, from Batam Island, Indonesia; P. reticulata Ng, 1990, from Singapore; and P. oxygona Nobili, 1901, from western Sarawak. It can be distinguished from these species and congeners by a suite of carapace, ambulatory leg, thoracic sternal and most importantly, male first gonopod characters. PMID:27394277

  19. Contribution of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to reconstruct flooding characteristics of a 4220 BP tsunami from a thick unconsolidated structureless deposit (Banda Aceh, Sumatra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmer, Patrick; Gomez, Christopher; Iskandasyah, T. Yan W. M.; Lavigne, Franck; Sartohadi, Junun

    2015-07-01

    One of the main concerns of deciphering tsunami sedimentary records along seashore is to link the emplaced layers with marine high energy events. Based on a combination of morphologic features, sedimentary figures, grain size characteristics, fossils content, microfossils assemblages, geochemical elements, heavy minerals presence; it is, in principle, possible to relate the sedimentary record to a tsunami event. However, experience shows that sometimes, in reason of a lack of any visible sedimentary features, it is hard to decide between a storm and a tsunami origin. To solve this issue, the authors have used the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to evidence the sediment fabric. The validity of the method for reconstructing flow direction has been proved when applied on sediments in the aftermath of a tsunami event, for which the behaviour was well documented (2004 IOT). We present herein an application of this method for a 56 cm thick paleo-deposit dated 4220 BP laying under the soil covered by the 2004 IOT, SE of Banda Aceh, North Sumatra. We analysed this homogenous deposit, lacking of any visible structure, using methods of classic sedimentology to confirm the occurrence of a high energy event. We then applied AMS technique that allowed the reconstruction of flow characteristics during sediment emplacement. We show that all the sequence was emplaced by uprush phases and that the local topography played a role on the re-orientation of a part of the uprush flow, creating strong reverse current. This particular behaviour was reported by eyewitnesses during the 2004 IOT event.

  20. Geochemistry and petrology of selected coal samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Tewalt, S.J.; Hower, J.C.; Stucker, J.D.; O'Keefe, J. M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Indonesia has become the world's largest exporter of thermal coal and is a major supplier to the Asian coal market, particularly as the People's Republic of China is now (2007) and perhaps may remain a net importer of coal. Indonesia has had a long history of coal production, mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan, but only in the last two decades have government and commercial forces resulted in a remarkable coal boom. A recent assessment of Indonesian coal-bed methane (CBM) potential has motivated active CBM exploration. Most of the coal is Paleogene and Neogene, low to moderate rank and has low ash yield and sulfur (generally < 10 and < 1??wt.%, respectively). Active tectonic and igneous activity has resulted in significant rank increase in some coal basins. Eight coal samples are described that represent the major export and/or resource potential of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. Detailed geochemistry, including proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, and major, minor, and trace element determinations are presented. Organic petrology and vitrinite reflectance data reflect various precursor flora assemblages and rank variations, including sample composites from active igneous and tectonic areas. A comparison of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) elements abundance with world and US averages show that the Indonesian coals have low combustion pollution potential.

  1. The 2007 Sumatra seismic sequence revealed by a regional seismic network in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Inoue, H.; Kumagai, H.; Yamashina, T.; Sunarjo; Fauzi; Suhardjono

    2007-12-01

    On September 12, 2007, a great earthquake with Mw 8.4 occurred at 11:10 (UTC) off Bengkulu, Sumatra, Indonesia. This event was followed by a large earthquake with Mw 8.0, which occurred at 23:49 (UTC) on the same day in the northwest of the Mw 8.4 earthquake. Another earthquake with Mw 6.8 occurred off Padang, in the northwest of the second earthquake, at 03:35 (UTC) on the next day. These earthquakes caused dozens of casualties and damage to the buildings in Bengkulu and Padang areas. Tsunami with a hight of 1m was observed in Padang, but no severe damage by tsunami was reported. We have been developing an automated system for rapid source parameter determinations of earthquakes in Indonesia, using data obtained from a broadband seismic network in this country (JISNET). This network is operated by NIED and Indonesia Meteorological and Geophysical Agency (BMG). In our method, the moment function is estimated simultaneously with a centroid moment tensor (CMT) solution based on the waveform inversion carried out in the frequency domain. The source parameters for an earthquake greater than Mw 5 can be determined automatically by our system within 15 minutes after the occurrence of an earthquake. The automatic inversion result is then checked manually. The source parameters of earthquakes that are not determined by the automatic system are also determined manually. The source parameters of the 2007 Sumatra earthquakes were succesfully determined by our system. The estimated focal mechanisms show similar thrust-type faultings, suggesting that these earthquakes occurred in association with the subduction of the Indo-Australian Plate beneath Sumatra Island. Both the Mw 8.4 and 8.0 events occurred at a depth of about 20 km. The rupture durations estimated from the moment functions are 140 s and 108 s for the Mw 8.4 and Mw 8.0 events, respectively. These rupture durations are slightly longer than typical values for earthquakes of these magnitudes. The aftershocks are

  2. Prototype Tsunami Evacuation Park in Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, B. E.; Cedillos, V.; Deierlein, G.; Di Mauro, M.; Kornberg, K.

    2012-12-01

    Padang, Indonesia, a city of some 900,000 people, half of whom live close to the coast and within a five-meter elevation above sea level, has one of the highest tsunami risks in the world due to its close offshore thrust-fault seismic hazard, flat terrain and dense population. There is a high probability that a tsunami will strike the shores of Padang, flooding half of the area of the city, within the next 30 years. If that tsunami occurred today, it is estimated that several hundred thousand people would die, as they could not reach safe ground in the ~30 minute interval between the earthquake's occurrence and the tsunami's arrival. Padang's needs have been amply demonstrated: after earthquakes in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012, citizens, thinking that those earthquakes might cause a tsunami, tried to evacuate in cars and motorbikes, which created traffic jams, and most could not reach safe ground in 30 minutes. Since 2008, GeoHazards International (GHI) and Stanford University have studied a range of options for improving this situation, including ways to accelerate evacuation to high ground with pedestrian bridges and widened roads, and means of "vertical" evacuation in multi-story buildings, mosques, pedestrian overpasses, and Tsunami Evacuation Parks (TEPs), which are man-made hills with recreation facilities on top. TEPs proved most practical and cost-effective for Padang, given the available budget, technology and time. The Earth Observatory Singapore (EOS) developed an agent-based model that simulates pedestrian and vehicular evacuation to assess tsunami risk and risk reduction interventions in Southeast Asia. EOS applied this model to analyze the effectiveness in Padang of TEPs over other tsunami risk management approaches in terms of evacuation times and the number of people saved. The model shows that only ~24,000 people (20% of the total population) in the northern part of Padang can reach safe ground within 30 minutes, if people evacuate using cars and

  3. The correlation of 2D-resistivity and magnetic methods in fault verification at northern Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaruddin, Nur Aminuda; Saad, Rosli; Nordiana, M. M.; Azwin, I. N.

    2015-04-01

    The Great Sumatra Fault system was split into two sub-parallel lines or segments at the Northern Sumatra. This event is one of the impacts of powerful earthquakes that hit Sumatra Island especially one that occurred in 2004. These two sub-parallel segments known as Aceh and Seulimeum fault. The study is focused on the Seulimeum fault and two geophysical methods chosen aimed to compare and verified the result obtained respectively. 2-D resistivity method is a common geophysical method used in determination of near surface structures such as faults, cavities, voids and sinkholes. Meanwhile, the magnetic method often chosen to delineate subsurface structures, determine depth of magnetic source bodies and possibly sediment thickness. Three survey lines of resistivity method and randomly magnetic stations were carried out covering Krueng district. The resistivity data processed using Res2Dinv and result presented using Surfer software. The fault identified by the contrast of low and high resistivity value. Meanwhile, the magnetic data were presented in magnetic residual contour map and the extended fault system is suspected represent by the contrast value of the magnetic anomalies. Within suspected fault zone, the results of resistivity are tally with magnetic result.

  4. Geochemistry of Selected Coal Samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Indonesia is an archipelago of more than 17,000 islands that stretches astride the equator for about 5,200 km in southeast Asia (figure 1) and includes major Cenozoic volcano-plutonic arcs, active volcanoes, and various related onshore and offshore basins. These magmatic arcs have extensive Cu and Au mineralization that has generated much exploration and mining in the last 50 years. Although Au and Ag have been mined in Indonesia for over 1000 years (van Leeuwen, 1994), it was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that the Dutch explored and developed major Sn and minor Au, Ag, Ni, bauxite, and coal resources. The metallogeny of Indonesia includes Au-rich porphyry Cu, porphyry Mo, skarn Cu-Au, sedimentary-rock hosted Au, epithermal Au, laterite Ni, and diamond deposits. For example, the Grasberg deposit in Papua has the world's largest gold reserves and the third-largest copper reserves (Sillitoe, 1994). Coal mining in Indonesia also has had a long history beginning with the initial production in 1849 in the Mahakam coal field near Pengaron, East Kalimantan; in 1891 in the Ombilin area, Sumatra, (van Leeuwen, 1994); and in South Sumatra in 1919 at the Bukit Asam mine (Soehandojo, 1989). Total production from deposits in Sumatra and Kalimantan, from the 19thth century to World War II, amounted to 40 million metric tons (Mt). After World War II, production declined due to various factors including politics and a boom in the world-wide oil economy. Active exploration and increased mining began again in the 1980's mainly through a change in Indonesian government policy of collaboration with foreign companies and the global oil crises (Prijono, 1989). This recent coal revival (van Leeuwen, 1994) has lead Indonesia to become the largest exporter of thermal (steam) coal and the second largest combined thermal and metallurgical (coking) coal exporter in the world market (Fairhead and others, 2006). The exported coal is desirable as it is low sulfur

  5. Nighttime lights time series of tsunami damage, recovery, and economic metrics in Sumatra, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    GILLESPIE, THOMAS W.; FRANKENBERG, ELIZABETH; CHUM, KAI FUNG; THOMAS, DUNCAN

    2014-01-01

    On 26 December 2004, a magnitude 9.2 earthquake off the west coast of the northern Sumatra, Indonesia resulted in 160,000 Indonesians killed. We examine the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime light imagery brightness values for 307 communities in the Study of the Tsunami Aftermath and Recovery (STAR), a household survey in Sumatra from 2004 to 2008. We examined night light time series between the annual brightness and extent of damage, economic metrics collected from STAR households and aggregated to the community level. There were significant changes in brightness values from 2004 to 2008 with a significant drop in brightness values in 2005 due to the tsunami and pre-tsunami nighttime light values returning in 2006 for all damage zones. There were significant relationships between the nighttime imagery brightness and per capita expenditures, and spending on energy and on food. Results suggest that Defense Meteorological Satellite Program nighttime light imagery can be used to capture the impacts and recovery from the tsunami and other natural disasters and estimate time series economic metrics at the community level in developing countries. PMID:25419471

  6. Fluctuation of diptera larvae in phytotelmata and relation with climate variation in West Sumatra Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Emantis; Dahelmi; Salmah, Siti; Syamsuardi

    2014-07-01

    Research of fluctuations in Diptera's larvae in Phytotelmata had been conducted at three locations in West Sumatra, Indonesia; Padang, Bukittinggi and Payakumbuh; which aimed to determine the number and fluctuations Diptera larvae in Phytotelmata. The results obtained; the highest number of individual larvae Diptera in Phytotelmata was 7109 Aedes albopictus larvae (49.56%), followed by larvae of Culex tritaeniorhynchus with 2409 individuals (16.80%). Larvae fluctuated every month and tent to increase in November and December. There was no difference in the number of Diptera larvae individuals inhabiting pandan, taro, and pineapple, but there were significant differences between the three types of Phytotelmata (pandanus, taro and pineapple) with bamboo (p < 0.05). Number of individual larvae in Phytotelmata negatively correlated with temperature and rainfall, but positively correlated with humidity (r = 0.44: p < 0.05). PMID:26035947

  7. Preliminary study on detection sediment contamination in soil affected by the Indian Ocean giant tsunami 2004 in Aceh, Indonesia using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Nasrullah; Ramli, Muliadi; Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik

    2016-03-01

    This work is intended to asses the capability of LIBS for the detection of the tsunami sediment contamination in soil. LIBS apparatus used in this work consist of a laser system and an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) system. The soil sample was collected from in Banda Aceh City, Aceh, Indonesia, the most affected region by the giant Indian Ocean tsunami 2004. The laser beam was focused onto surface of the soil pellet using a focusing lens to produce luminous plasma. The experiment was conducted under air as surrounding gas at 1 atmosphere. The emission spectral lines from the plasma were detected by the OMA system. It was found that metal including heavy metals can surely be detected, thus implying the potent of LIBS technique as a fast screening tools of tsunami sediment contamination.

  8. Indonesia: Sumatra

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... map of aerosol optical depth, a measure of the abundance of atmospheric particulates. This product used a test version of the MISR ... their outdoor activities and wear protective masks. Poor visibility at Medan airport forced a passenger plane to divert to Malaysia on ...

  9. How much does it cost to achieve coverage targets for primary healthcare services? A costing model from Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Asnawi; Hort, Krishna; Abidin, Azwar Zaenal; Amin, Fadilah M

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant investment in improving service infrastructure and training of staff, public primary healthcare services in low-income and middle-income countries tend to perform poorly in reaching coverage targets. One of the factors identified in Aceh, Indonesia was the lack of operational funds for service provision. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and transparent costing tool that enables health planners to calculate the unit costs of providing basic health services to estimate additional budgets required to deliver services in accordance with national targets. The tool was developed using a standard economic approach that linked the input activities to achieving six national priority programs at primary healthcare level: health promotion, sanitation and environment health, maternal and child health and family planning, nutrition, immunization and communicable diseases control, and treatment of common illness. Costing was focused on costs of delivery of the programs that need to be funded by local government budgets. The costing tool consisting of 16 linked Microsoft Excel worksheets was developed and tested in several districts enabled the calculation of the unit costs of delivering of the six national priority programs per coverage target of each program (such as unit costs of delivering of maternal and child health program per pregnant mother). This costing tool can be used by health planners to estimate additional money required to achieve a certain level of coverage of programs, and it can be adjusted for different costs and program delivery parameters in different settings. PMID:22887349

  10. Post Disaster Governance, Complexity and Network Theory: Evidence from Aceh, Indonesia After the Indian Ocean Tsunami 2004.

    PubMed

    Lassa, Jonatan A

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to understand the organizational network typology of large--scale disaster intervention in developing countries and to understand the complexity of post--disaster intervention, through the use of network theory based on empirical data from post--tsunami reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia, during 2005/-2007. The findings suggest that the ' degrees of separation' (or network diameter) between any two organizations in the field is 5, thus reflecting 'small- world' realities and therefore making no significant difference with the real human networks, as found in previous experiments. There are also significant loops in the network reflecting the fact that some actors tend to not cooperate, which challenges post- disaster coordination. The findings show the landscape of humanitarian actors is not randomly distributed. Many actors were connected to each other through certain hubs, while hundreds of actors make 'scattered' single 'principal--client' links. The paper concludes that by understanding the distribution of degree, centrality, 'degrees of separation' and visualization of the network, authorities can improve their understanding of the realities of coordination, from macro to micro scales. PMID:26236562

  11. Seismic and deformation precursory to the small explosions of Marapi Volcano, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, D.; Patria, C.; Gunawan, H.; Taisne, B.; Nurfiani, D.; Avila, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Marapi Volcano is one of the active volcanoes of Indonesia located near the city of Bukittinggi, West Sumatra, Indonesia. Its activity is characterized by small vulcanian explosions with occasional VEI 2 producing tephra and pyroclastic flows. Due to its activity, it is being monitored by Centre for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM). Four seismic stations consists of 2 broadband and 2 short period instruments have been established since 2009. In collaboration with CVGHM, Earth Observatory of Singapore added 5 seismic stations around the volcano in 2014, initially with short period instruments but later upgraded to broadbands. We added one tilt station at the summit of Marapi. These seismic and tilt stations are telemetered by 5.8GHz radio to Marapi Observatory Post where data are archived and displayed for Marapi observers for their daily volcanic activity monitoring work. We also archive the data in the EOS and CVGHM main offices. Here we are presenting examples of seismic and deformation data from Marapi prior, during, and after the vulcanian explosion. Our study attempt to understand the state of the volcano based on monitoring data and in order to enable us to better estimate the hazards associated with the future eruptions of this or similar volcano.

  12. A study of aerosol optical properties at the global GAW station Bukit Kototabang, Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhayati, N.; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2012-01-01

    There have been very few studies carried out in Indonesia on the atmospheric aerosol optical properties and their impact on the earth climate. This study utilized solar radiation and aerosol measurement results of Indonesian GAW station Bukit Kototabang in Sumatra. The radiation data of nine years were used as input to a radiation simulation code for retrieving optically equivalent parameters of aerosols, i.e., aerosol optical thickness (AOT), coarse particle to fine particle ratio ( γ-ratio), and soot fraction. Retrieval of aerosol properties shows that coarse particles dominated at the station due to high relative humidity (RH) reaching more than 80% throughout the year. AOT time series showed a distinct two peak structure with peaks in MJJ and NDJ periods. The second peak corresponds to the period of high RH suggesting it was formed by active particle growth with large RH near 90%. On the other hand the time series of hot spot number, though it is only for the year of 2004, suggests the first peak was strongly contributed by biomass burning aerosols. The γ-ratio took a value near 10 throughout the year except for November and December when it took a larger value. The soot fraction varies in close relation with the γ-ratio, i.e. low values when γ was large, as consistent with our proposal of active particle growth in the high relative periods.

  13. Degraded peatlands as a source of riverine organic carbon and enhanced river outgassing in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wit, Francisca; Rixen, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Sumatra, Indonesia, is well known for its widespread tropical peat lands. However, silvi- and agricultural purposes are currently inducing large-scale degradation of peat lands, transforming the landscape into mainly palm-oil plantations. The degradation induces loss of carbon via direct CO2 emissions, but also via riverine outflow of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC, respectively) due to leaching. This organic carbon is then decomposed along the way towards the coast and is hypothesized to enhance coastal and river outgassing of CO2. In the framework of SPICE III, Science for the Protection of Indonesian Coastal Ecosystems, we are quantifying these carbon budgets and fluxes in the rivers and coastal areas of northeast Sumatra. Using underway instruments, we have gathered continuous measurements of various parameters, including pCO2, pH, temperature, salinity and oxygen. In addition, water samples were obtained for DOC, POC, δ13CDIC, alkalinity and nutrient analyses. The results of the first analyses show that pCO2 values in the coastal areas range between 400-600 μatm. However, in the vicinity of the rivers pCO2 concentrations increase tremendously, ranging from 600 near the estuaries to a staggering 9000 μatm further upstream. These values are much higher than the marine pCO2 value of 390 μatm in the South China Sea. When adding carbon isotope results into the story, while knowing that upstream river life is greatly reduced due to oxygen depletion as a result of high DOC decomposition, it appears to be clear from the values, which range between -20 to -24‰ δ13CDIC, that the main source of the organic carbon is indeed originating from the degrading peat lands. In conclusion, our hypothesis can be deemed correct: degrading peat lands enhance organic carbon outflow and therefore elevated decomposition in the rivers, which results in increased river outgassing of CO2. Further analyses will be conducted to precisely quantify the budgets and

  14. CO2 and energy fluxes from an oil palm plantation in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijide, Ana; Herbst, Mathias; Knohl, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Oil palm plantations are expanding in Indonesia due to global increased demand of palm oil. Such plantations are usually set in previously forested land and in Sumatra, massive transformation of lowland forest into oil palm plantations is taking place. These land transformations have been identified as a potential driver of climate change, as they might result in changes of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. However, very limited information is available on GHG fluxes from oil palm plantations and their sink or source strength at ecosystem scale is yet unknown. An eddy covariance tower was therefore installed in a 2 year old oil palm plantation in the province of Jambi, Sumatra (1° 50' 7'S, 103° 17' 44'E), with the aim of studying carbon dioxide, water and energy fluxes during the non-productive phase of oil palm cultivation. The canopy was not yet closed and trees were around 2m high. The eddy covariance system consists of a Licor 7500A and an ultrasonic Metek Anemometer, operating at 10 Hz and installed on a 7m tower. In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, the site is equipped with a weather station, measuring short and long wave radiation, PAR, rainfall, profiles of air temperature, air humidity and wind speed, soil temperature and moisture and soil heat fluxes. Measurements started in July 2013 until January 2014, in order to capture possible differences which may happen during the dry (July-October) and wet (November-February) seasons. A large CO2 uptake would have been expected at this young oil palm plantation, as palm trees during this period of their cultivation are growing fast. However, our preliminary results show that during the first 5 months of measurements, the ecosystem was a small carbon source (below 10 g CO2 m-2). Latent heat flux was higher than sensible heat flux during the period of study, indicative of the high evaporation taking place. Our results show that both for CO2 and energy fluxes, large differences were observed between the

  15. Nutrient leaching losses in lowland forests converted to oil palm and rubber plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Syahrul; Corre, Marife D.; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, Sumatra, Indonesia is experiencing rapid expansion of oil palm and rubber plantations by conversion of rainforest. This is evident from the 2.9 thousand km2 decrease in forest area in this region over the last 15 years. Such rapid land-use change necessitates assessment of its environmental impacts. Our study was aimed to assess the impact of forest conversion to oil palm and rubber plantations on nutrient leaching losses. Land-use conversion increases nutrient leaching losses due to changes in vegetation litter input, rooting depth, nutrient cycling and management (e.g. fertilization) practices. Our study area was in Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. We selected two soil landscapes in this region: loam and clay Acrisol soils. At each soil landscape, we investigated four land-use systems: lowland secondary rainforest, secondary forest with regenerating rubber (referred here as jungle rubber), rubber (7-17 years old) and oil palm plantations (9-16 years old). Each land use in each soil landscape was represented by four sites as replicates, totaling to 32 sites. We measured leaching losses using suction lysimeters installed at 1.5-m soil depth, which was well below the rooting depth, with bi-weekly to monthly sampling from February to December 2013. In general, the loam Acrisol landscape, particularly the forest and oil palm plantations, had lower soil solution pH and higher leaching fluxes of dissolved organic N, Na, Ca, Mg, total Al, total S and Cl than the clay Acrisol of the same land uses (all P ≤ 0.05). Among land uses in the loam Acrisol landscape, oil palm had lower soil solution pH and higher leaching fluxes of NH4+, NO3-, dissolved organic C, total P, total S and Cl than rubber plantation whereas forest and jungle rubber showed intermediate fluxes (all P ≤ 0.05, except P ≤ 0.09 for total P); oil palm had also higher Na, Ca, Mg and total Al leaching fluxes than all the other land uses (all P ≤ 0.05, except P ≤ 0.09 for Na

  16. Time-series analysis of multi-resolution optical imagery for quantifying forest cover loss in Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broich, Mark; Hansen, Matthew C.; Potapov, Peter; Adusei, Bernard; Lindquist, Erik; Stehman, Stephen V.

    2011-04-01

    Monitoring loss of humid tropical forests via remotely sensed imagery is critical for a number of environmental monitoring objectives, including carbon accounting, biodiversity, and climate modeling science applications. Landsat imagery, provided free of charge by the U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS/EROS), enables consistent and timely forest cover loss updates from regional to biome scales. The Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Kalimantan are a center of significant forest cover change within the humid tropics with implications for carbon dynamics, biodiversity maintenance and local livelihoods. Sumatra and Kalimantan feature poor observational coverage compared to other centers of humid tropical forest change, such as Mato Grosso, Brazil, due to the lack of ongoing acquisitions from nearby ground stations and the persistence of cloud cover obscuring the land surface. At the same time, forest change in Indonesia is transient and does not always result in deforestation, as cleared forests are rapidly replaced by timber plantations and oil palm estates. Epochal composites, where single best observations are selected over a given time interval and used to quantify change, are one option for monitoring forest change in cloudy regions. However, the frequency of forest cover change in Indonesia confounds the ability of image composite pairs to quantify all change. Transient change occurring between composite periods is often missed and the length of time required for creating a cloud-free composite often obscures change occurring within the composite period itself. In this paper, we analyzed all Landsat 7 imagery with <50% cloud cover and data and products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to quantify forest cover loss for Sumatra and Kalimantan from 2000 to 2005. We demonstrated that time-series approaches examining all good land observations are more accurate in mapping forest cover change in

  17. Uncovering the factors that can support and impede post-disaster EIA practice in developing countries: The case of Aceh Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, Tom; Fischer, Thomas B.

    2014-01-15

    The close relationship between environmental degradation and the occurrence and severity of disaster events has in recent years raised the profile of environmental assessment (EA) in the disaster management field. EA has been identified as a potentially supportive tool in the global effort to reduce disaster risk. As a component of this, attention has been brought specifically to the importance of the application of EA in the aftermath of disaster events in order to help prevent recurrence and promote sustainability. At the same time, however, it has also been recognised that post-disaster environments may be unfavourable to such practices. Looking at the practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA), this paper reports on a study which sought to identify more specifically the factors which can both support and hinder such practice following disaster events in a developing country context. Analysing the situation in Aceh Province, Indonesia, after the impact of two tsunamigenic earthquakes in late 2004 and early 2005, it is concluded that if EIA is to have a central role in the post-disaster period, pre-disaster preparation could be a key. -- Highlights: • Close relationship between environmental degradation and occurrence/severity of disaster events has raised profile of EA. • EA as a potentially supportive tool in the global effort to reduce disaster risk • Application of EA in the aftermath of disaster events to help prevent recurrence and promote sustainability • The paper looks at factors which can both support and hinder EA following disaster events in a developing country context. • We analyse the situation in Aceh Province, Indonesia, after the impact of two tsunamigenic earthquakes in 2004 and 2005.

  18. Deterioration of soil fertility by land use changes in South Sumatra, Indonesia: from 1970 to 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumbanraja, Jamalam; Syam, Tamaluddin; Nishide, Hiroyo; Kabul Mahi, Ali; Utomo, Muhajir; Sarno; Kimura, Makoto

    1998-10-01

    We monitored the land use changes in a hilly area of West Lampung, South Sumatra, Indonesia, from 1970 to 1990. The main data sources were the land use maps produced in 1970, 1978, 1984 and 1990 covering the area of 27 km×27 km. Transmigration and the resultant effect of increased population were the major driving forces in land use changes. Fifty-seven per cent of the study area was covered with primary forests in 1970, but only 13% in 1990. Areas under plantations, which were absent in 1970, increased to 60% in 1990. In addition, the change from monoculture plantations (mostly coffee plantation) to mixed plantations was noticeable from 1984 to 1990. Total upland areas including upland areas under shifting cultivation and upland fields with crops and vegetables decreased from 21% in 1970 to 0·1% in 1990. Soil chemical properties (total organic C, total N, available P, total P, exchangeable cations, cation exchangeable capacity (CEC), etc.) were analysed for lands under different land use forms after deforestation in the study area. Soil samples (surface layers, 0-20 cm, and subsurface layers, 20-40 cm) were collected from three different locations, each comprised of four different land use systems: i.e. primary forests, secondary forests, coffee plantations and cultivated lands. The contents of total organic C, total N, available P, total P, exchangeable cations and CEC decreased significantly with land use change from primary forests to the other land use forms. Cultivated lands exhibited the lowest values. Although less remarkable than in the surface layers, the amounts of total organic C, total N, total P, exchangeable cations and CEC were also decreased by forest clearing in the subsurface layers.Based on the land use changes from 1978 in the study area and the deterioration of soil chemical properties by forest clearing, total decreases in the amounts of nutrients in the surface and subsurface layers were estimated. The land use changes were estimated to

  19. Tsunami Damage in Northwest Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The island of Sumatra suffered from both the rumblings of the submarine earthquake and the tsunamis that were generated on December 26, 2004. Within minutes of the quake, the sea surged ashore, bringing destruction to the coasts of the northern Sumatra. This pair of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite shows the Aceh province of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, on December 17, 2004, before the quake (bottom), and on December 29, 2004 (top), three days after the catastrophe. Although MODIS was not specifically designed to make the very detailed observations that are usually necessary for mapping coastline changes, the sensor nevertheless observed obvious differences in the Sumatran coastline. On December 17, the green vegetation along the west coast appears to reach all the way to the sea, with only an occasional thin stretch of white that is likely sand. After the earthquake and tsunamis, the entire western coast is lined with a noticeable purplish-brown border. The brownish border could be deposited sand, or perhaps exposed soil that was stripped bare of vegetation when the large waves rushed ashore and then raced away. Another possibility is that parts of the coastline may have sunk as the sea floor near the plate boundary rose. On a moderate-resolution image such as this, the affected area may seem small, but each pixel in the full resolution image is 250 by 250 meters. In places the brown strip reaches inland roughly 13 pixels, equal to a distance of 3.25 kilometers, or about 2 miles. On the northern tip of the island (shown in the large image), the incursion is even larger. NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data obtained from the MODIS Rapid Response team and the Goddard Earth Sciences DAAC.

  20. A Seismic Gap Study in the western offshore of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridhi, H. A.; Rizal, S.; Ridha, M.; Lee, C.

    2011-12-01

    The extremely destructive earthquake in December 26th 2004 and by the resulting tsunami was the worst natural disasters in recorded human history. However, the tsunami earthquakes continue to strike the west coast of Sumatra in the last 8 years. There are at least 12 events, the earthquake Magnitude between M = 7 to 8.9. The tragedies continue to add up to the already damaged coastal zone. In 2010 (after 6 years of the 2004 event), an earthquake of a magnitude 7.8 resulting a destructive tsunami was also happened near Mentawai Island at west coast of West Sumatra Province. Several thousand of people died and many houses buried. In order to have a better understanding of the seismic stress distribution and prepare for a future study including an IODP drilling in this area, we adopt the previous studies by French, Japan and German together with the absolute gravity data and seismic networks by the IRIS and Taiwan Central Weather Bureau for this research. In the last eight years, the Sumatra region already experienced two domains of the tsunami earthquake swamps, one in the north of Sumatra and the other in the south. Here, we present broadband earthquake data from the IRIS-NEIC catalogue between 2004 and 2010. The result shows that there is a possible of seismic gap in the border of central - southern domain of Sumatra region. This region included in the Northern Sumatra Province near Batu Island. The historical earthquake along the Sumatra margin since 17th century showed that the last big rapture in this border of central - southern domain was occurred in 1797 by the magnitude of 8.8 (Lange et al., 2010). In the other hand, the free-air gravity anomaly (Barber et al., 2005) shows high values correspond to the N-S oceanic fracture zone. All the high value was found near the trench of Sumatra subduction zone and gradually lower value through the south. Regarding to the stress release of the subducting Indo-Australian Oceanic Plate beneath Eurasian Plate, we also

  1. Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Maxomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi and Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Kartika; Hasegawa, Hideo; Fitriana, Yuli Sulistya; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2015-10-01

    The present report describes Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from two species of spiny rats, Maxomys musschenbroekii from Sulawesi and M. whiteheadi from Sumatra. It is characterized by a cephalic plate extending laterally with dorsoventral constriction and stumpy eggs with an operculum rim reaching pole. It is readily distinguishable by the former feature from all of hitherto known representatives of this genus in Indonesia, but it resembles parasites in Murini and Hydromyni rodents in continental Asia and Sahul. This is the first Syphacia species distributed in both the Sunda Shelf and Sulawesi with the exception of Syphacia muris, a cosmopolitan pinworm found in rodents of the of genus Rattus. It is surmised that S. maxomyos is specific to Maxomys and that it was introduced to Sulawesi by dispersal of some Maxomys from the Sunda Shelf. PMID:26062434

  2. Evidence of Postseismic Deformation Signal of the 2007 M8.5 Bengkulu Earthquake and the 2012 M8.6 Indian Ocean Earthquake in Southern Sumatra, Indonesia, Based on GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alif, Satrio Muhammad; Meilano, Irwan; Gunawan, Endra; Efendi, Joni

    2016-06-01

    GPS data in southern Sumatra, Indonesia, indicate crustal deformation associated to subduction zone and inland fault of Great Sumatran Fault (GSF). We analyze these deformation characteristics using campaign and continuous GPS data available in southern Sumatra from 2006-2014. After removing the effect of GSF in southern Sumatra and coseismic displacements of 2007 Bengkulu and 2012 Indian Ocean earthquake, we find that GPS sites experienced northwest-ward direction. These GPS velocities correspond to postseismic deformation of the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and the 2012 Indian Ocean earthquake. We analyze strain using these velocities, and we find that postseismic strains in southern Sumatra are in the range of 0.8-20 nanostrain.

  3. Soil Nitrogen-Cycling Responses to Conversion of Lowland Forests to Oil Palm and Rubber Plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kara; Corre, Marife D; Tjoa, Aiyen; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-01-01

    Rapid deforestation in Sumatra, Indonesia is presently occurring due to the expansion of palm oil and rubber production, fueled by an increasing global demand. Our study aimed to assess changes in soil-N cycling rates with conversion of forest to oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations. In Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, we selected two soil landscapes - loam and clay Acrisol soils - each with four land-use types: lowland forest and forest with regenerating rubber (hereafter, "jungle rubber") as reference land uses, and rubber and oil palm as converted land uses. Gross soil-N cycling rates were measured using the 15N pool dilution technique with in-situ incubation of soil cores. In the loam Acrisol soil, where fertility was low, microbial biomass, gross N mineralization and NH4+ immobilization were also low and no significant changes were detected with land-use conversion. The clay Acrisol soil which had higher initial fertility based on the reference land uses (i.e. higher pH, organic C, total N, effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC) and base saturation) (P≤0.05-0.09) had larger microbial biomass and NH4+ transformation rates (P≤0.05) compared to the loam Acrisol soil. Conversion of forest and jungle rubber to rubber and oil palm in the clay Acrisol soil decreased soil fertility which, in turn, reduced microbial biomass and consequently decreased NH4+ transformation rates (P≤0.05-0.09). This was further attested by the correlation of gross N mineralization and microbial biomass N with ECEC, organic C, total N (R=0.51-0. 76; P≤0.05) and C:N ratio (R=-0.71 - -0.75, P≤0.05). Our findings suggest that the larger the initial soil fertility and N availability, the larger the reductions upon land-use conversion. Because soil N availability was dependent on microbial biomass, management practices in converted oil palm and rubber plantations should focus on enriching microbial biomass. PMID:26222690

  4. South Sumatra Basin Province, Indonesia; the Lahat/Talang Akar-Cenozoic total petroleum system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, Michele G.

    2000-01-01

    Oil and gas are produced from the onshore South Sumatra Basin Province. The province consists of Tertiary half-graben basins infilled with carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks unconformably overlying pre-Tertiary metamorphic and igneous rocks. Eocene through lower Oligocene lacustrine shales and Oligocene through lower Miocene lacustrine and deltaic coaly shales are the mature source rocks. Reserves of 4.3 billion barrels of oil equivalent have been discovered in reservoirs that range from pre-Tertiary basement through upper Miocene sandstones and carbonates deposited as synrift strata and as marine shoreline, deltaic-fluvial, and deep-water strata. Carbonate and sandstone reservoirs produce oil and gas primarily from anticlinal traps of Plio-Pleistocene age. Stratigraphic trapping and faulting are important locally. Production is compartmentalized due to numerous intraformational seals. The regional marine shale seal, deposited by a maximum sea level highstand in early middle Miocene time, was faulted during post-depositional folding allowing migration of hydrocarbons to reservoirs above the seal. The province contains the Lahat/Talang Akar-Cenozoic total petroleum system with one assessment unit, South Sumatra.

  5. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for Sumatra, Indonesia and across the Southern Malaysian Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dewey, J.; Hartzell, S.; Mueller, C.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.D.; Rukstales, K.

    2004-01-01

    The ground motion hazard for Sumatra and the Malaysian peninsula is calculated in a probabilistic framework, using procedures developed for the US National Seismic Hazard Maps. We constructed regional earthquake source models and used standard published and modified attenuation equations to calculate peak ground acceleration at 2% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years for rock site conditions. We developed or modified earthquake catalogs and declustered these catalogs to include only independent earthquakes. The resulting catalogs were used to define four source zones that characterize earthquakes in four tectonic environments: subduction zone interface earthquakes, subduction zone deep intraslab earthquakes, strike-slip transform earthquakes, and intraplate earthquakes. The recurrence rates and sizes of historical earthquakes on known faults and across zones were also determined from this modified catalog. In addition to the source zones, our seismic source model considers two major faults that are known historically to generate large earthquakes: the Sumatran subduction zone and the Sumatran transform fault. Several published studies were used to describe earthquakes along these faults during historical and pre-historical time, as well as to identify segmentation models of faults. Peak horizontal ground accelerations were calculated using ground motion prediction relations that were developed from seismic data obtained from the crustal interplate environment, crustal intraplate environment, along the subduction zone interface, and from deep intraslab earthquakes. Most of these relations, however, have not been developed for large distances that are needed for calculating the hazard across the Malaysian peninsula, and none were developed for earthquake ground motions generated in an interplate tectonic environment that are propagated into an intraplate tectonic environment. For the interplate and intraplate crustal earthquakes, we have applied ground

  6. Ichnological constraints on the depositional environment of the Sawahlunto Formation, Kandi, northwest Ombilin Basin, west Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonneveld, J.-P.; Zaim, Y.; Rizal, Y.; Ciochon, R. L.; Bettis, E. A.; Aswan; Gunnell, G. F.

    2012-02-01

    A low diversity trace fossil assemblage is described from the Oligocene Sawahlunto Formation near Kandi, in the northwestern part of the Ombilin Basin in western Sumatra, Indonesia. This trace fossil assemblage includes six ichnogenera attributed to invertebrate infaunal and epifaunal activities ( Arenicolites, Diplocraterion, Planolites, Monocraterion/ Skolithos and Coenobichnus) and two ichnotaxa attributed to vertebrate activity (avian footprints: two species of Aquatilavipes). Arenicolites, Diplocraterion and Monocraterion/ Skolithos record the suspension feeding activities of either arthropods (most likely amphipods) or vermiform organisms. Planolites reflects the presence of an infaunal deposit feeder. Coenobichnus records the walking activities of hermit crabs. Both the Coenobichnus and the avian footprints record the surficial detritus scavenging of epifaunal organisms within a subaerial setting. These traces occur within a fine-grained sandstone succession characterized by planar laminae and low-relief, asymmetrical, commonly mud-draped (locally bidirectional) ripples. The presence of traces attributable to suspension feeders implies deposition in a subaqueous setting. Their occurrence (particularly the presence of Arenicolites and Diplocraterion) in a sandstone bed characterized by mud-draped and bidirectional ripples implies emplacement in a tidally-influenced marine to marginal marine setting. Co-occurrence of these traces with well-preserved avian footprints ( Aquatilavipes) further implies periodic subaerial exposure. Thus, it is most likely that the Sawahlunto Formation near Kandi records deposition within an intertidal flat setting. Definitive evidence of marine influences in the Oligocene interval of the Ombilin Basin implies a more complex tectono-stratigraphic history than has previously been implied.

  7. Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols emitted from peatland fire in Riau, Sumatra, Indonesia (2): Identification of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusuke; Kawamoto, Haruo; Tohno, Susumu; Oda, Masafumi; Iriana, Windy; Lestari, Puji

    2015-06-01

    Smoke emitted from Indonesian peatland fires has caused dense haze and serious air pollution in Southeast Asia such as visibility impairment and adverse health impacts. To mitigate the Indonesian peatland fire aerosol impacts, an effective strategy and international framework based on the latest scientific knowledge needs to be established. Although several attempts have been made, limited data exist regarding the chemical characteristics of peatland fire smoke for the source apportionment. In order to identify the key organic compounds of peatland fire aerosols, we conducted intensive field studies based on ground-based and source-dominated sampling of PM2.5 in Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, during the peatland fire seasons in 2012. Levoglucosan was the most abundant compound among the quantified organic compounds at 8.98 ± 2.28% of the PM2.5 mass, followed by palmitic acid at 0.782 ± 0.163% and mannosan at 0.607 ± 0.0861%. Potassium ion was not appropriate for an indicator of Indonesian peatland fires due to extremely low concentrations associated with smoldering fire at low temperatures. The vanillic/syringic acids ratio was 1.06 ± 0.155 in this study and this may be a useful signature profile for peatland fire emissions. Particulate n-alkanes also have potential for markers to identify impact of Indonesian peatland fire source at a receptor site.

  8. 16,000 Years of Tropical Eastern Ocean Climate Variability Recorded in a Speleothem From Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurtzel, J. B.; Abram, N.; Hantoro, W. S.; Rifai, H.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Heslop, D.; Troitzsch, U.; Eggins, S.

    2015-12-01

    Holocene climate variability in the Indo-Pacific has largely been inferred from sediment cores primarily from the central and eastern Warm Pool region. A limited number of speleothem oxygen-isotope records have provided decadally-resolved time-series of past rainfall variability over the central Indo-Pacific Warm Pool region, however no records currently exist for the Indian Ocean sector of the IPWP. Here we present the first continuous, high-resolution (~15year) speleothem record from the eastern tropical Indian Ocean, collected from central western Sumatra, Indonesia. Petrographic and geochemical analysis reveals that the sample is primarily composed of aragonite but is punctuated by intervals of primary calcite growth. In addition to Raman spectroscopy, trace element analysis by laser ablation ICP-MS reveals strongly antiphased behaviour between magnesium and strontium, attributed to the strong preference of those elements for the calcite and aragonite lattices, respectively. This relationship is utilized to develop a quantitative correction for the stable isotope fractionation offset between the two calcium carbonate polymorphs identified in the speleothem. The corrected oxygen isotope record shows a rapid transition from drier conditions during the Younger Dryas (YD) into a wetter Holocene, similar in timing and pattern to that recorded in Dongge Cave, China. This is strikingly different from other IPWP speleothem records, which show no YD or a wetter YD, suggesting that different mechanisms may be controlling rainfall amount in the eastern tropical Indian Ocean. These disparate responses are further explored through proxy-model comparison.

  9. Impact of The N - S Fracture Zone Along The Indo-Australia Plate Analyzed from Local Seismic Data In The Western Offshore of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridhi, H. A.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Huang, B. S.; Lee, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    Large subduction earthquake have repeatedly occurred along the Sumatra and Andaman subduction zones where the Indo-Australia plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate. We have analyzed earthquake data from local seismic network along the Sumatra region that provided by the Meteorology Climatology Geophysical Agencies of Indonesia (MCGAI), giving a reliable P-wave velocity model by using joint inversion of picked P-wave travel time using VELEST and a re-scanned single channel seismic reflection of Sumatra cruise I and II. As much as 1,503 events are being analyzed, that is from two years and three months of data recording (2009/04 - 2011/07). The VELEST and DD technique are used to relocate all events by forcing the obtained velocity model. It is found that the surface deformation and earthquake cluster are strongly influenced by the impact of an N - S subparalel fracture zone along the Indo-Australia plate. This also explains the seismic gaps along the Sumatra and Andaman subduction zones. So far, the intriguing seismogenic behaviour and forearc structure are not well explained by the existing models. Therefore, the planned IODP Expedition 362 is trying to ground truth the scientific questions. The aftershock earthquake data are huge, but they will provide a gateway to help the understanding of this shallow megathrust slip and reduce its devastated harzards.

  10. A comprehensive field and laboratory study of scale control and scale squeezes in Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, J.E.; Reizer, J.M.; Sitz, C.D.; Setia, D.E.A.; Hinrichsen, C.J.; Sujana, W.

    1999-11-01

    Scale squeezes were performed on thirteen wells in the Duri Field, Sumatra. At the time the squeezes were completed, seven were designed to be `Acid Squeezes` and six were designed to be `Neutral Squeezes.` In the course of preparing for the scale squeezes, produced waters were collected and analyzed. In addition, scale inhibitor evaluations, and inhibitor compatibility studies were completed. Simulated squeezes were done in the laboratory to predict field performance. The methodologies and results of the background work are reported. In addition, the relative effectiveness of the two sets of squeezes is discussed. The inhibitor flowback concentrations alter the squeezes, in all cases, can be explained using speciation chemistry and the amorphous and crystalline phase solubilities of the inhibitor used. The wells squeezed with a more acidic inhibitor have more predictable and uniform inhibitor return concentration curves than the wells squeezed with a more neutral scale inhibitor.

  11. Genetic identity, ancestry and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Aceh, Indonesia revealed by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is the source of cocoa powder and butter used for chocolate and this species originated in the rainforests of South America. Indonesia is the 3rd largest cacao producer in the world with an annual cacao output of 0.55 million tons. Knowledge of on-farm genetic diversity is...

  12. Field data and satellite imagery of tsunami effects in Banda Aceh.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Jose C

    2005-06-10

    After the 26 December 2004 earthquake and tsunami, field data on the extent of the inundation in Banda Aceh, Sumatra, were combined with satellite imagery to quantify the tsunami effects. Flow depths along the shores of Banda Aceh exceeded 9 meters, with inundation reaching 3 to 4 kilometers inland. To the southwest, at Lhoknga, flow depths were more than 15 meters at the shoreline and runup exceeded 25 meters. Erosion and subsidence moved the shoreline of Banda Aceh inland up to 1.5 kilometers, and 65 square kilometers of land between Banda Aceh and Lhoknga were flooded. PMID:15947180

  13. Local attitudes and perceptions toward crop-raiding by orangutans (Pongo abelii) and other nonhuman primates in northern Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Smith, Gail; Simanjorang, Hubert V P; Leader-Williams, Nigel; Linkie, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    Human-wildlife conflicts, such as crop-raiding, increase as people expand their agricultural activities into wildlife habitats. Crop-raiding can reduce tolerance toward species that are already threatened, whereas potential dangers posed by conflicts with large-bodied species may also negatively influence local attitudes. Across Asia, wild pigs and primates, such as macaques, tend to be the most commonly reported crop raiders. To date, reports of crop-raiding incidents involving great apes have been less common, but incidents involving orangutans are increasingly emerging in Indonesia. To investigate the interplay of factors that might explain attitudes toward crop-raiding by orangutans (Pongo abelii), focal group discussions and semi-structured interviews were conducted among 822 farmers from 2 contrasting study areas in North Sumatra. The first study area of Batang Serangan is an agroforest system containing isolated orangutans that crop-raid. In contrast, the second area of Sidikalang comprises farmlands bordering extensive primary forest where orangutans are present but not reported to crop-raid. Farmers living in Batang Serangan thought that orangutans were dangerous, irrespective of earlier experience of crop-raiding. Farmers placed orangutans as the third most frequent and fourth most destructive crop pest, after Thomas' leaf monkey (Presbytis thomasi), wild boar (Sus scrofa), and long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis). Although most (57%) farmers across both study areas were not scared of wildlife species, more than a quarter (28%) of the farmers' feared orangutans. Farmers in Batang Serangan were generally more tolerant toward crop-raiding orangutans, if they did not perceive them to present a physical threat. Most (67%) Batang Serangan farmers said that the local Forestry Department staff should handle crop-raiding orangutans, and most (81%) said that these officials did not care about such problems. Our results suggest that efforts to mitigate human

  14. The Ongoing Lava Flow Eruption of Sinabung Volcano (Sumatra, Indonesia): Observations from Structure-from-Motion and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. B.; Clarke, A. B.; Arrowsmith, R.; Vanderkluysen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Sinabung is a 2460 m high andesitic stratovolcano in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Its ongoing eruption has produced a 2.9 km long lava flow with two active summit lobes and frequent pyroclastic flows (≤ 5 km long) with associated plumes over 5 km high. Large viscous lava flows of this type are common at volcanoes around the world, but are rarely observed while active. This eruption therefore provides a special opportunity to observe and study the mechanisms of emplacement and growth of an active lava flow. In September 2014, we conducted a field campaign to collect ground-based photographs to analyze with Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric techniques. We built multiple 3D models from which we estimate the volume of the lava flow and identify areas where the flow was most active. Thermal infrared and visual satellite images provide information on the effusive eruption from its initiation in December 2013 to the present and allow us to estimate the eruption rate, advance rate and rheological characteristics of the flow. According to our DEMs the flow volume as of September 2014 was 100 Mm3, providing an average flow rate of 4.5 m3/s, while comparison of two DEMs from that month suggests that most growth occurred at the SE nose of the flow. Flow advancement was initially controlled by the yield strength of the flow crust while eruption and flow advance rates were at their highest in January-March 2014. A period of slow front advancement and inflation from March - October 2014 suggests that the flow's interior had cooled and that propagation was limited by the interior yield strength. This interpretation is supported by the simultaneous generation of pyroclastic flows due to collapse of the upper portion of the lava flow and consequent lava breakout and creation of new flow lobes originating from the upper reaches in October 2014 and June 2015. Both lobes remain active as of August 2015 and present a significant hazard for collapse and generation of pyroclastic flows

  15. Four new bioactive polybrominated diphenyl ethers of the sponge Dysidea herbacea from West Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Handayani, D; Edrada, R A; Proksch, P; Wray, V; Witte, L; Van Soest, R W; Kunzmann, A; Soedarsono

    1997-12-01

    The marine sponge Dysidea herbacea collected from Indonesia yielded four new polybrominated diphenyl ether congeners 2-5 and the known derivatives 1, 6, and 7. The structures of the new compounds were unambiguously established on the basis of NMR spectroscopic (1H, 13C, COSY, 1H-detected direct and long-range 13C-1H correlations) and mass spectrometric (EIMS) data. All of the compounds were active against the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and the phytopathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum. The isolated polybrominated compounds were also active in the brine shrimp lethality test. In the latter bioassay, compounds 1 and 6 were the most active with LC50's of 0.96 [SE +/- 0.19] and 0.94 [SE +/- 0.70] microg/mL, respectively. PMID:9463111

  16. High Resolution Satellite Remote Sensing of the 2013-2014 Eruption of Sinabung Volcano, Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, R. L.; Griswold, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing provided timely observations of the volcanic unrest and several months-long eruption at Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia. Visible to thermal optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems provided frequent observations of Sinabung. High resolution image data with spatial resolutions from 0.5 to 1.5m offered detailed measurements of early summit deformation and subsequent lava dome and lava flow extrusion. The high resolution data were captured by commercial satellites such as WorldView-1 and -2 visible to near-infrared (VNIR) sensors and by CosmoSkyMed, Radarsat-2, and TerraSar-X SAR systems. Less frequent 90 to 100m spatial resolution night time thermal infrared (TIR) observations were provided by ASTER and Landsat-8. The combination of data from multiple sensors allowed us to construct a more complete timeline of volcanic activity than was available via only ground-based observations. This satellite observation timeline documents estimates of lava volume and effusion rates and major explosive and lava collapse events. Frequent, repeat volume estimates suggest at least three high effusion rate pulses of up to 20 m3/s occurred during the first three months of lava effusion with an average effusion rate of 6m3/s from January 2014 to August 2014. Many of these rates and events show some correlation to variations in the Real-time Seismic-Amplitude Measurement (RSAM) documented by the Indonesian Center for Volcanology and Geologic Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM).

  17. Caldera-Fill Sediments at Toba Caldera, Sumatra, Indonesia: A Field Reconnaissance Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesner, C. A.; Barbee, O. A.; Lesmana, Z.; Nasution, A.

    2013-12-01

    The 74 ka Toba Caldera in northern Sumatra offers a unique opportunity to study caldera-fill sedimentation and its implications on the dynamic post-collapse history of Earth's largest Quaternary resurgent caldera. Although the complete 74,000 year sedimentation record is hidden beneath Lake Toba, a significant portion (~20-74 ka) of the post-caldera sedimentary sequence has been uplifted above lake level and is exposed on the 45 x 18 km Samosir Island resurgent dome. This extensive sedimentary record, over 100 m thick in places, is exposed by stream incision, and in resurgent dome fault scarps. Reconnaissance mapping and sampling of the sedimentary veneer covering Samosir Island was conducted in 2012-2013 to supplement recent sub-bottom seismic reflection profiling (chirp sonar) of the younger sediments and provide the basis for a more detailed caldera-fill sedimentation study at Toba. Our preliminary mapping indicates that distinct lacustrine and fluvial sedimentary sequences occur on Samosir Island. The lacustrine sequence dominates the surface exposures across the island and consists of interbedded clays, silts, sands, and diatomites. Different depositional environments and processes are suggested by regional variations in the componentry (i.e. abundance of diatoms, pumice clasts, reworked lake sediment clasts, rafted pumice blocks, etc.), but no significant ash-beds have been identified. An underlying coarse-grained indurated fluvial sequence is exposed in deeply incised drainages and fault scarps. This sequence consists mostly of coarse oxidized sands in eastern Samosir (approximately in the center of the caldera) that thicken and become coarser in western Samosir towards the caldera wall, where breccias and debris flows are also common. Blocks and boulders up to several meters in diameter derived from the basement rocks in the western caldera walls suggest a wedge of alluvial sediments formed before the lake reached its maximum level. Samples have been

  18. [Tsunami in South-East Asia--rapid response deployment in Banda Aceh].

    PubMed

    Streuli, Rolf A

    2008-01-01

    On December 26, 2004 the second largest earthquake ever seismographically registered occurred in South-East Asia. It had a magnitude of 9.3 on Richter's scale and its epicentre was located on sea ground 160 km West of Banda Aceh, the capital of the province of Aceh on the island of Sumatra. The earthquake resulted in a tsunami which almost completely destroyed the city of Banda Aceh. Its death toll on the island of Sumatra was 168,000. The Swiss Humanitarian Aid Unit was deployed within a few days after the catastrophe with an advance team, which had to evaluate the need for supplies and personal in Banda Aceh. In close collaboration with relief forces of the Australian armed forces the team was able to deliver efficient medical and technical support. The most prevalent medical problems were: (1) Tsunami associated aspiration pneumonia; (2) Infected wounds of lower extremities; (3) Open bone fractures of lower extremities; (4) Tetanus infection. PMID:18399180

  19. Permian to recent volcanism in northern sumatra, indonesia: a preliminary study of its distribution, chemistry, and peculiarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, N. M. S.; Syah, H. H.; Davis, A. E.; Hutchison, D.; Styles, M. T.; Lena, Rahayu

    1982-06-01

    Sumatra has been a ‘volcanic arc’, above an NE-dipping subduction zone, since at least the Late Permian. The principal volcanic episodes in Sumatra N of the Equator have been in the Late Permian, Late Mesozoic, Palaeogene, Miocene and Quaternary. Late Permian volcanic rocks, of limited extent, are altered porphyritic basic lavas interstratified with limestones and phyllites. Late Mesozoic volcanic rocks, widely distributed along and W of the major transcurrent. Sumatra Fault System (SFS), which axially bisects Sumatra, include ophiolite-related spilites, andesites and basalts. Possible Palaeogene volcanic rocks include an altered basalt pile with associated dyke-swarm in the extreme NW, intruded by an Early Miocene (19 my) dioritic stock; and variable pyroxene rich basic lavas and agglomerates ranging from alkali basaltic to absarokitic in the extreme SW. Miocene volcanic rocks, widely distributed (especially W of the SFS), and cropping out extensively along the W coast, include calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline basalts, andesites and dacites. Quaternary volcanoes (3 active, 14 dormant or extinct) are irregularly distributed both along and across the arc; thus they lie fore-arc of the SFS near the Equator but well back-arc farther north. The largest concentration of centres, around Lake Toba, includes the >2000 km3 Pleistocene rhyolitic Toba Tuffs. Quaternary volcanics are mainly calc-alkaline andesites, dacites and rhyolites with few basalts; they seem less variable, but on the whole more acid, than the Tertiary. The Quaternary volcanism is anomalous in relation to both southern Sumatra and adjacent Java/Bali: in southern Sumatra, volcanoes are regularly spaced along and successively less active away from the SFS, but neither rule holds in northern Sumatra. Depths to the subduction zone below major calc-alkaline volcanoes in Java/Bali are 160-210 km, but little over 100 km in northern Sumatra, which also lacks the regular K2O-depth correlations seen in

  20. Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

    2004-02-06

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  1. Soil carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from lowland forests converted to oil palm and rubber plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, Evelyn; Corre, Marife D.; Damris, Muhammad; Tjoa, Aiyen; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-04-01

    Demand for palm oil has increased strongly in recent decades. Global palm oil production quadrupled between 1990 and 2009, and although almost half of the global supply is already produced in Indonesia, a doubling of current production is planned for the next ten years. This agricultural expansion is achieved by conversion of rainforest. Land-use conversion affects soil carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes through changes in nutrient availability and soil properties which, in turn, influence plant productivity, microbial activity and gas diffusivity. Our study was aimed to assess changes in soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes with forest conversion to oil palm and rubber plantations. Our study area was Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. We selected two soil landscapes in this region: loam and clay Acrisol soils. At each landscape, we investigated four land-use systems: lowland secondary rainforest, secondary forest with regenerating rubber (referred here as jungle rubber), rubber (7-17 years old) and oil palm plantations (9-16 years old). Each land use in each soil landscape was represented by four sites as replicates, totaling to 32 sites. We measured soil-atmosphere CH4 and CO2 fluxes using vented static chamber method with monthly sampling from November 2012 to December 2013. There were no differences in soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes (all P > 0.05) between soil landscapes for each land-use type. For soil CO2 fluxes, in both clay and loam Acrisol soil landscapes oil palm were lower compared to the other land uses (P < 0.007). In the clay Acrisol, soil CO2 fluxes were 107.2 ± 7.2 mg C m-2 h-1 for oil palm, and 195.9 ± 13.5 mg C m-2 h-1for forest, 185.3 ± 9.4 mg C m-2 h-1for jungle rubber and 182.8 ± 16.2 mg C m2 h-1for rubber. In the loam Acrisol, soil CO2 fluxes were 115.7 ± 11.0 mg CO2-C m2 h-1 for oil palm, and 186.6 ± 13.7, 178.7 ± 11.2, 182.9 ± 14.5 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1 for forest, jungle rubber and rubber, respectively. The seasonal patterns of soil CO2 fluxes

  2. The Malaysian Orthopaedic Association humanitarian mission to Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, I; Saw, A; Hyzan, Y; Sivananthan, K S

    2005-07-01

    The tsunami which occurred off the west coast of North Sumatra on December 26, 2004 devastated the coastal areas of North Sumatra, South-West Thailand, South-East India and Sri Lanka killing more than a quarter of a million people. The destruction was enormous with many coastal villages destroyed. The other countries affected were Malaysia, Myanmar, Maldives, Bangladesh, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania and the Seychelles. In January 2005, volunteers went in weekly rotation to Banda Aceh in collaboration with Global Peace Mission. These were Dr Hyzan Yusof, Dr Suryasmi Duski, Dr Sharaf Ibrahim, Dr Saw Aik, Dr Kamariah Nor and Dr Nor Azlin. In Banda Aceh, the surgical procedures that we could do were limited to external fixation of open fractures and debriding infected wounds at the Indonesian Red Crescent field hospital. In February, a team comprising Dato Dr K S Sivananthan, Dr T Kumar and Dr S Vasan spent a week in Sri Lanka. In Sri Lanka, Dato Sivananthan and his team were able to perform elective orthopaedic operations in Dr Poonambalam Memorial Hospital. We appealed for national and international aid and received support from local hospitals and the orthopaedic industry. International aid bound for Banda Aceh arrived in Kuala Lumpur from the Philippine Orthopaedic Association, the Chiba Children's Hospital in Japan and the Chinese Orthopaedic Association. The COA donated 1.5 tons of orthopaedic equipments. A special handing over ceremony from the COA to the Indonesian Orthopaedic Association was held in Putrajaya in March. Malaysia Airlines flew in the donated equipment to Kuala Lumpur while the onward flight to Aceh was provided by the Royal Malaysian Air Force. In April, Dr Saw Aik and Dr Yong Su Mei joined the Tsu-Chi International Medical Association for volunteer services on Batam Island, Indonesia. The MOA acknowledges the many individuals and organizations, both governmental and non-governmental, for their contributions in the humanitarian efforts. PMID

  3. Variations in Organic Matter Burial and Composition in Sediments from the Indian Ocean Continental Margin Off SW Indonesia (Sumatra - Java - Flores) Since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennerjahn, T. C.; Gesierich, K.; Schefuß, E.; Mohtadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change is a mosaic of regional changes to a large extent determined by region-specific feedbacks between climate and ecosystems. At present the ocean is forming a major sink in the global carbon cycle. Organic matter (OM) storage in sediments displays large regional variations and varied over time during the Quaternary. Upwelling regions are sites of high primary productivity and major depocenters of organic carbon (OC), the least understood of which is the Indian Ocean upwelling off Indonesia. In order to reconstruct the burial and composition of OM during the Late Quaternary, we analyzed five sediment cores from the Indian Ocean continental margin off the Indonesian islands Sumatra to Flores spanning the last 20,000 years (20 kyr). Sediments were analyzed for bulk composition, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of OM, amino acids and hexosamines and terrestrial plant wax n-alkanes and their stable carbon isotope composition. Sedimentation rates hardly varied over time in the western part of the transect. They were slightly lower in the East during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and deglaciation, but increased strongly during the Holocene. The amount and composition of OM was similar along the transect with maximum values during the deglaciation and the late Holocene. High biogenic opal covarying with OM content indicates upwelling-induced primary productivity dominated by diatoms to be a major control of OM burial in sediments in the East during the past 20 kyr. The content of labile OM was low throughout the transect during the LGM and increased during the late Holocene. The increase was stronger and the OM less degraded in the East than in the West indicating that continental margin sediments off Java and Flores were the major depocenter of OC burial along the Indian Ocean margin off SW Indonesia. Temporal variations probably resulted from changes in upwelling intensity and terrestrial inputs driven by variations in monsoon strength.

  4. Estimating Carbon STOCK Changes of Mangrove Forests Using Satellite Imagery and Airborne LiDAR Data in the South Sumatra State, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Y.; Fukushima, A.; Imai, Y.; Tanahashi, Y.; Nakama, E.; Ohta, S.; Kawazoe, K.; Akune, N.

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to estimate the biomass in the mangrove forests using satellite imagery and airborne LiDAR data, and 2) to estimate the amount of carbon stock changes using biomass estimated. The study area is located in the coastal area of the South Sumatra state, Indonesia. This area is approximately 66,500 ha with mostly flat land features. In this study, the following procedures were carried out: (1) Classification of types of tree species using Satellite imagery in the study area, (2) Development of correlation equations between spatial volume based on LiDAR data and biomass stock based on field survey for each types of tree species, and estimation of total biomass stock and carbon stock using the equation, and (3) Estimation of carbon stock change using Chronological Satellite Imageries. The result showed the biomass and the amount of carbon stock changes can be estimated with high accuracy, by combining the spatial volume based on airborne LiDAR data with the tree species classification based on satellite imagery. Quantitative biomass monitoring is in demand for projects related to REDD+ in developing countries, and this study showed that combining airborne LiDAR data with satellite imagery is one of the effective methods of monitoring for REDD+ projects.

  5. A Field Assessment of the Effects of the M7.6 Earthquake, 30 September 2009, beneath Padang, Western Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; McGarr, A.; Sumarso, S.; Fauzi, F.; Amarizal, I.; Rudianto, S.; Deierlein, G.

    2009-12-01

    We report field observations of the effects of the M7.6 Padang earthquake of 30 September 2009, in Western Sumatra, Indonesia. In Padang City and its environs, we observed localized regions where heavy damage affected a large fraction of the structures separated by regions of only light damage. Construction type (e.g., unreinforced masonry) and the extent to which contractors adhered to building codes almost certainly played roles in the observed damage. Our observations of localized damage suggest, however, that site effects were also important. Factors influencing site response include near-surface geology, height of the water table, and depth to bedrock. We observed major landslides to the north of Padang City, where it appears that recent heavy rainfall saturated the weathered volcanic formations setting up the conditions for liquefaction and massive debris flows. These debris flows, which buried three villages at the site we visited, were triggered by the strong ground motion from the earthquake, as confirmed by eyewitnesses. Partly because of the great Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of 26 December 2004, earthquake hazards in the city of Padang were considered to be primarily due to an anticipated mega-thrust earthquake in the offshore region and an associated tsunami. On the contrary, the M7.6 earthquake of 30 September was neither a mega-thrust event nor did it generate a tsunami of any consequence. Instead, the compact rupture zone of this earthquake was located within the subducting oceanic slab at a depth of about 80 km. The September 30 earthquake is similar in terms of its intra-slab setting and damaging high-frequency ground motion to intermediate depth earthquakes elsewhere that have caused damage to cities above subduction zones, including those of South and Central America. The focal mechanism of this earthquake, however, was unusual in that it entailed thrust faulting on planes striking at high angles to the trend of the local subduction zone

  6. 26th December 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake: first insights from the summer 2005 Marion Dufresne cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, J.

    2005-12-01

    The 26th December 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake is the second biggest earthquake (Mw=9.3) recorded during the past century. It initiated at a depth of 20-30 km, close to an indentation of the Indonesian fore-arc. The rupture propagated about 1200 km northward and terminated north of Andaman Islands. The "Sumatra Aftershocks" cruise performed on the French R/V Marion Dufresne started July 15 in Jakarta and ended August 9, 2005 in Colombo. We carried out a complete swath-bathymetric survey in a 370*75 km stripe located between northern Sumatra and the Indonesia/India boundary and from the trench to northeast of the Sumatra fault. 20 OBSs were deployed in the area and recorded about 2000 earthquakes during that period. Coring, heat-flow and piezometer measurements were also carried out. Offshore northern Sumatra, the Australia/Sundaland motion is 5 cm/yr in the N008° direction (Bock et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2003), which means that both strike-slip and normal components might occur along features parallel to the trench direction. However, focal mechanisms of the 26th December 2004 earthquake as well as co-seismic motions and 5-days post-seismic displacement field determined from GPS sites are essentially perpendicular to the trench direction (Vigny et al., Nature, 2005). There is consequently an apparent mismatch between deformations derived from plate motions and from co-seismic and immediate after-slip motions. This might suggest that long-term post-seismic motions might have also a significant component of strike-slip motion along features parallel to the trench direction. Between the trench and the backstop located southwest of the Aceh forearc basin, numerous trench parallel piggy back basins were mapped, suggesting the existence of numerous thrust faults. On the basis of morphology, coring and heat flow measurements, a major active thrust fault, which might correspond to an active splay fault, was identified southwest of the Aceh forearc basin. The

  7. Hydrothermal minerals and microstructures in the Silangkitang geothermal field along the Great Sumatran fault zone, Sumatra, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, S.; Lockner, D.A.; Dobson, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed study of core samples of silicic tuff recovered from three geothermal wells along the strike-slip Great Sumatran fault zone near Silangkitang, North Sumatra, supports a model for enhanced hydrothermal circulation adjacent to this major plate-boundary fault. Two wells (A and C) were drilled nearly vertically ??1 km southwest of the eastern (i.e., the principal) fault trace, and the third, directional well (B) was drilled eastward from the site of well A to within ??100 m of the principal fault trace. The examined core samples come from depths of 1650-2120 m at measured well temperatures of 180-320 ??C. The samples collected near the principal fault trace have the highest temperatures, the largest amount of secondary pore space that correlates with high secondary permeability, and the most extensive hydrothermal mineral development. Secondary permeability and the degree of hydrothermal alteration decrease toward the southwestern margin of the fault zone. These features indicate episodic, localized flow of hot, possibly CO2-rich fluids within the fault zone. The microstructure populations identified in the core samples correlate to the subsidiary fault patterns typical of strike-slip faults. The geothermal reservoir appears to be centered on the fault zone, with the principal fault strands and adjoining, highly fractured and hydrothermally altered rock serving as the main conduits for vertical fluid flow and advective heat transport from deeper magmatic sources.

