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Sample records for aceh sumatra indonesia

  1. Tsunamis as geomorphic crises: Lessons from the December 26, 2004 tsunami in Lhok Nga, West Banda Aceh (Sumatra, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Raphaël; Wassmer, Patrick; Sartohadi, Junun; Lavigne, Franck; Barthomeuf, Benjamin; Desgages, Emilie; Grancher, Delphine; Baumert, Philippe; Vautier, Franck; Brunstein, Daniel; Gomez, Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Large tsunamis are major geomorphic crises, since they imply extensive erosion, sediment transport and deposition in a few minutes and over hundreds of kilometres of coast. Nevertheless, little is known about their geomorphologic imprints. The December 26, 2004 tsunami in Sumatra (Indonesia) was one of the largest and deadliest tsunamis in recorded human history. We present a description of the coastal erosion and boulder deposition induced by the 2004 tsunami in the Lhok Nga Bay, located to the West of Banda Aceh (northwest Sumatra). The geomorphological impact of the tsunami is evidenced by: beach erosion (some beaches have almost disappeared); destruction of sand barriers protecting the lagoons or at river mouths; numerous erosion escarpments typically in the order of 0.5-1.5 m when capped by soil and more than 2 m in dunes; bank erosion in the river beds (the retreat along the main river is in the order of 5-15 m, with local retreats exceeding 30 m); large scars typically 20-50 cm deep on slopes; dislodgement of blocks along fractures and structural ramps on cliffs. The upper limit of erosion appears as a continuous trimline at 20-30 m a.s.l., locally reaching 50 m. The erosional imprints of the tsunami extend to 500 m from the shoreline and exceed 2 km along riverbeds. The overall coastal retreat from Lampuuk to Leupung was 60 m (550,000 m 2) and locally exceeded 150 m. Over 276,000 m 3 of coastal sediments were eroded by the tsunami along the 9.2 km of sandy coast. The mean erosion rate of the beaches was ~ 30 m 3/m of coast and locally exceeded 80 m 3/m. The most eroded coasts were tangent to the tsunami wave train, which was coming from the southwest. The fringing reefs were not efficient in reducing the erosional impact of the tsunami. The 220 boulders measured range from 0.3 to 7.2 m large (typically 0.7-1.5 m), with weights from over 50 kg up to 85 t. We found one boulder, less than 1 m large, at 1 km from the coastline, but all the others were

  2. Biological control of Black Pod Disease and Seedling Blight of cacao caused by Phytophthora Species using Trichoderma from Aceh Sumatra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cocoa tree, Theobroma cacao L., suffers large yield losses in Aceh Indonesia to the disease black pod rot, caused by Phytophthora spp. Despite having the largest area under cacao production in Sumatra, farmers in the Aceh region have low overall production because of losses to insect pests and b...

  3. Indonesia, Sumatra, Singapore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view shows the area around Northeastern Sumatra, Indonesia (1.0N, 104.0E). The city of Singapore and the Singapore Strait is in the center at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula. The Singapore Strait is the eastern extension of the Strait of Malacca and separates the Malay Peninsula from Sumatra. Large sediment plumes from the rivers attest to the local soil erosion and industrial dumping ofd wastes.

  4. Out of Disaster Comes Opportunity: Initial Lessons from Teacher Mentoring in Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesnick, Joy; Schultz, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    On December 26, 2004, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake--the most powerful in more than 40 years--struck deep under the Indian Ocean. It was centered about 100 miles southwest off the coast of Aceh, Indonesia, and triggered massive tsunamis across the coasts of Asia and Africa. In Aceh province, located at the northwest tip of the island of Sumatra in…

  5. Tsunami damage in Aceh Province, Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The island of Sumatra suffered from both the rumblings of the submarine earthquake and the tsunamis that were generated on December 26, 2004. Within minutes of the quake, the sea surged ashore, bringing destruction to the coasts of northern Sumatra. This pair of natural-color images from Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument shows a small area along the Sumatran coast in Aceh province where the tsunami smashed its way ashore. In this region, the wave cut a swath of near-total destruction 1.5 kilometers (roughly one mile) in most places, but penetrating farther in many others. Some of these deeper paths of destruction can be seen especially dramatically in the larger-area ETM+ images linked to above. (North is up in these larger images.) ETM+ collects data at roughly 30 meter resolution, complimenting sensors like NASA's MODIS (onboard both Terra and Aqua satellites) which observed this area at 250-meter resolution to give a wide view and ultra-high-resolution sensors like Space Imaging's IKONOS, which observed the same region at 4-meter resolution to give a detailed, smaller-area view. NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data provided courtesy of the Landsat 7 Science Project Office

  6. Issues in Indonesia's tsunami disaster management system revealed after the 2004 Sumatra event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Koyama, A.; Sun, H.; Kang, I.; Arakawa, T.; Kobayashi, J.; Nagata, M.; Nakanishi, R.; Nakano, M.; Noguchi, S.

    2014-12-01

    During the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, Indonesia had the largest number of casualties around 170,000. International society has supported tsunami early warning system, disaster management and disaster education for Indonesia. The past ten years saw several tsunamis in Indonesia after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Construction of tsunami early warning system was not in time the 2006 Pangandaran tsunami in Jawa Island. On the other hand, tsunami science has been developed for this decade. Tsunami early warning system has been developed by deep ocean pressure gauges (DART system), coastal tide gauges, GPS buoys and so on. Tsunami folklore has been collected and used education and connected with tsunami deposit. However, the tsunami early warning system and other science application were not widely used at once in Indonesia. GPS buoys were stolen by fishery people. One tsunami evacuation building are not used for evacuation by local people in Aceh Sumatra Island in 2012 though locations of the buildings were selected by scientific numerical simulation. Big panic and trafic accidents occurred by M8.6 earthquake in Aceh in April 2012 and reveal lack of disaster management planning in urban planning during reconstruction (Fig.1: Trafic jam in Banda Aceh, source MSN news photo). In addition to this, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami reveal fragilities tsunami preparedness. How should we decide to use the tsunami science? We research field situation in Aceh the after 10 years past from the 2004 Sumatra event. This presentation discusses issues of the gap between tsunami science and operations through field research in Aceh now.

  7. Anti-Guerilla Warfare in Aceh, Indonesia from 1980-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Anti-Guerilla Warfare In Aceh, Indonesia From 1980-2005 CSC 2005 Subject Area Warfighting ANTI-GUERILLA WARFARE IN ACEH, INDONESIA FROM... Indonesia From 1980-2005 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK... Indonesia . This paper will also examine possible solutions to this conflict. I have focused on recent articles that show that the use of military

  8. A tsunami related tetanus epidemic in Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Jeremijenko, A; McLaws, M L; Kosasih, H

    2007-01-01

    In January 2005, a tetanus epidemic was discovered amongst survivors of the Boxing Day Tsunami in Aceh, Indonesia. Our aim was to describe the extent of the tetanus outbreak in tsunami survivors admitted and describe the case outcomes from one hospital. All clinicians were instructed to report suspected cases to a centralised organisation using a standardised data collection tool. Active case finding was carried out by a trained team that visited hospital wards in Aceh. Of the 106 cases, 79% was above 25 years old (the median age was 40 years) and 62% was male. The mortality rate in Aceh was 19% and that of in follow up cases was 17%. Fifteen of the follow-up cases were admitted with severe tetanus associated with superficial wounds, three of whom had a history of immersion. Supplies to treat the tetanus cases in this epidemic were initially limited as disaster relief agencies were not prepared for the resultant tetanus epidemic. The mortality rate of 17%, was significantly less than was usual for tetanus in adults (>50%) and children (80%) in underdeveloped countries. To reduce mortality and morbidity, rapid disaster relief organisations should include supplies for vaccination and treatment of tetanus cases and consider early tracheotomy for severe cases.

  9. Potential Sedimentary Evidence of Two Closely Spaced Tsunamis on the West Coast of Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Katrin; Meilianda, Ella; Rushdy, Ibnu; Moena, Abudzar; Yolanda, Irvan P.

    2016-04-01

    Recent research in the coastal regions of Aceh, Indonesia, an area that was largely affected by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami, suggests the possibility that two closely spaced tsunamis occurred at the turn of the 14th to 15th century (Meltzner et al., 2010; Sieh et al., 2015). Here, we present evidence of two buried sand layers in the coastal marshes of West Aceh, possibly representing these penultimate predecessors of the 2004 tsunami. We discovered the sand layers in an until recently inaccessible area of a previously studied beach ridge plain about 15 km North of Meulaboh, West Aceh. Here, the 2004 tsunami left a continuous, typically a few cm thick sand sheet in the coastal hinterland in low-lying swales that accumulate organic-rich deposits and separate the sandy beach ridges. In keeping with the long-term progradation of the coastline, older deposits have to be sought after further inland. Using a hand auger, the buried sand layers were discovered in 3 cores in a flooded and highly vegetated swale in about 1 km distance to the shoreline. The pair of sand layers occurs in 70-100 cm depth and overlies 40-60 cm of dark-brown peat that rests on the basal sand of the beach ridge plain. The lower sand layer is only 1-6 cm thick, whereas the upper layer is consistently thicker, measuring 11-17 cm, with 8-14 cm of peat in between sand sheets. Both layers consist of massive, grey, medium sand and include plant fragments. They show very sharp upper and lower boundaries clearly distinguishing them from the surrounding peat and indicating an abrupt depositional event. A previously developed age model for sediments of this beach ridge plain suggest that this pair of layers could indeed correlate to a nearby buried sand sheet interpreted as tsunamigenic and deposited soon after 1290-1400AD (Monecke et al., 2008). The superb preservation at this new site allows the clear distinction of two depositional events, which, based on a first

  10. Space Radar Image of Central Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the central part of the island of Sumatra in Indonesia that shows how the tropical rainforest typical of this country is being impacted by human activity. Native forest appears in green in this image, while prominent pink areas represent places where the native forest has been cleared. The large rectangular areas have been cleared for palm oil plantations. The bright pink zones are areas that have been cleared since 1989, while the dark pink zones are areas that were cleared before 1989. These radar data were processed as part of an effort to assist oil and gas companies working in the area to assess the environmental impact of both their drilling operations and the activities of the local population. Radar images are useful in these areas because heavy cloud cover and the persistent smoke and haze associated with deforestation have prevented usable visible-light imagery from being acquired since 1989. The dark shapes in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image are a chain of lakes in flat coastal marshes. This image was acquired in October 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Environmental changes can be easily documented by comparing this image with visible-light data that were acquired in previous years by the Landsat satellite. The image is centered at 0.9 degrees north latitude and 101.3 degrees east longitude. The area shown is 50 kilometers by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  11. Penultimate predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Aceh, Sumatra: Stratigraphic, archeological, and historical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, Kerry; Daly, Patrick; Edwards McKinnon, E.; Pilarczyk, Jessica E.; Chiang, Hong-Wei; Horton, Benjamin; Rubin, Charles M.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Ismail, Nazli; Vane, Christopher H.; Feener, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present stratigraphic, archeological and historical evidence for two closely timed predecessors of the giant 2004 tsunami on the northern coast of Aceh, northern Sumatra. This is the first direct evidence that a tsunami played a role in a fifteenth century cultural hiatus along the northern Sumatran portion of the maritime silk route. One seacliff exposure on the eastern side of the Lambaro headlands reveals two beds of tsunamigenic coral rubble within a small alluvial fan. Radiocarbon and Uranium-Thorium disequilibrium dates indicate emplacement of the coral rubble after 1344 ± 3 C.E. Another seacliff exposure, on the western side of the peninsula, contains evidence of nearly continuous settlement from ~1240 C.E. to soon after 1366 ± 3 C.E., terminated by tsunami destruction. At both sites, the tsunamis are likely coincident with sudden uplift of coral reefs above the Sunda megathrust 1394 ± 2 C.E., evidence for which has been published previously. The tsunami (or tsunami pair) appears to have destroyed a vibrant port community and led to the temporary recentering of marine trade dominance to more protected locations farther east. The reestablishment of vibrant communities along the devastated coast by about 1500 CE set the stage for the 2004 disaster.

  12. Predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in a coastal cave, Aceh Province, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarczyk, J.; Rubin, C. M.; Sieh, K.; Horton, B.; Daly, P.; Majewski, J.; Ismail, N.

    2013-12-01

    Geological studies of coral reefs and coastal plains have uncovered short and incomplete records of predecessors for the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Here we present a longer and more-complete mid- to late Holocene tsunami history from an extraordinary sedimentary deposit in northwestern Aceh Province, Sumatra. We exposed clastic sediment in six trenches up to 2 m deep within a sheltered limestone cave 200 m from the present coastline. The trim line of the 2004 tsunami is about 25 m above sea level and 15 m above the top of the 10-m high entrance to the cave. Within the cave, the deposits of 2004 comprise a 15 - 20 cm thick, laterally continuous sand sheet. Beneath this youngest tsunami sand is a <3-cm thick bed rich in guano dropped by insect feeding bats (Microchiroptera). Many similar couplets of sand and bat guano occur lower in the stratigraphic sequence. The sands have many diagnostic features of the 2004 deposit, namely a distinctly marine geochemical signature, high-diversity foraminiferal assemblages that include offshore species, normal grading, basal rip-up clasts, lenticular laminations, and articulated bivalves. Minor, local, non-tectonic normal and decollement faults that break the layers at several locations are likely due to strong ground shaking. Radiocarbon dating of charcoal and molluscs establish a mid- to late Holocene age range for the tsunami sands. Other than the 2004 deposit, layers younger than about 2,000 years are absent, because by about 2,000 years ago, accommodation space beneath the level of the rocky entrance to the cave had been filled. Pending analyses will reveal whether three clay layers within the sequence are of marine or of freshwater origin.

  13. A paleotsunami record from marshlands in West Aceh Province, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, K.; Finger, W.; Kongko, W.; McAdoo, B.; Moore, A. L.; Sudrajat, S. U.

    2007-12-01

    Constraining the frequency and magnitude of large events in the Indian Ocean region is critical to assess and mitigate tsunami risk along this densely populated coastline in the future. As historical records of large tsunamis in the area are sparse, the geological record provides the best evidence of recurrence rates and size of ancient tsunamis. Based on sediment data from coastal marshland deposits we present a paleotsunami record for West Aceh Province, Indonesia, an area immediately adjacent to the seismic source that was severely affected by the December 2004 tsunami. The recent tsunami deposited a distinct, typically 10-20 cm thick sand sheet up to 2 km inland within a prograding beach ridge plain. Sediment cores from swales in between beach ridges revealed three older sand layers, up to 10 cm thick, and intercalated within organic-rich marshland deposits. At least two of the older sand layers can be followed for several hundred meters along shore normal transects. Coring sites of different transects can be laterally correlated by following pronounced older beach ridges running parallel to the shoreline. The three individual sand layers occur at different distances to the shoreline, with the youngest sand layer at ~500 m distance from the present coast and the oldest one between 1500 m to 2000 m inland within older beach ridge complexes. The spatial distributions as well as grain size trends suggest landward directed flows over a prograding beach ridge plain, which can be best explained by ancient tsunamis. Radiocarbon dating of these deposits indicate three events occurring around 1000 AD, between 1350AD-1550AD, and after 1800AD, with the latter potentially correlating with a historically reported event in 1907AD.

  14. Analysis of rupture area of aftershocks caused by twin earthquakes (Case study: 11 April 2012 earthquakes of Aceh-North Sumatra)

    SciTech Connect

    Diansari, Angga Vertika Purwana, Ibnu; Subakti, Hendri

    2015-04-24

    The 11 April 2012 earthquakes off-shore Aceh-North Sumatra are unique events for the history of Indonesian earthquake. It is unique because that they have similar magnitude, 8.5 Mw and 8.1 Mw; close to epicenter distance, similar strike-slip focal mechanism, and occuring in outer rise area. The purposes of this research are: (1) comparing area of earthquakes base on models and that of calculation, (2) fitting the shape and the area of earthquake rupture zones, (3) analyzing the relationship between rupture area and magnitude of the earthquakes. Rupture area of the earthquake fault are determined by using 4 different formulas, i.e. Utsu and Seki (1954), Wells and Coppersmith (1994), Ellsworth (2003), and Christophersen and Smith (2000). The earthquakes aftershock parameters are taken from PGN (PusatGempabumiNasional or National Earthquake Information Center) of BMKG (Indonesia Agency Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics). The aftershock epicenters are plotted by GMT’s software. After that, ellipse and rectangular models of aftershock spreading are made. The results show that: (1) rupture areas were calculated using magnitude relationship which are larger than the the aftershock distributions model, (2) the best fitting model for that earthquake aftershock distribution is rectangular associated with Utsu and Seki (1954) formula, (3) the larger the magnitude of the earthquake, the larger area of the fault.

  15. Mental health in Aceh--Indonesia: A decade after the devastating tsunami 2004.

    PubMed

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Yessi, Sarifah; Aichberger, Marion C; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-02-01

    The province of Aceh has suffered enormously from the perennial armed conflict and the devastating Tsunami in 2004. Despite the waves of external aid and national concern geared toward improving healthcare services as part of the reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts after the Tsunami, mental health services still require much attention. This paper aims to understand the mental healthcare system in Aceh Province, Indonesia; its main focus is on the burden, on the healthcare system, its development, service delivery and cultural issues from the devastating Tsunami in 2004 until the present. We reviewed those published and unpublished reports from the local and national government, from international instances (UN bodies, NGOs) and from the academic literature pertaining to mental health related programs conducted in Aceh. To some extent, mental health services in Aceh have been improved compared to their condition before the Tsunami. The development programs have focused on procurement of policy, improvement of human resources, and enhancing service delivery. Culture and religious beliefs shape the pathways by which people seek mental health treatment. The political system also determines the development of the mental health service in the province. The case of Aceh is a unique example where conflict and disaster serve as the catalysts toward the development of a mental healthcare system. Several factors contribute to the improvement of the mental health system, but security is a must. Whilst the Acehnese enjoy the improvements, some issues such as stigma, access to care and political fluctuations remain challenging.

  16. Rapid response: email, immediacy, and medical humanitarianism in Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Grayman, Jesse Hession

    2014-11-01

    After more than 20 years of sporadic separatist insurgency, the Free Aceh Movement and the Indonesian government signed an internationally brokered peace agreement in August 2005, just eight months after the Indian Ocean tsunami devastated Aceh's coastal communities. This article presents a medical humanitarian case study based on ethnographic data I collected while working for a large aid agency in post-conflict Aceh from 2005 to 2007. In December 2005, the agency faced the first test of its medical and negotiation capacities to provide psychiatric care to a recently amnestied political prisoner whose erratic behavior upon returning home led to his re-arrest and detention at a district police station. I juxtapose two methodological approaches-an ethnographic content analysis of the agency's email archive and field-based participant-observation-to recount contrasting narrative versions of the event. I use this contrast to illustrate and critique the immediacy of the humanitarian imperative that characterizes the industry. Immediacy is explored as both an urgent moral impulse to assist in a crisis and a form of mediation that seemingly projects neutral and transparent transmission of content. I argue that the sense of immediacy afforded by email enacts and amplifies the humanitarian imperative at the cost of abstracting elite humanitarian actors out of local and moral context. As a result, the management and mediation of this psychiatric case by email produced a bureaucratic model of care that failed to account for complex conditions of chronic political and medical instability on the ground.

  17. Taeniasis and cysticercosis in Bali and North Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wandra, Toni; Depary, A A; Sutisna, Putu; Margono, Sri S; Suroso, Thomas; Okamoto, Munehiro; Craig, Philip S; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    It has been reported that three human Taenia species are distributed in Indonesia: Taenia solium, Taenia asiatica and Taenia saginata. T. asiatica is well known in North Sumatra, especially on Samosir island in Lake Toba. T. solium and T. saginata are known from Bali. T. solium is most serious public health issue in Papua (former Irian Jaya). In this report, we briefly review the present situation of these three human Taenia species mainly in Bali and North Sumatra. For community based epidemiological survey, we have adopted and applied questionnaire, microscopic observation of eggs, coproantigen tests, coproDNA tests, mitochondrial DNA analysis and morphology for isolated specimens, serology for cysticercosis and taeniasis. For detection of taeniasis cases of both T. saginata and T. asiatica, questionnaire by expert doctors is perfect to detect worm carriers. Corpoantigen test developed for detection of taeniasis of T. solium is also highly reliable to detect taeniasis carriers in the community. Epidemiological data from these two islands 2002-2005 are reviewed with backgrounds of historical culture, religions and customs.

  18. Assessment of coalbed gas resources of the Central and South Sumatra Basin Provinces, Indonesia, 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Finn, Thomas M.

    2016-12-09

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 20 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable coalbed gas resource in the Central and South Sumatra Basin Provinces of Indonesia.

  19. April 2012 intra-oceanic seismicity off Sumatra boosted by the Banda-Aceh megathrust.

    PubMed

    Delescluse, Matthias; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Cattin, Rodolphe; Fleitout, Luce; Trubienko, Olga; Vigny, Christophe

    2012-10-11

    Large earthquakes nucleate at tectonic plate boundaries, and their occurrence within a plate's interior remains rare and poorly documented, especially offshore. The two large earthquakes that struck the northeastern Indian Ocean on 11 April 2012 are an exception: they are the largest strike-slip events reported in historical times and triggered large aftershocks worldwide. Yet they occurred within an intra-oceanic setting along the fossil fabric of the extinct Wharton basin, rather than on a discrete plate boundary. Here we show that the 11 April 2012 twin earthquakes are part of a continuing boost of the intraplate deformation between India and Australia that followed the Aceh 2004 and Nias 2005 megathrust earthquakes, subsequent to a stress transfer process recognized at other subduction zones. Using Coulomb stress change calculations, we show that the coseismic slips of the Aceh and Nias earthquakes can promote oceanic left-lateral strike-slip earthquakes on pre-existing meridian-aligned fault planes. We further show that persistent viscous relaxation in the asthenospheric mantle several years after the Aceh megathrust explains the time lag between the 2004 megathrust and the 2012 intraplate events. On a short timescale, the 2012 events provide new evidence for the interplay between megathrusts at the subduction interface and intraplate deformation offshore. On a longer geological timescale, the Australian plate, driven by slab-pull forces at the Sunda trench, is detaching from the Indian plate, which is subjected to resisting forces at the Himalayan front.

  20. Malaria prevalence in Nias District, North Sumatra Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Syafruddin, Din; Asih, Puji BS; Wahid, Isra; Dewi, Rita M; Tuti, Sekar; Laowo, Idaman; Hulu, Waozidohu; Zendrato, Pardamean; Laihad, Ferdinand; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2007-01-01

    Background The Nias district of the North Sumatra Province of Indonesia has long been known to be endemic for malaria. Following the economic crisis at the end of 1998 and the subsequent tsunami and earthquake, in December 2004 and March 2005, respectively, the malaria control programme in the area deteriorated. The present study aims to provide baseline data for the establishment of a suitable malaria control programme in the area and to analyse the frequency distribution of drug resistance alleles associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. Methods Malariometric and entomology surveys were performed in three subdistricts. Thin and thick blood smears were stained with Giemsa and examined under binocular light microscopy. Blood blots on filter paper were also prepared for isolation of parasite and host DNA to be used for molecular analysis of band 3 (SAO), pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr, and dhps. In addition, haemoglobin measurement was performed in the second and third surveys for the subjects less than 10 years old. Results Results of the three surveys revealed an average slide positivity rate of 8.13%, with a relatively higher rate in certain foci. Host genetic analysis, to identify the Band 3 deletion associated with Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis (SAO), revealed an overall frequency of 1.0% among the 1,484 samples examined. One hundred six Plasmodium falciparum isolates from three sub-districts were successfully analysed. Alleles of the dhfr and dhps genes associated with resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, dhfr C59R and S108N, and dhps A437G and K540E, were present at frequencies of 52.2%, 82.5%, 1.18% and 1.18%, respectively. The pfmdr1 alleles N86Y and N1042D, putatively associated with mefloquine resistance, were present at 31.4% and 2%, respectively. All but one sample carried the pfcrt 76T allele associated with chloroquine resistance. Entomologic surveys identified three potential anopheline vectors in the area, Anopheles

  1. A Window of Opportunity for Aceh, Indonesia Post-Tsunami: Historic Continuity, Current Points of Interest, and a Pattern. Output of the Cultural Simulation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE 1 A Window of Opportunity for Aceh, Indonesia Post-Tsunami: Historic Continuity...00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Window of Opportunity for Aceh, Indonesia Post-Tsunami: Historic Continuity, Current Points of...for Indonesia is an example to demonstrate the prototype operation of the CSM and is not intended to be a comprehensive analysis of the Situation in

  2. Black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) of the Special Province of Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hadi, U K; Karmil, T F

    1999-11-01

    The black fly fauna of the Special Province of Aceh, Indonesia, was surveyed in 24 streams in 5 regencies, from 7 to 13 June 1998. Ten species were identified, Simulium (Nevermannia) aureohirtum Brunetti, S. (Gomphostilbia) duolongum Takaoka & Davies, S. (G.) sheilae Takaoka & Davies, S. (G.) sundaicum Edwards, S. (S.) nobile de Meijere, S. (S.) fenestratum Edwards, S. (S.) argyrocinctum de Meijere, S. (S.) nebulicola Edwards, S. (S.) iridescens de Meijere, and S. (S.) minangkabaum Takaoka & Sigit. These species are essentially oriental in distribution, because they belong to the 3 subgenera that are dominant groups in oriental or Palaearctic regions, or both.

  3. Remote sensing-based neural network mapping of tsunami damage in Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, Matthew J; Lumsdon, Parivash; Miller, David R

    2007-09-01

    In addition to the loss of human life, the tsunami event of 26 December 2004 caused extensive damage to coastal areas. The scale of the disaster was such that remote sensing may be the only way to determine its effects on the landscape. This paper presents the results of a neural network-based mapping of part of the region of Aceh, Sumatra. Before-and-after satellite imagery, combined with a novel neural network methodology, enabled a characterisation of landscape change. The neural network technique used a threshold of acceptance for identification, in combination with a bootstrapped identification method for identifying problem pixels. Map analysis allowed identification of urban areas that were inaccessible by road, and which aid agencies could therefore only reach by air or sea. The methods used provide a rapid and effective mapping ability and would be a useful tool for aid agencies, insurance underwriters and environmental monitoring.

  4. Observed and Simulated High Amplitude Tsunami Offshore of Northern Banda Aceh During the 2004 Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, M.; Nakamura, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Ishida, M.

    2007-12-01

    Several isolated high waves were observed about 0.5 to 20 km away from the west coast of northern Sumatra based from the interviews undertaken with fishermen who were on their fishing vessels when the December 2004 Sumatra earthquake occurred. The fishermen were on their wooden boats powered by motor engine manned by one to 20 crew members. Most of them felt the earthquake shocks and some of the crews immediately recognized the shaking phenomena as an earthquake based on their previous experiences. About half of interviewees had difficulties in controlling their boats during the shaking, which lasted about 10 to 15 min. About 5 to 15 minute after the shaking their boats were struck by the 10-20m high waves. Moreover, their boats, located more than several km off the coast of northern Sumatra, were struck repeatedly by more or less isolated high waves. Based from these interviews it is ascertained that tsunami can also pose danger even offshore when the tsunami amplitudes are high and water depths are shallower than about 50m. These observations also provided new evidence that the 2004 tsunami is already high enough to damage or overturn ships offshore. We simulated tsunami waves using a source model of the 2004 earthquake by Fujii and Satake (2007). Since the seafloor topography is not clear for both continental shelf and slope in northern Sumatra, the depth of 150m at 30 km off the coast varying gently towards the coast is presumed. This depth is assumed based on the type of fish caught in the area that are likely to live near the rocky seafloor at depths around 50m. For the numerical analysis, the non-linear long wave equation and the non-linear dispersive long wave equation were used for depths deeper and shallower than 150m, respectively. As a result, at depths around 20m, dispersive short- period solitary waves with height of 6-8m were generated that are similar to the waves that struck the fishing vessels. However, the tsunami waves that the fishermen

  5. Community Willingness to Participate in a Dengue Study in Aceh Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Samsul; Bustaman, Aslam; Radiansyah, Arsil; Angraini, Pradiba; Fasli, Riny; Salwiyadi, Salwiyadi; Bastian, Reza Akbar; Oktiviyari, Ade; Akmal, Imaduddin; Iqbalamin, Muhammad; Adil, Jamalul; Henrizal, Fenni; Darmayanti, Darmayanti; Pratama, Rovy; Fajar, Jonny Karunia; Setiawan, Abdul Malik; Imrie, Allison; Kuch, Ulrich; Groneberg, David Alexander; Sasmono, R. Tedjo; Dhimal, Meghnath; Müller, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection is the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease in the world. Essential research on dengue virus transmission and its prevention requires community participation. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the factors that are associated with the willingness of communities in high prevalence areas to participate in dengue research. The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with the willingness of healthy community members in Aceh province, Indonesia, to participate in dengue research that would require phlebotomy. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out in nine regencies and municipalities of Aceh from November 2014 to March 2015. Interviews using a set of validated questionnaires were conducted to collect data on demography, history of dengue infection, socioeconomic status, and knowledge, attitude and practice regarding dengue fever. Two-step logistic regression and Spearman’s rank correlation (rs) analysis were used to assess the influence of independent variables on dependent variables. Among 535 participants, less than 20% had a good willingness to participate in the dengue study. The factors associated with good willingness to participate were being female, working as a civil servant, private employee or entrepreneur, having a high socioeconomic status and good knowledge, attitude and practice regarding dengue. Good knowledge and attitude regarding dengue were positive independent predictors of willingness to participate (OR: 2.30 [95% CI: 1.36–3.90] and 3.73 [95% CI: 2.24–6.21], respectively). Conclusion/Significance The willingness to participate in dengue research is very low among community members in Aceh, and the two most important associated factors are knowledge and attitude regarding dengue. To increase participation rate, efforts to improve the knowledge and attitude of community members regarding dengue fever and dengue-related research is required

  6. Contemporary Minangkabau food culture in West Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Lipoeto, N I; Mmedsci; Agus, Z; Oenzil, F; Masrul, M; Wattanapenpaiboon, N

    2001-01-01

    Diet has a strong relationship with food culture and changes in it are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of newly emergent degenerative diseases. To obtain in-depth opinions about the food culture of Minangkabau people, focus group discussions were conducted in a Minangkabau region, represented by four villages in West Sumatra, Indonesia, from January to March 1999. The members of the discussion groups were principally women aged from 35 to 82 years old. Minangkabau culture is matriarchal and matrilineal which accounts for female gender dominants in the discussions. Rice, fish, coconut and chilli are the basic ingredients of the Minangkabau meals. Meat, especially beef and chicken, is mainly prepared for special occasions; pork is not halal and therefore not eaten by Muslim Minangkabau people; and for reasons of taste preference and availability, lamb, goat and wild game are rarely eaten. However, rendang, a popular meat dish, has been identified as one of the Minangkabau food culture characteristic dishes. Vegetables are consumed daily. Fruit is mainly seasonal, although certain kinds of fruit, such as banana, papaya and citrus, can be found all year around. Coconut has an important role in Minangkabau food culture and is the main source of dietary fat. While almost all food items consumed by the Minangkabau can be cooked with coconut milk, fried food with coconut oil is considered to be a daily basic food. Desiccated coconut is also used as a food ingredient on about a weekly basis and in snack foods almost every day. Although there have been no changes in food preparation and there is a slight difference in taste preference between the young and the old generations, there has been a dramatic shift in food preferences, which is reflected in the changing percentage of energy consumed over the past 15 years. The traditional combination of rice, fish and coconut in Minangkabau culture goes back hundreds of years, long before the emergence of the degenerative

  7. Dividing disasters in Aceh, Indonesia: separatist conflict and tsunami, human rights and humanitarianism.

    PubMed

    Zeccola, Paul

    2011-04-01

    This paper examines the interface between human rights and humanitarian action in the context of the conflict and tsunami in Aceh, Indonesia, between 1998 and 2007. It looks at the challenges international humanitarian non-governmental organisations (NGOs) faced as they engaged in human rights work in the conflict period and in conflict-related activities in the post-tsunami period. The paper argues that many large NGOs may have compromised what some would hold to be essential principles for humanitarian action because of domestic political concerns, donor restrictions and resistance among certain NGO chiefs. In contrast with the pre-tsunami period, in which NGOs worked for years amid military operations, in the post-tsunami period NGOs were decidedly apolitical, neglecting the conflict in their tsunami response--despite significant developments that permitted greater political engagement in Aceh's post-conflict transformation. The evidence suggests that NGOs are challenged in contextualising humanitarian responses and that there is a need to underscore donor flexibility and independence in humanitarian action.

  8. In Vitro Lipophilic Antioxidant Capacity, Antidiabetic and Antibacterial Activity of Citrus Fruits Extracts from Aceh, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Ernawita; Wahyuono, Ruri Agung; Hesse, Jana; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Elsner, Peter; Böhm, Volker

    2017-01-01

    This study reports in vitro lipophilic antioxidant, inhibition of α-amylase and antibacterial activities of extracts of peel and pulp of citrus samples from Aceh, Indonesia. HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography), phytochemical, and FTIR (fourier transform infrared) analysis detected carotenoids, flavonoids, phenolic acids and terpenoids, contributing to the biological potencies. Most peel and pulp extracts contained lutein and lower concentrations of zeaxanthin, α-carotene, β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin. The extracts also contained flavanone glycosides (hesperidin, naringin and neohesperidin), flavonol (quercetin) and polymethoxylated flavones (sinensetin, tangeretin). L-TEAC (lipophilic trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) test determined for peel extracts higher antioxidant capacity compared to pulp extracts. All extracts presented α-amylase inhibitory activity, pulp extracts showing stronger inhibitory activity compared to peel extracts. All extracts inhibited the growth of both gram (+) and gram (−) bacteria, with peel and pulp extracts of makin showing the strongest inhibitory activity. Therefore, local citrus species from Aceh are potential sources of beneficial compounds with possible health preventive effects. PMID:28165379

  9. Assessment of continuous oil and gas resources of the South Sumatra Basin Province, Indonesia, 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Klett, Timothy R.; Finn, Thomas M.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Le, Phuong A.; Hawkins, Sarah J.

    2016-12-09

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered, technically recoverable mean resources of 689 million barrels of continuous shale oil and 3.9 trillion cubic feet of shale gas in the South Sumatra Basin Province in Indonesia.

  10. Assessment of shale-oil resources of the Central Sumatra Basin, Indonesia, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2015-11-12

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 459 million barrels of shale oil, 275 billion cubic feet of associated gas, and 23 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Central Sumatra Basin, Indonesia.

  11. Sedimentary deposits of the 26 December 2004 tsunami on the northwest coast of Aceh, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, A.; Nishimura, Y.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Kamataki, T.; Triyono, R.

    2006-01-01

    The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman tsunami flooded coastal northern Sumatra to a depth of over 20 m, deposited a discontinuous sheet of sand up to 80 cm thick, and left mud up to 5 km inland. In most places the sand sheet is normally graded, and in some it contains complex internal stratigraphy. Structures within the sand sheet may record the passage of up to 3 individual waves. We studied the 2004 tsunami deposits in detail along a flow-parallel transect about 400 m long, 16 km southwest of Banda Aceh. Near the shore along this transect, the deposit is thin or absent. Between 50 and 400 m inland it ranges in thickness from 5 to 20 cm. The main trend in thickness is a tendency to thicken by filling low spots, most dramatically at pre-existing stream channels. Deposition generally attended inundation - along the transect, the tsunami deposited sand to within about 40 m of the inundation limit. Although the tsunami deposit contains primarily material indistinguishable from material found on the beach one month after the event, it also contains grain sizes and compositions unavailable on the current beach. Along the transect we studied, these grains become increasingly dominant both landward and upward in the deposit; possibly some landward source of sediment was exposed and exploited by the passage of the waves. The deposit also contains the unabraded shells of subtidal marine organisms, suggesting that at least part of the deposit came from offshore. Grain sizes within the deposit tend to fine upward and landward, although individual units within the deposit appear massive, or show reverse grading. Sorting becomes better landward, although the most landward sites generally become poorly sorted from the inclusion of soil clasts. These sites commonly show interlayering of sandy units and soil clast units. Deposits from the 2004 tsunami in Sumatra demonstrate the complex nature of the deposits of large tsunamis. Unlike the deposits of smaller tsunamis, internal stratigraphy is

  12. Mental health status of vulnerable tsunami-affected communities: a survey in Aceh Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Souza, Renato; Bernatsky, Sasha; Reyes, Rosalie; de Jong, Kaz

    2007-06-01

    The authors determined the prevalence of severe emotional distress and depressive symptoms using the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-25 (HSCL; Derogatis, Lipman, Rickels, Uhlenhuth, & Covi, 1974) in tsunami-affected communities that had experienced armed conflict arising from the ongoing independence movement in Aceh Province, Indonesia. We also evaluated determinants of severe emotional distress. The data were collected for the purposes of a mental health assessment. In our sample (N = 262), 83.6% demonstrated severe emotional distress, and 77.1% demonstrated depressive symptoms. In multivariate regression models, severe emotional distress was positively associated with the number of tsunami-related deaths among household members. Our data suggests a need for effective interventions in this vulnerable population.

  13. Determining the Controlling Factors of Coastal Development along an Active Margin - A Case Study from Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Katrin; Meilianda, Ella; Hill, Emma; McAdoo, Brian; Qiang, Qui; Storms, Joep; Walstra, Dirk-Jan; Setiawan, Agus; Masputri, Aisha S.; Mayasari, Cut D.; Riandi, Indra; Nasir, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the recovery of shorelines after catastrophic events is crucial for sustainable coastal development and future hazard mitigation. Here, we present post-seismic coastal development data from West Aceh, Indonesia, an area that was severely affected by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami. Using a combined approach of spatial data analysis, field surveys and numerical modeling, we reconstruct the build-up of a new beach ridge along a 10 kilometer long stretch of the western Acehnese coast after the complete destruction of the beach in 2004. The coastline of West Aceh can be characterized as a microtidal, wave dominated environment with the wave climate being controlled by the monsoon seasons reaching a significant wave height of Hs = 1.2 m during the more energetic West Monsoon from April to September. Waves approach the shoreline at a very low angle resulting in minor and variable longshore sediment transport. The beach has an average foreshore slope of 0.07 and is composed of well sorted medium sand. Recently obtained bathymetric data indicates a steep upper shoreface with a slope of 0.03. Further offshore the slope decreases to 0.01 with 14 m water depth being reached in about 700 m distance to the shoreline. Grab samples obtained in 10 m water depth are composed of fine to medium sand but lenses of medium to coarse sand with abundant shell debris do also occur. Beach ridges can be traced up to 2 km inland and indicate long-term coastal progradation and abundant sediment supply to the littoral zone. The western Acehnese shoreline parallels the Sunda trench and subsided 50 to 100 cm during the 2004 rupture. Modeled land elevation changes as a result of afterslip and viscoelastic mantle relaxation, indicate rapid post-seismic uplift of 4.4 cm/year in the year following the earthquake, but more moderate uplift rates of 1.4 cm/year since mid-2006. In 2004, co-seismic subsidence and tsunami scouring caused the coastline to

  14. Remittances and circulation behavior in the livelihood process: transmigrant families in South Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Leinbach, T R; Watkins, J F

    1998-01-01

    The impact of migrant remittances in Indonesia is examined using data gathered in interviews undertaken in 21 households and with village leaders participating in the transmigration program in Cinta Karya, Sumatra, Indonesia. "Our findings illustrate that remittance behavior is spatially controlled and temporally variable, as families balance their labor and capital resources among farm production, local industry and investments, and the often unpredictable nature of circulation employment and remittances. We emphasize the linked and recursive nature of elements in the livelihood process and the related importance of temporal family dynamics in decision-making strategies."

  15. "I feel like half my body is clogged up": Lay models of stroke in Central Aceh, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Norris, Meriel; Allotey, Pascale; Barrett, Geraldine

    2010-11-01

    Stroke in low and middle income countries is an increasing cause of death and disability, with rates and the estimated burden considerably higher than that of high income countries. Lay explanatory models are believed to be one of the major influences on health seeking behaviour and essential to understand for appropriate education strategies. Despite stroke being a considerable health concern in Indonesia and particularly in Aceh, no studies to date have explored lay stroke models in that context. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study informed by both hermeneutic phenomenology and ethnography. Based in rural communities in Bener Meriah and Aceh Tengah in Central Aceh, Indonesia, data were gathered through interviews, photographs and observations with 11 persons with stroke (aged 32-69 years) and 18 of their carers. Fieldwork was conducted over nine months between 2007 and 2008. The study examined lay concepts of stroke, described as a condition resulting from a local blockage in blood from multiple causes, many of which are not recognised within the biomedical frame. The blockage is understood to be reversible and therefore the condition curable. This understanding is embedded and sustained in the specific political, cultural, religious and social context. The results illustrate similarities and differences with other cross-cultural studies and suggest areas of future research and points of consideration for stroke education strategies.

  16. Indonesia’s Aceh Problem: Measuring International and Domestic Costs (Asia-Pacific Security Studies, Volume 2, Number 5, July 2003)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    unlike East Timor and Papua) has been part of Indonesia since independence, and successful Acehnese secession, the government fears, might set a precedent...for the unraveling of the state. Therefore, Indonesia will strive to retain Aceh as part of the state. Indonesia’s current military offensive, which...independence demands. While the decision to end peace talks lies with the Government of Indonesia , both sides are at fault. Acehnese secessionists have

  17. Groundmagnetic survey used to identify the weathered zone, in Blang Bintang, Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syukri, M.; Marwan; Safitri, R.; Fadhli, Z.; Andika, F.; Saad, R.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of a geomagnetic survey is to investigate subsurface characteristic of geology, especially the weathered zone on the basis of the anomalies in the earth’s magnetic field resulting from the magnetic properties of the underlying rocks. The magnetic properties of rocks called as magnetic intensity is extremely variable depending on the type of rock and the environment of the region. The result of the research shows that the local magnetic intensity varies of -697 nT and 484 nT in the study area 1 and about -697 nT and 103 nT in the study area 2 whichare indicative of weathered zones. The weathered zones were interpreted by highly magnetic contrast. The total magnetic anomaly of Blang Bintang, Aceh Besar (Indonesia) shows higher magnetic anomalies over the eastern part (area 1) and low magnetic anomalies in the western part (area 2) of the study area, which indicate the presence of weathered zonedue to the presence of sediments such as clay, gravel and schist within the zone. The study has shown that magnetic method could be used as an efficient tool for delineating weathered zone in a study area.

  18. Numerical simulations of tsunami waves impacts on Ulee Lheue Harbour in Banda Aceh-Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fachrurrazi; Syamsidik; Al’ala, M.; Mahardi, W.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the effects of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami onto the Ulee Lheue harbour facility, Banda AcehIndonesia. The breakwater that had damaged after tsunami were rebuilt into its original design once more due to UNDP funding source. As the existing construction knowing how much the chance it stands againts the tsunami in various terms would be decent for further improvement. This research aim is to measure the capabilities of the breakwater againts the various tsunami scenario. performing the numerical simulation to analyze the hydrodynamics we used both COMCOT and Delft3D-flow for tsunami propagation in line with the hydrodynamics. Several observation points were deployed representing each part of the breakwater. The process revealed that the breakwater only able to hold 8.0 Mw induced wave from overtopping. uniquely when 8.2 Mw tsunami wave strikes the breakwater till overtopped but not giving enough energy to move the boulder aside. Potential movement of the boulder occurred when the 8.4 Mw tsunami wave come through the breakwater produced 77.12 m (5.88 %) damaged structure. The 8.6 Mw single fault highest magnitude gave 209.32 m long (15.97%) destruction upon this Ulee Lheue Harbour breakwater.

  19. Variation in Morphometric Characters in Four Sand Crab (Albunea symmysta) Populations Collected from Sumatra and Java Island, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pramithasari, Febi Ayu; Butet, Nurlisa Alias; Wardiatno, Yusli

    2017-01-01

    Variation in morphometric characters in four sand crab (Albunea symmysta) populations from four intertidal areas in Sumatra (Aceh and Bengkulu) and Java (Cilacap and Yogyakarta) were studied. Crabs collected from the four sites were measured to obtain 10 morphometric characters, i.e., carapace length (CL), carapace width (CW), ocular peduncle length and width (LOP and WOP), telson length and width (LT and WT), merus length (ML), carpus length (CaL), propodus length (PL), and dactylus length (DL). Allometric relationships were established among three morphometric characters (CW, PL, and DL) for each site, in which CL was fixed on the abscissa as a reference variable. The analysis of covariance showed that population from Yogyakarta had a greater carapace width and the Aceh population had a longer dactylus length. In terms of propodus length, the Aceh population had a longer dactylus length than the Bengkulu population. Two group populations were detected by cluster analysis with 10 morphometric characters, i.e., the Sumatra population and the Java population. PMID:28228919

  20. Variation in Morphometric Characters in Four Sand Crab (Albunea symmysta) Populations Collected from Sumatra and Java Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Pramithasari, Febi Ayu; Butet, Nurlisa Alias; Wardiatno, Yusli

    2017-01-01

    Variation in morphometric characters in four sand crab (Albunea symmysta) populations from four intertidal areas in Sumatra (Aceh and Bengkulu) and Java (Cilacap and Yogyakarta) were studied. Crabs collected from the four sites were measured to obtain 10 morphometric characters, i.e., carapace length (CL), carapace width (CW), ocular peduncle length and width (LOP and WOP), telson length and width (LT and WT), merus length (ML), carpus length (CaL), propodus length (PL), and dactylus length (DL). Allometric relationships were established among three morphometric characters (CW, PL, and DL) for each site, in which CL was fixed on the abscissa as a reference variable. The analysis of covariance showed that population from Yogyakarta had a greater carapace width and the Aceh population had a longer dactylus length. In terms of propodus length, the Aceh population had a longer dactylus length than the Bengkulu population. Two group populations were detected by cluster analysis with 10 morphometric characters, i.e., the Sumatra population and the Java population.

  1. Paleoenvironmental conditions in the late Paleogene, Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'shea, Natalie; Arthur Bettis, E.; Zaim, Yahdi; Rizal, Yan; Aswan, Aswan; Gunnell, Gregg F.; Zonneveld, John-Paul; Ciochon, Russell L.

    2015-11-01

    A stratified paleosol sequence exposed in an open pit mine in central Sumatra provides a record of the paleoenvironmental conditions in the lower reaches of a large river system in the late Paleogene (latest Eocene or Oligocene). Morphological, geochemical, and stable isotope data suggest that the sequence represents a mosaic of local environmental conditions changing from estuarine to riverine up section. Weakly expressed soils formed on low-lying estuary surfaces, while more well expressed soils formed on higher, better drained surfaces. Peatlands (coal) with clayey subsoils were along the estuary margins. Well-expressed soils with evidence of clay translocation and chemical weathering become more common higher in the section where alluvial deposits associated with a meandering river are dominant. Stable carbon isotope ratios support a paleolandscape dominated by C3 plants with input by C4 vegetation limited to a few intervals. Finally, whole-rock geochemistry suggests moderate chemical weathering consistent with a tropical locality. This multi-proxy paleoenvironmental reconstruction suggests a highly productive lowland forest environment at this locality in the late Paleogene and provides the first direct examination of the terrestrial environment in Sumatra at this time. The limited fossil record in Island Southeast Asia during this time period is likely a result of poor bone and shell preservation in tropical forest environments combined with a general lack of systematic prospecting. However, our continuing work in this area has produced a relatively diverse assemblage of fossil vertebrates, now including fishes, amphibians, turtles, crocodiles, and mammals, as well as a growing diversity of fossil plants.

  2. Processes of inclusion and adverse incorporation: oil palm and agrarian change in Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2010-01-01

    Changes in globalised agriculture raise critical questions as rapid agricultural development leads to widespread social and environmental transformation. With increased global demand for vegetable oils and biofuel, in Indonesia the area under oil palm has doubled over the last decade. This paper presents a case study of how micro-processes that are linked to wider dynamics shape oil palm related agrarian change in villages in Sumatra, Indonesia. It pursues related questions regarding the impact of agribusiness-driven agriculture, the fate of smallholders experiencing contemporary agrarian transition, and the impact of increased demand for vegetable oils and biofuels on agrarian structures in Sumatra. It argues that the paths of agrarian change are highly uneven and depend on how changing livelihood strategies are enabled or constrained by economic, social and political relations that vary over time and space. In contrast to simplifying narratives of inclusion/exclusion, it argues that outcomes depend on the terms under which smallholders engage with oil palm. Distinguishing between exogenous processes of agribusiness expansion and endogenous commodity market expansion, it finds each is associated with characteristic processes of change. It concludes that the way successive policy interventions have worked with the specific characteristics of oil palm have cumulatively shaped the space where agrarian change occurs in Sumatra.

  3. Impacts of soil and groundwater salinization on tree crop performance in post-tsunami Aceh Barat, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marohn, C.; Distel, A.; Dercon, G.; Wahyunto; Tomlinson, R.; Noordwijk, M. v.; Cadisch, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004 had far reaching consequences for agriculture in Aceh province, Indonesia, and particularly in Aceh Barat district, 150 km from the seaquake epicentre. In this study, the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of soil and groundwater salinity and their impact on tree crops were monitored in Aceh Barat from 2006 to 2008. On 48 sampling points along ten transects, covering 40 km of coastline, soil and groundwater salinity were measured and related to mortality and yield depression of the locally most important tree crops. Given a yearly rainfall of over 3000 mm, initial groundwater salinity declined rapidly from over 10 to less than 2 mS cm-1 within two years. On the other hand, seasonal dynamics of the groundwater table in combination with intrusion of saline water into the groundwater body led to recurring elevated salinity, sufficient to affect crops. Tree mortality and yield depression in the flooded area varied considerably between tree species. Damage to coconut (65% trees damaged) was related to tsunami run-up height, while rubber (50% trees damaged) was mainly affected by groundwater salinity. Coconut yields (-35% in average) were constrained by groundwater Ca2+ and Mg2+, while rubber yields (-65% on average) were related to groundwater chloride, pH and soil sodium. These findings have implications on planting deep-rooted tree crops as growth will be constrained by ongoing oscillations of the groundwater table and salinity.

  4. The 1997 fires in Kalimantan and Sumatra, Indonesia: Gaseous and particulate emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    Extensive and widespread vegetation and peat fires swept throughout Kalimantan and Sumatra, Indonesia, from August 1997 through March 1998. The fires resulted from routine burning for land clearing and land-use change. However, the severe drought conditions resulting from El Nino caused small land-clearing fires to become large uncontrolled wildfires. Analysis of SPOT images indicate that a total of 45,600 km² burned between August and December 1997. In this paper, the gaseous and particulate emissions resulting from the 1997 fires are estimated. On a daily basis, the calculated emissions of CO2, CO, CH4, NOx, and particulates from the Kalimantan and Sumatra fires of 1997 significantly exceeded the emissions from the Kuwait oil fires of 1991.

  5. The effects of local culture on hospital administration in West Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Semiarty, Rima; Fanany, Rebecca

    2017-02-06

    Purpose Problems in health-care leadership are serious in West Sumatra, Indonesia, especially in hospitals, which are controlled locally. The purpose of this paper is to present the experience of three hospitals in balancing the conflicting demands of the national health-care system and the traditional model of leadership in the local community. Design/methodology/approach Three case studies of the hospital leadership dynamic in West Sumatra were developed from in-depth interviews with directors, senior administrators and a representative selection of employees in various professional categories. Findings An analysis of findings shows that traditional views about leadership remain strong in the community and color the expectations of hospital staff. Hospital directors, however, are bound by the modern management practices of the national system. This conflict has intensified since regional autonomy which emphasizes the local culture much more than in the past. Research limitations/implications The research was carried out in one Indonesian province and was limited to three hospitals of different types. Practical implications The findings elucidate a potential underlying cause of problems in hospital management in Indonesia and may inform culturally appropriate ways of addressing them. Originality/value The social and cultural contexts of management have not been rigorously studied in Indonesia. The relationship between local and national culture reported here likely has a similar effect in other parts of the country.

  6. Spawning seasons of Rasbora tawarensis (Pisces: Cyprinidae) in Lake Laut Tawar, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rasbora tawarensis is an endemic freshwater fish in Lake Laut Tawar, Aceh Province, Indonesia. Unfortunately, its status is regarded as critical endangered with populations decreasing in recent years. To date no information on the spawning activities of the fish are available. Therefore, this study provides a contribution to the knowledge on reproductive biology of R. tawarensis especially on spawning seasons as well as basic information for conservation of the species. Methods Monthly sampling was conducted from April 2008 to March 2009 by using selective gillnets. The gonadosomatic index, size composition and sex ratio were assessed. The gonadal development was evaluated based on macroscopic and microscopic examinations of the gonads. Results The gonadosomatic index (GSI) varied between 6.65 to 18.16 in female and 4.94 to 8.56 for male. GSI of the female R. tawarensis was higher in March, September and December indicating the onset of reproductive seasons, the GSI and oocyte size being directly correlated with gonadal development stages. Although, a greater proportion of mature male than female was detected during the study, the sex ratio showed that the overall number of female was higher than male. The ovaries had multiple oocyte size classes at every stage of gonadal development, thus R. tawarensis can be classified as a group synchronous spawner or a fractional multiple spawner. Conclusion The spawning seasons of R. tawarensis were three times a year and September being the peak of the reproductive season and the female was the predominant sex. This species is classified as a group synchronous spawner. PMID:20482777

  7. Dangers, delights, and destiny on the sea: fishers along the East coast of north sumatra, indonesia.

    PubMed

    Markkanen, Pia

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative project between the International Labour Organization's International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC) and the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production, in identifying work hazards of fishers along the east coast of North Sumatra, Indonesia, in July 2004. The study employed qualitative investigation techniques: participant observations at fishing villages and harbors; and interviews with local fishers and skippers. Fishers work long hours in life-threatening conditions, often with low pay. It would be synergistic to incorporate fishing safety and health policies and advocacy efforts into reconstruction undertakings of fisheries devastated by the 2004 tsunami.

  8. Parathelphusa pardus, a new species of lowland freshwater crab from swamps in central Sumatra, Indonesia (Crustacea: Brachyura: Gecarcinucidae).

    PubMed

    Ng, Peter K L; Riady, Rikhi; Windarti, Windarti

    2016-02-29

    A new species of gecarcinucid freshwater crab of the genus Parathelphusa H. Milne Edwards, 1853, is described from freshwater swamp habitats in Pekanbaru, Riau Province, in central-eastern Sumatra, Indonesia. Parathelphusa pardus sp. nov., has a very distinctive colour pattern, and in this respect, resembles P. maindroni (Rathbun, 1902) from Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia; P. batamensis Ng, 1992, from Batam Island, Indonesia; P. reticulata Ng, 1990, from Singapore; and P. oxygona Nobili, 1901, from western Sarawak. It can be distinguished from these species and congeners by a suite of carapace, ambulatory leg, thoracic sternal and most importantly, male first gonopod characters.