  8. The 2013-2014 Effusive Eruption of Sinabung Volcano, Sumatra, Indonesia: Satellite Thermal Observations and Ground-Based Photogrammetry of a Growing Lava Lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. B.; Vanderkluysen, L.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Sinabung is a 2460 m high andesitic volcano located in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. Sinabung had no confirmed historical activity until a small (VEI 2) explosive eruption in August-September 2010. In September 2013, explosions began again and were accompanied by lava dome growth and subsequent dome-collapse generated pyroclastic flows (Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network 35:07; 39:01). The Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (Indonesia) estimated dome growth at 3.5 m3/s in late December 2013. From January to March 2014 lava extrusion continued and formed a lobe down Sinabung's south flank. As of this writing, effusion and growth of the lava lobe continues, but at a much slower rate. Pyroclastic flows generated by collapse of the steep sides of the lobe remain a hazard. We use thermal infrared (TIR) images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiomter (MODIS) to observe volcanic activity at Sinabung during the 2013-2014 eruption and estimate effusion rates following the methods of Harris & Ripepe (2007, Geophys. Res. Let. 34). We also use new analysis of those thermal images to characterize style of activity, distinguishing pyroclastic flow activity from pure lava lobe growth. Preliminary results from satellite images show an average effusion rate of 1.1 m3/s during January-March 2014, with peak effusion rates from individual TIR images of 4-7 m3/s in mid-January. These numbers are in good agreement with the ground-based estimates, and they provide improved temporal resolution of the activity as it evolved. Since March, effusion rates have decreased to below 0.01 m3/s on average. Using the MODIS images, we estimate the maximum possible total erupted volume to be 7 million m3, and have constrained the accuracy of this estimate using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry from ground-based visual images of the lava lobe. Following explosions in 2010 and 2013 and high effusion rates from January to March 2014, the ongoing slow

  9. Evapotranspiration components determined by eddy covariance and sap flux measurements in oil palm plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijide, Ana; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; June, Tania; Hölscher, Dirk; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The expansion of oil palm cultivation fueled by the increasing global demand for palm oil is leading to massive land transformations in tropical areas, particularly in South-East Asia. Conversions of forest land to oil palm plantations likely affect ecosystem water fluxes. However, there is a lack of information on water fluxes from oil palm plantations as well as on the partitioning of these fluxes into its different components such as transpiration and evaporation. It is expected that water fluxes from oil palm plantations vary temporally, both long-term, i.e. between different age-classes of plantations, and short-term, i.e. from day to day within a certain plantation (e.g. during or after periods of rainfall). A proper evaluation of water fluxes from oil palm plantations thus requires an experimental design encompassing these types of variability. To assess evapotranspiration (ET) rates, an eddy covariance tower was installed in a 2-year-old oil palm plantation in the lowlands of Jambi, Sumatra; it was subsequently moved to a 12-year-old oil palm plantation located in the same region. In parallel to the ET, sap flux density was measured on 16 leaf petioles on four oil palms; stand transpiration rates were derived from these measurements with stand inventory data. The parallel measurements ran for several weeks in both plantations. Preliminary results for our period of study show that the average ET rate of the 2-year-old oil palm plantation was 5.2 mm day-1; values up to 7.0 mm day-1 were observed on dry, sunny days with non-limiting soil moisture. Stand transpiration (T) by the young oil palms was very low, 0.3 mm day-1on average, and only showed a small variation between days. Under optimal environmental conditions, the ratio of T to total ET was up to 0.08 in the young plantation, while in the mature, 12-year-old plantation, it was significantly higher and reached 0.5. Transpiration rates in the mature oil palm plantation were about six- to seven-fold higher

  10. CO2 and CH4 fluxes from oil palm plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia: effects of palm age and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijide, A.; Hassler, E.; Corre, M. D.; June, T.; Sabajo, C.; Veldkamp, E.; Knohl, A.

    2015-12-01

    Global increasing demand of palm oil is leading to the expansion of oil palm plantations, particularly in SE Asia, which in Sumatran lowlands has resulted in a 21% forest area loss. Large photosynthesis rates are expected for oil palms, due to their high growth and yield production. However, there is very limited information on their effect on carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and their sink or source strength at ecosystem scale. For methane (CH4) fluxes, research has mainly focused in oil palm plantations located on peatlands, but no information is available at ecosystem level from plantations on mineral soils. With the aim of studying CO2 fluxes during the non-productive and productive phases of oil palm cultivation, an eddy covariance (EC) tower was installed in a 2 year old oil palm plantation, where it was measuring for 8 months, and was subsequently moved to a 12 year old plantation, both in the province of Jambi, Sumatra. The EC system consisted of a Licor 7500A and an ultrasonic Metek anemometer, operating at 10 Hz, installed on a 7m and 22m tower respectively. In the 12 year old plantation, the tower was also equipped with a Los Gatos FGGA-24EP, to assess CH4 fluxes. Chamber measurements were also carried out to obtain information on respiration and CH4 fluxes from the soil. Radiation was the major driver controlling net carbon uptake, while soil moisture did not play a significant role. Average net ecosystem exchange in the hours of the day with higher radiation for the whole measurement period was 10 μmol m-2 s-1 for the 2 year old plantation and -22 μmol m-2 s-1 in the 12 year old. The analysis of the cumulative fluxes show that the non-productive plantation was a carbon source of around 636 g CO2 m-2 during the 8 months of measurements, while in the productive period, it acted as a strong carbon sink (-794 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). Methane uptake was observed in the soil in both plantations and also for the whole ecosystem in the 12 year old one, but its

  11. Quartenary Gede Salak volcanic complex, Banten area, at the junction between Sumatra arc and Java arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, I.; Hasenaka, T.; Suparka, E.

    2011-12-01

    Pleistocene Gede Salak volcanic complex is located at Banten, northwestern edge of Java island (NWJ), forming a part of Sunda arc. The volcanism is associated with the subduction of the India-Australia plate beneath Eurasian plate at the rate of 7 cm/y. This volcanic complex consists of Gede, Salak, Batur and Wadas volcanoes. To southeast is located Pinang volcano, and to south is volcanic complex of Rawa Dano. These volcanoes are located near Sunda Strait, a transitional zone between Java arc and Sumatera arc where oblique subduction is observed. The distance of all these volcanoes from Java trench varies from 250 km to 300 km. This study is the first geochemical study of volcanic rocks characterizing across-arc variation of Java-Sumatra junction. Gede Salak volcanic complex consists of pyroclastic flow deposits in the western part and lava flows in the eastern part. The later development of dome Wadas formation is probably associated with fault structures trending northwest to southeast. Pinang volcano mainly consists of basaltic lavas. Rawa Dano volcanic complex consists of two caldera, Anyer caldera and Dano caldera, which produced large amount of volcanic tuff called Tufa Banten. Samples from this volcanic complex include basaltic to trachytic rocks, in the range of medium-K to high-K. MgO content is less than 3 %. Elements of Rb, Zr, Ce, and La increase with increasing SiO2. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are similar to those of island arc basalts. When compared to volcanic samples from western Java volcanoes (WJ), REE pattern is similar to those from back-arc volcanoes. Gede Salak volcano is slightly enriched in the subduction component, as illustrated by the low Nb/Zr and elevated Ba/Zr ratios. B/Nb and B/Zr ratios are in the range of 1.5 - 5.4 and 0.03 - 0.10 respectively, which are higher than those of the back arc volcano in central Java (CJ), but lower than those of the frontal volcanoes there. Across arc variation of NWJ including GSVC, Pinang and

  12. Sedimentary Signature of the 26 December 2004 Mega Tsunami on the Eastern Coast of Banda Aceh, Indonesia P. Wassmer, F. Lavigne, J. Sartohadi, Ph. Baumert, R. Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmer, P. C.; Franck, L.; Sartohadi, J.; Baumert, P.; Paris, R.

    2007-05-01

    The eastern part of Banda Aceh was hit by a series of waves with flow depth measured up to 15 meters. In the Kajuh district, at least seven waves were observed by eyewitnesses. They emplaced sand deposits up to 80cm in thickness. We carried out a sedimentological study of these deposits along a 2km long transect oriented according to the main run up flow direction. The sedimentary signature of the tsunami moving landward shows a succession of sequences of normally graded deposit, except for the ungraded basal layer. Close to the shoreline only one or two sequences can be observed. The number of sequences increases progressively landward to reach a maximum of seven up to 2km from the former shoreline. Further inland, the thickness of the deposits is very limited. The sequences are attributed to sediment pulses related to each new wave reaching our investigation sites. Each pulsation corresponds to the arrival of a wave front. The high turbulence led to the deposit of the coarse basal material of each sequence. At the end of each pulse the decreasing of the energy allowed deposition of the finer material. The basal layer, which is undoubtedly related to the first wave, seems to have been truncated by the second and highest wave. This explains the absence of the fine material at the top of the basal layer. Close to the shoreline, the high energy of each new wave, and probably of the backwash, may explain the small amount of sedimentary sequences.The energy decreasing 2km from the shoreline allows each wave to sign his passage, emplacing a new sequence. This sedimentary record is of high interest for its exceptional number of sequences rarely observed so far. Such recording is to be related to several factors: the succession of several high waves progressing far inland, the presence on the shore of a stock of heterometric sediments easily removable, a flat topography which reduced the turbulence of the incoming flows. However, we put in light the key role played by the

  13. Time Series Surface Deformation using Multi-Temporal InSAR Technique at Mount Sinabung Eruption in North Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Eui-Hong; Lee, ChangWook; Jo, Eunyoung; Lee, SeulKi; Kim, KiYeon

    2014-05-01

    Sinabung volcano in Indonesia is a part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, formed due to the subduction between the Eurasian and the Indo-Australian plate. After about 400-year dormancy, Sinabung volcano erupted on August 29, 2010 and January 4, 2014, recently. We study the surface deformation of Sinabung volcano using ALOS/PALSAR and RADARSAT-2 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images acquired from February 2007 to September 2013. Based on multi-temporal InSAR processing, we can generate the ground surface deformation map due to the 2010 eruption. During the 3 years before the 2010 eruption, the volcano inflated at an average rate ~1.7 cm/yr with marked higher rate of 6.6 cm/year during the 6 months prior to the 2010 eruption. The inflation is constrained to the top of the volcano. Since the 2010 eruption to January 2011, the volcano has subsided for about 3 cm (or about 6 cm/yr). The observed inflation and deflation are modeled with a Mogi and Prolate spheroid source. The source of inflation is located about 0.3 - 1.3 km below sea level directly underneath the crater. On the other hand, deflation source is modeled about 0.6-1.0 km with coeruption period. The average volumetric change was about from 1.9x10-6 to -2.7x10-5 km3/yr during the eruption event using ALOS/PALSAR images. Recently, RADARSAT-2 SAR data were applied to new eruption event from September 2013 to January 2014 for frequently eruption during short time period. We interpret the inflation was due to magma accumulation at a shallow reservoir beneath the Sinabung volcano. The deflation was due to the magma withdrawal from the shallow reservoir during the eruption as well as thermo-elastic compaction of erupted material.

  14. Aceh Free Pasung: Releasing the mentally ill from physical restraint

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical restraint and confinement of the mentally ill (called pasung in Indonesia) is common in Aceh. In early 2010, the local government initiated a program called Aceh Free Pasung 2010. The main goal of the program is to release the mentally ill in the province from restraint and to provide appropriate medical treatment and care. The aim of the paper is to report the findings of a preliminary investigation of the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients who have been admitted to the Banda Aceh Mental Hospital as part of the Aceh Free Pasung program. Methods This is a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at the Banda Aceh Mental Hospital, where people who had been restrained or confined in the community are being admitted for psychiatric treatment and, where necessary, physical rehabilitation, as part of the Aceh Free Pasung program. Results Fifty-nine of former ex-pasung patients were examined. The majority (88.1%) of the patients were male, aged 18 to 68 years. The duration of pasung varied from a few days to 20 years, with a mean duration of 4.0 years. The reasons for applying pasung are many, with concerns about dangerousness being most common. The great majority (89.8%) had a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Discussion The development of a community mental health system and the introduction of a health insurance system in Aceh (together with the national health insurance scheme for the poor) has enabled access to free hospital treatment for people with severe mental disorders, including those who have been in pasung. The demographic and clinical characteristics of this group of ex-pasung patients are broadly similar to those reported in previous studies. Conclusions The Aceh Free Pasung program is an important mental health and human rights initiative that can serve to inform similar efforts in other parts of Indonesia and other low and middle-income countries where restraint and confinement of the mentally ill is receiving

  15. Deep-sea ash layers reveal evidence of large Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic eruptions from Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, M. J.; Kent, A.; Patton, J. R.; Goldfinger, C.; Surachman, Y.; Udrekh, U.

    2010-12-01

    eruption clouds presented by the numerous active volcanoes of the western Sunda arc in Indonesia.

  16. Fishing farmers or farming fishers? Fishing typology of inland small-scale fishing households and fisheries management in singkarak lake, west sumatra, indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yuerlita; Perret, Sylvain Roger; Shivakoti, Ganesh P

    2013-07-01

    Technical and socio-economic characteristics are known to determine different types of fishers and their livelihood strategies. Faced with declining fish and water resources, small-scale fisheries engage into transformations in livelihood and fishing practices. The paper is an attempt to understand these changes and their socio-economic patterns, in the case of Singkarak Lake in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Based upon the hypothesis that riparian communities have diverse, complex yet structured and dynamic livelihood systems, the paper's main objective is to study, document and model the actual diversity in livelihood, practices and performance of inland small-scale fisheries along the Singkarak Lake, to picture how households are adapted to the situation, and propose an updated, workable model (typology) of those for policy. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to develop a typology of fishing households. The results show that small-scale fishers can be classified into different types characterized by distinct livelihood strategies. Three household types are identified, namely "farming fishers" households (type I, 30 %), "fishing farmers" households (type II, 30 %), and "mainly fishers" households (type III, 40 %). There are significant differences among these groups in the number of boats owned, annual fishing income, agriculture income and farming experience. Type I consists of farming fishers, well equipped, with high fishing costs and income, yet with the lowest return on fishing assets. They are also landowners with farming income, showing the lowest return on land capital. Type II includes poor fishing farmers, landowners with higher farming income; they show the highest return on land asset. They have less fishing equipment, costs and income. Type III (mainly fishers) consists of poorer, younger fishers, with highest return on fishing assets and on fishing costs. They have little land, low farming income, and diversified livelihood

  17. Fishing Farmers or Farming Fishers? Fishing Typology of Inland Small-Scale Fishing Households and Fisheries Management in Singkarak Lake, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuerlita; Perret, Sylvain Roger; Shivakoti, Ganesh P.

    2013-07-01

    Technical and socio-economic characteristics are known to determine different types of fishers and their livelihood strategies. Faced with declining fish and water resources, small-scale fisheries engage into transformations in livelihood and fishing practices. The paper is an attempt to understand these changes and their socio-economic patterns, in the case of Singkarak Lake in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Based upon the hypothesis that riparian communities have diverse, complex yet structured and dynamic livelihood systems, the paper's main objective is to study, document and model the actual diversity in livelihood, practices and performance of inland small-scale fisheries along the Singkarak Lake, to picture how households are adapted to the situation, and propose an updated, workable model (typology) of those for policy. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to develop a typology of fishing households. The results show that small-scale fishers can be classified into different types characterized by distinct livelihood strategies. Three household types are identified, namely "farming fishers" households (type I, 30 %), "fishing farmers" households (type II, 30 %), and "mainly fishers" households (type III, 40 %). There are significant differences among these groups in the number of boats owned, annual fishing income, agriculture income and farming experience. Type I consists of farming fishers, well equipped, with high fishing costs and income, yet with the lowest return on fishing assets. They are also landowners with farming income, showing the lowest return on land capital. Type II includes poor fishing farmers, landowners with higher farming income; they show the highest return on land asset. They have less fishing equipment, costs and income. Type III (mainly fishers) consists of poorer, younger fishers, with highest return on fishing assets and on fishing costs. They have little land, low farming income, and diversified livelihood

  18. INDONESIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCVEY, RUTH T.

    THIS UNIVERSITY-LEVEL TEXT IS AN ATTEMPT TO BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN SUPERFICIAL IMPRESSION AND SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE CONCERNING INDONESIA. IT PROVIDES AN INTRODUCTION TO INDONESIA THROUGH CHAPTERS ON--(1) PHYSICAL AND HUMAN RESOURCE PATTERNS, BY K.J. PELZER, (2) INDONESIAN CULTURES AND COMMUNITIES, BY H. GEERTZ, (3) THE CHINESE MINORITY, BY G.W.…

  19. Indonesia.

    PubMed

    1989-04-01

    Indonesia, an archipelago of 13,500 islands, ranks 5th as the most populous nation in the world. It has 175 million people, 105 million of which live on the island of Java alone. Indonesia has many distinct cultural and linguistic groups. Islam almost wholly replaced Hindu by the end of the 16th century, after arriving in the 12th century. Today 88% of the people are Muslim, while the rest includes Christians, Hindus, Buddhists, and others. The constitution guarantees religious freedom. Indonesia gained independence from the Netherlands in 1949. Indonesia's 1st president, Sukarno, led the rebellion leading to independence and remained in power from 1949-1967. After aligning with Asian communist countries and establishing an authoritarian regime in the early 1960s, the people rebelled, attempted a coup and, in 1967, the People's,s Consultative Assembly named Soeharto as president. He continues to be Indonesia's president and the dominant government and political figure. The constitution provides limited separation of executive, legislative, and judicial power. During the 1970s, the strong economy was based on high oil revenues and an industrial policy which protected domestic industries. Beginning in the 1980s, however, lower energy earnings assisted by low inflation, a downward float against the dollar, and the government eliminating regulatory obstacles turned the economic tide. Even though Indonesia has a larger unrescheduled external debt than any other developing nation, the government is dealing successfully with servicing this debt. Foreign interests participate in the oil and minerals sectors. Indonesia acts on its free and active foreign policy by playing a prominent role in Asian affairs, but avoiding involvement in conflicts among major powers. Indonesia is on friendly terms with its neighbors, and the military does not advocate developing the capability to project its power. The US and Indonesia carry on cordial diplomatic and trade relations

  20. Indonesia.

    PubMed

    1985-12-01

    This discussion of Indonesia focuses on the following: geography; the people; history; government and political conditions; the economy; foreign relations; defense; and relations between Indonesia and the US. In 1985, Indonesia's population totaled 173 million with an annual growth rate of 2.1%. Infant mortality was 89/1000 and life expectancy 55 years. The Republic of Indonesia is an archipelago of more than 13,500 islands extending 4800 kilometers along the equator from the mainland of Southeast Asia to Australia. Indonesians are primarily of Malay stock and include many related but distinct cultural and linguistic groups. Republic based on the 1945 constitution providing for limited separation of executive, legislative, and judicial power. The president, elected for a 5-year term, is the dominant government and political figure. Over the 1983-85 period, Indonesia experienced much success in stabilizing the economy following a downturn in 1981-82. Indonesia cut government expenditures, devalued the rupiah by 28% vis-a-vis the US dollar, and introduced a financial reform package to improve efficiency in the banking system and to encourage savings. Real gross domestic product (GDP) grew 4.2% in 1983 and 6% in 1984; inflation fell from 12% in 1983 to 9% in 1984 and 4% during the 1st part of 1985; the current account deficit declined from 8% to 3% of GDP by 1984. Agriculture is the most important domestic sector, accounting for more than 25%. The manufacturing sector accounts for 12% of GDP. Since the beginning of the Soeharto government, US relations with Indonesia have been close and cordial. PMID:12233540

  1. Deforestation in Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Indonesia is rapidly losing its lowland forests to logging, much of it illegal. At present, logging is claiming the forests at a rate of nearly two million hectares (slightly less than 5 million acres: roughly the same area as the state of Massachusetts) each year. At this rate, the island of Sumatra will have no more lowland forests by 2005, a fate already befallen the island of Sulawesi. Indonesia's lowland forests are home to a wide variety of wildlife and are considered among the richest ecosystems in the world. Among the unique life forms in these forests are the Orangutan and the Sumatra Tiger. Sixteen percent of the entire world's bird species, eleven percent of its plants, and ten percent of all mammals on Earth call these forests home. Many are found nowhere else. In the two Landsat scenes shown above, the pattern of deforestation can be clearly discerned. Deep green in these images shows lush vegetation in the forest cover. In both scenes, deep and pale red shows areas where there is little or no vegetation, often bare ground from where forest has been completely stripped. The latter Landsat scene from 2001 not only shows extensive clear cut areas, but also new logging roads built into the remaining forest to facilitate future cutting. This lowland forest region is located on Indonesia's largest island, Sumatra, roughly 100 km southwest of the provincial capital of Jambi. The first image was acquired by Landsat 5's Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor on June 22, 1992, the second by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on January 14, 2001. Both are false-color composite images made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and green wavelengths. The area shown above is roughly 30 km x 22 km (19 miles x 14 miles). The large versions of these images show the same general area covering 60 km x 60 km. Images provided by the Tropical Rain Forest Information Center (TRFIC) through the Basic Science and Remote Sensing Initiative (BSRSI) based at Michigan

  2. "The Fruit Caught between Two Stones": The Conflicted Position of Teachers within Aceh's Independence Struggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes Cardozo, Mieke T.A.; Shah, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the challenging situation faced by teachers as professionals and members of the community in Aceh, Indonesia during the province's civil war. It reveals how teachers' sense of agency during this period was deeply influenced by the economic/material, political and socio-cultural condition at that time -- conditions and…

  3. Integrated study of geophysical and biological anomalies before earthquakes (seismic and non-seismic), in Austria and Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Wolfgang; Assef, Rizkita; Faber, Robert; Ferasyi, Reza

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes are commonly seen as unpredictable. Even when scientists believe an earthquake is likely, it is still hard to understand the indications observed, as well as their theoretical and practical implications. There is some controversy surrounding the concept of using animals as a precursor of earthquakes. Nonetheless, several institutes at University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, and Vienna University of Technology, both Vienna, Austria, and Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, as well as Terramath Indonesia, Buleleng, both Indonesia, cooperate in a long-term project, funded by Red Bull Media House, Salzburg, Austria, which aims at getting some decisive step forward from anecdotal to scientific evidence of those interdependencies, and show their possible use in forecasting seismic hazard on a short-term basis. Though no conclusive research has yet been published, an idea in this study is that even if animals do not respond to specific geophysical precursors and with enough notice to enable earthquake forecasting on that basis, they may at least enhance, in conjunction with other indications, the degree of certainty we can get of a prediction of an impending earthquake. In Indonesia, indeed, before the great earthquakes of 2004 and 2005, ominous geophysical as well as biological phenomena occurred (but were realized as precursors only in retrospect). Numerous comparable stories can be told from other times and regions. Nearly 2000 perceptible earthquakes (> M3.5) occur each year in Indonesia. Also, in 2007, the government has launched a program, focused on West Sumatra, for investigating earthquake precursors. Therefore, Indonesia is an excellent target area for a study concerning possible interconnections between geophysical and biological earthquake precursors. Geophysical and atmospheric measurements and behavioral observation of several animal species (elephant, domestic cattle, water buffalo, chicken, rat, catfish) are conducted in three areas

  4. The role of students' activities in Indonesian realistic mathematics education in primary schools of Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubainur, Cut Morina; Veloo, Arsaythamby; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to explore the implementation of the Indonesian Realistic Mathematics Education (PMRI) in Aceh primary schools, Indonesia. This study investigates the students' mathematics activities involved in the implementation of PMRI and for this purpose; students' mathematics activities in the classroom were observed. Students were observed three times within five weeks during mathematics class, based on PMRI. A total of 25 year five students from a public school participated in this study. Observation check list was used in this study based on ten items. The observation conducted was based on two different time periods which were 105 minutes for group A and 70 minutes for group B. The observation was conducted every 5 minutes. The results show that PMRI is being practised in Aceh, but not completely. This study shows that mathematics activities for those who were taught using PMRI are higher than for those using the traditional approach. Overall, the findings showed that the number of student activities undertaken in PMRI achieved 90.56%. The higher percentage of activities suggests that the Aceh Education Office expands the implementation of PMRI in all primary schools so that learning of mathematics is more effective. This indirectly increases the mathematics achievement of students in Aceh to a higher level on par with Indonesia's national achievement.

  5. Mathematical Understanding and Representation Ability of Public Junior High School in North Sumatra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minarni, Ani; Napitupulu, E. Elvis; Husein, Rahmad

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the result of first phase of the research about the development of students' mathematical understanding and representation ability through Joyful Problem-Based Learning (JPBL) at Public Junior High School in North Sumatra, Indonesia. The population is all of the students of public junior high school (PJHS) in North Sumatra. Samples…

  6. Livelihood change and livelihood sustainability in the uplands of Lembang subwatershed, West Sumatra, Indonesia, in a changing natural resource management context.

    PubMed

    Mahdi; Shivakoti, Ganesh P; Schmidt-Vogt, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes livelihood change and livelihood sustainability of households in the upland part of the Lembang subwatershed, West Sumatra, in response to changes in the natural resource management context during the last decade. Using the sustainable livelihood framework (SLF), we measured livelihood changes at two separate points in time, 1996 and 2006, and assessed their environmental, economic, social, and institutional sustainability. We found that people with a low income had less access to capital assets than people from middle- and high-income groups. Our analysis revealed, however, that access to capital assets increased over time, and that poor households experienced economic improvement, indicating an overall increase in economic sustainability. Environmental sustainability, however, is threatened by intensive agricultural practices such as high agrochemical input and intensive soil tillage on steep slopes, leading to pollution and soil erosion. Social sustainability is also a matter of concern: while social exclusion has been reduced, income inequity has increased. Institutional sustainability is likely to remain uncertain, as local institutions for natural resource management are still weak, despite the fact that decentralization has been implemented during the last 8 years. External facilitation is needed to improve the livelihood of upland people while, at the same time, enhancing the sustainability of watershed management. Strengthening local institutions, conserving natural resources, and promoting environmentally sound agricultural practices are the three most important policies to be promoted within the watershed. PMID:18506516

  7. Tsunami Research driven by Survivor Observations: Sumatra 2004, Tohoku 2011 and the Lituya Bay Landslide (Plinius Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.

    2014-05-01

    The 10th anniversary of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami recalls the advent of tsunami video recordings by eyewitnesses. The tsunami of December 26, 2004 severely affected Banda Aceh along the North tip of Sumatra (Indonesia) at a distance of 250 km from the epicenter of the Magnitude 9.0 earthquake. The tsunami flow velocity analysis focused on two survivor videos recorded within Banda Aceh more than 3km from the open ocean. The exact locations of the tsunami eyewitness video recordings were revisited to record camera calibration ground control points. The motion of the camera during the recordings was determined. The individual video images were rectified with a direct linear transformation (DLT). Finally a cross-correlation based particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis was applied to the rectified video images to determine instantaneous tsunami flow velocity fields. The measured overland tsunami flow velocities were within the range of 2 to 5 m/s in downtown Banda Aceh, Indonesia. The March 11, 2011, magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan caused catastrophic damage and loss of life. Fortunately many survivors at evacuation sites recorded countless tsunami videos with unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage. Numerous tsunami reconnaissance trips were conducted in Japan. This report focuses on the surveys at selected tsunami eyewitness video recording locations along Japan's Sanriku coast and the subsequent tsunami video image analysis. Locations with high quality survivor videos were visited, eyewitnesses interviewed and detailed site topography scanned with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The analysis of the tsunami videos followed the four step procedure developed for the analysis of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami videos at Banda Aceh. Tsunami currents up to 11 m/s were measured in Kesennuma Bay making navigation impossible. Further tsunami height and runup hydrographs are derived from the videos to discuss the complex effects of coastal structures

  8. Studying Displacement After a Disaster Using Large Scale Survey Methods: Sumatra After the 2004 Tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Clark; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Gillespie, Thomas; Sumantri, Cecep; Thomas, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of human vulnerability to environmental change has advanced in recent years, but measuring vulnerability and interpreting mobility across many sites differentially affected by change remains a significant challenge. Drawing on longitudinal data collected on the same respondents who were living in coastal areas of Indonesia before the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and were re-interviewed after the tsunami, this paper illustrates how the combination of population-based survey methods, satellite imagery and multivariate statistical analyses has the potential to provide new insights into vulnerability, mobility and impacts of major disasters on population well-being. The data are used to map and analyze vulnerability to post-tsunami displacement across the provinces of Aceh and North Sumatra and to compare patterns of migration after the tsunami between damaged areas and areas not directly affected by the tsunami. The comparison reveals that migration after a disaster is less selective overall than migration in other contexts. Gender and age, for example, are strong predictors of moving from undamaged areas but are not related to displacement in areas experiencing damage. In our analyses traditional predictors of vulnerability do not always operate in expected directions. Low levels of socioeconomic status and education were not predictive of moving after the tsunami, although for those who did move, they were predictive of displacement to a camp rather than a private home. This survey-based approach, though not without difficulties, is broadly applicable to many topics in human-environment research, and potentially opens the door to rigorous testing of new hypotheses in this literature. PMID:24839300

  9. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2012 Sumatra and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Gavin P., (compiler); Bernardino, Melissa; Dannemann, Fransiska; Smoczyk, Gregory; Briggs, Richard W.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The plate boundary southwest of Sumatra is part of a long tectonic collision zone that extends over 8,000 km from Papua, New Guinea, in the east to the Himalayan front in the west. The Sumatra-Andaman part of the collision zone forms a subduction zone plate boundary, which accommodates convergence between the Indo-Australia and Sunda plates. This convergence is responsible for the intense seismicity in Sumatra. The Sumatra Fault, a major transform structure that bisects Sumatra, accommodates the northwest-increasing lateral component of relative plate motion. Most strain accumulation and release between the two plates occurs along the Sunda megathrust. The increasingly oblique convergence moving northwest is accommodated by crustal seismicity along several transform and normal faults, including the Sumatra Fault. Plate-boundary related deformation is also not restricted to the subduction zone and overriding plate: the Indo-Australian plate actually comprises two somewhat independent plates (India and Australia) that are joined along a broad, actively deforming region that produces seismicity up to several hundred kilometers west of the trench. This deformation is exemplified by the recent April 2012 earthquake sequence, which includes the April 11 M 8.6 and M 8.2 strike-slip events and their subsequent aftershocks. Since 2004, much of the Sunda megathrust between the northern Andaman Islands and Enggano Island, a distance of more than 2,000 km, has ruptured in a series of large subduction zone earthquakes—most rupturing the plate boundary south of Banda Aceh. These events include the great M 9.1 earthquake of December 26, 2004; the M 8.6 Nias Island earthquake of March 28, 2005; and two earthquakes on September 12, 2007, of M 8.5 and M 7.9. On October 25, 2010, a M 7.8 on the shallow portion of the megathrust to the west of the Mentawai Islands caused a substantial tsunami on the west coast of those islands.

  10. Three factors to enlarge tsunami disaster in Indonesia after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Satake, K.

    2010-12-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami revealed Indonesia’s vulnerability for natural hazards to the international society. Various education programs of disaster risk reduction have been supported by many international agencies, and both students and community have gradually learned about natural hazards in Indonesia. After five years have passed, it is entering into a new phase. We started a three-year (2009-2011) multi-disciplinary cooperative research project as a part of ‘Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS)’ supported by the Japanese government. The project title is ‘Multi-disciplinary hazard reduction from earthquake and volcanoes in Indonesia’. Three factors contributing to earthquake and tsunami disasters in Indonesia are revealed through our research. Firstly, tsunami hazard is still high in Indonesia. Earthquakes have frequently occurred in West Sumatra after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. In Padang, our research field, a possibility of a great interplate earthquake with tsunami in the near future has been pointed out. Secondly, social infrastructure is very vulnerable. During the recent earthquakes such as the 2009 Padang earthquake, many people were killed by collapse of non-resistance buildings. For the future tsunami hazard, many building had been identified for vertical evacuation, but many candidate evacuation buildings were collapsed during the 2009 earthquake. The last factor is people’s incorrect knowledge about natural hazards. People misunderstand that tsunami comes with initial receding waves through the fact of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami in Indonesia. Every time large earthquake occurs, people go to seaside to check the low tide, especially in the 2004 tsunami disaster area such as Aceh. Our counterpart NGO has patiently struggled with such misunderstanding in Padang and succeeded to educate people. Because of the buildings’ vulnerability, the NGO put priority on horizontal evacuation. The

  11. Breaking the vicious circle of illegal logging in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Linkie, Matthew; Sloan, Sean; Kasia, Rahmad; Kiswayadi, Dedy; Azmi, Wahdi

    2014-08-01

    The government of Indonesia, which presides over 10% of the world's tropical forests, has set ambitious targets to cut its high deforestation rates through an REDD+ scheme (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation). This will require strong law enforcement to succeed. Yet, strategies that have accomplished this are rare and, along with past failures, tend not to be documented. We evaluated a multistakeholder approach that seeks to tackle illegal logging in the carbon-rich province of Aceh, Sumatra. From 2008 to 2009, Fauna & Flora International established and supported a community-based informant network for the 738,000 ha Ulu Masen ecosystem. The network reported 190 forest offenses to local law enforcement agencies, which responded with 86 field operations that confiscated illicit vehicles, equipment, and timber, and arrested 138 illegal logging suspects. From 45 cases subsequently monitored, 64.4% proceeded to court, from which 90.0% of defendants received a prison sentence or a verbal warning for a first offense. Spatial analyses of illegal logging and timber storage incidents predicted that illegal activities would be more effectively deterred by law enforcement operations that targeted the storage sites. Although numerous clusters of incidents were identified, they were still widespread reflecting the ubiquity of illegal activities. The multistakeholder results were promising, but illegal logging still persisted at apparently similar levels at the project's end, indicating that efforts need to be further strengthened. Nevertheless, several actions contributed to the law enforcement achievements: strong political will; strong stakeholder support; and funding that could be promptly accessed. These factors are highlighted as prerequisites for achieving Indonesia's ambitious REDD+ goals. PMID:24628366

  12. Earthquake and Tsunami booklet based on two Indonesia earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Aci, M.

    2014-12-01

    Many destructive earthquakes occurred during the last decade in Indonesia. These experiences are very important precepts for the world people who live in earthquake and tsunami countries. We are collecting the testimonies of tsunami survivors to clarify successful evacuation process and to make clear the characteristic physical behaviors of tsunami near coast. We research 2 tsunami events, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and 2010 Mentawai slow earthquake tsunami. Many video and photographs were taken by people at some places in 2004 Indian ocean tsunami disaster; nevertheless these were few restricted points. We didn't know the tsunami behavior in another place. In this study, we tried to collect extensive information about tsunami behavior not only in many places but also wide time range after the strong shake. In Mentawai case, the earthquake occurred in night, so there are no impressive photos. To collect detail information about evacuation process from tsunamis, we contrived the interview method. This method contains making pictures of tsunami experience from the scene of victims' stories. In 2004 Aceh case, all survivors didn't know tsunami phenomena. Because there were no big earthquakes with tsunami for one hundred years in Sumatra region, public people had no knowledge about tsunami. This situation was highly improved in 2010 Mentawai case. TV programs and NGO or governmental public education programs about tsunami evacuation are widespread in Indonesia. Many people know about fundamental knowledge of earthquake and tsunami disasters. We made drill book based on victim's stories and painted impressive scene of 2 events. We used the drill book in disaster education event in school committee of west Java. About 80 % students and teachers evaluated that the contents of the drill book are useful for correct understanding.

  13. Grassroots development and upwards accountabilities: tensions in the reconstruction of Aceh's fishing industry.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Rowan; McGregor, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the tensions between aid funding and grassroots development goals in the context of post-disaster fisheries reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia. We argue that both short- and long-term grassroots goals are distorted by upward accountability requirements which lead to unsatisfactory aid outcomes. Our analysis employs the concept of aid webs and draws on fifty-one formal interviews with stakeholders in Aceh in 2007/2008. The findings initially concentrate on the impacts of upward accountability on project cycles, with a particular focus on the problematic incorporation of private boat-building contractors and commercial values during the implementation phase. We then discuss the more subtle, long-term impacts of upward accountability on the professionalization of community institutions — in this case, the Panglima Laot Lhok. We conclude with a few observations about the hybrid institutions — combining elements of local and development cultures — that are produced within the current political economy of aid. PMID:22235491

  14. Seismology: energy radiation from the Sumatra earthquake.

    PubMed

    Ni, Sidao; Kanamori, Hiroo; Helmberger, Don

    2005-03-31

    We determined the duration of high-frequency energy radiation from Indonesia's great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (26 December 2004) to be about 500 seconds. This duration can be translated into a rupture length of about 1,200 km, which is more than twice as long as that inferred from body-wave analyses performed soon after the event. Our analysis was able rapidly to define the extent of rupture, thereby aiding the assessment of seismic hazard in the immediate future. PMID:15800612

  15. RESIDENTIAL WATER USE IN BANDA ACEH BEFORE AND AFTER DISASTER RECONSTRUCTION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, Yasuko; Nagasawa, Masaharu

    This study focuses on the residential consciousness on water use in the background of disaster reconstruction of water supply system in Banda Aceh, Indonesia after the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. Itwas turned out that half of residents started usingwater supply system after the earthquake and the water supply system user satisfies water quality rather than the domestic water user does. The satisfaction on water supply stability is not obtained well though there is a problem in resident's manner. Finally, the disaster countermeasure to the area where earthquake and tsunami are high potential and where the water supply system is not developed yet were discussed.

  16. Geothermal resource of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, M.P. . Geothermal Inst.); Sudarman, Sayogi . Geothermal Section)

    1993-06-01

    There are at least 30 high temperatures systems (with inferred reservoir temperatures > 200 C) along the active Sumatra Arc that transfer heat from crustal intrusions to the surface. These systems, together with eleven active volcanoes, five degassing volcanoes and one caldera volcano (Lake Toba), are controlled by the Sumatra Fault Zone, an active mega shear zone that follows the median axis of the arc. At least half of the active and degassing volcanoes are associated with volcanic geothermal reservoirs containing magmatic gases and acid fluids. Large, low temperature resources exist in the Tertiary sedimentary basins of east Sumatra (back-arc region), where anomalously higher thermal gradients (up to 8 C/100 m) have been measured. Volcanic activity was not continuous during the Cenozoic; subduction and arc volcanism probably decreased after the Eocene as a result of a clockwise rotation of Sumatra. In the Late Miocene, subduction started again, and andesitic volcanism reached a new peak of intensity in the Pliocene and has been continuous ever since. Rhyolitic volcanism, which has produced voluminous ignimbrite flows, began later (Pliocene/Pleistocene). All known rhyolitic centers associated with ignimbrite flows appear to lie along the Sumatra Fault Zone.

  17. Determining Proportion of Exfoliative Vaginal Cell during Various Stages of Estrus Cycle Using Vaginal Cytology Techniques in Aceh Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Siregar, Tongku N.; Melia, Juli; Rohaya; Thasmi, Cut Nila; Masyitha, Dian; Wahyuni, Sri; Rosa, Juliana; Nurhafni; Panjaitan, Budianto; Herrialfian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the period of estrus cycle in aceh cattle, Indonesia, based on vaginal cytology techniques. Four healthy females of aceh cattle with average weight of 250–300 kg, age of 5–7 years, and body condition score of 3-4 were used. All cattle were subjected to ultrasonography analysis for the occurrence of corpus luteum before being synchronized using intramuscular injections of PGF2 alpha 25 mg. A vaginal swab was collected from aceh cattle, stained with Giemsa 10%, and observed microscopically. Period of estrus cycle was predicted from day 1 to day 24 after estrus synchronization was confirmed using ultrasonography analysis at the same day. The result showed that parabasal, intermediary, and superficial epithelium were found in the vaginal swabs collected from proestrus, metestrus, and diestrus aceh cattle. Proportions of these cells in the particular period of estrus cycle were 36.22, 32.62, and 31.16 (proestrus); 21.33, 32.58, and 46.09 (estrus); 40.75, 37.58, and 21.67 (metestrus); and 41.07, 37.38, and 21.67 (diestrus), respectively. In conclusion, dominant proportion of superficial cell that occurred in estrus period might be used as the base for determining optimal time for insemination. PMID:26977335

  18. Fuel Cost Estimation for Sumatra Grid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liun, Edwaren

    2010-06-01

    Sumatra has a high growth rate electricity energy demand from the first decade in this century. At the medium of this decade the growth is 11% per annum. On the other side capability of Government of Indonesia cq. PLN authority is limited, while many and most old existing power plants will be retired. The electricity demand growth of Sumatra is increasing the fuel consumption for several next decades. Based on several cases by vary growth scenarios and economic parameters, it shown that some kinds of fossil fuel keep to be required until next several decades. Although Sumatra has abundant coal resource, however, the other fuel types such as fuel oil, diesel, gas and nuclear are needed. On the Base Scenario and discount rate of 10%, the Sumatra System will require 11.6 million tones of coal until 2030 producing 866 TWh with cost of US10558 million. Nuclear plants produce about 501 TWh or 32% by cost of US3.1 billion. On the High Scenario and discount rate 10%, the coal consumption becomes 486.6 million tones by fuel cost of US12.7 billion producing 1033 TWh electricity energy. Nuclear fuel cost required in this scenario is US7.06 billion. The other fuel in large amount consumed is natural gas for combined cycle plants by cost of US1.38 billion producing 11.7 TWh of electricity energy on the Base Scenario and discount rate of 10%. In the High Scenario and discount rate 10% coal plants take role in power generation in Sumatra producing about 866 TWh or 54% of electricity energy. Coal consumption will be the highest on the Base Scenario with discount rate of 12% producing 756 TWh and required cost of US17.1 billion. Nuclear plants will not applicable in this scenario due to its un-competitiveness. The fuel cost will depend on nuclear power role in Sumatra system. Fuel cost will increase correspond to the increasing of coal consumption on the case where nuclear power plants not appear.

  19. Numerical Simulation of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami: Accurate Flooding and drying in Banda Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Haiyang; Pietrzak, Julie; Stelling, Guus; Androsov, Alexey; Harig, Sven

    2010-05-01

    The Indian Ocean Tsunami on December 26, 2004 caused one of the largest tsunamis in recent times and led to widespread devastation and loss of life. One of the worst hit regions was Banda Aceh, which is the capital of the Aceh province, located in the northern part of Sumatra, 150km from the source of the earthquake. A German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) (www.gitews.de) is currently under active development. The work presented here is carried out within the GITEWS framework. One of the aims of this project is the development of accurate models with which to simulate the propagation, flooding and drying, and run-up of a tsunami. In this context, TsunAWI has been developed by the Alfred Wegener Institute; it is an explicit, () finite element model. However, the accurate numerical simulation of flooding and drying requires the conservation of mass and momentum. This is not possible in the current version of TsunAWi. The P1NC - P1element guarantees mass conservation in a global sense, yet as we show here it is important to guarantee mass conservation at the local level, that is within each individual cell. Here an unstructured grid, finite volume ocean model is presented. It is derived from the P1NC - P1 element, and is shown to be mass and momentum conserving. Then a number of simulations are presented, including dam break problems flooding over both a wet and a dry bed. Excellent agreement is found. Then we present simulations for Banda Aceh, and compare the results to on-site survey data, as well as to results from the original TsunAWI code.

  20. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  1. Management of hospitals in Aceh during the tsunami.

    PubMed

    Kartowisastro, Hermansyur

    2005-01-01

    On December 26th, 2004, Aceh and its vicinity was hit by two natural forces consecutively, an earthquake and a tsunami. Hundreds of thousands of people perished, leaving the remaining of about the same number to become refugees. The writer was assigned by the Ministry of Health to Aceh on duty on the second and third week after the catastrophe, to help the management of Zainoel Abidin General Hospital in Banda Aceh, the province's biggest hospital, revive its operation. PMID:16300161

  2. Exploration in the Ombilin Intermontane Basin, West Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, T.

    1996-12-31

    The Ombilin Basin is a Tertiary intermontane basin located within the Barisan Mountain Range of Sumatra. Oil exploration commenced in the Ombilin Basin in the early 1980s when geological mapping was carried out, a synthetic aperture radar survey was flown, and a basin-wide geophysical survey was completed. This effort led to the drilling of Sinimar No. 1 to a total depth 3020 m. Sinimar No. 1 was a historic well in Indonesia`s oil industry since it was the first oil exploration well drilled in the Ombilin Basin and also the first well drilled in an intermontane basin in Indonesia. Oil, gas and condensate was tested in the well. An integrated interpretation of the well, geophysical and outcrop data indicates that despite its small areal size (30 km x 50 km), the Ombilin Basin is a deep pull-apart basin containing up to 4500 m of Tertiary sediments, ranging in age from Middle Eocene to Early Miocene. The basin currently is in an intermontane basin structural setting but it was also an intermontane basin during its Early Tertiary depositional history. During the Eocene, alluvial fans and massive debris flows were deposited on the basin margins and a large lake occupied the basin center. Fluvial deposition occurred in the basin during the Oligocene followed by deposition of marine shales, sandstones, and isolated reefs during the Miocene. Although the Ombilin Basin is located within Sumatra`s magmatic arc and is partially covered by volcanics from extinct and active volcanoes, the subsurface temperature gradients of 1.62 deg. F/100 ft. recorded in Sinimar No. I and 1.47 deg F/100 ft. measured in a deep (670 m) coal exploration core hole are significantly cooler than the average subsurface temperature gradients in the Sumatra back-arc basins. Organic-rich Eocene lacustrine shales are the likely source rocks for the hydrocarbons tested in Sinimar No. 1 and the oil seeps located along the basin margins.

  3. Coseismic deformation induced by the Sumatra earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, E.; Casarotti, E.; Devoti, R.; Melini, D.; Piersanti, A.; Pietrantonio, G.; Riguzzi, F.

    2006-08-01

    The giant Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of December 26, 2004 caused permanent deformations effects in a region of previously never observed extension. The GPS data from the worldwide network of permanent IGS sites show significant coseismic displacements in an area exceeding 10 7 km 2, reaching most of South-East Asia, besides Indonesia and India. We have analyzed long GPS time series histories in order to characterize the noise type of each site and, consequently, to precisely assess the formal errors of the coseismic offset estimates. The synthetic simulations of the coseismic displacement field obtained by means of a spherical model using different rupture histories indicate that a major part of the energy release took place in a fault plane similar to that obtained by Ammon et al. (2005) and Vigny et al. (2005) but with a larger amount of compressional slip on the northern segment of the fault area.

  4. GPS Analyses of the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Gudmundsson, Ólafur

    2005-03-01

    The Sumatra, Indonesia, earthquake on 26 December 2004 was one of the most devastating earthquakes in history. With a magnitude of Mw = 9.3 (revised based on normal-mode amplitudes by Stein and Okal, http://www.earth.northwestern.edu/people/seth/research/sumatra.html), it is the second largest earthquake recorded since 1900. It occurred about 100 km off the west coast of northern Sumatra, where the relatively dense Indo-Australian plate moves beneath the lighter Burma plate, resulting in stress accumulation. The average relative velocity of the two plates is about 6 cm/yr. On 26 December 2004, however, the two plates moved by a distance of several meters, releasing the stress accumulated over hundreds of years. The result was a devastating tsunami that hit coastlines across the Indian Ocean, killing about 300,000 people in Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, Thailand, Burma, Malaysia, Somalia, and other countries (Guardian, 29 January 2005, http://www.guardian.co.uk/tsunami/story/0,15671,1380895,00.html).

  5. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp., Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon spp. and Giardia intestinalis in Wild, Semi-Wild and Captive Orangutans (Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus) on Sumatra and Borneo, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Mynářová, Anna; Foitová, Ivona; Kváč, Martin; Květoňová, Dana; Rost, Michael; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Nurcahyo, Wisnu; Nguyen, Cathleen; Supriyadi, Supriyadi; Sak, Bohumil

    2016-01-01

    Background Orangutans are critically endangered primarily due to loss and fragmentation of their natural habitat. This could bring them into closer contact with humans and increase the risk of zoonotic pathogen transmission. Aims To describe the prevalence and diversity of Cryptosporidium spp., microsporidia and Giardia intestinalis in orangutans at seven sites on Sumatra and Kalimantan, and to evaluate the impact of orangutans’ habituation and location on the occurrence of these zoonotic protists. Result The overall prevalence of parasites in 298 examined animals was 11.1%. The most prevalent microsporidia was Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype II, found in 21 animals (7.0%). Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype D (n = 5) and novel genotype Pongo 2 were detected only in six individuals (2.0%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of these parasites in orangutans. Eight animals were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. (2.7%), including C. parvum (n = 2) and C. muris (n = 6). Giardia intestinalis assemblage B, subtype MB6, was identified in a single individual. While no significant differences between the different human contact level groups (p = 0.479–0.670) or between the different islands (p = 0.992) were reported in case of E. bieneusi or E. cuniculi, Cryptosporidium spp. was significantly less frequently detected in wild individuals (p < 2×10−16) and was significantly more prevalent in orangutans on Kalimantan than on Sumatra (p < 2×10−16). Conclusion Our results revealed that wild orangutans are significantly less frequently infected by Cryptosporidium spp. than captive and semi-wild animals. In addition, this parasite was more frequently detected at localities on Kalimantan. In contrast, we did not detect any significant difference in the prevalence of microsporidia between the studied groups of animals. The sources and transmission modes of infections were not determined, as this would require repeated sampling of individuals

  6. Conflict nightmares and trauma in Aceh.

    PubMed

    Grayman, Jesse Hession; Good, Mary-Jo Delvecchio; Good, Byron J

    2009-06-01

    In both the Acehnese and Indonesian languages, there is no single lexical term for "nightmare." And yet findings from a large field research project in Aceh that examined post traumatic experience during Aceh's nearly 30-year rebellion against the Indonesian state and current mental distress revealed a rich variety of dream narratives that connect directly and indirectly to respondents' past traumatic experiences. The results reported below suggest that even in a society that has a very different cultural ideology about dreams, where "nightmares" as such are not considered dreams but rather the work of mischievous spirits called jin, they are still a significant part of the trauma process. We argue that it is productive to distinguish between terrifying and repetitive dreams that recreate the traumatic moment and the more ordinary varieties of dreams that Acehnese reported to their interviewers. Nightmares that refer back to conflict events do not appear as an elaborated feature of trauma as the condition is understood by people in Aceh, but when asked further about their dreams, respondents who reported symptoms suggestive of PTSD were more likely to report PTSD-like dreams, memory intrusions that repeat the political violence of the past. PMID:19283458

  7. Exploration in the Ombilin Intermontane Basin, West Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, T. Petroleum Co., Lagos )

    1996-01-01

    The Ombilin Basin is a Tertiary intermontane basin located within the Barisan Mountain Range of Sumatra. Oil exploration commenced in the Ombilin Basin in the early 1980s when geological mapping was carried out, a synthetic aperture radar survey was flown, and a basin-wide geophysical survey was completed. This effort led to the drilling of Sinimar No. 1 to a total depth 3020 m. Sinimar No. 1 was a historic well in Indonesia's oil industry since it was the first oil exploration well drilled in the Ombilin Basin and also the first well drilled in an intermontane basin in Indonesia. Oil, gas and condensate was tested in the well. An integrated interpretation of the well, geophysical and outcrop data indicates that despite its small areal size (30 km x 50 km), the Ombilin Basin is a deep pull-apart basin containing up to 4500 m of Tertiary sediments, ranging in age from Middle Eocene to Early Miocene. The basin currently is in an intermontane basin structural setting but it was also an intermontane basin during its Early Tertiary depositional history. During the Eocene, alluvial fans and massive debris flows were deposited on the basin margins and a large lake occupied the basin center. Fluvial deposition occurred in the basin during the Oligocene followed by deposition of marine shales, sandstones, and isolated reefs during the Miocene. Although the Ombilin Basin is located within Sumatra's magmatic arc and is partially covered by volcanics from extinct and active volcanoes, the subsurface temperature gradients of 1.62 deg. F/100 ft. recorded in Sinimar No. I and 1.47 deg F/100 ft. measured in a deep (670 m) coal exploration core hole are significantly cooler than the average subsurface temperature gradients in the Sumatra back-arc basins. Organic-rich Eocene lacustrine shales are the likely source rocks for the hydrocarbons tested in Sinimar No. 1 and the oil seeps located along the basin margins.

  8. Coalbed methane: A partial solution to Indonesia`s growing energy problems

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.K.; Gold, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    Indonesia contains the largest resources of coal in Southeast Asia. Indonesian scientists estimate that the in-place coalbed methane resource in 16 onshore basins is about 213 Tcf ({approximately}6 Tcm). This volume is approximately double Indonesia`s current reserves of natural gas. Indonesia is a rapidly industrializing nation of 186 million people, of which 111 million live in Java and 38 million in Sumatra. As industrialization progresses from the present low level, the growth in energy demand will be very rapid. Indonesia`s domestic gas demand is expected to increase form 1.6 Bcf/d (0.05 Bcm/d) in 1991 to 5.7 Bcf/d (0.2 Bcm/d) in 2021. Because the major gas resources of East Kalimantan, North Sumatra, and Natuna are so remote from the main consuming area in northwest Java and are dedicated for export by virtue of the national energy policy, the need is becoming urgent to develop new resources of natural gas, including coalbed methane, for the domestic market. Due to the high geothermal gradient, the coal deposits in the back-arc basins of Sumatra and Java are expected to be of higher than normal rank at depths favorable for coalbed methane production. The oil- and gas-productive Jatibarang sub-basin in northwest Java, with estimated in-place resources of coalbed methane in excess of 20 Tcf (0.6 Tcm), is considered to be the most prospective area in Indonesia for the near-term development of coalbed methane. This area includes Jakarta and vicinity, the most populous and most heavily industrialized part of Indonesia.

  9. Ischnura foylei sp. nov. (Odonata, Coenagrionidae) from the highlands of Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Kosterin, Oleg E

    2015-01-01

    Ischnura foylei sp. nov. is described from Indonesia, Sumatra, Jambi Province, Danau Gunung Tujuh (or Danau Sakti), a lake situated in an extinct volcanic crater, 1°41'15"S, 101°25'28"S, 1995 m a.s.l. Structurally it is close to I. senegalensis but larger and with differently shaped cerci in males and a more trilobate posterior lobe of the prothorax; males and androchromatic females have a unique colour pattern. PMID:26624348

  10. Long Continuous Deformation during 2008-2012 Sumatra Earthquakes Using DINSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Cahyadi, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    Indonesia located in three tectonic plates. This situation caused many earthquakes and long continuous movement of plate tectonics. The island which has big tectonic movement phenomena was Sumatra Island. We monitored long deformation process during interseismic and coseismic of three earthquakes in this Island. The three earthquakes were Mentawai 2008, Padang 2009 and North Sumatra 2012 earthquakes. We used Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DINSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite in order to monitor the displacement. We used GAMIT software for GPS and open source software ROYPAC for DINSAR. Sumatra GPS Array (SUGAR) Networks were used to analyze the displacement rate. The result of displacement was very different year to year, Mw 7.6 Padang earthquake had 15.8 cm up and caused subduction zone of trench Sumatra movement about 1.8 cm to 7 cm up. The displacements was continued by Mw 7.7 Mentawai earthquake 2008. We monitored intersesismic, coseismic and postseismic phase. Coseismic phase was 0.222m in horizontal direction and 0.1415 m in vertical direction (SLBU station). The interseismic phase was smaller about 0.118 m in BSAT stations (south east direction). The biggest deformation was detected during interseismic and postseismic North Sumatra 2012 earthquakes with deformation 0.300-3.00 meter.

  11. Rapid decision tool to predict earthquake destruction in Sumatra by using first motion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Shardul Sanjay

    The main idea of this project is to build an interactive and smart Geographic Information system tool which can help predict intensity of real time earthquakes in Sumatra Island of Indonesia. The tool has an underlying intelligence to predict the intensity of an earthquake depending on analysis of similar earthquakes in the past in that specific region. Whenever an earthquake takes place in Sumatra, a First Motion Study is conducted; this decides its type, depth, latitude and longitude. When the user inputs this information into the input string, the tool will try to find similar earthquakes with a similar First Motion Survey and depth. It will do a survey of similar earthquakes and predict if this real time earthquake can be disastrous or not. This tool has been developed in JAVA. I have used MOJO (Map Objects JAVA Objects) to show map of Indonesia and earthquake locations in the form of points. ESRI has created MOJO which is a set of JAVA API's. The Indonesia map, earthquake location points and its co-relation was all designed using MOJO. MOJO is a powerful tool which made it easy to design the tool. This tool is easy to use and the user has to input only a few parameters for the end result. I hope this tool justifies its use in prediction of earthquakes and help save lives in Sumatra.

  12. Multi-disciplinary Hazard Reduction from Earthquakes and Volcanoes in Indonesia - International Research Cooperation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Teruyuki

    2010-05-01

    themes were explained and panel discussion was conducted. Then, the project officially started in June 2009. The first plenary workshop was held in October 11-14 in Aceh, Indonesia, at the occasion of Indian Ocean-wide tsunami evacuation drill of IOC (Inter-governmental Oceanographic Commission). Considering that disastrous earthquakes occurred on 2nd September 2009 (Mw7.0) in the south of Java and on 30th September 2009 (Mw7.5) nearby Padang, central Sumatra, special reports for these earthquakes were presented. In particular, the latter earthquake that devastated the city of Padang was of great interest because its epicenter is located in a seismic gap called "Mentawai gap" where a large interplate earthquake is expected to occur in the near future. Research teams from our project were urgently deployed to the area for investigating disasters due to the September 2009 earthquake and trying to find effective countermeasures to the coming larger event.

  13. Seismicity associated with the Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of 26 December 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, J.W.; Choy, G.; Presgrave, B.; Sipkin, S.; Tarr, A.C.; Benz, H.; Earle, P.; Wald, D.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey/National Earthquake Information Center (USGS/ NEIC) had computed origins for 5000 earthquakes in the Sumatra-Andaman Islands region in the first 36 weeks after the Sumatra-Andaman Islands mainshock of 26 December 2004. The cataloging of earthquakes of mb (USGS) 5.1 and larger is essentially complete for the time period except for the first half-day following the 26 December mainshock, a period of about two hours following the Nias earthquake of 28 March 2005, and occasionally during the Andaman Sea swarm of 26-30 January 2005. Moderate and larger (mb ???5.5) aftershocks are absent from most of the deep interplate thrust faults of the segments of the Sumatra-Andaman Islands subduction zone on which the 26 December mainshock occurred, which probably reflects nearly complete release of elastic strain on the seismogenic interplate-thrust during the mainshock. An exceptional thrust-fault source offshore of Banda Aceh may represent a segment of the interplate thrust that was bypassed during the mainshock. The 26 December mainshock triggered a high level of aftershock activity near the axis of the Sunda trench and the leading edge of the overthrust Burma plate. Much near-trench activity is intraplate activity within the subducting plate, but some shallow-focus, near-trench, reverse-fault earthquakes may represent an unusual seismogenic release of interplate compressional stress near the tip of the overriding plate. The interplate-thrust Nias earthquake of 28 March 2005, in contrast to the 26 December aftershock sequence, was followed by many interplate-thrust aftershocks along the length of its inferred rupture zone.

  14. Future fire emissions associated with projected land use change in Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Marlier, Miriam E; DeFries, Ruth; Pennington, Derric; Nelson, Erik; Ordway, Elsa M; Lewis, Jeremy; Koplitz, Shannon N; Mickley, Loretta J

    2015-01-01

    Indonesia has experienced rapid land use change over the last few decades as forests and peatswamps have been cleared for more intensively managed land uses, including oil palm and timber plantations. Fires are the predominant method of clearing and managing land for more intensive uses, and the related emissions affect public health by contributing to regional particulate matter and ozone concentrations and adding to global atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Here, we examine emissions from fires associated with land use clearing and land management on the Indonesian island of Sumatra and the sensitivity of this fire activity to interannual meteorological variability. We find ~80% of 2005-2009 Sumatra emissions are associated with degradation or land use maintenance instead of immediate land use conversion, especially in dry years. We estimate Sumatra fire emissions from land use change and maintenance for the next two decades with five scenarios of land use change, the Global Fire Emissions Database Version 3, detailed 1-km2 land use change maps, and MODIS fire radiative power observations. Despite comprising only 16% of the original study area, we predict that 37-48% of future Sumatra emissions from land use change will occur in fuel-rich peatswamps unless this land cover type is protected effectively. This result means that the impact of fires on future air quality and climate in Equatorial Asia will be decided in part by the conservation status given to the remaining peatswamps on Sumatra. Results from this article will be implemented in an atmospheric transport model to quantify the public health impacts from the transport of fire emissions associated with future land use scenarios in Sumatra. PMID:25044917

  15. Embedded wisdom or rooted problems? Aid workers' perspectives on local social and political infrastructure in post-tsunami Aceh.

    PubMed

    Daly, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    This paper analyses the role of local social, cultural, and political institutions in post-disaster reconstruction projects. It contends that such institutions are important considerations within community-driven reconstruction initiatives, but are often viewed with ambivalence by external aid organisations. This paper draws upon in-depth qualitative interviews with aid workers involved in the post-tsunami reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia, to establish: (i) what roles community institutions were suited to play in the reconstruction; (ii) what were the limitations of community institutions when engaging with external aid agencies; (iii) how did external aid agencies engage with local community institutions; and (iv) how did external aid agencies perceive community institutions. PMID:25442350

  16. Thumb-pads up-a new species of thick-thumbed bat from Sumatra (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae: Glischropus).

    PubMed

    Csorba, Gábor; Görföl, Tamás; Wiantoro, Sigit; Kingston, Tigga; Bates, Paul J J; Huang, Joe Chun-Chia

    2015-01-01

    To date, three species of the genus Glischropus are recognized from the Indomalayan zoogeographic region-G. bucephalus from the Indochinese subregion, G. tylopus from the Sundaic subregion (Peninsular Thailand and Malaysia, Borneo, Sumatra, Moluccas) and G. javanus, restricted to Java. The investigation of the holotype and three topotype specimens of G. batjanus supported the view that the name was previously correctly regarded as the junior subjective synonym of G. tylopus. During review of material recently collected in southwestern Sumatra, Indonesia, one specimen of a yet undescribed species of Thick-thumbed bat was identified. G. aquilus n. sp. markedly differs from its congeners by its dark brown pelage, nearly black ear and tragus, and in skull proportions. The phylogenetic analysis based on cytb sequences also supports the specific distinctness of G. aquilus n. sp. Its discovery brings the count to 88 species of bats known from Sumatra. PMID:26249952

  17. Nutritional and household risk factors for xerophthalmia in Aceh, Indonesia: a case-control study. The Aceh Study Group.

    PubMed

    Mele, L; West, K P; Kusdiono; Pandji, A; Nendrawati, H; Tilden, R L; Tarwotjo, I

    1991-06-01

    Risk factors for xerophthalmia were assessed in 466 subjects [38% with night blindness (XN), 60% with Bitot's spots (X1B), 2% with corneal xerophthalmia (X2 or X3)] under age 6 y and their village-age-sex-matched control subjects during a community trial. Socioeconomic status and hygiene standards were lowest for households of xerophthalmic children and highest for nonstudy households in the trial population, with values for control households lying in between (P less than 0.001 by linear trend). Risk of xerophthalmia increased with less frequent consumption of dark green leaves, yellow fruits, or egg during weaning, adjusted for current intake and present age [odds ratio (OR) = approximately 3.5]. Exclusion of these same foods from the current diet (except for mango and papaya in older children) was associated with a two- to ninefold excess risk of xerophthalmia, adjusted for weaning influences. Xerophthalmic children aged less than 3 y were generally at higher risk of dietary imbalance than were older children. Xerophthalmia is associated with a chronic, infrequent consumption of key vitamin A foods from weaning through early childhood. PMID:2035474

  18. The 2004 Aceh-Andaman Earthquake: Early clay dehydration controls shallow seismic rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geersen, Jacob; McNeill, Lisa; Henstock, Timothy J.; Gaedicke, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    The physical state of the shallow plate-boundary fault governs the updip extent of seismic rupture during powerful subduction zone earthquakes and thus on a first order impacts on the tsunamigenic hazard of such events. During the 2004 Mw 9.2 Aceh-Andaman Earthquake seismic rupture extended unusually far seaward below the accretionary prism causing the disastrous Indian Ocean Tsunami. Here we show that the formation of a strong bulk sediment section and a high fluid-pressured predécollement, that likely enabled the 2004 rupture to reach the shallow plate-boundary, result from thermally controlled diagenetic processes in the upper oceanic basement and overlying sediments. Thickening of the sediment section to >2 km ˜160 km seaward of the subduction zone increases temperatures at the sediment basement interface and triggers mineral transformation and dehydration (e.g., smectite-illite) prior to subduction. The liberated fluids migrate into a layer that likely host high porosity and permeability and that is unique to the 2004 rupture area where they generate a distinct overpressured predécollement. Clay mineral transformation further supports processes of semilithification, induration of sediments, and coupled with compaction dewatering all amplified by the thick sediment section together strengthens the bulk sediments. Farther south, where the 2005 Sumatra Earthquake did not include similar shallow rupture, sediment thickness on the oceanic plate is significantly smaller. Therefore, similar diagenetic processes occur later and deeper in the subduction zone. Hence, we propose that shallow seismic rupture during the 2004 earthquake is primarily controlled by the thickness and composition of oceanic plate sediments.

  19. Interannual variation of ocean heat content in outer Indonesian waters in warming ocean (Case study: West Sumatra waters)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjawane, Ivonne M.; Bernawis, Lamona I.; Priyono, Bayu; Fadli, Muh.; Putuhena, Hugo S.

    2015-09-01

    This research was intended observe of interannual variation of Ocean Heat Content (OHC) in outer Indonesian Water within the boundary of Indonesia Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ) with study case focused West Sumatra waters that related to global ocean warming. The temperature data were obtained from ARGO floats as well as other observations data from 2002-2010. OHC was calculated following the equations adopted from Young et al.(2009) using a two-layer ocean models which are above and below the thermocline, where the heat content is calculated from the surface to depth of 28° C isotherm of upper thermocline.The results show trend of increasing OHC and varies interannual in West Sumatra water. The OHC ranges from 425 MJ/m2 to 4720 MJ/m2 in West Sumatra. The signal of OHC in West Sumatra influenced by Indian Ocean Dipole Mode phenomena. When positive IOD event occurs then decrease of OHC in West Sumatra due to decrease in SST over the areas.

  20. Multibeam Mapping of the West Andaman Fault, NW Sumatra Fault, Andaman Volcanic Arc and Their Tectonic and Magmatic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattoju, K. A.; Mudholkar, A. V.; Murty, G.; Vadakkeyakath, Y.; Singh, S. C.; Kiranmai, S.; Moeremans, R.

    2012-12-01

    West Andaman Fault (WAF) is a major structural feature in the Andaman Offshore region that plays an important role in modulating the strain partitioning within the Andaman Sea, well known for its complex tectonics and seismic hazard potential. However, detailed configuration of the WAF and its interaction with the Sumatra fault system in the Andaman sector are not well understood. Here we present near complete coverage of about 800 km long section of the WAF with special emphasis on the zone of confluence of the WAF and the Sumatra Fault systems, and the adjacent volcanic arc in the offshore region of the Great Nicobar Island. We have examined the fault system, and the volcanic arc feature by combining the newly acquired multibeam bathymetry data with the available data northwest of Sumatra. New multibeam map revealed a pattern of faults that are formed in the region of joining of the Seulimeum (SEU) and Aceh strands (AS) of the Sumatra fault with the WAF off Great Nicobar Island. Sandwiched between these faults, at this location, is a 50 km long and 7 km wide conspicuous NS elongated block that rises to 500 m from an adjacent seafloor of about 2000 m. The surface of the block has a westward dipping topographic fabric. Serpentinites were recovered from the eastern cliff of this block, suggestive of mantle origin. A deformed zone with corrugated surface is documented southeast of this elongated block at water depth ranging from 1000 to 1500 m. The mantle block and the deformed zone are bifurcated by a fault, which might be a branch of the WAF. Further south the expression of the Sumatra platform, northern boundary of the Aceh basin pinching out to WAF, extension of the SEU, AS strands towards south, and the northern limit of Weh basin are observed. The other prominent feature that is documented for the first time is the expression of the Andaman volcanic arc. Twenty-three submarine volcanoes of varying sizes have been mapped between 6°30‧N to 8°15‧N. Magnetic

  1. Rebuilt risk: involuntary return, voluntary migration, and socioeconomic segregation in post-tsunami Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, Jamie; Daly, Patrick; Mundzir, Ibnu; Mahdi, Saiful; Patt, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    In light of growing coastal populations and rising relative sea levels, understanding the consequences of infrequent, high-impact coastal hazards for human migration is a key ingredient for meeting the challenges of sustainable development. Using new quantitative and qualitative evidence from 1160 households and 121 village leaders, we examine longer-term migration in the city of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, following the devastating 2004 tsunami and an international aid response that offered most survivors only resettlement back in the tsunami-affected area. While many survivors wanted to return, some preferred to relocate further from the coast but did not have the chance to do so. Since that time, selective out-migration by those with the means and socioeconomic sorting of newcomers have led to a new socioeconomic segregation of the tsunami-affected parts of the city. More broadly, these findings suggest that short-distance socioeconomic sorting into and out from vulnerable areas may be an important migratory response to a newly recognized risk.

  2. Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami wave impact in west Aceh

    PubMed Central

    Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos; Marohn, Carsten; Dercon, Gerd; Dewi, Sonya; Piepho, Hans Peter; Joshi, Laxman; van Noordwijk, Meine; Cadisch, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In a tsunami event human casualties and infrastructure damage are determined predominantly by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. On land, wave energy is attenuated by gravitation (elevation) and friction (land cover). Tree belts have been promoted as “bioshields” against wave impact. However, given the lack of quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, tree belts have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. This study used 180 transects perpendicular to over 100 km on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia to analyze the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the impact of the 2004 tsunami. Satellite imagery; land cover maps; land use characteristics; stem diameter, height, and planting density; and a literature review were used to develop a land cover roughness coefficient accounting for the resistance offered by different land uses to the wave advance. Applying a spatial generalized linear mixed model, we found that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of impact (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. In contrast, dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. Debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. For sustainable and effective coastal risk management, location of settlements is essential, while the protective potential of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement, should be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bioshield. PMID:22065751

  3. Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami wave impact in west Aceh.

    PubMed

    Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos; Marohn, Carsten; Dercon, Gerd; Dewi, Sonya; Piepho, Hans Peter; Joshi, Laxman; van Noordwijk, Meine; Cadisch, Georg

    2011-11-15

    In a tsunami event human casualties and infrastructure damage are determined predominantly by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. On land, wave energy is attenuated by gravitation (elevation) and friction (land cover). Tree belts have been promoted as "bioshields" against wave impact. However, given the lack of quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, tree belts have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. This study used 180 transects perpendicular to over 100 km on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia to analyze the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the impact of the 2004 tsunami. Satellite imagery; land cover maps; land use characteristics; stem diameter, height, and planting density; and a literature review were used to develop a land cover roughness coefficient accounting for the resistance offered by different land uses to the wave advance. Applying a spatial generalized linear mixed model, we found that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of impact (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. In contrast, dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. Debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. For sustainable and effective coastal risk management, location of settlements is essential, while the protective potential of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement, should be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bioshield. PMID:22065751

  4. Acanthaster planci is a major cause of coral mortality in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, A. H.; Pratchett, M. S.; Hoey, A. S.; Herdiana, Y.; Campbell, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    The corallivorous crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS), Acanthaster planci, is recognised as a major cause of coral reef degradation throughout much of the Pacific Ocean. However, the effects of COTS on the high diversity reefs in Indonesia have been largely overlooked. In 2007, high densities of COTS were observed in two regions of Indonesia: Aceh and Halmahera. Densities of COTS ranged from 0 to 52 starfish 2,000 m2 across 24 sites in Aceh and from 0 to 18 starfish 2,000 m2 at 10 sites in Halmahera. Mortality rates of Acropora spp. were very high at affected sites: over 50 % of colonies had been killed at seven of the 16 affected sites. A review of historical sources going back to 1969 suggests that COTS have damaged many reefs throughout Indonesia, including much activity within the Indonesian section of the Coral Triangle. Furthermore, the data suggest that COTS activity has increased rapidly since 2000. Very little of this activity has been reported in the primary literature, and there is a general lack of awareness in Indonesia of COTS as a potential cause of reef degradation. This lack of awareness, combined with limited monitoring efforts, means that damage caused by COTS is often attributed to other causes, such as destructive fishing, bleaching or tsunami. COTS are clearly a major source of coral mortality in Indonesia of which scientists and government need to be more cognizant.

  5. Precursory seismicity changes prior to major earthquakes along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone: a region-time-length algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukrungsri, Santawat; Pailoplee, Santi

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the precursory seismicity changes related to the major earthquakes posed along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ) using the region-time-length (RTL) algorithm. Based on the suitable RTL characteristics of r 0 = 100 km and t 0 = 2 years, the anomalous RTL score representing the quiescence stage mostly started 0.1-5.2 years before the subsequent major earthquake, while no activation stage was illustrated. For the spatial investigation, the RTL anomalies also clearly illustrated the location of the subsequent major earthquakes. Thus, in order to determine the prospective areas of upcoming earthquakes, the series of RTL maps calculated during the recent 5-year (2010-2014) time span was used. The obtained results reveal four risk areas along the SASZ that might pose a major earthquake in the future, namely (i) Sittwe city, western Myanmar; (ii) offshore northern Nicobar Islands; (iii) Aceh city, northernmost of Sumatra Island; and (iv) offshore western Sumatra Island. Therefore, both a tsunami hazard in the Indian Ocean and a seismic hazard in the far-field cities should be recognized urgently.

  6. Recent progress of geological investigations in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prijosoesilo, Purnomo; Sunarya, Yaya; Wahab, A.

    Geologically, the Indonesian archipelago was formed as a result of the interaction and collision of the gigantic crustal blocks, i.e. the Eurasian, Indian, Australian and the Pacific plates. This process caused the formation of extensively distributed ultrabasic rocks in Eastern Indonesia, containing rich mineral resources. In Western Indonesia most ore bodies found are associated with the active volcano-plutonic arc or the stable mass of the Sunda Shelf. There are 60 known Tertiary sedimentary basins in Indonesia and only 36 of them have been "failry" explored, of which 14 basins have had hydrocarbon commercial production. Most of the hydrocarbon exploration and production during the last 100 years have been carried out in Western Indonesia. Many of the "unexplored" basins in Indonesia are located in the offshore areas with water depth over 200 m. Coal and geothermal resources are mostly found in Western Indonesia, particularly Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan. Coal production in 1990 has reached 11 million tons. The steady growth of production was primarily due to the establishment of the coal contract agreement with foreign contractors as well as the re-growth of the State coal mines in Bukit Asam and Sawahlunto, Sumatra. Aside from coal, geothermal is one of the alternative energy resources that have been developed in recent years. From some 16,000 MW resources potential estimated, presently only 140 MW geothermal generating power units have been commercially put on production in Kamojang, West Java. The most important minerals mined in Indonesia are tin (Sn), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu) and bauxite. Most of the gold (Au) and silver (Ag) production are mined in association with copper (Cu) such as those in Tembagapura, Irian Jaya, with the exception of a few epithermal gold mines in other areas in the country. Between 1984 and 1990, Indonesia produced around 1.3-1.5 MMBPD crude oil and condensate plus 1.6-2.2 TSCF natural gas. Most of the natural gas production was

  7. A probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horspool, N.; Pranantyo, I.; Griffin, J.; Latief, H.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Kongko, W.; Cipta, A.; Bustaman, B.; Anugrah, S. D.; Thio, H. K.

    2014-11-01

    Probabilistic hazard assessments are a fundamental tool for assessing the threats posed by hazards to communities and are important for underpinning evidence-based decision-making regarding risk mitigation activities. Indonesia has been the focus of intense tsunami risk mitigation efforts following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, but this has been largely concentrated on the Sunda Arc with little attention to other tsunami prone areas of the country such as eastern Indonesia. We present the first nationally consistent probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment (PTHA) for Indonesia. This assessment produces time-independent forecasts of tsunami hazards at the coast using data from tsunami generated by local, regional and distant earthquake sources. The methodology is based on the established monte carlo approach to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) and has been adapted to tsunami. We account for sources of epistemic and aleatory uncertainty in the analysis through the use of logic trees and sampling probability density functions. For short return periods (100 years) the highest tsunami hazard is the west coast of Sumatra, south coast of Java and the north coast of Papua. For longer return periods (500-2500 years), the tsunami hazard is highest along the Sunda Arc, reflecting the larger maximum magnitudes. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height of > 0.5 m at the coast is greater than 10% for Sumatra, Java, the Sunda islands (Bali, Lombok, Flores, Sumba) and north Papua. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height of > 3.0 m, which would cause significant inundation and fatalities, is 1-10% in Sumatra, Java, Bali, Lombok and north Papua, and 0.1-1% for north Sulawesi, Seram and Flores. The results of this national-scale hazard assessment provide evidence for disaster managers to prioritise regions for risk mitigation activities and/or more detailed hazard or risk assessment.

  8. An evaluation of public, private, and mobile health clinic usage for children under age 5 in Aceh after the tsunami: implications for future disasters

    PubMed Central

    Rassekh, Bahie Mary; Shu, Winnie; Santosham, Mathuram; Burnham, Gilbert; Doocy, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aceh, Indonesia, was the hardest-hit area in the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, with more than 500,000 people displaced, 120,000 people dead, and total damages and losses estimated at $4.5 billion. The relief effort following the tsunami was also immense. Objectives: This study aimed to determine and assess utilization patterns of formal public versus private and mobile health services for children under age 5 with diarrhea, cough and difficulty breathing, fever, or skin disease and to identify determinants of care usage. Methods: A household survey of 962 households was administered to caretakers of children aged 1–5 years. A sample of clusters within Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar were selected and those caretakers within the cluster who fit the inclusion criteria were interviewed. Results: Of those caretakers who utilized formal health services as the first line of care for their sick child, 62% used a public health facility, 30% used a private health facility, and 8% used a mobile clinic. In terms of significant factors associated with public, private, and mobile care utilization, mobile clinics were at one side of the spectrum and private clinics were at the other side overall, with public care somewhere in between. This was true for several variables. Mobile clinic users reported the lowest cost of services and medicine and the highest perceived level of accessibility, and private care users reported the highest perceived level of satisfaction. Conclusions: Utilization of formal health services for children was quite high after the tsunami. The caretaker's perceived satisfaction with public health services could have been improved. Mobile clinics were an accessible source of health care and could be used in future disaster relief efforts to target those populations that seek less care for their sick children, including displaced populations, and those children whose parents have died. PMID:25750788

  9. Geographical Assessment of Rickettsioses in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Susana; Williams, Maya; Winoto, Imelda; Farzeli, Arik; Stoops, Craig A; Barbara, Kathryn A; Richards, Allen L; Blair, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    To expand the documentation of rickettsioses in Indonesia, we conducted an ectoparasite and small mammal investigation involving four major islands: Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, and Kalimantan. Coastal and highland regions on each island surveyed were chosen to represent different ecologies in Indonesia. Indication of the presence of Rickettsia spp. was evident in all areas sampled. Typhus group rickettsiae-specific antibodies had significantly higher prevalence among small mammals captured in Java compared to the other islands surveyed (78% in coastal and 50% in highland regions) and the prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsiae-specific antibodies was significantly higher in Kalimantan than the other islands investigated. Hosts and vectors were restricted by Rickettsia spp. but not by coastal or highland regions. Our findings expand the range in which rickettsial pathogens have been documented within the Indonesian archipelago and point to a significant risk to human health. PMID:26771425

  10. Postseismic Deformations of the Aceh, Nias and Benkulu Earthquakes and the Viscoelastic Properties of the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleitout, L.; Garaud, J.; Cailletaud, G.; Vigny, C.; Simons, W. J.; Ambrosius, B. A.; Trisirisatayawong, I.; Satirapod, C.; Geotecdi Song

    2011-12-01

    The giant seism of Aceh (december 2004),followed by the Nias and Bengkulu earthquakes, broke a large portion of the boundary between the Indian ocean and the Sunda block. For the first time in history, the deformations associated with a very large earthquake can be followed by GPS, in particular by the SEAMERGE (far-field) and SUGAR (near-field) GPS networks. A 3D finite element code (Zebulon-Zset) is used to model both the cosismic and the postseismic deformations. The modeled zone is a large portion of spherical shell around Sumatra extanding over more than 60 degrees in latitude and longitude and from the Earth's surface to the core-mantle boundary. The mesh is refined close to the subduction zone. First, the inverted cosismic displacements on the subduction plane are inverted for and provide a very good fit to the GPS data for the three seisms. The observed postseismic displacements, non-dimensionalized by the cosismic displacements, present three very different patterns as function of time: For GPS stations in the far-field, the total horizontal post-seismic displacement after 4 years is as large as the cosismic displacement. The velocities vary slowly over 4 years. A large subsidence affects Thailand and Malaysia. In the near-field, the postseismic displacement reaches only some 15% of the cosismic displacement and it levels off after 2 years. In the middle-field (south-west coast of Sumatra), the postseismic displacement also levels-off with time but more slowly and it reaches more than 30% of the cosismic displacement after four years. In order to fit these three distinct displacement patterns, we need to invoke both viscoelastic deformation in the asthenosphere and a low-viscosity wedge: Neither the vertical subsidence nor the amplitude of the far-field horizontal velocities could be explained by postseismic sliding on the subduction interface. The low viscosity wedge permits to explain the large middle-field velocities. The viscoelastic properties of the

  11. Seasonal forecasting of fire over Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spessa, A. C.; Field, R. D.; Pappenberger, F.; Langner, A.; Englhart, S.; Weber, U.; Stockdale, T.; Siegert, F.; Kaiser, J. W.; Moore, J.

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale fires occur frequently across Indonesia, particularly in the southern region of Kalimantan and eastern Sumatra. They have considerable impacts on carbon emissions, haze production, biodiversity, health, and economic activities. In this study, we demonstrate that severe fire and haze events in Indonesia can generally be predicted months in advance using predictions of seasonal rainfall from the ECMWF System 4 coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Based on analyses of up-to-date and long series observations on burnt area and rainfall, and tree cover, we demonstrate that fire activity is negatively correlated with rainfall, and is positively associated with deforestation in Indonesia. There is a contrast between the southern region of Kalimantan (high fire activity, high tree cover loss and strong non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire) and the central region of Kalimantan (low fire activity, low tree cover loss and weak non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire). The ECMWF seasonal forecast provides skilled forecasts of burnt area with several months lead time explaining at least 70% of the variance between rainfall and with burnt area. Results are strongly influenced by El Niño years which show a consistent positive bias. Overall, our findings point to a high potential for using a more physical-based method for predicting fires with several months lead time in the tropics, rather than one based on indexes only. We argue that seasonal precipitation forecasts should be central to Indonesia's evolving fire management policy.

  12. Seasonal forecasting of fire over Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spessa, A. C.; Field, R. D.; Pappenberger, F.; Langner, A.; Englhart, S.; Weber, U.; Stockdale, T.; Siegert, F.; Kaiser, J. W.; Moore, J.

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale fires occur frequently across Indonesia, particularly in the southern region of Kalimantan and eastern Sumatra. They have considerable impacts on carbon emissions, haze production, biodiversity, health, and economic activities. In this study, we demonstrate that severe fire and haze events in Indonesia can generally be predicted months in advance using predictions of seasonal rainfall from the ECMWF System 4 coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Based on analyses of long, up-to-date series observations on burnt area, rainfall, and tree cover, we demonstrate that fire activity is negatively correlated with rainfall and is positively associated with deforestation in Indonesia. There is a contrast between the southern region of Kalimantan (high fire activity, high tree cover loss, and strong non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire) and the central region of Kalimantan (low fire activity, low tree cover loss, and weak, non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire). The ECMWF seasonal forecast provides skilled forecasts of burnt and fire-affected area with several months lead time explaining at least 70% of the variance between rainfall and burnt and fire-affected area. Results are strongly influenced by El Niño years which show a consistent positive bias. Overall, our findings point to a high potential for using a more physical-based method for predicting fires with several months lead time in the tropics rather than one based on indexes only. We argue that seasonal precipitation forecasts should be central to Indonesia's evolving fire management policy.

  13. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febriyani, Caroline; Prijatna, Kosasih; Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-01

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  14. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Febriyani, Caroline Prijatna, Kosasih Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  15. Characteristics and risk factors for typhoid fever after the tsunami, earthquake and under normal conditions in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although typhoid transmitted by food and water is a common problem in daily life, its characteristics and risk factors may differ in disaster-affected areas, which reinforces the need for rapid public health intervention. Surveys were carried out post-tsunami in Banda Aceh, post-earthquake in Yogyakarta, and under normal conditions in Bandung, Indonesia. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the risk factors with the dependent variable of typhoid fever, with or without complications. Findings Characteristic typhoid fever with complications was found in 5 patients (11.9%) affected by the tsunami in Aceh, 8 (20.5%) after the earthquake in Yogyakarta, and 13 (18.6%) in Bandung. After the tsunami in Aceh, clean water (OR = 0.05; 95%CI: 0.01-0.47) and drug availability (OR = 0.23; 95%CI: 0.02-2.43) are significant independent risk factors, while for the earthquake in Yogyakarta, contact with other typhoid patients (OR = 20.30; 95%CI: 1.93-213.02) and education (OR = 0.08; 95%CI: 0.01-0.98) were significant risk factors. Under normal conditions in Bandung, hand washing (OR = 0.07; 95%CI: 0.01-0.50) and education (OR = 0.08; 95%CI: 0.01-0.64) emerged as significant risk factors. Conclusion The change in risk factors for typhoid complication after the tsunami in Aceh and the earthquake in Yogyakarta emphasizes the need for rapid public health intervention in natural disasters in Indonesia. PMID:20398409

  16. Tsunami inundation modeling for western Sumatra

    PubMed Central

    Borrero, José C.; Sieh, Kerry; Chlieh, Mohamed; Synolakis, Costas E.

    2006-01-01

    A long section of the Sunda megathrust south of the great tsunamigenic earthquakes of 2004 and 2005 is well advanced in its seismic cycle and a plausible candidate for rupture in the next few decades. Our computations of tsunami propagation and inundation yield model flow depths and inundations consistent with sparse historical accounts for the last great earthquakes there, in 1797 and 1833. Numerical model results from plausible future ruptures produce flow depths of several meters and inundation up to several kilometers inland near the most populous coastal cities. Our models of historical and future tsunamis confirm a substantial exposure of coastal Sumatran communities to tsunami surges. Potential losses could be as great as those that occurred in Aceh in 2004. PMID:17170141

  17. Utilization of formal health services for children aged 1–5 in Aceh after the 2004 tsunami: Which children did not receive the health care they needed? Implications for other natural disaster relief efforts

    PubMed Central

    Rassekh, Bahie Mary; Santosham, Mathuram

    2014-01-01

    Aceh, Indonesia, was the hardest-hit area in the December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, with more than 500,000 people displaced, 120,000 people dead, and total damages and losses estimated at $4.5 billion. The relief effort following the tsunami was also immense, with billions of dollars of aid pledged to this province alone. Since then, there have been several natural disasters, including Typhoon Haiyan, which have caused great loss of life and displacement and for which these results are applicable. This study aimed to determine and assess utilization patterns of health services for children under the age of five with diarrhea, cough and difficulty breathing, fever, or skin disease and to identify determinants of formal and non-formal healthcare usage. A household survey of 1439 households was administered to caretakers of children aged 1–5 years. A sample of clusters within Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar were selected and those caretakers within the cluster who fit the inclusion criteria were interviewed. In the two weeks prior to the survey, 78.3% of respondents utilized formal health services as the first line of care for their child's illness episode. Factors significantly associated with decreased formal healthcare usage for the sick children were if the children were living in a displaced household, if the children's mother or father were not living, and if the children's caretaker was not the mother. Although utilization of formal health services for children was quite high after the tsunami, there were certain children who received significantly less care, including those who were displaced, those who were being cared for by someone other than their mother, and those for whom one or both parents had died. Among the recommendations are suggestions to target these children to ensure that they receive the health care they need. PMID:25750772

  18. Study of Genetic Diversity among Simmental Cross Cattle in West Sumatra Based on Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Agung, Paskah Partogi; Saputra, Ferdy; Septian, Wike Andre; Lusiana; Zein, Moch. Syamsul Arifin; Sulandari, Sri; Anwar, Saiful; Wulandari, Ari Sulistyo; Said, Syahruddin; Tappa, Baharuddin

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity among Simmental Cross cattle in West Sumatra using microsatellite DNA markers. A total of 176 individual cattle blood samples was used for obtaining DNA samples. Twelve primers of microsatellite loci as recommended by FAO were used to identify the genetic diversity of the Simmental Cross cattle population. Multiplex DNA fragment analysis method was used for allele identification. All the microsatellite loci in this study were highly polymorphic and all of the identified alleles were able to classify the cattle population into several groups based on their genetic distance. The heterozygosity values of microsatellite loci in this study ranged from 0.556 to 0.782. The polymorphism information content (PIC) value of the 12 observed loci is high (PIC>0.5). The highest PIC value in the Simmental cattle population was 0.893 (locus TGLA53), while the lowest value was 0.529 (locus BM1818). Based on the genetic distance value, the subpopulation of the Simmental Cross-Agam and the Simmental Cross-Limapuluh Kota was exceptionally close to the Simmental Purebred thus indicating that a grading-up process has taken place with the Simmental Purebred. In view of the advantages possessed by the Simmental Cross cattle and the evaluation of the genetic diversity results, a number of subpopulations in this study can be considered as the initial (base) population for the Simmental Cross cattle breeding programs in West Sumatra, Indonesia. PMID:26732442

  19. Study of Genetic Diversity among Simmental Cross Cattle in West Sumatra Based on Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Agung, Paskah Partogi; Saputra, Ferdy; Septian, Wike Andre; Lusiana; Zein, Moch Syamsul Arifin; Sulandari, Sri; Anwar, Saiful; Wulandari, Ari Sulistyo; Said, Syahruddin; Tappa, Baharuddin

    2016-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity among Simmental Cross cattle in West Sumatra using microsatellite DNA markers. A total of 176 individual cattle blood samples was used for obtaining DNA samples. Twelve primers of microsatellite loci as recommended by FAO were used to identify the genetic diversity of the Simmental Cross cattle population. Multiplex DNA fragment analysis method was used for allele identification. All the microsatellite loci in this study were highly polymorphic and all of the identified alleles were able to classify the cattle population into several groups based on their genetic distance. The heterozygosity values of microsatellite loci in this study ranged from 0.556 to 0.782. The polymorphism information content (PIC) value of the 12 observed loci is high (PIC>0.5). The highest PIC value in the Simmental cattle population was 0.893 (locus TGLA53), while the lowest value was 0.529 (locus BM1818). Based on the genetic distance value, the subpopulation of the Simmental Cross-Agam and the Simmental Cross-Limapuluh Kota was exceptionally close to the Simmental Purebred thus indicating that a grading-up process has taken place with the Simmental Purebred. In view of the advantages possessed by the Simmental Cross cattle and the evaluation of the genetic diversity results, a number of subpopulations in this study can be considered as the initial (base) population for the Simmental Cross cattle breeding programs in West Sumatra, Indonesia. PMID:26732442

  20. Indonesia palm oil production without deforestation and peat conversion by 2050.

    PubMed

    Afriyanti, Dian; Kroeze, Carolien; Saad, Asmadi

    2016-07-01

    Palm oil is a promising source of cooking oil and biodiesel. The demand for palm oil has been increasing worldwide. However, concerns exist surrounding the environmental and socio-economic sustainability of palm oil production. Indonesia is a major palm oil producing country. We explored scenarios for palm oil production in Indonesia until 2050, focusing on Sumatra, Kalimantan and Papua. Our scenarios describe possible trends in crude palm oil production in Indonesia, while considering the demand for cooking oil and biodiesel, the available land for plantations, production capacity (for crude palm oil and fresh fruit bunches) and environmentally restricting conditions. We first assessed past developments in palm oil production. Next, we analysed scenarios for the future. In the past 20years, 95% of the Indonesian oil palm production area was in Sumatra and Kalimantan and was increasingly cultivated in peatlands. Our scenarios for the future indicate that Indonesia can meet a considerable part of the global and Asian demand for palm oil, while avoiding further cultivation of peatlands and forest. By 2050, 264-447Mt crude palm oil may be needed for cooking oil and biodiesel worldwide. In Indonesia, the area that is potentially suitable for oil palm is 17 to 26Mha with a potential production rate of 27-38t fresh fruit bunches/ha, yielding 130-176Mt crude palm oil. Thus Indonesia can meet 39-60% of the international demand. In our scenarios this would be produced in Sumatra (21-26%), Kalimantan (12-16%), and Papua (2%). The potential areas include the current oil palm plantation in mineral lands, but exclude the current oil palm plantations in peatlands. PMID:27037877

  1. A~probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horspool, N.; Pranantyo, I.; Griffin, J.; Latief, H.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Kongko, W.; Cipta, A.; Bustaman, B.; Anugrah, S. D.; Thio, H. K.

    2014-05-01

    Probabilistic hazard assessments are a fundamental tool for assessing the threats posed by hazards to communities and are important for underpinning evidence based decision making on risk mitigation activities. Indonesia has been the focus of intense tsunami risk mitigation efforts following the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, but this has been largely concentrated on the Sunda Arc, with little attention to other tsunami prone areas of the country such as eastern Indonesia. We present the first nationally consistent Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment (PTHA) for Indonesia. This assessment produces time independent forecasts of tsunami hazard at the coast from tsunami generated by local, regional and distant earthquake sources. The methodology is based on the established monte-carlo approach to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) and has been adapted to tsunami. We account for sources of epistemic and aleatory uncertainty in the analysis through the use of logic trees and through sampling probability density functions. For short return periods (100 years) the highest tsunami hazard is the west coast of Sumatra, south coast of Java and the north coast of Papua. For longer return periods (500-2500 years), the tsunami hazard is highest along the Sunda Arc, reflecting larger maximum magnitudes along the Sunda Arc. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height at the coast of > 0.5 m is greater than 10% for Sumatra, Java, the Sunda Islands (Bali, Lombok, Flores, Sumba) and north Papua. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height of >3.0 m, which would cause significant inundation and fatalities, is 1-10% in Sumatra, Java, Bali, Lombok and north Papua, and 0.1-1% for north Sulawesi, Seram and Flores. The results of this national scale hazard assessment provide evidence for disaster managers to prioritise regions for risk mitigation activities and/or more detailed hazard or risk assessment.

  2. Lidar Observation of the 2014 Kelut Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosols at Kototabang, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo, Makoto; Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao

    2016-06-01

    The Kelut (Kelud) volcano (7.9S, 112.3E) in the Java island of Indonesia erupted on 13 February 2014. The CALIOP observed that the eruption cloud reached 26km above sea level. We have observed this stratospheric aerosol from 28 February 2014 at equatorial lidar site located in the Sumatra island of Indonesia (0.2S, 100.3E). We observed the depolarization maximum to be up to 2km below the backscatter maximum in April 2014. We also observed the vertical transportation process of stratospheric aerosol to troposphere by equatorial Kelvin wave.

  3. Prevention of Tetanus Outbreak Following Natural Disaster in Indonesia: Lessons Learned from Previous Disasters.

    PubMed

    Pascapurnama, Dyshelly Nurkartika; Murakami, Aya; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Hattori, Toshio; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Egawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    In Indonesia, the Aceh earthquake and tsunami in 2004 killed 127,000 people and caused half a million injuries, while the Yogyakarta earthquake in 2006 caused 5,700 deaths and 37,000 injuries. Because disaster-affected areas are vulnerable to epidemic-prone diseases and tetanus is one such disease that is preventable, we systematically reviewed the literature related to tetanus outbreaks following previous two natural disasters in Indonesia. Based on our findings, recommendations for proper vaccination and education can be made for future countermeasures. Using specified keywords related to tetanus and disasters, relevant documents were screened from PubMed, the WHO website, and books. Reports offering limited data and those released before 2004 were excluded. In all, 16 publications were reviewed systematically. Results show that 106 cases of tetanus occurred in Aceh, with a case fatality ratio (CFR) of 18.9%; 71 cases occurred in Yogyakarta, with CFR of 36.6%. For both outbreaks, most patients had been wounded during scavenging or evacuation after the disaster occurred. Poor access to health care because of limited transportation or hospital facilities, and low vaccination coverage and lack of awareness of tetanus risk contributed to delayed treatment and case severity. Tetanus outbreaks after disasters are preventable by increasing vaccination coverage, improving wound care treatment, and establishing a regular surveillance system, in addition to good practices of disaster management and supportive care following national guidelines. Furthermore, health education for communities should be provided to raise awareness of tetanus risk reduction. PMID:26960530

  4. Remotely triggered nonvolcanic tremor in Sumbawa, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, F.; Lupi, M.; Miller, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present, for the first time, evidence for triggered tremor beneath the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. We show triggered tremor in response to three teleseismic earthquakes: the Mw9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake and two oceanic strike-slip earthquakes (Mw 8.6 and Mw8.2) offshore of Sumatra in 2012. We constrain an apparent triggering threshold of 1 mm/s ground velocity that corresponds to about 8 kPa dynamic stress. Peak tremor amplitudes of about 180 nm/s are observed, and scale with the ground velocity induced by the remote earthquakes. Triggered tremor responds to 45-65 s period surface waves and predominantly correlates with Rayleigh waves, even though the 2012 oceanic events have stronger Love wave amplitudes. We could not locate the tremor because of minimal station coverage, but data indicate several potential source volumes including the Flores Thrust, the Java subduction zone, or Tambora volcano.

  5. Tsunami risk assessment in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunz, G.; Post, J.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Mück, M.; Riedlinger, T.; Mehl, H.; Dech, S.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.; Harjono, H.; Anwar, H. Z.; Sumaryono; Khomarudin, R. M.; Muhari, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) the assessment of tsunami risk is an essential part of the overall activities. The scientific and technical approach for the tsunami risk assessment has been developed and the results are implemented in the national Indonesian Tsunami Warning Centre and are provided to the national and regional disaster management and spatial planning institutions in Indonesia. The paper explains the underlying concepts and applied methods and shows some of the results achieved in the GITEWS project (Rudloff et al., 2009). The tsunami risk assessment has been performed at an overview scale at sub-national level covering the coastal areas of southern Sumatra, Java and Bali and also on a detailed scale in three pilot areas. The results are provided as thematic maps and GIS information layers for the national and regional planning institutions. From the analyses key parameters of tsunami risk are derived, which are integrated and stored in the decision support system of the national Indonesian Early Warning Centre. Moreover, technical descriptions and guidelines were elaborated to explain the developed approach, to allow future updates of the results and the further development of the methodologies, and to enable the local authorities to conduct tsunami risk assessment by using their own resources.

  6. Slope Stability: Factor of Safety along the Seismically Active Continental Slope Offshore Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J. R.; Goldfinger, C.; Djadjadihardja, Y.; None, U.

    2013-12-01

    Recent papers have documented the probability that turbidites deposited along and downslope of subduction zone accretionary prisms are likely the result of strong ground shaking from great earthquakes. Given the damaging nature of these earthquakes, along with the casualties from the associated tsunamis, the spatial and temporal patterns of these earthquakes can only be evaluated with paleoseismologic coring and seismic reflection methods. We evaluate slope stability for seafloor topography along the Sunda subduction offshore Sumatra, Indonesia. We use sediment material properties, from local (Sumatra) and analogous sites, to constrain our estimates of static slope stability Factor of Safety (FOS) analyses. We then use ground motion prediction equations (GMPE's) to estimate ground motion intensity (Arias Intensity, AI) and acceleration (Peak Ground Acceleration, PGA), as possibly generated by fault rupture, to constrain seismic loads for pseudostatic slope stability FOS analyses. The ground motions taper rapidly with distance from the fault plane, consistent with ground motion - fault distance relations measured during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki subduction zone earthquake. Our FOS analyses include a Morgenstern method of slices probabilistic analysis for 2-D profiles along with Critical Acceleration (Ac) and Newmark Displacement (Dn) analysis of multibeam bathymetry of the seafloor. In addition, we also use estimates of ground motion modeled with a 2004 Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ) earthquake fault slip model, to also compare with our static FOS analyses of seafloor topography. All slope and trench sites are statically stable (FOS < 1) and sensitive to ground motions generated by earthquakes of magnitude greater than 7. We conclude that for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 9, PGA of 0.4-0.6 to 1.4-2.5 g would be expected, respectively, from existing GMPE's. However, saturation of accelerations in the accretionary wedge may limit actual accelerations to less than 1

  7. Indonesia's great frontier and migration policy.

    PubMed

    Maloney, C

    1987-01-01

    The population of Indonesia is 175 million, of which 65% live in Java. Java has only 7% of the land area, causing a population density of 2,000/square mile. This has lead the government to introduce a policy of transmigration which encourages people to move from Java to the larger outer islands. In the last 35 years 4.3 million people have moved from Java to Sumatra, Borneo, Celebes, and Irian Jaya. The total area of Indonesia stretches over 3,200 miles and has 16,000 islands of which 1,000 are inhabited. It has vast resources of oil, lumber, rubber, tin, palm oil, copra, coffee, tea, pepper, cloves, nutmeg, and quinine. Indonesia is also rich in minerals, including coal, bauxite, iron ore, and gold. Even with a national family planning program, population growth has reached 2.1% a year. 3 other islands that people are induced to move from are Madura, Bali, and Lombok, although their population densities are less then Java. The small islands near Singapore are being developed and Batam will be a free port to compete with Hong Kong. The most intense migration has been to Kalimantan (Borneo) which has 4 provinces. The migration policy began in 1905 and by 1930 100,000 people, had moved to other islands; 600,000 people were relocated to plantations in Java for labor needs. In 1979-84, a more ambitious program costing 2.3 billion moved 1.5 million people. In the most recent 1984-89 plan, a goal of 3.1 million were to be relocated but due to budgetary restrictions only 150,000 families have moved. The main social issue addresses the domination of other people by Javanese, not only in numbers but cultural differences. Some observers say the real reason for migration is political in ensuring the boundaries and geographic integrity of Indonesia. PMID:12316071

  8. Deformation analysis of Aceh April 11th 2012 earthquake using GPS observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulida, Putra; Meilano, Irwan; Sarsito, Dina A.; Susilo

    2015-04-01

    This research tries to estimate the co-seismic deformation of intraplate earthquake occurred off northern Sumatra coast which is about 100-200 km southwest of Sumatrasubduction zone. The earthquake mechanism was strike-slip with magnitude 8.6 and triggering aftershock with magnitude 8.2 two hours later. We estimated the co-seismic deformation by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) continuous data along western Sumatra coast. The GPS observation derived from Sumatran GPS Array (SuGAr) and Geospatial Information Agency (BIG). For data processing we used GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) to estimate the co-seismic deformation. From the GPS daily solution, the result shows that the earthquake caused displacement for the GPS stations in Sumatra. GPS stations in northern Sumatra showed the displacement to the northeast with the average displacement was 15 cm. The biggest displacement was found at station BSIM which is located at Simeuleu Island off north west Sumatra coast. GPS station in middle part of Sumatra, the displacement was northwest. The earthquake also caused subsidence for stations in northern Sumatra, but from the time series there was not sign of subsidence was found at middle part of Sumatra. In addition, the effect of the earthquake was worldwide and affected the other GPS Stations around Hindia oceanic.

  9. Deformation analysis of Aceh April 11{sup th} 2012 earthquake using GPS observation data

    SciTech Connect

    Maulida, Putra; Meilano, Irwan; Sarsito, Dina A.; Susilo

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to estimate the co-seismic deformation of intraplate earthquake occurred off northern Sumatra coast which is about 100-200 km southwest of Sumatrasubduction zone. The earthquake mechanism was strike-slip with magnitude 8.6 and triggering aftershock with magnitude 8.2 two hours later. We estimated the co-seismic deformation by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) continuous data along western Sumatra coast. The GPS observation derived from Sumatran GPS Array (SuGAr) and Geospatial Information Agency (BIG). For data processing we used GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) to estimate the co-seismic deformation. From the GPS daily solution, the result shows that the earthquake caused displacement for the GPS stations in Sumatra. GPS stations in northern Sumatra showed the displacement to the northeast with the average displacement was 15 cm. The biggest displacement was found at station BSIM which is located at Simeuleu Island off north west Sumatra coast. GPS station in middle part of Sumatra, the displacement was northwest. The earthquake also caused subsidence for stations in northern Sumatra, but from the time series there was not sign of subsidence was found at middle part of Sumatra. In addition, the effect of the earthquake was worldwide and affected the other GPS Stations around Hindia oceanic.

  10. Surviving Women's Learning Experiences from the Tsunami in Aceh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teng, Yan Fang Jane; Yusof, Qismullah

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated surviving women's learning experiences from the 2004 tsunami in Aceh. Women were the majority of casualties and the most vulnerable after the tsunami. Almost a decade later, we used a conceptual framework of experiential learning, critical reflection, and transformative learning to understand the surviving women's…

  11. Phylogeography of the current rabies viruses in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Dibia, I Nyoman; Sumiarto, Bambang; Susetya, Heru; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Scott-Orr, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a major fatal zoonotic disease in Indonesia. This study was conducted to determine the recent dynamics of rabies virus (RABV) in various areas and animal species throughout Indonesia. A total of 27 brain samples collected from rabid animals of various species in Bali, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Java, and Flores in 2008 to 2010 were investigated. The cDNA of the nucleoprotein gene from each sample was generated and amplified by one-step reverse transcription-PCR, after which the products were sequenced and analyzed. The symmetric substitution model of a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection extension of the discrete phylogeographic model of the social network was applied in BEAST ver. 1.7.5 software. The spatial dispersal was visualized in Cartographica using Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics. We demonstrated inter-island introduction and reintroduction, and dog was found to be the only source of infection of other animals. Ancestors of Indonesian RABVs originated in Java and its descendants were transmitted to Kalimantan, then further to Sumatra, Flores, and Bali. The Flores descendent was subsequently transmitted to Sulawesi and back to Kalimantan. The viruses found in various animal species were transmitted by the dog. PMID:25643792

  12. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, T.; Pandoe, W.; Mudita, I.; Roemer, S.; Illigner, J.; Zech, C.; Galas, R.

    2011-03-01

    On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements. The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) (Rudloff et al., 2009) combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP) measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information. The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  13. Phylogeography of the current rabies viruses in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dibia, I Nyoman; Sumiarto, Bambang; Susetya, Heru; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Scott-Orr, Helen; Mahardika, Gusti Ngurah

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a major fatal zoonotic disease in Indonesia. This study was conducted to determine the recent dynamics of rabies virus (RABV) in various areas and animal species throughout Indonesia. A total of 27 brain samples collected from rabid animals of various species in Bali, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Java, and Flores in 2008 to 2010 were investigated. The cDNA of the nucleoprotein gene from each sample was generated and amplified by one-step reverse transcription-PCR, after which the products were sequenced and analyzed. The symmetric substitution model of a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection extension of the discrete phylogeographic model of the social network was applied in BEAST ver. 1.7.5 software. The spatial dispersal was visualized in Cartographica using Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics. We demonstrated inter-island introduction and reintroduction, and dog was found to be the only source of infection of other animals. Ancestors of Indonesian RABVs originated in Java and its descendants were transmitted to Kalimantan, then further to Sumatra, Flores, and Bali. The Flores descendent was subsequently transmitted to Sulawesi and back to Kalimantan. The viruses found in various animal species were transmitted by the dog. PMID:25643792

  14. Performance of Buildings in the 2009 Western Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deierlein, G.; Hart, T.; Alexander, N.; Hausler, E.; Henderson, S.; Wood, K.; Cedillos, V.; Wijanto, S.; Cabrera, C.; Rudianto, S.

    2009-12-01

    The M7.6 earthquake of 30 September 2009 in Western Sumatra, Indonesia caused significant damage and collapse to hundreds of buildings and the deaths of 1,117 people. In Padang City, with a population of about 900,000 people, building collapse was the primary cause of deaths and serious injuries (313 deaths and 431 serious injuries). The predominant building construction types in Padang are concrete moment frames with brick infill and masonry bearing wall systems. Concrete frames are common in multistory commercial retail buildings, offices, schools, and hotels; and masonry bearing wall systems are primarily used in low-rise (usually single story) residential and school buildings. In general, buildings that collapsed did not conform to modern seismic engineering practices that are required by the current Indonesian building code and would be expected in regions of moderate to high seismicity. While collapse of multi-story concrete buildings was more prevalent in older buildings (more than 10 years old), there were several newer buildings that collapsed. Primary deficiencies identified in collapsed or severely damaged buildings included: (a) soft or weak stories that failed in either by sidesway mechanisms or shear failures followed by loss of axial capacity of columns, (b) lack of ductile reinforcing bar detailing in concrete beams, columns, and beam-column joints, (c) poor quality concrete and mortar materials and workmanship, (d) vulnerable building configurations and designs with incomplete or deficient load paths, and (e) out-of-plane wall failures in unreinforced (or marginally reinforced) masonry. While these deficiencies may be expected in older buildings, damage and collapse to some modern (or recently rennovated buildings) indicates a lack of enforcement of building code provisions for design and construction quality assurance. Many new buildings whose structural systems were undamaged were closed due to extensive earthquake damage to brick infill walls

  15. 3D Visualization of Recent Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Atul; Kilb, Debi

    2005-04-01

    Scientists and visualization experts at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have created an interactive three-dimensional visualization of the 28 March 2005 magnitude 8.7 earthquake in Sumatra. The visualization shows the earthquake's hypocenter and aftershocks recorded until 29 March 2005, and compares it with the location of the 26 December 2004 magnitude 9 event and the consequent seismicity in that region. The 3D visualization was created using the Fledermaus software developed by Interactive Visualization Systems (http://www.ivs.unb.ca/) and stored as a ``scene'' file. To view this visualization, viewers need to download and install the free viewer program iView3D (http://www.ivs3d.com/products/iview3d).

  16. Estimation of postseismic deformation parameters from continuous GPS data in northern Sumatra after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anugrah, Bimar; Meilano, Irwan; Gunawan, Endra; Efendi, Joni

    2015-12-01

    Continuous global positioning system (GPS) in northern Sumatra detected signal of the ongoing physical process of postseismic deformation after the M9.2 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. We analyze the characteristics of postseismic deformation of the 2004 earthquake based on GPS networks operated by BIG, and the others named AGNeSS, and SuGAr networks located in northern Sumatra. We use a simple analytical logarithmic and exponential function to evaluate the postseismic deformation parameters of the 2004 earthquake. We find that GPS data in northern Sumatra during time periods of 2005-2012 are fit better using the logarithmic function with τlog of 104.2 ± 0.1 than using the exponential function. Our result clearly indicates that other physical mechanisms of postseismic deformation should be taken into account rather than a single physical mechanism of afterslip only.

  17. Uplift and Subsidence Associated with the Great Aceh-Andaman Earthquake of 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The magnitude 9.2 Indian Ocean earthquake of December 26, 2004, produced broad regions of uplift and subsidence. In order to define the lateral extent and the downdip limit of rupture, scientists from Caltech, Pasadena, Calif.; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.; the U.S. Geological Survey, Pasadena, Calif.; and the Research Center for Geotechnology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Bandung, Indonesia; first needed to define the pivot line separating those regions. Interpretation of satellite imagery and a tidal model were one of the key tools used to do this.

    These pre-Sumatra earthquake (a) and post-Sumatra earthquake (b) images of North Sentinel Island in the Indian Ocean, acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft, show emergence of the coral reef surrounding the island following the earthquake. The tide was 30 plus or minus 14 centimeters lower in the pre-earthquake image (acquired November 21, 2000) than in the post-earthquake image (acquired February 20, 2005), requiring a minimum of 30 centimeters of uplift at this locality. Observations from an Indian Coast Guard helicopter on the northwest coast of the island suggest that the actual uplift is on the order of 1 to 2 meters at this site.

    In figures (c) and (d), pre-earthquake and post-earthquake ASTER images of a small island off the northwest coast of Rutland Island, 38 kilometers east of North Sentinel Island, show submergence of the coral reef surrounding the island. The tide was higher in the pre-earthquake image (acquired January 1, 2004) than in the post-earthquake image (acquired February 4, 2005), requiring subsidence at this locality. The pivot line must run between North Sentinel and Rutland islands. Note that the scale for the North Sentinel Island images differs from that for the Rutland Island images.

    The tidal model used

  18. Population Genetic Structure and Reproductive Strategy of the Introduced Grass Centotheca lappacea in Tropical Land-Use Systems in Sumatra

    PubMed Central

    Hodac̆, Ladislav; Ulum, Fuad Bahrul; Opfermann, Nicole; Breidenbach, Natalie; Hojsgaard, Diego; Tjitrosoedirdjo, Sri Sudarmiyati; Vornam, Barbara; Finkeldey, Reiner; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Intensive transformation of lowland rainforest into oil palm and rubber monocultures is the most common land-use practice in Sumatra (Indonesia), accompanied by invasion of weeds. In the Jambi province, Centotheca lappacea is one of the most abundant alien grass species in plantations and in jungle rubber (an extensively used agroforest), but largely missing in natural rainforests. Here, we investigated putative genetic differentiation and signatures for adaptation in the introduced area. We studied reproductive mode and ploidy level as putative factors for invasiveness of the species. We sampled 19 populations in oil palm and rubber monocultures and in jungle rubber in two regions (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan). Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) revealed a high diversity of individual genotypes and only a weak differentiation among populations (FST = 0.173) and between the two regions (FST = 0.065). There was no significant genetic differentiation between the three land-use systems. The metapopulation of C. lappacea consists of five genetic partitions with high levels of admixture; all partitions appeared in both regions, but with different proportions. Within the Bukit Duabelas region we observed significant isolation-by-distance. Nine AFLP loci (5.3% of all loci) were under natural diversifying selection. All studied populations of C. lappacea were diploid, outcrossing and self-incompatible, without any hints of apomixis. The estimated residence time of c. 100 years coincides with the onset of rubber and oil palm planting in Sumatra. In the colonization process, the species is already in a phase of establishment, which may be enhanced by efficient selection acting on a highly diverse gene pool. In the land-use systems, seed dispersal might be enhanced by adhesive spikelets. At present, the abundance of established populations in intensively managed land-use systems might provide opportunities for rapid dispersal of C. lappacea across rural landscapes

  19. Population Genetic Structure and Reproductive Strategy of the Introduced Grass Centotheca lappacea in Tropical Land-Use Systems in Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Hodač, Ladislav; Ulum, Fuad Bahrul; Opfermann, Nicole; Breidenbach, Natalie; Hojsgaard, Diego; Tjitrosoedirdjo, Sri Sudarmiyati; Vornam, Barbara; Finkeldey, Reiner; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Intensive transformation of lowland rainforest into oil palm and rubber monocultures is the most common land-use practice in Sumatra (Indonesia), accompanied by invasion of weeds. In the Jambi province, Centotheca lappacea is one of the most abundant alien grass species in plantations and in jungle rubber (an extensively used agroforest), but largely missing in natural rainforests. Here, we investigated putative genetic differentiation and signatures for adaptation in the introduced area. We studied reproductive mode and ploidy level as putative factors for invasiveness of the species. We sampled 19 populations in oil palm and rubber monocultures and in jungle rubber in two regions (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan). Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) revealed a high diversity of individual genotypes and only a weak differentiation among populations (FST = 0.173) and between the two regions (FST = 0.065). There was no significant genetic differentiation between the three land-use systems. The metapopulation of C. lappacea consists of five genetic partitions with high levels of admixture; all partitions appeared in both regions, but with different proportions. Within the Bukit Duabelas region we observed significant isolation-by-distance. Nine AFLP loci (5.3% of all loci) were under natural diversifying selection. All studied populations of C. lappacea were diploid, outcrossing and self-incompatible, without any hints of apomixis. The estimated residence time of c. 100 years coincides with the onset of rubber and oil palm planting in Sumatra. In the colonization process, the species is already in a phase of establishment, which may be enhanced by efficient selection acting on a highly diverse gene pool. In the land-use systems, seed dispersal might be enhanced by adhesive spikelets. At present, the abundance of established populations in intensively managed land-use systems might provide opportunities for rapid dispersal of C. lappacea across rural landscapes

  20. The first geophilid centipedes from Malesia: a new genus with two new species from Sumatra (Chilopoda, Geophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bonato, Lucio; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahayu; Scheu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new genus Sundageophilus is here described for two new species of geophilid centipedes (Chilopoda: Geophilidae) from Sumatra, Indonesia. Both Sundageophilus bidentatus sp. n. and Sundageophilus poriger sp. n. feature a minute body size (less than 1 cm long with 31–35 pairs of legs), a similar structure of the maxillae, elongated forcipules, and few coxal organs. Sundageophilus bidentatus is unique among geophilids because the ultimate article of the forcipule is armed with two conspicuous denticles, one dorsal to the other, instead of a single one or none. The two species of Sundageophilus are the first genuine Geophilidae ever found in Malesia, and among the very few representatives of this family in the entire south-eastern Asia. PMID:27551212

  1. Contrasting décollement and prism properties over the Sumatra 2004-2005 earthquake rupture boundary.

    PubMed

    Dean, Simon M; McNeill, Lisa C; Henstock, Timothy J; Bull, Jonathan M; Gulick, Sean P S; Austin, James A; Bangs, Nathan L B; Djajadihardja, Yusuf S; Permana, Haryadi

    2010-07-01

    Styles of subduction zone deformation and earthquake rupture dynamics are strongly linked, jointly influencing hazard potential. Seismic reflection profiles across the trench west of Sumatra, Indonesia, show differences across the boundary between the major 2004 and 2005 plate interface earthquakes, which exhibited contrasting earthquake rupture and tsunami generation. In the southern part of the 2004 rupture, we interpret a negative-polarity sedimentary reflector approximately 500 meters above the subducting oceanic basement as the seaward extension of the plate interface. This predécollement reflector corresponds to unusual prism structure, morphology, and seismogenic behavior that are absent along the 2005 rupture zone. Although margins like the 2004 rupture zone are globally rare, our results suggest that sediment properties influence earthquake rupture, tsunami hazard, and prism development at subducting plate boundaries. PMID:20616276

  2. The first geophilid centipedes from Malesia: a new genus with two new species from Sumatra (Chilopoda, Geophilidae).

    PubMed

    Bonato, Lucio; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahayu; Scheu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    A new genus Sundageophilus is here described for two new species of geophilid centipedes (Chilopoda: Geophilidae) from Sumatra, Indonesia. Both Sundageophilus bidentatus sp. n. and Sundageophilus poriger sp. n. feature a minute body size (less than 1 cm long with 31-35 pairs of legs), a similar structure of the maxillae, elongated forcipules, and few coxal organs. Sundageophilus bidentatus is unique among geophilids because the ultimate article of the forcipule is armed with two conspicuous denticles, one dorsal to the other, instead of a single one or none. The two species of Sundageophilus are the first genuine Geophilidae ever found in Malesia, and among the very few representatives of this family in the entire south-eastern Asia. PMID:27551212

  3. Southeast Asian Summer Burning: A Micro Pulse Lidar Network Study of Aerosol Particle Physical Properties near Fires in Borneo and Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, S.; Welton, E. J.; Holben, B. N.; Campbell, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    In August and September 2012, as part of the continuing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) project, three autonomous elastic-scattering 355 nm lidars were deployed by the NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) to Sumatra and Borneo, measuring the vertical profile of aerosol particle scattering during peak burning season. In coordination with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a regional characterization of aerosol particle physical properties and distribution was performed. In addition to a permanent regional network site at Singapore, the three temporary sites established for this research include Jambi (Sumatra, Indonesia), Kuching (northwest Borneo, Malaysia) and Palangkaraya (south-central Borneo, Indonesia). In this paper, we discuss the mission and instruments, and introduce data products available to the community through the MPLNET online website. We further describe initial results of the study, including a contrast of mean vertical scattering profiles versus those observed near active fire sources at Jambi and Palangkaraya, and resolve longer-range particle evolution at receptor sites, like Kuching, that are most commonly 1-2 days downwind of larger fire complexes.

  4. Geothermal exploration in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Radja, V.T.

    1984-03-01

    Indonesia is blessed with geothermal resources. This fortunate aspect is directly related to the fact that the archipelago is an island arc created by a subduction zone. Evidence of geothermal activity is common throughout the Islands. Among the islands' many active volcanos are numerous geothermal phenomena. Almost half of the volcanic centers in Indonesia (88 out of 177 centers) contain fumarole and sulfatare features. A brief history of the exploration for geothermal energy in Indonesia is presented.

  5. El Habano and the world it has shaped: Cuba, Connecticut, and Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In the half century since the 1959 Cuban Revolution, El Habano remains the premium cigar the world over; but both before and since 1959, the seed, agricultural and industrial know-how, and human capital have been transplanted to replicate that cigar in a process accentuated by upheavals and out-migration. The focus here is on a little-known facet of the interconnected island and offshore Havana cigar history, linking Cuba with Connecticut and Indonesia: from when tobacco was taken from the Americas to Indonesia and gave rise to the famed Sumatra cigar wrapper leaf; through the rise and demise of its sister shade wrapper in Connecticut, with Cuban and Sumatra seed, ultimately overshadowed by Indonesia; and the resulting challenges facing Cuba today. The article highlights the role of Dutch, U.S., British, and Swedish capital to explain why in 2009 the two major global cigar corporations, British Imperial Tobacco and Swedish Match, were lobbying Washington, respectively, for and against the embargo on Cuba. As the antismoking, antitobacco lobby gains ground internationally, the intriguing final question is whether the future lies with El Habano or smokeless Swedish snus. PMID:21506307

  6. Geological Investigation and analysis in response to Earthquake Induced Landslide in West Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnawati, D.; Wilopo, W.; Salahudin, S.; Sudarno, I.; Burton, P.

    2009-12-01

    Substantial socio-economical loss occurred in response to the September 30. 2009 West Sumatra Earthquake with magnitude of 7.6. Damage of houses and engineered structures mostly occurred at the low land of alluvium sediments due to the ground amplification, whilst at the high land of mountain slopes several villages were buried by massive debris of rocks and soils. It was recorded that 1115 people died due to this disasters. Series of geological investigation was carried out by Geological Engineering Department of Gadjah Mada University, with the purpose to support the rehabilitation program. Based on this preliminary investigation it was identified that most of the house and engineered structural damages at the alluvial deposits mainly due to by the poor quality of such houses and engineered structures, which poorly resist the ground amplification, instead of due to the control of geological conditions. On the other hand, the existence and distribution of structural geology (faults and joints) at the mountaineous regions are significant in controlling the distribution of landslides, with the types of rock falls, debris flows and debris falls. Despite the landslide susceptibility mapping conducted by Geological Survey of Indonesia, more detailed investigation is required to be carried out in the region surrounding Maninjau Lake, in order to provide safer places for village relocation. Accordingly Gadjah Mada University in collaboration with the local university (Andalas University) as well as with the local Government of Agam Regency and the Geological Survey of Indonesia, serve the mission for conducting rather more detailed geological and landslide investigation. It is also crucial that the investigation (survey and mapping) on the social perception and expectation of local people living in this landslide susceptible area should also be carried out, to support the mitigation effort of any future potential earthquake induced landslides.

  7. Taeniases and cysticercosis in Indonesia: past and present situations.

    PubMed

    Wandra, Toni; Ito, Akira; Swastika, Kadek; Dharmawan, Nyoman S; Sako, Yasuhito; Okamoto, Munehiro

    2013-11-01

    The main aim of this study is to overview the past and present situations of human taeniases and cysticercosis in Indonesia and including future perspectives. Through joint projects from 1996, we have confirmed the occurrence of Taenia saginata (beef tapeworm) in Bali, of Taenia solium (pork tapeworm) mainly in Papua and sporadically in Bali, and of Taenia asiatica in North Sumatra. These taeniases were caused through eating uncooked pork and pig viscera for T. solium and T. asiatica, respectively, and beef for T. saginata. The distribution of these tapeworms in Indonesia is basically highly restricted by the traditional cultural and religious backgrounds in each island. T. saginata is relatively common in Bali although people consume pork 'lawar' more than beef 'lawar'. Taeniases due to T. saginata or T. asiatica and T. solium and cysticercosis due to T. solium have also been sporadically reported in some other islands. Among these species, T. solium is exceptional since humans can be infected not only by larval stages (cysticerci) in pork but also by eggs released from human tapeworm carriers. Cysticercosis has been confirmed in Indonesia in humans, pigs and even dogs. PMID:23965293

  8. Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dailin; Becker, Nathan C.; Walsh, David; Fryer, Gerard J.; Weinstein, Stuart A.; McCreery, Charles S.; Sardiña, Victor; Hsu, Vindell; Hirshorn, Barry F.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Duputel, Zacharie; Rivera, Luis; Kanamori, Hiroo; Koyanagi, Kanoa K.; Shiro, Brian

    2012-10-01

    The April 11, 2012, magnitude 8.6 earthquake off the northern coast of Sumatra generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epicenter and at four ocean bottom pressure sensors (DARTs) in the Indian Ocean. The governments of India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States' Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) issued an Indian Ocean-wide Tsunami Watch Bulletin in its role as an Interim Service Provider for the region. Using an experimental real-time tsunami forecast model (RIFT), PTWC produced a series of tsunami forecasts during the event that were based on rapidly derived earthquake parameters, including initial location and Mwp magnitude estimates and the W-phase centroid moment tensor solutions (W-phase CMTs) obtained at PTWC and at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). We discuss the real-time forecast methodology and how successive, real-time tsunami forecasts using the latest W-phase CMT solutions improved the accuracy of the forecast.

  9. Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Dailin; Becker, Nathan C.; Walsh, David; Fryer, Gerard J.; Weinstein, Stuart A.; McCreery, Charles S.; and others

    2012-01-01

    The April 11, 2012, magnitude 8.6 earthquake off the northern coast of Sumatra generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epicenter and at four ocean bottom pressure sensors (DARTs) in the Indian Ocean. The governments of India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States' Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) issued an Indian Ocean-wide Tsunami Watch Bulletin in its role as an Interim Service Provider for the region. Using an experimental real-time tsunami forecast model (RIFT), PTWC produced a series of tsunami forecasts during the event that were based on rapidly derived earthquake parameters, including initial location and Mwp magnitude estimates and the W-phase centroid moment tensor solutions (W-phase CMTs) obtained at PTWC and at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). We discuss the real-time forecast methodology and how successive, real-time tsunami forecasts using the latest W-phase CMT solutions improved the accuracy of the forecast.

  10. Anomalous variation in GPS TEC prior to the 11 April 2012 Sumatra earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fuying; Zhou, Yiyan; Wu, Yun

    2013-06-01

    On 11 April 2012, a strong earthquake of magnitude Ms8.6 occurred near the west coast of Northern Sumatra, Indonesia. In this paper, we investigated the morphological characteristics of anomalous variations in Global Positioning System Total Electron Content (GPS TEC) prior to the earthquake by the method of the statistical analysis. It was found the TEC anomaly was firstly decreased, then, it became more enhanced, finally, it decreased, the peak of anomaly enhancement arose from 13:00-17:00 LT on April 5 lasted for ˜4 hours and the anomalous ionospheric regions extended to ˜40∘ in longitude and ˜20∘ in latitude, its location did not coincide with the vertical projection of the epicenter, but lies at the north and south of the geomagnetic equator, meanwhile, corresponding ionospheric anomalies are also observed in the magneto conjugate region. Potential causes of these results are discussed,eliminating the ionospheric anomalies that may be caused by solar activities and magnetic storms, it can be concluded that the observed obvious anomalous variation in GPS TEC on April 5 were possibly related to the earthquake.

  11. A review on earthquake and tsunami hazards of the Sumatran plate boundary: Observing expected and unexpected events after the Aceh-Andaman Mw 9.15 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natawidjaja, D.

    2013-12-01

    The 600-km Mentawai megathrust had produced two giant historical earthquakes generating big tsunamies in 1797 and 1833. The SuGAr (Sumatran GPS continuous Array) network, first deployed in 2002, shows that the subduction interface underlying Mentawai Islands and the neighboring Nias section in the north are fully locked, thus confirming their potential hazards. Outreach activities to warn people about earthquake and tsunamies had been started since 4 months prior to the 26 December 2004 in Aceh-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.15). Later in March 2005, the expected megathrust earthquake (Mw 8.7) hit Nias-Simelue area and killed about 2000 people, releasing the accumulated strain since the previous 1861 event (~Mw 8.5). After then many Mw 7s and smaller events occured in Sumatra, filling areas between and around two giant ruptures and heighten seismicities in neighboring areas. In March 2007, the twin earthquake disaster (Mw 6.3 and Mw 6.4) broke two consecutive segments of the transcurrent Sumatran fault in the Singkarak lake area. Only six month later, in September 2007, the rapid-fire-failures of three consecutive megathrust patches (Mw 8.5, Mw 7.9 and Mw 7.0) ruptured a 250-km-section of the southern part of the Mentawai. It was a big surprise since this particular section is predicted as a very-low coupled section from modelling the SuGAr data, and hence, bypassing the more potential fully coupled section of the Mentawai in between the 2005 and 2007 ruptures. In September 2009, a rare unexpected event (Mw 7.6) suddenly ruptured an intracrustal fault in the subducted slab down under Padang City and killed about 500 people. Padang had been in preparation for the next tsunami but not for strong shakes from near by major earthquake. This event seems to have remotely triggered another Mw 6.7 on the Sumatran fault near kerinci Lake, a few hundred kilometers south of Padang, in less than a day. Just a year later, in November 2010, again an unexpected large slow-slip event of

  12. Forest Fruit Production Is Higher on Sumatra Than on Borneo

    PubMed Central

    Wich, Serge A.; Vogel, Erin R.; Larsen, Michael D.; Fredriksson, Gabriella; Leighton, Mark; Yeager, Carey P.; Brearley, Francis Q.; van Schaik, Carel P.; Marshall, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Various studies have shown that the population densities of a number of forest vertebrates, such as orangutans, are higher on Sumatra than Borneo, and that several species exhibit smaller body sizes on Borneo than Sumatra and mainland Southeast Asia. It has been suggested that differences in forest fruit productivity between the islands can explain these patterns. Here we present a large-scale comparison of forest fruit production between the islands to test this hypothesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Data on fruit production were collated from Sumatran and Bornean sites. At six sites we assessed fruit production in three forest types: riverine, peat swamp and dryland forests. We compared fruit production using time-series models during different periods of overall fruit production and in different tree size classes. We examined overall island differences and differences specifically for fruiting period and tree size class. The results of these analyses indicate that overall the Sumatran forests are more productive than those on Borneo. This difference remains when each of the three forest types (dryland, riverine, and peat) are examined separately. The difference also holds over most tree sizes and fruiting periods. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide strong support for the hypothesis that forest fruit productivity is higher on Sumatra than Borneo. This difference is most likely the result of the overall younger and more volcanic soils on Sumatra than Borneo. These results contribute to our understanding of the determinants of faunal density and the evolution of body size on both islands. PMID:21738627

  13. The global reach of the 26 December 2004 Sumatra tsunami.

    PubMed

    Titov, Vasily; Rabinovich, Alexander B; Mofjeld, Harold O; Thomson, Richard E; González, Frank I

    2005-09-23

    Numerical model simulations, combined with tide-gauge and satellite altimetry data, reveal that wave amplitudes, directionality, and global propagation patterns of the 26 December 2004 Sumatra tsunami were primarily determined by the orientation and intensity of the offshore seismic line source and subsequently by the trapping effect of mid-ocean ridge topographic waveguides. PMID:16123264

  14. Andaman-Sumatra island arc: II. The December 26, 2004 earthquake as one of the key episodes in seismogenic activation of the arc in the beginning of XXI century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakina, L. M.; Moskvina, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the nature and parameters of the source for the earthquake that occurred in Sumatra on December 26, 2004 is suggested. Our study relies on a variety of data on the geological structure of the region, long-term seismicity, spatial distribution of the foreshocks and aftershocks, and focal mechanisms; and the pattern of shaking and tsunami, regularities in the occurrence of the earthquakes, and the genetic relationship between the seismic and geological parameters inherent in various types of seismogenic zones including island arcs. The source of the Sumatran earthquake is a steep reverse fault striking parallel to the island arc and dipping towards the ocean. The length of the fault is ˜450 km, and its probable bedding depth is ˜70-100 km. The magnitude of this seismic event corresponding to the length of its source is 8.9-9.0. The vertical displacement in the source probably reached 9-13 m. The fault is located near the inner boundary of the Aceh Depression between the epicenter of the earthquake and the northern tip of the depression. The strike-slip and strike-slip reverse the faults cutting the island arc form the northern and southern borders of the source. The location and source parameters in the suggested interpretation account quite well for the observed pattern of shaking and tsunami. The Aceh Depression and its environs probably also host other seismic sources in the form of large reverse faults. The Sumatran earthquake, which was the culmination of the seismogenic activation of the Andaman-Sumatra island arc in the beginning of XXI century, is a typical tsunamigenic island-arc earthquake. By its characteristics, this event is an analogue to the M W = 9 Kamchatka earthquake of November 4, 1952. The spatial distribution of the epicenters and the focal mechanisms of the aftershocks indicate that the repeated shocks during the Sumatran event were caused by the activation of a complex system of geological structures in various parts of

  15. Impact of Lowland Rainforest Transformation on Diversity and Composition of Soil Prokaryotic Communities in Sumatra (Indonesia)

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dominik; Engelhaupt, Martin; Allen, Kara; Kurniawan, Syahrul; Krashevska, Valentyna; Heinemann, Melanie; Nacke, Heiko; Wijayanti, Marini; Meryandini, Anja; Corre, Marife D.; Scheu, Stefan; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotes are the most abundant and diverse group of microorganisms in soil and mediate virtually all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. Thereby, they influence aboveground plant productivity and diversity. In this study, the impact of rainforest transformation to intensively managed cash crop systems on soil prokaryotic communities was investigated. The studied managed land use systems comprised rubber agroforests (jungle rubber), rubber plantations and oil palm plantations within two Indonesian landscapes Bukit Duabelas and Harapan. Soil prokaryotic community composition and diversity were assessed by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. The curated dataset contained 16,413 bacterial and 1679 archaeal operational taxonomic units at species level (97% genetic identity). Analysis revealed changes in indigenous taxon-specific patterns of soil prokaryotic communities accompanying lowland rainforest transformation to jungle rubber, and intensively managed rubber and oil palm plantations. Distinct clustering of the rainforest soil communities indicated that these are different from the communities in the studied managed land use systems. The predominant bacterial taxa in all investigated soils were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Overall, the bacterial community shifted from proteobacterial groups in rainforest soils to Acidobacteria in managed soils. The archaeal soil communities were mainly represented by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Members of the Terrestrial Group and South African Gold Mine Group 1 (Thaumarchaeota) dominated in the rainforest and members of Thermoplasmata in the managed land use systems. The alpha and beta diversity of the soil prokaryotic communities was higher in managed land use systems than in rainforest. In the case of bacteria, this was related to soil characteristics such as pH value, exchangeable Ca and Fe content, C to N ratio, and extractable P content. Archaeal community composition and diversity were correlated to pH value, exchangeable Fe content, water content, and total N. The distribution of bacterial and archaeal taxa involved in biological N cycle indicated functional shifts of the cycle during conversion of rainforest to plantations. PMID:26696965

  16. An Evaluation of Infrastructure for Tsunami Evacuation in Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedillos, V.; Canney, N.; Deierlein, G.; Diposaptono, S.; Geist, E. L.; Henderson, S.; Ismail, F.; Jachowski, N.; McAdoo, B. G.; Muhari, A.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Sieh, K. E.; Toth, J.; Tucker, B. E.; Wood, K.