  9. Structure and kinematics of the Sumatran Fault System in North Sumatra (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Blanco, David; Philippon, Melody; von Hagke, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Lithospheric-scale faults related to oblique subduction are responsible for some of the most hazardous earthquakes reported worldwide. The mega-thrust in the Sunda sector of the Sumatran oblique subduction has been intensively studied, especially after the infamous 2004 Mw 9.1 earthquake, but its onshore kinematic complement within the Sumatran subduction, the transform Sumatran Fault System, has received considerably less attention. In this paper, we apply a combination of analysis of Digital Elevation Models (ASTER GDEM) and field evidence to resolve the kinematics of the leading edge of deformation of the northern sector of the Sumatran Fault System. To this end, we mapped the northernmost tip of Sumatra, including the islands to the northwest, between 4.5°N and 6°N. Here, major topographic highs are related to different faults. Using field evidence and our GDEM structural mapping, we can show that in the area where the fault bifurcates into two fault strands, two independent kinematic regimes evolve, both consistent with the large-scale framework of the Sumatran Fault System. Whereas the eastern branch is a classic Riedel system, the western branch features a fold-and-thrust belt. The latter contractional feature accommodated significant amounts (c. 20%) of shortening of the system in the study area. Our field observations of the tip of the NSFS match a strain pattern with a western contractional domain (Pulau Weh thrust splay) and an eastern extensional domain (Pulau Aceh Riedel system), which are together characteristic of the tip of a propagating strike-slip fault, from a mechanical viewpoint. For the first time, we describe the strain partitioning resulting from the propagation of the NSFS in Sumatra mainland. Our study helps understanding complex kinematics of an evolving strike-slip system, and stresses the importance of field studies in addition to remote sensing and geophysical studies.

  10. Contribution of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to reconstruct flooding characteristics of a 4220 BP tsunami from a thick unconsolidated structureless deposit (Banda Aceh, Sumatra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmer, Patrick; Gomez, Christopher; Iskandasyah, T. Yan W. M.; Lavigne, Franck; Sartohadi, Junun

    2015-07-01

    One of the main concerns of deciphering tsunami sedimentary records along seashore is to link the emplaced layers with marine high energy events. Based on a combination of morphologic features, sedimentary figures, grain size characteristics, fossils content, microfossils assemblages, geochemical elements, heavy minerals presence; it is, in principle, possible to relate the sedimentary record to a tsunami event. However, experience shows that sometimes, in reason of a lack of any visible sedimentary features, it is hard to decide between a storm and a tsunami origin. To solve this issue, the authors have used the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to evidence the sediment fabric. The validity of the method for reconstructing flow direction has been proved when applied on sediments in the aftermath of a tsunami event, for which the behaviour was well documented (2004 IOT). We present herein an application of this method for a 56 cm thick paleo-deposit dated 4220 BP laying under the soil covered by the 2004 IOT, SE of Banda Aceh, North Sumatra. We analysed this homogenous deposit, lacking of any visible structure, using methods of classic sedimentology to confirm the occurrence of a high energy event. We then applied AMS technique that allowed the reconstruction of flow characteristics during sediment emplacement. We show that all the sequence was emplaced by uprush phases and that the local topography played a role on the re-orientation of a part of the uprush flow, creating strong reverse current. This particular behaviour was reported by eyewitnesses during the 2004 IOT event.

  11. Geochemistry and petrology of selected coal samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Tewalt, S.J.; Hower, J.C.; Stucker, J.D.; O'Keefe, J. M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Indonesia has become the world's largest exporter of thermal coal and is a major supplier to the Asian coal market, particularly as the People's Republic of China is now (2007) and perhaps may remain a net importer of coal. Indonesia has had a long history of coal production, mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan, but only in the last two decades have government and commercial forces resulted in a remarkable coal boom. A recent assessment of Indonesian coal-bed methane (CBM) potential has motivated active CBM exploration. Most of the coal is Paleogene and Neogene, low to moderate rank and has low ash yield and sulfur (generally < 10 and < 1??wt.%, respectively). Active tectonic and igneous activity has resulted in significant rank increase in some coal basins. Eight coal samples are described that represent the major export and/or resource potential of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. Detailed geochemistry, including proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, and major, minor, and trace element determinations are presented. Organic petrology and vitrinite reflectance data reflect various precursor flora assemblages and rank variations, including sample composites from active igneous and tectonic areas. A comparison of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) elements abundance with world and US averages show that the Indonesian coals have low combustion pollution potential.

  12. Prototype Tsunami Evacuation Park in Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, B. E.; Cedillos, V.; Deierlein, G.; Di Mauro, M.; Kornberg, K.

    2012-12-01

    Padang, Indonesia, a city of some 900,000 people, half of whom live close to the coast and within a five-meter elevation above sea level, has one of the highest tsunami risks in the world due to its close offshore thrust-fault seismic hazard, flat terrain and dense population. There is a high probability that a tsunami will strike the shores of Padang, flooding half of the area of the city, within the next 30 years. If that tsunami occurred today, it is estimated that several hundred thousand people would die, as they could not reach safe ground in the ~30 minute interval between the earthquake's occurrence and the tsunami's arrival. Padang's needs have been amply demonstrated: after earthquakes in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012, citizens, thinking that those earthquakes might cause a tsunami, tried to evacuate in cars and motorbikes, which created traffic jams, and most could not reach safe ground in 30 minutes. Since 2008, GeoHazards International (GHI) and Stanford University have studied a range of options for improving this situation, including ways to accelerate evacuation to high ground with pedestrian bridges and widened roads, and means of "vertical" evacuation in multi-story buildings, mosques, pedestrian overpasses, and Tsunami Evacuation Parks (TEPs), which are man-made hills with recreation facilities on top. TEPs proved most practical and cost-effective for Padang, given the available budget, technology and time. The Earth Observatory Singapore (EOS) developed an agent-based model that simulates pedestrian and vehicular evacuation to assess tsunami risk and risk reduction interventions in Southeast Asia. EOS applied this model to analyze the effectiveness in Padang of TEPs over other tsunami risk management approaches in terms of evacuation times and the number of people saved. The model shows that only ~24,000 people (20% of the total population) in the northern part of Padang can reach safe ground within 30 minutes, if people evacuate using cars and

  13. A new species of Malayopotamon Bott, 1968 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura: Potamidae), a freshwater crab from northern Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Peter K L

    2014-02-28

    A new species of potamid freshwater crab, Malayopotamon weh sp. nov., is described from the island of Pulau Weh off northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The species superficially resembles three Sumatran species: M. batak Ng & Wowor, 1991, M. tobaense (Bott, 1968), and M. turgeo Ng & Tan, 1999, but can easily be distinguished by various carapace as well as gonopod characters.

  14. Indonesian Separatist Movement in Aceh

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-25

    1 Arnold, Wayne. Exxon is Preparing Return to Rebel Area in Indonesia . New York Times, June 19, 2001. p. W1. Congressional Research Service ˜ The...in Aceh Larry Niksch Specialist in Asian Affairs Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division Summary Indonesia faces a major separatist insurgency in...Aceh produce frequent reports of human rights abuses and alienation of the populace. The Bush Administration has urged Indonesia to seek a political

  15. Indonesia: Sumatra

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... abundance of atmospheric particulates. This product used a test version of the MISR retrieval that incorporates an experimental set of ... number and severity of this year's fires was exacerbated by dry weather conditions associated with the onset of a weak to moderate El ...

  16. Geochemistry of Selected Coal Samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Indonesia is an archipelago of more than 17,000 islands that stretches astride the equator for about 5,200 km in southeast Asia (figure 1) and includes major Cenozoic volcano-plutonic arcs, active volcanoes, and various related onshore and offshore basins. These magmatic arcs have extensive Cu and Au mineralization that has generated much exploration and mining in the last 50 years. Although Au and Ag have been mined in Indonesia for over 1000 years (van Leeuwen, 1994), it was not until the middle of the nineteenth century that the Dutch explored and developed major Sn and minor Au, Ag, Ni, bauxite, and coal resources. The metallogeny of Indonesia includes Au-rich porphyry Cu, porphyry Mo, skarn Cu-Au, sedimentary-rock hosted Au, epithermal Au, laterite Ni, and diamond deposits. For example, the Grasberg deposit in Papua has the world's largest gold reserves and the third-largest copper reserves (Sillitoe, 1994). Coal mining in Indonesia also has had a long history beginning with the initial production in 1849 in the Mahakam coal field near Pengaron, East Kalimantan; in 1891 in the Ombilin area, Sumatra, (van Leeuwen, 1994); and in South Sumatra in 1919 at the Bukit Asam mine (Soehandojo, 1989). Total production from deposits in Sumatra and Kalimantan, from the 19thth century to World War II, amounted to 40 million metric tons (Mt). After World War II, production declined due to various factors including politics and a boom in the world-wide oil economy. Active exploration and increased mining began again in the 1980's mainly through a change in Indonesian government policy of collaboration with foreign companies and the global oil crises (Prijono, 1989). This recent coal revival (van Leeuwen, 1994) has lead Indonesia to become the largest exporter of thermal (steam) coal and the second largest combined thermal and metallurgical (coking) coal exporter in the world market (Fairhead and others, 2006). The exported coal is desirable as it is low sulfur

  17. A new species of tree frog genus Rhacophorus from Sumatra, Indonesia Amphibia, Anura).

    PubMed

    Hamidy, Amir; Kurniati, Hellen

    2015-04-14

    A small-sized tree frog of the genus Rhacophorus is described on the basis of 18 specimens collected from three different localities on Sumatra Island, Indonesia. Rhacophorus indonesiensis sp. nov. is divergent from all other Rhacophorus species genetically and morphologically. The new species is distinguished from its congeners by a combination of: the presence of black spots on the ventral surfaces of the hand and foot webbing, an absence of vomerine teeth, a venter with a white kite-shaped marking, raised white spots on the dorsum or on the head, and a reddish brown dorsum with irregular dark brown blotches and distinct black dots. With the addition of this new species, fifteen species of Rhacophorus are now known from Sumatra, the highest number of species of this genus in the Sundaland region. However, with the increasing conversion of forest to oil palm cultivation or mining, the possibility of the extinction of newly described or as yet undiscovered species is of great concern.

  18. Nighttime lights time series of tsunami damage, recovery, and economic metrics in Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Thomas W; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Chum, Kai Fung; Thomas, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    On 26 December 2004, a magnitude 9.2 earthquake off the west coast of the northern Sumatra, Indonesia resulted in 160,000 Indonesians killed. We examine the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime light imagery brightness values for 307 communities in the Study of the Tsunami Aftermath and Recovery (STAR), a household survey in Sumatra from 2004 to 2008. We examined night light time series between the annual brightness and extent of damage, economic metrics collected from STAR households and aggregated to the community level. There were significant changes in brightness values from 2004 to 2008 with a significant drop in brightness values in 2005 due to the tsunami and pre-tsunami nighttime light values returning in 2006 for all damage zones. There were significant relationships between the nighttime imagery brightness and per capita expenditures, and spending on energy and on food. Results suggest that Defense Meteorological Satellite Program nighttime light imagery can be used to capture the impacts and recovery from the tsunami and other natural disasters and estimate time series economic metrics at the community level in developing countries.

  19. Social dimensions of science-humanitarian collaboration: lessons from Padang, Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Rachel; Hope, Max; McCloskey, John; Crowley, Dominic; Crichton, Peter

    2014-07-01

    This paper contains a critical exploration of the social dimensions of the science-humanitarian relationship. Drawing on literature on the social role of science and on the social dimensions of humanitarian practice, it analyses a science-humanitarian partnership for disaster risk reduction (DRR) in Padang, Sumatra, Indonesia, an area threatened by tsunamigenic earthquakes. The paper draws on findings from case study research that was conducted between 2010 and 2011. The case study illustrates the social processes that enabled and hindered collaboration between the two spheres, including the informal partnership of local people and scientists that led to the co-production of earthquake and tsunami DRR and limited organisational capacity and support in relation to knowledge exchange. The paper reflects on the implications of these findings for science-humanitarian partnering in general, and it assesses the value of using a social dimensions approach to understand scientific and humanitarian dialogue.

  20. Termite assemblages from oil palm agroecosystems across Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Andi; Jalaludin, Nur-Atiqah; Hazmi, Izfa Riza; Rahim, Faszly

    2016-11-01

    Termite survey was conducted at six oil palm agroecosystem sites in Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia to document species richness across the sites. Six sites were surveyed by using continuous transect representing gradients of oil palm landuse across Indragiri Hulu to Bengkalis District since February 5th, 2015 until May 21st, 2015. Termites were sampled by modified transect protocols (100 m × 4 m × 10 cm). A total of 23 species belonging to two families and five subfamilies were collected. The termite assemblage was dominated by wood-feeding termites. The major family collected was Rhinotermitidae which included some pest species, such as Coptotermes curvignathus, C. sepangensis, C. kalshoveni, Schedorhinotermes malaccensis, S. medioobscurus, S. brevialatus, and S. javanicus.

  1. Analysis of tsunami disaster map by Geographic Information System (GIS): Aceh Singkil-Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, A.; Akhyar, H.

    2017-02-01

    Tsunami risk map is used by stakeholder as a base to decide evacuation plan and evaluates from disaster. Aceh Singkil district of Aceh- Indonesia’s disaster maps have been developed and analyzed by using GIS tool. Overlay methods through algorithms are used to produce hazard map, vulnerability, capacity and finally created disaster risk map. Spatial maps are used topographic maps, administrative map, SRTM. The parameters are social, economic, physical environmental vulnerability, a level of exposed people, parameters of houses, public building, critical facilities, productive land, population density, sex ratio, poor ratio, disability ratio, age group ratio, the protected forest, natural forest, and mangrove forest. The results show high-risk tsunami disaster at nine villages; moderate levels are seventeen villages, and other villages are shown in the low level of tsunami risk disaster.

  2. Seismic and deformation precursory to the small explosions of Marapi Volcano, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, D.; Patria, C.; Gunawan, H.; Taisne, B.; Nurfiani, D.; Avila, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Marapi Volcano is one of the active volcanoes of Indonesia located near the city of Bukittinggi, West Sumatra, Indonesia. Its activity is characterized by small vulcanian explosions with occasional VEI 2 producing tephra and pyroclastic flows. Due to its activity, it is being monitored by Centre for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM). Four seismic stations consists of 2 broadband and 2 short period instruments have been established since 2009. In collaboration with CVGHM, Earth Observatory of Singapore added 5 seismic stations around the volcano in 2014, initially with short period instruments but later upgraded to broadbands. We added one tilt station at the summit of Marapi. These seismic and tilt stations are telemetered by 5.8GHz radio to Marapi Observatory Post where data are archived and displayed for Marapi observers for their daily volcanic activity monitoring work. We also archive the data in the EOS and CVGHM main offices. Here we are presenting examples of seismic and deformation data from Marapi prior, during, and after the vulcanian explosion. Our study attempt to understand the state of the volcano based on monitoring data and in order to enable us to better estimate the hazards associated with the future eruptions of this or similar volcano.

  3. Relationship between personal, maternal, and familial factors with mental health problems in school-aged children in Aceh province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Saputra, Fauzan; Yunibhand, Jintana; Sukratul, Sunisa

    2017-02-01

    Recently, mental health problems (MHP) in school-aged children have become a global phenomenon. Yet, the number of children affected remains unclear in Indonesia, and the effects of mental health problems are of concern. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MHP in school-aged children and its relationship to personal, maternal, and familial factors in Aceh province, Indonesia. Participants were 143 school-aged children with MHP and their mothers. They completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, Social Competence Questionnaire, Brief Family Relationship Scale, Parental Stress Scale, Parent's Report Questionnaire, and Indonesian Version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Mainly, children were rated to have emotional symptoms by their mothers (37.8%). Factors such as academic competence, family relationships, and maternal parenting stress are related to MHP. Given the high prevalence of school-aged children that have emotional symptoms, child psychiatric mental health nurses should give special attention to assist them during their school years. Moreover, nurses should aim to improve family relationships and reduce maternal parenting stress.

  4. Microclimatic conditions in different land-use systems in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijide, Ana; Tiralla, Nina; Sabajo, Clifton; Panferov, Oleg; Gunawan, Dodo; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decades, Indonesia has experienced an unprecedented transformation of the land surface through deforestation and conversion from forest to other land-uses such as oil palm and rubber plantations. These transformations are expected to affect not only biodiversity and carbon storage, but also the biophysical conditions of the land surface, i.e. air and surface temperature, surface albedo, air humidity, and soil moisture. There is, however, a lack of quantitative information characterizing these differences with a systematic experimental design. We report results from micrometeorological measurements in four different land-use types (forest, rubber plantation, jungle rubber, and oil palm plantation, n=4) in two different landscapes in Jambi Province in Sumatra/Indonesia as well as remote sensing data from Landsat. Preliminary results show differences on the average within-canopy air temperature, with lowest values in the forest (24.70°C ± 0.01°C) and highest in oil palm and rubber plantations (25.45°C ± 0.02°C and 25.55°C ± 0.01°C respectively). The temperature ranges also varied between different land uses, from 6.27°C in the forest and up to 9.40 °C in oil palm between the 5 and 95% percentile. Relative air humidity followed an inverse trend to air temperature, with rubber and oil palm plantations being on average 6.29 and 5.37 % drier than the forest. Soil temperature was up to 1°C warmer in oil palm than in forest plots, while soil moisture was more influenced by the soil type in the different landscapes than by the land uses. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that land transformation in Indonesia results in distinctly different microclimatic conditions across land-use types.

  5. Field based geothermal exploration: Structural controls in the Tarutung Basin/North Central Sumatra (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukman, M.; Moeck, I.

    2012-04-01

    two million years due to the increase in sea-floor spreading rate of the Indian-Australian plate. The combination of regional clockwise rotation of Sumatra with local clockwise rotation caused by simple shear along the dextral SFS might generate the complex fault pattern which controls fluid flow of thermal water and placement of hot springs. Acknowledgements : Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst, DAAD. German Ministry for Education and Research, BMBF. Badan Geologi - KESDM Bandung, Indonesia.

  6. Preliminary study on detection sediment contamination in soil affected by the Indian Ocean giant tsunami 2004 in Aceh, Indonesia using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Nasrullah; Ramli, Muliadi; Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik

    2016-03-01

    This work is intended to asses the capability of LIBS for the detection of the tsunami sediment contamination in soil. LIBS apparatus used in this work consist of a laser system and an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) system. The soil sample was collected from in Banda Aceh City, Aceh, Indonesia, the most affected region by the giant Indian Ocean tsunami 2004. The laser beam was focused onto surface of the soil pellet using a focusing lens to produce luminous plasma. The experiment was conducted under air as surrounding gas at 1 atmosphere. The emission spectral lines from the plasma were detected by the OMA system. It was found that metal including heavy metals can surely be detected, thus implying the potent of LIBS technique as a fast screening tools of tsunami sediment contamination.

  7. Assessment of post-tsunami disaster recovery of Banda Aceh city of Indonesia as window of opportunities for sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilianda, E.; Munadi, K.; Azmeri; Safrida; Direzkia, Y.; Syamsidik; Oktari, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    Post-tsunami recovery process at Banda Aceh city of Indonesia were assessed in this study. Several actions and programs implemented during the recovery process were exercised and examined through several FGDs, to identify any windows of opportunities to change were captured in the aspects of infrastructure and housing, economic revitalization of the affected community, mental health and psychosocial condition and development, establishment and implementation of disaster risk reduction programs and community preparedness. Subsequently, whether or not those changes fit into the principle criteria of sustainability were examined. The results give insights on the dynamics of recovery process after more than a decade since the tsunami was affected the area. Some success and not-so-success stories of actions and program implementations during the recovery process were captured. On the aspect of livelihoods and public finance, the local government seems to have seen a window of opportunity and subsequently seize the opportunity to revitalize the administrative system of financing the micro-finance for communities. In contrast, on the aspect of socio-ecological systems integrity toward preserving the natural environment, the case of housing development at the coastal areas against the blueprint city masterplan exemplifies the failure in seizing the window of opportunity to “build back better”.

  8. CO2 and energy fluxes from an oil palm plantation in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijide, Ana; Herbst, Mathias; Knohl, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Oil palm plantations are expanding in Indonesia due to global increased demand of palm oil. Such plantations are usually set in previously forested land and in Sumatra, massive transformation of lowland forest into oil palm plantations is taking place. These land transformations have been identified as a potential driver of climate change, as they might result in changes of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. However, very limited information is available on GHG fluxes from oil palm plantations and their sink or source strength at ecosystem scale is yet unknown. An eddy covariance tower was therefore installed in a 2 year old oil palm plantation in the province of Jambi, Sumatra (1° 50' 7'S, 103° 17' 44'E), with the aim of studying carbon dioxide, water and energy fluxes during the non-productive phase of oil palm cultivation. The canopy was not yet closed and trees were around 2m high. The eddy covariance system consists of a Licor 7500A and an ultrasonic Metek Anemometer, operating at 10 Hz and installed on a 7m tower. In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, the site is equipped with a weather station, measuring short and long wave radiation, PAR, rainfall, profiles of air temperature, air humidity and wind speed, soil temperature and moisture and soil heat fluxes. Measurements started in July 2013 until January 2014, in order to capture possible differences which may happen during the dry (July-October) and wet (November-February) seasons. A large CO2 uptake would have been expected at this young oil palm plantation, as palm trees during this period of their cultivation are growing fast. However, our preliminary results show that during the first 5 months of measurements, the ecosystem was a small carbon source (below 10 g CO2 m-2). Latent heat flux was higher than sensible heat flux during the period of study, indicative of the high evaporation taking place. Our results show that both for CO2 and energy fluxes, large differences were observed between the

  9. Degraded peatlands as a source of riverine organic carbon and enhanced river outgassing in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wit, Francisca; Rixen, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Sumatra, Indonesia, is well known for its widespread tropical peat lands. However, silvi- and agricultural purposes are currently inducing large-scale degradation of peat lands, transforming the landscape into mainly palm-oil plantations. The degradation induces loss of carbon via direct CO2 emissions, but also via riverine outflow of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC, respectively) due to leaching. This organic carbon is then decomposed along the way towards the coast and is hypothesized to enhance coastal and river outgassing of CO2. In the framework of SPICE III, Science for the Protection of Indonesian Coastal Ecosystems, we are quantifying these carbon budgets and fluxes in the rivers and coastal areas of northeast Sumatra. Using underway instruments, we have gathered continuous measurements of various parameters, including pCO2, pH, temperature, salinity and oxygen. In addition, water samples were obtained for DOC, POC, δ13CDIC, alkalinity and nutrient analyses. The results of the first analyses show that pCO2 values in the coastal areas range between 400-600 μatm. However, in the vicinity of the rivers pCO2 concentrations increase tremendously, ranging from 600 near the estuaries to a staggering 9000 μatm further upstream. These values are much higher than the marine pCO2 value of 390 μatm in the South China Sea. When adding carbon isotope results into the story, while knowing that upstream river life is greatly reduced due to oxygen depletion as a result of high DOC decomposition, it appears to be clear from the values, which range between -20 to -24‰ δ13CDIC, that the main source of the organic carbon is indeed originating from the degrading peat lands. In conclusion, our hypothesis can be deemed correct: degrading peat lands enhance organic carbon outflow and therefore elevated decomposition in the rivers, which results in increased river outgassing of CO2. Further analyses will be conducted to precisely quantify the budgets and

  10. Nutrient leaching losses in lowland forests converted to oil palm and rubber plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Syahrul; Corre, Marife D.; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, Sumatra, Indonesia is experiencing rapid expansion of oil palm and rubber plantations by conversion of rainforest. This is evident from the 2.9 thousand km2 decrease in forest area in this region over the last 15 years. Such rapid land-use change necessitates assessment of its environmental impacts. Our study was aimed to assess the impact of forest conversion to oil palm and rubber plantations on nutrient leaching losses. Land-use conversion increases nutrient leaching losses due to changes in vegetation litter input, rooting depth, nutrient cycling and management (e.g. fertilization) practices. Our study area was in Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. We selected two soil landscapes in this region: loam and clay Acrisol soils. At each soil landscape, we investigated four land-use systems: lowland secondary rainforest, secondary forest with regenerating rubber (referred here as jungle rubber), rubber (7-17 years old) and oil palm plantations (9-16 years old). Each land use in each soil landscape was represented by four sites as replicates, totaling to 32 sites. We measured leaching losses using suction lysimeters installed at 1.5-m soil depth, which was well below the rooting depth, with bi-weekly to monthly sampling from February to December 2013. In general, the loam Acrisol landscape, particularly the forest and oil palm plantations, had lower soil solution pH and higher leaching fluxes of dissolved organic N, Na, Ca, Mg, total Al, total S and Cl than the clay Acrisol of the same land uses (all P ≤ 0.05). Among land uses in the loam Acrisol landscape, oil palm had lower soil solution pH and higher leaching fluxes of NH4+, NO3-, dissolved organic C, total P, total S and Cl than rubber plantation whereas forest and jungle rubber showed intermediate fluxes (all P ≤ 0.05, except P ≤ 0.09 for total P); oil palm had also higher Na, Ca, Mg and total Al leaching fluxes than all the other land uses (all P ≤ 0.05, except P ≤ 0.09 for Na

  11. Primary Health Centre disaster preparedness after the earthquake in Padang Pariaman, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Sumatra earthquake that occurred on September 30, 2009, caused severe damage in some districts, including Padang Pariaman. As Padang Pariaman is an earthquake-prone area, disaster and emergency management is necessary. Due to the limited health facilities, the health services completely rely on Puskesmas (Primary Health Centres, PHCs). This study is aimed at assessing the preparedness of PHCs to response to potential disasters in their surrounding area. Findings Padang Pariaman district was used in a case study setting to assess the readiness and preparedness of the PHCs there to face disasters. Self-administered questionnaire, key informant interview, and direct observation were used to obtain the data on human resources, facilities preparedness, and the procedures. The investigation focused on measuring four aspects, i.e. human resources, facilities preparedness, standard operating procedure (SOP), and policy. Due to the limited co-operation of the head of the PHCs, three PHCs were directly observed as a subsample. The evaluation was performed six months after the impact phase of the earthquake and three months after the PHCs' health staff training on improving the primary health care services. The number and quality of health staff in Padang Pariaman was far below ideal. Fewer than half of the PHCs had emergency facilities and only one considered the need for triage and fire management, whereas the transportation mode was still limited. An SOP and policy for facing disasters were not available in any of the PHCs. Therefore, promoting disaster preparedness, technical provision, including health staff training, is necessary. Conclusions Padang Pariaman district has not yet prepared its PHCs to face disaster, so it is apparent that PHCs' disaster preparedness in Padang Pariaman and also other earthquake-prone areas in Indonesia should be promoted. This should include increasing the number of doctors, providing training for health staff, and

  12. Carbon dioxide emissions from an Acacia plantation on peatland in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhiainen, J.; Hooijer, A.; Page, S. E.

    2011-08-01

    Peat surface CO2 emission, groundwater table depth and peat temperature were monitored for two years along transects in an Acacia plantation on thick tropical peat (>4 m) in Sumatra, Indonesia. A total of 2300 emission measurements were taken at 144 locations. The autotrophic root respiration component of the CO2 emission was separated from heterotrophic emissions caused by peat oxidation in three ways: (i) by comparing CO2 emissions within and beyond the tree rooting zone, (ii) by comparing CO2 emissions with and without peat trenching (i.e. cutting any roots remaining in the peat beyond the tree rooting zone), and (iii) by comparing CO2 emissions before and after Acacia tree harvesting. On average, the contribution of root respiration to daytime CO2 emission is 21 % along transects in mature tree stands. At locations 0.5 m from trees this is up to 80 % of the total emissions, but it is negligible at locations more than 1.3 m away. This means that CO2 emission measurements well away from trees are free of any root respiration contribution and thus represent only peat oxidation emission. We find daytime mean annual CO2 emission from peat oxidation alone of 94 t ha-1 yr-1 at a mean water table depth of 0.8 m, and a minimum emission value of 80 t ha-1 yr-1 after correction for the effect of diurnal temperature fluctuations, which resulted in a 14.5 % reduction of the daytime emission. There is a positive correlation between mean long-term water table depths and peat oxidation CO2 emission. However, no such relation is found for instantaneous emission/water table depth within transects and it is clear that factors other than water table depth also affect peat oxidation and total CO2 emissions. The increase in the temperature of the surface peat due to plantation development may explain over 50 % of peat oxidation emissions.

  13. The drug sensitivity and transmission dynamics of human malaria on Nias Island, North Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fryauff, D J; Leksana, B; Masbar, S; Wiady, I; Sismadi, P; Susanti, A I; Nagesha, H S; Syafruddin; Atmosoedjono, S; Bangs, M J; Baird, J K

    2002-07-01

    Nias Island, off the north-western coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, was one of the first locations in which chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax malaria was reported. This resistance is of particular concern because its ancient megalithic culture and the outstanding surfing conditions make the island a popular tourist destination. International travel to and from the island could rapidly spread chloroquine-resistant strains of P. vivax across the planet. The threat posed by such strains, locally and internationally, has led to the routine and periodic re-assessment of the efficacy of antimalarial drugs and transmission potential on the island. Active case detection identified malaria in 124 (17%) of 710 local residents whereas passive case detection, at the central health clinic, confirmed malaria in 77 (44%) of 173 cases of presumed 'clinical malaria'. Informed consenting volunteers who had malarial parasitaemias were treated, according to the Indonesian Ministry of Health's recommendations, with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) on day 0 (for P. falciparum) or with chloroquine (CQ) on days 0, 1 and 2 (for P. vivax). Each volunteer was then monitored for clinical and parasite response until day 28. Recurrent parasitaemia by day 28 treatment was seen in 29 (83%) of the 35 P. falciparum cases given SP (14, 11 and four cases showing RI, RII and RIII resistance, respectively). Recurrent parasitaemia was also observed, between day 11 and day 21, in six (21%) of the 28 P. vivax cases given CQ. Although the results of quantitative analysis confirmed only low prevalences of CQ-resistant P. vivax malaria, the prevalence of SP resistance among the P. falciparum cases was among the highest seen in Indonesia. When the parasites present in the volunteers with P. falciparum infections were genotyped, mutations associated with pyrimethamine resistance were found at high frequency in the dhfr gene but there was no evidence of selection for sulfadoxine resistance in the dhps gene

  14. Time-series analysis of multi-resolution optical imagery for quantifying forest cover loss in Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broich, Mark; Hansen, Matthew C.; Potapov, Peter; Adusei, Bernard; Lindquist, Erik; Stehman, Stephen V.

    2011-04-01

    Monitoring loss of humid tropical forests via remotely sensed imagery is critical for a number of environmental monitoring objectives, including carbon accounting, biodiversity, and climate modeling science applications. Landsat imagery, provided free of charge by the U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS/EROS), enables consistent and timely forest cover loss updates from regional to biome scales. The Indonesian islands of Sumatra and Kalimantan are a center of significant forest cover change within the humid tropics with implications for carbon dynamics, biodiversity maintenance and local livelihoods. Sumatra and Kalimantan feature poor observational coverage compared to other centers of humid tropical forest change, such as Mato Grosso, Brazil, due to the lack of ongoing acquisitions from nearby ground stations and the persistence of cloud cover obscuring the land surface. At the same time, forest change in Indonesia is transient and does not always result in deforestation, as cleared forests are rapidly replaced by timber plantations and oil palm estates. Epochal composites, where single best observations are selected over a given time interval and used to quantify change, are one option for monitoring forest change in cloudy regions. However, the frequency of forest cover change in Indonesia confounds the ability of image composite pairs to quantify all change. Transient change occurring between composite periods is often missed and the length of time required for creating a cloud-free composite often obscures change occurring within the composite period itself. In this paper, we analyzed all Landsat 7 imagery with <50% cloud cover and data and products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to quantify forest cover loss for Sumatra and Kalimantan from 2000 to 2005. We demonstrated that time-series approaches examining all good land observations are more accurate in mapping forest cover change in

  15. Health diplomacy through collaboration and a story of hope in tsunami-ravaged Banda Aceh, Indonesia: A U.S. Public Health Service nurse officer perspective.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    As a registered nurse, I have witnessed the powerful influence of bedside care for > 10 years. Yet my experience aboard the USNS Mercy--the first interagency deployment designed to provide humanitarian assistance to tsunami-stricken Indonesia--revealed a direct link between individual bedside care and health diplomacy. Despite desperate medical and humanitarian needs in the province of Banda Aceh, the Mercy was met with suspicion and resistance by the Indonesian government. In the first few days, it seemed uncertain that the Mercy would be asked to assist in any humanitarian capacity. The Mercy crew and staff agreed only to assist at the request of the Indonesian government. Ultimately it was the emergent medical needs of a 10-year-old survior, evacuated to the ship by Australian and German organizations, which established the seeds of health diplomacy between the United States and Indonesia. This article explores the ways in which health diplomacy can be fostered by individual medical and nursing care, through the story of one young survivor of the East Asian tsunami. My experience of compassionate and culturally centered care aboard the USNS Mercy touched the hearts and minds of care providers and, ultimately, won the trust of local government officials and the people of Banda Aceh.

  16. Deterioration of soil fertility by land use changes in South Sumatra, Indonesia: from 1970 to 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumbanraja, Jamalam; Syam, Tamaluddin; Nishide, Hiroyo; Kabul Mahi, Ali; Utomo, Muhajir; Sarno; Kimura, Makoto

    1998-10-01

    We monitored the land use changes in a hilly area of West Lampung, South Sumatra, Indonesia, from 1970 to 1990. The main data sources were the land use maps produced in 1970, 1978, 1984 and 1990 covering the area of 27 km×27 km. Transmigration and the resultant effect of increased population were the major driving forces in land use changes. Fifty-seven per cent of the study area was covered with primary forests in 1970, but only 13% in 1990. Areas under plantations, which were absent in 1970, increased to 60% in 1990. In addition, the change from monoculture plantations (mostly coffee plantation) to mixed plantations was noticeable from 1984 to 1990. Total upland areas including upland areas under shifting cultivation and upland fields with crops and vegetables decreased from 21% in 1970 to 0·1% in 1990. Soil chemical properties (total organic C, total N, available P, total P, exchangeable cations, cation exchangeable capacity (CEC), etc.) were analysed for lands under different land use forms after deforestation in the study area. Soil samples (surface layers, 0-20 cm, and subsurface layers, 20-40 cm) were collected from three different locations, each comprised of four different land use systems: i.e. primary forests, secondary forests, coffee plantations and cultivated lands. The contents of total organic C, total N, available P, total P, exchangeable cations and CEC decreased significantly with land use change from primary forests to the other land use forms. Cultivated lands exhibited the lowest values. Although less remarkable than in the surface layers, the amounts of total organic C, total N, total P, exchangeable cations and CEC were also decreased by forest clearing in the subsurface layers.Based on the land use changes from 1978 in the study area and the deterioration of soil chemical properties by forest clearing, total decreases in the amounts of nutrients in the surface and subsurface layers were estimated. The land use changes were estimated to

  17. Carbon dioxide emissions from an Acacia plantation on peatland in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhiainen, J.; Hooijer, A.; Page, S. E.

    2012-02-01

    Peat surface CO2 emission, groundwater table depth and peat temperature were monitored for two years along transects in an Acacia plantation on thick tropical peat (>4 m) in Sumatra, Indonesia. A total of 2300 emission measurements were taken at 144 locations, over a 2 year period. The autotrophic root respiration component of CO2 emission was separated from heterotrophic emission caused by peat oxidation in three ways: (i) by comparing CO2 emissions within and beyond the tree rooting zone, (ii) by comparing CO2 emissions with and without peat trenching (i.e. cutting any roots remaining in the peat beyond the tree rooting zone), and (iii) by comparing CO2 emissions before and after Acacia tree harvesting. On average, the contribution of autotrophic respiration to daytime CO2 emission was 21% along transects in mature tree stands. At locations 0.5 m from trees this was up to 80% of the total emissions, but it was negligible at locations more than 1.3 m away. This means that CO2 emission measurements well away from trees were free of any autotrophic respiration contribution and thus represent only heterotrophic emissions. We found daytime mean annual CO2 emission from peat oxidation alone of 94 t ha-1 y-1 at a mean water table depth of 0.8 m, and a minimum emission value of 80 t ha-1 y-1 after correction for the effect of diurnal temperature fluctuations, which may result in a 14.5% reduction of the daytime emission. There is a positive correlation between mean long-term water table depth and peat oxidation CO2 emission. However, no such relation is found for instantaneous emission/water table depth within transects and it is clear that factors other than water table depth also affect peat oxidation and total CO2 emissions. The increase in the temperature of the surface peat due to plantation establishment may explain over 50% of peat oxidation emissions. Our study sets a standard for greenhouse gas flux studies from tropical peatlands under different forms of

  18. Tsunami Damage in Northwest Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The island of Sumatra suffered from both the rumblings of the submarine earthquake and the tsunamis that were generated on December 26, 2004. Within minutes of the quake, the sea surged ashore, bringing destruction to the coasts of the northern Sumatra. This pair of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite shows the Aceh province of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, on December 17, 2004, before the quake (bottom), and on December 29, 2004 (top), three days after the catastrophe. Although MODIS was not specifically designed to make the very detailed observations that are usually necessary for mapping coastline changes, the sensor nevertheless observed obvious differences in the Sumatran coastline. On December 17, the green vegetation along the west coast appears to reach all the way to the sea, with only an occasional thin stretch of white that is likely sand. After the earthquake and tsunamis, the entire western coast is lined with a noticeable purplish-brown border. The brownish border could be deposited sand, or perhaps exposed soil that was stripped bare of vegetation when the large waves rushed ashore and then raced away. Another possibility is that parts of the coastline may have sunk as the sea floor near the plate boundary rose. On a moderate-resolution image such as this, the affected area may seem small, but each pixel in the full resolution image is 250 by 250 meters. In places the brown strip reaches inland roughly 13 pixels, equal to a distance of 3.25 kilometers, or about 2 miles. On the northern tip of the island (shown in the large image), the incursion is even larger. NASA images created by Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory, using data obtained from the MODIS Rapid Response team and the Goddard Earth Sciences DAAC.

  19. Tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of the Sarulla graben geothermal area, North Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, R. G.; Dobson, P. F.; van Gerven, M.; Sagala, B. D.; Gunderson, R. P.

    2004-07-01

    The Sarulla graben is a composite Plio-Pleistocene basin developed along the northwest striking, dextral-slip Sumatra fault in a region where the fault coincides with the Sumatra volcanic arc. Offset of the 0.27±0.03 Ma Tor Sibohi rhyodacite dome by an active strand of the Sumatra fault, the Tor Sibohi fault (TSF), indicates a slip rate of about 9 mm/y. This value is lower than previous regional estimates of ˜25-30 mm/y for Holocene slip on the Sumatra fault determined from stream offsets in the Taratung region. This discrepancy may be due to (1) a difference between Holocene and late Quaternary rates of slip and (2) additional slip on other faults in the Sarulla area. Since the magnitude of undated stream offsets along the TSF in the Sarulla area is similar to those in the Taratung area, the discrepancy is likely to be due largely to a change in slip rate over time. Within the Sarulla area, major volcanic centers include the Sibualbuali stratavolcano (˜0.7-0.3 Ma), the Hopong caldera (˜1.5 Ma), and the Namora-I-Langit dacitic dome field (0.8-0.1 Ma). These centers generated the majority of the ash-flow tuffs and tuffaceous sediments filling the Sarulla graben, and appear to have been localized by structural features related to the Sumatra fault zone. Four geothermal systems within the Sarulla area are closely linked to major faults and volcanic centers. In three of the systems, reservoir permeability is clearly dominated by specific structures within the Sumatra fault system. In the fourth geothermal system, Namora-I-Langit geothermal field, permeability may be locally influenced by faults, but highly permeable fractures are widely distributed.

  20. Tectonic features of the southern Sumatra-western Java forearc of Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, H. U.; Gaedicke, C.; Roeser, H. A.; Schreckenberger, B.; Meyer, H.; Reichert, C.; Djajadihardja, Y.; Prexl, A.

    2002-10-01

    Multichannel reflection seismic profiles along the active Sunda Arc, where the Indo-Australian plate subducts under the overriding Eurasian margin revealed two accretionary wedges: The inner wedge I is of assumed Paleogene age, and the outer wedge II is of Neogene to Recent age. The inner wedge I is composed of tectonic flakes stretching from southeast Sumatra across the Sunda Strait to northwest Java, implying a similar plate tectonic regime in these areas at the time of flake development during upper Oligocene. Today, wedge I forms the outer arc high and the backstop for the younger outer wedge II. The missing outer arc high of the southern Sunda Strait is explained by a combination of Neogene transtension due to a clockwise rotation of Sumatra with respect to Java and by arc-parallel strike-slip movements. The rotation created transtensional pull-apart basins along the western Sunda Strait (Semangka Graben) as opposed to transpression and inversion on the eastern Sunda Strait, within the new detected Krakatau Basin. The arc-parallel transpressional Mentawai strike-slip fault zone (MFZ) was correlated from the Sumatra forearc basin to the northwest Java forearc basin. Off the Sunda Strait, northward bending branches of the MFZ are connected with the right-lateral Sumatra fault zone (SFZ) along the volcanic arc segment on Sumatra. It is speculated that the SFZ was attached to the Cimandiri-Pelabuhan Ratu strike-slip fault of Java prior to the presumed rotation of Sumatra, and that since the late lower Miocene the main slip movement shifted from the volcanic arc position to the forearc basin area due to increasingly oblique plate convergence.

  1. A Seismic Gap Study in the western offshore of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridhi, H. A.; Rizal, S.; Ridha, M.; Lee, C.

    2011-12-01

    The extremely destructive earthquake in December 26th 2004 and by the resulting tsunami was the worst natural disasters in recorded human history. However, the tsunami earthquakes continue to strike the west coast of Sumatra in the last 8 years. There are at least 12 events, the earthquake Magnitude between M = 7 to 8.9. The tragedies continue to add up to the already damaged coastal zone. In 2010 (after 6 years of the 2004 event), an earthquake of a magnitude 7.8 resulting a destructive tsunami was also happened near Mentawai Island at west coast of West Sumatra Province. Several thousand of people died and many houses buried. In order to have a better understanding of the seismic stress distribution and prepare for a future study including an IODP drilling in this area, we adopt the previous studies by French, Japan and German together with the absolute gravity data and seismic networks by the IRIS and Taiwan Central Weather Bureau for this research. In the last eight years, the Sumatra region already experienced two domains of the tsunami earthquake swamps, one in the north of Sumatra and the other in the south. Here, we present broadband earthquake data from the IRIS-NEIC catalogue between 2004 and 2010. The result shows that there is a possible of seismic gap in the border of central - southern domain of Sumatra region. This region included in the Northern Sumatra Province near Batu Island. The historical earthquake along the Sumatra margin since 17th century showed that the last big rapture in this border of central - southern domain was occurred in 1797 by the magnitude of 8.8 (Lange et al., 2010). In the other hand, the free-air gravity anomaly (Barber et al., 2005) shows high values correspond to the N-S oceanic fracture zone. All the high value was found near the trench of Sumatra subduction zone and gradually lower value through the south. Regarding to the stress release of the subducting Indo-Australian Oceanic Plate beneath Eurasian Plate, we also

  2. Male replacement and stability of territorial boundary in a group of agile gibbons (Hylobates agilis agilis) in West Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hiroki; Oyakawa, Chisako; Nurulkamilah, Santi; Rizaldi; Sugiura, Hideki; Bakar, Amsir; Masataka, Nobuo

    2012-10-01

    We report membership change in a group of wild agile gibbons, Hylobates agilis agilis, in West Sumatra, Indonesia. During 6-month observational periods, we focused on a particular unit of individuals known as the B group. We confirmed that the group consisted of five individuals: one adult female, one adult male, one subadult male, one subadult female, and one infant male. During our observations, the resident adult male and the two subadult individuals dispersed or disappeared, and a new adult male took over the group. We examined the effects of the male replacement on the territorial boundary, using the auditory census technique. The boundary was stable. We also documented the succession of the home range. Our results indicate a flexible social structure in this species and contribute some useful data to an ongoing debate on their social dynamics.

  3. Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Maxomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi and Sumatra, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    DEWI, Kartika; HASEGAWA, Hideo; FITRIANA, Yuli Sulistya; ASAKAWA, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from two species of spiny rats, Maxomys musschenbroekii from Sulawesi and M. whiteheadi from Sumatra. It is characterized by a cephalic plate extending laterally with dorsoventral constriction and stumpy eggs with an operculum rim reaching pole. It is readily distinguishable by the former feature from all of hitherto known representatives of this genus in Indonesia, but it resembles parasites in Murini and Hydromyni rodents in continental Asia and Sahul. This is the first Syphacia species distributed in both the Sunda Shelf and Sulawesi with the exception of Syphacia muris, a cosmopolitan pinworm found in rodents of the of genus Rattus. It is surmised that S. maxomyos is specific to Maxomys and that it was introduced to Sulawesi by dispersal of some Maxomys from the Sunda Shelf. PMID:26062434

  4. Uncovering the factors that can support and impede post-disaster EIA practice in developing countries: The case of Aceh Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, Tom; Fischer, Thomas B.

    2014-01-15

    The close relationship between environmental degradation and the occurrence and severity of disaster events has in recent years raised the profile of environmental assessment (EA) in the disaster management field. EA has been identified as a potentially supportive tool in the global effort to reduce disaster risk. As a component of this, attention has been brought specifically to the importance of the application of EA in the aftermath of disaster events in order to help prevent recurrence and promote sustainability. At the same time, however, it has also been recognised that post-disaster environments may be unfavourable to such practices. Looking at the practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA), this paper reports on a study which sought to identify more specifically the factors which can both support and hinder such practice following disaster events in a developing country context. Analysing the situation in Aceh Province, Indonesia, after the impact of two tsunamigenic earthquakes in late 2004 and early 2005, it is concluded that if EIA is to have a central role in the post-disaster period, pre-disaster preparation could be a key. -- Highlights: • Close relationship between environmental degradation and occurrence/severity of disaster events has raised profile of EA. • EA as a potentially supportive tool in the global effort to reduce disaster risk • Application of EA in the aftermath of disaster events to help prevent recurrence and promote sustainability • The paper looks at factors which can both support and hinder EA following disaster events in a developing country context. • We analyse the situation in Aceh Province, Indonesia, after the impact of two tsunamigenic earthquakes in 2004 and 2005.

  5. Evidence of Postseismic Deformation Signal of the 2007 M8.5 Bengkulu Earthquake and the 2012 M8.6 Indian Ocean Earthquake in Southern Sumatra, Indonesia, Based on GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alif, Satrio Muhammad; Meilano, Irwan; Gunawan, Endra; Efendi, Joni

    2016-06-01

    GPS data in southern Sumatra, Indonesia, indicate crustal deformation associated to subduction zone and inland fault of Great Sumatran Fault (GSF). We analyze these deformation characteristics using campaign and continuous GPS data available in southern Sumatra from 2006-2014. After removing the effect of GSF in southern Sumatra and coseismic displacements of 2007 Bengkulu and 2012 Indian Ocean earthquake, we find that GPS sites experienced northwest-ward direction. These GPS velocities correspond to postseismic deformation of the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and the 2012 Indian Ocean earthquake. We analyze strain using these velocities, and we find that postseismic strains in southern Sumatra are in the range of 0.8-20 nanostrain.

  6. Oil-productive Miocene algal and sea grass carbonate mudbanks, south Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Longman, M.W.; Beddoes, L.R. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Ramba and Tanjung Laban oil fields, located about 70 km northwest of Palembang in southern Sumatra, produce from wackestones and packstones in the lower Miocene Batu Raja Formation. Reservoir rocks are part of relatively small, undolomitized, low-relief carbonate buildups that accumulated on a widespread platform facies. Rocks in the platform facies are dominantly shaly nodular wackestones, whereas rocks in the buildup are dominantly nonshaly wackestones and packstones. The regional setting, the abundance of micrite in the buildups, the absence of both coralline algae and marine cements, and the geometry of the buildups suggest that noncalcareous algae and/or sea grasses were the dominant organisms responsible for forming these mudbanks. The absence of shale in the mudbanks has been important in forming the secondary porosity that yields most of the oil. Vugs and molds form as much as 30% of the rock in the best reservoir zones. Fractures formed by dissolution and collapse greatly enhance reservoir zones quality in many places. Another type of porosity, microintercrystalline, occurs within chalky micrites scattered through the upper part of the buildups. Porosity in these micrites reaches 25%, but permeability is very low. The recent discovery of oil in these low-energy carbonate mudbanks of the Batu Raja Formation has opened a new exploration play in the South Sumatra basin. Many similar buildups will likely be found as exploration continues and the basin's paleogeography becomes better understood.

  7. South Sumatra Basin Province, Indonesia; the Lahat/Talang Akar-Cenozoic total petroleum system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, Michele G.

    2000-01-01

    Oil and gas are produced from the onshore South Sumatra Basin Province. The province consists of Tertiary half-graben basins infilled with carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks unconformably overlying pre-Tertiary metamorphic and igneous rocks. Eocene through lower Oligocene lacustrine shales and Oligocene through lower Miocene lacustrine and deltaic coaly shales are the mature source rocks. Reserves of 4.3 billion barrels of oil equivalent have been discovered in reservoirs that range from pre-Tertiary basement through upper Miocene sandstones and carbonates deposited as synrift strata and as marine shoreline, deltaic-fluvial, and deep-water strata. Carbonate and sandstone reservoirs produce oil and gas primarily from anticlinal traps of Plio-Pleistocene age. Stratigraphic trapping and faulting are important locally. Production is compartmentalized due to numerous intraformational seals. The regional marine shale seal, deposited by a maximum sea level highstand in early middle Miocene time, was faulted during post-depositional folding allowing migration of hydrocarbons to reservoirs above the seal. The province contains the Lahat/Talang Akar-Cenozoic total petroleum system with one assessment unit, South Sumatra.

  8. Typology of land and forest fire in South Sumatra, Indonesia Based on Assessment of MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardiansyah, M.; Boer, R.; Situmorang, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, Sumatera and Kalimantan, in particular, has undergone dramatic fires. The fires were particularly bad in 2015 because of a prolonged dry season caused by the El Nino weather pattern and creating a lot of greenhouse gas emissions. Between about July and December, more than a million hectares of forest were burned. South Sumatra is one of the provinces with the highest of hotspots number and of fire area on this period. The aim of the study was to find burned area that caused by fire activity in 2015 and to identify a typology of land and forest fire the South Sumatera. In our study showed that between July and December 2015 the estimated burned area during El Nino in South Sumatra was 422,718 ha, of which 163,143 ha in mineral soil and 260,575 ha in peat soil. The majority of burned area occurred outside concession and inside concession with following typology: the fire activity in the HTI on non-forested land (26%), in the HTI on forested land (24%), in oil palm on non-forested land (17%), and in oil palm on forested land (2%).

  9. Soil Nitrogen-Cycling Responses to Conversion of Lowland Forests to Oil Palm and Rubber Plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kara; Corre, Marife D; Tjoa, Aiyen; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-01-01

    Rapid deforestation in Sumatra, Indonesia is presently occurring due to the expansion of palm oil and rubber production, fueled by an increasing global demand. Our study aimed to assess changes in soil-N cycling rates with conversion of forest to oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations. In Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, we selected two soil landscapes - loam and clay Acrisol soils - each with four land-use types: lowland forest and forest with regenerating rubber (hereafter, "jungle rubber") as reference land uses, and rubber and oil palm as converted land uses. Gross soil-N cycling rates were measured using the 15N pool dilution technique with in-situ incubation of soil cores. In the loam Acrisol soil, where fertility was low, microbial biomass, gross N mineralization and NH4+ immobilization were also low and no significant changes were detected with land-use conversion. The clay Acrisol soil which had higher initial fertility based on the reference land uses (i.e. higher pH, organic C, total N, effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC) and base saturation) (P≤0.05-0.09) had larger microbial biomass and NH4+ transformation rates (P≤0.05) compared to the loam Acrisol soil. Conversion of forest and jungle rubber to rubber and oil palm in the clay Acrisol soil decreased soil fertility which, in turn, reduced microbial biomass and consequently decreased NH4+ transformation rates (P≤0.05-0.09). This was further attested by the correlation of gross N mineralization and microbial biomass N with ECEC, organic C, total N (R=0.51-0. 76; P≤0.05) and C:N ratio (R=-0.71 - -0.75, P≤0.05). Our findings suggest that the larger the initial soil fertility and N availability, the larger the reductions upon land-use conversion. Because soil N availability was dependent on microbial biomass, management practices in converted oil palm and rubber plantations should focus on enriching microbial biomass.

  10. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for Sumatra, Indonesia and across the Southern Malaysian Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dewey, J.; Hartzell, S.; Mueller, C.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.D.; Rukstales, K.

    2004-01-01

    The ground motion hazard for Sumatra and the Malaysian peninsula is calculated in a probabilistic framework, using procedures developed for the US National Seismic Hazard Maps. We constructed regional earthquake source models and used standard published and modified attenuation equations to calculate peak ground acceleration at 2% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years for rock site conditions. We developed or modified earthquake catalogs and declustered these catalogs to include only independent earthquakes. The resulting catalogs were used to define four source zones that characterize earthquakes in four tectonic environments: subduction zone interface earthquakes, subduction zone deep intraslab earthquakes, strike-slip transform earthquakes, and intraplate earthquakes. The recurrence rates and sizes of historical earthquakes on known faults and across zones were also determined from this modified catalog. In addition to the source zones, our seismic source model considers two major faults that are known historically to generate large earthquakes: the Sumatran subduction zone and the Sumatran transform fault. Several published studies were used to describe earthquakes along these faults during historical and pre-historical time, as well as to identify segmentation models of faults. Peak horizontal ground accelerations were calculated using ground motion prediction relations that were developed from seismic data obtained from the crustal interplate environment, crustal intraplate environment, along the subduction zone interface, and from deep intraslab earthquakes. Most of these relations, however, have not been developed for large distances that are needed for calculating the hazard across the Malaysian peninsula, and none were developed for earthquake ground motions generated in an interplate tectonic environment that are propagated into an intraplate tectonic environment. For the interplate and intraplate crustal earthquakes, we have applied ground

  11. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for Sumatra, Indonesia and across the Southern Malaysian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Mark D.; Dewey, James; Hartzell, Stephan; Mueller, Charles; Harmsen, Stephan; Frankel, ArthurD.; Rukstales, Ken

    2004-10-01

    The ground motion hazard for Sumatra and the Malaysian peninsula is calculated in a probabilistic framework, using procedures developed for the US National Seismic Hazard Maps. We constructed regional earthquake source models and used standard published and modified attenuation equations to calculate peak ground acceleration at 2% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years for rock site conditions. We developed or modified earthquake catalogs and declustered these catalogs to include only independent earthquakes. The resulting catalogs were used to define four source zones that characterize earthquakes in four tectonic environments: subduction zone interface earthquakes, subduction zone deep intraslab earthquakes, strike-slip transform earthquakes, and intraplate earthquakes. The recurrence rates and sizes of historical earthquakes on known faults and across zones were also determined from this modified catalog. In addition to the source zones, our seismic source model considers two major faults that are known historically to generate large earthquakes: the Sumatran subduction zone and the Sumatran transform fault. Several published studies were used to describe earthquakes along these faults during historical and pre-historical time, as well as to identify segmentation models of faults. Peak horizontal ground accelerations were calculated using ground motion prediction relations that were developed from seismic data obtained from the crustal interplate environment, crustal intraplate environment, along the subduction zone interface, and from deep intraslab earthquakes. Most of these relations, however, have not been developed for large distances that are needed for calculating the hazard across the Malaysian peninsula, and none were developed for earthquake ground motions generated in an interplate tectonic environment that are propagated into an intraplate tectonic environment. For the interplate and intraplate crustal earthquakes, we have applied ground

  12. Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols emitted from peatland fire in Riau, Sumatra, Indonesia (2): Identification of organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusuke; Kawamoto, Haruo; Tohno, Susumu; Oda, Masafumi; Iriana, Windy; Lestari, Puji

    2015-06-01

    Smoke emitted from Indonesian peatland fires has caused dense haze and serious air pollution in Southeast Asia such as visibility impairment and adverse health impacts. To mitigate the Indonesian peatland fire aerosol impacts, an effective strategy and international framework based on the latest scientific knowledge needs to be established. Although several attempts have been made, limited data exist regarding the chemical characteristics of peatland fire smoke for the source apportionment. In order to identify the key organic compounds of peatland fire aerosols, we conducted intensive field studies based on ground-based and source-dominated sampling of PM2.5 in Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, during the peatland fire seasons in 2012. Levoglucosan was the most abundant compound among the quantified organic compounds at 8.98 ± 2.28% of the PM2.5 mass, followed by palmitic acid at 0.782 ± 0.163% and mannosan at 0.607 ± 0.0861%. Potassium ion was not appropriate for an indicator of Indonesian peatland fires due to extremely low concentrations associated with smoldering fire at low temperatures. The vanillic/syringic acids ratio was 1.06 ± 0.155 in this study and this may be a useful signature profile for peatland fire emissions. Particulate n-alkanes also have potential for markers to identify impact of Indonesian peatland fire source at a receptor site.