    2009-12-01

    Padang has one of the world’s highest tsunami risks due to its high hazard, vulnerable terrain and population density. The current strategy to prepare for tsunamis in Padang is focused on developing early warning systems, planning evacuation routes, conducting evacuation drills, and raising local awareness. Although these are all necessary, they are insufficient. Padang’s proximity to the Sunda Trench and flat terrain make reaching safe ground impossible for much of the population. The natural warning in Padang - a strong earthquake that lasts over a minute - will be the first indicator of a potential tsunami. People will have about 30 minutes after the earthquake to reach safe ground. It is estimated that roughly 50,000 people in Padang will be unable to evacuate in that time. Given these conditions, other means to prepare for the expected tsunami must be developed. With this motivation, GeoHazards International and Stanford University’s Chapter of Engineers for a Sustainable World partnered with Indonesian organizations - Andalas University and Tsunami Alert Community in Padang, Laboratory for Earth Hazards, and the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries - in an effort to evaluate the need for and feasibility of tsunami evacuation infrastructure in Padang. Tsunami evacuation infrastructure can include earthquake-resistant bridges and evacuation structures that rise above the maximum tsunami water level, and can withstand the expected earthquake and tsunami forces. The choices for evacuation structures vary widely - new and existing buildings, evacuation towers, soil berms, elevated highways and pedestrian overpasses. This interdisciplinary project conducted a course at Stanford University, undertook several field investigations, and concluded that: (1) tsunami evacuation structures and bridges are essential to protect the people in Padang, (2) there is a need for a more thorough engineering-based evaluation than conducted to-date of the suitability of existing buildings to serve as evacuation structures, and of existing bridges to serve as elements of evacuation routes, and (3) additions to Padang’s tsunami evacuation infrastructure must carefully take into account technical matters (e.g. expected wave height, debris impact forces), social considerations (e.g. cultural acceptability, public’s confidence in the structure’s integrity), and political issues (e.g. land availability, cost, maintenance). Future plans include collaboration between U.S. and Indonesian engineers in developing designs for new tsunami evacuation structures, as well as providing training for Indonesian authorities on: (1) siting, designing, and constructing tsunami evacuation structures, and (2) evaluating the suitability of existing buildings to serve as tsunami evacuation shelters.

  17. A Seismic Reflection Profiling Survey of Lake Toba, Sumatra, Indonesia: Preliminary Findings from the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesner, C. A.; Dolan, M. T.; Halsor, S. P.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Liu, J.; Nasution, A.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Toba lies within the giant Toba Caldera that last erupted 74,000 years ago. In its early history, Lake Toba may have covered about 1800 km2, possibly reaching depths of 750 m. The central portion of the 100 x 30 km caldera has since been uplifted to form the asymmetrical Samosir Island resurgent dome (60 x 20 km). Its upper surface dips gently to the west while its eastern margin consists of a series of parallel normal faults with total displacement of at least 1100 m. Several lava domes have been emplaced along these faults as well as the southwestern caldera ring fracture. At least 30 m of laminated tuffaceous sand and silt, diatomaceous clay, diatomites, and volcanic ash cover Samosir Island and sediments up to 100 m have been reported. In an effort to understand the post-collapse sedimentation, structural, volcanic, and resurgent histories of the caldera, we conducted a 14 day seismic reflection profiling survey of Lake Toba in July/August 2012. An EdgeTech SB-512i "chirp" sonar unit was towed across about 900 km of transect lines. Signal penetration was not affected by water depth, which sometimes exceeded 500 m, but was often reduced by adverse tow conditions or strong stratigraphic reflectors, and occasionally lost altogether possibly due to gas pockets in the sediments. In areas of flat-lying or gently sloping lake bottom, about 10-30 m of lake sediments was typically detected. Along the steep caldera bounding faults and the faulted eastern margin of the Samosir resurgent dome virtually no sediments were detected. However, up to 90 m of laminated sediments were apparent on the crest and gently sloping submerged portions of Samosir. These thick sedimentary sequences showed distinct marker horizons with evidence of faulting, folding, sliding, and slumping. Local unconformities or onlapping sequences demonstrated discrete sedimentary episodes. Several subaqueous lava domes were discovered that uplifted, folded, and sometimes truncated the sedimentary sequence. Uplifted ridges near the base of the caldera bounding fault were noted in several areas. Alluvial sedimentation into the caldera appears minor and consists of a few short subaqueous extensions of alluvial fans and debris at the base of the collapse scarp. Collectively, the imaged sedimentary sequences indicate a dynamic post-caldera collapse history of deep water sedimentation that has been deformed by resurgent doming, lava dome intrusions, and reactivated collapse fault movements. Detailed analysis of the seismic records, coupled with study of lake sediment samples collected from subaerial exposures on Samosir Island, is expected to yield new insights into the post-collapse history of Earth's youngest large resurgent caldera.

  18. Petroleum systems of the Northwest Java Province, Java and offshore southeast Sumatra, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, Michele G.

    2000-01-01

    Mature, synrift lacustrine shales of Eocene to Oligocene age and mature, late-rift coals and coaly shales of Oligocene to Miocene age are source rocks for oil and gas in two important petroleum systems of the onshore and offshore areas of the Northwest Java Basin. Biogenic gas and carbonate-sourced gas have also been identified. These hydrocarbons are trapped primarily in anticlines and fault blocks involving sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. These source rocks and reservoir rocks were deposited in a complex of Tertiary rift basins formed from single or multiple half-grabens on the south edge of the Sunda Shelf plate. The overall transgressive succession was punctuated by clastic input from the exposed Sunda Shelf and marine transgressions from the south. The Northwest Java province may contain more than 2 billion barrels of oil equivalent in addition to the 10 billion barrels of oil equivalent already identified.

  19. Off-farm employment, land, and life cycle: transmigrant households in South Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Leinbach, T R; Smith, A

    1994-07-01

    This paper examines the role that off-farm employment (OFE) plays in the restructuring of peasant economies. In particular, we examine the incidence and pattern of labor allocation as it relates to landownership and family life cycle (FLC) stages in the Indonesian transmigration program.... Using a sample of South Sumatran transmigration schemes, our findings show that both size of landholdings and the life cycle stage of the family influence labor allocation decisions....The results show how landownership and other means of production can influence the trade-off between children's education and the use of child labor at various stages in the FLC." PMID:12288856

  20. Possible Intercontinental Dispersal of Microorganisms from a Paleolake Toba in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesner, C. A.; Barbee, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geochemical fingerprinting of glass shards and minerals have clearly demonstrated that ash from the 74 ka Toba eruption was distributed over a vast area including parts of the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Indian sub-continent, and eastern Africa. The great dispersal has been attributed to eruption column height, co-ignimbrite ash, shard morphology, and volume of the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) eruption. New evidence suggests that another contributing factor may have been a phreatomagmatic component of the eruption whereby portions of the YTT interacted with a paleolake Toba during the eruption. This evidence consists of an accretionary lapilli ash fall bed at the base of the YTT, friable lake sediment lithic fragments found within the proximal YTT ignimbrite, and organic remains in distal ash exposures. Notably, diatom frustules and sponge spicules similar to those that occur in post-YTT lacustrine sediments at Toba have now been identified in the proximal YTT ash fall bed and ignimbrite, as well as distal ash exposures in Malaysia and India. Our findings support the observations of J.B.Scrivenor (1930, 1943) who first described such microfossil occurrences in the Toba ash from sites in Malaysia, and speculated that they may have originated from Toba. Species characterization is currently underway to determine if the microflora/faunal assemblages of the Malaysian and Indian ashes are consistent with a Toba source. The preliminary results of our study lends further credence to Van Eaton et al.'s (2013) suggestion that microbiological cargo carried by phreatomagmatic tephra can provide a new tool in deciphering volcanological, paleoenvironmental, and biologic dispersal models.

  1. Patterns and Determinants of Treatment Seeking among Previously Untreated Psychotic Patients in Aceh Province, Indonesia: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Aichberger, Marion C.; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-01-01

    Immediate treatment of first-episode psychosis is essential in order to achieve a positive outcome. However, Indonesian psychiatric patients often delay accessing health services, the reason for which is not yet fully understood. The current study aimed to understand patterns of treatment seeking and to reveal determinants of the delay in accessing psychiatric care among first-time user psychotic patients. Qualitative interviews were conducted with sixteen family members who accompanied the patients to a psychiatric hospital. Many families expressed beliefs that mental illness appertains to village sickness and not hospital sickness; therefore, they usually take the patients to traditional or religious healers before taking them to a health professional. They also identified various factors that potentially delay accessing psychiatric treatment: low literacy and beliefs about the cause of the illness, stigmatisation, the role of extended family, financial problems, and long distance to the psychiatric hospital. On the other hand, the family mentioned various factors related to timely help seeking, including being a well-educated family, living closer to health facilities, previous experience of successful psychotic therapy, and having more positive symptoms of psychosis. The findings call for mental health awareness campaigns in the community. PMID:27382501

  2. Patterns and Determinants of Treatment Seeking among Previously Untreated Psychotic Patients in Aceh Province, Indonesia: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Aichberger, Marion C; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-01-01

    Immediate treatment of first-episode psychosis is essential in order to achieve a positive outcome. However, Indonesian psychiatric patients often delay accessing health services, the reason for which is not yet fully understood. The current study aimed to understand patterns of treatment seeking and to reveal determinants of the delay in accessing psychiatric care among first-time user psychotic patients. Qualitative interviews were conducted with sixteen family members who accompanied the patients to a psychiatric hospital. Many families expressed beliefs that mental illness appertains to village sickness and not hospital sickness; therefore, they usually take the patients to traditional or religious healers before taking them to a health professional. They also identified various factors that potentially delay accessing psychiatric treatment: low literacy and beliefs about the cause of the illness, stigmatisation, the role of extended family, financial problems, and long distance to the psychiatric hospital. On the other hand, the family mentioned various factors related to timely help seeking, including being a well-educated family, living closer to health facilities, previous experience of successful psychotic therapy, and having more positive symptoms of psychosis. The findings call for mental health awareness campaigns in the community. PMID:27382501

  3. P-wave velocity structure offshore central Sumatra: implications for compressional and strike-slip faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karplus, M.; Henstock, T.; McNeill, L. C.; Vermeesch, P. M. T.; Barton, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Sunda subduction zone features significant along-strike structural variability including changes in accretionary prism and forearc morphology. Some of these changes have been linked to changes in megathrust faulting styles, and some have been linked to other thrust and strike-slip fault systems across this obliquely convergent margin (~54-58 mm/yr convergence rate, 40-45 mm/yr subduction rate). We examine these structural changes in detail across central Sumatra, from Siberut to Nias Island, offshore Indonesia. In this area the Investigator Fracture Zone and the Wharton Fossil Ridge, features with significant topography, are being subducted, which may affect sediment thickness variation and margin morphology. We present new seismic refraction P-wave velocity models using marine seismic data collected during Sonne cruise SO198 in 2008. The experiment geometry consisted of 57 ocean bottom seismometers, 23 land seismometers, and over 10,000 air gun shots recorded along ~1750 km of profiles. About 130,000 P-wave first arrival refractions were picked, and the picks were inverted using FAST (First Arrivals Refraction Tomography) 3-D to give a velocity model, best-resolved in the top 25 km. Moho depths, crustal composition, prism geometry, slab dip, and upper and lower plate structures provide insight into the past and present tectonic processes at this plate boundary. We specifically examine the relationships between velocity structure and faulting locations/ styles. These observations have implications for strain-partitioning along the boundary. The Mentawai Fault, located west of the forearc basin in parts of Central Sumatra, has been interpreted variably as a backthrust, strike-slip, and normal fault. We integrate existing data to evaluate these hypotheses. Regional megathrust earthquake ruptures indicate plate boundary segmentation in our study area. The offshore forearc west of Siberut is almost aseismic, reflecting the locked state of the plate interface, which

  4. Seismicity analysis in Indonesia region from high precision hypocenter location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Andri; Shiddiqi, Hasbi; Widiyantoro, Sri; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono, Wandono

    2015-04-01

    As a complex tectonic region, Indonesia has a high seismicity rate which is related to subduction and collision as well as strike-slip fault. High-precision earthquake locations with adequate relocation method and proper velocity model are necessary for seismicity analysis. We used nearly 25,000 earthquakes that were relocated using double-difference method. In our relocation process, we employed teleseismic, regional, and local P-wave arrival times. Furthermore, we employed regional-global nested velocity models that take into account the subduction slab in the study region by using a 3D model for area inside and a 1D model for area outside Indonesia. Relocation results show shifted hypocenters that are generally perpendicular to the trench. Beneath western Sunda arc, the Wadati-Benioff Zone (WBZ) extents to a depth of about 300 km and depicts a gently dipping slab. The WBZ beneath eastern Sunda arc extends deeper to about 500 km and depicts a steep slab geometry. In the Sunda-Banda transition zone, we found anomalously low seismicity beneath the oceanic-continental transition region. The WBZ of the severely curved Banda arc extends to a depth of about 600 km and depicts a two-slab model. In the Molucca collision zone, seismicity clearly depicts two opposing slabs of the Molucca sea plate, i.e. to the east and to the west. Around Sulawesi region, most earthquakes are related to the north Sulawesi trench and depict subducted slab beneath the northern part of the island. In Sumatra region, we identified a seismic gap in the WBZ between 70 km and 150 km. Seismicity gaps are also detected beneath particular regions, e.g. Mentawai region, and several parts along the subducted slab. Similar to the Sumatra region, beneath eastern Sunda arc, seismic gap in WBZ is also detected but deeper, i.e. at depths of 150 km to 250 km. Furthermore, we used global centroid moment tensor catalog data available for earthquakes with magnitude 5.0 or greater. In general, focal mechanism

  5. Why is Pseudosphromenus cupanus (Teleostei: Osphronemidae) reported from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, and Pakistan?

    PubMed

    Kullander, Sven O; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Norén, Michael; Mollah, Abdur Rob

    2015-01-01

    The native distribution of the small labyrinth fish species Pseudosphromenus cupanus includes southern India and Sri Lanka. According to literature it has a range including also Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Malaysia, and Indonesia (Sumatra) but there are no voucher specimens or reliable observations from those areas. The distribution record of P. cupanus was inflated partly by including P. dayi as a synonym. Pseudosphronemus dayi is native to the Western Ghats in India, but the origin of the aquarium importation in 1907 was reported as both Cochin (=Kochi) and Malacca (=Malaysia), the latter locality obviously in error. The basis for the Sumatra record is an obviously mislabeled sample of P. dayi from Pulau Weh close to Sumatra. The basis for reporting the species from Pakistan, Myanmar or Bangladesh could not be located. Misidentified museum specimens from Myanmar and Pakistan identified as P. cupanus were never published on. Pseudosphromenus cupanus has been considered recently to be extinct in Bangladesh, but in fact it never occurred there. PMID:26250251

  6. Coupling eruption and tsunami records: the Krakatau 1883 case study, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Raphaël; Wassmer, Patrick; Lavigne, Franck; Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Iskandarsyah, Yan; Benbakkar, Mhammed; Ontowirjo, Budianto; Mazzoni, Nelly

    2014-04-01

    The well-documented 1883 eruption of Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) offers an opportunity to couple the eruption's history with the tsunami record. The aim of this paper is not to re-analyse the scenario for the 1883 eruption but to demonstrate that the study of tsunami deposits provides information for reconstructing past eruptions. Indeed, though the characteristics of volcanogenic tsunami deposits are similar to those of other tsunami deposits, they may include juvenile material (e.g. fresh pumice) or be interbedded with distal pyroclastic deposits (ash fall, surges), due to their simultaneity with the eruption. Five kinds of sedimentary and volcanic facies related to the 1883 events were identified along the coasts of Java and Sumatra: (1) bioclastic tsunami sands and (2) pumiceous tsunami sands, deposited respectively before and during the Plinian phase (26-27 August); (3) rounded pumice lapilli reworked by tsunami; (4) pumiceous ash fall deposits and (5) pyroclastic surge deposits (only in Sumatra). The stratigraphic record on the coasts of Java and Sumatra, which agrees particularly well with observations of the 1883 events, is tentatively linked to the proximal stratigraphy of the eruption.

  7. Geoelectrical dimensionality analyses in Sumatran Fault (Aceh segment) using magnetotelluric phase tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prihantoro, Rudy; Nurhasan, Sutarno, Doddy; Ogawa, Yasuo; Priahadena, Has; Fitriani, Dini

    2014-03-01

    Earth electrical / geoelectrical conductivity may vary in any direction in a complex earth model. When conductivity only varying within one direction such as depth, it is considered as an one-dimensional (1-D) structure model. Two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) structure have more degrees of conductivity variation. In magnetotelluric (MT) surveys localized heterogeneities in conductivity near the Earth's surface distort the electromagnetic (EM) response produced by the underlying or 'regional' conductivity structure under investigation. Several attempts had been done to remove this distortion effect in measured MT transfer functions (impedances tensor) by a series of techniques and general conductivity models of increasing complexity. The most common technique are Bahr's method and Groom-Bailey decompositions, that is restricted by assumption of two dimensional (2D) regional conductivity structure. MT phase tensor technique proposed by Caldwell et al. (2004) requires no assumption about the dimensionality of the regional conductivity structure and is applicable where both the heterogeneity and the regional conductivity structure are 3-D. Here, we examine the dimensionality analyses using the MT phase tensor to measured data of Sumatran Fault (SF) Aceh segment that we've collected during July 2012. A small value of phase tensor dimensionality indicator (β) was found along the profile. This result indicate a strong a two dimensionality of regional conductivity structure of SF Aceh segment.

  8. Permanent GPS Geodetic Array in Southern California (PGGA) and GPS observations in Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Yehuds

    1994-01-01

    The Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) is a network of permanent monitoring GPS stations in southern California devoted to the continuous measurement of crustal deformation in near real-time. The PGGA plays a unique role in studies of the kinematics of crustal deformation and the earthquake cycle in southern California because it is also providing temporally dense geodetic measurements of crustal motion over periods of minutes to variations in regional crustal strain. As it expands and matures the PGGA will play an increasingly important role in the study of active tectonics of southern California by bridging the frequency range between seismology, observatory geodesy, paleoseismology, and geology. In Indonesia GPS data is used for measurement of a large scale crustal deformation, extending from north China to the Indonesian archipelago. Indonesia offers a tremendous laboratory to study some of the processes that build continents, and mountains are active there. We began GPS observations in August 1989 on mainland Sumatra and the Mentawai Islands to study the phenomena of oblique plate convergence. We have analyzed the Indonesian data in conjunction with data collected on Christmas and Cocos Islands and at Darwin, Australia, and with the triangulation data in Sumatra.

  9. MODIS data used to study 2002 fires in Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Douglas O.

    Smoke and haze blanketed western Indonesia during August and September 2002, signaling the arrival of another El Niño event in Southeast Asia. Although not as severe as the 1997-1998 El Niño event, the 2002 El Niño produced drought conditions in western Indonesia that favored extensive biomass burning in lowland areas of Borneo, Sumatra, and Sulawesi, three of the largest islands that form part of the vast Indonesian archipelago. Data derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on board the NASA Terra satellite showed that most of the burning during 2002 occurred in central and western Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), where forests are being cleared to make way for industrial oil palm and pulp plantations.Comparison of fire data from several different satellite sensors also reveals that fires detected in Kalimantan during 1997 appeared more numerous (Figure 1) and burned over a longer period (Figure 2) than fires that burned in late 2002 (see discussion below). This result is consistent with recent El Niño observations that characterize the current event as moderate relative to the 1997-1998 event (see http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/ products/analysis_monitoring/enso_advisory/).

  10. Two new species of Cyrtodactylus (Squamata: Gekkonidae) from the Southern Bukit Barisan Range of Sumatra and an estimation of their phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Michael B; O'connell, Kyle A; Barraza, Gabriel; Riyanto, Awal; Kurniawan, Nia; Smith, Eric N

    2015-01-01

    We describe Cyrtodactylus psarops sp. nov. and C. semicinctus sp. nov., two new species of bent-toed geckos from montane forests in the southern Bukit Barisan Range of Sumatra, Indonesia. The new species are closely related to one another and to C. semenanjungensis, a lowland species currently known only from Peninsular Malaysia. Three characters of the new species immediately distinguish them from most congeners in the Sunda Region: they lack transversely enlarged subcaudals, have a precloacal depression, and have a greatly enlarged scale positioned at the apex of a continuous series of femoral and precloacal pore-bearing scales. They differ from one another in cephalic pattern, tuberculation of the brachium, and in numbers of cloacal tubercles, dorsal bands, and ventrals in a transverse row. The greatly enlarged scale at the apex of the precloacal pores appears to be a rare apomorphy of these two species and C. agamensis. PMID:26624112

  11. Spatio-temporal analysis on land transformation in a forested tropical landscape in Jambi Province, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melati, Dian N.; Nengah Surati Jaya, I.; Pérez-Cruzado, César; Zuhdi, Muhammad; Fehrmann, Lutz; Magdon, Paul; Kleinn, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) in forested tropical landscapes is very dynamically developing. In particular, the pace of forest conversion in the tropics is a global concern as it directly impacts the global carbon cycle and biodiversity conservation. Expansion of agriculture is known to be among the major drivers of forest loss especially in the tropics. This is also the case in Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia where it is the mainly expansion of tree crops that triggers deforestation: oil palm and rubber trees. Another transformation system in Jambi is the one from natural forest into jungle rubber, which is an agroforestry system where a certain density of forest trees accompanies the rubber tree crop, also for production of wood and non-wood forest products. The spatial distribution and the dynamics of these transformation systems and of the remaining forests are essential information for example for further research on ecosystem services and on the drivers of land transformation. In order to study land transformation, maps from the years 1990, 2000, 2011, and 2013 were utilized, derived from visual interpretation of Landsat images. From these maps, we analyze the land use/land cover change (LULCC) in the study region. It is found that secondary dryland forest (on mineral soils) and secondary swamp forest have been transformed largely into (temporary) shrub land, plantation forests, mixed dryland agriculture, bare lands and estate crops where the latter include the oil palm and rubber plantations. In addition, we present some analyses of the spatial pattern of land transformation to better understand the process of LULC fragmentation within the studied periods. Furthermore, the driving forces are analyzed.

  12. Temporal changes of surface wave velocity associated with major Sumatra earthquakes from ambient noise correlation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen J.; Song, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Detecting temporal changes of the medium associated with major earthquakes has implications for understanding earthquake genesis. Here we report temporal changes of surface wave velocity over a large area associated with 3 major Sumatra earthquakes in 2004, 2005, and 2007. We use ambient noise correlation to retrieve empirical Green's function (EGF) of surface waves between stations. Because the process is completely repeatable, the technique is powerful in detecting possible temporal change of medium. We find that 1 excellent station pair (PSI in Indonesia and CHTO in Thailand) shows significant time shifts (up to 1.44 s) after the 2004 and 2005 events in the Rayleigh waves at 10–20 s but not in the Love waves, suggesting that the Rayleigh time shifts are not from clock error. The time shifts are frequency dependent with the largest shifts at the period band of 11–16 s. We also observe an unusual excursion ∼1 month before the 2004 event. We obtain a total of 17 pairs for June, 2007 to June, 2008, which allow us to examine the temporal and spatial variation of the time shifts. We observed strong anomalies (up to 0.68 s) near the epicenter after the 2007 event, but not in the region further away from the source or before the event or 3 months after the event. The observations are interpreted as stress changes and subsequent relaxation in upper-mid crust in the immediate vicinity of the rupture and the broad area near the fault zone. PMID:19667205

  13. My Classroom: Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balazs, Erica

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the teaching experiences of Alief Noor Farida--a junior lecturer at Indonesia's "Universitas Negeri Semarang" (Semarang State University [UNNES]). Now teaching her fourth semester and an alumna of the English Education program at UNNES, Ms. Farida is an especially motivated and dedicated educator. She teaches 18…

  14. Country Profiles, Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Council, New York, NY.

    A profile of Indonesia is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population - size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  15. Decentralising Education in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristiansen, Stein; Pratikno

    2006-01-01

    The paper aims to assess the impacts of a dramatic decentralisation reform in Indonesia on access to and quality of primary and secondary education. The research draws on qualitative and quantitative data from interviews, focus group discussions and household surveys in four selected districts. The main conclusions are threefold; the…

  16. Population, environment and sustainable development in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Jones, G W

    1993-12-01

    Sustainable development is expressed in terms of living standards and economic welfare. The basic dichotomy of general sustainable development pits the environmentalists who fear that population growth poses grave threats to natural resources against the economic rationalists who envisage that market forces will take care of scarcities and technological development will solve environmental problems. The Brundtland committee defined sustainable development as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability to meet the needs of future generations. An increase in population or per capita income will increase environmental stress, while an increase in efficiency of production will reduce environmental stress. Indonesia is an important case of the interrelationships between population growth and environmental problems. It had 180 million people in 1990. Despite fertility decline the population is expected to increase by 89 million over the next 30 years. The island of Java is subject to the greatest population-related environmental stress because the population numbers 112 million people. Severe erosion already occurred in the 1950s in the uplands, and cultivation is moving further up the slopes of volcanic hillsides to accommodate commercial vegetable growing on previously forested slopes. The underlying problem is population growth and the need for increased crop production and employment. Other causative factors are the building of freeways, airports, and factories; sand and soil extraction; the impact on fisheries of blasting of coral rock; and urbanization. Jakarta has inadequate water supplies and waste disposal and increasing air pollution. In the outer island in South Sulawesi erosion is also severe; in South Sumatra deforestation is widespread as the transmigration program unfolds. Natural resource degradation occurs when population becomes too large in relation to the productivity of the resource base. PMID:12159254

  17. Remotely triggered nonvolcanic tremor in Sumbawa, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Florian; Lupi, Matteo; Miller, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Nonvolcanic (or tectonic) tremor is a seismic phenomenom which can provide important information about dynamics of plate boundaries but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Tectonic tremor is often associated with slow-slip (termed episodic tremor and slip) and understanding the mechanisms driving tremor presents an important challenge because it is likely a dominant aspect of the evolutionary processes leading to tsunamigenic, megathrust subduction zone earthquakes. Tectonic tremor is observed worldwide, mainly along major subduction zones and plate boundaries such as in Alaska/Aleutians, Cascadia, the San Andreas Fault, Japan or Taiwan. We present, for the first time, evidence for triggered tremor beneath the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. The island of Sumbawa, Indonesia, is part of the Lesser Sunda Group about 250 km north of the Australian/Eurasian plate collision at the Java Trench with a convergence rate of approximately 70 mm/yr. We show surface wave triggered tremor beneath Sumbawa in response to three teleseismic earthquakes: the Mw9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake and two oceanic strike-slip earthquakes (Mw 8.6 and Mw8.2) offshore of Sumatra in 2012. Tremor amplitudes scale with ground motion and peak at 180 nm/s ground velocity on the horizontal components. A comparison of ground motion of the three triggering events and a similar (nontriggering) Mw7.6 2012 Philippines event constrains an apparent triggering threshold of approximately 1 mm/s ground velocity or 8 kPa dynamic stress. Surface wave periods of 45-65 s appear optimal for triggering tremor at Sumbawa which predominantly correlates with Rayleigh waves, even though the 2012 oceanic events have stronger Love wave amplitudes and triggering potential. Rayleigh wave triggering, low-triggering amplitudes, and the tectonic setting all favor a model of tremor generated by localized fluid transport. We could not locate the tremor because of minimal station coverage, but data indicate several

  18. An Overview of SEATOS: Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami Offshore Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, K.; Grilli, S.; Tappin, D.

    2005-12-01

    In May 2005, an international, interdisciplinary team of scientists conducted a detailed survey of the seafloor in the vicinity of the epicenter of the Great Sumatra earthquake of December 26, 2004-dubbed Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami Offshore Survey (SEATOS 2005). The overall goal of the survey was to gather data to improve models of seafloor displacement and the resulting tsunami waves. To accomplish this goal, SEATOS conducted detailed investigations at seven sites: a large underwater landslide, initially thought to be the result of the December 26th earthquake: a ~20km long trench feature at the deformation front that was interpreted to represent recent seafloor displacement; seafloor locations at three sites on the forearc high; and a steep mound north of Sumatra, interpreted as volcanic. High resolution seismic lines were run across the margin and between detailed study sites to characterize the overall style of the subduction zone (see abstract by Mosher et al., this session). At each site, detailed surveys including seismic, and remotely operated vehicles (ROV) were conducted. ROV surveys included high definition television-quality video imaging of the seafloor, as well as core sampling for biological and geotechnical analyses. During SEATOS, tsunami simulations were also conducted using a wave model based on fully nonlinear Boussinesq equations (see Grilli et al. abstract, this session). Such a model better represents the oscillatory wave trains that were typically observed during the event. Early results suggest seafloor disturbances (from the Dec. 26th 2004 earthquake) and the formation of new seafloor features occurred at the deformation front and stable seafloor conditions prevailed at the forearc high. These data are currently being analyzed, along with recently published seismic inversion analyses, to develop a seafloor displacement model that best represents the Dec. 26th event. Also, the comparison of wave model results with observations at tide

  19. Numerical Modeling and Forecasting of Strong Sumatra Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H. L.; Yin, C.

    2007-12-01

    ESyS-Crustal, a finite element based computational model and software has been developed and applied to simulate the complex nonlinear interacting fault systems with the goal to accurately predict earthquakes and tsunami generation. With the available tectonic setting and GPS data around the Sumatra region, the simulation results using the developed software have clearly indicated that the shallow part of the subduction zone in the Sumatra region between latitude 6S and 2N has been locked for a long time, and remained locked even after the Northern part of the zone underwent a major slip event resulting into the infamous Boxing Day tsunami. Two strong earthquakes that occurred in the distant past in this region (between 6S and 1S) in 1797 (M8.2) and 1833 (M9.0) respectively are indicative of the high potential for very large destructive earthquakes to occur in this region with relatively long periods of quiescence in between. The results have been presented in the 5th ACES International Workshop in 2006 before the recent 2007 Sumatra earthquakes occurred which exactly fell into the predicted zone (see the following web site for ACES2006 and detailed presentation file through workshop agenda). The preliminary simulation results obtained so far have shown that there seem to be a few obvious events around the previously locked zone before it is totally ruptured, but apparently no indication of a giant earthquake similar to the 2004 M9 event in the near future which is believed to happen by several earthquake scientists. Further detailed simulations will be carried out and presented in the meeting.

  20. Terrestrial heat flow in the tertiary basin of central Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva Carvalho, Humberto; Purwoko; Siswoyo; Thamrin, M.; Vacquier, Victor

    1980-10-01

    Heat flow at 170 locations in the Central Tertiary basin of Sumatra was determined from thermal gradients obtained from the extrapolated oil well bottom hole formation temperature and the assumed temperature of 80°F at the surface. The effective thermal conductivity of the whole rock column, by which the gradient is multiplied to get the heat flow was calculated from measurements on 273 specimens of the geologic section and inspection of 92 well logs. For the whole basin the gradient averaged 3.71 ± 1.04°F/ 100 ft (67.6°C/km) the conductivity 4.83 ± 0.31 mcal °C -1 cm -1 sec -1, giving an average heat flow of 3.27 ± 0.93 10-6 cal cm -2 sec -1 which is about twice the world average. The gradient and the heat flow vary inversely with the depth of the wells most of which bottom in the pre-Tertiary basement. This may result from the basement rocks being several times more conductive than the sediments. Mocel calculations on a narrow heat-flow anomaly which rises from a base level of 3.2 HFU to 8.8 HFU suggest that it can be caused by the intrusion less than 55,000 years ago of an igneous plug or laccolith no deeper than 3 km and 2.2 to 4.6 km wide. Using the gradients from the SEAPEX Geothermal Gradient Map and assuming a conductivity of 5 mcal cm -1 °C -1 sec -1, the heat flow in the North Sumatra basin, the South Sumatra Basin, Sunda Strait and West Java is 2.5 HFU, while in Java east of 110°E longitude it drops to 1.9 HFU. Since subduction off Sumatra dates back at least to the Cretaceous, compression of the Asian plate against the Benioff zone is preventing the opening of a back-arc basin. This does not preclude the possibility of occasional periods of crustal tension corresponding perhaps to episodes of transgression which allow magma to rise into the rocks underlying the basin.

  1. Post-seismic relaxation following the great 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on a compressible self-gravitating Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Burgmann, R.; Banerjee, P.

    2006-01-01

    he Mw ??? 9.0 2004 December 26 Sumatra-Andaman and Mw =8.7 2005 March 28 Nias earthquakes, which collectively ruptured approximately 1800 km of the Andaman and Sunda subduction zones, are expected to be followed by vigorous viscoelastic relaxation involving both the upper and lower mantle. Because of these large spatial dimensions it is desirable to fully account for gravitational coupling effects in the relaxation process. We present a stable method of computing relaxation of a spherically-stratified, compressible and self-gravitating viscoelastic Earth following an impulsive moment release event. The solution is cast in terms of a spherical harmonic expansion of viscoelastic normal modes. For simple layered viscoelastic models, which include a low-viscosity oceanic asthenosphere, we predict substantial post-seismic effects over a region several 100s of km wide surrounding the eastern Indian Ocean. We compare observed GPS time-series from ten regional sites (mostly in Thailand and Indonesia), beginning in 2004 December, with synthetic time-series that include the coseismic and post-seismic effects of the 2004 December 26 and 2005 March 28 earthquakes. A viscosity structure involving a biviscous (Burgers body) rheology in the asthenosphere explains the pattern and amplitude of post-seismic offsets remarkably well. ?? 2006 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2006 RAS.

  2. The trap-jaw ant genus Odontomachus Latreille (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) from Sumatra, with a new species description.

    PubMed

    Satria, Rijal; Kurushima, Hiroaki; Herwina, Henny; Yamane, Seiki; Eguchi, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The ant genus Odontomachus Latreille is reviewed for Sumatra, the sixth largest island in the world and located in western Indonesia. Previously three species were recorded from the island: O. simillimus F. Smith, O. rixosus F. Smith, and O. latidens Mayr. We add two species to the fauna, O. procerus Emery stat. nov and Odontomachus minangkabau sp. nov. The new species belongs to O. rixosus species group, and it is morphologically most similar to O. rixosus and O. pararixosus Terayama & Ito. However, it can be separated from the latter two by its large body (HL 3.13-3.55 mm, WL 4.15-4.65 mm), the masticatory margin with 11-14 denticles, and dark-colored body. Odontomachus latidens subsp. sumatranus Emery is newly synonymized with O. procerus. The castes and sexes of the known species are also described, including the first descriptions of the male for O. latidens, O. procerus, and O. rixosus. A key to the Sumatran species based on the worker caste is provided, and the bionomics of each species is summarized. PMID:26624734

  3. Field Survey of Tsunami Effects in Sri Lanka due to the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake of December 26, 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shusaku; Wijeyewickrema, Anil C.; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Miura, Hiroyuki; Gunaratna, Priyantha; Madurapperuma, Manoj; Sekiguchi, Toru

    2007-03-01

    The December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake that registered a moment magnitude (M w ) of 9.1 was one of the largest earthquakes in the world since 1900. The devastating tsunami that resulted from this earthquake caused more casualties than any previously reported tsunami. The number of fatalities and missing persons in the most seriously affected countries were Indonesia - 167,736, Sri Lanka - 35,322, India - 18,045 and Thailand - 8,212. This paper describes two field visits to assess tsunami effects in Sri Lanka by a combined team of Japanese and Sri Lankan researchers. The first field visit from December 30, 2004 January 04, 2005 covered the western and southern coasts of Sri Lanka including the cities of Moratuwa, Beruwala, Bentota, Pereliya, Hikkaduwa, Galle, Talpe, Matara, Tangalla and Hambantota. The objectives of the first field visit were to investigate the damage caused by the tsunami and to obtain eyewitness information about wave arrival times. The second field visit from March 10 18, 2005 covered the eastern and southern coasts of Sri Lanka and included Trincomalee, Batticaloa, Arugam Bay, Yala National Park and Kirinda. The objectives of the second visit were mainly to obtain eyewitness information about wave arrival times and inundation data, and to take relevant measurements using GPS instruments.

  4. Snakebite in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Adiwinata, Randy; Nelwan, Erni J

    2015-10-01

    Indonesia as one of the largest tropical and agricultural countries in the world shared the particularly high burden cases of snakebite. In the last decade, World Health Organization (WHO) has listed snakebite as one of the neglected tropical disease. The clinical manifestations of snakebite could vary according to the type of venoms ranging from mild to life threatening condition. Appropriate first aid treatment and comprehensive management of snakebite cases are warranted to reduce mortality and morbidity rates. PMID:26932707

  5. Indonesia's migration transition.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G

    1995-01-01

    This article describes population movements in Indonesia in the context of rapid and marked social and economic change. Foreign investment in Indonesia is increasing, and global mass media is available to many households. Agriculture is being commercialized, and structural shifts are occurring in the economy. Educational levels are increasing, and women's role and status are shifting. Population migration has increased over the decades, both short and long distance, permanent and temporary, legal and illegal, and migration to and between urban areas. This article focuses specifically on rural-to-urban migration and international migration. Population settlements are dense in the agriculturally rich inner areas of Java, Bali, and Madura. Although the rate of growth of the gross domestic product was 6.8% annually during 1969-94, the World Bank ranked Indonesia as a low-income economy in 1992 because of the large population size. Income per capita is US $670. Indonesia is becoming a large exporter of labor to the Middle East, particularly women. The predominance of women as overseas contract workers is changing women's role and status in the family and is controversial due to the cases of mistreatment. Malaysia's high economic growth rate of over 8% per year means an additional 1.3 million foreign workers and technicians are needed. During the 1980s urban growth increased at a very rapid rate. Urban growth tended to occur along corridors and major transportation routes around urban areas. It is posited that most of the urban growth is due to rural-to-urban migration. Data limitations prevent an exact determination of the extent of rural-to-urban migration. More women are estimated to be involved in movements to cities during the 1980s compared to the 1970s. Recruiters and middlemen have played an important role in rural-to-urban migration and international migration. PMID:12347370

  6. Urologic cancer in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Umbas, Rainy; Safriadi, Ferry; Mochtar, Chaidir A; Djatisoesanto, Wahjoe; Hamid, Agus Rizal A H

    2015-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases, including cancer, start to become more common in Indonesia. According to the government statement, incidence of malignant diseases increased annually up to 8% in the last decade and these diseases become the seventh leading cause of death in Indonesia. On the basis of the latest Globocan report on cancer incidence in Indonesia, prostate cancer ranks sixth; followed by bladder (12th) and kidney (18th). More than half of patients with kidney cancer are diagnosed in the advanced stage. Besides renal cell carcinoma, there are significant number of people affected with squamous cell and transitional cell carcinoma because of kidney stones. Radical nephrectomy or cytoreductive nephrectomy was the primary treatment, mostly done as an open procedure. Transitional cell carcinoma is the commonest histology type in bladder cancer cases followed by squamous cell carcinoma, which almost always related to bladder stones. Unfortunately, >70% of our cases were diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancer, and ∼60% of these patients refused further radical treatment. Incidence of prostate cancer is increasing rapidly and it becomes the third most common cancer in men. However, most of our patients are diagnosed in the advanced stage. Radical prostatectomy or external beam radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in localized disease. Nearly 40% of the elderly patients are treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy. Therefore, it requires more research by the Indonesian urologists and other healthcare providers to diagnose these cancers in earlier stage as well as community education for prevention. PMID:26085688

  7. Complex emergencies in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Bradt, D A; Drummond, C M; Richman, M

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Indonesia has experienced six major provincial, civil, armed conflicts. Underlying causes include the transmigration policy, sectarian disputes, the Asian economic crisis, fall of authoritarian rule, and a backlash against civil and military abuses. The public health impact involves the displacement nationwide of > 1.2 million persons. Violence in the Malukus, Timor, and Kalimantan has sparked the greatest population movements such that five provinces in Indonesia each now harbor > 100,000 internally displaced persons. With a background of government instability, hyperinflation, macroeconomic collapse, and elusive political solutions, these civil armed conflicts are ripe for persistence as complex emergencies. Indonesia has made substantial progress in domestic disaster management with the establishment of central administrative authority, strategic planning, and training programs. Nevertheless, the Indonesian experience reveals recurrent issues in international humanitarian health assistance. Clinical care remains complicated by absences of treatment protocols, inappropriate drug use, high procedural complication rates, and variable referral practices. Epidemiological surveillance remains complicated by unsettled clinical case definitions, non-standardized case management of diseases with epidemic potential, variable outbreak management protocols, and inadequate epidemiological analytic capacity. International donor support has been semi-selective, insufficient, and late. The militia murders of three UN staff in West Timor prompted the withdrawal of UN international staff from West Timor for nearly a year to date. Re-establishing rules of engagement for humanitarian health workers must address security, public health, and clinical threats. PMID:12090212

  8. Human amplification of drought-related biomass burning in Indonesia since 1960

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. D.; van der Werf, G. R.; Shen, S. S.; Roswintiarti, O.

    2008-12-01

    Biomass burning in Indonesia is a singularly large source of greenhouse gas emissions at a global scale, with pronounced regional impacts on air quality. Although some fire events have been documented on a case- by-case basis, no continuous record exists prior to 1996, due to the absence of satellite estimates or ground- truthed records of fire extent. Here, we provide a continuous record of severe haze in Indonesia from 1960 to 2006 using the visibility reported at airports, which was found to be an excellent proxy for particulate matter emissions. We used the visibility proxy to show that the haze events in Indonesia were worse, by a factor of five, than extreme periods in cities with the world's worst air quality, and to better understand the underlying climatic and anthropogenic causes of the fire. Large fire events have occurred in Sumatra at least since the 1960s, but in Kalimantan only since the 1980s, despite the occurrence of several severe droughts during 1960- 1980. This difference can be attributed to different patterns of deforestation and population growth, which intensified in Kalimantan only in the 1980s during Indonesia's official program of transmigration. In the presence of intensive land use, there is a non-linear relationship between rainfall and fire, whereby fire events occur only during drought years when rainfall falls below a certain threshold, which we estimated using change-point analysis. Whereas recent fire events have been linked to exclusively El Niño, our long- term record suggests that the Indian Ocean Dipole is equally as, if not more, important a factor. Better understanding of these controls may help to assess future fire risk in Indonesia, which recent studies suggest could increase due to reduced precipitation and accelerated deforestation.

  9. Precipitation microstructure in different Madden-Julian Oscillation phases over Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Shibagaki, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    Intraseasonal variations of precipitation and its microstructure are investigated using measurements of the Equatorial Atmospheric Radar (EAR) facilities at Kototabang, west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). Raindrop size distribution (DSD) observations are obtained from a 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) with a near continuous record of operation over eight consecutive years (2003-2010). Precipitation types are classified using 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation, and are partitioned according to active and inactive convective phases of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). It is found that precipitation systems during the inactive phase are more continental in nature than those during the active phase. Cloud propagation from brightness temperature data indicates that Sumatra receives the rainfall mainly from maritime clouds during the active phase, while it is mainly from the continental clouds (land-based convection) during the inactive phase. Other remarkable differences between active and inactive phase precipitation systems are also observed from the vertical structure of precipitation. The precipitation during the inactive phase has deeper storms, a higher reflectivity aloft, more lightning activity and less stratiform characteristics, as compared to the active phase. Assessment of cloud effective radius of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data also shows a slight difference in the cloud droplet between the active and the inactive MJO phases. Different convective storms in different MJO phases lead to different DSD characteristics and Z-R relationships. The DSD during the inactive phase tends to have a higher concentration of medium and large-size drops than the active counterpart, consistent with the previous study during the first campaign of Coupling Processes in the Equatorial Atmosphere project. Although the DSD parameters and coefficient of Z-R relationships fall within the range of tropical maritime

  10. Fire emissions and regional air quality impacts from fires in oil palm, timber, and logging concessions in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlier, Miriam E.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Kim, Patrick S.; Koplitz, Shannon N.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Myers, Samuel S.

    2015-08-01

    Fires associated with agricultural and plantation development in Indonesia impact ecosystem services and release emissions into the atmosphere that degrade regional air quality and contribute to greenhouse gas concentrations. In this study, we estimate the relative contributions of the oil palm, timber (for wood pulp and paper), and logging industries in Sumatra and Kalimantan to land cover change, fire activity, and regional population exposure to smoke concentrations. Concessions for these three industries cover 21% and 49% of the land area in Sumatra and Kalimantan respectively, with the highest overall area in lowlands on mineral soils instead of more carbon-rich peatlands. In 2012, most remaining forest area was located in logging concessions for both islands, and for all combined concessions, there was higher remaining lowland and peatland forest area in Kalimantan (45% and 46%, respectively) versus Sumatra (20% and 27%, respectively). Emissions from all combined concessions comprised 41% of total fire emissions (within and outside of concession boundaries) in Sumatra and 27% in Kalimantan for the 2006 burning season, which had high fire activity relative to decadal emissions. Most fire emissions were observed in concessions located on peatlands and non-forested lowlands, the latter of which could include concessions that are currently under production, cleared in preparation for production, or abandoned lands. For the 2006 burning season, timber concessions from Sumatra (47% of area and 88% of emissions) and oil palm concessions from Kalimantan (33% of area and 67% of emissions) contributed the most to concession-related fire emissions from each island. Although fire emissions from concessions were higher in Kalimantan, emissions from Sumatra contributed 63% of concession-related smoke concentrations for the population-weighted region because fire sources were located closer to population centers. In order to protect regional public health, our results

  11. Statistical Analysis of Seismicity in the Sumatra Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, A.; Main, I.

    2007-12-01

    We examine the effect of the great M=9.0 Boxing day 2004 earthquake on the statistics of seismicity in the Sumatra region by dividing data from the NEIC catalogue into two time windows before and after the earthquake. First we determine a completeness threshold of magnitude 4.5 for the whole dataset from the stability of the maximum likelihood b-value with respect to changes in the threshold. The split data sets have similar statistical sampling, with 2563 events before and 3701 after the event. Temporal clustering is first quantified broadly by the fractal dimension of the time series to be respectively 0.137, 0.259 and 0.222 before, after and for the whole dataset, compared to a Poisson null hypothesis of 0, indicating a significant increase in temporal clustering after the event associated with aftershocks. To quantify this further we apply the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. The background random seismicity rate £g and the coefficient Ñ, a measure of an efficiency of a magnitude of an earthquake in generating its aftershocks, do not change significantly when averaged over the two time periods. In contrast the amplitude A of aftershock generation changes by a factor 4 or so, and there is a small but statistically significant increase in the Omori decay exponent p, indicating a faster decay rate of the aftershocks after the Sumatra earthquake. The ETAS model parameters are calculated for different magnitude threshold (i.e. 4.5, 5.0, 5.5) with similar results for the different magnitude thresholds. The Ñ values increases from near 1 to near 1.5, possibly reflecting known changes in the scaling exponent between scalar moment and magnitude with increasing magnitude. A simple relation of magnitude and span of aftershock activity indicates that detectable aftershock activity of the Sumatra earthquake may last up to 8.7 years. Earthquakes are predominantly in the depth range 30-40 km before 20-30 km after the mainshock, compared to a CMT centroid

  12. Southern extension of the Sumatra Fault and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, W.; Gaedicke, C.; Djajadihardja, Y. S.; Saito, S.

    2003-12-01

    Mode of slip partitioning in a fore arc of Sunda Arc between near trench normal thrusting and trench-parallel strike-slip faulting has been postulated mainly from the study of earthquake slip vectors and slip rate of the strike slip Sumatra Fault. However, there is no dependable geomorphic data, despite great attention for the area off the Sunda Strait which represent the junction between normal subduction off Java and oblique subduction off Sumatra. New single channel and bathymetric data were obtained by R/V Yokosuka, YK01-02/YK02-07 cruises and they provide a quite different geomorphologic view to the previously knowledge. New discovery of the southern extension of the Sumatra Fault is an example. In the southern extension, Shinkai 6500 dives allow us to identify more or less a meter of vertical topographic displacement along the SSE-trending active fault. Several amount of mud diapir mounds and a few sink hole are first recognized in the area where corresponds to a significant negative Bouguer anomaly zone. A methan content anomaly is detected in the summit of the mounds and bottom floor of the sink hole, together with Calyptogena colony. On the other hand, geomorphologic feature in the junction area is quite different to those of forearc setting; the area is covered by a bundle of tectonic blocks including the Genteng Bank, that well demarcated by the SSE- and east-trending conjugate lineaments. The junction area extending toward SSE occupies between the fore arc basin and the outer arc high and is demarcated by faults. The boundary fault cuts the preexisting geomorphology including trench-parallel strike slip fault in the outer arc high; e.g. Mentaiwai Faults. Consequently these geomorphic feature, as an accumulation of crustal deformation (plastic strain), is most likely to be caused by stretching of the fore arc crust. This study suggests that strain (plastic) partitioning in a fore arc occurs within the localized (or concentrated) area such as the junction

  13. Exploring Indonesia: Past and Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schelander, Bjorn

    This book provides an overview of Indonesia's history and culture. The book begins with prehistoric times and continues through nationhood. Each chapter provides background information along with student activities and project suggestions. Chapters include: (1) "Introduction to the Lands and Peoples of Indonesia"; (2) "Early Indonesian Societies";…

  14. Emergence of Melioidosis in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Tauran, Patricia M.; Sennang, Nurhayana; Rusli, Benny; Wiersinga, W. Joost; Dance, David; Arif, Mansyur; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is known to be highly endemic in parts of southeast Asia and northern Australia; however, cases are rarely reported in Indonesia. Here we report three cases of melioidosis in Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia occurring between 2013 and 2014. Two patients died and the other was lost to follow-up. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates from all three cases were identified by the VITEK2 Compact installed in the hospital in 2012. None of the three patients reported received antimicrobials recommended for melioidosis because of the delayed recognition of the organism. We reviewed the literature and found only seven reports of melioidosis in Indonesia. Five were reported before 1960. We suggest that melioidosis is endemic throughout Indonesia but currently under-recognized. Training on how to identify B. pseudomallei accurately and safely in all available microbiological facilities should be provided, and consideration should be given to making melioidosis a notifiable disease in Indonesia. PMID:26458777

  15. Emergence of Melioidosis in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Tauran, Patricia M; Sennang, Nurhayana; Rusli, Benny; Wiersinga, W Joost; Dance, David; Arif, Mansyur; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2015-12-01

    Melioidosis is known to be highly endemic in parts of southeast Asia and northern Australia; however, cases are rarely reported in Indonesia. Here we report three cases of melioidosis in Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia occurring between 2013 and 2014. Two patients died and the other was lost to follow-up. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates from all three cases were identified by the VITEK2 Compact installed in the hospital in 2012. None of the three patients reported received antimicrobials recommended for melioidosis because of the delayed recognition of the organism. We reviewed the literature and found only seven reports of melioidosis in Indonesia. Five were reported before 1960. We suggest that melioidosis is endemic throughout Indonesia but currently under-recognized. Training on how to identify B. pseudomallei accurately and safely in all available microbiological facilities should be provided, and consideration should be given to making melioidosis a notifiable disease in Indonesia. PMID:26458777

  16. A program to develop the domestic natural gas industry in Indonesia: Case history of two World Bank projects

    SciTech Connect

    Klass, D.L. ); Khwaja, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Indonesia depends heavily on revenues from the export of LNG and oil, the availability of which appears to be decreasing. It is therefore making a strong effort to accelerate development of a domestic natural gas industry. A high priority has been given to the conversion of power plants and city gas systems, including local industries and commercial facilities, from liquid fuels to natural gas. This will release more oil for export, help to meet the objectives of Repelita V, and provide substantial environmental benefits. The World Bank recently provided loans to the Indonesian Government for two projects that are aimed at substituting natural gas for oil and manufactured gas in domestic markets. One project involves expansion of the gas distribution systems of Indonesia's natural gas utility (PGN) in three cities: Jakarta and Bogor in Java, and Medan in Sumatra. The project also includes training programs for PGN staff and an energy pricing policy study to be carried out by Indonesia's Ministry of Mines and Energy. The second project involves expansion of the supply of natural gas for Surabaya and twelve other towns in its vicinity in East Java, and further expansion of Medan's supply system. Technical assistance will be provided to enhance the skills ofPGN and the Ministry of Mines and Energy, and a Gas Technology Unit similar to the Institute of Gas Technology will be established at Indonesia's Research and Development Center for Oil and Gas (LEMIGAS) in Jakarta. 14 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Preliminary Numerical Simulations of the September 12, 2007 Southern Sumatra Tsunami: Forward Modeling and Comparison With Publicly Available Tsunami Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, R.; Tinti, S.; Armigliato, A.; Pagnoni, G.; Zaniboni, F.

    2007-12-01

    An earthquake of magnitude Mw=8.4 (USGS source) was registered on September 12, 2007 offshore the southern coasts of Sumatra, Indonesia. The epicenter was located about 130 km offshore the city of Bengkulu. The earthquake generated a tsunami which, according to some preliminary surveys posted on the Internet by the Indonesian BMG, produced significant damage especially in a region north of Bengkulu, with maximum run-up of 3.6 m in Muko-Muko. The tsunami was also recorded by a number of "tsunameter" stations (including DART) all over the Indian Ocean, including some stations along the coast of Sumatra itself, like Padang. The aim of the present study is to perform some forward modeling of the tsunami and to try to put some constraints on the position and geometry of the causative fault. We basically follow a trial-and-error procedure by adopting some initial fault models, all sharing the same magnitude (provided by the Harvard Moment Tensor Solution), but being different as regards the position and the geometry, including possibly some slight variations of the focal parameters with respect to the solution provided by the Harvard CMT. For each fault choice, we simulate the ensuing tsunami and compare the obtained results with the available experimental data, and in particular with the available tide-gauge records in the Indian Ocean and the run-up measurements that will possibly be collected in the close future. As for the models adopted, we formulate the simple hypothesis that the tsunami initial condition coincides with the coseismic vertical displacement component of the ocean floor, which in turn is computed by means of the classical elastic half-space approach. The propagation of the tsunami is simulated through the numerical finite- differences code UBO-TSUFD, developed by the Tsunami Research Team at the University of Bologna (Italy), which solves the linear Navier-Stokes equations in the shallow-water approximation and in spherical coordinates, and is

  18. Deep infrasound radiated by the Sumatra earthquake and tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés, M.; Caron, P.; Hetzer, C.; Le Pichon, A.; Bass, H.; Drob, D.; Bhattacharyya, J.

    Infrasound arrays in the Pacific and Indian oceans that are part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) recorded distinct signatures associated with the 26 December 2004 Sumatra earthquake (M/9, http://earthquake.usgs.gov/) and tsunami. Although the radiation of infrasound from large continental earthquakes is established [e.g., Le Pichon et al., 2003], the results presented in the present article indicate that islands undergoing significant surface displacements from submarine earthquakes can produce infrasound.Far more intriguing is the possibility that the initiation and propagation of a tsunami may produce low-frequency sound near the source as well as along coastlines and basins. Since distant sound effectively propagates at ˜300 m/s and tsunamis propagate at ˜200 m/s, precursory sound could potentially be used as a discriminant for tsunami genesis.

  19. Interpretation of Geoelectric Structure at Hululais Prospect Area, South Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Mulyadi

    1995-01-01

    Schlumberger resistivity surveys were conducted in 1993 as part of a combined geological, geophysical and geological program to investigate a geothermal prospect in the Hululais area, Southern Sumatra. These resistivity data resolved the upper conductive layer and were interpreted to define the shallow extent of a possible geothermal system. A follow-up magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out to probe deeper than the dc resistivity survey results achieved. However, the resistive sub-stratum below the conductive layer was still poorly resolved. Possible reasons for this include a preferential channeling of the telluric current within the thick shallow very conductive layer, thus limiting the penetration depth of the magnetotelluric signals and poor resolution due to high noise levels caused by significant rain and sferics.

  20. Apes in Space: Saving an Imperilled Orangutan Population in Sumatra

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Smith, Gail; Campbell-Smith, Miran; Singleton, Ian; Linkie, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Deforestation rates in Sumatra are amongst the highest in the tropics. Lowland forests, which support the highest densities of orangutans, are particularly vulnerable to clearance and fragmentation because they are highly accessible. Consequently, many orangutans will, in the future, live in strictly or partially isolated populations. Whilst orangutans have been extensively studied in primary forests, their response to living in human-dominated landscapes remains poorly known, despite it being essential for their future management. Here, we focus on an isolated group of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) that co-exist with farmers in a mixed agroforest system consisting of degraded natural forest, smallholder (predominantly rubber) farms and oil palm plantations. Over 24 months we conducted the first ever spatial assessment of orangutan habitat use in the human-transformed landscape of Batang Serangan, North Sumatra. From 1,204 independent crop-raiding incidents recorded, orangutans showed strong foraging preference for mixed farmland/degraded forest habitat over oil palm patches. The core home range areas of the eight adult orangutans encompassed only 14% of the available study area. Monthly home range sizes averaged 423 ha (±139, SD) for males, and 131±46 ha for females, and were positively influenced by wild and cultivated fruit presence, and by crop consumption. The average daily distance travelled was similar for both adult males (868 m±350, SD) and females (866 m±195), but increased when orangutans raided crops. These findings show that orangutans can survive, demographically, in certain types of degraded landscapes, foraging on a mixture of crops and wild fruits. However, the poor quality habitat offered to orangutans by oil palm plantations, in terms of low food availability and as a barrier to female movements, is cause for concern since this is the land use type that is most rapidly replacing the preferred forest habitat across

  1. Crustal shear-wave velocity structure beneath Sumatra from receiver function modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-05-01

    We estimated the shear-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs ratio of the crust beneath the Sumatra region by inverting stacked receiver functions from five three-component broadband seismic stations, located in diverse geologic setting, using a well known non-linear direct search approach, Neighborhood Algorithm (NA). Inversion results show significant variation of sediment layer thicknesses from 1 km beneath the backarc basin (station BKNI and PMBI) to 3-7 km beneath the coastal part of Sumatra region (station LHMI and MNAI) and Nias island (station GSI). Average sediment layer shear velocity (Vss) beneath all the stations is observed to be less (∼1.35 km/s) and their corresponding Vp/Vs ratio is very high (∼2.2-3.0). Crustal thickness beneath Sumatra region varies between 27 and 35 km, with exception of 19 km beneath Nias island, with average crustal Vs ∼3.1-3.4 km/s (Vp/Vs ∼1.8). It is well known that thick sediments with low Vs (and high Vp/Vs) amplify seismic waves even from a small-magnitude earthquake, which can cause huge damage in the zone. This study can provide the useful information of the crust for the Sumatra region. Since, Sumatra is an earthquake prone zone, which suffered the strong shaking of Great Andaman-Sumatra earthquake; this study can also be helpful for seismic hazard assessment.

  2. Contributions to the knowledge of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) of Indonesia. 3. The genus Galumna (Galumnidae) with description of a new subgenus and seven new species

    PubMed Central

    Ermilov, Sergey G.; Sandmann, Dorothee; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahaju; Scheu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Seven new species of oribatid mites of the genus Galumna are described from litter and soil materials of Sumatra, Indonesia. A new subgenus, Galumna (Atypicogalumna) subgen. n., is proposed; it differs from all galumnid genera and subgenera by the simultaneous presence of porose areas and sacculi on the notogaster (vs. either porose areas or sacculi present). Galumna (Galumna) calva Starý, 1997 is recorded for the first time in the Oriental region, and Galumna (Galumna) sabahna Mahunka, 1995 is recorded for the first time in the Indonesian fauna. PMID:26798244

  3. Contributions to the knowledge of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) of Indonesia. 3. The genus Galumna (Galumnidae) with description of a new subgenus and seven new species.

    PubMed

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Sandmann, Dorothee; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahaju; Scheu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Seven new species of oribatid mites of the genus Galumna are described from litter and soil materials of Sumatra, Indonesia. A new subgenus, Galumna (Atypicogalumna) subgen. n., is proposed; it differs from all galumnid genera and subgenera by the simultaneous presence of porose areas and sacculi on the notogaster (vs. either porose areas or sacculi present). Galumna (Galumna) calva Starý, 1997 is recorded for the first time in the Oriental region, and Galumna (Galumna) sabahna Mahunka, 1995 is recorded for the first time in the Indonesian fauna. PMID:26798244

  4. Wake Vortices and Tropical Cyclogenesis Downstream of Sumatra over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, Caitlin Marie

    A myriad of processes acting singly or in concert may contribute to tropical cyclogenesis, including convectively coupled waves, breakdown of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ), or upper-level troughs. This thesis investigates the role that topographic effects from the island of Sumatra may play in initiating tropical cyclogenesis (TC genesis) in the eastern Indian Ocean. If easterly flow is split by the mountains of Sumatra, counter-rotating lee vortices may form downstream. Because Sumatra straddles the equator, though the wake vortices rotate in opposite directions, they will both be cyclonic when winds are easterly upon Sumatra, and may intensify further into tropical cyclones. The phenomenon of crossequatorial cyclone pairs, or "twin" tropical cyclones, in the Indian Ocean originating from Sumatra was first noted by Kuettner (1989). TC genesis appears to be particularly favored during the pre-onset phase of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO), when easterly flow encroaches upon Sumatra and the resulting cyclonic wake vortices encounter convectively coupled waves and enhanced moisture associated with the MJO in the Indian Ocean. Operational analysis data from the Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) and Dynamics of the Madden Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) campaigns were used to evaluate the impacts of Sumatra's topography upon the flow. The YOTC data encompass two years, from May 2008 to April 2010, while the special observing period of DYNAMO was conducted from October to December 2011. This research also presents three case studies of twin tropical cyclones west of Sumatra in the Indian Ocean, which were all determined to originate from Sumatran wake vortices and occurred between October and December of 2008, 2009, and 2011. Multiple cyclonic wake vortices and vorticity streamers were observed downstream of Sumatra during periods of easterly flow, most frequently between October and December. Froude numbers calculated for the region upstream of Sumatra

  5. Geologic impacts of the 2004 Indian ocean tsunami on Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, B.M.; Jaffe, B.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Morton, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was generated by a large submarine earthquake (magnitude ???9.1) with an epicenter located under the seafloor in the eastern Indian Ocean near northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The resulting tsunami was measured globally and had significant geologic impacts throughout the Indian Ocean basin. Observations of tsunami impacts, such as morphologic change, sedimentary deposits, and water-level measurements, are used to reconstruct tsunamogenic processes. Data from Sumatra, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives provide a synoptic view of tsunami characteristics from a wide range of coastal environments both near- and far-field from the tsunami origin. Impacts to the coast as a result of the tsunami varied depending upon the height of the wave at impact, orientation of the coast with regard to direction of wave approach, and local topography, bathymetry, geology, and vegetation cover. Tsunami deposits were observed in all the countries visited and can be generally characterized as relatively thin sheets (<80 cm), mostly of sand. ?? 2006 Gebru??der Borntraeger.

  6. Inventory of Forts in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinandi, N.; Suryaningsih, F.

    2015-08-01

    The great archipelago in Indonesia with its wealthy and various nature, the products and commodities of tropic agriculture and the rich soil, was through the centuries a region of interest for other countries all over the world. For several reasons some of these countries came to Indonesia to establish their existence and tried to monopolize the trading. These countries such as the Portuguese, the Spanish, the Dutch and the British built strengthened trade stations which later became forts all over Indonesia to defend their interest. The archipelago of Indonesia possesses a great number of fortification-works as legacies of native rulers and those which were built by European trading companies and later became colonial powers in the 16th to the 19th centuries. These legacies include those specific structures built as a defence system during pre and within the period of World War II. These fortresses are nowadaysvaluable subjects, because they might be considered as shared heritage among these countries and Indonesia. It's important to develop a vision to preserve these particular subjects of heritage, because they are an interesting part of the Indonesian history and its cultural treasures. The Government of the Republic of Indonesia has national program to compile a comprehensive documentation of the existing condition of these various types of forts as cultural heritage. The result of the 3 years project was a comprehensive 442 forts database in Indonesia, which will be very valuable to the implementation of legal protection, preservation matters and adaptive re-use in the future.

  7. Infant malnutrition in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Oomen, H. A. P. C.

    1953-01-01

    Infant malnutrition, resulting frequently in the death of children of pre-school age, is a problem requiring urgent solution in Indonesia. Children suffering from malnutrition show a variety of symptoms, the most characteristic being emaciation, growth retardation, liver changes, dyspigmentation of skin and hair, other skin lesions, oedema, muscular wasting, anaemia, and xerophthalmia. The indicative value of xerophthalmia, which often leads to the development of keratomalacia, in the diagnosis of malnutrition is stressed by the author. Further research is required to determine the causes—and particularly the part played by diet—of the clinical differences observed in malnutrition cases. Far greater interest in the problem of malnutrition must be shown by the entire medical profession in Indonesia if treatment is to be carried out successfully. The specific symptom, xerophthalmia, is easily curable with cod-liver oil. General malnutrition can be prevented only if sufficient amounts, both quantitatively and qualitatively, of protein, vitamin A, and calories are provided for every child. The Indonesian must be taught, by practical example, the necessity of adequate feeding, and be encouraged to make maximum use of locally available foods. It is hoped that the centres to deal with malnutrition, envisaged by the Ministry of Health, will provide both curative and preventive treatment and facilities for propaganda and research. ImagesFIG. 1-2FIG. 3-4FIG. 5-6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:13106702

  8. Measurement of momentum flux using two meteor radars in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Riggin, Dennis M.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Two nearly identical meteor radars were operated at Koto Tabang (0.20° S, 100.32° E), West Sumatra, and Biak (1.17° S, 136.10° E), West Papua, in Indonesia, separated by approximately 4000 km in longitude on the Equator. The zonal and meridional momentum flux, u'w' and v'w', where u, v, and w are the eastward, northward, and vertical wind velocity components, respectively, were estimated at 86 to 94 km altitudes using the meteor radar data by applying a method proposed by Hocking (2005). The observed u'w' at the two sites agreed reasonably well at 86, 90, and 94 km during the observation periods when the data acquisition rate was sufficiently large enough. Variations in v'w' were consistent between 86, 90, and 94 km altitudes at both sites. The climatological variation in the monthly averaged u'w' and v'w' was investigated using the long-term radar data at Koto Tabang from November 2002 to November 2013. The seasonal variations in u'w' and v'w' showed a repeatable semiannual and annual cycles, respectively. u'w' showed eastward values in February-April and July-September and v'w' was northward in June to August at 90-94 km, both of which were generally anti-phase with the mean zonal and meridional winds, having the same periodicity. Our results suggest the usefulness of the Hocking method.

  9. Accuracy Verification of Gps-Ins Method in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyana, A. K.; Rizaldy, A.; Uesugi, K.