  13. 16,000 Years of Tropical Eastern Ocean Climate Variability Recorded in a Speleothem From Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurtzel, J. B.; Abram, N.; Hantoro, W. S.; Rifai, H.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Heslop, D.; Troitzsch, U.; Eggins, S.

    2015-12-01

    Holocene climate variability in the Indo-Pacific has largely been inferred from sediment cores primarily from the central and eastern Warm Pool region. A limited number of speleothem oxygen-isotope records have provided decadally-resolved time-series of past rainfall variability over the central Indo-Pacific Warm Pool region, however no records currently exist for the Indian Ocean sector of the IPWP. Here we present the first continuous, high-resolution (~15year) speleothem record from the eastern tropical Indian Ocean, collected from central western Sumatra, Indonesia. Petrographic and geochemical analysis reveals that the sample is primarily composed of aragonite but is punctuated by intervals of primary calcite growth. In addition to Raman spectroscopy, trace element analysis by laser ablation ICP-MS reveals strongly antiphased behaviour between magnesium and strontium, attributed to the strong preference of those elements for the calcite and aragonite lattices, respectively. This relationship is utilized to develop a quantitative correction for the stable isotope fractionation offset between the two calcium carbonate polymorphs identified in the speleothem. The corrected oxygen isotope record shows a rapid transition from drier conditions during the Younger Dryas (YD) into a wetter Holocene, similar in timing and pattern to that recorded in Dongge Cave, China. This is strikingly different from other IPWP speleothem records, which show no YD or a wetter YD, suggesting that different mechanisms may be controlling rainfall amount in the eastern tropical Indian Ocean. These disparate responses are further explored through proxy-model comparison.

  14. Variations of ionospheric plasma at different altitudes before the 2005 Sumatra Indonesia Ms 7.2 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xuemin; Novikov, Victor; Shen, Xuhui

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, many researchers pay more attention to abnormities before earthquake, and in this study, seismo-ionospheric synchronous disturbances at different altitudes by GPS and satellite observations were first studied around one Sumatra Indonesia Ms 7.2 earthquake that occurred on 5 July 2005. By using the same temporal and spatial methods, data of GPS-total electron content (TEC) from Jet Propulsion Laboratory, electron density (Ne) from Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions, and ion density (Ni) from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program were deeply analyzed. The ionospheric plasma disturbances in GPS-TEC and increasement of Ne at 710 km were found on 4 July, and plasma density at the three altitudes has all increased on 7 July after the earthquake. All the disturbances were not just above the epicenter. TEC perturbations have happened at the east of the epicenter for the two days, and electron density enhancement at 710 km has moved to west of the TEC perturbations at the same time on 4 July, which may be caused by E × B drift. The moving direction of upgoing plasma was simulated using SAMI2 model. The results have shown that the plasma will move to higher altitude along the geomagnetic force line, which could exactly account for the plasma density enhancement in the northern direction of the geomagnetic south latitude earthquake.

  15. The Impact of Tropical Peat Fire on Termite Assemblage in Sumatra, Indonesia: Reduced Complexity of Community Structure and Survival Strategies.

    PubMed

    Neoh, Kok-Boon; Bong, Lee-Jin; Muhammad, Ahmad; Itoh, Masayuki; Kozan, Osamu; Takematsu, Yoko; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    Tropical peat swamp forests in Southeast Asia account for approximately 72% of global peatland. However, extensive forest exploitation following peat drainage for agricultural expansion has been leading to catastrophic peat fires. In this study, we compared the termite assemblage in burnt and unburnt peats in Sumatra, Indonesia. We also identified which taxonomic group is particularly resistant to fire disturbance and the traits that correlate with its persistence in fire-impacted peatlands. Overall, the termite species richness in fire-impacted peats was up to 40% lower than that of the total species found in peat swamp forests. Although the estimated species richness values in fire-impacted peats and peat swamp forests were not significantly different, fire changed termite community structure significantly. Only termites of the family Rhinotermitidae survived in the fire event, whereas members of the Termitidae that were reportedly resilient to fire and open habitats elsewhere disappeared during the fire events. The rhinotermitids found in the burnt sites were exclusively wood nesters. This suggests that the desiccation tolerance of termites in open habitat is not the simple underlying survival strategy, but tree branches and barks might have provided a refuge from heat during fire. The result also suggests that the high similarity in species composition in recently burnt peats and long burnt peats implies low species turnover. Thus, regardless of how much time had passed since the fire-impacted peats were abandoned or cultivated, the increase in habitat complexity did not favor colonization by the forest-dependent group.

  16. Ichnological constraints on the depositional environment of the Sawahlunto Formation, Kandi, northwest Ombilin Basin, west Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonneveld, J.-P.; Zaim, Y.; Rizal, Y.; Ciochon, R. L.; Bettis, E. A.; Aswan; Gunnell, G. F.

    2012-02-01

    A low diversity trace fossil assemblage is described from the Oligocene Sawahlunto Formation near Kandi, in the northwestern part of the Ombilin Basin in western Sumatra, Indonesia. This trace fossil assemblage includes six ichnogenera attributed to invertebrate infaunal and epifaunal activities ( Arenicolites, Diplocraterion, Planolites, Monocraterion/ Skolithos and Coenobichnus) and two ichnotaxa attributed to vertebrate activity (avian footprints: two species of Aquatilavipes). Arenicolites, Diplocraterion and Monocraterion/ Skolithos record the suspension feeding activities of either arthropods (most likely amphipods) or vermiform organisms. Planolites reflects the presence of an infaunal deposit feeder. Coenobichnus records the walking activities of hermit crabs. Both the Coenobichnus and the avian footprints record the surficial detritus scavenging of epifaunal organisms within a subaerial setting. These traces occur within a fine-grained sandstone succession characterized by planar laminae and low-relief, asymmetrical, commonly mud-draped (locally bidirectional) ripples. The presence of traces attributable to suspension feeders implies deposition in a subaqueous setting. Their occurrence (particularly the presence of Arenicolites and Diplocraterion) in a sandstone bed characterized by mud-draped and bidirectional ripples implies emplacement in a tidally-influenced marine to marginal marine setting. Co-occurrence of these traces with well-preserved avian footprints ( Aquatilavipes) further implies periodic subaerial exposure. Thus, it is most likely that the Sawahlunto Formation near Kandi records deposition within an intertidal flat setting. Definitive evidence of marine influences in the Oligocene interval of the Ombilin Basin implies a more complex tectono-stratigraphic history than has previously been implied.

  17. Impact of The N - S Fracture Zone Along The Indo-Australia Plate Analyzed from Local Seismic Data In The Western Offshore of Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridhi, H. A.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Huang, B. S.; Lee, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    Large subduction earthquake have repeatedly occurred along the Sumatra and Andaman subduction zones where the Indo-Australia plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate. We have analyzed earthquake data from local seismic network along the Sumatra region that provided by the Meteorology Climatology Geophysical Agencies of Indonesia (MCGAI), giving a reliable P-wave velocity model by using joint inversion of picked P-wave travel time using VELEST and a re-scanned single channel seismic reflection of Sumatra cruise I and II. As much as 1,503 events are being analyzed, that is from two years and three months of data recording (2009/04 - 2011/07). The VELEST and DD technique are used to relocate all events by forcing the obtained velocity model. It is found that the surface deformation and earthquake cluster are strongly influenced by the impact of an N - S subparalel fracture zone along the Indo-Australia plate. This also explains the seismic gaps along the Sumatra and Andaman subduction zones. So far, the intriguing seismogenic behaviour and forearc structure are not well explained by the existing models. Therefore, the planned IODP Expedition 362 is trying to ground truth the scientific questions. The aftershock earthquake data are huge, but they will provide a gateway to help the understanding of this shallow megathrust slip and reduce its devastated harzards.

  18. Seismic Hazard characterization study using an earthquake source with Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) method in the Northern of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, A.; Palupi, M. I. R.; Suharsono

    2016-11-01

    Sumatra region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Indonesia because it is lie on an active tectonic zone. In 2004 there is earthquake with a moment magnitude of 9.2 located on the coast with the distance 160 km in the west of Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam and triggering a tsunami. These events take a lot of casualties and material losses, especially in the Province of Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam and North Sumatra. To minimize the impact of the earthquake disaster, a fundamental assessment of the earthquake hazard in the region is needed. Stages of research include the study of literature, collection and processing of seismic data, seismic source characterization and analysis of earthquake hazard by probabilistic methods (PSHA) used earthquake catalog from 1907 through 2014. The earthquake hazard represented by the value of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and Spectral Acceleration (SA) in the period of 0.2 and 1 second on bedrock that is presented in the form of a map with a return period of 2475 years and the earthquake hazard curves for the city of Medan and Banda Aceh.

  19. Extensional fault-bend folding and synrift deposition: An example from the Central Sumatra basin, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.H.; Hook, S.C.; Sitohang, E.P.

    1997-03-01

    We describe an analytical method for interpreting the geometry and structural history of asymmetric half grabens in rift basins with extensional fault-bend fold theory. Using seismic reflection profiles from the Central Sumatra basin and balanced forward models, we show how local variations in tectonic subsidence relative to deposition rates yield distinctive patterns of folded synrift strata and unconformities that record basin history. If the deposition rate exceeds the local subsidence rate, folded growth strata form upwardly narrowing kink bands that have been described previously as growth triangles. In contrast, if the deposition rate is less than or equals the local subsidence rate, growth strata are folded and truncated at the surface on half-graben margins. Subsequent increases in deposition rate relative to subsidence rate form angular unconformities near the half-graben margins. These unconformities develop without the necessity of erosion and are folded by continuing fault slip. Strata above and below the unconformities are concordant in the deeper parts of the half grabens. Thus, angular unconformities on half-graben margins are helpful for defining sequence boundaries that may reflect changes in deposition and tectonic subsidence rates. In addition, fault-bend fold interpretations yield fault geometry and measures of horizontal extension, both of which control three-dimensional half-graben geometry and accommodation space. We show how along-strike variations in fault geometry produce intrabasinal structures that may form prospective fair-ways or local depocenters.

  20. Willingness to pay for a dengue vaccine and its associated determinants in Indonesia: A community-based, cross-sectional survey in Aceh.

    PubMed

    Harapan, Harapan; Anwar, Samsul; Bustamam, Aslam; Radiansyah, Arsil; Angraini, Pradiba; Fasli, Riny; Salwiyadi, Salwiyadi; Bastian, Reza Akbar; Oktiviyari, Ade; Akmal, Imaduddin; Iqbalamin, Muhammad; Adil, Jamalul; Henrizal, Fenni; Darmayanti, Darmayanti; Mahmuda, Mahmuda; Mudatsir, Mudatsir; Imrie, Allison; Sasmono, R Tedjo; Kuch, Ulrich; Shkedy, Ziv; Pramana, Setia

    2017-02-01

    Vaccination strategies are being considered as a part of dengue prevention programs in endemic countries. To accelerate the introduction of dengue vaccine into the public sector program and private markets, understanding the private economic benefits of a dengue vaccine is therefore essential. The aim of this study was to assess the willingness to pay (WTP) for a dengue vaccine among community members in Indonesia and its associated explanatory variables. A community-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted in nine regencies of Aceh province, Indonesia, from November 2014 to March 2015. A pre-tested validated questionnaire was used to facilitate the interviews. To assess the explanatory variables influencing participants' WTP for a dengue vaccine, a linear regression analysis was employed. We interviewed 677 healthy community members; 476 participants (87.5% of the total) were included in the final analysis. An average individual was willing to pay around US-$ 4 (mean: US-$ 4.04; median: US-$ 3.97) for a dengue vaccine. Our final multivariate model revealed that working as a civil servant, living in the city, and having good knowledge on dengue viruses, a good attitude towards dengue, and good preventive practice against dengue virus infection were associated with a higher WTP (P<0.05). Our model suggests that marketing efforts should be directed to community members who are working in the suburbs especially as farmers. In addition, the results of our study underscore the need for low-cost quality vaccines, public sector subsidies for vaccinations, and intensifying efforts to further educate and encourage households regarding other dengue preventive measures, using trusted individuals as facilitators.

  1. Local attitudes and perceptions toward crop-raiding by orangutans (Pongo abelii) and other nonhuman primates in northern Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Smith, Gail; Simanjorang, Hubert V P; Leader-Williams, Nigel; Linkie, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    Human-wildlife conflicts, such as crop-raiding, increase as people expand their agricultural activities into wildlife habitats. Crop-raiding can reduce tolerance toward species that are already threatened, whereas potential dangers posed by conflicts with large-bodied species may also negatively influence local attitudes. Across Asia, wild pigs and primates, such as macaques, tend to be the most commonly reported crop raiders. To date, reports of crop-raiding incidents involving great apes have been less common, but incidents involving orangutans are increasingly emerging in Indonesia. To investigate the interplay of factors that might explain attitudes toward crop-raiding by orangutans (Pongo abelii), focal group discussions and semi-structured interviews were conducted among 822 farmers from 2 contrasting study areas in North Sumatra. The first study area of Batang Serangan is an agroforest system containing isolated orangutans that crop-raid. In contrast, the second area of Sidikalang comprises farmlands bordering extensive primary forest where orangutans are present but not reported to crop-raid. Farmers living in Batang Serangan thought that orangutans were dangerous, irrespective of earlier experience of crop-raiding. Farmers placed orangutans as the third most frequent and fourth most destructive crop pest, after Thomas' leaf monkey (Presbytis thomasi), wild boar (Sus scrofa), and long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis). Although most (57%) farmers across both study areas were not scared of wildlife species, more than a quarter (28%) of the farmers' feared orangutans. Farmers in Batang Serangan were generally more tolerant toward crop-raiding orangutans, if they did not perceive them to present a physical threat. Most (67%) Batang Serangan farmers said that the local Forestry Department staff should handle crop-raiding orangutans, and most (81%) said that these officials did not care about such problems. Our results suggest that efforts to mitigate human

  2. Transition of microbiological and sedimentological features associated with the geochemical gradient in a travertine mound in northern Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Chiya; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Okumura, Tomoyo; Takashima, Chizuru; Harijoko, Agung; Kano, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    Modern travertines, carbonate deposits in Ca-rich hydrothermal water with high pCO2, often display a changing environment along the water path, with corresponding variability in the microbial communities. We investigated a travertine-bearing hot spring at the Blue Pool in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The thermal water of 62 °C with high H2S (200 μM) and pCO2 ( 1 atm) developed a travertine mound 70 m wide. The concentrations of the gas components H2S and CO2, decrease immediately after the water is discharged, while the dissolved oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation increase in the downstream direction. Responding to the geochemical gradient in the water, the surface biofilms change color from white to pink, light-green, dark-green, and brown as the water flows from the vent; this corresponds to microbial communities characterized by chemolithoautotrophs (Halothiobacillaceae), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae), Anaerolineaceae, and co-occurrence of green non-sulfur bacteria (Chloroflexales)-Cyanobacteria, and green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiales), respectively. In an environment with a certain level of H2S (> 1 μM), sulfur digestion and anoxygenic photosynthesis can be more profitable than oxygenic photosynthesis by Cyanobacteria. The precipitated carbonate mineral consists of aragonite and calcite, with the proportion of aragonite increasing downstream due to the larger Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratio in the water or the development of thicker biofilm. Where the biofilm is well developed, the aragonite travertines often exhibit laminated structures that were likely associated with the daily metabolism of these bacteria. The microbiological and sedimentological features at the Blue Pool may be the modern analogs of geomicrobiological products in the early Earth. Biofilm of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria had the potential to form ancient stromatolites that existed before the appearance of cyanobacteria.

  3. The Ongoing Lava Flow Eruption of Sinabung Volcano (Sumatra, Indonesia): Observations from Structure-from-Motion and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. B.; Clarke, A. B.; Arrowsmith, R.; Vanderkluysen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Sinabung is a 2460 m high andesitic stratovolcano in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Its ongoing eruption has produced a 2.9 km long lava flow with two active summit lobes and frequent pyroclastic flows (≤ 5 km long) with associated plumes over 5 km high. Large viscous lava flows of this type are common at volcanoes around the world, but are rarely observed while active. This eruption therefore provides a special opportunity to observe and study the mechanisms of emplacement and growth of an active lava flow. In September 2014, we conducted a field campaign to collect ground-based photographs to analyze with Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric techniques. We built multiple 3D models from which we estimate the volume of the lava flow and identify areas where the flow was most active. Thermal infrared and visual satellite images provide information on the effusive eruption from its initiation in December 2013 to the present and allow us to estimate the eruption rate, advance rate and rheological characteristics of the flow. According to our DEMs the flow volume as of September 2014 was 100 Mm3, providing an average flow rate of 4.5 m3/s, while comparison of two DEMs from that month suggests that most growth occurred at the SE nose of the flow. Flow advancement was initially controlled by the yield strength of the flow crust while eruption and flow advance rates were at their highest in January-March 2014. A period of slow front advancement and inflation from March - October 2014 suggests that the flow's interior had cooled and that propagation was limited by the interior yield strength. This interpretation is supported by the simultaneous generation of pyroclastic flows due to collapse of the upper portion of the lava flow and consequent lava breakout and creation of new flow lobes originating from the upper reaches in October 2014 and June 2015. Both lobes remain active as of August 2015 and present a significant hazard for collapse and generation of pyroclastic flows

  4. Quantifying above- and belowground biomass carbon loss with forest conversion in tropical lowlands of Sumatra (Indonesia).

    PubMed

    Kotowska, Martyna M; Leuschner, Christoph; Triadiati, Triadiati; Meriem, Selis; Hertel, Dietrich

    2015-10-01

    Natural forests in South-East Asia have been extensively converted into other land-use systems in the past decades and still show high deforestation rates. Historically, lowland forests have been converted into rubber forests, but more recently, the dominant conversion is into oil palm plantations. While it is expected that the large-scale conversion has strong effects on the carbon cycle, detailed studies quantifying carbon pools and total net primary production (NPPtotal ) in above- and belowground tree biomass in land-use systems replacing rainforest (incl. oil palm plantations) are rare so far. We measured above- and belowground carbon pools in tree biomass together with NPPtotal in natural old-growth forests, 'jungle rubber' agroforests under natural tree cover, and rubber and oil palm monocultures in Sumatra. In total, 32 stands (eight plot replicates per land-use system) were studied in two different regions. Total tree biomass in the natural forest (mean: 384 Mg ha(-1) ) was more than two times higher than in jungle rubber stands (147 Mg ha(-1) ) and >four times higher than in monoculture rubber and oil palm plantations (78 and 50 Mg ha(-1) ). NPPtotal was higher in the natural forest (24 Mg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) than in the rubber systems (20 and 15 Mg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ), but was highest in the oil palm system (33 Mg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ) due to very high fruit production (15-20 Mg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ). NPPtotal was dominated in all systems by aboveground production, but belowground productivity was significantly higher in the natural forest and jungle rubber than in plantations. We conclude that conversion of natural lowland forest into different agricultural systems leads to a strong reduction not only in the biomass carbon pool (up to 166 Mg C ha(-1) ) but also in carbon sequestration as carbon residence time (i.e. biomass-C:NPP-C) was 3-10 times higher in the natural forest than in rubber and oil palm plantations.

  5. Numerical simulations of land cover roughness influence on tsunami inundation in Ulee Lheue Bay, Aceh-Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursina; Syamsidik

    2017-02-01

    Most of the flat area at Ulee Lheue Bay of Aceh Besar is affected by tsunami wave during the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. The coastal area with no significant barrier caused tsunami wave inundating further inland. Coastal forest is known as an effective way to reduce tsunami impact in the coastal environment. In this paper, we used 2 Dimensional Horizontal (2DH) numerical model Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami (COMCOT) and Delft3D to evaluate the coastal forest influence which interpreted by variable Manning’s coefficient of tsunami inundation. We also discussed the hydrodynamic characteristic of tsunami wave such as maximum water elevation and flow velocities to evaluate how effective is the coastal forest in reducing tsunami impacts at Ulee Lheue Bay. The results showed that the coastal forest effect is not significant difference both water elevation and tsunami inundation. Meanwhile, the coastal forest with 100 m width can reduce tsunami wave velocities about 40 %. It is important because high tsunami velocities caused severely eroded in the coastal area.

  6. Genetic identity, ancestry and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Aceh, Indonesia revealed by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is the source of cocoa powder and butter used for chocolate and this species originated in the rainforests of South America. Indonesia is the 3rd largest cacao producer in the world with an annual cacao output of 0.55 million tons. Knowledge of on-farm genetic diversity is...

  7. The December 26, 2004, off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, M W=9.0, earthquake and the critical-point-like model of earthquake preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chang-Sheng; Wu, Zhong-Liang

    2005-05-01

    Long-term seismic activity prior to the December 26, 2004, off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, M W=9.0 earthquake was investigated using the Harvard CMT catalogue. It is observed that before this great earthquake, there exists an accelerating moment release (AMR) process with the temporal scale of a quarter century and the spatial scale of 1 500 km. Within this spatial range, the M W=9.0 event falls into the piece-wise power-law-like frequency-magnitude distribution. Therefore, in the perspective of the critical-point-like model of earthquake preparation, the failure to forecast/predict the approaching and/or the size of this earthquake is not due to the physically intrinsic unpredictability of earthquakes.

  8. Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

    2004-02-06

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  9. Soil carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from lowland forests converted to oil palm and rubber plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, Evelyn; Corre, Marife D.; Damris, Muhammad; Tjoa, Aiyen; Rahayu Utami, Sri; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2015-04-01

    Demand for palm oil has increased strongly in recent decades. Global palm oil production quadrupled between 1990 and 2009, and although almost half of the global supply is already produced in Indonesia, a doubling of current production is planned for the next ten years. This agricultural expansion is achieved by conversion of rainforest. Land-use conversion affects soil carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes through changes in nutrient availability and soil properties which, in turn, influence plant productivity, microbial activity and gas diffusivity. Our study was aimed to assess changes in soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes with forest conversion to oil palm and rubber plantations. Our study area was Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. We selected two soil landscapes in this region: loam and clay Acrisol soils. At each landscape, we investigated four land-use systems: lowland secondary rainforest, secondary forest with regenerating rubber (referred here as jungle rubber), rubber (7-17 years old) and oil palm plantations (9-16 years old). Each land use in each soil landscape was represented by four sites as replicates, totaling to 32 sites. We measured soil-atmosphere CH4 and CO2 fluxes using vented static chamber method with monthly sampling from November 2012 to December 2013. There were no differences in soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes (all P > 0.05) between soil landscapes for each land-use type. For soil CO2 fluxes, in both clay and loam Acrisol soil landscapes oil palm were lower compared to the other land uses (P < 0.007). In the clay Acrisol, soil CO2 fluxes were 107.2 ± 7.2 mg C m-2 h-1 for oil palm, and 195.9 ± 13.5 mg C m-2 h-1for forest, 185.3 ± 9.4 mg C m-2 h-1for jungle rubber and 182.8 ± 16.2 mg C m2 h-1for rubber. In the loam Acrisol, soil CO2 fluxes were 115.7 ± 11.0 mg CO2-C m2 h-1 for oil palm, and 186.6 ± 13.7, 178.7 ± 11.2, 182.9 ± 14.5 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1 for forest, jungle rubber and rubber, respectively. The seasonal patterns of soil CO2 fluxes

  10. K Ar age of the Ranau Tuffs: implications for the Ranau caldera emplacement and slip-partitioning in Sumatra (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellier, Olivier; Bellon, Hervé; Sébrier, Michel; Sutanto; Maury, René C.

    1999-11-01

    The Sumatran subduction is an example of oblique convergence which is partitioned into a component normal to the plate boundary and a wrench component taken up by strike-slip deformation within the overriding plate. Indeed, off Sumatra, the approximately NNE-trending convergence is mechanically accommodated both by subduction processes and strike-slip deformation partly localised on the Great Sumatran dextral Fault (GSF). The GSF parallels the trench and follows approximately the magmatic arc, where major calderas are installed. The Ranau caldera is one of those located along the GSF in south Sumatra. A Ranau Tuff sample yielded 40K- 40Ar ages of 0.55±0.15 Ma for its separated feldspars, which places the major Ranau caldera collapse between 0.7 and 0.4 Ma, a period of paroxysmal calderic activity along the Sumatran Arc. Geomorphic features affecting the Ranau Tuff and offset by the GSF yield a long-term dextral slip rate of 5.5±1.9 mm/yr at 5°S. Consequently, south Sumatra represents an intermediate case between complete slip-partitioning and purely oblique thrusting, where the leading edge is characterised by a low convergence obliquity (<20°) accommodated by strike-slip deformation in the overriding plate. This demonstrates that even for low obliquity, slip-partitioning can exist.

  11. [Tsunami in South-East Asia--rapid response deployment in Banda Aceh].

    PubMed

    Streuli, Rolf A

    2008-01-01

    On December 26, 2004 the second largest earthquake ever seismographically registered occurred in South-East Asia. It had a magnitude of 9.3 on Richter's scale and its epicentre was located on sea ground 160 km West of Banda Aceh, the capital of the province of Aceh on the island of Sumatra. The earthquake resulted in a tsunami which almost completely destroyed the city of Banda Aceh. Its death toll on the island of Sumatra was 168,000. The Swiss Humanitarian Aid Unit was deployed within a few days after the catastrophe with an advance team, which had to evaluate the need for supplies and personal in Banda Aceh. In close collaboration with relief forces of the Australian armed forces the team was able to deliver efficient medical and technical support. The most prevalent medical problems were: (1) Tsunami associated aspiration pneumonia; (2) Infected wounds of lower extremities; (3) Open bone fractures of lower extremities; (4) Tetanus infection.