    2012-07-01

    Pasco Corporation (Japan) has been implementing a project in Indonesia for Sumatra Island which is named Data Acquisition and Production on the National Geo-Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) Development. Digital aerial images in 25 cm GSD for 1:10,000 scale mapping have been taken as a part of the project. The owner of the project, The National Coordinating Agency for Surveys and Mapping (Bakosurtanal) planned to apply conventional aerial triangulation method as the initial stage. Pasco recommended Direct Geo-Reference Methodology by using GPS-IMU measurements and carried out a verification work in a city area. Measurements of tie points were implemented by using KLT/ATLAS software manually and adjusted by BINGO software. Aerial triangulation accuracy verifications were done by using one height control in the block center, one GCP in the center and four GCPs at the corners and one in the center. The results are sequentially, rms X,Y = 0.410 cm, rms Z = 0.394 cm (one height control point), rms X,Y = 0.430 cm, rms Z = 0.392 cm (one GCP) and rms X,Y = 0.356 cm, rms Z = 0.395 cm (5 GCPs). 5 GCPs for each block in official applications have been preferred for safety reasons. Comparisons of direct geo-referencing results with geodetic check points and aerial triangulation block adjustments have been done. The details of the work have been given in this study.

  10. The 2004 Sumatra Earthquake Mw 9.3: Seismological and Geophysical Investigations in the Andaman-Nicobar Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Kayal, J.

    2007-05-01

    The December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (MW 9.3) is the fourth largest event (M>9.0) in the world during the last 100 years. It occurred by thrust faulting on the interplate thrust zone of the subducting India plate and overriding Burma platelet. The main shock rupture, ~1300 km long and ~200 km wide, propagated from north of Sumatra to Andaman - Nicobar Islands; the slow rupture generated Tsunami which killed about 300,000 people. The epicenter of the earthquake is located at 3.90N and 94.260E with a focal depth at 28 km (USGS). This mega seismic event triggered giant tsunamis that devastated the coastal regions of Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Sri Lanka, India, Maldives and even the east coast of Africa. The impact of the tsunami was quite severe in India, in the coasts of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The Air-base in the Car- Nicobar island was totally devastated by the tsunami and killed about 200 people. Macroseismic survey was carried out by different teams of GSI in North Andaman, Middle Andaman, South Andaman, Havelock Hut Bay and also in the Nicobar Islands. A maximum intensity VIII was recorded in the Andaman Islands. The mega thrust event was followed by an intense aftershock activity spreading over an area extending between 30-140N along the Andaman - Nicobar - Sumatra Island arc region. The aftershocks are distributed northwards from the epicenter of the main shock suggesting a unilateral rupture propagation. The aftershock (M >4.5) area covers a length of about 1300 km and a width of about 200 km, in a 'banana' shape. The national network (IMD) recorded almost all aftershocks M >5.0; about 350 were recorded till 31.01.2005. The Geological Survey of India (GSI) deployed six temporary seismograph stations in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands and also in Havelok and Narkunda (volcanic) islands. About 20,000 aftershocks (M >3.0) were recorded until end of March, 2005. About 1000 aftershocks (M >3.0) located by the GSI network until January 31, 2005

  11. The 339 Years of Living Dangerously in Indonesia: Earthquakes and Tsunamis in the Indonesian Region from 1538 to 1877

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. A.; Major, J.

    2013-05-01

    Using 339 years of Dutch records of geophysical events in Indonesia and tsunami modeling, we have identified previously unknown mega-thrust earthquake sources in eastern Indonesia that caused severe devastation in the past and are likely to reoccur in the near future. Indonesia has experienced some of the most extreme geohazards known (Toba, Krakatoa, Tambora, Indian Ocean tsunami). Although most of well known events occurred in western Indonesia, historical records reveal that eastern Indonesia is actually more hazardous. Strain rates in eastern Indonesia are twice those in Sumatra and tsunamis are much more frequent. Adding to the disaster potential in Indonesia is its rapid population growth and urbanization, especially in coastal regions. When the events documented in historical records reoccur in eastern Indonesia, as they have in western Indonesia, ten times more people and assets will be in harms way. Arthur Wichmann's Die Erdbeben Des Indischen Archipels [The Earthquakes of the Indian Archipelago] (1918) documents >100 destructive earthquakes and 68 tsunamis between 1600 and 1877. The largest and best documented are the events of 1629, 1674 and 1852 in the Banda Sea region, 1770 and 1859 in the Molucca Sea region, 1820 in Makassar, 1857 in Dili, Timor, 1815 in Bali and Lombak, 1699, 1771, 1780, 1815, 1848 and 1852 in Java and 1799, 1833 and 1861 in Sumatra. All of these events caused damage over a broad region notwithstanding high seismic attenuation rates, and are associated with years of temporal and spatial clustering of earthquakes. Several tsunami are recorded with run-up heights > 15 meters. Many islands were engulfed and coastal communities washed away. The earthquakes associated with these events were felt over a region as large as the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake in Japan and were followed by decades of aftershocks. Over the past 160 years no major shallow earthquakes have struck eastern Indonesia, which is characterized as an area incapable of mega

  12. Cities and Calamities: Learning from Post-Disaster Response in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The article examines the post-disaster response to recent urban-centered calamities in Indonesia, extracting lessons learned and identifying specific implications for public health. Brief background information is provided on the December 2004 tsunami and earthquakes in Aceh and Nias and the May 2006 earthquake in Yogyakarta and Central Java provinces. Another brief section summarizes the post-disaster response to both events, covering relief and recovery efforts. Lessons that have been learned from the post-disaster response are summarized, including: (a) lessons that apply primarily to the relief phase; (b) lessons for rehabilitation and reconstruction; (c) do’s and don’ts; (d) city-specific observations. Finally, several implications for urban public health are drawn from the experiences to address health inequities in the aftermath of disasters. An initial implication is the importance of undertaking a serious assessment of health sector damages and needs shortly following the disaster. Then, there is a need to distinguish between different types of interventions and concerns during the humanitarian (relief) and recovery phases. As recovery proceeds, it is important to incorporate disaster preparation and prevention into the overall reconstruction effort. Lastly, both relief and recovery efforts must pay special attention to the needs of vulnerable groups. In conclusion, these lessons are likely to be increasingly relevant as the risk of urban-centered disasters increases. PMID:17356900

  13. Decentralization and health resource allocation: a case study at the district level in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Asnawi; Stoelwinder, Johannes

    2007-12-01

    Health resource allocation has been an issue of political debate in many health systems. However, the debate has tended to concentrate on vertical allocation from the national to regional level. Allocation within regions or institutions has been largely ignored. This study was conducted to contribute analysis to this gap. The objective was to investigate health resource allocation within District Health Offices (DHOs) and to compare the trends and patterns of several budget categories before and after decentralization. The study was conducted in three districts in the Province of Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. Six fiscal year budgets, two before decentralization and four after, were studied. Data was collected from the Local Government Planning Office and DHOs. Results indicated that in the first year of implementing a decentralization policy, the local government budget rose sharply, particularly in the wealthiest district. In contrast, in relatively poor districts the budget was only boosted slightly. Increasing total local government budgets had a positive impact on increasing the health budget. The absolute amount of health budgets increased significantly, but by percentage did not change very much. Budgets for several projects and budget items increased significantly, but others, such as health promotion, monitoring and evaluation, and public-goods-related activities, decreased. This study concluded that decentralization in Indonesia had made a positive impact on district government fiscal capacity and had affected DHO budgets positively. However, an imbalanced budget allocation between projects and budget items was obvious, and this needs serious attention from policy makers. Otherwise, decentralization will not significantly improve the health system in Indonesia. PMID:18567948

  14. Decentralization and health resource allocation: a case study at the district level in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Asnawi; Stoelwinder, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Health resource allocation has been an issue of political debate in many health systems. However, the debate has tended to concentrate on vertical allocation from the national to regional level. Allocation within regions or institutions has been largely ignored. This study was conducted to contribute analysis to this gap. The objective was to investigate health resource allocation within District Health Offices (DHOs) and to compare the trends and patterns of several budget categories before and after decentralization. The study was conducted in three districts in the Province of Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. Six fiscal year budgets, two before decentralization and four after, were studied. Data was collected from the Local Government Planning Office and DHOs. Results indicated that in the first year of implementing a decentralization policy, the local government budget rose sharply, particularly in the wealthiest district. In contrast, in relatively poor districts the budget was only boosted slightly. Increasing total local government budgets had a positive impact on increasing the health budget. The absolute amount of health budgets increased significantly, but by percentage did not change very much. Budgets for several projects and budget items increased significantly, but others, such as health promotion, monitoring and evaluation, and public-goods-related activities, decreased. This study concluded that decentralization in Indonesia had made a positive impact on district government fiscal capacity and had affected DHO budgets positively. However, an imbalanced budget allocation between projects and budget items was obvious, and this needs serious attention from policy makers. Otherwise, decentralization will not significantly improve the health system in Indonesia. PMID:18700274

  15. Prehospital care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, E; Pusponegoro, A

    2005-01-01

    Current system: Hospitals of varying standards are widespread but have no system of emergency ambulance or patient retrieval. Indonesia's only public emergency ambulance service, 118, is based in five of the biggest cities and is leading the way in paramedic training and prehospital care. Challenges and developments: There are many challenges faced including the culture of acceptance, vast geographical areas, traffic, inadequate numbers of ambulances, and access to quality training resources. Recently there have been a number of encouraging developments including setting up of a disaster response brigade, better provision of ambulances, and development of paramedic training. Conclusions: An integrated national regionalised hospital and prehospital system may seem fantastic but with the enthusiasm of those involved and perhaps some help from countries with access to training resources it may not be an unrealistic goal. PMID:15662073

  16. Induced abortion in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hull, T H; Sarwono, S W; Widyantoro, N

    1993-01-01

    Induced abortion is one of the most difficult sociomedical problems facing the Indonesian government. While well-known in traditional society, the practice was discouraged by all Indonesian religious groups, and forbidden by the Dutch colonial authorities. Although abortion was technically illegal under the criminal code, a judicial interpretation in the early 1970s permitted medical professionals to offer the procedure so long as they were discreet and careful. The numbers of medical abortions carried out in Indonesia rose dramatically, and there was evidence of matching declines in the incidence of morbidity and mortality caused by dangerous illegal procedures. Medical and community groups campaigned for a more liberal abortion law to protect legal practitioners and stamp out illegal traditional practices. Their efforts appeared to bear fruit in the draft Health Law, but when the law was passed by the legislature in late 1992, the issue was again clouded by contradictions and inconsistencies. PMID:8212094

  17. Health services in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kosen, S; Gunawan, S

    In Indonesia, rapid economic development has led to a reduction in poverty among the 195 million inhabitants. While population increased more than 50% from 1971 to 1990, the annual growth rate, crude birth rate, and total fertility rates have declined rapidly. Life expectancy has increased from 45.7 years in 1971 to 62.7 in 1994 as crude death rates and infant and child mortality rates have declined. Causes of death have shifted from infectious to chronic diseases, but in 1992 major causes of death in children under 5 years old were preventable, and the maternal mortality rate was 425/100,000. Policies which guide the development of health care call for improvements in quality of life, adherence to humanitarian principles, use of scientifically approved traditional medicine, and provision of public health through a three-tiered system. Health care is financed by the government and the community, and managed care has been encouraged. Foreign aid has bolstered development in the health sector. Adequate sanitation has been achieved for 35% of the population, and 65% of urban and 35% of rural residents have reasonable access to clean water. Improvements in health indicators include 55% contraceptive prevalence, reduction in prevalence of anemia during pregnancy, 55.8% of pregnant women receiving prenatal care, a decrease in protein-energy malnutrition among children under five, and high vaccination coverage. Remaining public health problems include malaria, tuberculosis, dengue hemorrhagic fever, an increase in HIV/AIDS, iodine-deficiency, an increasing number of traffic fatalities, and an increasing number of smokers. New health policies have been instituted to meet these challenges as Indonesia's need for a productive and competitive labor force increases. PMID:8985447

  18. Ergonomics policy in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sutarjo, Untung S

    2007-12-01

    Workers' conditions in accordance with their place of work are different from one area to another, especially in this reformation era where there are immense alterations in politics shown from the centralized government shifting to decentralization and district autonomy. Ergonomics problems in Indonesia are reviewed. In home industries, workers have to adjust themselves to their jobs, and ergonomic improvement may face significant impediments especially in small-scale industries. It is necessary to create or identify the most plausible model to be implemented in accordance with the conditions of districts, including low awareness about the relation between ergonomics and workers' productivity in producing goods and services and working processes scattered often at their own houses. As conditions conducive to ergonomics programs, district-level willingness to improve and increase the wealth of their society, recognition by businesses about the impacts of ergonomics on productivity and reduction of medical treatment costs may be mentioned. Labor unions support ergonomic improvements at production processes, and professionals and academicians are ready to assist, whereas national banks and foreign investment may encourage new technologies including ergonomics aspects. It is important to strengthen ergonomic improvement efforts in Indonesia through establishing district ergonomics improvement networks and ergonomics peer leaders with the support of continual training starting from the training of core leaders at the province level and extending to peer leaders at district level. This training should be made as simple as possible in order to facilitate innovations toward changes. Finally assistance is needed by the mentor teams in order to periodically monitor the improvements undertaken. PMID:18572796

  19. The future of forests and orangutans (Pongo abelii) in Sumatra: predicting impacts of oil palm plantations, road construction, and mechanisms for reducing carbon emissions from deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaveau, David L. A.; Wich, Serge; Epting, Justin; Juhn, Daniel; Kanninen, Markku; Leader-Williams, Nigel

    2009-09-01

    Payments for reduced carbon emissions from deforestation (RED) are now attracting attention as a way to halt tropical deforestation. Northern Sumatra comprises an area of 65 000 km2 that is both the site of Indonesia's first planned RED initiative, and the stronghold of 92% of remaining Sumatran orangutans. Under current plans, this RED initiative will be implemented in a defined geographic area, essentially a newly established, 7500 km2 protected area (PA) comprising mostly upland forest, where guards will be recruited to enforce forest protection. Meanwhile, new roads are currently under construction, while companies are converting lowland forests into oil palm plantations. This case study predicts the effectiveness of RED in reducing deforestation and conserving orangutans for two distinct scenarios: the current plan of implementing RED within the specific boundary of a new upland PA, and an alternative scenario of implementing RED across landscapes outside PAs. Our satellite-based spatially explicit deforestation model predicts that 1313 km2 of forest would be saved from deforestation by 2030, while forest cover present in 2006 would shrink by 22% (7913 km2) across landscapes outside PAs if RED were only to be implemented in the upland PA. Meanwhile, orangutan habitat would reduce by 16% (1137 km2), resulting in the conservative loss of 1384 orangutans, or 25% of the current total population with or without RED intervention. By contrast, an estimated 7824 km2 of forest could be saved from deforestation, with maximum benefit for orangutan conservation, if RED were to be implemented across all remaining forest landscapes outside PAs. Here, RED payments would compensate land users for their opportunity costs in not converting unprotected forests into oil palm, while the construction of new roads to service the marketing of oil palm would be halted. Our predictions suggest that Indonesia's first RED initiative in an upland PA may not significantly reduce

  20. Raindrop axis ratios, fall velocities and size distribution over Sumatra from 2D-Video Disdrometer measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Randeu, Walter L.; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Schönhuber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution are important in broad list of applications. However, they are not frequently observed in the equatorial region. This paper elucidated the characteristics of raindrop axis ratio, falling velocity and size distribution based on 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) data that have been collected in the equatorial Indonesia, particularly at Kototabang (hereafter called KT), west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). A comprehensive follow-up of the previous study on the natural variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) is presented. Precipitation was classified through 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation. The dependence of raindrop falling velocity and axis ratio on rainfall type was not clearly observed. Overall, measured raindrop fall velocities were in good agreement with Gunn-Kinzer's data. Raindrop axis ratio at KT was more spherical than that of artificial rain and equilibrium model, and close to the values reported in the turbulent high shear zone of surface layer which can be partially due to the effect of the instrument errors (e.g., location and container shape). Of some natural variations of DSD investigated, the dependence of DSD on rainfall rate and rainfall type as well as diurnal variation was clearly visible. A striking contrast between the stratiform and convective rains is that the size distributions from the stratiform (convective) rains tend to narrow (broaden) with increasing rainfall rates. For rainfall rate R < 10 mm/h, the size distribution of stratiform was broader than that of convective. On the other hand, at higher rainfall rate more large-sized drops were found in convective rain. During the convective rain, very large-sized drops were found mainly at the very start of rain event while for the stratiform they were found to be associated with a strong bright band. In diurnal basis, the DSDs in the morning hours were narrower than those in the evening which was

  1. Design and testing of fish drier system utilizing geothermal energy resource in Ie Suum, Aceh Besar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarak, Amir Zaki; Maulana, M. Ilham; Syuhada, Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    In an effort to increase the value of fish produced by the community in Krueng Raya Sub-district, it has been designed and tested a fish drier system utilizing geothermal energy resource in IeSuum Village, Krueng Raya Sub-district, Aceh Besar District. The geothermal energy is in the form of hot water with the temperature range is between 86 and 86.4 °C. Based on the design consideration, it is used a terraced rack type drier system. The drier system consists of a heat exchanger, drying chamber, and a blower to blow the air. Hot water from the geothermal source is passed into the heat exchanger to increase the air temperature outside it. The air is then blown into the drying chamber. Based on the design analysis is obtained that to dry 200 kg of fish in 24 hour, it is required a drying chamber with 1m long, 1 m width and 0.4 m high, the temperature of hot water entering the exchanger is 80 °C and the temperature of the air entering the drying chamber is maintained at 60°C. The average time required to dry fish till 10% of water level is 18-20 jam. The research is then continued by developing and testing the drying system with three layer rack to put in the fish. From the experimental result is obtained that the average water temperature flows out of the chamber is in the range of 76-78 °C and the temperature in the chamber is in the range of 57-62 °C. In addition, the weight of the fish, which initially is 20 kg, becomes12 kg in average after 18 hours drying process.

  2. Glacial to Holocene dynamics of Indonesian precipitation - New insights from plant-wax dD off Northwest Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeyer, E. M.; Mohtadi, M.; Sessions, A. L.; Feakins, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    We used the stable hydrogen and stable carbon isotopic composition (dD and d13C, respectively) of terrestrial plant leaf waxes as a proxy for past rainfall variations over northwestern Indonesia. Our study site lies within the western boundary of the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP), a key evaporative site for the global hydrologic cycle. At present, rainfall intensity in tropical Indonesia is influenced by the Pacific Ocean El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (see Kirono et al., 1999), the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) mode (Saji et al., 1999), and to some extend by the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) (e.g. Koutavas and Lynch-Stieglitz, 2005). Paleoclimate studies show that these systems have varied in the past, however, the impact of these changes on regional paelo-hydrology of Indonesia is yet unknown. We worked on marine sediment core SO189-144KL (1°09,300 N; 98°03,960 E) retrieved at 480 m water depth off Northwest Sumatra from the eastern Indian Ocean. Sediments consist of material from marine and terrestrial sources, and radiocarbon dating indicates an age of ~300 years at the core top and of ~24,000 years at the base. We used d13C and dD values of the n-C30 alkanoic acid as proxies for changes in vegetation composition (C3 vs. C4 plants) and rainfall variability on land, respectively. Values of d13C show only little variation and suggest persistent dominance of tropical trees throughout the past 24,000 years. Values of dD display distinct variability throughout the record, however, mean rainfall intensities during the late Last Glacial compare to those during the Holocene. This is in agreement with rather consistent vegetation at the study site but in sharp contrast with reconstructions of contemporaneous rainfall patterns at the nearby islands Borneo (Partin et al., 2007) and Flores (Griffiths et al., 2009), indicating multiple controls on regional hydrology of Indonesia. In combination with previous studies of late Pleistocene to Holocene

  3. Landslides and mass wasting offshore Sumatra - results from the Sumatra Earthquake HMS Scott survey January-February 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappin, D. R.; Henstock, T.; McNeill, L.; Grilli, S.; Biscontin, G.; Watts, P.

    2005-12-01

    Earthquakes are a commonly cited mechanism for triggering submarine landslides that have the potential to generate damaging tsunamis (e.g. Papua New Guinea 1998). Notwithstanding, the Indian Ocean earthquake of December 26th 2005 has been cited as the cause of both far field and local tsunami runups that have been measured at over 35 metres on the west coast of Sumatra. On the basis of present modelling this seems to be the case. However, if earthquakes are such a common trigger for landslides then the magnitude 9.3 earthquake of December 26th might be expected to have caused numerous seabed failures within the area of rupture that may have contributed to local tsunami runup. This contribution discusses the seabed morphology offshore of Sumatra acquired during the survey carried out by HMS Scott in January and February 2005. Utilising a unique high resolution 12 kHz, 361-beam hull-mounted Sass IV sonar, over 40,000 square kilometres of seabed were mapped. The objective was to identify seabed movements that were the result of the earthquake and to identify submarine slope failures that may have contributed to the tsunami. This paper reports on the results of the survey using Fledermaus imaging software. The area mapped is an accretionary complex formed as the two plates have converged over the past 40 million years. From the data several seabed failure mechanisms of different ages have been identified. Along the plate margin in the west of the survey area the deformation front comprises a series of young thrust folds up to 1000m in elevation and tens of kilometres in length. In places the seaward faces of these folds have failed cohesively and slumped blocks 100's of metres high and up to several kilometres long have been displaced up to 13 kilometres onto the inner trench floor. At other locations older episodes of failure are identified by the presence of displaced slumped blocks located on the crests of the folds; the slumps thus predating uplift. Where young

  4. The characteristics of neogene sediments and structures in the Siberuang Area (Central Sumatra, Indonesia) based on gravity data

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, D. )

    1994-07-01

    Neogene sediments in the Siberuang area consist of the Sihapas, Telisa, and Petani formations. The Sihapas Formation is a friable, white to brown sandstone with intercalated claystones, siltstones, and some coal layers. It was deposited in channels or bars of a braided-stream system during early Miocene N4-N8 times. The Telisa Formation, which unconformably overlies the Sihapas Formation, is a calcareous claystone with intercalated glauconitic sands and limestone lenses deposited in a middle to outer neritic environment during middle Miocene N8-N10 times. The Petani Formation is a claystone containing clasts of terrestrial material with some coal lenses and tuffs in the upper part of the section. It is a regressive sequence deposited in an outer neritic environment. These Neogene sediments lie unconformably above the Paleogene Pematang Formation, which is mainly composed of brown conglomerate and conglomeratic sandstones. The Pematang Formation lies unconformably above pre-Tertiary rocks. A Bouguer gravity map processed using a density value of 1.9 gm/cc reveals anomalies with wavelengths of 10 and 15 km. Moving average filtering has been applied to make a regional-residual separation. Map interpretation and modeling along a profile run northeast across the structural trend of the region and indicate a graben-type structure with Neogene sediment thickness increasing from 600 m in the northeast to 2800 m in the southwest. Greatest sediment thickness is attained in the center of the graben, which is delineated by northeast-dipping faults southwest of the area and southwest-dipping faults northeast of the area.

  5. Detailed fault structure of the Tarutung Pull-Apart Basin in Sumatra, Indonesia, derived from local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muksin, Umar; Haberland, Christian; Nukman, Mochamad; Bauer, Klaus; Weber, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The Tarutung Basin is located at a right step-over in the northern central segment of the dextral strike-slip Sumatran Fault System (SFS). Details of the fault structure along the Tarutung Basin are derived from the relocations of seismicity as well as from focal mechanism and structural geology. The seismicity distribution derived by a 3D inversion for hypocenter relocation is clustered according to a fault-like seismicity distribution. The seismicity is relocated with a double-difference technique (HYPODD) involving the waveform cross-correlations. We used 46,904 and 3191 arrival differences obtained from catalogue data and cross-correlation analysis, respectively. Focal mechanisms of events were analyzed by applying a grid search method (HASH code). Although there is no significant shift of the hypocenters (10.8 m in average) and centroids (167 m in average), the application of the double difference relocation sharpens the earthquake distribution. The earthquake lineation reflects the fault system, the extensional duplex fault system, and the negative flower structure within the Tarutung Basin. The focal mechanisms of events at the edge of the basin are dominantly of strike-slip type representing the dextral strike-slip Sumatran Fault System. The almost north-south striking normal fault events along extensional zones beneath the basin correlate with the maximum principal stress direction which is the direction of the Indo-Australian plate motion. The extensional zones form an en-echelon pattern indicated by the presence of strike-slip faults striking NE-SW to NW-SE events. The detailed characteristics of the fault system derived from the seismological study are also corroborated by structural geology at the surface.

  6. A Preliminary Case Study for Rectenna Sites in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Y.; Collins, P.

    2004-12-01

    include the possibilities of environmental damage due to the high intensity electromagnetic energy from outer space. As is well known, most Indonesian land areas consist of tropical forest which is rich with flora and fauna; these may face risks from receiving such electromagnetic energy illumination. It is considered that rectenna location selection in the main islands (like Java, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Irian, etc.) which are densely populated should be avoided. The same conditions should also be considered for the location in the forest, due to the flora and fauna damage possibilities during the physical development process. From this study it can be considered that the appropriate rectenna location should be placed on uninhabited small coral islands (atoll) sized about 5x5 km 2 , which are located along the equator. Such coral islands are vailable in the western and eastern parts of Indonesia. It is also considered that such coral islands should be located not too far from major inhabited islands, that is about 5-10 km offshore due to the convenience of physical rectenna development and electric energy distribution to the mainland. Such a coral island is to be considered to suffer minimal effects if the surface is illuminated by microwave energy. The same effect suffered by resident creatures like birds and reptiles should also be minimal. Because of the very limited infrastructure available on the mainland (and likely no facilities at all), a rectenna development study should consider all technical risks. For example, antenna installation and building of other support components should be done in such a location so that sea surface transportation can be easily performed. Communication system may be performed only by radio transceivers and satellite systems. The existence of human resources, that are needed to physically develop buildings, must be considered since the location is a remote island. There will also be no expert staff available, so that they will

  7. Language in Education: The Case of Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nababan, P. W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the institution of Bahasa Indonesia as the state language of Indonesia. Discusses the use of Indonesian, 400+ vernaculars, and foreign languages in the country; the implementation of state language policy through formal and nonformal language education; and the rise of bilingualism in Indonesia. (DMM)

  8. The Indonesia Kit. A Study Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briere, Elaine; Gage, Susan

    This document is designed for Canadians interested in the South Pacific island chain nation of Indonesia. The kit includes information, photographs, and illustrations concerning Indonesia, West Papua (Irian Jaya), and East Timor. There are discussions of Indonesia's environment, its transmigration program, development refugees, and ties with…

  9. Eastern Indonesia Megaregional Project - principles and results of a regional study

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N.G.; Bertagne, A.J.; Samuel, L.

    1995-06-01

    The International Megaregional Project is a worldwide project involving the compilation and interpretation of long regional seismic lines which cross several basins with the same transect. The goal of the project is to synthesize the current geologic knowledge of the areas traversed and to identify new areas of exploration interest. The International Megaregional framework which has been established serves as a focus for the geologic efforts and seismic data compilation. This project was conducted with the cooperation of a consortium of multinational oil companies as well as Pertamina and CGG. Megaregional lines can provide new insights into: (1) what is and is not basement, (2) maturation history and migration pathways, (3) regional structure, and (4) regional stratigraphy. The lines can thereby lead to the development of new exploration concepts. The project is based on 4900 km, of state-of-the-art marine seismic data acquired in 1993. The poster session includes examples of several Megaregional lines from three areas in Eastern Indonesia and another area east of Natuna Island. Key geologic features imaged by the transacts include, subduction zones (lava Trench, Timor Trough) Island Arcs (Sumatra/Bali Arc), back arc basins (eg.. Bali Basin) and major wrench zones (Sorong Fault). The seismic expression of reef plays (Natuna Sea, Salawati Basin), deltaic plays (eg, Mahakam Delta), and other plays is well illustrated. These lines provide an unprecedented perspective on the petroleum setting of Eastern Indonesia.

  10. Indonesia: persues ICPD Action Programme.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    Since the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), the focus of Indonesia's population policies have utilized people- and family-centered approaches, emphasizing poverty alleviation as a central challenge for development initiatives. However, the ongoing economic crisis in the country is hampering its efforts to extend reproductive health services to the people. The crisis also resulted in loss of jobs, price increases, and a drop in the purchasing power of families. Despite these conditions, Indonesia will still pursue its implementation of the ICPD Program of Action, and the international community should help the country achieve the goals of the ICPD amidst the economic crisis. PMID:12157874

  11. Newborn screening in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Rustama, Diet S; Fadil, M Ryadi; Harahap, Elly R; Primadi, Aris

    2003-01-01

    In Indonesia, newborn screening is not yet a policy, and the incidence of preventable causes of mental retardation detected by newborn screening is not known. Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is not infrequent. Without a screening program, unrecognized CH patients were neglected for years. Since May 1999, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has assisted in starting a CH Newborn Screening Project to estimate the local incidence of CH and to evaluate the problems associated with the screening. In June 2000, a pilot study was conducted using primary TSH measurement, supplemented by T4 in infants with elevated TSH. The target was to screen 12,000 newborn infants, using cord blood serum taken at birth, or a heel prick between 2 to 6 days of age. Between June 2000 and February 2001, 3,534 neonates born in 4 hospitals were screened using cord blood serum taken at birth (recall rate 3.3%). From March 2001 onwards, the heel prick method was used and participating hospitals increased from 4 to 7. Using this approach, until August 2001, 3,309 samples were analysed and the recall rate was much lower (0.64%). The number of unsatisfactory samples was relatively high due to an unstable process of blood collection. Parental refusal and low acceptance of screening among policy makers resulted from lack of awareness of the dangers of CH, and the screening program was not considered a health priority. Recall of patients after screening was a major barrier, with problems in tracking patients arising from urbanization and a high rate of relocation. To advance the CH screening program nationwide, infrastructure must be improved along with the recall system, and education as well as information campaigns for parents and medical professionals must be intensified. The Department of Health must be persuaded to give a national mandate. PMID:15906701

  12. Fast performance tool for Tsunami Flood Hazard Assessment and Early Warning, Banda Aceh (2004) and American Samoan case (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatvani, Deepak; Kie Thio, Hong; Gelfenbaum, Guy

    2010-05-01

    Recent tsunami flood disasters in the American Samoa and in 2004 in the Indian Ocean region have shown the need for obtaining a quick estimate on the flooding extent caused by a tsunamigenic earthquakes. An overview of the flooding is crucial to help plan the first relief operation and damage estimate. An estimate of tsunami height along the coast using a relatively coarse grid numerical model and assumed tsunami source based on earthquake parameters could, theoretically, be performed shortly after an earthquake event. Inundation models, however, requires very high resolution numerical models which still needs large amount of computation time. Based on a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and an empirical relation (derived from numerical experiments and analytical expressions from well known publications), a fast 2D tsunami flooding and run-up estimation tool has been built that can produce sufficiently accurate overall run-up and flooding estimate caused by the tsunami. The accuracy of the tool depends on the quality of the underlying DTM and tsunami heights fed to the tool. Because of its speed, this tool may even be used in near real time / early warning system to obtain a good indication of the area under threat in case of an approaching tsunami. The tool may also be used to produce flood (hazard/vulnerability) maps that may occur in future. The model has been tested for the 2004 tsunami event in Banda Aceh and 2009 tsunami event in American Samoa. The inundation and run-up maps for Banda Aceh event were compared to numerical model results (Delft3D) as well as survey data. The American Samoa event were compared to numerical model run by URS and preliminary survey data from USGS.

  13. Observing ground surface change series at active volcanoes in Indonesia using backscattering intensity of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Trianaputri, Mila Olivia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia contains 27 active volcanoes passing the West through the East part. Therefore, Indonesia is the most hazard front due to the volcanic activities. To obtain the new precursory signals leading to the eruptions, we applied remote sensing technique to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes. Sinabung volcano is located at Karo Region, North Sumatra Province. This volcano is a strato volcano type which is re-activated in August 2010. The eruption continues to the later years by ejecting volcanic products such as lava, pyroclastic flow, and ash fall deposits. This study is targeted to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung volcano since 2007 to 2011. In addition, we also compared the summit ground surface changes after the eruptions of Kelud volcano in 2007. Kelud volcano is also strato volcano type which is located at East Java, Indonesia. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remotely sensed technology makes possible to observe rapidly a wide ground surface changes related to ground surface roughness. Detection series were performed by extracting the backscattering intensity of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The intensity values were then calculated using a Normalized Radar Cross-Section (NRCS). Based on surface roughness criterion at the summit of Sinabung volcano, we could observe the ground surface changes prior to the early eruption in August 2010. The continuous increment of NRCS values showed clearly at window size 3×3 pixel of the summit of Sinabung volcano. The same phenomenon was also detected at the summit of Kelud volcano after the 2007 eruptions. The detected ground surface changes were validated using optical Landsat-8, backscattering intensity ratio for volcanic products detection, and radial component of a tilt-meter data.

  14. Rupture characteristics of 28 March 2005 Sumatra earthquake from GPS measurements and its implication for tsunami generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahalaut, V. K.; Catherine, J. K.

    2006-09-01

    The great earthquake of 28 March 2005 (Mw 8.6) that occurred off the western coast of Sumatra did not cause a much-anticipated major tsunami, despite its large magnitude and its similarities with the giant 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. The later earthquake caused a deadly tsunami. Here, we analyse the coseismic displacements estimated from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in the Sumatra region, which provide constraints on the rupture characteristics. We suggest that since majority of the slip on rupture of this earthquake occurred under the island belt and under shallow water east of it, it could only cause a minor tsunami.

  15. Social Impact of Solar Eclipse in Indonesia: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumpuni, Emanuel S.; Hidayat, Bambang

    2012-09-01

    The social impact and public comprehension of the natural phenomenon varies depending on how a particular cultural background perceives the phenomenon and how the interaction between general public and the authoritative bodies has persisted. While astronomers and scientists have taken for granted that solar eclipse is a natural phenomenon and subjected it to various scientific studies, large percentages of the population have been left uninformed scientifically and have responded to the phenomena quite differently. The technical and scientific aspects of the earliest expedition, to Padang (Sumatra) in 1901, have recently been discussed at length.Two major solar eclipses, namely the 1926 and 1929, offered many scientific outputs as well as results on observations of societies: anthropology, demography, and culinary habits of the local inhabitants. Those days, science was the preserve of a few selected. To a certain degree, many old perceptions of on natural phenomena, with their ruling deities still lingered on. The purpose of this paper is to show the changing views of the endogenous population in particular after the government's massive efforts to enlighten the people and to empower the younger generations in comprehending natural phenomena. The great efforts of the Government of Indonesia's Institute of Sciences (LIPI) related to the June 1983 solar eclipse produced a dramatic change in the sense of appreciation of solar eclipse as a natural phenomenon in consequence of relative motions of the Sun, Moon and the Earth. It took however another five years, till the time of the great eclipse in 1988, to a full fruition in which younger generations as well as older ones abandoned almost completely the old views and embarked on the understanding the value of solar eclipse for science.

  16. Measuring women's psychological well-being in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, E; Wong, E L; Hardee, K; Irwanto; Poerwandari, E K; Severy, L J

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a set of measures of women's psychological well-being in Indonesia, identifies meaningful clusters of women based on the well-being measures, and explores the sociodemographic factors associated with these well-being clusters. This is the first published study to measure psychological well-being among a large sample of Indonesians and the first to focus on women in that country. Rather than use standard measures of psychological well-being developed in Western nations and untested among Asian women, focus groups were conducted to develop an understanding of Indonesian women's perceptions of their own well-being. The focus group findings were used to develop 41 questionnaire items to measure psychological well-being, and the questionnaire was administered to 796 women in Sumatra and Lampung. Factor analysis reduced the well-being variables into five factors accounting for 45% of the total variance: (1) general negative feelings; (2) satisfaction with relationships and ability to control fertility; (3) satisfaction with economic, family and personal conditions; (4) negative feelings regarding marital and domestic issues; and (5) ability to pursue activities outside the home. We constructed five scales based on these factors. Based on their scores on these scales, women grouped into three clusters differentiated by their scores on four of the five scales. Low levels of psychological well-being were associated in bivariate analyses with: (1) rural residence; (2) young age (under age 30); (3) marriage before age 20; (4) low socioeconomic status; and (5) lower educational attainment. PMID:11548134

  17. Characterization of biomass burning aerosols from forest fire in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Iriana, W.; Okumura, M.; Lestari, P.; Tohno, S.; Akira, M.; Okuda, T.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass burning (forest fire, wild fire) is a major source of pollutants, generating an estimate of 104 Tg per year of aerosol particles worldwide. These particles have adverse human health effects and can affect the radiation budget and climate directly and indirectly. Eighty percent of biomass burning aerosols are generated in the tropics and about thirty percent of them originate in the tropical regions of Asia (Andreae, 1991). Several recent studies have reported on the organic compositions of biomass burning aerosols in the tropical regions of South America and Africa, however, there is little data about forest fire aerosols in the tropical regions of Asia. It is important to characterize biomass burning aerosols in the tropical regions of Asia because the aerosol properties vary between fires depending on type and moisture of wood, combustion phase, wind conditions, and several other variables (Reid et al., 2005). We have characterized PM2.5 fractions of biomass burning aerosols emitted from forest fire in Indonesia. During the dry season in 2012, PM2.5 aerosols from several forest fires occurring in Riau, Sumatra, Indonesia were collected on quartz and teflon filters with two mini-volume samplers. Background aerosols in forest were sampled during transition period of rainy season to dry season (baseline period). Samples were analyzed with several analytical instruments. The carbonaceous content (organic and elemental carbon, OC and EC) of the aerosols was analyzed by a thermal optical reflectance technique using IMPROVE protocol. The metal, inorganic ion and organic components of the aerosols were analyzed by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), ion chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. There was a great difference of chemical composition between forest fire and non-forest fire samples. Smoke aerosols for forest fires events were composed of ~ 45 % OC and ~ 2.5 % EC. On the other hand, background aerosols for baseline periods were

  18. Recent Two Distinct Eruptions at Sinabung and Kelud, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, S.; Yoshimoto, M.; Maeno, F.; Iguchi, M.; Zaenudin, A.; Hendrasto, M.

    2014-12-01

    Two distinct eruptions occurred in 2014 at Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes in Indonesia. Lava dome-forming eruption started at Sinabung volcano, N Sumatra, in the end of 2013, which was preceded by the phreatic events since 2010 and shallow inflation with high seismicity since 3 months before eruption. The 2010 eruption was the first historic eruption, and the latest eruption geologically recorded occurred in the 9 to 10th Century. The eruption had continued in a nearly constant rate of magma effusion as of the summer of 2014. The lava complex extended on the SE slope (~2.5 km long from the source), frequently generating pyroclastic flows. The volume of erupted magma reached about 0.1 km3 in the 2014 summer. The lava is porphyritic andesite (SiO2 ~57%). The existence of mafic blobs in rocks and plagioclase microlites more calcic than the phenocryst rims, and the absence of breakdown rim on hornblende phenocrysts suggest magma mixing prior to eruption and relatively fast magma ascent. On the other hand, the Plinian eruption began at Kelud volcano, W Java on the evening of February 13, 2014, which had declined almost within about 6 hours. The eruption cloud rose to 18-25 km in altitude, and tephra deposited on extensive areas. The precursory seismic activity started two weeks before eruption and the intensity increased with time. This short but explosive eruption was one of recent large eruptions (VEI 4) at Kelud, which had repeated every ~20 years. A lava dome of 0.035 km3 was accidentally (?) formed within the crater in 2007-2008. The total volume of tephra of the 2014 eruption is 0.2-0.3 km3 in DRE. The magma is crystal-rich basaltic andesite (SiO2 ~56%; phenocryst proportion of ~60%). The petrological characteristics are close to the 2007-2008 dome lava except higher crystallinity in the latter. Mobilization of crystal-rich chamber magma probably was brought by intrusion of new magma. Thus, these recent examples in Indonesia are less-explosive and explosive

  19. Coseismic Slip and Afterslip Associated to The Mw9.14 Aceh-Andaman Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlieh, M.; Avouac, J.; Sieh, K.; Prawirodirdjo, L.; Bock, Y.; Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Ji, C.; Hebert, H.; Sladen, A.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Subarya, C.; Galetzka, J.

    2005-12-01

    The Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of December 26, 2004 is the first giant earthquake to occur since the advent of modern space-based geodesy and broadband seismology and therefore provides an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the characteristics of one of these most dreadful and rare events. We determine co-seismic and post-seismic deformation over the first month following the main shock using a variety of geodetic data. These include ground displacements from near-field Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys in northwestern Sumatra and in-situ paleogeodetic and remotely sensed observations of the vertical motion of coral reefs, campaign data and continuous GPS measurements from Thailand and Malaysia. The co-seismic model is mainly constrained from co-seismic displacement derived from daily solutions at 34 cGPS stations. It shows that earthquake ruptured the Sunda subduction megathrust over a distance of about 1300 km and a width of less than 150 km releasing a total moment of 6.7-7.0 1022 Nm, (equivalent to Mw=9.15. This moment is slightly in excess of the 6.2 1022 Nm moment released over the first 500s, as estimated from the inversion of seismic records. The latitudinal distribution of released moment derived from the two models compare remarkably well. This pattern is also found consistent with the 500s long source time function and rupture velocity derived from T waves recorded in the Indian Ocean. Finally, this co-seismic model is found consistent with the observed tsunami as measured from altimetric satellite measurements of the tsunami by JASON and TOPEX, as well as with the arrival times of the tsunami recorded by tide gage records at a number of sites bordering the Indian Ocean and Andaman Sea. We find no need for slow slip or delayed slip as proposed in some early studies. However, the geodetic data postdating the main shock by up to 40 days, require that slip must have continued on the plate interface after the 500s long seismic rupture. The

  20. The tears have not stopped, the violence has not ended: political upheaval, ethnicity, and violence against women in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wandita, G

    1998-11-01

    The view of women as the sexual property of men becomes heightened during periods of political unrest. The rape of Chinese-Indonesian women in Jakarta, Indonesia, during the May 1998 student demonstrations confirms this observation. This article describes interviews with Jakarta rape victims conducted by Volunteers for Humanity--a coalition of nongovernmental organizations established after attacks on the opposition Indonesian Democratic Party in 1996. By July 1998, Volunteers for Humanity had documented 152 rapes in Jakarta and 20 rape-related deaths. The result of this fact-collecting was formation of the National Commission on Violence Against Women. Women's groups originally established to address violence against women are now incorporating racism into their campaign agendas. National publicity of these assaults led to further reports of violence against minority-group women perpetuated by the military, paramilitary forces, or civilian men in powerful positions in other areas of the country (e.g., Aceh, East Timor, and Irian Jaya/West Papua). In recent months, a backlash has developed, with official denial that any rapes occurred and intimidation and threats of sexual violence against potential witnesses. Future responses must involve multiethnic, multireligious groups to prevent further isolation/victimization of Chinese-Indonesian women. PMID:12294410

  1. Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

  2. MORTALITY, THE FAMILY AND THE INDIAN OCEAN TSUNAMI

    PubMed Central

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Gillespie, Thomas; Preston, Samuel; Sikoki, Bondan; Thomas, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Over 130,000 people died in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. The correlates of survival are examined using data from the Study of the Tsunami Aftermath and Recovery (STAR), a population-representative survey collected in Aceh and North Sumatra, Indonesia, before and after the tsunami. Children, older adults and females were the least likely to survive. Whereas socio-economic factors mattered relatively little, the evidence is consistent with physical strength playing a role. Pre-tsunami household composition is predictive of survival and suggests that stronger members sought to help weaker members: men helped their wives, parents and children, while women helped their children. PMID:25866413

  3. Future fire emissions associated with projected land use change in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlier, M. E.; DeFries, R. S.; Pennington, D.; Ordway, E.; Nelson, E.; Mickley, L.; Koplitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    Indonesia has experienced rapid land use change in past decades as forests and peatlands are cleared for agricultural development, including oil palm and timber plantations1. Fires are the predominant method of clearing and the subsequent emissions can have important public health impacts by contributing to regional particulate matter and ozone concentrations2. This regional haze was dramatically seen in Singapore during June 2013 due to the transport of emissions from fires in Sumatra. Our study is part of a larger project that will quantify the public health impact of various land use development scenarios for Sumatra over the coming decades. Here, we describe how we translate economic projections of land use change into future fire emissions inventories for GEOS-Chem atmospheric transport simulations. We relate past GFED3 fire emissions3 to detailed 1-km land use change data and MODIS fire radiative power observations, and apply these relationships to future estimates of land use change. The goal of this interdisciplinary project is to use modeling results to interact with policy makers and influence development strategies in ways that protect public health. 1Miettinen et al. 2011. Deforestation rates in insular Southeast Asia between 2000 and 2010. Glob. Change Biol.,17 (7), 2261-2270. 2Marlier et al. 2013. El Niño and health risks from landscape fire emissions in southeast Asia. Nature Clim. Change, 3, 131-136. 3van der Werf et al. 2010. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009). Atmos. Chem. Physics, 10 (23), 11707-11735.

  4. [The experience of 183 medical special forces of the Volga-Urals Military District in the elimination of the health effects of the emergency in the Republic of Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Korniushko, I G; Iakovlev, S V; Vladimirov, A V

    2011-08-01

    The article is based on personal experience of the authors with assistance in the aftermath of the tsunami in the Republic of Indonesia, which killed about 120 thousand (December 26, 2004 at 255 km to the west coast of Sumatra). In the disaster area were sent to 183 medical detachments for special purposes of the Volga-Urals Military District, reinforced brigade of specialized medical care of military medical institutions under the central government and the Moscow Military District. As the authors noted, in the aftermath of a disaster like the tsunami, at first put forward preventive measures among displaced persons. The experience gained by the Medical Service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation in the aftermath of natural disaster in the Republic of Indonesia, is used to plan future humanitarian operations abroad with the assistance of military medical specialists from Russia. PMID:22164981

  5. Low-sensitivity acceleration seismic records obtained on sea floor in the source region of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, M.; Yamada, T.; Kanazawa, T.

    2005-12-01

    To understand characteristics of large earthquakes occurred in a subduction zone, it is necessary to study an asperity where large earthquakes occur repeatedly. Because observation near an asperity is needed for studies of asperities, ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) is essential to observe seismic waves from earthquakes in subduction area. Since a conventional OBS is designed for high-sensitivity observation, OBS records of large earthquake occurred near OBS are often saturated. To record large amplitude seismic waves, a servo-type accelerometer is suitable. However it was difficult for OBS to use an accelerometer due to large electric power consumption. Recently a servo-type accelerometer with a large dynamic range and low-power consumption is being developed. In addition, a pressure vessel of OBS can contain much more batteries by using a large size titanium sphere. For the long-term sea floor observation of aftershock of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, we installed a small three-component accelerometer in a conventional long-term OBS and obtained both high-sensitivity seismogram and low-sensitivity (strong motion) accelerograms on the sea floor. We used a compact three-component servo-type accelerometer whose weight is 85 grams as a seismic sensor. Measurement range and resolution of the sensor are 3 G and 10-5 G. The sensor was directly attached to the inside of the pressure vessel. Signals from the accelerometer were digitally recorded to Compact Flash memory with 16 bit resolution and a sampling frequency of 100 Hz. The OBS with the accelerometer was deployed on February 24, 2005 in a southern part of the source region of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake by R/V Natsushima belonging to JAMSTEC, and recovered on August 3 by R/V Baruna Jaya I belonging to BPPT, Indonesia. The accelerograms were obtained from the deployment to April 13 when the CF memory became full. Although there are some small troubles for the recording, we could obtain low

  6. Using Zircon-Hosted Melt Inclusions to Track the Late Volatile Evolution of the 74 ka Youngest Toba Tuff, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, A. H.; Kent, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Melt inclusions provide important constraints on the behavior of magmatic volatiles; however, our understanding is hindered by a lack of temporal constraints on volatile evolution. Melt inclusions in zircon crystals have the unique potential to provide a temporal record of pre-eruptive magmatic volatile abundances through radiometric U-Pb or U-Th dating of zircon hosts. We present work on zircon-hosted melt inclusions (ZHMIs) from the ~74 ka Youngest Toba Tuff (hereafter: Toba), Sumatra, Indonesia. Zircon separated from Toba pumice contain abundant melt inclusions of ovoid or irregular-wormy forms, which range in size from 5-50 μm. Cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging of Toba zircon show that many ovoid melt inclusions and all the irregular melt inclusions occur within areas of zircon growth following earlier dissolution events. These zones crosscut oscillatory-zoned zircon and have negligible CL variability, suggesting that remineralizion and entrapment of melt inclusions may have occurred relatively quickly. Some inclusions do occur within regions of oscillatory CL zonation, indicating melt entrapment also occurs during primary crystal growth. Electron microprobe analyses show no significant compositional differences between ovoid and irregular-shaped inclusions. Toba ZHMIs are chemically similar to quartz-hosted melt inclusions (Chesner and Luhr, 2010) and to the most differentiated Toba pumice glass (Chesner, 1998). Zircon saturation calculations (Boehnke et al, 2013) from ZHMI chemistries indicate that zircon saturated at ~750-770°C, consistent with Fe-Ti geothermometry from Toba pumice (700-780°C; Chesner and Luhr, 2010). Chlorine in zircon inclusions range from 0.11-0.17 wt%, which are within the range measured in quartz-hosted inclusions (0.11-0.20 wt%). Non-degassed matrix glass has a similar maximum chlorine content of 0.15 wt%, while out-gassed samples have Cl as low as 0.08 wt% (Chesner and Luhr, 2010). Evidence indicates that zircon saturated late and

  7. Siak River System — East-Sumatra: Characterisation of sources, estuarine processes, and discharge into the Malacca Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Herbert; Stottmeister, Iris; Reißmann, Jan; Gerth, Monika; Jose, Christin; Samiaji, Joco

    2009-04-01

    Interdisciplinary pollution studies were performed in the Siak River system in the Riau Province of East-Sumatra (Indonesia). Remote sensing investigations combined with in situ measurements in different seasons of the years 2004-2006 were focused on the identification of different sources of water masses in the tributaries and on the discharge into the estuary and Malacca Strait. Ship-borne measurements comprised the determination of the concentration and composition of optically active water constituents and water colour. Satellite data of different spectral and spatial resolution were implemented. Sources of different water masses such as humic substance dominated rivers, erosion areas of high suspended matter concentration and areas of limited bio-productivity are identified. Sources of humic substances are the rivers Tapung Kanan, Mandau, Siak Kecil, and Bukit Batu which are draining peatlands. The absorption coefficients of dissolved organic substances are partly (Siak Kecil, 51.8 m - 1 ) more than double of the currently admitted coefficients. The highest suspended matter concentrations near a channel between Siak and Siak Kecil leading to lowest transparency are caused by the estuarine turbidity maximum developing at the tidal front. The lowest Chlorophyll concentrations were measured between Pekanbaru and the channel, in and downstream of an industrial area. The concentration and distribution of water constituents are characterised by distinct regional patterns independent from the monsoon phases. The high absorption of dissolved organic humic substances originated from draining peatlands shifts the maximum of spectral reflectances to 700 nm leading to the extreme brownish to red-brownish water colour. High scattering of suspended particles increases the reflectance in the entire spectral range. The strong changes in the water colour enables satellite data of the visible spectral range to follow the distribution patterns of the Siak River discharge in the

  8. Numerical modelling of potential submarine landslides and generated tsunami in Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Nieto, E.; Mangeney, A.; Singh, S. C.; Chauhan, A.; Bouchut, F.; Castro Díaz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies suggests that tsunami risk along the SW coast of Sumatra could be due to co-seismic slip along a backthrust at the NE Margin of the Mentawai Island and associated landslides (Singh et al., 2010). Using a combination of high-resolution seismic reflection and bathymetry data, they observed deposits of large submarine landslides at the NE margin of Mentawai Island and suggest that the high wave that occurred in 1797 might have been enhanced by landslides, producing a large localised tsunami. Until now most of the work devoted to tsunami hazard assessment in the area of Sumatra Island focussed on megaearthquakes earthquakes generated tsunamis. Therefore, estimating the run up heights due to submarine landslides is essential for risk mitigation along the SW coast of Sumatra. A series of numerical scenarios are performed here to simulate potential submarine landslides and generated tsunamis in the area of Sumatra Island. The height and velocity of the water wave and the impact zones are calculated using a new numerical model solving the depth-averaged shallow water equations with high order finite volume methods. This model corresponds to the 2D extension of the model developed by Fernández-Nieto et al., 2008. The fluidized mass is modeled using a generalization of the Savage-Hutter model [Savage and Hutter, 1989] by including the role of buoyancy and fluid into the thin-layer equations with a Coulomb-type friction law. Our model takes into account the coupling between the fluid and the landslides and incorporates the rigorous description of topography effects that play a key role in the dynamics of landslides. We study the magnitude of variation of the wave expected depending on the location and volume released. These results shows that landslide generated tsunamis have to be taken into account for risk assessment in the area of Sumatra Island. E.D. Fernández-Nieto, F. Bouchut, D. Bresch, M.J. Castro, A. Mangeney, 2008. A new Savage-Hutter type model

  9. Indonesian experts' perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Setiyawati, Diana; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Colucci, Erminia; Minas, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Mental health is a critical issue in Indonesia, since its population ranks among the top five in the world and the prevalence of common mental disorders is 11.6% of the adult population. However, the need to build an effective mental health-care system that is accessible to the whole population has only been recently addressed. The Aceh tsunami in 2004 brought to the forefront an unexpected window of opportunity to build a mental health-care system. Integration of mental health care into primary health care is a key strategy to close the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. Existing integration of psychologists into primary health care is a big step to meet the shortage of mental health-care specialists. As primary mental health care is an emerging field, the perspectives of Indonesian experts on Indonesian mental health care are needed to develop a curriculum for training psychologists to work in primary health care. In this study, data have been collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 Indonesian mental health experts, and three focus group discussions with 26 psychologists. Overall, experts agreed that to be able to work in primary health-care psychologists should have roles and training ranging from clinical to advocacy skills. Participants also agreed that psychologists should work in the community and contribute to primary health care as service providers and that strong collaborations between psychologists and other primary health-care providers are the key; these can be developed partly through referral and by respecting each other's unique strengths. PMID:25750806

  10. Application of remote sensing in coastal change detection after the tsunami event in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.; Saleh, N. Mohd.; Surbakti, M. S.

    2008-10-01

    Shoreline mapping and shoreline change detection are critical in many coastal zone applications. This study focuses on applying remote sensing technology to identify and assess coastal changes in the Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Major changes to land cover were found along the coastal line. Using remote sensing data to detect coastal line change requires high spatial resolution data. In this study, two high spatial data with 30 meter resolution of Landsat TM images captured before and after the Tsunami event were acquired for this purpose. The two satellite images was overlain and compared with pre-Tsunami imagery and with after Tsunami. The two Landsat TM images also were used to generate land cover classification maps for the 24 December 2004 and 27 March 2005, before and after the Tsunami event respectively. The standard supervised classifier was performed to the satellite images such as the Maximum Likelihood, Minimum Distance-to-mean and Parallelepiped. High overall accuracy (>80%) and Kappa coefficient (>0.80) was achieved by the Maximum Likelihood classifier in this study. Estimation of the damage areas between the two dated was estimated from the different between the two classified land cover maps. Visible damage could be seen in either before and after image pair. The visible damage land areas were determined and draw out using the polygon tool included in the PCI Geomatica image processing software. The final set of polygons containing the major changes in the coastal line. An overview of the coastal line changes using Landsat TM images is also presented in this study. This study provided useful information that helps local decision makers make better plan and land management choices.

  11. Sexually transmitted diseases in Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Harahap, M

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological factors and changing ecological conditions have greatly facilitated the spread of sexually transmitted diseases and led to their rising incidence in Indonesia. Gonorrhoea is at present very prevalent, and drug resistance among circulating strains of gonococci is a contributing factor. Despite medical advances in both diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, these are becoming commoner; unlike other communicable diseases they have so far defied efforts to control them. PMID:6893569

  12. Estimates of potential new production in the Java-Sumatra upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing; Liao, Xiaomei; Zhan, Haigang; Liu, Hailong

    2012-11-01

    The Java-Sumatra upwelling is one of the most important upwelling systems in the Indian Ocean, with maximum upwelling intensity in July through August. To estimate the nitrate supplied by upwelling, we developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to calculate the mean vertical speed and determine the depth of upwelling. We used in-situ vertical nitrate profiles to assess nitrate concentration in the upwelled waters, and calculated the nitrate supply as the product of nitrate concentration and vertical transport obtained from the numerical model. The calculated result represents potential new production generated in the upwelling region. We found that on the event time scale (monthly) of Java-Sumatra upwelling, water brought to the surface originated from locations 100-m deep, giving a nitrate supply of 93.77×103 mol/s and potential new production of 1.02×1014 gC/a.

  13. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    SciTech Connect

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  14. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA's) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 - April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  15. Marapi an active West-Central Sumatra Volcano: a geological and petrological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Marmol, M.; Budianto, A.; Fournelle, J.; Jacobs, P.; Elburg, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Marapi volcano (West - Central Sumatra), Sumatra’s most active volcano (not to be confused with Merapi on Java), located in a densely populated area and where more than 50 explosive eruptions have been recorded in the last 200 years has been studied in detail in the field to gain fundamental understanding of the volcano's activity in terms of its basic geology, petrology and geochemistry. Marapi is one of a few active volcanoes among many dormant volcanoes of this island. Large deposits of the nearby Maninjau caldera, dated 50 ka (n=3), associated with very silica-rich volcanic products is another reason for concern, since caldera formation is linked with severe explosive activity. Those deposits are found at the base of the volcano and largely in the deeply incised valley which follows the Sumatra fault extending parallel to the Sumatra volcanic front. A possible landslide parallel to the Sumatra fault is recognized on the LANDSAT image. Landslides on the external old external side have allowed the collection of the oldest part of the volcano as most of it is covered with a thick primary forest. These landslides occurring on old volcanic terrain are a threat to the surrounding population living nearby the rivers especially during the heavy rainy seasons. A 20 m high stratigraphic column has been studied, with the volcano’s explosive nature seen in the collected samples (i.e. bombs and pumices). A new sketch map of the area of the craters (6 over 2km) replaces the one made in 1921 at the Dutch colonial time. A geological and hazard map have been created showing the extension of the various deposits.

  16. Deep Seismic Reflection Images of the Sumatra Seismic and Aseismic Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Hananto, N. D.; Chauhan, A.; Carton, H. D.; Midenet, S.; Djajadihardja, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is seismically most active region on the Earth, and has been the site of three great earthquakes only in the last four years. The first of the series, the 2004 Boxing Day earthquake, broke 1300 km of the plate boundary and produced the devastating tsunami around the Indian Ocean. The second great earthquake occurred three months later in March 2005, about 150 km SE of the 2004 event. The Earth waited for three years, and then broke again in September 2007 at 1300 km SE of the 2004 event producing a twin earthquake of magnitudes of 8.5 and 7.9 at an interval of 12 hours, leaving a seismic gap of about 600 km between the second and third earthquake, the Sumatra Seismic Gap. Seismological and geodetic studies suggest that this gap is fully locked and may break any time. In order to study the seismic and tsunami risk in this locked region, a deep seismic reflection survey (Tsunami Investigation Deep Evaluation Seismic -TIDES) was carried out in May 2009 using the CGGVeritas vessel Geowave Champion towing a 15 long streamer, the longest ever used during a seismic survey, to image the nature of the subducting plate and associated features, including the seismogenic zone, from seafloor down to 50 km depth. A total of 1700 km of deep seismic reflection data were acquired. Three dip lines traverse the Sumatra subduction zone; one going through the Sumatra Seismic Gap, one crossing the region that broke during the 2007 great earthquake, and one going through the aseismic zone. These three dip profiles should provide insight about the locking mechanism and help us to understand why an earthquake occurs in one zone and not in aseismic zone. A strike-line was shot in the forearc basin connecting the locked zone with broken zone profiles, which should provide insight about barriers that might have stopped propagation of 2007 earthquake rupture further northward.

  17. Semi-Idealized COAMPS®* Simulations of Sumatra Squall Lines: the Role of Boundary Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Lan; Lim, Hock

    Sumatra squall line is a fairly impactive convective storm that often forms along the Malacca Straits and sweeps across Singapore in the early mornings of April to November each year. To understand and better predict this phenomenon, cloud resolving simulations with COAMPS at 3 km horizontal resolution are performed in a 3-D semi-idealized framework starting from a horizontally uniform atmosphere initialized by observed radiosonde data. Realistic boundary forcing effects by land-sea distribution, radiative fluxes, topography, and sea surface temperature (SST) are evaluated. Five ellipsoidal warm bubbles are prescribed to line up along the Malacca Straits to spawn a squall line. The bubbles are excluded in some cases to see if the squall line can be triggered without the initial external perturbation. Results demonstrate that line convection can be initiated by SST heating under no initial thermal perturbation; warm SST is conducive to kicking off convection. The diurnal circulations driven by the land sea thermal contrast play an important role in the intensification of the Sumatra squall line and its eastward migration. The shallow convection is enhanced by the convergence resulting from colliding land breezes from the west and the east coast of the Malacca Straits. It is found that the high relieves along west Sumatra and northwest Malaysia act to veer the low to mid tropospheric westerly winds into northerly flows, which converge into the strait with the southwest monsoonal flows from the south. The low-level convergence may then trigger and sustain the squall line.

  18. Viscoelastic relaxation in a heterogeneous Earth following the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Kelly; Bürgmann, Roland; Freed, Andrew M.; Banerjee, Paramesh

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of the three-dimensional heterogeneity of mantle rheology allows models of viscoelastic relaxation following the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake to simultaneously fit both the observed far-field and near-field postseismic deformation. We use horizontal and vertical campaign and continuous GPS observations from the Andaman, Nicobar, and Sumatran forearc islands, mainland Sumatra, Thailand, the Malay Peninsula, the Indian Ocean, and southern India, spanning the first five years of postseismic deformation. The postseismic relaxation models consider contributions from the 2004 Mw 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman, the 2005 Mw 8.7 Nias, and 2007 Mw 8.4 Bengkulu earthquakes. Far-field motions to the east of the ruptures are equally well fit by homogeneous or laterally variable earth models. However, only models with contrasting rheology across the subducting slab, a ten-times higher mantle viscosity under the Indian Ocean lithosphere than the backarc mantle, can also produce the observed enduring postseismic uplift along the forearc and lack of far-field transient displacements in southern India. While postseismic uplift of forearc stations can also be produced by rapid and enduring down-dip afterslip, the inferred rheology structure is consistent with the distribution of mantle temperature inferred from seismic tomography.

  19. Geological structure of the offshore Sumatra forearc region estimated from high-resolution MCS reflection survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Ayanori; Hirata, Kenji; Seeber, Leonard; Arai, Kohsaku; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Rahardiawan, Riza; Udrekh; Fujiwara, Toshiya; Kinoshita, Masataka; Baba, Hisatoshi; Kameo, Katsura; Adachi, Keita; Sarukawa, Hiroshi; Tokuyama, Hidekazu; Permana, Haryadi; Djajadihardja, Yusuf S.; Ashi, Juichiro

    2014-01-01

    To investigate detailed fault distributions and shallow geological structure offshore northwestern Sumatra, we obtained high-resolution Multi-Channel Seismic (MCS) reflection data around the Sunda Trench, trench slope, and forearc high regions offshore northwestern Sumatra. In general, trench-parallel anticlinal ridges are distributed from trench slope region to forearc high region. Two kinds of different vergence systems are characterized in the Sumatra forearc region; landward vergence is dominant in the lower trench slope region, and seaward vergence is dominant in the forearc high region. Moreover, piggyback or slope basins are recognized between anticlinal ridges. Deformation in the uppermost part of these basins, that is referred to ‘recent’ deformation in this paper, can be identified not only along major thrusts but also between major thrusts and the lower trench slope, suggesting these are related to recently active faulting. Several but the largest number of such deformation are distributed along a major thrust located in the middle of the forearc high region, whereas few are done along other major thrusts.

  20. Report on Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, Charles Elroy

    This resource packet was compiled by a participant in the Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia. The materials provide information for teaching about the diaspora of Hinduism and Islamic beliefs throughout the southeast Asia archipelagoes and their influence on art and culture. The handouts supplement information on Indonesia as part of an Asian…

  1. Classification of earthquake site effects by shallow reflection seismics using a shear-wave land-streamer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, S.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Touched in the SW by the Great Sumatra Fault, the densely populated delta of the Krueng Aceh River consists mainly of young alluvial sediments of clay, sand and gravel with partially high organic content. The depth of this sediment body and its internal structure are widely unknown. Whereas traditional timber constructed buildings are mostly unaffected by strong earthquakes, the change to concrete building techniques added a significant new and locally unknown seismic risk in this region. The classification of earthquake site effects in the city of Banda Aceh and the surrounding region of Aceh Besar was the aim of a high-resolution shear-wave reflection seismic survey in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. In cooperation with the Government of Indonesia and local counterparts, this was part of the Project "Management of Georisk" of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources. Using shear-wave reflection seismics in combination with a land streamer has proven to be an enormously useful method in the sedimentary regions of the Aceh province with an easy and fast recording operation. In addition, the specialized seismic system accounts for compacted soil surfaces which allows a wide range of applications within cities, industrial sites, paved roads and also on small dirt roads. Using a vibrator seismic source, this technique was applied successfully also in areas of high building density in the city of Banda Aceh or in the surrounding mostly agricultural environment. Combined with standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests, it was possible to evaluate the soil stiffness in populated urban areas down to 100 m depth in terms of the IBC2003. This is important for the exploration of new areas for save building foundation and groundwater aquifer detection in the tsunami-flooded region.

  2. Atmospheric processes in reaction of Northern Sumatra Earthquake sequence Dec 2004-Apr 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S.; Cervone, G.; Singh, R.; Taylor, P.

    2005-05-01

    This work describes our first results in analyzing data from different and independent sources ûemitted long-wavelength radiation (OLR), surface latent heat flux (SHLF) and GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) collected from ground based (GPS) and satellite TIR (thermal infra-red) data sources (NOAA/AVHRR, MODIS). We found atmosphere and ionosphere anomalies one week prior to both the Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake (Dec 26, 2004) and M 8.7 - Northern Sumatra, March 28, 2005. We analyzed 118 days of data from December 1, 2004 through April 1, 2005 for the area (0°-10°,north latitude and 90°-100° east longitude) which included 125 earthquakes with M>5.5. Recent analysis of the continuous OLR from the Earth surface indicates anomalous variations (on top of the atmosphere) prior to a number of medium to large earthquakes. In the case of M 9.0 - Sumatra-Andaman Islands event, compared to the reference fields for the months of December between 2001 and 2004, we found strongly OLR anomalous +80 W/m2 signals (two sigma) along the epicentral area on Dec 21, 2004 five days before the event. In the case of M8.7 March 28, 2005 anomalues signatures over the epicenter appears on March 26 is much weaker (only +20W/m2) and have a different topology. Anomalous values of SHLF associated with M9.0 - Sumatra-Andaman Islands were found on Dec 22, 2005 (SLHF +280Wm2) and less intensity on Mar 23, 2005 (SLHF +180Wm2). Ionospheric variations (GPS/TEC) associated with the Northern Sumatra events were determine by five Regional GPS network stations (COCO, BAKO, NTUS, HYDE and BAST2). For every station time series of the vertical TEC (VTEC) were computed together with correlation with the Dst index. On December 22, four days prior to the M9.0 quake GPS/TEC data reach the monthly maximum for COCO with minor DST activity. For the M 8.7-March 28 event, the increased values of GPS/TEC were observed during four days (March 22-25) in quiet geomagnetic background. Our results need additional

  3. Modeling temporal variations in interseismic subsidence rates recorded by corals in the Simeulue-Nias region, Sumatra: How can we explain them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, L. L.; Meltzner, A. J.; Hill, E. M.; Freymueller, J. T.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Suwargadi, B. W.; Sieh, K.