  12. Variations in Organic Matter Burial and Composition in Sediments from the Indian Ocean Continental Margin Off SW Indonesia (Sumatra - Java - Flores) Since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennerjahn, T. C.; Gesierich, K.; Schefuß, E.; Mohtadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change is a mosaic of regional changes to a large extent determined by region-specific feedbacks between climate and ecosystems. At present the ocean is forming a major sink in the global carbon cycle. Organic matter (OM) storage in sediments displays large regional variations and varied over time during the Quaternary. Upwelling regions are sites of high primary productivity and major depocenters of organic carbon (OC), the least understood of which is the Indian Ocean upwelling off Indonesia. In order to reconstruct the burial and composition of OM during the Late Quaternary, we analyzed five sediment cores from the Indian Ocean continental margin off the Indonesian islands Sumatra to Flores spanning the last 20,000 years (20 kyr). Sediments were analyzed for bulk composition, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of OM, amino acids and hexosamines and terrestrial plant wax n-alkanes and their stable carbon isotope composition. Sedimentation rates hardly varied over time in the western part of the transect. They were slightly lower in the East during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and deglaciation, but increased strongly during the Holocene. The amount and composition of OM was similar along the transect with maximum values during the deglaciation and the late Holocene. High biogenic opal covarying with OM content indicates upwelling-induced primary productivity dominated by diatoms to be a major control of OM burial in sediments in the East during the past 20 kyr. The content of labile OM was low throughout the transect during the LGM and increased during the late Holocene. The increase was stronger and the OM less degraded in the East than in the West indicating that continental margin sediments off Java and Flores were the major depocenter of OC burial along the Indian Ocean margin off SW Indonesia. Temporal variations probably resulted from changes in upwelling intensity and terrestrial inputs driven by variations in monsoon strength.

  13. Methanoculleus palmolei sp. nov., an irregularly coccoid methanogen from an anaerobic digester treating wastewater of a palm oil plant in north-Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Zellner, G; Messner, P; Winter, J; Stackebrandt, E

    1998-10-01

    Strain INSLUZT (= DSM 4273T) was isolated from a biogas-producing bioreactor treating wastewater of a palm oil mill on North-Sumatra (Indonesia). Cells of strain INSLUZT were highly irregularly coccoid, 1.25-2.0 microns in diameter, had a cell envelope consisting of the cytoplasmic membrane and an S-layer of hexagonally arranged glycoprotein subunits with an M(r) of 120,000, and were flagellated (motility was not observed). Cells were mesophilic and grew most rapidly at 40 degrees C on H2/CO2' formate, 2-propanol/CO2 2-butanol/CO2 and cyclopentanol/CO2 to give methane. Tungstate promoted growth on H2/CO2 with acetate as the solely required organic medium supplement. The G + C content of DNA was 59 mol% (Tm method) and 59.5 mol% (HPLC method). 16S rDNA analysis revealed a phylogenetic relationship to Methanoculleus species; the name Methanoculleus palmolei sp. nov. is therefore proposed for strain INSLUZT (= DSM 4273T).

  14. Watershed-scale assessment of oil palm cultivation impact on water quality and nutrient fluxes: a case study in Sumatra (Indonesia).

    PubMed

    Comte, Irina; Colin, François; Grünberger, Olivier; Whalen, Joann K; Harto Widodo, Rudi; Caliman, Jean-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    High fertilizer input is necessary to sustain high yields in oil palm agroecosystems, but it may endanger neighboring aquatic ecosystems when excess nutrients are transported to waterways. In this study, the hydrochemical dynamics of groundwater and streams under baseflow conditions were evaluated with bi-monthly measurements for 1 year on 16 watersheds. Hydrochemical measurements were related to the spatial distribution of soil and fertilization practices across a landscape of 100 km(2), dominated by oil palm cultivation, in Central Sumatra, Indonesia. The low nutrient concentrations recorded in streams throughout the landscape indicated that the mature oil palm plantations in this study did not contribute to eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. This was ascribed to high nutrient uptake by oil palm, a rational fertilizer program, and dilution of nutrient concentrations due to heavy rainfall in the study area. Soil type controlled dissolved inorganic N and total P fluxes, with greater losses of N and P from loamy-sand uplands than loamy lowlands. Organic fertilization helped to reduce nutrient fluxes compared to mineral fertilizers. However, when K inputs exceeded the oil palm requirement threshold, high K export occurred during periods when groundwater had a short residence time. For higher nutrient use efficiency in the long term, the field-scale fertilizer management should be complemented with a landscape-scale strategy of fertilizer applications that accounts for soil variability.

  15. Estimating Carbon STOCK Changes of Mangrove Forests Using Satellite Imagery and Airborne LiDAR Data in the South Sumatra State, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Y.; Fukushima, A.; Imai, Y.; Tanahashi, Y.; Nakama, E.; Ohta, S.; Kawazoe, K.; Akune, N.

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to estimate the biomass in the mangrove forests using satellite imagery and airborne LiDAR data, and 2) to estimate the amount of carbon stock changes using biomass estimated. The study area is located in the coastal area of the South Sumatra state, Indonesia. This area is approximately 66,500 ha with mostly flat land features. In this study, the following procedures were carried out: (1) Classification of types of tree species using Satellite imagery in the study area, (2) Development of correlation equations between spatial volume based on LiDAR data and biomass stock based on field survey for each types of tree species, and estimation of total biomass stock and carbon stock using the equation, and (3) Estimation of carbon stock change using Chronological Satellite Imageries. The result showed the biomass and the amount of carbon stock changes can be estimated with high accuracy, by combining the spatial volume based on airborne LiDAR data with the tree species classification based on satellite imagery. Quantitative biomass monitoring is in demand for projects related to REDD+ in developing countries, and this study showed that combining airborne LiDAR data with satellite imagery is one of the effective methods of monitoring for REDD+ projects.

  16. Hydrothermal minerals and microstructures in the Silangkitang geothermal field along the Great Sumatran fault zone, Sumatra, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, S.; Lockner, D.A.; Dobson, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed study of core samples of silicic tuff recovered from three geothermal wells along the strike-slip Great Sumatran fault zone near Silangkitang, North Sumatra, supports a model for enhanced hydrothermal circulation adjacent to this major plate-boundary fault. Two wells (A and C) were drilled nearly vertically ??1 km southwest of the eastern (i.e., the principal) fault trace, and the third, directional well (B) was drilled eastward from the site of well A to within ??100 m of the principal fault trace. The examined core samples come from depths of 1650-2120 m at measured well temperatures of 180-320 ??C. The samples collected near the principal fault trace have the highest temperatures, the largest amount of secondary pore space that correlates with high secondary permeability, and the most extensive hydrothermal mineral development. Secondary permeability and the degree of hydrothermal alteration decrease toward the southwestern margin of the fault zone. These features indicate episodic, localized flow of hot, possibly CO2-rich fluids within the fault zone. The microstructure populations identified in the core samples correlate to the subsidiary fault patterns typical of strike-slip faults. The geothermal reservoir appears to be centered on the fault zone, with the principal fault strands and adjoining, highly fractured and hydrothermally altered rock serving as the main conduits for vertical fluid flow and advective heat transport from deeper magmatic sources.

  17. 26th December 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake: first insights from the summer 2005 Marion Dufresne cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, J.

    2005-12-01

    The 26th December 2004 Great Sumatra Earthquake is the second biggest earthquake (Mw=9.3) recorded during the past century. It initiated at a depth of 20-30 km, close to an indentation of the Indonesian fore-arc. The rupture propagated about 1200 km northward and terminated north of Andaman Islands. The "Sumatra Aftershocks" cruise performed on the French R/V Marion Dufresne started July 15 in Jakarta and ended August 9, 2005 in Colombo. We carried out a complete swath-bathymetric survey in a 370*75 km stripe located between northern Sumatra and the Indonesia/India boundary and from the trench to northeast of the Sumatra fault. 20 OBSs were deployed in the area and recorded about 2000 earthquakes during that period. Coring, heat-flow and piezometer measurements were also carried out. Offshore northern Sumatra, the Australia/Sundaland motion is 5 cm/yr in the N008° direction (Bock et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2003), which means that both strike-slip and normal components might occur along features parallel to the trench direction. However, focal mechanisms of the 26th December 2004 earthquake as well as co-seismic motions and 5-days post-seismic displacement field determined from GPS sites are essentially perpendicular to the trench direction (Vigny et al., Nature, 2005). There is consequently an apparent mismatch between deformations derived from plate motions and from co-seismic and immediate after-slip motions. This might suggest that long-term post-seismic motions might have also a significant component of strike-slip motion along features parallel to the trench direction. Between the trench and the backstop located southwest of the Aceh forearc basin, numerous trench parallel piggy back basins were mapped, suggesting the existence of numerous thrust faults. On the basis of morphology, coring and heat flow measurements, a major active thrust fault, which might correspond to an active splay fault, was identified southwest of the Aceh forearc basin. The

  18. The 2013-2014 Effusive Eruption of Sinabung Volcano, Sumatra, Indonesia: Satellite Thermal Observations and Ground-Based Photogrammetry of a Growing Lava Lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. B.; Vanderkluysen, L.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Sinabung is a 2460 m high andesitic volcano located in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. Sinabung had no confirmed historical activity until a small (VEI 2) explosive eruption in August-September 2010. In September 2013, explosions began again and were accompanied by lava dome growth and subsequent dome-collapse generated pyroclastic flows (Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network 35:07; 39:01). The Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (Indonesia) estimated dome growth at 3.5 m3/s in late December 2013. From January to March 2014 lava extrusion continued and formed a lobe down Sinabung's south flank. As of this writing, effusion and growth of the lava lobe continues, but at a much slower rate. Pyroclastic flows generated by collapse of the steep sides of the lobe remain a hazard. We use thermal infrared (TIR) images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiomter (MODIS) to observe volcanic activity at Sinabung during the 2013-2014 eruption and estimate effusion rates following the methods of Harris & Ripepe (2007, Geophys. Res. Let. 34). We also use new analysis of those thermal images to characterize style of activity, distinguishing pyroclastic flow activity from pure lava lobe growth. Preliminary results from satellite images show an average effusion rate of 1.1 m3/s during January-March 2014, with peak effusion rates from individual TIR images of 4-7 m3/s in mid-January. These numbers are in good agreement with the ground-based estimates, and they provide improved temporal resolution of the activity as it evolved. Since March, effusion rates have decreased to below 0.01 m3/s on average. Using the MODIS images, we estimate the maximum possible total erupted volume to be 7 million m3, and have constrained the accuracy of this estimate using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry from ground-based visual images of the lava lobe. Following explosions in 2010 and 2013 and high effusion rates from January to March 2014, the ongoing slow

  19. CO2 and CH4 fluxes from oil palm plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia: effects of palm age and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijide, A.; Hassler, E.; Corre, M. D.; June, T.; Sabajo, C.; Veldkamp, E.; Knohl, A.

    2015-12-01

    Global increasing demand of palm oil is leading to the expansion of oil palm plantations, particularly in SE Asia, which in Sumatran lowlands has resulted in a 21% forest area loss. Large photosynthesis rates are expected for oil palms, due to their high growth and yield production. However, there is very limited information on their effect on carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and their sink or source strength at ecosystem scale. For methane (CH4) fluxes, research has mainly focused in oil palm plantations located on peatlands, but no information is available at ecosystem level from plantations on mineral soils. With the aim of studying CO2 fluxes during the non-productive and productive phases of oil palm cultivation, an eddy covariance (EC) tower was installed in a 2 year old oil palm plantation, where it was measuring for 8 months, and was subsequently moved to a 12 year old plantation, both in the province of Jambi, Sumatra. The EC system consisted of a Licor 7500A and an ultrasonic Metek anemometer, operating at 10 Hz, installed on a 7m and 22m tower respectively. In the 12 year old plantation, the tower was also equipped with a Los Gatos FGGA-24EP, to assess CH4 fluxes. Chamber measurements were also carried out to obtain information on respiration and CH4 fluxes from the soil. Radiation was the major driver controlling net carbon uptake, while soil moisture did not play a significant role. Average net ecosystem exchange in the hours of the day with higher radiation for the whole measurement period was 10 μmol m-2 s-1 for the 2 year old plantation and -22 μmol m-2 s-1 in the 12 year old. The analysis of the cumulative fluxes show that the non-productive plantation was a carbon source of around 636 g CO2 m-2 during the 8 months of measurements, while in the productive period, it acted as a strong carbon sink (-794 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). Methane uptake was observed in the soil in both plantations and also for the whole ecosystem in the 12 year old one, but its

  20. Evapotranspiration components determined by eddy covariance and sap flux measurements in oil palm plantations in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijide, Ana; Röll, Alexander; Niu, Furong; June, Tania; Hölscher, Dirk; Knohl, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The expansion of oil palm cultivation fueled by the increasing global demand for palm oil is leading to massive land transformations in tropical areas, particularly in South-East Asia. Conversions of forest land to oil palm plantations likely affect ecosystem water fluxes. However, there is a lack of information on water fluxes from oil palm plantations as well as on the partitioning of these fluxes into its different components such as transpiration and evaporation. It is expected that water fluxes from oil palm plantations vary temporally, both long-term, i.e. between different age-classes of plantations, and short-term, i.e. from day to day within a certain plantation (e.g. during or after periods of rainfall). A proper evaluation of water fluxes from oil palm plantations thus requires an experimental design encompassing these types of variability. To assess evapotranspiration (ET) rates, an eddy covariance tower was installed in a 2-year-old oil palm plantation in the lowlands of Jambi, Sumatra; it was subsequently moved to a 12-year-old oil palm plantation located in the same region. In parallel to the ET, sap flux density was measured on 16 leaf petioles on four oil palms; stand transpiration rates were derived from these measurements with stand inventory data. The parallel measurements ran for several weeks in both plantations. Preliminary results for our period of study show that the average ET rate of the 2-year-old oil palm plantation was 5.2 mm day-1; values up to 7.0 mm day-1 were observed on dry, sunny days with non-limiting soil moisture. Stand transpiration (T) by the young oil palms was very low, 0.3 mm day-1on average, and only showed a small variation between days. Under optimal environmental conditions, the ratio of T to total ET was up to 0.08 in the young plantation, while in the mature, 12-year-old plantation, it was significantly higher and reached 0.5. Transpiration rates in the mature oil palm plantation were about six- to seven-fold higher

  1. Fishing farmers or farming fishers? Fishing typology of inland small-scale fishing households and fisheries management in singkarak lake, west sumatra, indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yuerlita; Perret, Sylvain Roger; Shivakoti, Ganesh P

    2013-07-01

    Technical and socio-economic characteristics are known to determine different types of fishers and their livelihood strategies. Faced with declining fish and water resources, small-scale fisheries engage into transformations in livelihood and fishing practices. The paper is an attempt to understand these changes and their socio-economic patterns, in the case of Singkarak Lake in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Based upon the hypothesis that riparian communities have diverse, complex yet structured and dynamic livelihood systems, the paper's main objective is to study, document and model the actual diversity in livelihood, practices and performance of inland small-scale fisheries along the Singkarak Lake, to picture how households are adapted to the situation, and propose an updated, workable model (typology) of those for policy. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to develop a typology of fishing households. The results show that small-scale fishers can be classified into different types characterized by distinct livelihood strategies. Three household types are identified, namely "farming fishers" households (type I, 30 %), "fishing farmers" households (type II, 30 %), and "mainly fishers" households (type III, 40 %). There are significant differences among these groups in the number of boats owned, annual fishing income, agriculture income and farming experience. Type I consists of farming fishers, well equipped, with high fishing costs and income, yet with the lowest return on fishing assets. They are also landowners with farming income, showing the lowest return on land capital. Type II includes poor fishing farmers, landowners with higher farming income; they show the highest return on land asset. They have less fishing equipment, costs and income. Type III (mainly fishers) consists of poorer, younger fishers, with highest return on fishing assets and on fishing costs. They have little land, low farming income, and diversified livelihood

  2. Fishing Farmers or Farming Fishers? Fishing Typology of Inland Small-Scale Fishing Households and Fisheries Management in Singkarak Lake, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuerlita; Perret, Sylvain Roger; Shivakoti, Ganesh P.

    2013-07-01

    Technical and socio-economic characteristics are known to determine different types of fishers and their livelihood strategies. Faced with declining fish and water resources, small-scale fisheries engage into transformations in livelihood and fishing practices. The paper is an attempt to understand these changes and their socio-economic patterns, in the case of Singkarak Lake in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Based upon the hypothesis that riparian communities have diverse, complex yet structured and dynamic livelihood systems, the paper's main objective is to study, document and model the actual diversity in livelihood, practices and performance of inland small-scale fisheries along the Singkarak Lake, to picture how households are adapted to the situation, and propose an updated, workable model (typology) of those for policy. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to develop a typology of fishing households. The results show that small-scale fishers can be classified into different types characterized by distinct livelihood strategies. Three household types are identified, namely "farming fishers" households (type I, 30 %), "fishing farmers" households (type II, 30 %), and "mainly fishers" households (type III, 40 %). There are significant differences among these groups in the number of boats owned, annual fishing income, agriculture income and farming experience. Type I consists of farming fishers, well equipped, with high fishing costs and income, yet with the lowest return on fishing assets. They are also landowners with farming income, showing the lowest return on land capital. Type II includes poor fishing farmers, landowners with higher farming income; they show the highest return on land asset. They have less fishing equipment, costs and income. Type III (mainly fishers) consists of poorer, younger fishers, with highest return on fishing assets and on fishing costs. They have little land, low farming income, and diversified livelihood

  3. Two solitudes: post-tsunami and post-conflict Aceh.

    PubMed

    Waizenegger, Arno; Hyndman, Jennifer

    2010-07-01

    In August 2005, after the devastating tsunami in the Indian Ocean Basin, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for the cessation of hostilities was signed by Aceh's longstanding adversaries-the Government of Indonesia and the Free Aceh Movement (GAM). The tsunami was a major catalyst for 'disaster diplomacy'-international political pressure, which, this paper argues, was an important ingredient in creating conditions for the MoU, although the situation within Aceh also shaped the peace process. Based on interviews conducted in 2006 and 2007 with government officials, GAM representatives and fighters, and non-governmental organization staff in Aceh, this paper finds that assistance for tsunami survivors far exceeds that available for conflict survivors and ex-combatants. The formation of these two solitudes-the tsunami-affected and the conflict-affected-compounds challenges for sustaining peace in Aceh. This research points to an enduring lack of livelihoods for former fighters and conflict victims that may threaten a sustainable peace.

  4. Deforestation in Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Indonesia is rapidly losing its lowland forests to logging, much of it illegal. At present, logging is claiming the forests at a rate of nearly two million hectares (slightly less than 5 million acres: roughly the same area as the state of Massachusetts) each year. At this rate, the island of Sumatra will have no more lowland forests by 2005, a fate already befallen the island of Sulawesi. Indonesia's lowland forests are home to a wide variety of wildlife and are considered among the richest ecosystems in the world. Among the unique life forms in these forests are the Orangutan and the Sumatra Tiger. Sixteen percent of the entire world's bird species, eleven percent of its plants, and ten percent of all mammals on Earth call these forests home. Many are found nowhere else. In the two Landsat scenes shown above, the pattern of deforestation can be clearly discerned. Deep green in these images shows lush vegetation in the forest cover. In both scenes, deep and pale red shows areas where there is little or no vegetation, often bare ground from where forest has been completely stripped. The latter Landsat scene from 2001 not only shows extensive clear cut areas, but also new logging roads built into the remaining forest to facilitate future cutting. This lowland forest region is located on Indonesia's largest island, Sumatra, roughly 100 km southwest of the provincial capital of Jambi. The first image was acquired by Landsat 5's Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor on June 22, 1992, the second by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on January 14, 2001. Both are false-color composite images made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and green wavelengths. The area shown above is roughly 30 km x 22 km (19 miles x 14 miles). The large versions of these images show the same general area covering 60 km x 60 km. Images provided by the Tropical Rain Forest Information Center (TRFIC) through the Basic Science and Remote Sensing Initiative (BSRSI) based at Michigan

  5. INDONESIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCVEY, RUTH T.

    THIS UNIVERSITY-LEVEL TEXT IS AN ATTEMPT TO BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN SUPERFICIAL IMPRESSION AND SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE CONCERNING INDONESIA. IT PROVIDES AN INTRODUCTION TO INDONESIA THROUGH CHAPTERS ON--(1) PHYSICAL AND HUMAN RESOURCE PATTERNS, BY K.J. PELZER, (2) INDONESIAN CULTURES AND COMMUNITIES, BY H. GEERTZ, (3) THE CHINESE MINORITY, BY G.W.…

  6. Indonesia.

    PubMed

    1989-04-01

    Indonesia, an archipelago of 13,500 islands, ranks 5th as the most populous nation in the world. It has 175 million people, 105 million of which live on the island of Java alone. Indonesia has many distinct cultural and linguistic groups. Islam almost wholly replaced Hindu by the end of the 16th century, after arriving in the 12th century. Today 88% of the people are Muslim, while the rest includes Christians, Hindus, Buddhists, and others. The constitution guarantees religious freedom. Indonesia gained independence from the Netherlands in 1949. Indonesia's 1st president, Sukarno, led the rebellion leading to independence and remained in power from 1949-1967. After aligning with Asian communist countries and establishing an authoritarian regime in the early 1960s, the people rebelled, attempted a coup and, in 1967, the People's,s Consultative Assembly named Soeharto as president. He continues to be Indonesia's president and the dominant government and political figure. The constitution provides limited separation of executive, legislative, and judicial power. During the 1970s, the strong economy was based on high oil revenues and an industrial policy which protected domestic industries. Beginning in the 1980s, however, lower energy earnings assisted by low inflation, a downward float against the dollar, and the government eliminating regulatory obstacles turned the economic tide. Even though Indonesia has a larger unrescheduled external debt than any other developing nation, the government is dealing successfully with servicing this debt. Foreign interests participate in the oil and minerals sectors. Indonesia acts on its free and active foreign policy by playing a prominent role in Asian affairs, but avoiding involvement in conflicts among major powers. Indonesia is on friendly terms with its neighbors, and the military does not advocate developing the capability to project its power. The US and Indonesia carry on cordial diplomatic and trade relations

  7. Indonesia.

    PubMed

    1985-12-01

    This discussion of Indonesia focuses on the following: geography; the people; history; government and political conditions; the economy; foreign relations; defense; and relations between Indonesia and the US. In 1985, Indonesia's population totaled 173 million with an annual growth rate of 2.1%. Infant mortality was 89/1000 and life expectancy 55 years. The Republic of Indonesia is an archipelago of more than 13,500 islands extending 4800 kilometers along the equator from the mainland of Southeast Asia to Australia. Indonesians are primarily of Malay stock and include many related but distinct cultural and linguistic groups. Republic based on the 1945 constitution providing for limited separation of executive, legislative, and judicial power. The president, elected for a 5-year term, is the dominant government and political figure. Over the 1983-85 period, Indonesia experienced much success in stabilizing the economy following a downturn in 1981-82. Indonesia cut government expenditures, devalued the rupiah by 28% vis-a-vis the US dollar, and introduced a financial reform package to improve efficiency in the banking system and to encourage savings. Real gross domestic product (GDP) grew 4.2% in 1983 and 6% in 1984; inflation fell from 12% in 1983 to 9% in 1984 and 4% during the 1st part of 1985; the current account deficit declined from 8% to 3% of GDP by 1984. Agriculture is the most important domestic sector, accounting for more than 25%. The manufacturing sector accounts for 12% of GDP. Since the beginning of the Soeharto government, US relations with Indonesia have been close and cordial.

  8. Determinants of psychological morbidity in survivors of the earthquake and tsunami in Aceh and Nias

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to collect information to inform the design of a mental health response following the massive December 2004 earthquake and tsunami in Aceh and North Sumatra, Indonesia. As well as exploring the effect on mental health of direct exposure to the tsunami the study was designed to examine the effect on mental health of immediate post-disaster changes in life circumstances (impact). Methods Information was collected from a sample of 783 people aged 15 years and over in earthquake and tsunami-affected areas of Aceh and Nias, 616 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and 167 non-IDPs. The structured questionnaire that was designed for data collection consisted of demographic information, measures of disaster exposure and of changes in life circumstances (impact), the extended version of the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ), and a brief measure of resilience. Group comparisons, contrasting responses of IDPs and non-IDPs, were by chi-square for frequency data and t-tests for ordinal or continuous data. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were performed to examine the relative contributions to psychopathology of demographic variables and measures of exposure, impact and resilience. Results High rates of psychopathology, including symptoms of anxiety and affective disorders and post-traumatic stress syndrome, were recorded in the overall sample, particularly in Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) who experienced more substantial post-disaster changes in life circumstances (impact). The IDP group experienced significantly more SRQ symptoms than did the non-IDP group. Demographic factors alone accounted for less two percent of variance in SRQ-scores. Higher SRQ-20 scores were observed among women, those with lower education, those with diminished resilience beliefs, those experiencing high scores on disaster impact, those experiencing direct exposures to the disaster, and due to (unmeasured) conditions related to being an IDP

  9. "The Fruit Caught between Two Stones": The Conflicted Position of Teachers within Aceh's Independence Struggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes Cardozo, Mieke T.A.; Shah, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the challenging situation faced by teachers as professionals and members of the community in Aceh, Indonesia during the province's civil war. It reveals how teachers' sense of agency during this period was deeply influenced by the economic/material, political and socio-cultural condition at that time -- conditions and…

  10. Seismology: energy radiation from the Sumatra earthquake.

    PubMed

    Ni, Sidao; Kanamori, Hiroo; Helmberger, Don

    2005-03-31

    We determined the duration of high-frequency energy radiation from Indonesia's great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (26 December 2004) to be about 500 seconds. This duration can be translated into a rupture length of about 1,200 km, which is more than twice as long as that inferred from body-wave analyses performed soon after the event. Our analysis was able rapidly to define the extent of rupture, thereby aiding the assessment of seismic hazard in the immediate future.

  11. Livelihood Change and Livelihood Sustainability in the Uplands of Lembang Subwatershed, West Sumatra, Indonesia, in a Changing Natural Resource Management Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi; Shivakoti, Ganesh P.; Schmidt-Vogt, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes livelihood change and livelihood sustainability of households in the upland part of the Lembang subwatershed, West Sumatra, in response to changes in the natural resource management context during the last decade. Using the sustainable livelihood framework (SLF), we measured livelihood changes at two separate points in time, 1996 and 2006, and assessed their environmental, economic, social, and institutional sustainability. We found that people with a low income had less access to capital assets than people from middle- and high-income groups. Our analysis revealed, however, that access to capital assets increased over time, and that poor households experienced economic improvement, indicating an overall increase in economic sustainability. Environmental sustainability, however, is threatened by intensive agricultural practices such as high agrochemical input and intensive soil tillage on steep slopes, leading to pollution and soil erosion. Social sustainability is also a matter of concern: while social exclusion has been reduced, income inequity has increased. Institutional sustainability is likely to remain uncertain, as local institutions for natural resource management are still weak, despite the fact that decentralization has been implemented during the last 8 years. External facilitation is needed to improve the livelihood of upland people while, at the same time, enhancing the sustainability of watershed management. Strengthening local institutions, conserving natural resources, and promoting environmentally sound agricultural practices are the three most important policies to be promoted within the watershed.

  12. Clustering of CO and CO2 concentration from Sumatra peat fire haze using HYSPLIT and K-means algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni’am, M.; Sitanggang, I. S.; Nuryanto, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Peat fires in Indonesia could have a negative impact for human life such as the emergence of haze. Therefore, this research aims to analyze concentration of CO and CO2 due to peat fires in Sumatra in 2015 using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) and K-Means algorithm. The results of this study indicate that HYSPLIT can be used to obtain the concentration of CO and CO2 from the haze. Clustering using K-Means algorithm produces an average of the highest concentration of CO is 11.1471 μg/m3 and CO2 is 88.5882 μg/m3. Generally, pollutants have an average concentration of 0.0487 μg/m3 for CO and 0.3687 μg/m3 for CO2. The pollutant concentration is contained in 45 525 (95%) positions in haze trajectory and the haze spread starting from Riau to Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam.

  13. Integrated study of geophysical and biological anomalies before earthquakes (seismic and non-seismic), in Austria and Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Wolfgang; Assef, Rizkita; Faber, Robert; Ferasyi, Reza

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes are commonly seen as unpredictable. Even when scientists believe an earthquake is likely, it is still hard to understand the indications observed, as well as their theoretical and practical implications. There is some controversy surrounding the concept of using animals as a precursor of earthquakes. Nonetheless, several institutes at University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, and Vienna University of Technology, both Vienna, Austria, and Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, as well as Terramath Indonesia, Buleleng, both Indonesia, cooperate in a long-term project, funded by Red Bull Media House, Salzburg, Austria, which aims at getting some decisive step forward from anecdotal to scientific evidence of those interdependencies, and show their possible use in forecasting seismic hazard on a short-term basis. Though no conclusive research has yet been published, an idea in this study is that even if animals do not respond to specific geophysical precursors and with enough notice to enable earthquake forecasting on that basis, they may at least enhance, in conjunction with other indications, the degree of certainty we can get of a prediction of an impending earthquake. In Indonesia, indeed, before the great earthquakes of 2004 and 2005, ominous geophysical as well as biological phenomena occurred (but were realized as precursors only in retrospect). Numerous comparable stories can be told from other times and regions. Nearly 2000 perceptible earthquakes (> M3.5) occur each year in Indonesia. Also, in 2007, the government has launched a program, focused on West Sumatra, for investigating earthquake precursors. Therefore, Indonesia is an excellent target area for a study concerning possible interconnections between geophysical and biological earthquake precursors. Geophysical and atmospheric measurements and behavioral observation of several animal species (elephant, domestic cattle, water buffalo, chicken, rat, catfish) are conducted in three areas

  14. Mathematical Understanding and Representation Ability of Public Junior High School in North Sumatra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minarni, Ani; Napitupulu, E. Elvis; Husein, Rahmad

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the result of first phase of the research about the development of students' mathematical understanding and representation ability through Joyful Problem-Based Learning (JPBL) at Public Junior High School in North Sumatra, Indonesia. The population is all of the students of public junior high school (PJHS) in North Sumatra. Samples…

  15. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2012 Sumatra and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Bernardino, Melissa; Dannemann, Fransiska; Smoczyk, Gregory; Briggs, Richard W.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The plate boundary southwest of Sumatra is part of a long tectonic collision zone that extends over 8,000 km from Papua, New Guinea, in the east to the Himalayan front in the west. The Sumatra-Andaman part of the collision zone forms a subduction zone plate boundary, which accommodates convergence between the Indo-Australia and Sunda plates. This convergence is responsible for the intense seismicity in Sumatra. The Sumatra Fault, a major transform structure that bisects Sumatra, accommodates the northwest-increasing lateral component of relative plate motion. Most strain accumulation and release between the two plates occurs along the Sunda megathrust. The increasingly oblique convergence moving northwest is accommodated by crustal seismicity along several transform and normal faults, including the Sumatra Fault. Plate-boundary related deformation is also not restricted to the subduction zone and overriding plate: the Indo-Australian plate actually comprises two somewhat independent plates (India and Australia) that are joined along a broad, actively deforming region that produces seismicity up to several hundred kilometers west of the trench. This deformation is exemplified by the recent April 2012 earthquake sequence, which includes the April 11 M 8.6 and M 8.2 strike-slip events and their subsequent aftershocks. Since 2004, much of the Sunda megathrust between the northern Andaman Islands and Enggano Island, a distance of more than 2,000 km, has ruptured in a series of large subduction zone earthquakes—most rupturing the plate boundary south of Banda Aceh. These events include the great M 9.1 earthquake of December 26, 2004; the M 8.6 Nias Island earthquake of March 28, 2005; and two earthquakes on September 12, 2007, of M 8.5 and M 7.9. On October 25, 2010, a M 7.8 on the shallow portion of the megathrust to the west of the Mentawai Islands caused a substantial tsunami on the west coast of those islands.

  16. Tsunami Research driven by Survivor Observations: Sumatra 2004, Tohoku 2011 and the Lituya Bay Landslide (Plinius Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Hermann M.

    2014-05-01

    The 10th anniversary of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami recalls the advent of tsunami video recordings by eyewitnesses. The tsunami of December 26, 2004 severely affected Banda Aceh along the North tip of Sumatra (Indonesia) at a distance of 250 km from the epicenter of the Magnitude 9.0 earthquake. The tsunami flow velocity analysis focused on two survivor videos recorded within Banda Aceh more than 3km from the open ocean. The exact locations of the tsunami eyewitness video recordings were revisited to record camera calibration ground control points. The motion of the camera during the recordings was determined. The individual video images were rectified with a direct linear transformation (DLT). Finally a cross-correlation based particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis was applied to the rectified video images to determine instantaneous tsunami flow velocity fields. The measured overland tsunami flow velocities were within the range of 2 to 5 m/s in downtown Banda Aceh, Indonesia. The March 11, 2011, magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan caused catastrophic damage and loss of life. Fortunately many survivors at evacuation sites recorded countless tsunami videos with unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage. Numerous tsunami reconnaissance trips were conducted in Japan. This report focuses on the surveys at selected tsunami eyewitness video recording locations along Japan's Sanriku coast and the subsequent tsunami video image analysis. Locations with high quality survivor videos were visited, eyewitnesses interviewed and detailed site topography scanned with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The analysis of the tsunami videos followed the four step procedure developed for the analysis of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami videos at Banda Aceh. Tsunami currents up to 11 m/s were measured in Kesennuma Bay making navigation impossible. Further tsunami height and runup hydrographs are derived from the videos to discuss the complex effects of coastal structures

  17. The role of students' activities in Indonesian realistic mathematics education in primary schools of Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubainur, Cut Morina; Veloo, Arsaythamby; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to explore the implementation of the Indonesian Realistic Mathematics Education (PMRI) in Aceh primary schools, Indonesia. This study investigates the students' mathematics activities involved in the implementation of PMRI and for this purpose; students' mathematics activities in the classroom were observed. Students were observed three times within five weeks during mathematics class, based on PMRI. A total of 25 year five students from a public school participated in this study. Observation check list was used in this study based on ten items. The observation conducted was based on two different time periods which were 105 minutes for group A and 70 minutes for group B. The observation was conducted every 5 minutes. The results show that PMRI is being practised in Aceh, but not completely. This study shows that mathematics activities for those who were taught using PMRI are higher than for those using the traditional approach. Overall, the findings showed that the number of student activities undertaken in PMRI achieved 90.56%. The higher percentage of activities suggests that the Aceh Education Office expands the implementation of PMRI in all primary schools so that learning of mathematics is more effective. This indirectly increases the mathematics achievement of students in Aceh to a higher level on par with Indonesia's national achievement.

  18. Community perceptions on diarrheal diseases: a case study in swampy lowland area of south Sumatra, Indonesia. The Diarrheal Diseases Research and Training Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R; Aulia, H; Susanto, T A; Roisuddin; Hamzah, M

    1991-01-01

    Four investigators conducted participative observation at 4 hamlets, representing 4 typical topography in the area, wet or dry near the river and wet or dry far from the river, in District Rambutan, South Sumatera Province, Indonesia from July 1988 up until February 1989 to study the community perception and practices on diarrheal diseases (DD). The observation was supported by focus group discussions and informal interviews. It was found that the causes of DD can be grouped into: dirty water; wrong (cold, hot, sting) food; part of the growth process; physical condition (extreme heat, cold wind and inner abnormality, inner heat, muscle strain), and supernatural. The type of DD can be grouped into: mild without vomiting named ngadi, negenteng-ngentengi, nambah kepacakan, etc which was linked to the growth process; more severe diarrhea, might be with fever (mising-mising, murus, mencret, etc); more severe diarrhea with severe vomiting (muntager, kolera); bloody/mucoid stool (disentri, mising tai angin, mising umbal). The community had also the concept of prolonged diarrhea named as menerus (literally meaning prolonged) Muntaber was more associated with bad water while the prolonged one was more associated with inner abnormality. The danger of diarrhea perceived was susut = shrinkage, lisut = emaciation. Pale and red hair with lisut were recognized as the dangers of prolonged diarrhea. The community did not associate these conditions with fluid loss. The management started by self medication using tapel (pasta of herb applied) to the stomach), decoct (daun jambu, akar teratai etc), solid oral preparation (cassava with raw sugar, rast rice, etc).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Studying Displacement After a Disaster Using Large Scale Survey Methods: Sumatra After the 2004 Tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Clark; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Gillespie, Thomas; Sumantri, Cecep; Thomas, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of human vulnerability to environmental change has advanced in recent years, but measuring vulnerability and interpreting mobility across many sites differentially affected by change remains a significant challenge. Drawing on longitudinal data collected on the same respondents who were living in coastal areas of Indonesia before the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and were re-interviewed after the tsunami, this paper illustrates how the combination of population-based survey methods, satellite imagery and multivariate statistical analyses has the potential to provide new insights into vulnerability, mobility and impacts of major disasters on population well-being. The data are used to map and analyze vulnerability to post-tsunami displacement across the provinces of Aceh and North Sumatra and to compare patterns of migration after the tsunami between damaged areas and areas not directly affected by the tsunami. The comparison reveals that migration after a disaster is less selective overall than migration in other contexts. Gender and age, for example, are strong predictors of moving from undamaged areas but are not related to displacement in areas experiencing damage. In our analyses traditional predictors of vulnerability do not always operate in expected directions. Low levels of socioeconomic status and education were not predictive of moving after the tsunami, although for those who did move, they were predictive of displacement to a camp rather than a private home. This survey-based approach, though not without difficulties, is broadly applicable to many topics in human-environment research, and potentially opens the door to rigorous testing of new hypotheses in this literature. PMID:24839300

  20. Geothermal resource of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, M.P. . Geothermal Inst.); Sudarman, Sayogi . Geothermal Section)

    1993-06-01

    There are at least 30 high temperatures systems (with inferred reservoir temperatures > 200 C) along the active Sumatra Arc that transfer heat from crustal intrusions to the surface. These systems, together with eleven active volcanoes, five degassing volcanoes and one caldera volcano (Lake Toba), are controlled by the Sumatra Fault Zone, an active mega shear zone that follows the median axis of the arc. At least half of the active and degassing volcanoes are associated with volcanic geothermal reservoirs containing magmatic gases and acid fluids. Large, low temperature resources exist in the Tertiary sedimentary basins of east Sumatra (back-arc region), where anomalously higher thermal gradients (up to 8 C/100 m) have been measured. Volcanic activity was not continuous during the Cenozoic; subduction and arc volcanism probably decreased after the Eocene as a result of a clockwise rotation of Sumatra. In the Late Miocene, subduction started again, and andesitic volcanism reached a new peak of intensity in the Pliocene and has been continuous ever since. Rhyolitic volcanism, which has produced voluminous ignimbrite flows, began later (Pliocene/Pleistocene). All known rhyolitic centers associated with ignimbrite flows appear to lie along the Sumatra Fault Zone.

  1. Assessing school disaster preparedness by applying a comprehensive school safety framework: A case of elementary schools in Banda Aceh City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, A.; Bisri, M. B. F.; Oda, T.; Oktari, R. S.; Murayama, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The study assessed the depth of school disaster safety at public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City, Indonesia in terms of comprehensive school safety, especially school location, disaster management and disaster education. The findings indicate that 56% of public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City are exposed to high tsunami risk, and most externally driven school disaster preparedness activities were not continued by the schools due to lack of ownership and funding. To realize comprehensive school safety, disaster preparedness programs should neither be brought in by external donors, nor be in a patchwork. Rather, it should be conducted jointly and sustainably by the local school and the community and supported by multi-sectoral support in the city. Comprehensive school safety of public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City could be realized by reviewing, updating and localizing school disaster preparedness programs by all the education partners in the city with strong political will and commitment.

  2. Three factors to enlarge tsunami disaster in Indonesia after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Satake, K.

    2010-12-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami revealed Indonesia’s vulnerability for natural hazards to the international society. Various education programs of disaster risk reduction have been supported by many international agencies, and both students and community have gradually learned about natural hazards in Indonesia. After five years have passed, it is entering into a new phase. We started a three-year (2009-2011) multi-disciplinary cooperative research project as a part of ‘Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS)’ supported by the Japanese government. The project title is ‘Multi-disciplinary hazard reduction from earthquake and volcanoes in Indonesia’. Three factors contributing to earthquake and tsunami disasters in Indonesia are revealed through our research. Firstly, tsunami hazard is still high in Indonesia. Earthquakes have frequently occurred in West Sumatra after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. In Padang, our research field, a possibility of a great interplate earthquake with tsunami in the near future has been pointed out. Secondly, social infrastructure is very vulnerable. During the recent earthquakes such as the 2009 Padang earthquake, many people were killed by collapse of non-resistance buildings. For the future tsunami hazard, many building had been identified for vertical evacuation, but many candidate evacuation buildings were collapsed during the 2009 earthquake. The last factor is people’s incorrect knowledge about natural hazards. People misunderstand that tsunami comes with initial receding waves through the fact of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami in Indonesia. Every time large earthquake occurs, people go to seaside to check the low tide, especially in the 2004 tsunami disaster area such as Aceh. Our counterpart NGO has patiently struggled with such misunderstanding in Padang and succeeded to educate people. Because of the buildings’ vulnerability, the NGO put priority on horizontal evacuation. The

  3. Fuel Cost Estimation for Sumatra Grid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liun, Edwaren

    2010-06-01

    Sumatra has a high growth rate electricity energy demand from the first decade in this century. At the medium of this decade the growth is 11% per annum. On the other side capability of Government of Indonesia cq. PLN authority is limited, while many and most old existing power plants will be retired. The electricity demand growth of Sumatra is increasing the fuel consumption for several next decades. Based on several cases by vary growth scenarios and economic parameters, it shown that some kinds of fossil fuel keep to be required until next several decades. Although Sumatra has abundant coal resource, however, the other fuel types such as fuel oil, diesel, gas and nuclear are needed. On the Base Scenario and discount rate of 10%, the Sumatra System will require 11.6 million tones of coal until 2030 producing 866 TWh with cost of US10558 million. Nuclear plants produce about 501 TWh or 32% by cost of US3.1 billion. On the High Scenario and discount rate 10%, the coal consumption becomes 486.6 million tones by fuel cost of US12.7 billion producing 1033 TWh electricity energy. Nuclear fuel cost required in this scenario is US7.06 billion. The other fuel in large amount consumed is natural gas for combined cycle plants by cost of US1.38 billion producing 11.7 TWh of electricity energy on the Base Scenario and discount rate of 10%. In the High Scenario and discount rate 10% coal plants take role in power generation in Sumatra producing about 866 TWh or 54% of electricity energy. Coal consumption will be the highest on the Base Scenario with discount rate of 12% producing 756 TWh and required cost of US17.1 billion. Nuclear plants will not applicable in this scenario due to its un-competitiveness. The fuel cost will depend on nuclear power role in Sumatra system. Fuel cost will increase correspond to the increasing of coal consumption on the case where nuclear power plants not appear.

  4. Breaking the vicious circle of illegal logging in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Linkie, Matthew; Sloan, Sean; Kasia, Rahmad; Kiswayadi, Dedy; Azmi, Wahdi

    2014-08-01

    The government of Indonesia, which presides over 10% of the world's tropical forests, has set ambitious targets to cut its high deforestation rates through an REDD+ scheme (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation). This will require strong law enforcement to succeed. Yet, strategies that have accomplished this are rare and, along with past failures, tend not to be documented. We evaluated a multistakeholder approach that seeks to tackle illegal logging in the carbon-rich province of Aceh, Sumatra. From 2008 to 2009, Fauna & Flora International established and supported a community-based informant network for the 738,000 ha Ulu Masen ecosystem. The network reported 190 forest offenses to local law enforcement agencies, which responded with 86 field operations that confiscated illicit vehicles, equipment, and timber, and arrested 138 illegal logging suspects. From 45 cases subsequently monitored, 64.4% proceeded to court, from which 90.0% of defendants received a prison sentence or a verbal warning for a first offense. Spatial analyses of illegal logging and timber storage incidents predicted that illegal activities would be more effectively deterred by law enforcement operations that targeted the storage sites. Although numerous clusters of incidents were identified, they were still widespread reflecting the ubiquity of illegal activities. The multistakeholder results were promising, but illegal logging still persisted at apparently similar levels at the project's end, indicating that efforts need to be further strengthened. Nevertheless, several actions contributed to the law enforcement achievements: strong political will; strong stakeholder support; and funding that could be promptly accessed. These factors are highlighted as prerequisites for achieving Indonesia's ambitious REDD+ goals.

  5. Earthquake and Tsunami booklet based on two Indonesia earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Aci, M.

    2014-12-01

    Many destructive earthquakes occurred during the last decade in Indonesia. These experiences are very important precepts for the world people who live in earthquake and tsunami countries. We are collecting the testimonies of tsunami survivors to clarify successful evacuation process and to make clear the characteristic physical behaviors of tsunami near coast. We research 2 tsunami events, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and 2010 Mentawai slow earthquake tsunami. Many video and photographs were taken by people at some places in 2004 Indian ocean tsunami disaster; nevertheless these were few restricted points. We didn't know the tsunami behavior in another place. In this study, we tried to collect extensive information about tsunami behavior not only in many places but also wide time range after the strong shake. In Mentawai case, the earthquake occurred in night, so there are no impressive photos. To collect detail information about evacuation process from tsunamis, we contrived the interview method. This method contains making pictures of tsunami experience from the scene of victims' stories. In 2004 Aceh case, all survivors didn't know tsunami phenomena. Because there were no big earthquakes with tsunami for one hundred years in Sumatra region, public people had no knowledge about tsunami. This situation was highly improved in 2010 Mentawai case. TV programs and NGO or governmental public education programs about tsunami evacuation are widespread in Indonesia. Many people know about fundamental knowledge of earthquake and tsunami disasters. We made drill book based on victim's stories and painted impressive scene of 2 events. We used the drill book in disaster education event in school committee of west Java. About 80 % students and teachers evaluated that the contents of the drill book are useful for correct understanding.

  6. Reconciliation is the Best Solution for Conflict in Aceh

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    the Minangkabau in West Sumatera . In the Kuala Simpang region of East Aceh, the Deli Malay dialect prevails. In Central and South East Aceh, the...75. 182 Joss Wibisono, June 27, 2003, “Milisi Aceh Tengah , Lain Sejarahnya, tapi Sama Fungsinya”, Available at [http://www.rnw.nl/ranesi/html

  7. Exploration in the Ombilin Intermontane Basin, West Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, T.

    1996-12-31

    The Ombilin Basin is a Tertiary intermontane basin located within the Barisan Mountain Range of Sumatra. Oil exploration commenced in the Ombilin Basin in the early 1980s when geological mapping was carried out, a synthetic aperture radar survey was flown, and a basin-wide geophysical survey was completed. This effort led to the drilling of Sinimar No. 1 to a total depth 3020 m. Sinimar No. 1 was a historic well in Indonesia`s oil industry since it was the first oil exploration well drilled in the Ombilin Basin and also the first well drilled in an intermontane basin in Indonesia. Oil, gas and condensate was tested in the well. An integrated interpretation of the well, geophysical and outcrop data indicates that despite its small areal size (30 km x 50 km), the Ombilin Basin is a deep pull-apart basin containing up to 4500 m of Tertiary sediments, ranging in age from Middle Eocene to Early Miocene. The basin currently is in an intermontane basin structural setting but it was also an intermontane basin during its Early Tertiary depositional history. During the Eocene, alluvial fans and massive debris flows were deposited on the basin margins and a large lake occupied the basin center. Fluvial deposition occurred in the basin during the Oligocene followed by deposition of marine shales, sandstones, and isolated reefs during the Miocene. Although the Ombilin Basin is located within Sumatra`s magmatic arc and is partially covered by volcanics from extinct and active volcanoes, the subsurface temperature gradients of 1.62 deg. F/100 ft. recorded in Sinimar No. I and 1.47 deg F/100 ft. measured in a deep (670 m) coal exploration core hole are significantly cooler than the average subsurface temperature gradients in the Sumatra back-arc basins. Organic-rich Eocene lacustrine shales are the likely source rocks for the hydrocarbons tested in Sinimar No. 1 and the oil seeps located along the basin margins.

  8. Determinants of community-based coverage: periodic vitamin A supplementation. Aceh Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Tarwotjo, I; West, K P; Mele, L; Nur, S; Nendrawati, H; Kraushaar, D; Tilden, R L

    1989-01-01

    Factors related to preschool child receipt of vitamin A during the first year of a semi-annual vitamin A capsule delivery program were investigated in 229 villages in Aceh, Indonesia. Coverage was higher in villages which were more rural and less economically developed. Highest performance was achieved by village distributors who represented the local status quo in this rural area (farmers, or non-farmers with minimum education) rather than more upwardly mobile, highly educated residents. Household or child-level characteristics were not associated with coverage. This information may be useful for planning direct service programs in the community. PMID:2735470

  9. Determining Proportion of Exfoliative Vaginal Cell during Various Stages of Estrus Cycle Using Vaginal Cytology Techniques in Aceh Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Siregar, Tongku N.; Melia, Juli; Rohaya; Thasmi, Cut Nila; Masyitha, Dian; Wahyuni, Sri; Rosa, Juliana; Nurhafni; Panjaitan, Budianto; Herrialfian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the period of estrus cycle in aceh cattle, Indonesia, based on vaginal cytology techniques. Four healthy females of aceh cattle with average weight of 250–300 kg, age of 5–7 years, and body condition score of 3-4 were used. All cattle were subjected to ultrasonography analysis for the occurrence of corpus luteum before being synchronized using intramuscular injections of PGF2 alpha 25 mg. A vaginal swab was collected from aceh cattle, stained with Giemsa 10%, and observed microscopically. Period of estrus cycle was predicted from day 1 to day 24 after estrus synchronization was confirmed using ultrasonography analysis at the same day. The result showed that parabasal, intermediary, and superficial epithelium were found in the vaginal swabs collected from proestrus, metestrus, and diestrus aceh cattle. Proportions of these cells in the particular period of estrus cycle were 36.22, 32.62, and 31.16 (proestrus); 21.33, 32.58, and 46.09 (estrus); 40.75, 37.58, and 21.67 (metestrus); and 41.07, 37.38, and 21.67 (diestrus), respectively. In conclusion, dominant proportion of superficial cell that occurred in estrus period might be used as the base for determining optimal time for insemination. PMID:26977335

  10. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp., Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon spp. and Giardia intestinalis in Wild, Semi-Wild and Captive Orangutans (Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus) on Sumatra and Borneo, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Mynářová, Anna; Foitová, Ivona; Kváč, Martin; Květoňová, Dana; Rost, Michael; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Nurcahyo, Wisnu; Nguyen, Cathleen; Supriyadi, Supriyadi; Sak, Bohumil

    2016-01-01

    Background Orangutans are critically endangered primarily due to loss and fragmentation of their natural habitat. This could bring them into closer contact with humans and increase the risk of zoonotic pathogen transmission. Aims To describe the prevalence and diversity of Cryptosporidium spp., microsporidia and Giardia intestinalis in orangutans at seven sites on Sumatra and Kalimantan, and to evaluate the impact of orangutans’ habituation and location on the occurrence of these zoonotic protists. Result The overall prevalence of parasites in 298 examined animals was 11.1%. The most prevalent microsporidia was Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype II, found in 21 animals (7.0%). Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype D (n = 5) and novel genotype Pongo 2 were detected only in six individuals (2.0%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of these parasites in orangutans. Eight animals were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. (2.7%), including C. parvum (n = 2) and C. muris (n = 6). Giardia intestinalis assemblage B, subtype MB6, was identified in a single individual. While no significant differences between the different human contact level groups (p = 0.479–0.670) or between the different islands (p = 0.992) were reported in case of E. bieneusi or E. cuniculi, Cryptosporidium spp. was significantly less frequently detected in wild individuals (p < 2×10−16) and was significantly more prevalent in orangutans on Kalimantan than on Sumatra (p < 2×10−16). Conclusion Our results revealed that wild orangutans are significantly less frequently infected by Cryptosporidium spp. than captive and semi-wild animals. In addition, this parasite was more frequently detected at localities on Kalimantan. In contrast, we did not detect any significant difference in the prevalence of microsporidia between the studied groups of animals. The sources and transmission modes of infections were not determined, as this would require repeated sampling of individuals

  11. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  12. Uplift and subsidence associated with the great Aceh-Andaman earthquake of 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meltzner, A.J.; Sieh, K.; Abrams, M.; Agnew, D.C.; Hudnut, K.W.; Avouac, J.-P.; Natawidjaja, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Rupture of the Sunda megathrust on 26 December 2004 produced broad regions of uplift and subsidence. We define the pivot line separating these regions as a first step in defining the lateral extent and the downdip limit of rupture during that great Mw ??? 9.2 earthquake. In the region of the Andaman and Nicobar islands we rely exclusively on the interpretation of satellite imagery and a tidal model. At the southern limit of the great rupture we rely principally on field measurements of emerged coral microatolls. Uplift extends from the middle of Simeulue Island, Sumatra, at ??? 2.5??N, to Preparis Island, Myanmar (Burma), at ??? 14.9??N. Thus the rupture is ??? 1600 km long. The distance from the pivot line to the trench varies appreciably. The northern and western Andaman Islands rose, whereas the southern and eastern portion of the islands subsided. The Nicobar Islands and the west coast of Aceh province, Sumatra, subsided. Tilt at the southern end of the rupture is steep; the distance from 1.5 m of uplift to the pivot line is just 60 km. Our method of using satellite imagery to recognize changes in elevation relative to sea surface height and of using a tidal model to place quantitative bounds on coseismic uplift or subsidence is a novel approach that can be adapted to other forms of remote sensing and can be applied to other subduction zones in tropical regions. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Shallow subsurface morpho-tectonics at the Northern offshore Sumatra subduction system using high resolution reflection and refraction seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, D.; Dibakar Ghosal*, S. C. Singh, A. P. S. Chauhan, H. Carton, N. D. Hananto

    2011-12-01

    The oblique subduction of Indo-Australian plate below the Eurosian plate regulates the subsurface geology of the Sumatra subduction system from south to north. Although many geological, geophysical and geodetic studies have been carried over since several decades nevertheless a high resolution subsurface image describing the detailed structural features over the Northern Sumatra is still missing. To scrutinize the northern part of this subduction system we had carried out a multi channel seismic (MCS) and OBS survey using a 12 km long streamer and 56 ocean bottom seismometers in 2006 and procured a high resolution deep seismic reflection and refraction data over a 500 km long profile mapping the whole subduction setting from the subduction front, forearc high and basin, Sumatra platform, Sumatra fault and volcanic arc. The acoustic basement along the profile is very complex because of its extremities lies in a range of 300 m to 5000 m. In order to overcome the imaging-intricacies caused due to the abrupt changes of water depth, we have downward continued the 12 km streamer data to the seafloor, which provides refraction arrivals from near zero offsets to 12 km, and subsequently a high-resolution travel time tomography keeping node spacing of 50m x 50m has accomplished to procure a detail velocity structure along the profile. We have conducted our analysis in two important areas at northern offshore Sumatra: (1) subduction front and accretionary settings and (2) forearc high and West Anadman Fault. Our main goal lies to observe the nature of shallow subsurface velocity distribution over these regions. Tomographic result of the subduction front demonstrates the changes in velocity gradient along up-dip. The 1D velocity gradients become shallower toward the subduction trench inferring the fact of lithification of accreted sediments around the accretionary wedge. At the forearc high adjacent to the Aceh basin a pile of 1 km thick low velocity sediments is underlain by

  14. Plate-boundary deformation associated with the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake.

    PubMed

    Subarya, Cecep; Chlieh, Mohamed; Prawirodirdjo, Linette; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Bock, Yehuda; Sieh, Kerry; Meltzner, Aron J; Natawidjaja, Danny H; McCaffrey, Robert

    2006-03-02

    The Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 26 December 2004 is the first giant earthquake (moment magnitude M(w) > 9.0) to have occurred since the advent of modern space-based geodesy and broadband seismology. It therefore provides an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the characteristics of one of these enormous and rare events. Here we report estimates of the ground displacement associated with this event, using near-field Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys in northwestern Sumatra combined with in situ and remote observations of the vertical motion of coral reefs. These data show that the earthquake was generated by rupture of the Sunda subduction megathrust over a distance of >1,500 kilometres and a width of <150 kilometres. Megathrust slip exceeded 20 metres offshore northern Sumatra, mostly at depths shallower than 30 kilometres. Comparison of the geodetically and seismically inferred slip distribution indicates that approximately 30 per cent additional fault slip accrued in the 1.5 months following the 500-second-long seismic rupture. Both seismic and aseismic slip before our re-occupation of GPS sites occurred on the shallow portion of the megathrust, where the large Aceh tsunami originated. Slip tapers off abruptly along strike beneath Simeulue Island at the southeastern edge of the rupture, where the earthquake nucleated and where an M(w) = 7.2 earthquake occurred in late 2002. This edge also abuts the northern limit of slip in the 28 March 2005 M(w) = 8.7 Nias-Simeulue earthquake.