    2014-12-01

    How large can temporal variations in interseismic deformation rates be? Meltzner et al. (2014, in review) reported that fossil coral microatolls on Simeulue and the Banyak Islands of Sumatra, Indonesia, show contemporaneous temporal variations in interseismic subsidence rates. For example, a fossil coral microatoll located at Bangkaru, in the Banyak Islands, reveals interseismic subsidence for a 10-year period between 1956 and 1966, followed by a reversal to interseismic uplift for ~ 15 years from 1966 to 1981, before reverting back to interseismic subsidence after 1981. These temporal variations can neither be accounted for by regional or local sea level changes, nor by postseismic deformation following major historic megathrust earthquakes. These coral observations span a period of ~ 260 years. Such an extensive temporal record of interseismic deformation at subduction zones is rare, and it offers us a unique opportunity to better understand what physical processes likely control the behavior of this portion of the megathrust. In this study, we use elastic dislocation models to explore the extent to which the observed spatio-temporal variations can be consistently explained by tectonic processes. Possible processes include temporal changes in either the width of the locked fault zone or the interseismic coupling coefficient, and/or slow-slip event occurrence. Our models incorporate a realistic fault dip geometry and subduction rate. Our results suggest that a change in the width of the locked zone with time can explain temporal variations in interseismic subsidence rates on Simeulue Island. In addition, the reversal of the sense of vertical displacement at Bangkaru can be explained by the occurrence of a large, long, slow-slip event on the underlying megathrust.

  4. Subduction Initiation in Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction is often reported to be difficult to initiate, yet in the West Pacific and Eastern Indonesia there are many young subduction zones. Few theoretical or modelling studies consider such settings in which subduction commonly began close to boundaries between ocean crust and thickened crust of arc or continental origin. In Eastern Indonesia there are subduction zones at different stages of development. Some young examples such as the Banda Arc developed by propagation of an existing trench into a new area by tearing, probably along an ocean-continent boundary. This 'solves' the problem since the older subducted slab provides the driving force to drag down unsubducted ocean lithosphere. However, similar explanations cannot account for other subduction zones, such as North Sulawesi, nearby examples in which the subducted slab is not yet at 100 km depth, or troughs where subduction appears to be beginning. These examples show that subduction initiated at a point, such as a corner in an ocean basin, where there were very great differences in elevation between land and adjacent ocean floor. Depression of ocean crust by flow of arc/continent crust is associated with granitic magmatism and detachments within the upper crust. Once the oceanic corner reaches depths of c.100 km, eclogite formation may lead to slab pull that causes the new subduction zone to grow in both directions along strike; arc magmatism may or may not begin. The close relationship between subduction and extension in Eastern Indonesia links dramatic elevation of land, exhumation of deep crust, and spectacular subsidence of basins imaged by oil exploration seismic and multibeam data. Exhumed granites and high-grade metamorphic rocks at elevations up to 3 km, separated by Neogene alluvial sediments from carbonate reefs now at depths of 2 kilometres, imply vertical movements of several kilometres in a few million years. These observations raise the question of whether subduction is driving extension

  5. Wind profiler dedicated in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Ken

    A dedication ceremony was recently held in Biak, Indonesia, to commemorate the opening of the Biak VHF wind profiler. The wind profiler, which operates at 50 MHz, was constructed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Aeronomy Laboratory in cooperation with the Indonesian National Institute of Aeronautics and Space (LAPAN). The Biak facility completes the NOAA'Colorado University trans-Pacific wind-profiler network. Other stations in the network, which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, are Piura, Peru; Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia; and Christmas Island in Kirabati. The Christmas Island facility is supported by NOAA's Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Program Project Office.

  6. Using Isotopes to Reconstruct Mammalian Diet, Migration and Paleoenvironment for Hominin Sites in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wershow, H.; Janssen, R.; Vonhof, H.; Lubbe, J. V. D.; Joordens, J. J.; Koutamanis, D. S.; Puspaningrum, M. R.; de Vos, J.; Reijmer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate plays a prominent role in ecosystem development in the biodiversity hotspot Sundaland (Malaysia and western Indonesia) throughout the Quaternary. Recurrent isolation and connection of the islands to mainland Asia due to sea level fluctuations has enabled repeated biotic migrations and encouraged genetic speciation. These migration waves also brought Homo erectus to Java. Together with extensive and well-documented collections of other terrestrial species, these hominin fossils form faunal assemblages of which the paleoenvironmental and paleogeographical background is poorly known. Using carbon, oxygen and strontium isotopes, we have reconstructed the paleoenvironmental and paleoecological conditions of several Holocene and Pleistocene fossil sites on Sumatra and Java, Indonesia. Carbon (∂13C) and oxygen (∂18O) isotope analysis of well-preserved herbivore teeth enamel reveals a marked contrast between C3-dominated diets in warmer periods, and C4-dominated diets in cooler periods, reflecting the distinct changes in Sundaland vegetation cover between glacials and interglacials. These isotope patterns allow us to assign the appropriate climatic background to some of the older fossil assemblages from Java, for which dating uncertainty does not allow direct assignment to glacial or interglacial conditions. The stable isotope signatures of herbivores from Trinil and Sangiran, sites well-known for the fossil occurrence of Homo erectus, indicate glacial conditions. The isotope data of several H. erectus fossils from these sites seem to be in line with such an interpretation. Furthermore, we applied strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope analyses to a sample subset. The preliminary data show distinct Sr-isotope ratios for different sites, providing clues for the applicability of this isotope technique in detecting climate-related mobility of Sundaland fossil faunas.

  7. Ambient seismic noise tomography reveals a hidden caldera and its relation to the Tarutung pull-apart basin at the Sumatran Fault Zone, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryberg, Trond; Muksin, Umar; Bauer, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the noise recordings of a short-period seismic network to derive a shallow crustal S-wave velocity model at the Sumatra Fault in Northern Sumatra, Indonesia. By correlating the noise of 40 seismic stations' recording for 9 months, we could recover Rayleigh waves from vertical component recordings with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. Group velocities of the Rayleigh waves could be determined in the period range from 0.71 to 4.4 s. These group velocities were used to invert for 2D group velocity maps at specific periods. Finally, the derived group velocity maps were inverted for a 3D S-wave velocity model. This model shows a region of a strong velocity decrease off the Great Sumatran Fault Zone, at the northeastern margin of the young Tarutung pull-apart basin. This observed low velocity block coincides with a caldera-like morphological feature which is interpreted as the surface expression of a hidden volcanic caldera. Considering the surface manifestations of geothermal activity around this anomaly, we conclude that the caldera is still acting as a heat source. On the other hand, the weak morphological expression at the surface indicates a certain age of the caldera which might be older than the Tarutung pull-apart basin. The findings provide important constraints on general concepts for the formation of pull-apart basins along the Sumatran fault and their relation to volcanism.

  8. Contributions to the knowledge of oribatid mites of Indonesia. 1. The genus Allogalumna (Galumnidae) with descriptions of two new species (Acari, Oribatida)

    PubMed Central

    Ermilov, Sergey G.; Sandmann, Dorothee; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahaju; Scheu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of oribatid mites of the genus Allogalumna (Oribatida, Galumnidae) are described from litter and soil materials of Sumatra, Indonesia. Allogalumna indonesiensis sp. n. is morphologically most similar to Allogalumna borhidii Balogh & Mahunka, 1979, Allogalumna quadrimaculata (Mahunka, 1988), Allogalumna rotundiceps Aoki, 1996 and Allogalumna plowmanae Balogh & Balogh, 1983; however, the new species differs by having densely ciliate bothridial heads, larger body size and absence of a median pore. Allogalumna paranovazealandica sp. n. is morphologically most similar to Allogalumna novazealandica Hammer, 1968; however, the new species differs by the shorter body length and barbed and curving postero-laterad bothridial setae. The genus Allogalumna is recorded for the first time in the Indonesian fauna. PMID:26692793

  9. Evaluation of environmental effect of coal stockpile in Muara Telang, Banyuasin, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusdianasari; Arita, Susila; Ibrahim, Eddy; Ngudiantoro

    2013-04-01

    Stockpile commonly serves as a temporary dump before the coal is transported through the waterways. This study investigated the effects of coal stockpiles on the surrounding environment: air, water, and soil. The location of the study is in the estuary of Telang, South-Sumatra, Indonesia, which is located at the edge of the river of Telang and close to the residential community. The monitoring of the environmental impact from the stockpile is intended to conduct an environmental assessment owing the existence and operations of coal accumulation. Enviromental impact analysis was conducted based on the value of the effluent, air pollution (dust), soil and water by determining the parameters of the coal wastewater pH, total suspended solid, ferrous dan ferrous metals contents. The results indicate that the total suspended particulate, total suspended solids, noise level, ferrous metal and manganese metal were 10-14 μg/Nm3 249-355 mg/L, 41.3 to 50.3 dBA, 6.074 to7.579 mg/L, and 1.987 to 2.678 mg/L, respectively. Meanwhile the pH of water and soil were 3 to 4 and 2.83 to 4.02 respectively. It is concluded that the pH value are beyond the threshold standard.

  10. Historical tsunamis and present tsunami hazard in eastern Indonesia and the southern Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LøVholt, Finn; Kühn, Daniela; Bungum, Hilmar; Harbitz, Carl B.; Glimsdal, Sylfest

    2012-09-01

    Eastern Indonesia and the southern Philippines comprise a huge and seismically highly active region that has received less than the deserved attention in tsunami research compared with the surrounding areas exposed to the major subduction zones. In an effort to redress the balance the tsunami hazard in this region is studied by establishing a tsunami event database which, in combination with seismological and tectonic information from the region, has allowed us to define and justify a number of `credible worst-case' tsunami scenarios. These scenarios have been used in numerical simulations of tsunami generation and propagation to study maximum water level along potentially affected shorelines. The scenarios have in turn been combined to provide regional tsunami hazard maps. In many cases the simulations indicate that the maximum water level may exceed 10 m locally and even reach above 20 m in the vicinity of the source, which is of the same order as what is forecasted along the Sumatra and Java trenches for comparable return periods. For sections of coastlines close to a source, a tsunami may strike only a few minutes after it is generated, providing little time for warning. Moreover, several of the affected areas are highly populated and are therefore also high risk areas. The combination of high maximum water levels, short warning times, dense populations, and relatively short return periods suggests strongly that the tsunami hazard and risk in these regions are alarmingly high.

  11. Monitoring 137Cs and 134Cs at marine coasts in Indonesia between 2011 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Suseno, Heny; Prihatiningsih, Wahyu Retno

    2014-11-15

    Environmental samples (seawater, sediments and biota) were collected along the eastern and western Indonesian coasts between 2011 and 2013 to anticipate the possible impacts of the Fukushima radioactive releases in Indonesia. On the eastern coasts (south and north Sulawesi), the (137)Cs concentrations in the seawater and sediments were 0.12-0.32 Bq m(-3) and 0.10-1.03 Bq kg(-1), respectively. On the western coasts (West Sumatra, Bangka Island, North Java, South Java and Madura island), the (137)Cs concentrations in the seawater and sediments were 0.12-0.66 Bq m(-3) and 0.19-1.64 Bq kg(-1), respectively. In general, the (137)Cs concentrations in the fish from several Indonesian coasts were

  12. Long-wave infrared identification of smoldering peat fires in Indonesia with nighttime Landsat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvidge, Christopher D.; Zhizhin, Mikhail; Hsu, Feng-Chi; Baugh, Kimberly; Rokhis Khomarudin, M.; Vetrita, Yenni; Sofan, Parwati; Suwarsono; Hilman, Dadang

    2015-06-01

    Smoldering peat fires in Indonesia are responsible for large quantities of trace gas and particulate emissions. However, to date no satellite remote sensing technique has been demonstrated for the identification of smoldering peat fires. Fires have two distinct combustion phases: a high temperature flaming and low temperature smoldering phases. The flaming phase temperature is approximately twice that of the smoldering phase. This temperature differential results in a spectral displacement of the primary radiant emissions of the two combustion phases. It it is possible to exploit this spectral displacement using widely separated wavelength ranges. This paper examines active fire features found in short-wave infrared (SWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) nighttime Landsat data collected on peatlands in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Landsat 8’s SWIR bands are on the leading edge of flaming phase radiant emissions, with only minor contribution from the smoldering phase. Conversely, Landsat 8’s LWIR bands are on the trailing edge of smoldering phase radiant emissions. After examining the LWIR fire features, we conclude that they are the result of smoldering phase combustion. This has been confirmed with field validation. Detection limits for smoldering peat fires in Landsat 8 is in the 40-90 m2 range. These results could lead to improved management of peatland fires and emission modeling.

  13. The molecular and clinical features of dengue during outbreak in Jambi, Indonesia in 2015.

    PubMed

    Haryanto, Sotianingsih; Hayati, Rahma F; Yohan, Benediktus; Sijabat, Lanceria; Sihite, Ifo F; Fahri, Sukmal; Meutiawati, Febrina; Halim, Jonathan A N; Halim, Stefanie N; Soebandrio, Amin; Sasmono, R Tedjo

    2016-05-01

    Dengue is hyperendemic in Indonesia. In 2015, reported cases of dengue fever doubled those of 2014 in the Jambi municipality of Sumatra. We examined viral aetiology and its relationship with disease outcome in Jambi. Dengue-suspected patients' sera were collected and NS1 detection and IgM/IgG serology were performed. Dengue virus (DENV) serotyping was performed using real-time RT-PCR. Envelope genes were sequenced to determine the genotypes of DENV. Clinical, haematologic, and demographic data were recorded. Of 210 dengue-suspected patients, 107 were confirmed. The disease manifested as Dengue Fever (62%), Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (36%), and Dengue Shock Syndrome (2%). The serotypes of 94 DENV were determined. All DENV serotypes were detected with DENV-1 as the predominant serotype (66%). Genotypically, the DENV-1 viruses belong to Genotype I, DENV-2 was of Cosmopolitan genotype, DENV-3 as Genotype I, and DENV-4 belonged to Genotype II. Comparison with historical data revealed serotype predominance switched from DENV-3 to DENV-1, and the replacement of Genotype IV of DENV-1 with Genotype I. In summary, DENV-1 predominated during the 2015 dengue outbreak in Jambi. The full spectrum of dengue disease occurred and was characterized by a switch in predominant serotypes. PMID:27215933

  14. Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

    2007-06-01

    Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

  15. Rural Indonesia women’s traditional beliefs about antenatal care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Indonesia Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) of 420/100.00 live births remains among the highest in East Asia while coverage of births assisted by skilled providers is still low. Traditional beliefs have been a key factor associated with the choice between midwives or traditional birth attendants (TBA) and the low number of antenatal care visits in rural West Sumatra. Methods We conducted three focus groups with 16 women from rural West Java to describe their perception regarding issues related to traditional beliefs. Focus group discussions provided data for the content analysis. Results The majority of the 16 women interviewed was from Village Dago, West Java and had only an elementary school education. Their ages ranged from 19 to 40 years. Most were multiparous housewives with an income of IDR 918.750 per month, which was lower than the monthly income in West Java (IDR. 1.172.060). Emerging from the focus group discussion were four main themes regarding their pregnancy and traditional beliefs: 1) pregnancy was a normal cycle in women’s life (pregnancy is a natural phenomena, not a sickness; no recognition of danger signs during pregnancy and death of baby or mother during pregnancy was brought about by God’s will); 2) women followed the traditional beliefs (positive motivation to follow the traditional beliefs and fear of not following the traditional beliefs); 3) relying on TBA called paraji rather than midwife (parajis are kind, tolerant and patient and have more experience than midwives; more accessibility than midwives and encouragement of natural birth) and 4) midwives are more secure than paraji; (they use a medical standard of care). Conclusions Women’s beliefs grounded in religion and tradition permeated the village culture making it difficult to counter their long held health practices with practices based on recent advances in health care. Use of TBA in this village was still dominant and women believed that following traditional

  16. Automated and Rapid Determinations of Earthquake Source Parameters in Indonesia: Comparisons with Global CMT Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Yamashina, T.; Kumagai, H.; Inoue, H.; S.; F.

    2008-12-01

    Rapid determinations of the earthquake source parameters are important for early disaster response and tsunami warning issue. After the devastation of the 2004 great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, a nationwide broadband seismograph network in Indonesia has been developed by international cooperations among Meteorological and Geophysical Agency of Indonesia (BMG), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Germany (GFZ), the China Earthquake Administration (CEA), and the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Japan (NIED). This seismic network is intended to improve the capabilities for monitoring seismic activity and tsunami generation in Indonesia, and is a part of the Indonesia Tsunami Early Warning System (InaTEWS). We developed an automated system for rapid determinations of the earthquake source parameters called SWIFT (Source parameter determinations based on Waveform Inversion of Fourier Transformed seismograms) using data from the seismic network in Indonesia. This paper describes the SWIFT system and its performance. We also compare the obtained source parameters with those obtained by the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) project (http://www.globalcmt.org/). The SWIFT system is based on the waveform inversion method of Nakano et al. (2008, GJI, 173, 1000-1011). In this method, waveform inversion is carried out in the frequency domain to rapidly and routinely estimate both the focal mechanism and moment function. A pure double-couple focal mechanism from a point source is assumed in order to stabilize the inversion using data from a small number of seismic stations. The fault and slip orientation angles are estimated by a grid search with respect to the dip, strike, and rake angles. The source centroid location is determined by a spatial grid search, in which we adopt adaptive grid spacings for an efficient search. The moment function is reconstructed from its bandpassed form obtained from the inversion. This system is triggered by

  17. Women and tobacco in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Barraclough, S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To present a broad exploration of the relationship of women and tobacco in Indonesia and to describe action on tobacco and health specific to women taken by government and non-government agencies.
DATA SOURCES—Published and unpublished prevalence surveys, official documents, vernacular newspapers, secondary sources, unstructured interviews, and personal observations.
STUDY SELECTION—Data on smoking prevalence among women was primarily sought from official household surveys but several smaller scale local surveys were also examined. The only representative national household data on smoking prevalence from 1995 suggested a national prevalence for occasional and regular smoking of 2.6% for women aged 20 years or older. Smaller, local level surveys had reported rates varying from 4% for junior high school girls, and 2.9% for women undergraduates at a provincial university, to 6.4% of women in a representative sample in Jakarta. Claims that the incidence of female smoking is increasing cannot be confirmed due to an absence of comparable national longitudinal data.
CONCLUSION—Although Indonesian women are conspicuous in growing and processing tobacco, their rates of smoking are low in comparison with their male compatriots and internationally. Anecdotal evidence suggests that their disinclination to smoke is commonly attributed to cultural values, which stigmatise women smokers as morally flawed, while at the same time sanctioning smoking by men. Although there is little evidence of tobacco advertising directly targeting women, Indonesian health activists interviewed by the author felt that women are increasingly taking up smoking due to a weakening of stigma and to Western cultural influences. Cultural factors in the low rates of smoking among Indonesian women deserve closer investigation as they have proved to be a major source of health protection, albeit within a stigmatising context. More also needs to be known about the dynamics of

  18. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Parola, P.; Vogelaers, D.; Roure, C.; Janbon, F.; Raoult, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers. PMID:9866749

  19. Bicentennial Earthquake Supercycles Inferred from Relative Sealevel Changes in Corals off West Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, K.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Meltzner, A. J.; Shen, C.; Suwargadi, B. W.; Galetzka, J.; Li, K.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R.

    2008-12-01

    Records of strain accumulation and relief extracted from corals of the Mentawai islands, Sumatra, imply that this 700-km-long section of the Sunda megathrust has generated sequences of great earthquakes about every two centuries for at least the past 700 years. Episodes in the 14th and 16th/17th centuries resemble broadly the great rupture pair of 1797-1833. The MW8.4 earthquake of September 2007 represents the first in a series of large partial failures of the Mentawai section that will likely occur within the next several decades.

  20. The Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake and Tsunami of 2004: the hazards, events, and damage.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Patrice A; O'Rourke, Ann P; Schmidman, Dana L; Dopkin, Wendy A; Birnbaum, Marvin L

    2005-01-01

    The Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake and subsequent Asian Tsunami of 26 December 2004 affected multiple countries in the Indian Ocean and beyond, creating disasters of a scale unprecedented in recorded history. Using the Conceptual Framework and terminology described in the Disaster Health Management: Guidelines for Evaluation and Research in the Utstein Style, the hazard, events, and damage associated with the Earthquake and Tsunami are described. Many gaps in the available information regarding this event are present. Standardized indicators and reporting criteria are necessary for research on future disasters and the development of best practice standards internationally. PMID:16496614

  1. Crustal dilatation observed by GRACE after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake.

    PubMed

    Han, Shin-Chan; Shum, C K; Bevis, Michael; Ji, Chen; Kuo, Chung-Yen

    2006-08-01

    We report the detection of an earthquake by a space-based measurement. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites observed a +/-15-microgalileo gravity change induced by the great December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. Coseismic deformation produces sudden changes in the gravity field by vertical displacement of Earth's layered density structure and by changing the densities of the crust and mantle. GRACE's sensitivity to the long spatial wavelength of gravity changes resulted in roughly equal contributions of vertical displacement and dilatation effects in the gravity measurements. The GRACE observations provide evidence of crustal dilatation resulting from an undersea earthquake. PMID:16888136

  2. Periodically triggered seismicity at Mount Wrangell, Alaska, after the Sumatra earthquake.

    PubMed

    West, Michael; Sánchez, John J; McNutt, Stephen R

    2005-05-20

    As surface waves from the 26 December 2004 earthquake in Sumatra swept across Alaska, they triggered an 11-minute swarm of 14 local earthquakes near Mount Wrangell, almost 11,000 kilometers away. Earthquakes occurred at intervals of 20 to 30 seconds, in phase with the largest positive vertical ground displacements during the Rayleigh surface waves. We were able to observe this correlation because of the combination of unusually long surface waves and seismic stations near the local earthquakes. This phase of Rayleigh wave motion was dominated by horizontal extensional stresses reaching 25 kilopascals. These observations imply that local events were triggered by simple shear failure on normal faults. PMID:15905395

  3. Persistent Behaviors of the Sunda Megathrust in Sumatra: Opportunities to Forecast Destructive Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, K.

    2007-12-01

    The 2000-km-long Sumatran section of the Sunda megathrust is a treasure trove of information about the long- term behavior of a great active fault. This is due principally to the presence of an island chain along the Sumatran outer arc, which provides a platform for both man-made and natural instruments atop the shallow, seismogenic part of the megathrust. My students, colleagues and I have been using these "instruments" to understand the megathrust's past and to forecast its future behavior. We recognize three long segments that produce great earthquakes separated by two short patches of low seismic coupling. Two of the long segments have just ruptured and the other is nearing the end of its seismic cycle. The largest seismic rupture along the Sumatran megathrust in the 20th century was a M 7.7 earthquake at the Equator in 1935 (G&R, 1954). GPS geodesy and coral paleogeodesy, historical seismograms and coral paleoseismology show that the rupture is embedded in a 120-km section of the megathrust that slips primarily aseismically. The ~2.3-m rupture of 1935 is the largest seismic event on this Batu Islands patch in at least the past 250 years, despite its high (45 mm/yr) rate of plate convergence. Immediately north of the Equator is the 350-km-long section of the megathrust that generated the Mw8.7 Nias- Simeulue earthquake of 2005. Analysis of records from several continuous GPS stations above the rupture and about a hundred vertically displaced living corals shows that large seismic slippage was confined to depths between 14 and 35 km. In contrast, post-seismic deformations recorded at the cGPS stations reflect concentrations of slip updip and downdip of the seismic rupture. Fossil corals record previous large earthquakes in 1861 and in about 1800 and 1845. This history, though still incomplete, suggests that a cluster of three overlapping large seismic ruptures ended the previous earthquake cycle there. The 1600-km Mw9.15 Aceh-Andaman rupture of 2004 began still

  4. Neogene sutures in eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.; Wilson, M. E. J.

    2000-12-01

    Five suture zones are described from the zone of collision between the Eurasian, Indian-Australian and Pacific-Philippine Sea plates within the eastern Indonesia region. These are the Molucca, Sorong, Sulawesi, Banda and Borneo sutures. Each of these sutures has a relatively short history compared to most pre-Neogene orogenic belts, but each preserves a record of major changes in tectonics including subduction polarity reversals, elimination of volcanic arcs, changing plate boundaries, and important extension within an overall contractional setting. Rapid tectonic changes have occurred within periods of less than 5 Ma. Many of these events, although important, would be overlooked in older orogenic belts because the age resolution required to identify them, even when the evidence is preserved, is simply not possible.

  5. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia. PMID:26478663

  6. Micronutrient deficiency in urban Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Schultink, W

    1997-06-01

    The economic situation of Indonesia is characterized by a large increase in the gross national product which has been on average 7% annually during the last ten years. This was accompanied by rapid urbanization. With the economic improvement, "First World" and "Third World" health and nutrition problems are coexisting in Indonesia. In 1992, the most common of death cause was cardiovascular disease whereas tuberculosis was the second ranking. About 40% of the preschool children are stunted. The main stable food and energy source is rice, although the urban population has a more diverse food pattern than the rural population. In Jakarta, many children receive too late colostrum feeding and mothers are not aware about the importance of correct breastfeeding practices after delivery. Three studies had shown that about one fifth of preschool children and one fourth of elderly take micronutrient supplements. Nevertheless, micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent in Jakarta. About one third of women suffer from moderate vitamin A deficiency (plasma retinol < 0.70 mmol/L) and 50% of pregnant women are anemic. More information is necessary on other micronutrient deficiencies. For example, a small study revealed that nearly two thirds of non-institutionalized elderly living in Jakarta experience thiamine deficiency. Appropriate interventions to reduce micronutrient deficiencies should sensitize the urban population to the fact that the government should restrict itself to use its resources to assist only the poorest individuals and groups, whereas it must be expected from the middle class to spend more time and money to solve their own problems. PMID:9659420

  7. Assessment of biomass open burning emissions in Indonesia and potential climate forcing impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permadi, Didin Agustian; Kim Oanh, Nguyen Thi

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an emission inventory (EI) for biomass open burning (OB) sources including forest, agro-residue and municipal solid waste (MSW) in Indonesia for year 2007. The EI covered toxic air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) and was presented as annual and monthly average for every district, and further on a grid of 0.25° × 0.25°. A rigorous analysis of activity data and emission factor ranges was done to produce the low, best and high emission estimates for each species. Development of EI methodology for MSW OB which, to our best knowledge, has not been presented in detail in the literature was a focus of this paper. The best estimates of biomass OB emission of toxic air pollutants for the country, in Gg, were: 9.6 SO2; 98 NOx; 7411 CO; 335 NMVOC; 162 NH3; 439 PM10; 357 PM2.5; 24 BC; and 147 OC. The best emission estimates of GHGs, in Gg, were: 401 CH4, 57,247 CO2; and 3.6 N2O. The low and high values of the emission estimates for different species were found to range from -86% to +260% of the corresponding best estimates. Crop residue OB contributed more than 80% of the total biomass OB emissions, followed by forest fire of 2-12% (not including peat soil fire emission) and MSW (1-8%). An inter-annual active fires count for Indonesia showed relatively low values in 2007 which may be attributed to the high rainfall intensity under the influence of La Niña climate pattern in the year. Total estimated net climate forcing from OB in Indonesia was 110 (20 year horizon) and 73 (100 year horizon) Tg CO2 equivalents which is around 0.9-1.1% of that reported for the global biomass OB for both time horizons. The spatial distribution showed higher emissions in large urban areas in Java and Sumatra Island, while the monthly emissions indicated higher values during the dry months of August-October.

  8. Source of 1629 Banda Mega-Thrust Earthquake and Tsunami: Implications for Tsunami Hazard Evaluation in Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. R.; Liu, Z.; Harris, R. A.; Fisher, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    Using Dutch records of geophysical events in Indonesia over the past 400 years, and tsunami modeling, we identify tsunami sources that have caused severe devastation in the past and are likely to reoccur in the near future. The earthquake history of Western Indonesia has received much attention since the 2004 Sumatra earthquakes and subsequent events. However, strain rates along a variety of plate boundary segments are just as high in eastern Indonesia where the earthquake history has not been investigated. Due to the rapid population growth in this region it is essential and urgent to evaluate its earthquake and tsunami hazards. Arthur Wichmann's 'Earthquakes of the Indian Archipelago' shows that there were 30 significant earthquakes and 29 tsunami between 1629 to 1877. One of the largest and best documented is the great earthquake and tsunami effecting the Banda islands on 1 August, 1629. It caused severe damage from a 15 m tsunami that arrived at the Banda Islands about a half hour after the earthquake. The earthquake was also recorded 230 km away in Ambon, but no tsunami is mentioned. This event was followed by at least 9 years of aftershocks. The combination of these observations indicates that the earthquake was most likely a mega-thrust event. We use a numerical simulation of the tsunami to locate the potential sources of the 1629 mega-thrust event and evaluate the tsunami hazard in Eastern Indonesia. The numerical simulation was tested to establish the tsunami run-up amplification factor for this region by tsunami simulations of the 1992 Flores Island (Hidayat et al., 1995) and 2006 Java (Katoet al., 2007) earthquake events. The results yield a tsunami run-up amplification factor of 1.5 and 3, respectively. However, the Java earthquake is a unique case of slow rupture that was hardly felt. The fault parameters of recent earthquakes in the Banda region are used for the models. The modeling narrows the possibilities of mega-thrust events the size of the one

  9. Constraints on rupture of the December 26, 2004, Sumatra earthquake from far-field GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine, Joshi K.; Gahalaut, Vineet K.; Sahu, Vipul K.

    2005-09-01

    We use Global Positioning System (GPS) data from nine permanent GPS sites surrounding the epicentre of the December 26, 2004, Sumatra earthquake to infer coseismic displacements at these sites. The results suggest that GPS site at SAMP, Medan in Sumatra Island, the nearest site from the epicentre, experienced a westward coseismic horizontal displacement of about 14 cm, while sites in southern India, namely, HYDE and IISC experienced predominantly eastward coseismic horizontal displacement of about 6-11 mm. We estimated the slip on the mainshock rupture and rupture extent in a uniform half space by analysing these coseismic displacements. We estimate an average reverse slip of about 11 m on the southern part of the rupture and an oblique slip of about 10 m on the northern part of the 1200 × 100-175-km 2 rupture. Our results of estimated coseismic horizontal displacement in the Andaman and Nicobar region using the above rupture parameters are also consistent with the near-field GPS measured coseismic displacements in the region.

  10. Constraints on 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake rupture from GPS measurements in Andaman Nicobar Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahalaut, V. K.; Nagarajan, B.; Catherine, J. K.; Kumar, S.

    2006-02-01

    The 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.0-9.3) is the greatest earthquake of the modern seismological era. The rupture characteristics of the earthquake, particularly in the Andaman-Nicobar region, are not well resolved from seismological or far-field geodetic data. Here, in this article we present, campaign mode Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of coseismic displacements at 13 sites in the Andaman-Nicobar Islands before and after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. These measurements provide improved estimates of rupture characteristics in the region. Coseismic horizontal ground displacement of 1.5-6.5 m towards the southwest and coseismic vertical displacement, mostly subsidence, of 0.5-2.8 m occurred along the Andaman-Nicobar Islands with maximum displacements in the Nicobar Islands. We estimate coseismic slip under the Andaman and Nicobar Islands as 3.8-7.9 m and 11-15 m, respectively. The length of the rupture is estimated to be about 1500 km with a width varying from 120 km under Middle Andaman Island to 160 km under Great Nicobar Island. GPS measurements during January 11-22, 2005 from Port Blair suggest rapid afterslip in the postseismic period. Limited GPS data available from 1995 measurements at two sites in Andaman provide evidence of strain accumulation that varied significantly in the 10 yr preceding the earthquake.

  11. The goblin spider genus Ischnothyreus (Araneae, Oonopidae) in Java and Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Richard, Miguel; Graber, Werner; Kropf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The genus Ischnothyreus Simon, 1893 from Java and Sumatra is revised with the description of seven new species from Java (I. baltenspergerae sp. nov., I. bauri sp. nov., I. gigeri sp. nov., I. ligulatus sp. nov., I. nentwigorum sp. nov., I. sigridae sp. nov., I. ujungkulon sp. nov) and eight from Sumatra (I. ascifer sp. nov., I. concavus sp. nov., I. habeggeri sp. nov., I. haymozi sp. nov., I. lucidus sp. nov., I. marggii sp. nov., I. microphthalmus sp. nov., I. obscurus sp. nov.). Furthermore the male of I. serpentinum Saaristo, 2001 is described for the first time and the female redescribed in detail. Special morphological features of Ischnothyreus males and females are described and discussed, such as peculiar trochanter projections, partially fused pedipalp segments, processes on the cheliceral fang base in males and external and internal genitalic structures in females. This work is part of the Planetary Biodiversity Inventory (PBI) of goblin spiders (http://research.amnh.org/oonopidae/).. PMID:27615819

  12. High-resolution reflection seismics in pyroclastic sediments - a case study from the SESaR-project in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, B.; Wiyono, W.; Polom, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    The sustainable use of geothermal resources for decentral electricity generation in Indonesia requires sophisticated pre-exploration, exploitation and monitoring due to the very complex geological conditions. High-resolution seismics for pre-exploration in areas with high geothermal gradients is an emerging new field of application. Therefore the development of new, site-specific methodical procedures of exploration is required to deal with the special lithologies and outer conditions. This is the background for the BMBF-financed SESaR (Seismic Exploration and Safety Risk study for decentral geothermal plants in Indonesia) project. Until now, we have investigated one site in Northern Sumatra and one in Western Java. Both of them are dominated by pyroclastic sediments. The high-resolution reflection seismic survey carried out in Tarutung/North Sumatra was shot with both P-wave and S-wave sources (the ELVIS microvibrator of LIAG) and partly also with vertical hammer blow. Using a 48-channel geophone array (10 Hz S-wave, 14 Hz P-wave) and a geophone interval of 5 m (P-wave) and 1 m (S-wave), respectively, fourteen reflection seismic profiles were acquired. The P-wave data give unexpected results. At almost all locations clear reflection events and also refractions are missing indicating indifferent wave propagation. This is in strong contrast to the S-wave seismic signals that enable a clear wave propagation and also correlate to some subsurface reflectors. A small discordance structure interpreted as fault was clearly recognised at 5 m depth, bounding a travertine body that crops out at the surface. Seismic measurements at Lembang/West Java, with same layout and equipment as described above, led to thirteen seismic profiles at four different locations. Additionally a hammer blow source was used at each location. The results are comparable to those of the Tarutung data. Most of the P-wave seismic data show poor signals. Only some single records contain weak reflectors

  13. Seismological studies of tectonics in the Toba region and in the Banda sea, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi

    By using arrival time data from the Indonesian Meteorological and Geophysical Agency (MGA), International Seismological Center (ISC) and United State Geological Survey (USGS), and the Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions of Harvard, I studied the tectonic features in north Sumatra and Banda arc, Indonesia. In north Sumatra, the study was focused on the subducted slab and attenuation beneath Toba---the world's largest Quaternary caldera. In the Banda arc, I studied the unusual shape of the slab where a part of Australian continent has been subducted under the oceanic plate. Toba was formed 75ka, resulting in a caldera of the area of 25km x 100km. The age and area of the caldera suggest that the magma remains partially molten. Seismograms at the stations near the caldera showed that P- and S-waves have been attenuated. This attenuation was studied using both qualitative and quantitative method to locate the magma system. By applying both methods, the results indicate that the magma chamber is shallower than 20km. In Banda area, hypocenters were determined using a combination of local and teleseismic data to reveal the slab geometry. Because a flat-lying slab at 600km depth is unusual, the accuracy of the hypocenters within this slab was studied in more detail. Statistically several hypocenters in this region have been accurately located using probability density functions. The shape of the slab shown by the hypocenter distribution reveals high contortion beneath the Banda sea. The stress distribution revealed from the P,T and B axes of fault plane solutions suggests that the stress field is controlled by both gravity and contortion within the slab. The subduction process in Banda region has changed since the Australian continent plate collided with the Banda arc. Strike slip earthquakes seem to concentrate along the extension of the Terera-Aiduna fault to the southwest in Wetar backarc thrust. I conclude that the extension of Terera-Aiduna fault in the subducted

  14. Theft of electricity in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priatna, Dedy Supriadi

    In 1996, among 196 million Indonesian people, only 47.6% had access to electricity; 45.4% in rural areas and 51.5% in urban. 64% of population lived in 61,975 villages, and electric power was supplied to 69% of villages. The government has set a goal to achieve nearly universal services by the year 2014. The government can use existing installed capacity of PLN's system more efficiently. Theft of electricity, which currently constitutes a large share of PLN's losses, should be reduced. The potential of the private sector including captive power and local communities, to participate in electric power generation can also be utilized. The large interest that has been shown by the private sector might be followed by making electric power provision profitable and therefore attractive for the private sector. PLN profits, that in 1996 were only 5.22% instead of the 8% recommended by the World Bank as the best practice for Indonesia, have to be increased by improving their performance levels. The government should also seek solutions for the extremely poor households who will never be able to afford both connection charges and a monthly bill. In 1996 the extremely poor households included 5,251,788 households, constituting 12.1% of the total Indonesian households. Only 1.2% of these households had access to electricity. The objective of this study is to seek the policies that can be implemented in Indonesia that will make it possible to generate and deliver electricity profitably, and reduce theft while providing nearly universal services. For this purpose, the options that are proposed in this study are reducing theft of electricity; something like the CAMPFIRE that has successfully reduced poaching of elephants in Africa: that is, consumer-owned systems, both partially (distribution facilities) and completely (generation and distribution facilities); performance-based regulation (PBR); and solutions for supplying the extremely poor based on the minimum subsidies from the

  15. Earthquake Nonconcordancies in the Aceh-Nias and Mentawai Forearcs: Implications for the Energetics of Earthquakes and Tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, G. L.; Kirby, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    The identification and characterization of nonconcordant events, by virtue of their strong influence on rupture geometry and extent, will be valuable for estimating seismic and tsunami potential. We classify thrust earthquakes at the subduction zone as nonconcordant if (1) their depths are unequivocally off the slab interface; (2) neither nodal plane of their focal mechanisms is compatible with the dip of the slab interface; or (3) their radiated energies are anomalously high (having taua > 1 MPa, where taua is apparent stress mu ES/M_O). We find that about 12% of large (M > 5.5) thrust earthquakes in the subduction zone occur off the slab interface. Other earthquakes with hypocenters that are not distinguishable from the slab interface have nonconcordant focal mechanisms. Another subset of earthquakes is characterized by high apparent stress. This is an indicator of nonconcordancy because high energy radiation is associated with immature faults. [In contrast, the subducting-plate interface is a mature fault on which thrust events radiate generally low energy (Choy and Kirby, 2004)]. The environments in which nonconcordant high-energy events typically occur are intraslab or regions of plate reorganization. On the other hand, nonconcordant mid-energy events (taua < 1 MPa) often correlate with subducted topography or splay faults. Transoceanic tsunamis are often associated with slow earthquakes which are characterized by an anomalous depletion of high frequency energy. However, some recent large earthquakes in the Aceh-Nias and Mentawai forearcs show (1) that tsunamis generated by mid- and high-energy earthquakes are possible, and (2) that regional tsunami wave heights can be associated with intraslab and intracrustal earthquakes. Furthermore, epicenters of nonconcordant earthquakes in the Sunda arc can help define the rupture zone of large earthquakes as they tend to be located on the periphery of the rupture zones. Clusters of high-energy nonconcordant events

  16. Socio-Economic Factors on Indonesia Education Disparity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzizah, Yuni

    2015-01-01

    Since 1998, regional governments in Indonesia have had greater autonomy due to the commencement of a reformation movement across Indonesia. Large portions of education management were delegated to the regional governments. Because of this, the education level varies strongly across Indonesia' provinces. Referring to the data provided by the…

  17. Volcanics oil bearing in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lukman, K.A.; Nyak, B.R.; Anditya, I.M. )

    1996-01-01

    The volcanic rock is seldom considered as good reservoir rocks. However, in Indonesia there is a volcanic layer called the Jatibarang Formation in Jatibarang Field, West Java, that has proven to be a producer of oil and gas of adequate amount. The lateral development of this rock extent along the whole of the basin, about 400 km over a Tertiary block-faulting system of the North West Java Basin. It is estimated that the volume of the spread is about 2360 km[sup 3]. Beside from the primary volcanic rock, the developing reservoir rock could also resulted from rework of massive volcanics or agglomerate, and other volcanic product resedimented as clastic deposits. The hydrocarbon is sourced from the younger Talang Aker Formation that is in direct contact with the reservoir rock. It migrated through the faults. Present cumulative production has reached 1.2 BBC and 2.7 TCFG, while speculative reserve is estimated at 4.0 BBO and 3 TCFG. Regionally, the volcanic rock of the Jatibarang Formation where the hydrocarbon is found is the result of eruptions along the magmatic trend during Late Cretaceous. In North West Java Basin, the trapping system includes both the structural and stratigraphic traps. Reservoir analysis yields pororsity values of around 16-25% and permeability of around 10 Darcies. It is concluded that there are good opportunities still left for hydrocarbon exploration in volcanic rocks. The study is discussed in detail, supported by data from cores and laboratories.

  18. Plague in Central Java, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. E.; Hudson, B. W.; Turner, R. W.; Saroso, J. Sulianti; Cavanaugh, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Plague in man occurred from 1968 to 1970 in mountain villages of the Boyolali Regency in Central Java. Infected fleas, infected rats, and seropositive rats were collected in villages with human plague cases. Subsequent isolations of Yersinia pestis and seropositive rodents, detected during investigations of rodent plague undertaken by the Government of Indonesia and the WHO, attested to the persistence of plague in the region from 1972 to 1974. Since 1968, the incidence of both rodent and human plague has been greatest from December to May at elevations over 1000 m. Isolations of Y. pestis were obtained from the fleas Xenopsylla cheopis and Stivalius cognatus and the rats Rattus rattus diardii and R. exulans ephippium. The major risk to man has been fleas infected with Y. pestis of unique electrophoretic phenotype. Infected fleas were collected most often in houses. Introduced in 1920, rodent plague had persisted in the Boyolali Regency for at least 54 years. The recent data support specific requirements for continued plague surveillance. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:6968252

  19. Tsunamigenic potential due to frontal rupturing in the Sumatra locked zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncoro, Alvina K.; Cubas, Nadaya; Singh, Satish C.; Etchebes, Marie; Tapponnier, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is one of the most seismically active subduction zones. Although there have been three Mw ≥ 8.4 earthquakes in the region, including the disastrous 2004 Mw = 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, a 500 km long patch around Mentawai Islands is still locked and could produce a large megathrust earthquake. If the rupture propagates to the subduction front, as it most likely occurred during the 2004 earthquake, it may lead to a devastating tsunami. Here, we present high-resolution reflection seismic data from the Sumatra locked zone that shows the subduction interface down to 20 km depth. The seismic data also show that the wedge is composed of two layers: a shallow layer formed by mixed to landward vergent thrusts, termed as pop-ups, and a deeper layer showing sub-horizontal reflectors. The lower layer is most probably formed by duplexes, whose roof serves as a pseudo-décollement for the mixed to landward thrust systems. Based on the seismic results, we perform mechanical modeling in order to understand the formation of these structures and to retrieve the associated frictional properties. We first show that the activation of the pseudo-décollement requires (1) either a sudden increase of effective friction along the plate interface or an irregular geometry of the plate interface, (2) a lower effective friction along the pseudo-décollement than along the plate interface. We then show that low effective frictional values (≤0.1) are required to reproduce the observed frontal structures. The low effective friction along the pseudo-décollement could either be due to the presence of a long-term high pore pressure layer or to dynamic weakening associated with earthquakes. Since similar structures are present in the 2010 tsunami earthquake area, we favor the dynamic weakening hypothesis. According to the mechanical modeling, if the next rupture propagates up to the toe rupturing the three most frontal pop-up structures, we could expect at least

  20. How Robust are Science-Based Disaster Preparedness Strategies? Lessons from Western Sumatra (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R.; McCloskey, J.; McDowell, S.

    2009-12-01

    Forecasts of the next likely megathrust earthquake which will occur off the western coast of Sumatra, possibly in the near future, indicate that it will likely be tsunamigenic and could be more devastating than the 2004 event. Hundreds of simulations of potential earthquakes and their tsunamis show that, while the earthquake is fundamentally unpredictable, many scenarios would see dangerous inundation of low-lying areas along the west coast of Sumatra; the cities of Padang and Bengkulu broadside-on to the areas of highest seismic potential have a combined population of over one million. Understanding how the science of unpredictable, high probability events is absorbed by society is essential for the development of effective mitigation and preparedness campaigns. A five month field investigation conducted in Padang and Bengkulu aimed to conceptualise the main issues driving risk perception of tsunami hazard, and explore its influence upon preparedness. Of specific interest was the role of scientifically quantified hazard information upon risk perception and hazard preparedness. Target populations were adult community members (n=270) and senior high school students (n=90). Preliminary findings indicate that scientific knowledge of earthquake and tsunami threat amongst respondents in both cities is good. However the relationship between respondent’s hazard knowledge, desired risk perception, and the adoption of preparedness measures was often non-linear and is susceptible to the negative effects of unscientific forecasts disseminated by government and mass media. Evidence suggests that ‘mystic’ predictions often portrayed in the media as being scientific, have been readily absorbed by the public; when these fail to materialise the credibility of authentic science and scientists plummets. As a result levels of sustainable earthquake and tsunami preparedness measures adopted by those living in tsunami threatened areas can be detrimentally impacted. It is

  1. GPS Constrained Coseismic Slip of the 26 December 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Shen, Z.; Wan, Y.; Zeng, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman megathrust earthquake is one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded since 1900. The event took place at the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone between the Australia and Sundaland plate in the south and the India and Burma plate in the north. Despite of its great size and catastrophic consequences, the magnitude and rupture distribution of the earthquake are still not well constrained yet. We ensemble a GPS data set from continuous and survey mode stations in the region to obtain the coseismic displacement field. The continuous data set includes these from the IGS stations located in East Asia and around the Northern Indian Ocean, from the Crustal Motion Observation Network of China in mainland China and South China Sea, and from Caltech's Indonesian GPS network in central Sumatra. Three months and ten days of data before and after the quake respectively are processed to derive the coseismic displacement offsets using the GAMIT and QOCA softwares. Three additional data sets of coseismic displacement offsets are also incorporated, one from the southeast Asia area (Vigny et al., 2005), another from the India subcontinent (Banerjee et al., 2005), and the third from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands (http://www.seires.net/content/view/122/52/). These data are used to invert for fault rupture which is devised as dislocation in a layered elastic media. We also adopt the `Earth flattening' method to accommodate the curvature effect of the Earth's surface, which is significant at the far field and should not be neglected. The fault model is composed of multiple tiles, meshing the interface of the subduction slab, with second order smoothing applied to enforce slip continuity. Our result shows dominant thrust faulting for all the patches, ranging from ~2.5 m to 7 m in amplitude, with the largest slip centered around the central section of the rupture zone 5°-10°N latitude. Rupture is also accompanied with meter level right slip for the

  2. On reported occurrences of shock-deformed clasts in the volcanic ejecta from Toba caldera, Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpton, V. L.; Schuraytz, B. C.

    1989-01-01

    Reports of shock-deformed phenocrysts from the Toba ignimbrite deposits, Sumatra, have prompted considerable debate over whether shock-deformation products are clear evidence of a meteorite impact origin for the K/T boundary deposits as well as terresrial 'cryptoexplosion' structures. Evidence presented in favor of volcanically induced shock at Toba includes kinked biotites and rare occurrences of single set of lamellae in quartz grains but rests most heavily upon occurrences of mosaic extinction patterns in plagioclase phenocrysts. The present analysis of several of the same Toba samples reveals that these mosaic patterns ae related to distinct compositional zoning and cannot be attributed to deformation of the crystal lattice that shock would produce. Additionally, in more than 200 quartz grains examined, no occurrences of microdeformation features or mosaic textures similar to those associated with known impact structures and the K/T boundary are detected. It is concluded that evidence of shock deformation in the Toba deposits has not been demonstrated.

  3. Geodetic Observations of Interseismic Strain Segmentation at the Sumatra Subduction Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prawirodirdjo, L.; Bock, Y.; McCaffrey, R.; Genrich, J.; Calais, E.; Puntodewo, S. S. O.; Subarya, C.; Rais, J.; Zwick, P.; Fauzi

    1997-01-01

    Deformation above the Sumatra subduction zone, revealed by Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic surveys, shows nearly complete coupling of the forearc to the subducting plate south of 0.5 deg S and half as much to north. The abrupt change in plate coupling coincides with the boundary between the rupture zones of the 1833 and 1861 (Mw greater than 8) thrust earthquakes. The rupture boundary appears as an abrupt change in strain accumulation well into the interseismic cycle, suggesting that seismic segmentation is controlled by properties of the plate interface that persist occupied through more than one earthquake cycle. Structural evidence indicates that differences in basal shear stress may be related to elevated pore pressure in the north.

  4. Gender and advocacy in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ray-ross, S

    1997-01-01

    The Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) and the Indonesian Midwives Association (IBI) have developed a two-phase training program regarding gender issues for the association's midwives. The first phase focuses on the leadership, management, and advocacy skills necessary to articulate program needs and to take part in making decisions regarding family planning and reproductive health. The second phase concerns the integration of gender into project design. Proposals developed by the midwives include the following: 1) to improve counseling services for women in a district where 70% of the women using contraception do not decide for themselves which methods to use; 2) to reduce maternal mortality in a district where it has increased by 20% and where women have died while waiting for husbands or fathers-in-law to make the decision to bring them to hospitals; 3) to develop gender-sensitive materials concerning HIV/AIDS; and 4) to expand gender training to all levels of IBI, to provide follow-up technical support, and to integrate gender into the mission statement of the organization. Dr. Nafsiah Mboi (member of Parliament and vice chair of the Global Commission on Women's Health), Dr. Widyastuti Wibisana (director of community participation in the Ministry of Health), Dr. Kokila Vaidya (WHO Medical Officer), Carla Bianpoen (gender specialist with the World Bank), and Titi Sumbung (director of the Melati Foundation) helped to develop and to conduct the program. IBI, which has 65,000 members, provides family planning, reproductive health, and maternal and child health services throughout Indonesia. PMID:12292791

  5. A Science Teacher Experience in the Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami Offshore Survey Expedition of May 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, K.; Holt, S.; Grilli, S.

    2005-12-01

    Through the NSF-funded ARMADA Project, K-12 teachers can participate in scientific expeditions to gain a first-hand, and usually exciting, research experience. ARMADA Master Teachers decode this research opportunity that includes data collection and experimentation, into methodology development, and technology for use in their classrooms. Their experiences have broader impact because each teacher mentors other teachers in their school district and directly participates in the National Science Teachers Association Annual Convention to share the knowledge to an even broader educational audience. A science teacher, Susan Holt (from Arcadia High School in Phoenix, Arizona) participated as part of an international scientific party on a recent cruise to study the seafloor in the area of the December 26th Great Sumatra earthquake and tsunami-the Sumatra Earthquake And Tsunami Offshore Survey (SEATOS). She participated in all aspects of the expedition: geophysical surveys, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) "watch", sample preparation and recovery, science planning and review meetings, and by interacting with the expert ship's crew. Susan posted reports regularly on a website and prepared a daily log that that was useful not only for her students, but also for other teachers in the Scottsdale Unified School District in Arizona and the Montgomery County School District in Tennessee, science team members' families, friends, and local press. Overall, the experience benefited all parties: the teacher by learning and experiencing a shipboard geophysical operation; the scientists by Susan's fresh perspective that encouraged everyone to re-examine their first assumptions and interpretations; the SEATOS expedition by Susan's assistance in science operations; and the shipboard environment where she was able to break down the typical artificial barriers between the science `crew' and the ship's crew through frank and open dialogue. We present a summary of the SEATOS expedition, the

  6. Intermediate water radiocarbon off west Sumatra during the last 45,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pol-Holz, R.; Mohtadi, M.; Southon, J.

    2012-04-01

    Radiocarbon content of intermediate waters originating from the Southern Ocean is held as the likely smoking gun of the events that triggered the atmospheric CO2 rise and its radiocarbon content decline during the last glacial-interglacial transition. Extremely depleted radiocarbon has been found off the coast of Baja California, the Galapagos and the Arabian Sea, but not unequivocally elsewhere. Knowing the route of the old water is therefore central for the mechanistic linkage of Southern Ocean processes and the atmospheric response. Here, we present high-resolution radiocarbon content of intermediate depth waters off west Sumatra in the attempt to trace the hypothetical route of old water emanating near Antarctica. Sediment core SO189-39KL (0°47'S, 99°55'E, 517 m) resulted in a 1350 cm hemipelagic sedimentary sequence that spans the last 45,000 years and it was sampled for planktonic and benthic foraminifera radiocarbon determinations at a centennial time resolution. Besides the planktonic radiocarbon age control points, we attempted an independent stratigraphy based on the Mg/Ca sea surface temperature evolution and its apparent similarity with Antarctic Ice core records. This allowed us to infer surface reservoir ages as well as the D14C of the intermediate waters. Our results show that throughout the LGM and the entire deglaciation, radiocarbon content at 500 m depth off west Sumatra remained in equilibrium with the contemporaneous atmosphere, discarding this area as a probable route for the spreading of the old water along its way to northern latitudes. These results add up to increasing evidence that the radiocarbon content of intermediate waters originating from the Southern Ocean was not influenced by the upwelling of a large abyssal old water reservoir, as it has been hypothesized in order to explain the atmospheric deglacial records.

  7. The Diverse Slip Behavior of the Banyak Islands Section of the Sunda Megathrust Offshore Sumatra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, P. M.; Feng, L.; Qiu, Q.; Meltzner, A. J.; Tsang, L. L.; Hill, E.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the long-term slip history of the Banyak Islands section of the Sunda megathrust, which stretches for ~100 km between the islands of Simeulue and Nias offshore northern Sumatra. In the last decade this section has ruptured in two large earthquakes: the great Mw 8.6 2005 Nias-Simeulue earthquake and a previously unstudied Mw 7.8 earthquake that occurred five years later in April 2010. Using data from the Sumatra GPS Array (SuGAr), we model the coseismic slip distributions of these earthquakes. The 2005 rupture had a low-slip patch near the Banyak Islands (with higher slip patches on either side along-strike), and we show that the 2010 earthquake rupture coincides with this low-slip patch. The uplift pattern in the coral records suggest that the 2005 rupture might have been similar to its 1861 predecessor [Meltzner et al., 2015]. We investigate whether the low coseismic slip behavior of the Banyak Islands section is persistent for great earthquakes in this region. Coral records also show that the Banyak Islands section had a 15-year-long slow slip event between 1966 and 1981, immediately down-dip of the 2010 rupture patch [Tsang et al., 2015, in press]. The complex slip history in this section might result from differences in frictional properties, or structural features that could include a transform fault in the downgoing slab, a bend in the megathrust, and an extension of the Batee fault zone in the upper plate. We explore candidates for the cause of the diverse slip behavior of this patch. Understanding these structural and morphological controls on megathrust slip behavior has important implications for seismic hazard analyses.

  8. Regional air quality impacts of future fire emissions in Sumatra and Kalimantan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlier, Miriam E.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Kim, Patrick S.; Gaveau, David L. A.; Koplitz, Shannon N.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Margono, Belinda A.; Myers, Samuel S.

    2015-05-01

    Fire emissions associated with land cover change and land management contribute to the concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, which can affect regional air quality and climate. Mitigating these impacts requires a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between fires and different land cover change trajectories and land management strategies. We develop future fire emissions inventories from 2010-2030 for Sumatra and Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo) to assess the impact of varying levels of forest and peatland conservation on air quality in Equatorial Asia. To compile these inventories, we combine detailed land cover information from published maps of forest extent, satellite fire radiative power observations, fire emissions from the Global Fire Emissions Database, and spatially explicit future land cover projections using a land cover change model. We apply the sensitivities of mean smoke concentrations to Indonesian fire emissions, calculated by the GEOS-Chem adjoint model, to our scenario-based future fire emissions inventories to quantify the different impacts of fires on surface air quality across Equatorial Asia. We find that public health impacts are highly sensitive to the location of fires, with emissions from Sumatra contributing more to smoke concentrations at population centers across the region than Kalimantan, which had higher emissions by more than a factor of two. Compared to business-as-usual projections, protecting peatlands from fires reduces smoke concentrations in the cities of Singapore and Palembang by 70% and 40%, and by 60% for the Equatorial Asian region, weighted by the population in each grid cell. Our results indicate the importance of focusing conservation priorities on protecting both forested (intact or logged) peatlands and non-forested peatlands from fire, even after considering potential leakage of deforestation pressure to other areas, in order to limit the impact of fire emissions on atmospheric smoke concentrations and

  9. Equivalent Body Force Finite Elements Method and 3-D Earth Model Applied In 2004 Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W.; Cheng, H.; Shi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake with moment magnitude (Mw) of 9.1 to 9.3 is the first great earthquake recorded by digital broadband, high-dynamic-range seismometers and global positioning system (GPS) equipment, which recorded many high-quality geophysical data sets. The spherical curvature is not negligible in far field especially for large event and the real Earth is laterally inhomogeneity and the analytical results still are difficult to explain the geodetic measurements. We use equivalent body force finite elements method Zhang et al. (2015) and mesh the whole earth, to compute global co-seismic displacements using four fault slip models of the 2004 Sumatra earthquake provided by different authors. Comparisons of calculated co-seismic displacements and GPS show that the confidences are well in near field for four models, and the confidences are according to different models. In the whole four models, the Chlieh model (Chlieh et al., 2007) is the best as this slip model not only accord well with near field data but also far field data. And then we use the best slip model, Chlieh model to explore influence of three dimensional lateral earth structure on both layered spherically symmetric (PREM) and real 3-D heterogeneous earth model (Crust 1.0 model and GyPSuM). Results show that the effects of 3-D heterogeneous earth model are not negligible and decrease concomitantly with increasing distance from the epicenter. The relative effects of 3-D crust model are 23% and 40% for horizontal and vertical displacements, respectively. The effects of the 3-D mantle model are much smaller than that of 3-D crust model but with wider impacting area.

  10. Precursory seismic quiescence along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukrungsri, Santawat; Pailoplee, Santi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the seismic quiescence prior to hazardous earthquakes was analyzed along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ). The seismicity data were screened statistically with mainshock earthquakes of M w ≥ 4.4 reported during 1980-2015 being defined as the completeness database. In order to examine the possibility of using the seismic quiescence stage as a marker of subsequent earthquakes, the seismicity data reported prior to the eight major earthquakes along the SASZ were analyzed for changes in their seismicity rate using the statistical Z test. Iterative tests revealed that Z factors of N = 50 events and T = 2 years were optimal for detecting sudden rate changes such as quiescence and to map these spatially. The observed quiescence periods conformed to the subsequent major earthquake occurrences both spatially and temporally. Using suitable conditions obtained from successive retrospective tests, the seismicity rate changes were then mapped from the most up-to-date seismicity data available. This revealed three areas along the SASZ that might generate a major earthquake in the future: (i) Nicobar Islands (Z = 6.7), (ii) the western offshore side of Sumatra Island (Z = 7.1), and (iii) western Myanmar (Z = 6.7). The performance of a stochastic test using a number of synthetic randomized catalogues indicated these levels of anomalous Z value showed the above anomaly is unlikely due to chance or random fluctuations of the earthquake. Thus, these three areas have a high possibility of generating a strong-to-major earthquake in the future.

  11. Contributions to the knowledge of oribatid mites of Indonesia. 2. The genus Pergalumna (Galumnidae) with description of a new species and key to known species in the Oriental region (Acari, Oribatida)

    PubMed Central

    Ermilov, Sergey G.; Sandmann, Dorothee; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahaju; Scheu, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species of oribatid mite of the genus Pergalumna (Oribatida, Galumnidae) is described from litter and soil materials in Sumatra, Indonesia. Pergalumna paraindistincta sp. n. is morphologically most similar to Pergalumna indistincta Ermilov & Anichkin, 2011, Pergalumna pertrichosa Mahunka, 1995 and Pergalumna sura Balogh, 1997; however, the new species differs from Pergalumna indistincta by the smaller body size, presence of long adanal setae ad1, and large, single median pore in females and males; from Pergalumna pertrichosa by the smaller body size, presence of three pairs of notogastral porose areas, elongated A1 and minute anal setae; from Pergalumna sura by the presence of strong adanal setae ad1, large, single median pore in females and males, and shorter bothridial setae. Furthermore, Pergalumna hawaiiensis hawaiiensis (Jacot, 1934) and Pergalumna panayensis Ermilov & Corpuz-Raros, 2015 are recorded for the first time in the Indonesian fauna. An identification key to the known species of Pergalumna in the Oriental region is given. PMID:26692794

  12. Natural product of wild Zingiberaceae Elettariopsis slahmong: biopesticide to control the vector of banana blood disease bacterium in West Sumatera, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Nasir, N; Dharma, A; Efdi, M; Yuhendra; Eliesti, F

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the most important food crops in Indonesia. Its production is greater than any other agricultural commodity. With the population of 230 million in 2010, banana was consumed up to three million tons in this country. However, Banana Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB), one of the most devastating banana pathogens in the world, which is only found in Indonesia, threatens not only the growth of this plant but also the lives and the livelihoods for most of the Indonesian society. BDB is caused by a lethal bacteria, Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotype-4, which infects a wide range of bananas, from bananas used for consumption to wild bananas. In West Sumatera, the disease killed 1.40% of bananas in 1998, and then increased dramatically to 37.9% in 2003. The total banana production dropped to 62% in this province. The search for controlling the vector has led to the pre-investigation of Wild Zingiberaceae Elettariopsis slahmong C.K. Lim which has a stink bug odour similar to a methidathion insecticide. The plant was collected around the conservation area of Lembah Anal in West Sumatra. The goal of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of natural insecticides compound contained in E. slahmong against D. melanogaster. This study tested the effect of E. slahmong on the mortality, anti-feedant and repellent levels against Drosophila melanogaster, the vector of BDB. The essential oil of E. slahmong was obtained by steam distillation of fresh rhizomes, pseudo stems and leaves. We found that the extract of E. slahmong significantly affected the mortality of D. melanogaster of 30-40% and also acted as an antifeedant (with success rate of 73-93%) and repellent (with success rate of 99-99.6%). The long- term objective of this study is to develop green biopesticide to control BDB in Indonesia, based on an environmentally friendly pest management. PMID:25151825

  13. Studies of a peatified angiosperm log cross section from Indonesia by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analytical pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Lerch, H. E., III; Cecil, C.B.; Neuzil, S.G.; Supardi

    1991-01-01

    Samples from a 10 cm cross-sectional radius of a peatified angiosperm log from Sumatra, Indonesia, were examined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and pyrolysis-gas chromatography in order to understand chemical changes due to the peatification process. NMR results show degradation by selective loss of carbohydrates in all parts of the log section compared with fresh wood; however, the degree of degradation is less near the center of the log section. The degree of ring substitution of aromatic lignin monomeric units, as measured by dipolar dephasing NMR methods, appears to be less at the center of the log section than at the periphery. The methoxyl carbon content of lignin in the log is lower than in unaltered angiospermous lignin but does not appear to change as a function of either radial position or the degree of aromatic ring substitution. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography indicates higher yields of catechols in the outer areas relative to the heartwood. Other than the variations in catechol contents and in the yields of carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis products (e.g. levoglucosan, angelicalactones), the pyrolysis results do not show significant changes related to radial position, indicating that the lignin is not significantly altered across the log section. ?? 1991.

  14. Genetic variation and population genetic structure of Rhizophora apiculata (Rhizophoraceae) in the Greater Sunda Islands, Indonesia using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Andi Fadly; Hyun, Jung Oh; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Yong Yul; Lee, Kyung Mi; Hong, Kyung Nak; Kim, Seung-Chul

    2014-03-01

    Genetic variations within and among Rhizophora apiculata populations in the Greater Sunda Islands of Indonesia were studied using microsatellite markers. The study found 38 alleles on five loci in 15 populations. The observed (H(o)) and expected (H(e)) heterozygosity values are 0.338 and 0.378, respectively. Inbreeding effect from self-pollination might explain its heterozygote deficiency. Population genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.381) was similar to other mangrove species. The genetic diversity of R. apiculata populations along the coastline inside the archipelago (e.g., Buleleng, Donggala, Mamuju, and Takalar) was higher than those of population along the coastline outside the archipelago, especially northern Sumatra populations (i.e., Langkat, Tapanuli Tengah, Dumai, and Padang). The isolation by distances and sea currents directions as well as their connectivity might affect the gene flow and genetic exchange. The more isolated with fewer connections by sea currents, the smaller gene flow and genetic exchange observed between populations. The higher genetic exchange, on the contrary, occurred when population location was closer to the meeting point of the sea currents. The study also showed that the patterns of sea current movement seemed to have influence genetic clustering of populations which fell into three main groups (Sunda Shelf Mangroves) and one isolated population (New Guinea Mangroves). PMID:24323307

  15. Child Labor and Trade Liberalization in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kis-Katos, Krisztina; Sparrow, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We examine the effects of trade liberalization on child work in Indonesia, identifying geographical differences in the effects of trade policy through district level exposure to reduction in import tariff barriers, from 1993 to 2002. The results suggest that increased exposure to trade liberalization is associated with a decrease in child work…

  16. Language in education: The case of Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nababan, P. W. J.

    1991-03-01

    Although over 400 languages are spoken in Indonesia, by 1986 60% of the population had some competence in the Indonesian national language, a substantial increase over 1971. Bahasa Indonesia was declared the state language in the 1945 constitution, and reformed spelling was agreed in 1972. It is the sole medium of instruction, except in the first three grades of elementary school in nine regions, where vernaculars may be used transitionally. Thereafter vernaculars are taught as school subjects. Bilingualism, and even multilingualism in Indonesian and one or more vernaculars and/or foreign languages is increasing, and despite the use of Indonesian for official documentary purposes at all levels it does not appear that vernaculars are dying out, although their spheres of use are restricted. Bahasa Indonesia fulfils the four functions: cognitive, instrumental, integrative and cultural, while vernaculars are only integrative and cultural. The curriculum of Indonesian, established centrally, is pragmatic or communicative. It is expressed in a standard syllabus for course books. This approach equally applies to foreign languages, which are introduced at secondary level, although here receptive reading is given more weight than productive skills. A full description of the syllabus organization of the various languages is given. Nonformal language learning also takes place, in the national basic education and literacy programme, which teaches Bahasa Indonesia, and in vocational courses in foreign languages for commerce.

  17. Seismic risk assessment for road in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyfur, Mona Foralisa; Pribadi, Krishna S.

    2016-05-01

    Road networks in Indonesia consist of 446,000 km of national, provincial and local roads as well as toll highways. Indonesia is one of countries that exposed to various natural hazards, such as earthquakes, floods, landslides, etc. Within the Indonesian archipelago, several global tectonic plates interact, such as the Indo-Australian, Pacific, Eurasian, resulting in a complex geological setting, characterized by the existence of seismically active faults and subduction zones and a chain of more than one hundred active volcanoes. Roads in Indonesia are vital infrastructure needed for people and goods movement, thus supporting community life and economic activities, including promoting regional economic development. Road damages and losses due to earthquakes have not been studied widely, whereas road disruption caused enormous economic damage. The aim of this research is to develop a method to analyse risk caused by seismic hazard to roads. The seismic risk level of road segment is defined using an earthquake risk index, adopting the method of Earthquake Disaster Risk Index model developed by Davidson (1997). Using this method, road segments' risk level can be defined and compared, and road risk map can be developed as a tool for prioritizing risk mitigation programs for road networks in Indonesia.

  18. Local Responses to Decentralization Policy in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjork, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Ethnographic fieldwork in six junior high schools in East Java, Indonesia, focused on local responses to a national policy devolving authority over the curriculum to the schools. Interviews and observations in the schools revealed little change in teacher actions. The objectives of decentralization clashed with deeply rooted ideas about authority,…

  19. Difficulties in Initial Algebra Learning in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paul; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Within mathematics curricula, algebra has been widely recognized as one of the most difficult topics, which leads to learning difficulties worldwide. In Indonesia, algebra performance is an important issue. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007, Indonesian students' achievement in the algebra domain was…

  20. Developmental Book Activities and Needs in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Stanley A.; And Others

    This report is the fourth in a series of six studies of developmental book activity in East Asia. The scope of work in the Republic of Indonesia included assessment of books and materials in the educational process; books used by individuals for the improvement of reading skills and for learning enrichment; books for technical and professional…

  1. Situation Report [--Fiji, Indonesia, Israel, and Philippines].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This is a series of four situation reports prepared by the International Planned Parenthood Federation for informational and consultative purposes. The countries reported on are Fiji, Indonesia, Israel, and the Philippines. Some of the latest statistical figures for each country are listed. They are area, population and growth rate, birth, death,…

  2. OUTLINE OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN INDONESIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Perth.

    THE POPULATION OF INDONESIA WAS 105,000,000 IN 1965, 70 PERCENT OF WHICH ARE ENGAGED IN AGRICULTURE ON THE SEVEN MAIN ISLANDS AND SOME OF THE 3,000 SMALLER ISLANDS. DIVERSIFICATION OF THE ECONOMY IS BEING EMPHASIZED. COMPULSORY PRIMARY EDUCATION EXTENDS OVER 6 YEARS. SECONDARY EDUCATION INCLUDES A JUNIOR LEVEL WITH BOTH ACADEMIC AND VOCATIONAL…

  3. The Lamaholot Language of Eastern Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaya, Naonori

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the grammar of the Lewotobi dialect of Lamaholot, an Austronesian language spoken in the eastern part of Flores Island and neighboring islands of Indonesia. Lamaholot belongs to the Central Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of Austronesian, within which it is in a subgroup with the languages of Timor and Roti. The number of speakers…

  4. Methods for the Identification of the Three Major Eruptions from the Toba Complex, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Pearce, N. J.; Westgate, J.; Villa, I. M.; Achyuthan, H.; Pattan, J. N.; Oppenheimer, C.

    2014-12-01

    Tephra provide a valuable tool for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions when correctly identified. Here we present three approaches to discriminate between the Oldest, Middle and Younger Toba Tuff (OTT, MTT and YTT, respectively), these being three major Quaternary eruptions of the Toba volcano in Sumatra, Indonesia. Toba ash forms an important stratigraphic marker across peninsular India, and it has been widely used for archaeological and palaeoenvironmental studies. Major element ratios in YTT show post-depositional diagenetic effects from ash-environment interaction. Na2O/K2O varies up to 50% between marine and terrestrial sites, because of seawater induced alkali migration and site-specific water pH. However, major elements cannot discriminate between OTT and YTT, but these can be identified using trace elements data. Compiling several hundreds analyses of selected rare elements, four glass populations are recognized, which define the YTT and represent different stages of magma evolution. In contrast, OTT has one, homogeneous, low Ba glass population. Thus, the presence of multiple glass populations now allows the YTT to be clearly distinguished from OTT and MTT. This discrimination was used to resolve the issue surrounding the age of Toba ash from Morgaon, a tephra deposit in western India recently dated at c. 809 ka (Ar-Ar). New LA-ICP-MS analyses revealed that the Morgaon tephra contains the same four glass populations that define YTT, indicating this cannot be OTT. In addition, a study of the area density of spontaneous fission tracks (ρs) in glass shards of the Morgaon tephra sample (91±19 tracks/cm2) are within the range of the YTT (70-181 tracks/cm2) and well below the OTT (1567 tracks/cm2), again confirming its YTT origins. Indeed, all other Toba tephra occurrences from India thus far analysed for trace elements and spontaneous FT density show a YTT origin.

  5. Joint body and surface wave tomography applied to the Toba caldera complex (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Koulakov, Ivan; Shapiro, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    We developed a new algorithm for a joint body and surface wave tomography. The algorithm is a modification of the existing LOTOS code (Koulakov, 2009) developed for local earthquake tomography. The input data for the new method are travel times of P and S waves and dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. The main idea is that the two data types have complementary sensitivities. The body-wave data have good resolution at depth, where we have enough crossing rays between sources and receivers, whereas the surface waves have very good near-surface resolution. The surface wave dispersion curves can be retrieved from the correlations of the ambient seismic noise and in this case the sampled path distribution does not depend on the earthquake sources. The contributions of the two data types to the inversion are controlled by the weighting of the respective equations. One of the clearest cases where such approach may be useful are volcanic systems in subduction zones with their complex magmatic feeding systems that have deep roots in the mantle and intermediate magma chambers in the crust. In these areas, the joint inversion of different types of data helps us to build a comprehensive understanding of the entire system. We apply our algorithm to data collected in the region surrounding the Toba caldera complex (north Sumatra, Indonesia) during two temporary seismic experiments (IRIS, PASSCAL, 1995, GFZ, LAKE TOBA, 2008). We invert 6644 P and 5240 S wave arrivals and ~500 group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love waves. We present a series of synthetic tests and real data inversions which show that joint inversion approach gives more reliable results than the separate inversion of two data types. Koulakov, I., LOTOS code for local earthquake tomographic inversion. Benchmarks for testing tomographic algorithms, Bull. seism. Soc. Am., 99(1), 194-214, 2009, doi:10.1785/0120080013

  6. Bird Responses to Lowland Rainforest Conversion in Sumatran Smallholder Landscapes, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Yann; Toledo-Hernandez, Manuel; Arlettaz, Raphael; Mulyani, Yeni A.; Tscharntke, Teja

    2016-01-01

    Rapid land-use change in the tropics causes dramatic losses in biodiversity and associated functions. In Sumatra, Indonesia, lowland rainforest has mainly been transformed by smallholders into oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) monocultures, interspersed with jungle rubber (rubber agroforests) and a few forest remnants. In two regions of the Jambi province, we conducted point counts in 32 plots of four different land-use types (lowland rainforest, jungle rubber, rubber plantation and oil palm plantation) as well as in 16 nearby homegardens, representing a small-scale, traditional agricultural system. We analysed total bird abundance and bird abundance in feeding guilds, as well as species richness per point count visit, per plot, and per land-use system, to unveil the conservation importance and functional responses of birds in the different land-use types. In total, we identified 71 species from 24 families. Across the different land-use types, abundance did not significantly differ, but both species richness per visit and per plot were reduced in plantations. Feeding guild abundances between land-use types were variable, but homegardens were dominated by omnivores and granivores, and frugivorous birds were absent from monoculture rubber and oil palm. Jungle rubber played an important role in harbouring forest bird species and frugivores. Homegardens turned out to be of minor importance for conserving birds due to their low sizes, although collectively, they are used by many bird species. Changes in functional composition with land-use conversion may affect important ecosystem functions such as biological pest control, pollination, and seed dispersal. In conclusion, maintaining forest cover, including degraded forest and jungle rubber, is of utmost importance to the conservation of functional and taxonomic bird diversity. PMID:27224063

  7. Bird Responses to Lowland Rainforest Conversion in Sumatran Smallholder Landscapes, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Prabowo, Walesa Edho; Darras, Kevin; Clough, Yann; Toledo-Hernandez, Manuel; Arlettaz, Raphael; Mulyani, Yeni A; Tscharntke, Teja

    2016-01-01

    Rapid land-use change in the tropics causes dramatic losses in biodiversity and associated functions. In Sumatra, Indonesia, lowland rainforest has mainly been transformed by smallholders into oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) monocultures, interspersed with jungle rubber (rubber agroforests) and a few forest remnants. In two regions of the Jambi province, we conducted point counts in 32 plots of four different land-use types (lowland rainforest, jungle rubber, rubber plantation and oil palm plantation) as well as in 16 nearby homegardens, representing a small-scale, traditional agricultural system. We analysed total bird abundance and bird abundance in feeding guilds, as well as species richness per point count visit, per plot, and per land-use system, to unveil the conservation importance and functional responses of birds in the different land-use types. In total, we identified 71 species from 24 families. Across the different land-use types, abundance did not significantly differ, but both species richness per visit and per plot were reduced in plantations. Feeding guild abundances between land-use types were variable, but homegardens were dominated by omnivores and granivores, and frugivorous birds were absent from monoculture rubber and oil palm. Jungle rubber played an important role in harbouring forest bird species and frugivores. Homegardens turned out to be of minor importance for conserving birds due to their low sizes, although collectively, they are used by many bird species. Changes in functional composition with land-use conversion may affect important ecosystem functions such as biological pest control, pollination, and seed dispersal. In conclusion, maintaining forest cover, including degraded forest and jungle rubber, is of utmost importance to the conservation of functional and taxonomic bird diversity. PMID:27224063

  8. Th-230 Dates of MIS 5e Coral Terraces in Kisar Island, Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, H. W.; Harris, R. A.; Prasetyadi, C.; Shen, C. C.; Chiu, T. C.; Cox, N. L.; Chen, Y. G.

    2010-05-01

    2004 Sumatra earthquakes caused a devastating tsunami and cost the lives of nearly 260,000 people in the South Asian region. These earthquakes and associated tsunami are sourced from convergence of the Indo-Australian and Asian Plates. In the eastern part of this plate boundary the Australian continent is colliding with Asia. The first turbiditic sand in Timor island was around 5 Ma and the collision propagated to the southwestern until ~2 Ma. But the activities of the neighborhood of the Timor island in the Quaternary or the Holocene is unknown. This study provides the new 230Th dates from the raised coral terraces at Kisar Island, eastern Indonesia. Eight fossil corals were measured by MC-ICP-MS at the National Taiwan University with permil-level precision. Two out of the eight samples having ~1.5 % calcite and acceptable δ234Uinitial showed robust ages of 123-121 ka. Another three open-system model ages were from 125-119 ka by Thompson et al.'s method (2003). These different elevated fossil corals with ages of 125-119 ka favored the two-peak sea-level curve in MIS 5e explained by Chappell and Veeh (1978). New age results relocated the second peak should be about three thousand years earlier than their proposed 119 ka. A minimum uplift rate of 0.1 m/kyrs is derived from the highest-position fossil corals. The 230Th-dated fossils in the north coast of Timor-Leste suggest the MIS 5e terraces could reach 55 m high, hence a referable uplift rate of ~0.4 m/kyrs could be a maximum estimate. The uplift rate of 0.1-0.4 m/ka since late Pleistocene is well consistent with published values from Atauro Island and Timor-Leste in eastern Indonesia. Based on the uplift rate, the terraces in eastern Kisar, with elevation lower than 100 m, expectedly located at MIS 7, 9, or 11; while the higher western terraces ranged from MIS 9-15. Besides, no remanet of Holocene fringe reefs around Kisar Island also suggests a relatively low activity of tectonics, in agreement with the modern

  9. Climate Controls on Sediment Discharge in Selected Fluvial Systems in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, C. B.

    2004-12-01

    Sediment discharge was evaluated in selected rivers in Indonesia where catchment basin size, relief, and gradient are somewhat similar, but where tectonic setting, bedrock lithology, and atmospheric circulation and rainfall, are variables. Rivers were studied in humid to perhumid regions where the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is relatively stable and rainfall exceeds evapotranspiration for all or most months of the year (Sumatra, Borneo, Seram, and Irian Jaya). In contrast, fluvial sediment discharge was evaluated in rivers in Timor where 85 percent of all rainfall occurs during a four-month rainy season (dry subhumid climate) in response to the passage of the ITCZ. Stream sampling was conducted for solid suspended sediment concentrations, solute concentrations, and pH. In addition, the nature of stream channels (meandering or braided), streambed materials, the degree and source of estuarine fill, the degree of delta formation, and the nature of coastlines were used to evaluate fluvial sediment discharge. Very low sediment concentrations (10 mg/l suspended and 10mg/l solute) in rivers in the perhumid to humid regions are indicative of a very low fluvial sediment discharge. The absence of fluvially derived bed loads, river mouth deltas, the lack of fluvial fill of estuaries, and mud-dominated coastal zones are consistent with this observation. In contrast, very high sediment concentrations (2100 mg/l suspended and 340 mg/l dissolved) during rainy season discharge in dry-subhumid regions (Timor) are indicative of very high sediment discharge in dry subhumid climates. Coarse-grained braided streams, the complete fluvial fill of estuaries, the formation of river-mouth deltas, cobbles transported to the coast, and coarse-grained beaches are consistent with this observation. All factors indicate that fluvial sediment discharge is exceedingly low in humid and perhumid areas where denudation is dominated by chemical weathering, whereas fluvial sediment discharge

  10. Exploration of the taxonomy of some Pleistocene Cervini (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Cervidae) from Java and Sumatra (Indonesia): a geometric- and linear morphometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruwier, Ben; de Vos, John; Kovarovic, Kris

    2015-07-01

    Third molars of extant- and fossil Southeast Asian deer were metrically compared using a linear- and geometric morphometric approach and discussed in relation to known taxonomic information from the literature. Our analysis suggests the presence of medium sized deer of the genus Axis and large sized taxa of the genus Cervus s. l. in Java. Axis lydekkeri and Axis javanicus are considered valid taxa, with A. lydekkeri probably related to the subgenus Hyelaphus. The large deer, such as Cervus kendengensis, Cervus stehlini and Cervus problematicus are most likely of the subgenus Rusa, the former two closely related to extant Cervus timorensis. The Sumatran fossils are members of the subgenus Rusa, but not necessarily conspecific with extant Cervus (Rusa) unicolor.

  11. An Analysis on Teachers' Politeness Strategy and Student's Compliance in Teaching Learning Process at SD Negeri 024184 Binjai Timur Binjai--North Sumatra-Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manik, Sondang; Hutagaol, Juniati

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to find out the politeness strategies used by the teachers and how the politeness affects to the student's compliance. The focus is on directive and expressive speech acts. The subjects of this study were two teachers and the students of class II-A and II-B at SD 024184 Binjai Timur Binjai. The data was gathered by video audio…

  12. Domestication of Mahseer (Tor soro) in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gustiano, R; Kontara, E K; Wahyuningsih, H; Subagja, J; Asih, S; Saputr, A

    2013-01-01

    Mahseer is an economically important fish in the world with a distribution from the Himalayan Mountains up to Southeast Asia. One species of Masheer is Tor soro in the Indonesian Archipelago. For a long time, T. soro has been collected from the wild and now is becoming rare. In addition, the degradation of its habitat is another problem. Hence, it is urgent that this species is saved from extinction. Domestication of T. soro from North Sumatra has been conducted since 1996. This paper reports the results of domestication of T. soro starting from collecting live specimens, genetic and morphometric characterizations, evaluation to breeding, and growing out. In 2010, domestication was successful to produce a second generation of young broodstocks and now the breeding technology is being shared with several provinces where T. soro exist. PMID:25141656

  13. 2008 Little Andaman aftershock: Genetic linkages with the subducting 90°E ridge and 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine, J. K.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Ambikapathy, A.; Kundu, Bhaskar; Subrahmanyam, C.; Jade, S.; Bansal, Amit; Chadha, R. K.; Narsaiah, M.; Premkishore, L.; Gupta, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    We analyse the June 27, 2008 Little Andaman aftershock (Mw 6.6) of December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.2) that occurred near the trench in the subducting India plate beneath the Sunda Plate. Unlike majority of the other aftershocks in the frontal arc, the Little Andaman aftershock and its own aftershocks occurred through normal slip on the north-south oriented steep planes. We use the coseismic and ongoing postseismic deformation due to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake at a GPS site nearest to the Little Andaman aftershock and compute changes in the Coulomb stresses due to the coseismic slip and postseismic afterslip. The Coulomb stress on the Little Andaman aftershock fault plane progressively increased since the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake which probably led to the occurrence of the Little Andaman aftershock on the pre-existing N-S oriented strike-slip steep planes of the subducting 90°E ridge that were reactivated through normal slip.

  14. The 2005 volcano-tectonic earthquake swarm in the Andaman Sea: Triggered by the 2004 great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Bhaskar; Legrand, Denis; Gahalaut, Kalpna; Gahalaut, Vineet K.; Mahesh, P.; Kamesh Raju, K. A.; Catherine, J. K.; Ambikapthy, A.; Chadha, R. K.

    2012-10-01

    A 6 day duration earthquakes swarm occurred in the Andaman Sea, 31 days after the giant 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.2). The swarm occurred less than 100 km from the eastern edge of the 2004 earthquake rupture and is the most energetic ever recorded in the world. The earthquakes swarm appear to have occurred on en echelon fault system bounded by the two main right-lateral strike-slip faults, namely, the Seulimeum Strand of Sumatra Fault system (SEU) and the West Andaman Fault (WAF). At the beginning of the swarm, earthquakes with predominantly strike-slip focal mechanisms occurred which were followed by earthquakes with predominantly normal faulting focal mechanisms having significant deviatoric component. Highbvalue, presence of double slope in the Gutenberg-Richter relation, presence of monogenetic submarine volcanoes in the region of the swarm and the earthquake focal mechanisms suggest that the swarm was of volcano-tectonic origin and fluid flow played an important role in its occurrence. Indeed, our modeling suggests that it was triggered by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake through poroelastic relaxation of the coseismic stresses.

  15. Tracking the rupture of the Mw = 9.3 Sumatra earthquake over 1,150 km at teleseismic distance.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Frank; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2005-06-16

    On 26 December 2004, a moment magnitude Mw = 9.3 earthquake occurred along Northern Sumatra, the Nicobar and Andaman islands, resulting in a devastating tsunami in the Indian Ocean region. The rapid and accurate estimation of the rupture length and direction of such tsunami-generating earthquakes is crucial for constraining both tsunami wave-height models as well as the seismic moment of the events. Compressional seismic waves generated at the hypocentre of the Sumatra earthquake arrived after about 12 min at the broadband seismic stations of the German Regional Seismic Network (GRSN), located approximately 9,000 km from the event. Here we present a modification of a standard array-seismological approach and show that it is possible to track the propagating rupture front of the Sumatra earthquake over a total rupture length of 1,150 km. We estimate the average rupture speed to be 2.3-2.7 km s(-1) and the total duration of rupture to be at least 430 s, and probably between 480 and 500 s. PMID:15908983

  16. 78 FR 54912 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Indonesia and Thailand; Termination of Investigations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... connection with the subject investigations concerning Indonesia (78 FR 50379) and Thailand (78 FR 50383... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Indonesia and Thailand; Termination of Investigations AGENCY: United...(a)), the countervailing duty investigations concerning frozen warmwater shrimp from Indonesia...

  17. Tectonics and Relative Plate Motions Around the Andaman Sea and Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, T.; Murakoshi, T.

    2005-12-01

    There are several R-F-R models of the active back-arc opening system in the Andaman Sea proposed by authors, e.g., Curray et al. (1978), Eguchi et al. (1979), Eguchi (1991), Mantovani et al. (2001) and Nielsen et al. (2004). Most of the previous authors, except Eguchi et al. (1978) and Eguchi (1991), documented NW-SE or NNW-SSE striking relative plate motion at the Central Andaman Rift. Recent multi-beam bathymetry study by GEODYSSEA Project group confirmed the detailed configuration of the ENE-WSW striking Central Andaman Rift and adjacent transcurrent faults. All of data from the marine survey and recent shallow earthquakes as well as their strike-slip type focal mechanisms along the N-S striking fault segment at 95.2E from 11N to 12.5N support the approximate N-S opening at the adjacent Central Andaman Rift. The magnetic anomaly survey data of Curray et al. (1978) suggest that, in the case of N-S opening, the rate becomes 4.0 cm/y, although Curray et al. (1978) proposed the total rate of 3.7 cm/y in the case of NNW-SSE opening. We then studied the realistic geometry of plate boundaries from Sumatra through the Andaman sea including the Central Andaman Rift to Myanmar, using recent seismological data and GPS studies. As is important, the Sundaland is not part of the Eurasia plate as revealed by recent GPS surveys. Furthermore, based on data of GPS velocity vectors w.r.t. Eurasia plate (e.g., Pradirodirdjo et al., 1997; Michel et. al., 2001), we can recognize some differential motion within the NW-SE striking fore-arc block, which is bounded by the Sumatra transcurrent fault and Java trench. The GPS data indicate 'differential motion' in both the trench-parallel and trench-normal directions within the NW-SE striking fore-arc block. We must resolve whether such kind differential movement within the fore-arc block is steady or not, to investigate the detailed spatio-temporal nature of dynamic coupling at the subduction zones with intermittent activity of larger

  18. The June 2000 Enggano earthquake, South Sumatra, and the role of the Mentawai Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsom, J.; Abercrombie, R. E.

    2003-04-01

    Sumatra is widely regarded as a type example of strain-partitioning during oblique subduction. In the simplest view, arc-orthogonal motion is accomodated at the trench and arc-parallel motion is accomodated at the strike-slip Sumatra Fault System along the volcanic line. There is, however, a third, more enigmatic, feature that runs the length of the oceanward side of the forearc basin and defines, in many cases, steep eastern margins to the forearc islands. This 'Mentawai Fault' has been variously interpreted as a fold and as a fault with strike-slip, normal or high-angle reverse motion. Seismic reflection images vary considerably from place to place, and the role of the feature in the subduction process remains controversial. It is, however, significant that repeat GPS measurements in the vicinity of Enggano, the southernmost of the forearc islands, indicated that much of the convergence between the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asian plates was being absorbed within the forearc basin during the period of observation. The Mentawai Fault is the only feature observed on the seismic sections that appears capable of accomodating this convergence. The subduction zone beneath Sumatra has been the site of repeated large earthquakes, most recently in June 2000 when a Magnitude 7.9 earthquake occurred near Enggano followed by a strong aftershock sequence. Analysis of the main shock, using body and surface waves, indicates that there were two distinct sub-events occurring a few seconds apart. The first, involving strike-slip within the subducting Indian Ocean Plate, evidently triggered reverse slip on the subduction interface. Both sub-events were too deep, and in the wrong locations, to be due to failure on the Mentawai Fault. They do, however, provide important insights into its likely role. The GPS results indicate that in areas such as Enggano, and possibly only for short periods, the forearc wedge moves with the subducting plate. It must therefore compress against the

  19. Long Term Slip Deficit Modelling for the Sunda Megathrust beneath the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.; Simao, N.; Lindsay, T.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow earthquakes are a response of crustal faults to stress. Faults are loaded by the slow, heterogeneous accumulation of tectonic stress and the almost instantaneous interaction with neighbouring earthquakes. These effects allow us to model the increase of stress on known active faults. In particular we can calculate changes in stress that can help identify regions of known active faults where secular loading is rapid, elapsed time since the last large event (normalised to the estimated recurrence time for large events) is long and interactions stresses due to recent events suggest that earthquake hazard is particularly high. However, these models implicitly assume a uniform zero stress on the studied fault at the beginning of the study period which is clearly wrong. Even assuming a constant loading rate over a known distribution of fault coupling, earthquakes in the recent past have left stress footprints (both positive and negative) on the fault which must have a first-order effect on the contemporary stress field and therefore on the future activity of the fault. The geographical distribution of these footprints is in principle determinable if the slip distribution on the past earthquakes can be estimated. In general this estimation is unsatisfactory since the resolution of the slip distribution in past earthquakes is in general no better than an unfeasible box-car slip function with a data-consistent moment. Coral paleo-geodesy on the Mentawai Islands off western Sumatra has produced a multi-seismic-cycle geodetic record which provides physical constraints on the slip distributions of large and great earthquakes. Here we describe a new unifying description of the reconstruction of the evolution of slip deficit (the difference between loading and cumulative seismic and aseismic slip) in which we include 330 years of heterogeneous loading of the Sunda megathrust and slip due to more than 30 historical and instrumentally recorded earthquakes. This complex slip

  20. Earthquake and tsunami hazard in West Sumatra: integrating science, outreach, and local stakeholder needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, J.; Lubis, A. M.; Huang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Hill, E. M.; Eriksson, S.; Sieh, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) is building partnerships with local to provincial government agencies, NGOs, and educators in West Sumatra to inform their policymaking, disaster-risk-reduction, and education efforts. Geodetic and paleoseismic studies show that an earthquake as large as M 8.8 is likely sometime in the coming decades on the Mentawai patch of the Sunda megathrust. This earthquake and its tsunami would be devastating for the Mentawai Islands and neighboring areas of the western Sumatra coast. The low-lying coastal Sumatran city of Padang (pop. ~800,000) has been the object of many research and outreach efforts, especially since 2004. Padang experienced deadly earthquakes in 2007 and 2009 that, though tragedies in their own right, served also as wake-up calls for a larger earthquake to come. However, there remain significant barriers to linking science to policy: extant hazard information is sometimes contradictory or confusing for non-scientists, while turnover of agency leadership and staff means that, in the words of one local advocate, "we keep having to start from zero." Both better hazard knowledge and major infrastructure changes are necessary for risk reduction in Padang. In contrast, the small, isolated villages on the outlying Mentawai Islands have received relatively fewer outreach efforts, yet many villages have the potential for timely evacuation with existing infrastructure. Therefore, knowledge alone can go far toward risk reduction. The tragic October 2010 Mentawai tsunami has inspired further disaster-risk reduction work by local stakeholders. In both locations, we are engaging policymakers and local NGOs, providing science to help inform their work. Through outreach contacts, the Mentawai government requested that we produce the first-ever tsunami hazard map for their islands; this aligns well with scientific interests at EOS. We will work with the Mentawai government on the presentation and explanation of the hazard map, as

  1. Sumatra-Andaman Megathrust Earthquake Slip: Insights From Mechanical Modeling of ICESat Surface Deformation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, D. J.; Miuller, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    Modeling the kinematics of the 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake is limited in the northern two-thirds of the rupture zone by a scarcity of near-rupture geodetic deformation measurements. Precisely repeated Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) profiles across the Andaman and Nicobar Islands provide a means to more fully document the spatial pattern of surface vertical displacements and thus better constrain geomechanical modeling of the slip distribution. ICESat profiles that total ~45 km in length cross Car Nicobar, Kamorta, and Katchall in the Nicobar chain. Within the Andamans, the coverage includes ~350 km on North, Central, and South Andaman Islands along two NNE and NNW-trending profiles that provide elevations on both the east and west coasts of the island chain. Two profiles totaling ~80 km in length cross South Sentinel Island, and one profile ~10 km long crosses North Sentinel Island. With an average laser footprint spacing of 175 m, the total coverage provides over 2700 georeferenced surface elevations measurements for each operations period. Laser backscatter waveforms recorded for each footprint enable detection of forest canopy top and underlying ground elevations with decimeter vertical precision. Surface elevation change is determined from elevation profiles, acquired before and after the earthquake, that are repeated with a cross-track separation of less than 100 m by precision pointing of the ICESat spacecraft. Apparent elevation changes associated with cross-track offsets are corrected according to local slopes calculated from multiple post-earthquake repeated profiles. The surface deformation measurements recorded by ICESat are generally consistent with the spatial distribution of uplift predicted by a preliminary slip distribution model. To predict co-seismic surface deformation, we apply a slip distribution, derived from the released energy distribution computed by Ishii et al. (2005), as the displacement discontinuity

  2. Eradicating smallpox in Indonesia: the archipelagic challenge.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    From 1804 to 1974, the colonial Dutch East Indies government and the postcolonial Indonesian state attempted to tackle the problem of smallpox. The vaccination efforts in the colonial era virtually eliminated smallpox by 1940. Unfortunately, as a consequence of the war smallpox was reintroduced into the archipelago in 1947. Indonesia finally succeeded in eradicating smallpox in 1974 through campaigns of mass vaccination and surveillance. In the last few years of the fight against smallpox, a detection system was set up in order to have every suspected case of smallpox isolated and investigated by the health authorities until verified in the government laboratory at Bandung. This paper looks at the impact of the archipelagic nature of Indonesia on the smallpox eradication campaigns. PMID:20973337

  3. Diarrhoeal diseases among refugees in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Winardi, B; Adhyatma, M

    1982-09-01

    The influx of refugees from Vietnam had created some consequences especially in transmission of certain communicable diseases. During several months of their first arrival, most of illness (90%) were caused by upper respiratory tract infections, skin diseases and diarrhoeal diseases. Several efforts and measures had been done by the Government of Indonesia in collaboration with several agencies i.e. P3V, PMI, UNHCR, W.VI, etc. As a result of the activities, a reduction of diarrhoeal diseases, has been observed. There was no cholera or typhoid cases detected through routine surveillance activities or by special survey. If we examine the morbidity and mortality pattern of refugees or we are comparing with Indonesian figures, it can be concluded that diarrhoeal diseases is not a significant health problem among refugees in Indonesia. PMID:7163840

  4. Muria Volcano, Island of Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view of the north coast of central Java, Indonesia centers on the currently inactive Muria Volcano (6.5S, 111.0E). Muria is 5,330 ft. tall and lies just north of Java's main volcanic belt which runs east - west down the spine of the island attesting to the volcanic origin of the more than 1,500 Indonesian Islands.

  5. Major Land Clearing Fires, Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    These many and intense land clearing fires in the Kalimantan region of the island of Borneo, Indonesia (3.5S, 113.5E) are indicative of the many deforestation activities on a worldwide scale. In order to feed and house ever increasing populations, more cleared land is required for agriculture to feed ever increasing populations. More pasture lands are needed for livestock. And, more cleared lands are needed for housing.

  6. The midwife in private practice in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Soh-Sanu, R

    1989-04-01

    Indonesia is an archipelago, the largest in the world, stretching 3,200 miles from east to west. It straddles the equator between the Asian and Australian continents. The climate is tropical and has two seasons, the dry season from June to October; and the wet season from November to March. The total population is currently estimated as only 165 million and Indonesian is the national language. PMID:2761438

  7. Unfocused response to AIDS in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Maclaren, L

    1997-01-01

    Indonesia has a population of more than 200 million among which less than 500 official cases of HIV/AIDS have been recorded. The number of estimated cases is far greater. High rates of male migration, widespread prostitution, high rates of sexually transmitted disease infection, the absence of sex education for youth, women's low status, and the absence of a national AIDS awareness campaign were cited in 1993 as reasons why HIV would spread quickly throughout Indonesia. Access to basic information about AIDS remains a problem for both urban and rural populations in Indonesia. A national AIDS strategy was made public in 1993 by President Suharto. Supported by the Australians, the plan comprehensively covers almost every key aspect in managing HIV/AIDS. The plan since its release, however, has been largely ignored and the government has done little aside from a handful of television public service announcements, a few pamphlets distributed by the Department of Health, a few small HIV surveillance projects which have yielded little useful information, and the training of government officials to provide AIDS education. Approximately 15 nongovernmental organizations have been actively and successfully conducting AIDS prevention work. PMID:12320962

  8. Late Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinschberger, Florent; Malod, Jacques-André; Réhault, Jean-Pierre; Villeneuve, Michel; Royer, Jean-Yves; Burhanuddin, Safri

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents an internally and globally consistent model of plate evolution in eastern Indonesia from Middle Miocene to Present time. It is centered on the Banda Sea region located in the triple junction area between the Pacific-Philippine, Australia and South-East Asia plates. The geological and geophysical data available from Indonesia were until recently insufficient to define a unique plate tectonic model. In this paper, the new data taken into account clearly restrict the possible interpretations. Owing to a great number of geological, geophysical and geochemical studies, the major plate boundaries (the Sunda-Banda subduction zone to the south, the Tarera-Aiduna Fault zone and the Seram Thrust to the east, and the Sorong Fault zone and Molucca Sea collision zone to the north) are now clearly identified. The age of the major tectonic structures is also better known. Geodetic measurements well constrain the Present time plate kinematics. We also consider the deformation history within eastern Indonesia, where numerous short-lived microplates and their related microcontinents successively accreted to the Asiatic margin. Moreover, magnetic anomalies identification of the North and South Banda Sea basins allows a precise kinematic reconstruction of the back-arc opening. We used the Plates software to test the coherency of our model, presented as a series of 4 plate reconstruction maps from 13 Ma to the present. Finally, the origin of oceanic domains restored by our reconstruction is discussed.

  9. Physics of the environment: possible Sumatra Tsunami warning times for large animals in Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David G.; Scheifele, Peter M.; Vonwinkle, William A.

    2005-04-01

    There has previously been significant anecdotal evidence that animals can anticipate or sense seismic events. It is known that large animals, specifically elephants, sense and utilize low frequency sound. The object of this paper is to estimate the possible warning times that large animals in Sri Lanka could have had of the Sumatra Tsunami, assuming they could sense low frequency wave transmission from the initial earthquake arriving by either atmospheric, ocean, or bottom paths. The atmospheric path appears to be the least efficient due to relatively high attenuation and poor coupling to the source. It would also give the shortest warning time: approximately 30 minutes. The ocean path via the deep sound channel, which has been shown by a previous Bermuda experiment to be an efficient means of coupling seismic energy to an island, would give a warning time of more than 1.5 hours. The bottom path(s), which gave strong received signals at a Sri Lanka seismic station, would give a warning time of about 2 hours. These estimates should provide a context for animal behavior reports.

  10. Postseismic GRACE and GPS observations indicate a rheology contrast above and below the Sumatra slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broerse, Taco; Riva, Riccardo; Simons, Wim; Govers, Rob; Vermeersen, Bert

    2015-07-01

    More than 7 years of observations of postseismic relaxation after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake provide an improving view on the deformation in the wide vicinity of the 2004 rupture. We include both Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity field data that show a large postseismic signal over the rupture area and GPS observations in the back arc region. With increasing time GPS and GRACE show contrasting relaxation styles that were not easily discernible on shorter time series. We investigate whether mantle creep can simultaneously explain the far-field surface displacements and the long-wavelength gravity changes. We interpret contrasts in the temporal behavior of the GPS-GRACE observations in terms of lateral variations in rheological properties of the asthenosphere below and above the slab. Based on 1-D viscoelastic models, our results support an (almost) order of magnitude contrast between oceanic lithosphere viscosity and continental viscosity, which likely means that the low viscosities frequently found from postseismic deformation after subduction earthquakes are valid only for the mantle wedge. Next to mantle creep, we also consider afterslip as an alternative mechanism for postseismic deformation. We investigate how the combination of GRACE and GPS data can better discriminate between different mechanisms of postseismic relaxation: distributed deformation (mantle creep) versus localized deformation (afterslip). We conclude that the GRACE-observed gravity changes rule out afterslip as the dominant mechanism explaining long-wavelength deformation even over the first year after the event.

  11. Multiple Moment Tensor Inversions For the December 26, 2004 Sumatra Earthquake Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    We present multiple moment-tensor solution of the December 26, 2004 Sumatra earthquake based upon adjoint methods. An objective function Φ that measures the goodness of waveform fit between data and synthetics is minimized. Synthetics are calculated by spectral-element simulations (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) in a 3D global earth model S362ANI to reduce the effect of heterogeneous structures. The Fréchet derivatives of Φ in the form δΦ = ∫T ∫VI(ɛ †ij)(x,T-t) δ(m_dot)ij(x,t)d3xdt, where δmij is the perturbation of moment density function and I(ɛ†ij)(x,T-t) denotes the time-integrated adjoint strain tensor, are calculated based upon adjoint methods implemented in SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. Our initial source model is obtained by monitoring the time-integrated adjoint strain tensors in the vicinity of the presumed source region. Source model parameters are iteratively updated by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient method to iteratively utilizing the calculated Φ and δΦ values. Our final inversion results show both similarities to and differences from previous source inversion results based on 1D background models.

  12. Multiple Moment Tensor Inversions For the December 26, 2004 Sumatra Earthquake Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, L.; Liu, Q.; Hjörleifsdóttir, V.

    2010-12-01

    We present multiple moment-tensor solution of the Dec 26, 2004 Sumatra earthquake based upon the adjoint methods. An objective function Φ(m), where m is the multiple source model, measures the goodness of waveform fit between data and synthetics. The Fréchet derivatives of Φ in the form δΦ = ∫∫I(ɛ†)(x,T-t)δmij_dot(x,t)dVdt, where δmij is the source model perturbation and I(ɛ†)(x,T-t) denotes the time-integrated adjoint strain tensor, are calculated based upon adjoint methods and spectral-element simulations (SPECFEM3D_GLOBE) in a 3D global earth model S362ANI. Our initial source model is obtained independently by monitoring the time-integrated adjoint strain tensors around the presumed source region. We then utilize the Φ and δΦ calculations in a conjugate-gradient method to iteratively invert for the source model. Our final inversion results show both similarities with and differences to previous source inversion results based on 1D earth models.

  13. Particle precipitation prior to large earthquakes of both the Sumatra and Philippine Regions: A statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidani, Cristiano

    2015-12-01

    A study of statistical correlation between low L-shell electrons precipitating into the atmosphere and strong earthquakes is presented. More than 11 years of the Medium Energy Protons Electrons Detector data from the NOAA-15 Sun-synchronous polar orbiting satellite were analysed. Electron fluxes were analysed using a set of adiabatic coordinates. From this, significant electron counting rate fluctuations were evidenced during geomagnetic quiet periods. Electron counting rates were compared to earthquakes by defining a seismic event L-shell obtained radially projecting the epicentre geographical positions to a given altitude towards the zenith. Counting rates were grouped in every satellite semi-orbit together with strong seismic events and these were chosen with the L-shell coordinates close to each other. NOAA-15 electron data from July 1998 to December 2011 were compared for nearly 1800 earthquakes with magnitudes larger than or equal to 6, occurring worldwide. When considering 30-100 keV precipitating electrons detected by the vertical NOAA-15 telescope and earthquake epicentre projections at altitudes greater that 1300 km, a significant correlation appeared where a 2-3 h electron precipitation was detected prior to large events in the Sumatra and Philippine Regions. This was in physical agreement with different correlation times obtained from past studies that considered particles with greater energies. The Discussion below of satellite orbits and detectors is useful for future satellite missions for earthquake mitigation.

  14. Congenital vestibular disease in captive Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) in Australasia.

    PubMed

    Wheelhouse, Jaimee L; Hulst, Frances; Beatty, Julia A; Hogg, Carolyn J; Child, Georgina; Wade, Claire M; Barrs, Vanessa R

    2015-11-01

    The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) is a critically endangered species in the wild. To ensure that demographic and genetic integrity are maintained in the longer term, those Sumatran tigers held in captivity are managed as a global population under a World Association of Zoos and Aquariums Global Species Management Plan (GSMP). A retrospective study, including segregation and pedigree analysis, was conducted to investigate potential cases of congenital vestibular disease (CVD) in captive Sumatran tigers in Australasian zoos using medical and husbandry records, as well as video footage obtained from 50 tigers between 1975 and 2013. Data from the GSMP Sumatran tiger studbook were made available for pedigree and segregation analysis. Fourteen cases of CVD in 13 Sumatran tiger cubs and one hybrid cub (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae × Panthera tigris) were identified. Vestibular signs including head tilt, circling, ataxia, strabismus and nystagmus were observed between birth and 2 months of age. These clinical signs persisted for a median of 237 days and had resolved by 2 years of age in all cases. Pedigree analysis revealed that all affected tigers were closely related and shared a single common ancestor in the last four generations. A genetic cause for the disease is suspected and, based on pedigree and segregation analysis, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is likely. Further investigations to determine the world-wide prevalence and underlying pathology of this disorder are warranted. PMID:26403953

  15. Evaluating physiological stress in Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) managed in Australian zoos

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Tempe; Narayan, Edward J.; Magrath, Michael J. L.; Roe, Sheila; Clark, Giles; Nicolson, Vere; Martin-Vegue, Patrick; Mucci, Al; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoid quantification using non-invasive methods provides a powerful tool for assessing the health and welfare of wildlife in zoo-based programmes. In this study, we provide baseline data on faecal-based glucocorticoid (cortisol) monitoring of Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) managed at the Melbourne Zoo in Victoria, Australia. We sampled five tigers daily for 60 days. Faecal cortisol metabolites (FCMs) in tiger faecal extracts were quantified using enzyme immunoassays that were successfully validated using parallelism and accuracy recovery checks. Two female tigers had significantly higher mean FCM levels than the two males and another female, suggesting that females may have higher FCM levels. A significant elevation was noted in the FCM levels for one female 2 days after she was darted and anaesthetized; however, the FCM levels returned to baseline levels within 3 days after the event. Comparative analysis of FCM levels of tigers sampled at Melbourne Zoo with tigers sampled earlier at two other Australian Zoos (Dreamworld Themepark and Australia Zoo) showed that FCM levels varied between zoos. Differences in the enclosure characteristics, timing of sampling, size and composition of groupings and training procedures could all contribute to this variation. Overall, we recommend the use of non-invasive sampling for the assessment of adrenocortical activity of felids managed in zoos in Australia and internationally in order to improve the welfare of these charismatic big cats. PMID:27293659

  16. An optimal renewable energy mix for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Sylvain; Patrizio, Piera; Yowargana, Ping; Kraxner, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Indonesia has experienced a constant increase of the use of petroleum and coal in the power sector, while the share of renewable sources has remained stable at 6% of the total energy production during the last decade. As its domestic energy demand undeniably continues to grow, Indonesia is committed to increase the production of renewable energy. Mainly to decrease its dependency on fossil fuel-based resources, and to decrease the anthropogenic emissions, the government of Indonesia has established a 23 percent target for renewable energy by 2025, along with a 100 percent electrification target by 2020 (the current rate is 80.4 percent). In that respect, Indonesia has abundant resources to meet these targets, but there is - inter alia - a lack of proper integrated planning, regulatory support, investment, distribution in remote areas of the Archipelago, and missing data to back the planning. To support the government of Indonesia in its sustainable energy system planning, a geographic explicit energy modeling approach is applied. This approach is based on the energy systems optimization model BeWhere, which identifies the optimal location of energy conversion sites based on the minimization of the costs of the supply chain. The model will incorporate the existing fossil fuel-based infrastructures, and evaluate the optimal costs, potentials and locations for the development of renewable energy technologies (i.e., wind, solar, hydro, biomass and geothermal based technologies), as well as the development of biomass co-firing in existing coal plants. With the help of the model, an optimally adapted renewable energy mix - vis-à-vis the competing fossil fuel based resources and applicable policies in order to promote the development of those renewable energy technologies - will be identified. The development of the optimal renewable energy technologies is carried out with special focus on nature protection and cultural heritage areas, where feedstock (e.g., biomass

  17. Along-arc geochemical and isotopic variations in Javanese volcanic rocks: 'crustal' versus 'source' contamination at the Sunda arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, H.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Turner, S.; Macpherson, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    lavas. This information presented will help elucidate the nature of the transition between the continental and oceanic basement to the arc, which is expected to lie between Sumatra and East Java. Whitford, D.J. (1975) Strontium isotopic studies of the volcanic rocks of the Sunda arc, Indonesia, and their petrogenesis. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 39: 12871302. Handley, H.K., Macpherson, C. G., Davidson, J. P., Berlo, K. & Lowry, D. (2007). Constraining Fluid and Sediment Contributions to Subduction-Related Magmatism in Indonesia: Ijen Volcanic Complex. J. Petrol. 48, 1155-1183. Handley, H.K., Davidson, J.P., Macpherson, C.G. & Stimac .J.A. (2008). Untangling differentiation in arc lavas: constraints from unusual minor and trace element variations at Salak Volcano, Indonesia. Chem. Geol. 255, 360-376. Handley, H.K., Macpherson, C.G., Davidson, J.P. (2010). Geochemical and Sr-O isotopic constraints on magmatic differentiation at Gede Volcanic Complex, Java, Indonesia. Contrib. Mineral. Pet. 159, 885-908. Handley, H.K., Turner, S., Macpherson, C.G., Gertisser, R., Davidson, J.P. (2011) Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: limitations of Hf anomalies and Sm/Hf ratios as input indicators. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 304, 212-223.

  18. Efficient post-disaster patient transportation and transfer: experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue in Aceh after the 2004 Asian tsunami.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Hui; Zheng, Jing-Chen

    2014-08-01

    This descriptive study aimed to present experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue after the 2004 Asian tsunami in terms of transportation and transfer of patients and coordination of medical rescue forces. After the tsunami, numerous rescue institutions and international organizations rushed to Aceh province to aid in the rescue work. To coordinate various aspects of medical rescue efforts, an airport-based joint patient transfer center was developed. Within the framework of the joint transport center, rescue teams, militaries, and international institutions worked together to jointly triage, rapidly treat, and transfer patients. As members of the Chinese International Search and Rescue team, we were involved in the rescue efforts in the joint patient transfer center, and treated and transferred a total of 217 injured patients, the majority of whom were triaged as level II, followed by level III, and level I. The top three diseases were trauma/wound infection, respiratory system disease, and digestive system disease. The airport-based joint patient transfer center provided an efficient mechanism for successfully coordinating various aspects of the medical rescue efforts to transfer patients. Large-scale air transport, available health resources, and effective triage criteria also played an essential role in patient transportation and transfer. PMID:25102536

  19. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Register of September 20, 2013 (78 FR 57881). The conference was held in Washington, DC, on October 23... COMMISSION Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in...

  20. Sculpture of Indonesia. [Teacher's Packet for a Teacher Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, CA.

    This teacher's packet accompanies a slide presentation on the sculpture found in Indonesia. The packet contains: (1) a slide list with descriptions listing time period and dimensions of each piece; (2) an introductory essay describing the setting of Indonesia, the Central Javanese Period and the Eastern Javanese Period; (3) descriptions of how to…

  1. Cultural Aspects of Language Imposition in Malaya, Singapore, and Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickley, Verner C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper distinguishes Bahasa Malaysia (Malaysian language) and Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian language) according to type and function and summarizes their development as the national languages of Malaya, Singapore, and Indonesia. It presents a short, historical account of the spread, through religious and educational activities, of the English…

  2. Avian influenza in Indonesia: Observations of disease detection in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza, subtype H5N1, also known as highly pathogenic notifiable avian influenza (HPNAI), has spread throughout Indonesia since 2003. As of June 2007 there have been a total of 100 documented human cases in Indonesia, 80 of which have been fatal. Although efforts have be...

  3. Educational Decentralization and Behavior Change Needs in Indonesia. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Joseph

    This working paper examines behavior change as a key element in creating an enabling environment to sustain educational reform in Indonesia. It recommends elevating the importance of a formalized behavior change framework and methodology so that future plans for educational reform in Indonesia will include social marketing as a planned…

  4. Indonesia: Internal Conditions, the Global Economy, and Regional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Helga; Sheppard, Eric S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes recent trends in the economic and regional development of Indonesia and examines the internal and external forces influencing the process. Shows how these forces account for the rise of a strong centralized state. Discusses Indonesia's current problems. Includes tables, maps, and graphs of economic investment figures, world trade, and…

  5. 75 FR 54087 - Education Trade Mission to Indonesia and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... International Trade Administration Education Trade Mission to Indonesia and Vietnam AGENCY: International Trade... education trade mission to Indonesia and Vietnam, April 3-8, 2011. Led by a senior Department of Commerce... accredited U.S. education institutions. However, the emphasis will be on community colleges,...

  6. Mari Belajar Sopan Santun Bahasa Indonesia. [Multimedia Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFon, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    Filmed on location in East Java, Indonesia, the Mari Belajar Sopan Santun Bahasa Indonesia set consists of two videotapes, a manual, and extended notes on the individual video scenarios. The videos present interactions among Indonesian native speakers and foreign language learners as they engage in tasks and activities of everyday life. The…

  7. "Selamat Datang di Indonesia": Learning about Chemistry and Chemistry Education in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppola, Brian P.

    2008-01-01

    In 2007--60 years after chemistry was established as an academic subject in independent Indonesia--representatives from the country's 57 chemistry departments (in public institutions) gathered to discuss issues of mutual interest. The author served as a Fulbright senior specialist during and after the conference; he describes the current state of…

  8. The 2004 Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami: Lessons Learned in Subduction Zone Science and Emergency Management for the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, John F.

    2015-03-01

    The 26 December 2004, Mw 9.3 Sumatra earthquake and tsunami was a pivotal turning point in our awareness of the dangers posed by subduction zone earthquakes and tsunamis. This earthquake was the world's largest in 40 years, and it produced the world's deadliest tsunami. This earthquake ruptured a subduction zone that has many similarities to the Cascadia Subduction Zone. In this article, I summarize lessons learned from this tragedy, and make comparisons with potential rupture characteristics, slip distribution, deformation patterns, and aftershock patterns for Cascadia using theoretical modeling and interseismic observations. Both subduction zones are approximately 1,100-1,300 km in length. Both have similar convergence rates and represent oblique subduction. Slip along the subduction fault during the 26 December earthquake is estimated at 15-25 m, similar to values estimated for Cascadia. The width of the rupture, ~80-150 km estimated from modeling seismic and geodetic data, is similar to the width of the "locked and transition zone" estimated for Cascadia. Coseismic subsidence of up to 2 m along the Sumatra coast is also similar to that predicted for parts of northern Cascadia, based on paleoseismic evidence. In addition to scientific lessons learned, the 2004 tsunami provided many critical lessons for emergency management and preparedness. As a result of that tragedy, a number of preparedness initiatives are now underway to promote awareness of earthquake and tsunami hazards along the west coast of North America, and plans are underway to develop prototype tsunami and earthquake warning systems along Cascadia. Lessons learned from the great Sumatra earthquake and tsunami tragedy, both through scientific studies and through public education initiatives, will help to reduce losses during future earthquakes in Cascadia and other subduction zones of the world.

  9. Evidence of self organization in great Sumatra earthquake recurrence times: Implications for coupling of tidal forcing and tectonic stress accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R. K.; Puli, K.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed inter- event time series of earthquake activities (M≥ 5) of Sumatra region spanning over 1973 to 2009 using techniques of nonlinear dynamics. The earthquake data were taken from the USGS catalogue centered on latitude 3.240N and longitude 95.825E. As a first step, in our analyses we computed the rank order statistics which revealed mixed response of earthquake dynamics indicating distinct breaks in slope of the rank order. This suggests that earthquake dynamics in this region is partly unstable and partly "self-organized" with a random tail. Comparison of return maps of the earthquakes inter- event time series with those representing random, stochastic and chaotic processes shows a quasi-deterministic behavior of earthquake genesis in the region. We further assessed the dimensionality of earthquake-generating mechanisms using a nonlinear predictor technique on two dimensional phase portrait constructed by recurrence time series. The nonlinear forecasting analysis suggests that the earthquake processes in the Sumatra region evolve on a non-random low-dimensional chaotic plane. Further, "K2" Entropy revealed a coherent structure indicating the deterministic dynamical pattern. This analysis is consistent with "self-organized" processes which could be explained invoking earth's internal dynamics, where, impulsively derived interdependencies cascades through the stress generated by tectonic plate movement. Our results, however, do not preclude the role of coupling of the above self-organized system with tidal forcing. Evidence for such a coupling in this region exists as 'triggering force". Keywords: Sumatra Earthquakes, Quasi-deterministic, Stochastic, Chaotic, Self-organized, K2 entropy, Phase portrait.

  10. Information on the Earth's Deep Interior Conveyed by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake Using Superconducting Gravimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosat, S.; Watada, S.; Sato, T.; Tamura, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The recent Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of magnitude Mw > 9 on 2004 December 26th has strongly excited the low-frequency seismic modes and, in particular, the degree one 2S1 mode is observed for the first time without any stacking. This mode corresponds to the first overtone of the sub-seismic mode 1S1, the so-called Slichter triplet (Slichter, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 1961). On the one hand, theoretical computations suggest that the Slichter modes could not have been excited with sufficient amplitude to be detected by superconducting gravimeters (SGs) on the Earth's surface. The maximum surface gravity effect of 1S1 after Sumatra event is 0.3 nGal, that is to say 0.3 10-12 g, where g is the mean absolute gravity value on the Earth's surface, corresponding to a free air displacement of 10-3 mm (1 nm). On the other hand, the core-sensitive mode 3S2 and the fundamental radial mode 0S0 were strongly excited, meaning that the earthquake radiated much energy toward the core. 0S0 is a radial fundamental spheroidal mode called "breathing mode" of the Earth and corresponds to changes in the Earth's circumference. The high stability of SG records has enabled us to follow the time decay of 0S0 amplitude till the second Sumatra event on March 28th 2005 and to estimate 0S0 quality factor at a value of 5513 +- 8 from the weighted mean of 12 SG record estimates. Amplitude measurements of 0S0 at most SG sites in the world reveal a latitude dependency that we try to explain by theory. The amplitude deviation of 0S0 reaches +- 2% while the calibration errors of SGs are usually less than 0.2%.

  11. From Sumatra 2004 to Tuhoku-Oki 2011: what we learn about Tsunami detection by ionospheric sounding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, G.; Rolland, L.; Coisson, P.; Watada, S.; Makela, J. J.; Hebert, H.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    The recent tsunamigenic Tohoku earthquake (2011) strongly affirms, again, after the 26 December 2004, the necessity to open new paradigms in oceanic monitoring. Detection of ionospheric anomalies following the Sumatra earthquake tsunami (e.g., Occhipinti et al. 2006) demonstrated that ionosphere is sensitive to earthquake and tsunami propagation: ground and oceanic vertical displacement induces acoustic-gravity waves propagating within the neutral atmosphere and detectable in the ionosphere. Observations supported by modelling proved that tsunamigenic ionospheric anomalies are deterministic and reproducible by numerical modeling via the ocean/neutral-atmosphere/ionosphere coupling mechanism (Occhipinti et al., 2008). To prove that the tsunami signature in the ionosphere is routinely detected we show here perturbations of total electron content (TEC) measured by GPS and following tsunamigenic eartquakes from 2004 to 2010 (Rolland et al. 2010, Occhipinti et al., 2013, Occhipinti, 2014), nominally, Sumatra (26 December, 2004 and 12 September, 2007), Chile (14 November, 2007), Samoa (29 September, 2009) and the recent Tohoku-Oki (11 Mars, 2011). In addition to GPS/TEC observations close to the epicenter and measured by GEONET network, new exciting measurements in the far-field were performed by Airglow measurement in Hawaii: those measurements show the propagation of the IGWs induced by the Tohoku tsunami in the Pacific Ocean (Occhipinti et al., 2011). Based on the observations close to the epicenter, mainly performed by GPS networks located in Sumatra, Chile and Japan, we highlight the TEC perturbation observed within the first hour after the seismic rupture. This perturbation contains informations about the ground displacement, as well as the consequent sea surface displacement resulting in the tsunami. In this talk we present all this new tsunami observations in the ionosphere and we discuss, under the light of modelling, the potential role of ionospheric sounding

  12. From Sumatra 2004 to Tohoku-Oki 2011: The systematic GPS detection of the ionospheric signature induced by tsunamigenic earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, Giovanni; Rolland, Lucie; Lognonné, Philippe; Watada, Shingo

    2013-06-01

    The recent tsunamigenic earthquake in Tohoku (11 March 2011) strongly affirms, one more time after the Sumatra event (26 December 2004), the necessity to open new paradigms in oceanic monitoring. Detection of ionospheric anomalies following the Sumatra tsunami demonstrated that ionosphere is sensitive to the tsunami propagation. Observations supported by modeling proved that tsunamigenic ionospheric anomalies are deterministic and reproducible by numerical modeling via the ocean/neutral-atmosphere/ionosphere coupling mechanism. In essence, tsunami induces internal gravity waves propagating within the neutral atmosphere and detectable in the ionosphere. Most of the ionospheric anomalies produced by tsunamis were observed in the far field where the tsunami signature in the ionosphere is clearly identifiable. In this work, we highlight the early signature in the ionosphere produced by tsunamigenic earthquakes and observed by GPS, measuring the total electron content, close to the epicenter. We focus on the first hour after the seismic rupture. We demonstrate that acoustic-gravity waves generated at the epicenter by the direct vertical displacement of the source rupture and the gravity wave coupled with the tsunami can be discriminated with theoretical support. We illustrate the systematic nature of those perturbations showing several observations: nominally the ionospheric perturbation following the tsunamigenic earthquakes in Sumatra on 26 December 2004 and 12 September 2007; in Chile on 14 November 2007; in Samoa on 29 September 2009; and the recent catastrophic Tohoku-Oki event on 11 March 2011. Based on the analytical description, we provide tracks for further modeling efforts and clues for the interpretation of complex—and thus often misleading—observations. The routine detection of the early ionospheric anomalies following the rupture highlights the role of ionospheric sounding in the future ocean monitoring and tsunami detection.

  13. Therapeutic apheresis in Asia: An Indonesia single center experience.

    PubMed

    Triyono, Teguh; Vrielink, Hans

    2015-06-01

    In developing countries, like Indonesia, apheresis is still a relative new procedure. Nowadays, therapeutic apheresis procedures are performed in the field of hematology and neurology, especially in the teaching hospitals in Indonesia. Therapeutic apheresis procedure, that is, leukocytapheresis, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), and thrombocytapheresis are already performed. In the period 2009-2013, 204 apheresis procedures in 137 patients to reduce the leukocytes, 72 TPE procedures in 17 patients, and 14 thrombocyte reductions were performed in the Sardjito hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. In the future, to improve the therapeutic apheresis implementation, it is important to increase the insurance coverage and also should be considered to introduce the apheresis medicine into the curriculum of appropriate physician programs in Indonesia. Especially in Indonesia, a lot of efforts are still being needed to improve implementation of therapeutic apheresis. PMID:25116034

  14. Urban shear-wave reflection seismics: Reconstruction support by combined shallow seismic and engineering geology investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Guenther, A.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, P.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the massive reconstruction activities in the Aceh province (Northern Sumatra) were promoted by the Republic of Indonesia and the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The aims of the project MANGEONAD (Management of Georisk Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam). are to establish geoscientific on the ground support for a sustainable development and management of save building constructions, lifelines, infrastructure and also natural resources. Therefore, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in close combination to engineering geology investigations in the period between 2005-2009 since depth and internal structure of the Krueng Aceh River delta (mainly young alluvial sediments) were widely unknown. Due to the requirements in the densely populated Banda Aceh region, lacking also traffic infrastructure, a small and lightweight engineering seismic setup of high mobility and high subsurface resolution capability was chosen. The S-wave land streamer system with 48 channels was applied successfully together with the ELVIS vibratory source using S- and P-waves on paved roads within the city of Banda Aceh. The performance of the S-wave system enabled the detailed seismic investigation of the shallow subsurface down to 50-150 m depth generating shaking frequencies between 20 Hz to 200 Hz. This also provides depth information extending the maximum depths of boreholes and Standard Penetrometer Testings (SPT), which could only be applied to max. 20 m depth. To integrate the results gained from all three methods, and further to provide a fast statistical analysis tool for engineering use, the Information System Engineering Geology (ISEG, BGR) was developed. This geospatial information tool includes the seismic data, all borehole information, geotechnical SPT and laboratory results from samples available in the investigation area. Thereby, the geotechnical 3D analysis of the subsurface units is enabled. The

  15. Translating Developing Science into Public Awareness and Social Organisation in W. Sumatra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R.; McDowell, S.; McCloskey, J.

    2009-04-01

    Social idiosyncrasies confounding cross-cultural scientific interventions on an intra-regional and international scale continue to blight the positive benefits robust science offers to vulnerable communities inhabiting areas prone to natural hazards. The sustained malice inflicted by these phenomena upon socioeconomic systems epitomises the perilous task facing mitigation bodies attempting to communicate scientific forecasts and interweave technical knowledge into social policy internationally. This quandary continues to confront disaster officials and scientists in Sumatra. Palaeoseismological studies, coupled with a developing understanding of stress transference between earthquakes, reveal that the Mentawai segment of the Sumatran forearc is the most plausible candidate for future rupture. Simulations of tsunami propagation and inundation illustrate that the coastal regions of western Sumatran, inhabited by approximately 2 million people, lie in immediate mortal threat. Many Sumatrans' live with stark memories of the 1600 km megathrust rupture in December 2004, which spawned one of the worst global natural atrocities of recent time. The earthquake accelerated collaboration between seismologists, geophysicists and geologists and has produced unrivalled advances in understanding fault locations, geometries and potential rupture characteristics of the Sumatran forearc. Nowhere else on earth are scientists more aware of the impending threat of another magnitude 8+ megathrust earthquake. However with the twenty-first century being tainted by natural disasters which have typified the blatantly ambiguous linkages which exist between science and society, assessing to what extent this notion is exemplified in the Sumatran context is imperative. Here we begin to present the results from a social survey, conducted in the Sumatran cities of Padang and Bengkulu between May and September 2008. The campaign sought to dissect the broader societal complexities and moral values

  16. Indonesia and OPEC: the economic costs of cartel membership

    SciTech Connect

    Linquiti, P.D.

    1982-09-01

    The primary focus of this study is on why the Indonesians have cut production in the second quarter of 1982. There appears to be only one answer. The spector of triggering a price war seems powerful enough to deter Indonesia from acting against the dictates of the cartel. Additionally, the introduction of more competition into the oil market - the result of increased Indonesian production - can only cut the long-run price of oil and reduce the present discounted value of Indonesia's oil. Futhermore, it is critical to note that the other three scenarios hinge on Indonesia having excess capacity to boost production and capture added revenues. Excess capacity is the key to undercutting the cartel. By lowering prices, a producer is doomed to earn lower revenues unless it can up production. This has never been an option for Indonesia because the current level of excess capacity is a new phenomenon. Since the rise of President Suharto in 1967, Indonesia has consistently produced its oil at full capacity. Indonesia has thus spent the last fifteen years in a situation where there was little, if anything, to be gained from undercutting the cartel. Not surprisingly, Indonesia has not acted quickly to increase production in violation of OPEC ceilings. Only if the soft market continues for a long period of time does the cost of OPEC membership impose a serious burden on Indonesia. For a host of political and economic reasons, Indonesia seems willing to wait out the current cartel disarray. If the market continues its present weakness and OPEC membership becomes truly costly, the Indonesians will find it quite difficult to adhere to coordinated pricing and production policies. If however, the world market tightens again, Indonesia may soon find itself back at full production, with no incentive to undercut the cartel.

  17. Long-period spectral features of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 earthquake rupture process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clévédé, E.; Bukchin, B.; Favreau, P.; Mostinskiy, A.; Aoudia, A.; Panza, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the spatial variability of the seismic radiation spectral content of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 earthquake. We determine the integral estimates of source geometry, duration and rupture propagation given by the stress glut moments of total degree 2 of different source models. These models are constructed from a single or a joint use of different observations including seismology, geodesy, altimetry and tide gauge data. The comparative analysis shows coherency among the different models and no strong contradictions are found between the integral estimates of geodetic and altimetric models, and those retrieved from very long period seismic records (up to 2000-3000 s). The comparison between these results and the integral estimates derived from observed surface wave spectra in period band from 500 to 650 s suggests that the northern part of the fault (to the north of 8°N near Nicobar Islands) did not radiate long period seismic waves, that is, period shorter than 650 s at least. This conclusion is consistent with the existing composite short and long rise time tsunami model: with short rise time of slip in the southern part of the fault and very long rise time of slip at the northern part. This complex space-time slip evolution can be reproduced by a simple dynamic model of the rupture assuming a crude phenomenological mechanical behaviour of the rupture interface at the fault scales combining an effective slip-controlled exponential weakening effect, related to possible friction and damage breakdown processes of the fault zone, and an effective linear viscous strengthening effect, related to possible interface lubrication processes. While the rupture front speed remains unperturbed with initial short slip duration, a slow creep wave propagates behind the rupture front in the case of viscous effects accounting for the long slip duration and the radiation characteristics in the northern segment.

  18. Constructivist learning at the science-policy interface: tsunami science informing disaster policy in West Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, J.; Dewi, P. R.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Sieh, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    Science communication often falls short when it is based on the blank-slate assumption that if we can just get the message right, then the information will be received and understood as intended. In contrast, constructivist learning theory and practice suggest that we all actively construct our knowledge from a variety of information sources and through particular, novel associations with our prior knowledge. This constructed knowledge can be quite different from any of its original sources, such as a particular science communication. Successful communication requires carefully examining how people construct their knowledge of the topic of interest. Examples from our outreach work to connect hazard-science research with disaster-risk reduction practice in West Sumatra illustrate the mismatch between expert and stakeholder/public mental models of the characteristics of tsunamigenic earthquakes. There are incorrect conceptions that seawater always withdraws before a tsunami, and that a tsunami can be produced by an earthquake only if the epicenter is located at the ocean trench. These incorrect conceptions arise from generalizations based on recent, local earthquake experiences, as well as from unintended consequences of science outreach, science education, and, in one case, the way that tsunami modelling is graphically presented in scientific journals. We directly address these incorrect conceptions in our discussions with government officials and others; as a result, the local disaster-management agency has changed its policies to reflect an increased understanding of the hazard. This outreach success would not have been possible without eliciting the prior knowledge of our audiences through dialogue.

  19. Differences in tsunami generation between the December 26, 2004 and March 28, 2005 Sumatra earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Bilek, S.L.; Arcas, D.; Titov, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    Source parameters affecting tsunami generation and propagation for the Mw > 9.0 December 26, 2004 and the Mw = 8.6 March 28, 2005 earthquakes are examined to explain the dramatic difference in tsunami observations. We evaluate both scalar measures (seismic moment, maximum slip, potential energy) and finite-source repre-sentations (distributed slip and far-field beaming from finite source dimensions) of tsunami generation potential. There exists significant variability in local tsunami runup with respect to the most readily available measure, seismic moment. The local tsunami intensity for the December 2004 earthquake is similar to other tsunamigenic earthquakes of comparable magnitude. In contrast, the March 2005 local tsunami was deficient relative to its earthquake magnitude. Tsunami potential energy calculations more accurately reflect the difference in tsunami severity, although these calculations are dependent on knowledge of the slip distribution and therefore difficult to implement in a real-time system. A significant factor affecting tsunami generation unaccounted for in these scalar measures is the location of regions of seafloor displacement relative to the overlying water depth. The deficiency of the March 2005 tsunami seems to be related to concentration of slip in the down-dip part of the rupture zone and the fact that a substantial portion of the vertical displacement field occurred in shallow water or on land. The comparison of the December 2004 and March 2005 Sumatra earthquakes presented in this study is analogous to previous studies comparing the 1952 and 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquakes and tsunamis, in terms of the effect slip distribution has on local tsunamis. Results from these studies indicate the difficulty in rapidly assessing local tsunami runup from magnitude and epicentral location information alone.

  20. Flowers are an important food for small apes in southern Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Lappan, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Flowers are included in the diets of many primates, but are not generally regarded as making an important contribution to primate energy budgets. However, observations of a number of lemur, platyrrhine, and cercopithecine populations suggest that some flower species may function as key primate fallback foods in periods of low abundance of preferred foods (generally ripe fruits), and that flowers may be preferred foods in some cases. I report heavy reliance on flowers during some study months for a siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus) population in southern Sumatra. Siamangs at Way Canguk spent 12% of feeding time eating flowers from October 2000 to August 2002, and in 1 month flower-feeding time exceeded 40% of total feeding time. The overall availabilities of fig and nonfig fruits, flowers, and new leaves in the study area were not significant predictors of the proportion of time that siamangs spent consuming any plant part. However, flower-feeding time was highest in months when nonfig fruit-feeding time was lowest, and a switch from heavy reliance on fruit to substantial flower consumption was associated with a shift in activity patterns toward reduced energy expenditure, which is consistent with the interpretation that flowers may function as a fallback food for Way Canguk siamangs. Hydnocarpus gracilis, a plant from which siamangs only consume flowers, was the third-most-commonly consumed plant at Way Canguk (after Ficus spp. and Dracontomelon dao), and flowers from this plant were available in most months. It is possible that relatively high local availability of these important siamang plant foods is one factor promoting high siamang density in the study area. PMID:19459180

  1. Seismotectonics of a diffuse plate boundary: Observations off the Sumatra-Andaman trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aderhold, K.; Abercrombie, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    The actively deforming Indo-Australian intraplate region off the Sumatra-Andaman trench hosted the largest strike-slip earthquake recorded by modern instruments, the 2012 Mw 8.6 Wharton Basin earthquake, closely followed by a Mw 8.2 aftershock. These two large events ruptured either parallel north-south trending faults or a series of north-south and nearly perpendicular east-west fault planes. No active east-west faults had been identified in the region prior to these earthquakes, and the seismic rupture for these two earthquakes extended past the 800°C isotherm for lithosphere of this age, deep into the oceanic mantle and possibly beyond the inferred transition to ductile failure. To investigate the seismic behavior of this region, we calculate moment tensors with teleseismic body waves for 6.0 ≤ Mw ≤ 8.0 intraplate strike-slip earthquakes. The centroid depths are located throughout the seismogenic mantle and could extend through the oceanic crust, but are generally well constrained by the 600°C isotherm and do not appear to rupture beyond the 800°C isotherm. We conclude that while many earthquakes are consistent with a thermal limit to depth, large magnitude earthquakes may be able to rupture typically aseismic zones. We also perform finite-fault modeling for Mw ≥ 7.0 earthquakes and find a slight preference for rupture on east-west oriented faults for the 2012 Mw 7.2 and 2005 Mw 7.2 earthquakes. This lends support for the presence of active east-west faults in this region, consistent with the majority of previously published models of the 2012 M8+ earthquakes.

  2. Fault interactions and triggering during the 10 January 2012 Mw 7.2 Sumatra earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenyuan; Shearer, Peter M.

    2016-03-01

    The 10 January 2012 Mw 7.2 Sumatra earthquake in the Wharton basin occurred 3 months before the great Mw 8.6 and Mw 8.2 earthquakes in the same region, which had complex ruptures and are the largest strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded. Teleseismic P wave back projection of the Mw 7.2 earthquake images a unilateral rupture lasting ˜40 s without observable frequency dependency (low frequency, 0.05-0.3 Hz, high frequency, 0.3-1 Hz). In addition to radiation bursts during the Mw 7.2 main shock, coherent energy releases from 50 to 75 s and from 100 to 125 s are observed about 143 km northeast of the main shock rupture and landward of the trench. Analysis of globally recorded P waves, in both 0.02-0.05 Hz velocity records and 1-5 Hz stacked envelope functions, confirms the presence of coherent sources during the time windows. The observed energy bursts are likely to be large early aftershocks occurring on or near the subduction interface. Both dynamic and static triggering could have induced these early aftershocks, as they initiated after the surface wave passed by, and the Coulomb stress perturbations from the Mw 7.2 main shock promote earthquakes in the observed locations. The earthquake sequence is a clear example of a seaward-intraplate strike-slip earthquake triggering landward-intraplate earthquakes in the same region, in contrast to previously reported normal-reverse or reverse-normal interactions at subduction zones.

  3. Islam, society and development: focus on Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Jusuf, M

    1972-01-01

    After a review of the traditional society as found in Indonesia, the role of Islam in this changing, modernizing society, and changes which must be made by religious leaders to cope with development, which is bettering life for the people, are discussed. Centuries of oppressive colonial rule have kept many Indonesian Moslem village-families locked into a passive, subsistence way of life. A fatalistic mentality makes family and children together with performing the religious rituals the chief rewards of earthly life. With modernization many young people have left the villages hoping for economic opportunity. Instead they do not have technical skills and they find themselves without either the material advancements promised by modernization or the traditional dignity and pride which is found in the village family. Through centuries of distortion the position of Islam on the family, which is one of love and justice, became viewed as a system in which the traditional faith no longer meets modern situations and church leaders do not help matters by protesting and exhorting insteading of going back to basic truths and showing the way to a better life. The 1st field which demands attention is the attitude toward human reproduction. Leaders should find verses like Al Baqarah verse 233 and explain in easy language to village families why responsible parents do not have more children than they can care for. The 2nd step is to teach families to take social and family welfare into their own hands and not to submit to fatalism. The 3rd is to establish educational systems which systematically change families' attitudes and awaken them from outmoded practices. It is shown that of 28 million school age children in Indonesia, only 13 million can attend schools. By helping in this educational task, religious leaders will improve the outlook for these children and become a vital force in a changing Indonesia. PMID:12256866

  4. Effect of 3-D viscoelastic structure on post-seismic relaxation from the 2004 M = 9.2 Sumatra earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.; Banerjee, P.; Grijalva, K.; Nagarajan, B.; Burgmann, R.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 M=9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake profoundly altered the state of stress in a large volume surrounding the ???1400 km long rupture. Induced mantle flow fields and coupled surface deformation are sensitive to the 3-D rheology structure. To predict the post-seismic motions from this earthquake, relaxation of a 3-D spherical viscoelastic earth model is simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The quasi-static deformation basis set and solution on the 3-D model is constructed using: a spherically stratified viscoelastic earth model with a linear stress-strain relation; an aspherical perturbation in viscoelastic structure; a 'static'mode basis set consisting of Earth's spheroidal and toroidal free oscillations; a "viscoelastic" mode basis set; and interaction kernels that describe the coupling among viscoelastic and static modes. Application to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake illustrates the profound modification of the post-seismic flow field at depth by a slab structure and similarly large effects on the near-field post-seismic deformation field at Earth's surface. Comparison with post-seismic GPS observations illustrates the extent to which viscoelastic relaxation contributes to the regional post-seismic deformation. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 RAS.

  5. Linear volcanic segments in the central Sunda Arc, Indonesia, identified using Hough Transform analysis: Implications for arc lithosphere control upon volcano distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacey, Adam; Macpherson, Colin G.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.

    2013-05-01

    Hough Transform analysis is used as an objective means to constrain volcano distribution in the central Sunda Arc, Indonesia. Most volcanoes in the arc define four en echelon, linear segments, each of 500-700 km length. Javan volcanoes that do not lie on these segments either (i) formed at an early stage in the history of the arc and erupted products that are petrologically and geochemically distinct from typical arc magma, or (ii) lie along other mapped structures. The en echelon distribution of volcanoes in the central Sunda Arc is best explained as originating from two possible sources. First, interaction with the subducting Indo-Australian Plate may induce stress in the arc lithosphere generating pathways for magma to exploit. Second, downward flexure of the arc lithosphere, as a result of mantle flow or loading by the arc, would also establish arc-normal tension towards the base of the lithosphere, where magma is supplied to volcanic systems. To the west and east of the central Sunda Arc deviations from the distribution of long, en echelon, linear segments can be understood as responses to specific stress fields in the arc lithosphere of Sumatra and eastern Nusa Tenggara, respectively. Control of volcano distribution by arc lithosphere explains why there are large variations in the depth from volcanoes to the zone of slab seismicity in the central Sunda Arc, where there is little variation in slab geometry or the rate of plate convergence.

  6. Seismicity in Andaman - Nicobar - Java - Sumatra Region and its Bearing on the Volcanism in the Region, With Special Reference to the Barren Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M.; Chandrasekharam, D.

    2005-12-01

    Barren Island volcano in the Andaman Sea (Indian Ocean) is the lone active volcano in the Indian Subcontinent. The island showed renewed activity (commenced from May 28, 2005) after the great earthquake of Sumatra (December 26, 2004) along with increased mud volcanism in Bartang (south of Barren Island) and first ever reported mud volcanism on Narcondum (north of Barren Island) in the Andaman-Nicobar Archipelago. These islands lie on a volcanic arc that extends from the extinct volcanoes like Mt. Popa, Mt. Wuntho of Myanmar in the north to the active volcanoes of Sumatra and Java in the south. Regional tectonism of this region is largely driven by the subduction of the Indo-Australian plate beneath the Asian (Burmese) plate. Regional seismicity pattern reflects different tectonic regimes, namely, thrust dominated subduction front, strike-slip faulting (west Andaman fault) and the extensional processes in the Andaman spreading center. Earthquakes of magnitude more than 4.5 on Richter Scale are quite frequent in the region and are related to the subduction-related processes. Continuous seismic activities in the Andaman-Nicobar-Java-Sumatra region cannot be dealt with separately as evident from the increased volcanic activities following the great earthquake of Sumatra. More recently increased seismic activity in the vicinity of the dormant volcano of Mt. Toba is very much likely to culminate in a catastrophic eruption of this volcano in near future.

  7. Variability of raindrop size distribution over Sumatra and its effect on the Z-R relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, Marzuki; Randeu, W. L.; Kozu, T.; Shimomai, T.; Hashiguchi, H.; Schoenhuber, M.

    2010-05-01

    A systematic and intensive analysis is performed on 2 years (2006-2007) of two-dimensional video distrometer (2DVD) data to re-investigate the variability of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) over Sumatra and their impact on the radar reflectivity (Z) to rainfall rate (R) conversion. Linear regression on log-transformed values both R over Z (LREG1) and Z over R (LREG2), minimizing the root mean square difference (RMSD), and probability matching method (PMM) are used to calculate the coefficient A and exponent b of the Z - R relationship. The sequential intensity filtering technique (SIFT) and sorting and averaging based on two parameters (SATP) are used to minimizes the effect of the spurious variability on 2DVD data. From a whole dataset, the Z - R relationship before (and after) the filtering procedure are Z = 155R1.54 (153R1.55), Z = 166R1.40 (191R1.40), Z = 158R1.47 (171R1.47), Z = 204R1.41 (314R1.31), for LREG1, LREG2, PMM, RMSD respectively. It is found that SATP (SIFT) increase (decrease) the coefficient A, in comparison with the values estimated from non-filtered data. During 2006-2007, we analyzed 385 rain events. Of 385 Z - R relations, the diurnal variation is observed, consistent with previous results. A-coefficients during 00-06, 06-12, 12-18 and 18-24 local time (LT) are in an interval of 98-249 (86 % of the values < 200), 93-220 (99 % of the values < 200), 98-283 (87 % of the values < 200) and 88-301 (89 % of the values < 200), respectively. Other scales (seasonal, intraseasonal, rain type, time average, rainfall rate threshold) of the DSD variability and their effect on rainfall intensity R estimation from radar reflectivity Z are explored in terms of bias and random errors. In addition, we also discussed the effect of binning procedure of 2DVD data on the Z - R relation. Physical processes leading to the formation of DSDs are then classified according to the vertical structure of radar data as measured by a 1.3GHz wind profiler collocated with the

  8. Faecal cortisol metabolites in Bengal (Panthera tigris tigris) and Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Parnell, Tempe; Clark, Giles; Martin-Vegue, Patrick; Mucci, Al; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-12-01

    The tiger (Panthera tigris) faces a great risk of extinction as its wild numbers have plummeted due to poaching and habitat destruction so ex-situ conservation programs are becoming ever more necessary. Reliable non-invasive biomarkers of the stress hormone (cortisol) are necessary for assessing the health and welfare of tigers in captivity. To our knowledge, non-invasive stress endocrinology methods have not been tested as widely in tigers. The first aim of this study was to describe and validate a faecal cortisol metabolite enzyme-immmunoassay (FCM EIA) for two tiger sub-species, the Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and the Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae). Individual tigers (n=22) were studied in two large Zoos in Queensland, Australia (Dreamworld Theme Park and Australia Zoo). Fresh faecal samples (<12 h old) were collected each morning from both Zoos over a study period of 21 days. Biological validation was conducted separately by collecting feces 5 days before and 5 days after blood was taken from four male and five female tigers. Results showed that mean FCM levels increased by 138% and 285% in the male and female tigers within 1 day after bloods were taken, returning to baseline in 5 days. Laboratory validations of the FCM EIA were done using an extraction efficiency test and parallelism. Results showed >89% recovery of the cortisol standard that was added to tiger faecal extract. We also obtained parallel displacement of the serially diluted cortisol standard against serially diluted tiger faecal extract. Our second aim was to determine whether the FCM levels were significantly different between tiger sub-species and sex. Results showed no significant difference in mean FCM levels between the Bengal and Sumatran tiger sub-species. Mean levels of FCMs were significantly higher in females than in male tigers. Those male and female tigers with reported health issues during the study period expressed higher FCM levels than the reportedly healthy

  9. Large scale dynamic rupture scenario of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman megathrust earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Thomas; Madden, Elizabeth H.; Wollherr, Stephanie; Gabriel, Alice A.

    2016-04-01

    The Great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 26 December 2004 is one of the strongest and most devastating earthquakes in recent history. Most of the damage and the ~230,000 fatalities were caused by the tsunami generated by the Mw 9.1-9.3 event. Various finite-source models of the earthquake have been proposed, but poor near-field observational coverage has led to distinct differences in source characterization. Even the fault dip angle and depth extent are subject to debate. We present a physically realistic dynamic rupture scenario of the earthquake using state-of-the-art numerical methods and seismotectonic data. Due to the lack of near-field observations, our setup is constrained by the overall characteristics of the rupture, including the magnitude, propagation speed, and extent along strike. In addition, we incorporate the detailed geometry of the subducting fault using Slab1.0 to the south and aftershock locations to the north, combined with high-resolution topography and bathymetry data.The possibility of inhomogeneous background stress, resulting from the curved shape of the slab along strike and the large fault dimensions, is discussed. The possible activation of thrust faults splaying off the megathrust in the vicinity of the hypocenter is also investigated. Dynamic simulation of this 1300 to 1500 km rupture is a computational and geophysical challenge. In addition to capturing the large-scale rupture, the simulation must resolve the process zone at the rupture tip, whose characteristic length is comparable to smaller earthquakes and which shrinks with propagation distance. Thus, the fault must be finely discretised. Moreover, previously published inversions agree on a rupture duration of ~8 to 10 minutes, suggesting an overall slow rupture speed. Hence, both long temporal scales and large spatial dimensions must be captured. We use SeisSol, a software package based on an ADER-DG scheme solving the spontaneous dynamic earthquake rupture problem with high

  10. Coral 13C/12C records of vertical seafloor displacement during megathrust earthquakes west of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagan, Michael K.; Sosdian, Sindia M.; Scott-Gagan, Heather; Sieh, Kerry; Hantoro, Wahyoe S.; Natawidjaja, Danny H.; Briggs, Richard W.; Suwargadi, Bambang W.; Rifai, Hamdi

    2015-12-01

    The recent surge of megathrust earthquakes and tsunami disasters has highlighted the need for a comprehensive understanding of earthquake cycles along convergent plate boundaries. Space geodesy has been used to document recent crustal deformation patterns with unprecedented precision, however the production of long paleogeodetic records of vertical seafloor motion is still a major challenge. Here we show that carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the skeletons of massive Porites corals from west Sumatra record abrupt changes in light exposure resulting from coseismic seafloor displacements. Validation of the method is based on the coral δ13C response to uplift (and subsidence) produced by the March 2005 Mw 8.6 Nias-Simeulue earthquake, and uplift further south around Sipora Island during a M ∼ 8.4 megathrust earthquake in February 1797. At Nias, the average step-change in coral δ13C was 0.6 ± 0.1 ‰ /m for coseismic displacements of +1.8 m and -0.4 m in 2005. At Sipora, a distinct change in Porites microatoll growth morphology marks coseismic uplift of 0.7 m in 1797. In this shallow water setting, with a steep light attenuation gradient, the step-change in microatoll δ13C is 2.3 ‰ /m, nearly four times greater than for the Nias Porites. Considering the natural variability in coral skeletal δ13C, we show that the lower detection limit of the method is around 0.2 m of vertical seafloor motion. Analysis of vertical displacement for well-documented earthquakes suggests this sensitivity equates to shallow events exceeding Mw ∼ 7.2 in central megathrust and back-arc thrust fault settings. Our findings indicate that the coral 13C /12C paleogeodesy technique could be applied to convergent tectonic margins throughout the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian oceans, which host prolific coral reefs, and some of the world's greatest earthquake catastrophes. While our focus here is the link between coral δ13C, light exposure and coseismic crustal deformation, the

  11. Radiocarbon Content of Intermediate Waters off West Sumatra During the Last 45,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pol-Holz, R.; Mohtadi, M.; Southon, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon content of intermediate waters originating from the Southern Ocean is held as a likely smoking gun of the events that triggered the atmospheric CO2 rise and its radiocarbon decline during the last glacial-interglacial transition. Late Glacial depleted radiocarbon water masses have been found at intermediate depths off the coast of Baja California, the Galapagos, the Arabian Sea, but not unequivocally elsewhere. Knowing the route of the old water is therefore central for the required mechanistic linkage of Southern Ocean processes and the atmospheric response. A common approach to search for the old water reservoir is the radiocarbon difference between planktonic and benthic foraminifera or 'apparent ventilation age'. Caveats of this approach are due to the fact that it relies strongly on the knowledge of the surface water reservoir age. In this study, we present a high-resolution radiocarbon difference between surface and intermediate depth waters off west Sumatra in the attempt to elucidate a possible route of the old water from its hypothetical source in the high latitudes near Antarctica on its way to the lower latitude sites where it has been observed. Samples come from core SO189-39KL (0°47'S, 99°55'E, 517 m), a 1350 cm hemipelagic sedimentary sequence that spans the last 45,000 years. Radiocarbon determinations were made at centennial time resolution on both planktonic and benthic species. Calibration of the planktonic radiocarbon as age control points allowed us to infer the Δ14C of the intermediate waters. Our results show that throughout the LGM and the entire deglaciation, radiocarbon content of intermediate depths in the area remained with an almost constant age difference with the contemporaneous atmosphere. Unless we have grossly underestimated the local planktonic reservoir age, our results discard this area as a probable route for the spreading of the old water along its way to northern latitudes. In light of recent evidence from the

  12. Reconstruction of the slip distributions in historical earthquakes on the Sunda megathrust, W. Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nic Bhloscaidh, Mairéad; McCloskey, John; Naylor, Mark; Murphy, Shane; Lindsay, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Spatially heterogeneous inversions for the slip in major earthquakes are typically only available for modern, instrumentally recorded events. Stress reconstructions on active faults, which are potentially vital elements of earthquake hazard assessment, are usually based on one or two instrumental inversions and some semi-quantitative information concerning historical seismic activity. Here we develop a new Bayesian Monte Carlo inversion method for sparse, large uncertainty data, such as is available for many historical earthquakes. We use it to reconstruct the slip in two great historical earthquakes on the Sunda megathrust, from 200 yr of paleogeodetic data recorded in the stratigraphy of coral microatolls on the forearc islands. The technique is based on the stochastic forward modelling of many slip distributions, which are constrained by the observed fractal scaling in the slip field. A set of static elastic Green's functions is used to estimate the vertical displacement at the coral locations resulting from each trial slip distribution. The posterior expected value of the slip and its variance are obtained from the average of the trial slips, weighted by their ability to reproduce the coral displacements. We successfully test the method on a synthetic slip distribution, before applying it to reconstruct the slip in a recent, instrumentally recorded event. We then invert for the great 1797 and 1833 megathrust events under the Mentawai Islands west of Sumatra. When compared with the slip distributions in recent earthquakes, our results unambiguously indicate that the sequence is not consistent with the classic characteristic earthquake model; earthquakes tend to incrementally tessellate the active fault plane rather than repeatedly breaking a segment of it. The results indicate that homogeneous loading of a fault with heterogeneous initial stress is enough to explain the observations on the Mentawai segment of the Sunda megathrust; no time dependence of material

  13. Coral 13C/12C records of vertical seafloor displacement during megathrust earthquakes west of Sumatra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gagan, Michael K.; Sosdian, Sindia M.; Scott-Gagan, Heather; Sieh, Kerry; Hantoro, Wahyoe S.; Natawidjaja, Danny H.; Briggs, Richard W.; Suwargadi, Bambang W.; Rifai, Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    The recent surge of megathrust earthquakes and tsunami disasters has highlighted the need for a comprehensive understanding of earthquake cycles along convergent plate boundaries. Space geodesy has been used to document recent crustal deformation patterns with unprecedented precision, however the production of long paleogeodetic records of vertical seafloor motion is still a major challenge. Here we show that carbon isotope ratios () in the skeletons of massive Porites   corals from west Sumatra record abrupt changes in light exposure resulting from coseismic seafloor displacements. Validation of the method is based on the coral  response to uplift (and subsidence) produced by the March 2005 Mw 8.6 Nias–Simeulue earthquake, and uplift further south around Sipora Island during a M∼8.4 megathrust earthquake in February 1797. At Nias, the average step-change in coral  was 0.6±0.1‰/m for coseismic displacements of +1.8 m and −0.4 m in 2005. At Sipora, a distinct change in Porites  microatoll growth morphology marks coseismic uplift of 0.7 m in 1797. In this shallow water setting, with a steep light attenuation gradient, the step-change in microatoll  is2.3‰/m, nearly four times greater than for the Nias Porites  . Considering the natural variability in coral skeletal , we show that the lower detection limit of the method is around 0.2 m of vertical seafloor motion. Analysis of vertical displacement for well-documented earthquakes suggests this sensitivity equates to shallow events exceedingMw∼7.2 in central megathrust and back-arc thrust fault settings. Our findings indicate that the coral  paleogeodesy technique could be applied to convergent tectonic margins throughout the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian oceans, which host prolific coral reefs, and some of the world's greatest earthquake catastrophes. While our focus here is the link between coral , light exposure and coseismic crustal deformation, the same principles

  14. Communicating Tsunami Preparedness Through the Lessons Learned by Survivors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlow, I.

    2015-12-01

    Often times science communication is reactive and it minimizes the perceptions of the general public. The Tsunami of New Dreams is a film with the testimonies of survivors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Production of the film spanned over five years and dozens of interviews, and is based on a unique geographic, demographic and experiential sampling of the local population. This documentary feature film underscores the importance of Earth science and science communication in building sustainable communities. The film is a lesson in survival and sustainability, and it provides a simple but powerful testimony of what to do and what not to do before and during a tsunami. The film also highlights the direct relationship that exists between disaster survival rates and the knowledge of basic Earth science and preparedness facts. We hope that the human stories presented in the film will serve as a strong motivator for general audiences to learn about natural hazards, preparedness, and Earth science. These engaging narratives can touch the minds and hearts of general audiences much faster than technical lectures in a classroom. Some of the testimonies are happy and others are sad, but they all present the wide range of beliefs that influenced the outcomes of the natural disaster. The interviews with survivors are complemented with unique archival footage of the tsunami and unique footage of daily life in Aceh. Hand-drawn illustrations are used to recreate what survivors did immediately after the earthquake, and during the extreme moments when they faced the tsunami waves. Animated visuals, maps and diagrams enhance the understanding of earthquake and tsunami dynamics. The film is a production of the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) in collaboration with the International Center for Aceh and Indian Ocean Studies (ICAIOS) in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. The film is scheduled for release in late 2015. This is a unique

  15. Malaria Modeling and Surveillance in Thailand and Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Soebiyanto, Radina

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of malaria transmission in Thailand and Indonesia to assist in the understanding and reducing the incidence of the deadly disease. Satellite observations are being integrated into this work, and this is described herein.

  16. AGE-STRUCTURAL TRANSITION IN INDONESIA

    PubMed Central

    Kreager, Philip; Schröder-Butterfill, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This paper responds to recent calls for empirical study of the impact of age-structural transition. It begins by reviewing evidence of cohort oscillations in twentieth-century Indonesia, which indicates that current older generations are likely to have smaller numbers of children on whom they may rely than generations before and after them. However, to assess whether the imbalances implied by this situation are actually influencing people’s lives, attention to further factors shaping the availability and reliability of younger generations, notably differences in socio-economic status and in patterns of inter-generational support flows, is required. Community-level Indonesian data confirm that elders in the lower social strata are child-poor. Social structural and family network patterns, however, have a greater influence on the availability of inter-generational support than cohort differentials. PMID:27158254

  17. Volcano hazard mitigation program in Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sudradjat, A.

    1990-01-01

    Volcanological investigations in Indonesia were started in the 18th century, when Valentijn in 1726 prepared a chronological report of the eruption of Banda Api volcno, Maluku. Modern and intensive volcanological studies did not begin until the catastrophic eruption of Kelut volcano, East Java, in 1919. The eruption took 5,011 lives and destroyed thousands of acres of coffee plantation. An eruption lahar generated by the crater lake water mixed with volcanic eruptions products was the cause of death for a high number of victims. An effort to mitigate the danger from volcanic eruption was first initiated in 1921 by constructing a tunnel to drain the crater lake water of Kelut volcano. At the same time a Volcanological Survey was established by the government with the responsibility of seeking every means for minimizing the hazard caused by volcanic eruption. 

  18. Coastal flood management in Semarang, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marfai, Muh Aris; King, Lorenz

    2008-10-01

    Semarang is one of the biggest cities in Indonesia and is nowadays suffering from coastal flooding. Land subsidences, high water tide, and inadequate structural measures play important roles in the coastal inundations. Structural and non-structural methods for controlling coastal flooding including dykes, drainage systems, pump stations, polder systems, coastal-land reclamations, coastal planning and management, public education, as well as the establishment of an institutional framework for disaster management have been implemented in the Semarang coastal area. Although some improvements have been made, the current flood management system has generally failed to address a wide range of coastal inundation problems. Some improvement actions have been proposed including stakeholders involvement on the disaster mitigation. For a long period coastal management, accelerated sea level rises due to global warming should also be taken into account.

  19. Earthquake Hazard Mitigation Strategy in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnawati, D.; Anderson, R.; Pramumijoyo, S.

    2008-05-01

    Because of the active tectonic setting of the region, the risks of geological hazards inevitably increase in Indonesian Archipelagoes and other ASIAN countries. Encouraging community living in the vulnerable area to adapt with the nature of geology will be the most appropriate strategy for earthquake risk reduction. Updating the Earthquake Hazard Maps, enhancement ofthe existing landuse management , establishment of public education strategy and method, strengthening linkages among stake holders of disaster mitigation institutions as well as establishement of continues public consultation are the main strategic programs for community resilience in earthquake vulnerable areas. This paper highlights some important achievements of Earthquake Hazard Mitigation Programs in Indonesia, together with the difficulties in implementing such programs. Case examples of Yogyakarta and Bengkulu Earthquake Mitigation efforts will also be discussed as the lesson learned. The new approach for developing earthquake hazard map which is innitiating by mapping the psychological aspect of the people living in vulnerable area will be addressed as well.

  20. Marriage and Socioeconomic Change in Contemporary Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Jenna; Buttenheim, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between economic trends and entry into marriage in a rapidly developing setting. We examine Indonesian marriage in the 1990’s, a decade of substantial economic growth followed by a sudden financial collapse in 1998. We use discrete-time hazard models to analyze information on 4,078 women and 4,496 men from the Indonesia Family Life Survey. While previous research has shown that marriages may be postponed after economic downturn, we find no evidence of such delays at the national level following the 1998 financial crisis. In contrast, we use regional wage rate data to show that entry into marriage is inversely related to economic growth throughout the decade for all women and for men from lower socioeconomic strata. PMID:26336321

  1. From Sumatra 2004 to Tuhoku-Oki 2011: what we learn about Tsunami detection by ionospheric sounding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, G.; Rolland, L. M.; Watada, S.; Coisson, P.; Aden-Antoniow, F.; Bablet, A.; Lognonne, P. H.; Makela, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The recent tsunamigenic Tohoku earthquake (2011) strongly affirms, again, after the 26 December 2004, the necessity to open new paradigms in oceanic monitoring. Detection of ionospheric anomalies following the Sumatra earthquake tsunami (e.g., Occhipinti et al. 2006) demonstrated that ionosphere is sensitive to earthquake and tsunami propagation: ground and oceanic vertical displacement induces acoustic-gravity waves propagating within the neutral atmosphere and detectable in the ionosphere. Observations supported by modelling proved that tsunamigenic ionospheric anomalies are deterministic and reproducible by numerical modeling via the ocean/neutral-atmosphere/ionosphere coupling mechanism (Occhipinti et al., 2008). To prove that the tsunami signature in the ionosphere is routinely detected we show here perturbations of total electron content (TEC) measured by GPS and following tsunamigenic eartquakes from 2004 to 2010 (Rolland et al. 2010, Occhipinti et al., 2013), nominally, Sumatra (26 December, 2004 and 12 September, 2007), Chile (14 November, 2007), Samoa (29 September, 2009) and the recent Tohoku-Oki (11 Mars, 2011). In addition to GPS/TEC observations close to the epicenter and measured by GEONET network, new exciting measurements in the far-field were performed by Airglow measurement in Hawaii: those measurements show the propagation of the IGWs induced by the Tohoku tsunami in the Pacific Ocean (Occhipinti et al., 2011). Based on the observations close to the epicenter, mainly performed by GPS networks located in Sumatra, Chile and Japan, we highlight the TEC perturbation observed within the first hour after the seismic rupture. This perturbation contains informations about the ground displacement, as well as the consequent sea surface displacement resulting in the tsunami. In this talk we present all this new tsunami observations in the ionosphere and we discuss, under the light of modelling, the potential role of ionospheric sounding in the oceanic

  2. The energy radiated by the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake estimated from 10-minute P-wave windows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Boatwright, J.

    2007-01-01

    The rupture process of the Mw 9.1 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake lasted for approximately 500 sec, nearly twice as long as the teleseismic time windows between the P and PP arrival times generally used to compute radiated energy. In order to measure the P waves radiated by the entire earthquake, we analyze records that extend from the P-wave to the S-wave arrival times from stations at distances ?? >60??. These 8- to 10-min windows contain the PP, PPP, and ScP arrivals, along with other multiply reflected phases. To gauge the effect of including these additional phases, we form the spectral ratio of the source spectrum estimated from extended windows (between TP and TS) to the source spectrum estimated from normal windows (between TP and TPP). The extended windows are analyzed as though they contained only the P-pP-sP wave group. We analyze four smaller earthquakes that occurred in the vicinity of the Mw 9.1 mainshock, with similar depths and focal mechanisms. These smaller events range in magnitude from an Mw 6.0 aftershock of 9 January 2005 to the Mw 8.6 Nias earthquake that occurred to the south of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on 28 March 2005. We average the spectral ratios for these four events to obtain a frequency-dependent operator for the extended windows. We then correct the source spectrum estimated from the extended records of the 26 December 2004 mainshock to obtain a complete or corrected source spectrum for the entire rupture process (???600 sec) of the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. Our estimate of the total seismic energy radiated by this earthquake is 1.4 ?? 1017 J. When we compare the corrected source spectrum for the entire earthquake to the source spectrum from the first ???250 sec of the rupture process (obtained from normal teleseismic windows), we find that the mainshock radiated much more seismic energy in the first half of the rupture process than in the second half, especially over the period range from 3 sec to 40 sec.

  3. Recent situation of schistosomiasis in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Izhar, Ali; Sinaga, R M; Sudomo, M; Wardiyo, N D

    2002-05-01

    Schistosomiasis in Indonesia is limited to two very isolated areas, the Napu and Lindu valleys, in the province of Central Sulawesi. The disease was initially found in 1937 in the village of Tomado. In 1940, a study on schistosomiasis in the Lake Lindu area was initiated and an infection rate of 56% among the people in the three villages of Anca, Tomado and Langko was found. Before a comprehensive control programme was initiated, the infection rate among the population of approximately 4000 people in the Napu valley was very high, e.g. 72% in the village of Winowanga. In 1982, more coordinated and intensive schistosomiasis control measures in the Napu and Lindu valleys were initiated. The average infection rate after control measures were greatly decreased-in Napu valley it was 1.83%, while in Lindu valley it was 0.46%, in 1999. The control approaches can be described over five phases, from 1982 to 1986, up to 1998 to present. In 1998, an agreement between the Government of Indonesia and the Asian Development Bank was signed to develop the schistosomiasis endemic areas of Central Sulawesi into a better socio-economic condition. The objectives of the project are not only to control schistosomiasis, but mainly to protect the National Park which is located between the Lindu and Napu valleys. It is an integrated project named 'Central Sulawesi Integrated Area Development and Conservation Project' and many relevant sectors have been involved in the implementation of this project for the development of the area, including control of schistosomiasis. The implementation of the integrated project started in 1999. PMID:12020902

  4. Mitigation of carbon dioxide from the Indonesia energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Adi, A.C.; Nurrohim, A.; Hidajat, M.N.

    1996-12-31

    Energy consumption in Indonesia is growing fast in line with the development of national economy. During (1990 - 1993) the emission of CO{sub 2} gas coming from energy sector increased from 150 million tones to 200 million tones in 1993. Whereas, the total methane emission from the oil, gas and coal sub-sector reached 550 kilo tones in 1991 and increased to 670 kilo tones in 1994. This amount of CO{sub 2} and Methane from energy sector was 26% and 10 % respectively of the total emission of Indonesia. Based on the last two decades of Indonesia`s economic growth experience, as a developing country this high economic growth rate of Indonesia in the future will be kept until reaching the newly industrialized country level, which is more than 6% annually in the next decade. This high growth rate economic projection will also added the level of GHG emission in the future. As a developing country Indonesia is one of the fast growing countries. The GDP growth in the year 1995 was more than 7 percent, therefore growth rate of energy consumption in this country also rose following the economic growth.

  5. The Acceptance Strategy for Nuclear Power Plant In Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaemi, Tjipta; Syaukat, Achmad

    2010-06-01

    THE ACCEPTANCE STRATEGY FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN INDONESIA. Indonesia has planned to build nuclear power plants. Some feasibility studies have been conducted intensively. However, the processes of NPP introduction are still uncertain. National Energy Plan in Indonesia, which has been made by some governmental agencies, does not yet give positive impact to the government decision to construct the nuclear power plant (NPP). This paper discusses the process of NPP introduction in Indonesia, which has been colored with debate of stakeholder and has delayed decision for go-nuclear. The technology paradigm is used to promote NPP as an alternative of reliable energy resources. This paradigm should be complemented with international politic-economic point of view. The international politic-economic point of view shows that structural powers, consisting of security, production, finance, and knowledge structures, within which the NPP is introduced, have dynamic characteristics. The process of NPP introduction in Indonesia contains some infrastructure development (R&D, legislation, regulation, energy planning, site study, public acceptance efforts, etc), but they need a better coherent NPP implementation program and NPP Acceptance Program. Strategic patterns for NPP acceptance described in this paper are made by considering nuclear regulation development and the interest of basic domestic participation. The first NPP program in Indonesia having proven technology and basic domestic participation is and important milestone toward and optimal national energy-mix.

  6. Geophysics: The size and duration of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake from far-field static offsets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banerjee, P.; Pollitz, F.F.; Burgmann, R.

    2005-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Sumatra earthquake produced static offsets at continuously operating GPS stations at distances of up to 4500 kilometers from the epicenter. We used these displacements to model the earthquake and include consideration of the Earth's shape and depth-varying rigidity. The results imply that the average slip was >5 meters along the full length of the rupture, including the ???650-kilometer-long Andaman segment. Comparison of the source derived from the far-field static offsets with seismically derived estimates suggests that 25 to 35% of the total moment release occurred at periods greater than 1 hour. Taking into consideration the strong dip dependence of moment estimates, the magnitude of the earthquake did not exceed Mw = 9.2.

  7. No evidence of unusually large postseismic deformation in Andaman region immediately after 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahalaut, V. K.; Catherine, J. K.; Jade, Sridevi; Gireesh, R.; Gupta, D. C.; Narsaiah, M.; Ambikapathy, A.; Bansal, A.; Chadha, R. K.

    2008-05-01

    Static offsets due to the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake have been reported from the campaign mode GPS measurements in the Andaman-Nicobar region. However, these measurements contain contributions from postseismic deformation that must have occurred in the 16-25 days period between the earthquake and the measurements. We analyse these and tide gauge measurements of coseismic deformation, a longer time series of postseismic deformation from GPS measurements at Port Blair in the South Andaman and aftershocks, to suggest that postseismic displacement not larger than 7 cm occurred in the 16-25 days following the earthquake in the South Andaman and probably elsewhere in the Andaman Nicobar region. Earlier, this contribution was estimated to be as large as 1 m in the Andaman region, which implied that the magnitude of the earthquake based on these campaign mode measurements should be decreased. We suggest an Mw for this earthquake as 9.23.

  8. Slow postseismic recovery of geoid depression formed by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake by mantle water diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Ryoko; Heki, Kosuke

    2007-03-01

    Earthquakes are accompanied with mass redistributions and cause changes in gravity field and shape of geoid, an equipotential surface coincident with the mean sea surface. Such coseismic changes were detected by satellite gravimetry after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake, but little has been known on what happens on geoid after the earthquake. Here we report slow postseismic recovery of coseismic geoid depression from satellite measurements. This cannot be explained with simple afterslip or viscous relaxation of Maxwellian upper mantle. It suggests the relaxation of coseismic dilatation and compression by the diffusion of supercritical H2O abundant in the upper mantle. Such a self-healing system of coseismic geoid undulations, a brand-new role of water in mantle, would significantly reduce the amount of permanent shifts of the Earth's rotation axis by earthquakes.

  9. Postseismic self-healing of geoid undulations by water after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake observed with GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, R.; Heki, K.

    2007-12-01

    Earthquakes are accompanied with mass redistributions and cause changes in gravity field and shape of geoid, an equipotential surface coincident with the mean sea surface. Such coseismic changes were detected by satellite gravimetry after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake, but little has been known on what happens on geoid after the earthquake. Here we report slow postseismic recovery of coseismic geoid depression from satellite measurements. This cannot be explained with simple afterslip or viscous relaxation of Maxwellian upper mantle. It suggests the relaxation of coseismic dilatation and compression by the diffusion of supercritical H2O abundant in the upper mantle. Such a self-healing system of coseismic geoid undulations, a brand- new role of water in mantle, would significantly reduce the amount of permanent shifts of the Earth's rotation axis by earthquakes.

  10. Triggered tectonic tremor in various types of fault systems of Japan following the 2012 Mw8.6 Sumatra earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Kevin; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    Tectonic tremor, an extremely stress-sensitive seismic phenomenon occurring in the brittle-ductile transition section of a fault, is associated with the shearing mechanism of slow slip. Observations of triggered tremor can facilitate the evaluation of the existence of background ambient tremor and slow-slip events. This paper presents widespread triggered tremor sources in Japan initiated by the surface waves of the 2012 Mw8.6 Sumatra earthquake on strike-slip and thrust faults, in the deep volcanic low-frequency earthquake active area, in the shallow tectonic tremor and very low frequency earthquake active regions, and in the subduction zone. In most regions, the amplitudes of triggered tremor are generally logarithmically proportional to the dynamic stress caused by various triggering earthquakes. Our observations suggest that triggered tremor in the newly discovered sources is the result of a more rapid rate of background ambient tremor, and evidence has suggested the existence of ambient tremor in some regions.

  11. Decade-scale decrease in b value prior to the M9-class 2011 Tohoku and 2004 Sumatra quakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanjo, K. Z.; Hirata, N.; Obara, K.; Kasahara, K.

    2012-10-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes has become well established in seismology. The slope of the relation between frequency and magnitude (b value) is typically 1, but it often shows variations around 1. Based on an analysis of seismicity prior to the 2011 Tohoku and 2004 Sumatra earthquakes (both in magnitude (M) 9 class), we show that the pronounced decade-scale decrease in b value was a common precursor to both mega-quakes around their hypocenters. This is the first report on M9-class quakes to confirm a change in b value, which has been predicted based on the results of laboratory experiments. We propose that the b value is an important indicator of an impending great earthquake, and has great potential in terms of predicting a future large quake off the Pacific coast of Hokkaido, Japan.

  12. Controls on early retention and late enhancement of microporosity in reefal gas reservoirs, offshore north Sumatra basin

    SciTech Connect

    Moshier, S.O.

    1989-03-01

    Chalky lime-matrix texture is pervasive in 300 m of coralgal and skeletal carbonates in the NSB-A (North Sumatra basin-A) gas field (lower-middle Miocene), offshore northern Sumatra. Much of the reservoir quality can be attributed to matrix with abundant intercrystalline, vuggy, and channel-form micropores. Matrix is composed of calcite microrhombs which are interpreted to have developed during stabilization of the precursor mud. On the same shelf, the smaller NSB-H oil field is composed of more than 45-m thick buildup of similar lithofacies which lack abundant microporosity. In both fields, early diagenesis included dissolution of aragonitic skeletal material, matrix neomorphism, and precipitation of nonluminescent calcite followed by zoned, luminescent calcite cements. Stable isotopes from matrix reflect a more open or water-dominated matrix diagenesis at NSB-H field. More active flushing of oversaturated, organically charged meteoric waters was responsible for thorough matrix cementation and microporosity occlusion at NSB-H field. Calcite cements show progressive enrichment of iron and manganese and depletion of magnesium and strontium during growth. The matrix at NSB-H field contains iron-rich dolomite. At A field, remnant matrix microporosity and intraparticle microporosity in calcitic skeletal material were greatly enhanced after all phases of cementation. Some pore-rimming cements are partially dissolved. At NSB-H field, late-phase dissolution is limited to the vicinity of open fractures where matrix-calcite and dolomite crystals are leached. Reservoir brines have a limey marine origin but are depleted in Ca and Mg relative to seawater, and carbon dioxide accounts for 31% of reservoir gas. If present brines are carbonate undersaturated, they may be substantially enhanced microporosity at NSB-A field. Late-stage dissolution is insignificant at NSB-H field due to the lack of early formed matrix microporosity.

  13. Translating Developing Science into Public Awareness and Social Organisation in W. Sumatra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R.; McDowell, S.; McCloskey, J.

    2009-04-01

    Social idiosyncrasies confounding cross-cultural scientific interventions on an intra-regional and international scale continue to blight the positive benefits robust science offers to vulnerable communities inhabiting areas prone to natural hazards. The sustained malice inflicted by these phenomena upon socioeconomic systems epitomises the perilous task facing mitigation bodies attempting to communicate scientific forecasts and interweave technical knowledge into social policy internationally. This quandary continues to confront disaster officials and scientists in Sumatra. Palaeoseismological studies, coupled with a developing understanding of stress transference between earthquakes, reveal that the Mentawai segment of the Sumatran forearc is the most plausible candidate for future rupture. Simulations of tsunami propagation and inundation illustrate that the coastal regions of western Sumatran, inhabited by approximately 2 million people, lie in immediate mortal threat. Many Sumatrans' live with stark memories of the 1600 km megathrust rupture in December 2004, which spawned one of the worst global natural atrocities of recent time. The earthquake accelerated collaboration between seismologists, geophysicists and geologists and has produced unrivalled advances in understanding fault locations, geometries and potential rupture characteristics of the Sumatran forearc. Nowhere else on earth are scientists more aware of the impending threat of another magnitude 8+ megathrust earthquake. However with the twenty-first century being tainted by natural disasters which have typified the blatantly ambiguous linkages which exist between science and society, assessing to what extent this notion is exemplified in the Sumatran context is imperative. Here we begin to present the results from a social survey, conducted in the Sumatran cities of Padang and Bengkulu between May and September 2008. The campaign sought to dissect the broader societal complexities and moral values

  14. 78 FR 13325 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigations, 78 FR 5416 (January 25, 2013) (Initiation Notice...-815] Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia... frozen warmwater shrimp from the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia,...

  15. Multiple Magma Batches Recorded in Tephra Deposits from the Toba Complex, Sumatra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, N. J. G.; Westgate, J.; Gatti, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Toba Caldera Complex is the largest Quaternary caldera on Earth, and has generated three voluminous and compositionally similar rhyolitic tuffs, viz. the Oldest (OTT, 800 ka), Middle (MTT, ~500 ka) and Youngest Toba Tuffs (YTT, 75 ka). These tephra deposits are widespread across Indonesia, Malaysia, South China Sea, Sea of Bengal, India and Indian Ocean and provide useful stratigraphic markers in oceanic, lacustrine and terrestrial environments. Single shard trace element analysis of these deposits reveals the changing availability of different batches of magma through time, with Sr, Ba and Y contents defining 5 discrete magma populations in YTT, 4 populations in MTT and only a single, low Ba population in OTT. Within an individual eruption these populations are clearly distinct, but between eruptions (e.g. MTT and YTT) some of these populations overlap while others do not, indicating both the longevity (and/or continuous supply of fresh material) and evolution of these magma batches in the Toba Complex. Major element compositions of the different groups show equilibration at different pressures (based on Q'-Ab'-Or'), with the equilibration of low Ba populations at ~160 MPa, increasing to depths of ~210 MPa for the highest Ba population. The proportions of different populations of glass in distal YTT shows that relatively little of the high Ba population makes it into the distal record across India, and that this population appears to be over-represented in the proximal free glass and pumice from the caldera walls. This data may shed light on magma availability and tephra dispersal during the YTT eruption. Similarly, the glass composition of individual pumices from proximal deposits record regional, compositional and temporal differences in the erupted products. These show, for example, the apparent mingling of some of the magma batches and also that the high Ba population appears early (i.e. stratigraphically lower) in the northern caldera wall.

  16. 77 FR 53174 - Certain Lined Paper Products From Indonesia: Revocation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ..., 76 FR 45778 (August 1, 2011) and Certain Lined Paper School Supplies From China, India, and Indonesia... Republic of China, 76 FR 76123 (December 6, 2011) and Certain Lined Paper Products From Indonesia: Final... Paper School Supplies From China, India, and Indonesia, 77 FR 51570 (August 24, 2012). See also...

  17. Chytridiomycosis in frogs of Mount Gede Pangrango, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kusrini, M D; Skerratt, L F; Garland, S; Berger, L; Endarwin, W

    2008-12-22

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a fungus recognised as one of the causes of global amphibian population declines. To assess its occurrence, we conducted PCR diagnostic assays of 147 swab samples, from 13 species of frogs from Mount Gede Pangrango National Park, Indonesia. Four swab samples, from Rhacophorus javanus, Rana chalconota, Leptobrachium hasseltii and Limnonectes microdiscus, were positive for Bd and had low to moderate levels of infection. The sample from L. hasseltii was from a tadpole with mouthpart deformities and infection was confirmed by histology and immunohistochemistry. An additional sample from Leptophryne cruentata showed a very low level of infection (< or = 1 zoospore equivalent). This is the first record of Bd in Indonesia and in Southeast Asia, dramatically extending the global distribution of Bd, with important consequences for international amphibian disease control, conservation and trade. Consistent with declines in amphibian populations caused by Bd in other parts of the world, evidence exists for the decline and possible extirpation of amphibian populations at high elevations and some decline with recovery of populations at lower elevations on this mountain. Therefore, it is essential to manage Bd in Indonesia where it is likely to be threatening amphibian populations. This will require a national strategy to mitigate the spread of Bd in Indonesia and neighboring countries as well as the impact of that spread. It is also important to collect information on the extent of the impact of Bd on frog populations in Indonesia. PMID:19244970

  18. The hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Indonesia: an unsolved dilemma.

    PubMed

    Hariman, H

    2008-08-01

    Allogeneic BMT was performed in Indonesia, but had to be stopped prematurely because of the small number of patients. In the beginning, only patients with sufficient financial resources to travel to western countries could undergo transplant procedures. When neighbouring countries (Singapore and Malaysia) began performing transplant, patients were referred to those centres. In both countries, the procedure is more economical and therefore patients come from a broader range of economic classes. The Indonesian hematologist must deal with the post-transplantation side effects, such as GVHD, which are mostly of the chronic type of GVHD. The types of the post-transplant complications do not differ too much from other centres and need the same treatment used in the transplant centres. Hematologists in Indonesia also treat complications of HSCT performed in other countries. When there is no recovery of HSCT development in Indonesia so far, many commercially oriented companies or centres from other countries see Indonesia as a good commercial market and offer services, some of which are not scientifically sound. One of the main problems is umbilical cord blood stem cell banking from foreign countries, which is eagerly offered to parents expecting a baby. Moreover, parents are not fully protected by law. In conclusion, Indonesia needs to revive its own HSCT program to serve and protect its own patients of being used as commercial targets by other countries. PMID:18724313

  19. Lead exposure from battery recycling in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Haryanto, Budi

    2016-03-01

    In Indonesia, more than 200 illegal used lead acid battery (ULAB) smelters are currently operating. Only a few health studies support the finding of lead-related symptoms and diseases among populations living near the smelters. To assess the blood lead levels (BLLs) and potential health impacts among the population surrounding ULAB recycling smelters, we evaluated health effects reported from 2003 to 2013, conducted focus group discussions with lead smelter owner/workers and a group of 35 female partners of smelter owners or workers not actively engaged in smelter work, and retook and measured BLLs. It was found that many children in the areas were having difficulty achieving high grades at school and having stunting or other problems with physical development. The average mean of BLLs increased by almost double in 2015, compared with in 2011. The risk of having hypertension, interference in the ability to make red blood cells in females occurred among 24% of respondents; Elevated blood pressure, hearing loss, and interference in the ability to make red bloods cell occurred in 20% of males; Kidney damage, infertility in male, nerve problems, including decreased sensation and decreased ability to move quickly occurred in 13%; Decreased ability to make red blood cells (20%), and; Frank anemia, decreased life-span, coma/seizures were experienced by 22%. The populations living in areas surrounding ULAB smelters are experiencing severe chronic health problems. It is recommended that the smelters must be moved and placed far away from the municipality. PMID:26812760

  20. Treponemal serology on Bali Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Ney, R; Garner, M F; Backhouse, J L; Duarsa, N W; Breguet, D; Breguet, G

    1982-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary study of the population of Bali, Indonesia, treponemal serology was carried out on 2452 serum samples from subjects of both sexes. Sera reactive to the Treponema pallidum immobilisation test (TPI) were found in 81 (3.3%) subjects with a male prevalence of 4% and a female prevalence of 2%. All the reactive sera were from villagers. Of 1118 students sampled in various towns, none had reactive TPI tests. The prevalence of reactive sera varied greatly from one village to another; up to 50% of the sera examined were reactive. Geographical and socioeconomic analyses of the data show a strict correlation between poor socioeconomic status and high reactivity rates to the TPI test. Fifty-seven per cent of all the reactive sera originated from subjects living in two districts where yaws had recently been reported. Only three of the 1406 subjects, aged 15-29 years, had reactive sera. The reactivity rate steadily increased in the age groups 30-44, 45-59, and 60 years and over. Biological false-positive reactions occurred in 3.8% of the sera tested. PMID:6756541

  1. Difficulties in initial algebra learning in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paul; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-12-01

    Within mathematics curricula, algebra has been widely recognized as one of the most difficult topics, which leads to learning difficulties worldwide. In Indonesia, algebra performance is an important issue. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007, Indonesian students' achievement in the algebra domain was significantly below the average student performance in other Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore. This fact gave rise to this study which aims to investigate Indonesian students' difficulties in algebra. In order to do so, a literature study was carried out on students' difficulties in initial algebra. Next, an individual written test on algebra tasks was administered, followed by interviews. A sample of 51 grade VII Indonesian students worked the written test, and 37 of them were interviewed afterwards. Data analysis revealed that mathematization, i.e., the ability to translate back and forth between the world of the problem situation and the world of mathematics and to reorganize the mathematical system itself, constituted the most frequently observed difficulty in both the written test and the interview data. Other observed difficulties concerned understanding algebraic expressions, applying arithmetic operations in numerical and algebraic expressions, understanding the different meanings of the equal sign, and understanding variables. The consequences of these findings on both task design and further research in algebra education are discussed.

  2. Reconnaissance microearthquake survey of Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, R.; Sutardjo, R.

    Several hundred earthquakes were recorded during the operation of a two-week five-station portable seismograph network on Sulawesi, Indonesia. Forty one of these events were locatable and half of these occurred beneath the eastern Gorontalo Basin in a north dipping zone which extends from the Batui Thrust on the East Arm of Sulawesi to about 100 km depth beneath the Gorontalo Basin. The Batui Thrust is the site of thrusting of the Banggai Islands continental fragment beneath the East Arm ophiolite and oceanic crust of the Gorontalo Basin. The observation of a zone of earthquakes dipping to the north from this thrust zone suggests that the leading edge of the Banggai Island block was subducted to at least 100 km depth. The eastern Gorontalo Basin earthquake zone may connect with a deep seismic zone beneath the Celebes Basin. Beneath the western Gorontalo Basin, a very narrow zone of earthquakes dips to the south, probably within lithosphere of the Celebes Basin subducted at the North Sulawesi Trench. Three shallow earthquakes occurred near Lake Matano in central Sulawesi, possibly on the Matano Fault, and their composite focal plane solution suggests east-west extension. The occurrence of only one earthquake on the Palu Fault and the lack of short S-P times at a station operated on the fault indicate that this feature was very quiet during the survey period.

  3. Treponemal serology on Bali Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ney, R; Garner, M F; Backhouse, J L; Duarsa, N W; Breguet, D; Breguet, G

    1982-12-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary study of the population of Bali, Indonesia, treponemal serology was carried out on 2452 serum samples from subjects of both sexes. Sera reactive to the Treponema pallidum immobilisation test (TPI) were found in 81 (3.3%) subjects with a male prevalence of 4% and a female prevalence of 2%. All the reactive sera were from villagers. Of 1118 students sampled in various towns, none had reactive TPI tests. The prevalence of reactive sera varied greatly from one village to another; up to 50% of the sera examined were reactive. Geographical and socioeconomic analyses of the data show a strict correlation between poor socioeconomic status and high reactivity rates to the TPI test. Fifty-seven per cent of all the reactive sera originated from subjects living in two districts where yaws had recently been reported. Only three of the 1406 subjects, aged 15-29 years, had reactive sera. The reactivity rate steadily increased in the age groups 30-44, 45-59, and 60 years and over. Biological false-positive reactions occurred in 3.8% of the sera tested. PMID:6756541

  4. On the taxonomy of the genera Proneca Swinhoe, 1890, Ctenane Swinhoe, 1905 and Selca Walker, 1866 (Lepidoptera, Nolidae, Nolinae), with the description of two new species from Sumatra.

    PubMed

    László, Gyula M; Ronkay, Gábor; Ronkay, László

    2015-01-01

    Present paper contains the characterisation of the genera Proneca Swinhoe, 1890, Ctenane Swinhoe, 1905, and Selca Walker, 1866, and their species, with the description of two new species, Proneca brunneostriata sp. n. and Ctenane         michaeli sp. n., from Sumatra. Two new combinations and a new synonymy are established. With 32 colour photos and 24 genitalia figures. PMID:26624747

  5. Roadmap to a Tobacco Epidemic: Transnational Tobacco Companies Invade Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Richard D.; Ebbert, Jon O.; Achadi, Anhari; Croghan, Ivana T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Indonesia is the world’s fifth largest cigarette market in the world but for decades, transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) have had limited success infiltrating this market, due to their inability to compete in the kretek market. Kreteks are clove/tobacco cigarettes that most Indonesians smoke. Objective To determine how Phillip Morris International (PMI) and British American Tobacco (BAT) have now successfully achieved a substantial market presence in Indonesia. Methods We analyzed previously secret, tobacco industry documents, corporate reports on Indonesia operations, the Tobacco Trade press, Indonesia media, and “The Roadmap.” Results Internal, corporate documents from BAT and PMI demonstrate that they had known for decades that kreteks are highly carcinogenic. Despite that knowledge, BAT and PMI now own and heavily market these products, as well as new more westernized versions of kreteks. BAT and PMI maintained the basic strategy of keeping cigarettes affordable by maintaining the social responsibility of smoking and opposing smoke-free workplace laws but in the 21st century, they added the acquisition of and Westernization of domestic kretek manufacturers as an additional strategy. These acquisitions allowed them to assert influences on health policy in Indonesia and to grow their business under current government policy embodied in the 2007-2020 Roadmap of Tobacco Products Industry and Excise Policy which calls for increased cigarette production by 12% over the next 15 years. Conclusion PMI and Bat have successfully entered and are expanding their share in the Indonesia cigarette market. Despite the obvious and pervasive influence of the tobacco industry on policy decisions, the Indonesian government should ratify the FCTC and implement effective legislation to reduce tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke and revise the Roadmap to protect future generations of Indonesians. PMID:21852413

  6. Intraplate Splay Faults and Near-field Tsunami Generation during Giant Megathrust Earthquakes in Chile, Alaska, and Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plafker, G.; Savage, J. C.; Lee, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Mw 9.5 Chile earthquake sequence (21-22/05/1960), the largest instrumentally-recorded seismic event in history, was generated by a megathrust rupture of the southern end of the Peru-Chile Arc about 850 km long and 60-150 km wide down dip. Within Chile, the accompanying tsunami reached 15 m high and took an estimated 1,000 of the more than 2,000 lives lost. The trans-Pacific tsunami killed 230 people in Japan, Hawaii and the Philippine Islands. The tsunami source was primarily due to regional offshore upwarp, with possible superimposed larger local uplift due to displacement on splay faults. The Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake (27/03/1964) ruptured major segments of the eastern Aleutian Arc 800 km long by 250-350 km wide down dip. Coseismic uplift along splay faults offshore generated a major near-field tsunami reaching 13 m high in Alaska that took at least 21 lives. Local earthquake-triggered submarine landslides in fiords along the rugged Kenai and Chugach mountains generated local (non-tsunami) waves with run up to 52 m high that took about 77 lives and caused major damage to coastal communities. Tectonically-generated tsunami waves were also generated over the continental shelf and slope due to regional uplift that averaged about 2 m; these waves added to the damage in coastal Alaska and caused 15 deaths and local property damage as far away as Oregon and California. The Mw 9.15 Sumatra earthquake (26/12/2004) ruptured segments of the Sunda Arc more than 1200 km long by 150-200 km wide down dip. The accompanying near-field tsunami was as high as 36 m in northern Sumatra where it caused 169,000 casualties along 200 km of shoreline while the far-field tsunami took an additional 63,000 lives throughout the Indian Ocean region. This made it the deadliest tsunami in recorded history. In addition to a few meters of regional uplift caused by slip on the megathrust, large-slip splay fault sources are inferred from intraplate seismicity, and from early tsunami arrival

  7. Mortality from neonatal tetanus in Indonesia: results of two surveys*

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Richard B.; Soewarso, Titi Indijati; Karyadi, Albertus

    1986-01-01

    Two, 30-cluster, retrospective surveys of deaths from neonatal tetanus in Indonesia were conducted during 1982. The first survey, in the city of Jakarta, identified 16 deaths from neonatal tetanus among 2310 live births, giving a mortality rate of 6.9 per 1000 live births. The second survey covered 19 of Indonesia's 27 provinces. Fifty-three neonatal tetanus deaths occurred among 4971 live births, giving a mortality rate of 10.7 per 1000 live births. Overall, 68.8% of mothers interviewed in the second survey received antenatal care on at least two occasions when tetanus toxoid was, in principle, available. PMID:3488840

  8. The place of people with intellectual disabilities in Bandung, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Komardjaja, Inge

    2005-06-01

    This report is an attempt to 'make visible' people with intellectual disabilities in Bandung, Indonesia, who have been rendered invisible due the stigmatization of disabled bodies in Indonesian society. The Western concept of deinstitutionalization is not appropriate to the contemporary culture of Indonesia. Returning to the 'special schools' following completion of secondary education resolves some of the problems of social exclusion, while reinforcing other exclusionary aspects of Indonesian society. Institutionalization is seen as a privilege in the Indonesian context, as only the better off can afford the cost of placing people with intellectual disabilities in institutions. PMID:15629679

  9. Indonesia's family planning story: success and challenge.

    PubMed

    Hull, T H; Hull, V J; Singarimbun, M

    1977-11-01

    A historical overview and descriptions of family planning programs in Indonesia are presented. 85 million of the 135 million inhabitants of the Indonesian archipelago are concentrated on the island of Java, which comprises about 7% of the Indonesian land mass. The Dutch colonial government preferred a policy ("transmigration") which advocated the redistribution of population from Java to the other islands to relieve overpopulation. This policy was also advocated by President Sukarno after the Indonesian Revolution of 1940. The need for family planning was recognized by small groups, and official policy supported national family planning programs to replace transmigration programs only after Sukarno became president in 1966. The focus of the program was on Java and Bali, the 2 most populous islands. Local clinics became the locus for birth control efforts. Fieldworkers affiliated with the clinics were given the job of advocating birth control use door-to-door. Fieldworkers "incentive programs," area "target" (quota) programs, and "special drives" were organized to create new contraceptive "acceptors." A data reporting system and a research program increase the effectiveness of the family planning drive by ascertaining trends in contraceptive use which can determine where and how money and effort can best be applied. "Village Contraception Distribution Centers" bring the contraceptive means closer to the people than do the clinics. Figures from the years 1969-1977 show the great increase in acceptance of contraceptives by the inhabitants of the Java-Bali area. Steps are now being taken to alleviate the large monthly variations in the number of (often temporary) acceptors caused by the "target programs" and "special drives." The average acceptor is 27-years-old, has 2.6 children, has not finished primary school, and has a husband of low social status. Bali has shown the greatest success in family planning. It is a small island with a highly developed system of local

  10. Cleaner production: Minimizing hazardous waste in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Bratasida, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    In the second long-term development plan, industry plays a significant role in economic growth. In Indonesia, industries grow very fast; such fast growth can adversely effect the environment. Exploitation of assets can mean depletion of natural resources and energy, which, if incorrectly managed, can endanger human life and the environment. The inefficient use of natural resources will accelerate their exhaustion and generate pollution, resulting in environmental damage and threats to economic development and human well being. In recent years, changes in the approach used to control pollution have been necessary because of the increasing seriousness of the problems. Initial environmental management strategies were based on a carrying capacity approach; the natural assimilative capacity accommodated the pollution load that was applied. The environmental management strategies adopted later included technologies applied to the end of the discharge point (so-called {open_quotes}end-of-pipe{close_quotes} treatments). Until now, environmental management strategies focused on end-of-pipe approaches that control pollutants after they are generated. These approaches concentrate on waste treatment and disposal to control pollution and environmental degradation. However, as industry develops, waste volumes continue to increase, thereby creating further environmental problems. In addition, the wastes produced tend to have more complex characteristics and are potentially more difficult to treat for a reasonable cost. There are often technical and financial obstacles to regulatory compliance if waste treatment is relied on as the only means of achieving environmental objectives. Consequently, the reactive end-of-pipe treatment approach has been changed to a proactive cleaner production approach. This approach is based on the concept of sustainable development and is designed to prevent pollution as well as to protect natural resources and the quality of the environment.

  11. Tsunami Source Model of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake inferred from Tide Gauge and Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Satake, K.

    2005-12-01

    The tsunami generation process of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake were estimated from the tsunami waveforms recorded on tide gauges and sea surface heights captured by satellite altimetry measurements over the Indian Ocean. The earthquake (0:58:53, 26, Dec., 2004, UTC), the largest in the last 40 years, caused devastating tsunami damages to the countries around the Indian Ocean. One of the important questions is the source length; the aftershocks were distributed along the Sunda trench for 1000 to 1200 km, from off northwestern part of Sumatra island through Nicobar islands to Andaman island, while seismic wave analyses indicate much shorter source length (several hundred km). We used instrumental data of this tsunami, tide gauges and sea surface heights. Tide gauge data have been collected by Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS). We have also used another tide gauges data for tsunami simulation analysis. Tsunami propagation was captured as sea surface heights of Jason-1 satellite altimetry measurements over the Indian Ocean for the first time (Gower, 2005). We numerically compute tsunami propagation on actually bathymetry. ETOPO2 (Smith and Sandwell, 1997), the gridded data of global ocean depth from bathymetry soundings and satellite gravity data, are less reliable in the shallow ocean. To improve the accuracy, we have digitized the charts near coasts and merged the digitized data with the ETOPO2 data. The long-wave equation and the equation of motion were numerically solved by finite-difference method (Satake, 1995). As the initial condition, a static deformation of seafloor has been calculated using rectangular fault model (Okada, 1985). The source region is divided into 22 subfaults. We fixed the size and geometry of each subfault, and varied the slip amount and rise time (or slip duration) for each subfault, and rupture velocity. Tsunami waveforms or Greens functions for each subfault were calculated for the rise times of 3, 10, 30 and 60 minutes

  12. Systematic variation in anisotropy beneath the mantle wedge in the Java-Sumatra subduction system from shear-wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, J. O. S.; Wookey, J.; Kaneshima, S.; Inoue, H.; Yamashina, T.; Harjadi, P.

    2010-02-01

    The tectonic context of south-east Asia is dominated by subduction. One such major convergent boundary is the Java-Sunda trench, where the Australian-Indian plates are being subducted beneath the Eurasian plate. We measure shear-wave splitting in local and teleseismic data from 12 broadband stations across Sumatra and Java to study the anisotropic characteristics of this subduction system, which can provide important constraints on dynamical processes involved. Splitting in S-waves from local earthquakes between 75 and 300 km deep show roughly trench parallel fast directions, and with time-lags 0.1-1.3 s (92% ≤0.6 s). Splitting from deeper local events and SKS, however, shows larger time-lags (0.8-2.0 s) and significant variation in fast direction. In order to infer patterns of deformation in the slab we apply a hybrid modelling scheme. We raytrace through an isotropic subduction zone velocity model, obtaining event to station raypaths in the upper mantle. We then apply appropriately rotated olivine elastic constants to various parts of the subduction zone, and predict the shear-wave splitting accrued along the raypath. Finally, we perform grid searches for orientation of deformation, and attempt to minimise the misfit between predicted and observed shear-wave splitting. Splitting from the shallow local events is best explained by anisotropy confined to a 40 km over-riding plate with horizontal, trench parallel deformation. However, in order to explain the larger lag times from SKS and deeper events, we must consider an additional region of seismic anisotropy in or around the slab. The slab geometry in the model is constrained by seismicity and regional tomography models, and many SKS raypaths travel large distances within the slab. Models placing anisotropy in the slab produce smaller misfits than those with anisotropy outside for most stations. There is a strong indication that inferred flow directions are different for sub-Sumatran stations than for sub

  13. The utilization of Indonesia`s low rank coal: Its potential, challenges and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Panaka, P.

    1997-07-01

    It has known that there are around 36 billion tons of coal resources potential in Indonesia, however over 21 billion tons (58.7%) is classified as low-rank (lignite) coal. Due to their properties, these coals are not economical to be transported for a long distance and are therefore unexportable. That`s why these low-rank coals still under-utilized at present. As the utilization of low-rank coals is expected to grow in importance as the domestic`s demand for energy increases in the near future, efforts should also be directed to find the possible upgrading technology for low-rank coals by reducing the total moisture of it, once the possible upgrading technology has been adopted, then those coal can be converted into coal water mixture, coal liquefaction, gasification, briquetting, etc., even for mine mouth power-plant. The challenges facing low-rank coals are: low conversion efficiency resulting from the high moisture content and relatively low in calorific values, the risk of spontaneous combustion, ash deposit formation and higher CO{sub 2} emission To response to these challenges, the adoption of new and advanced technologies for the utilization of low-rank coals from the third countries is therefore required. Combined cycle technologies such as CFBC, PFBC and IGCC, etc. combined with coal up-grading technology are applicable to low-rank coals and are expected to become a major future power plant for Indonesia. The main question for low-rank coals is whether these plants can be competitive when the extra costs involved in up-grading (drying) the coal are taken into account.

  14. Stress changes along the Sunda trench following the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman and 28 March 2005 Nias earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Banerjee, P.; Burgmann, R.; Hashimoto, M.; Choosakul, N.

    2006-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Mw = 9.2 and 28 March 2005 Mw = 8.7 earthquakes on the Sumatra megathrust altered the state of stress over a large region surround