  15. The Perennial Problem: The Chinese Minority in Indonesia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-28

    one another at least as much as Italian from Spanish and Spanish from Portuguese.(13) Hokkiens were the first Chinese to settle in Indonesia in large...Today, the Hokkiens and their descendants are the dominant Chinese group in East Indonesia , Central and East Java, and on the We1t coast of Sumatra. A... Hokkien ) term meaning ’master.’ But in Indonesia , it is used to denote a "skillful Chinese businessman who closely cooperates as a middleman with those

  16. Conflict nightmares and trauma in Aceh.

    PubMed

    Grayman, Jesse Hession; Good, Mary-Jo Delvecchio; Good, Byron J

    2009-06-01

    In both the Acehnese and Indonesian languages, there is no single lexical term for "nightmare." And yet findings from a large field research project in Aceh that examined post traumatic experience during Aceh's nearly 30-year rebellion against the Indonesian state and current mental distress revealed a rich variety of dream narratives that connect directly and indirectly to respondents' past traumatic experiences. The results reported below suggest that even in a society that has a very different cultural ideology about dreams, where "nightmares" as such are not considered dreams but rather the work of mischievous spirits called jin, they are still a significant part of the trauma process. We argue that it is productive to distinguish between terrifying and repetitive dreams that recreate the traumatic moment and the more ordinary varieties of dreams that Acehnese reported to their interviewers. Nightmares that refer back to conflict events do not appear as an elaborated feature of trauma as the condition is understood by people in Aceh, but when asked further about their dreams, respondents who reported symptoms suggestive of PTSD were more likely to report PTSD-like dreams, memory intrusions that repeat the political violence of the past.

  17. Embedded wisdom or rooted problems? Aid workers' perspectives on local social and political infrastructure in post-tsunami Aceh.

    PubMed

    Daly, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    This paper analyses the role of local social, cultural, and political institutions in post-disaster reconstruction projects. It contends that such institutions are important considerations within community-driven reconstruction initiatives, but are often viewed with ambivalence by external aid organisations. This paper draws upon in-depth qualitative interviews with aid workers involved in the post-tsunami reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia, to establish: (i) what roles community institutions were suited to play in the reconstruction; (ii) what were the limitations of community institutions when engaging with external aid agencies; (iii) how did external aid agencies engage with local community institutions; and (iv) how did external aid agencies perceive community institutions.

  18. Exploration in the Ombilin Intermontane Basin, West Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, T. Petroleum Co., Lagos )

    1996-01-01

    The Ombilin Basin is a Tertiary intermontane basin located within the Barisan Mountain Range of Sumatra. Oil exploration commenced in the Ombilin Basin in the early 1980s when geological mapping was carried out, a synthetic aperture radar survey was flown, and a basin-wide geophysical survey was completed. This effort led to the drilling of Sinimar No. 1 to a total depth 3020 m. Sinimar No. 1 was a historic well in Indonesia's oil industry since it was the first oil exploration well drilled in the Ombilin Basin and also the first well drilled in an intermontane basin in Indonesia. Oil, gas and condensate was tested in the well. An integrated interpretation of the well, geophysical and outcrop data indicates that despite its small areal size (30 km x 50 km), the Ombilin Basin is a deep pull-apart basin containing up to 4500 m of Tertiary sediments, ranging in age from Middle Eocene to Early Miocene. The basin currently is in an intermontane basin structural setting but it was also an intermontane basin during its Early Tertiary depositional history. During the Eocene, alluvial fans and massive debris flows were deposited on the basin margins and a large lake occupied the basin center. Fluvial deposition occurred in the basin during the Oligocene followed by deposition of marine shales, sandstones, and isolated reefs during the Miocene. Although the Ombilin Basin is located within Sumatra's magmatic arc and is partially covered by volcanics from extinct and active volcanoes, the subsurface temperature gradients of 1.62 deg. F/100 ft. recorded in Sinimar No. I and 1.47 deg F/100 ft. measured in a deep (670 m) coal exploration core hole are significantly cooler than the average subsurface temperature gradients in the Sumatra back-arc basins. Organic-rich Eocene lacustrine shales are the likely source rocks for the hydrocarbons tested in Sinimar No. 1 and the oil seeps located along the basin margins.

  19. Structural controls on a geothermal system in the Tarutung Basin, north central Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukman, Mochamad; Moeck, Inga

    2013-09-01

    The Sumatra Fault System provides a unique geologic setting to evaluate the influence of structural controls on geothermal activity. Whereas most of the geothermal systems in Indonesia are controlled by volcanic activity, geothermal systems at the Sumatra Fault System might be controlled by faults and fractures. Exploration strategies for these geothermal systems need to be verified because the typical pattern of heat source and alteration clays are missing so that conventional exploration with magnetotelluric surveys might not provide sufficient data to delineate favorable settings for drilling. We present field geological, structural and geomorphological evidence combined with mapping of geothermal manifestations to allow constraints between fault dynamics and geothermal activity in the Tarutung Basin in north central Sumatra. Our results indicate that the fault pattern in the Tarutung Basin is generated by a compressional stress direction acting at a high angle to the right-lateral Sumatra Fault System. NW-SE striking normal faults possibly related to negative flower structures and NNW-SSE to NNE-SSW oriented dilative Riedel shears are preferential fluid pathways whereas ENE-WSW striking faults act as barriers in this system. The dominant of geothermal manifestations at the eastern part of the basin indicates local extension due to clockwise block rotation in the Sumatra Fault System. Our results support the effort to integrate detailed field geological surveys to refined exploration strategies even in tropical areas where outcrops are limited.

  20. Ischnura foylei sp. nov. (Odonata, Coenagrionidae) from the highlands of Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Kosterin, Oleg E

    2015-10-15

    Ischnura foylei sp. nov. is described from Indonesia, Sumatra, Jambi Province, Danau Gunung Tujuh (or Danau Sakti), a lake situated in an extinct volcanic crater, 1°41'15"S, 101°25'28"S, 1995 m a.s.l. Structurally it is close to I. senegalensis but larger and with differently shaped cerci in males and a more trilobate posterior lobe of the prothorax; males and androchromatic females have a unique colour pattern.

  1. Future fire emissions associated with projected land use change in Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Marlier, Miriam E; DeFries, Ruth; Pennington, Derric; Nelson, Erik; Ordway, Elsa M; Lewis, Jeremy; Koplitz, Shannon N; Mickley, Loretta J

    2015-01-01

    Indonesia has experienced rapid land use change over the last few decades as forests and peatswamps have been cleared for more intensively managed land uses, including oil palm and timber plantations. Fires are the predominant method of clearing and managing land for more intensive uses, and the related emissions affect public health by contributing to regional particulate matter and ozone concentrations and adding to global atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Here, we examine emissions from fires associated with land use clearing and land management on the Indonesian island of Sumatra and the sensitivity of this fire activity to interannual meteorological variability. We find ~80% of 2005-2009 Sumatra emissions are associated with degradation or land use maintenance instead of immediate land use conversion, especially in dry years. We estimate Sumatra fire emissions from land use change and maintenance for the next two decades with five scenarios of land use change, the Global Fire Emissions Database Version 3, detailed 1-km2 land use change maps, and MODIS fire radiative power observations. Despite comprising only 16% of the original study area, we predict that 37-48% of future Sumatra emissions from land use change will occur in fuel-rich peatswamps unless this land cover type is protected effectively. This result means that the impact of fires on future air quality and climate in Equatorial Asia will be decided in part by the conservation status given to the remaining peatswamps on Sumatra. Results from this article will be implemented in an atmospheric transport model to quantify the public health impacts from the transport of fire emissions associated with future land use scenarios in Sumatra.

  2. Status of peatland degradation and development in Sumatra and Kalimantan.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Jukka; Liew, Soo Chin

    2010-01-01

    Peatlands cover around 13 Mha in Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia. Human activities have rapidly increased in the peatland ecosystems during the last two decades, invariably degrading them and making them vulnerable to fires. This causes high carbon emissions that contribute to global climate change. For this article, we used 94 high resolution (10-20 m) satellite images to map the status of peatland degradation and development in Sumatra and Kalimantan using visual image interpretation. The results reveal that less than 4% of the peatland areas remain covered by pristine peatswamp forests (PSFs), while 37% are covered by PSFs with varying degree of degradation. Furthermore, over 20% is considered to be unmanaged degraded landscape, occupied by ferns, shrubs and secondary growth. This alarming extent of degradation makes peatlands vulnerable to accelerated peat decomposition and catastrophic fire episodes that will have global consequences. With on-going degradation and development the existence of the entire tropical peatland ecosystem in this region is in great danger.

  3. Seismicity associated with the Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of 26 December 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, J.W.; Choy, G.; Presgrave, B.; Sipkin, S.; Tarr, A.C.; Benz, H.; Earle, P.; Wald, D.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey/National Earthquake Information Center (USGS/ NEIC) had computed origins for 5000 earthquakes in the Sumatra-Andaman Islands region in the first 36 weeks after the Sumatra-Andaman Islands mainshock of 26 December 2004. The cataloging of earthquakes of mb (USGS) 5.1 and larger is essentially complete for the time period except for the first half-day following the 26 December mainshock, a period of about two hours following the Nias earthquake of 28 March 2005, and occasionally during the Andaman Sea swarm of 26-30 January 2005. Moderate and larger (mb ???5.5) aftershocks are absent from most of the deep interplate thrust faults of the segments of the Sumatra-Andaman Islands subduction zone on which the 26 December mainshock occurred, which probably reflects nearly complete release of elastic strain on the seismogenic interplate-thrust during the mainshock. An exceptional thrust-fault source offshore of Banda Aceh may represent a segment of the interplate thrust that was bypassed during the mainshock. The 26 December mainshock triggered a high level of aftershock activity near the axis of the Sunda trench and the leading edge of the overthrust Burma plate. Much near-trench activity is intraplate activity within the subducting plate, but some shallow-focus, near-trench, reverse-fault earthquakes may represent an unusual seismogenic release of interplate compressional stress near the tip of the overriding plate. The interplate-thrust Nias earthquake of 28 March 2005, in contrast to the 26 December aftershock sequence, was followed by many interplate-thrust aftershocks along the length of its inferred rupture zone.

  4. Seismology: speed and size of the Sumatra earthquake.

    PubMed

    Stein, Seth; Okal, Emile A

    2005-03-31

    Our seismological results reveal that Indonesia's devastating Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on 26 December 2004 was 2.5 times larger than initial reports suggested--second only to the 1960 Chilean earthquake in recorded magnitude. They indicate that it slowly released its energy by slip along a 1,200-km fault, generating a long rupture that contributed to the subsequent tsunami. Now that the entire rupture zone has slipped, the strain accumulated from the subduction of the Indian plate beneath the Burma microplate has been released, and there is no immediate danger of a similar tsunami being generated on this part of the plate boundary, although large earthquakes on segments to the south still present a threat.

  5. Green city Banda Aceh: city planning approach and environmental aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Banda Aceh as the capital of Aceh Province is the region with the tsunami disaster that occurred on December 26, 2004 the most severe of which over 60% of the city area were destroyed mainly coastal region and settlements. One product plan for rehabilitation and reconstruction of Banda Aceh is made of Banda Aceh as Green City. To realize the Green City Banda Aceh, urban development process should be conducted in a planned and integrated way with attention to spatial and environmental aspects to ensure an efficient urban management and to create a healthy, beautiful and comfortable environment. There is a weakness of the process in urban planning and development that occurred at present where cities tend to minimize the development of green open space and land conversion into a commercial district, residential areas, industrial areas, transport networks and infrastructure and facilities for other cities. Another tendency that occurs is urban environment only developed economically but not ecologically, whereas ecological balance is as important as the development of the economic value of urban areas. Such conditions have caused unbalance of urban ecosystems including increased air temperature, air pollution, declining water table, flooding, salt water intrusion and increased content of heavy metals in the soil. From an ecological perspective, unfavorable microclimate, high-temperature increase due to the lack of trees as a sieve / filter against heavy rain, can cause flooding. These conditions result in inconvienient, arid and less beautiful urban areas. The author identifies the elements contained in the Green City Banda Aceh and how the efforts and approaches must be made toward Green City Banda Aceh.

  6. Multi-disciplinary Hazard Reduction from Earthquakes and Volcanoes in Indonesia - International Research Cooperation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Teruyuki

    2010-05-01

    themes were explained and panel discussion was conducted. Then, the project officially started in June 2009. The first plenary workshop was held in October 11-14 in Aceh, Indonesia, at the occasion of Indian Ocean-wide tsunami evacuation drill of IOC (Inter-governmental Oceanographic Commission). Considering that disastrous earthquakes occurred on 2nd September 2009 (Mw7.0) in the south of Java and on 30th September 2009 (Mw7.5) nearby Padang, central Sumatra, special reports for these earthquakes were presented. In particular, the latter earthquake that devastated the city of Padang was of great interest because its epicenter is located in a seismic gap called "Mentawai gap" where a large interplate earthquake is expected to occur in the near future. Research teams from our project were urgently deployed to the area for investigating disasters due to the September 2009 earthquake and trying to find effective countermeasures to the coming larger event.

  7. Surviving Women's Learning Experiences from the Tsunami in Aceh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teng, Yan Fang Jane; Yusof, Qismullah

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated surviving women's learning experiences from the 2004 tsunami in Aceh. Women were the majority of casualties and the most vulnerable after the tsunami. Almost a decade later, we used a conceptual framework of experiential learning, critical reflection, and transformative learning to understand the surviving women's ways of…

  8. Precursory seismicity changes prior to major earthquakes along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone: a region-time-length algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukrungsri, Santawat; Pailoplee, Santi

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the precursory seismicity changes related to the major earthquakes posed along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ) using the region-time-length (RTL) algorithm. Based on the suitable RTL characteristics of r 0 = 100 km and t 0 = 2 years, the anomalous RTL score representing the quiescence stage mostly started 0.1-5.2 years before the subsequent major earthquake, while no activation stage was illustrated. For the spatial investigation, the RTL anomalies also clearly illustrated the location of the subsequent major earthquakes. Thus, in order to determine the prospective areas of upcoming earthquakes, the series of RTL maps calculated during the recent 5-year (2010-2014) time span was used. The obtained results reveal four risk areas along the SASZ that might pose a major earthquake in the future, namely (i) Sittwe city, western Myanmar; (ii) offshore northern Nicobar Islands; (iii) Aceh city, northernmost of Sumatra Island; and (iv) offshore western Sumatra Island. Therefore, both a tsunami hazard in the Indian Ocean and a seismic hazard in the far-field cities should be recognized urgently.

  9. Tsunami threat in the Indian Ocean from a future megathrust earthquake west of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, John; Antonioli, Andrea; Piatanesi, Alessio; Sieh, Kerry; Steacy, Sandy; Nalbant, Suleyman; Cocco, Massimo; Giunchi, Carlo; Huang, JianDong; Dunlop, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Several independent indicators imply a high probability of a great ( M > 8) earthquake rupture of the subduction megathrust under the Mentawai Islands of West Sumatra. The human consequences of such an event depend crucially on its tsunamigenic potential, which in turn depends on unpredictable details of slip distribution on the megathrust and how resulting seafloor movements and the propagating tsunami waves interact with bathymetry. Here we address the forward problem by modelling about 1000 possible complex earthquake ruptures and calculating the seafloor displacements and tsunami wave height distributions that would result from the most likely 100 or so, as judged by reference to paleogeodetic data. Additionally we carry out a systematic study of the importance of the location of maximum slip with respect to the morphology of the fore-arc complex. Our results indicate a generally smaller regional tsunami hazard than was realised in Aceh during the December 2004 event, though more than 20% of simulations result in tsunami wave heights of more than 5 m for the southern Sumatran cities of Padang and Bengkulu. The extreme events in these simulations produce results which are consistent with recent deterministic studies. The study confirms the sensitivity of predicted wave heights to the distribution of slip even for events with similar moment and reproduces Plafker's rule of thumb. Additionally we show that the maximum wave height observed at a single location scales with the magnitude though data for all magnitudes exhibit extreme variability. Finally, we show that for any coastal location in the near field of the earthquake, despite the complexity of the earthquake rupture simulations and the large range of magnitudes modelled, the timing of inundation is constant to first order and the maximum height of the modelled waves is directly proportional to the vertical coseismic displacement experienced at that point. These results may assist in developing tsunami

  10. Rebuilt risk: involuntary return, voluntary migration, and socioeconomic segregation in post-tsunami Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, Jamie; Daly, Patrick; Mundzir, Ibnu; Mahdi, Saiful; Patt, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    In light of growing coastal populations and rising relative sea levels, understanding the consequences of infrequent, high-impact coastal hazards for human migration is a key ingredient for meeting the challenges of sustainable development. Using new quantitative and qualitative evidence from 1160 households and 121 village leaders, we examine longer-term migration in the city of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, following the devastating 2004 tsunami and an international aid response that offered most survivors only resettlement back in the tsunami-affected area. While many survivors wanted to return, some preferred to relocate further from the coast but did not have the chance to do so. Since that time, selective out-migration by those with the means and socioeconomic sorting of newcomers have led to a new socioeconomic segregation of the tsunami-affected parts of the city. More broadly, these findings suggest that short-distance socioeconomic sorting into and out from vulnerable areas may be an important migratory response to a newly recognized risk.

  11. Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami wave impact in west Aceh

    PubMed Central

    Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos; Marohn, Carsten; Dercon, Gerd; Dewi, Sonya; Piepho, Hans Peter; Joshi, Laxman; van Noordwijk, Meine; Cadisch, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In a tsunami event human casualties and infrastructure damage are determined predominantly by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. On land, wave energy is attenuated by gravitation (elevation) and friction (land cover). Tree belts have been promoted as “bioshields” against wave impact. However, given the lack of quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, tree belts have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. This study used 180 transects perpendicular to over 100 km on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia to analyze the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the impact of the 2004 tsunami. Satellite imagery; land cover maps; land use characteristics; stem diameter, height, and planting density; and a literature review were used to develop a land cover roughness coefficient accounting for the resistance offered by different land uses to the wave advance. Applying a spatial generalized linear mixed model, we found that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of impact (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. In contrast, dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. Debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. For sustainable and effective coastal risk management, location of settlements is essential, while the protective potential of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement, should be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bioshield. PMID:22065751

  12. Influence of coastal vegetation on the 2004 tsunami wave impact in west Aceh.

    PubMed

    Laso Bayas, Juan Carlos; Marohn, Carsten; Dercon, Gerd; Dewi, Sonya; Piepho, Hans Peter; Joshi, Laxman; van Noordwijk, Meine; Cadisch, Georg

    2011-11-15

    In a tsunami event human casualties and infrastructure damage are determined predominantly by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. On land, wave energy is attenuated by gravitation (elevation) and friction (land cover). Tree belts have been promoted as "bioshields" against wave impact. However, given the lack of quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, tree belts have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. This study used 180 transects perpendicular to over 100 km on the west coast of Aceh, Indonesia to analyze the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the impact of the 2004 tsunami. Satellite imagery; land cover maps; land use characteristics; stem diameter, height, and planting density; and a literature review were used to develop a land cover roughness coefficient accounting for the resistance offered by different land uses to the wave advance. Applying a spatial generalized linear mixed model, we found that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of impact (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. In contrast, dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. Debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. For sustainable and effective coastal risk management, location of settlements is essential, while the protective potential of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement, should be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bioshield.

  13. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Febriyani, Caroline Prijatna, Kosasih Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  14. Acanthaster planci is a major cause of coral mortality in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, A. H.; Pratchett, M. S.; Hoey, A. S.; Herdiana, Y.; Campbell, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    The corallivorous crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS), Acanthaster planci, is recognised as a major cause of coral reef degradation throughout much of the Pacific Ocean. However, the effects of COTS on the high diversity reefs in Indonesia have been largely overlooked. In 2007, high densities of COTS were observed in two regions of Indonesia: Aceh and Halmahera. Densities of COTS ranged from 0 to 52 starfish 2,000 m2 across 24 sites in Aceh and from 0 to 18 starfish 2,000 m2 at 10 sites in Halmahera. Mortality rates of Acropora spp. were very high at affected sites: over 50 % of colonies had been killed at seven of the 16 affected sites. A review of historical sources going back to 1969 suggests that COTS have damaged many reefs throughout Indonesia, including much activity within the Indonesian section of the Coral Triangle. Furthermore, the data suggest that COTS activity has increased rapidly since 2000. Very little of this activity has been reported in the primary literature, and there is a general lack of awareness in Indonesia of COTS as a potential cause of reef degradation. This lack of awareness, combined with limited monitoring efforts, means that damage caused by COTS is often attributed to other causes, such as destructive fishing, bleaching or tsunami. COTS are clearly a major source of coral mortality in Indonesia of which scientists and government need to be more cognizant.

  15. Disaster risk reduction policies and regulations in Aceh after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamsidik; Rusydy, I.; Arief, S.; Munadi, K.; Melianda, E.

    2017-02-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami that struck most of coastal cities in Aceh has motivated a numerous changes in the world of disaster risk reduction including to the policies and regulations at local level in Aceh. This paper is aimed at elaborating the changes of policies and regulations in Aceh captured and monitored during 12-year of the tsunami recovery process. A set of questionnaires were distributed to about 245 respondents in Aceh to represent government officials at 6 districts in Aceh. The districts were severely damaged due to the 2004 tsunami. Four aspects were investigated during this research, namely tsunami evacuation mechanism and infrastructures, disaster risk map, disaster data accessibility, perceptions on tsunami risks, and development of tsunami early warning at local level in Aceh. This research found that the spatial planning in several districts in Aceh have adopted tsunami mitigation although they were only significant in terms of land-use planning within several hundreds meter from the coastline. Perceptions of the government officials toward all investigated aspects were relatively good. One concern was found at coordination among disaster stakeholders in Aceh.

  16. Geological evidences of the fifth model for the tsunami generation in ocean floor off northwest Sumatra during the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, K.; Permana, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Udrekh, U.; Gaffar, E. Z.; Kawano, M.; Djajadihardia, Y. S.; Arai, K.

    2010-12-01

    A common character among fault models proposed for the 2004 Mw 9.3 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake is large slip off northwest Sumatra, which is considered to be responsible for huge tsunami heights of more than 20 m on average, as measured in field surveys along the west coast of Aceh. However, the generation mechanism of the huge tsunami remains unresolved, although five hypothetical models have been proposed. Among them, the fifth hypothetical model was proposed by Hirata et al. [2008a, b] that the 2004 earthquake ruptured updip along the megathrust (plate interface) near the deformation front, but branched onto one of the outer-arc high splay faults: either the Middle Thrust or possibly the Lower Thrust of Sibuet et al.[2007]. To examine the fifth hypothetical model, we have conducted a multi-narrow beam swath bathymetry around the Middle Thrust and Lower Thrust within the well-developed outer-arc high region off northwest of Sumatra as a task of a scientific research cruise KY09-09 using the JAMSTEC R/V Kaiyo during a period from 26 October 2009 to 20 November 2009. After the KY09-09 cruise, we then merged the bathymetry data into that, previously obtained by the previous Japanese research cruise NT05-02, and finally produced a detailed bathymetry data with its grid spacing of 37 m, which is much finer than those (about 100 - 150 m spacing) previously obtained by other foreign cruises. In the survey area, the water depth ranges from 300 m to 3300 m. A prominent feature in the detailed bathymetry is a series of ridge and trough structure trending along the arc in the direction of NNW-SSE, parallel to the strike of the Sumatra Trench. In particular, we can identify a clearly distinguishable fault traces at around 50 km landward from the deformation front located in the toe of the accreationary prism. The fault traces cross, in turn from southeast to northwest, (a) the central axis of a NNW-SSE trending, narrow and long sedimentary trough in the southwest part of the

  17. Recent progress of geological investigations in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prijosoesilo, Purnomo; Sunarya, Yaya; Wahab, A.

    Geologically, the Indonesian archipelago was formed as a result of the interaction and collision of the gigantic crustal blocks, i.e. the Eurasian, Indian, Australian and the Pacific plates. This process caused the formation of extensively distributed ultrabasic rocks in Eastern Indonesia, containing rich mineral resources. In Western Indonesia most ore bodies found are associated with the active volcano-plutonic arc or the stable mass of the Sunda Shelf. There are 60 known Tertiary sedimentary basins in Indonesia and only 36 of them have been "failry" explored, of which 14 basins have had hydrocarbon commercial production. Most of the hydrocarbon exploration and production during the last 100 years have been carried out in Western Indonesia. Many of the "unexplored" basins in Indonesia are located in the offshore areas with water depth over 200 m. Coal and geothermal resources are mostly found in Western Indonesia, particularly Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan. Coal production in 1990 has reached 11 million tons. The steady growth of production was primarily due to the establishment of the coal contract agreement with foreign contractors as well as the re-growth of the State coal mines in Bukit Asam and Sawahlunto, Sumatra. Aside from coal, geothermal is one of the alternative energy resources that have been developed in recent years. From some 16,000 MW resources potential estimated, presently only 140 MW geothermal generating power units have been commercially put on production in Kamojang, West Java. The most important minerals mined in Indonesia are tin (Sn), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu) and bauxite. Most of the gold (Au) and silver (Ag) production are mined in association with copper (Cu) such as those in Tembagapura, Irian Jaya, with the exception of a few epithermal gold mines in other areas in the country. Between 1984 and 1990, Indonesia produced around 1.3-1.5 MMBPD crude oil and condensate plus 1.6-2.2 TSCF natural gas. Most of the natural gas production was

  18. A probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horspool, N.; Pranantyo, I.; Griffin, J.; Latief, H.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Kongko, W.; Cipta, A.; Bustaman, B.; Anugrah, S. D.; Thio, H. K.

    2014-11-01

    Probabilistic hazard assessments are a fundamental tool for assessing the threats posed by hazards to communities and are important for underpinning evidence-based decision-making regarding risk mitigation activities. Indonesia has been the focus of intense tsunami risk mitigation efforts following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, but this has been largely concentrated on the Sunda Arc with little attention to other tsunami prone areas of the country such as eastern Indonesia. We present the first nationally consistent probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment (PTHA) for Indonesia. This assessment produces time-independent forecasts of tsunami hazards at the coast using data from tsunami generated by local, regional and distant earthquake sources. The methodology is based on the established monte carlo approach to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) and has been adapted to tsunami. We account for sources of epistemic and aleatory uncertainty in the analysis through the use of logic trees and sampling probability density functions. For short return periods (100 years) the highest tsunami hazard is the west coast of Sumatra, south coast of Java and the north coast of Papua. For longer return periods (500-2500 years), the tsunami hazard is highest along the Sunda Arc, reflecting the larger maximum magnitudes. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height of > 0.5 m at the coast is greater than 10% for Sumatra, Java, the Sunda islands (Bali, Lombok, Flores, Sumba) and north Papua. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height of > 3.0 m, which would cause significant inundation and fatalities, is 1-10% in Sumatra, Java, Bali, Lombok and north Papua, and 0.1-1% for north Sulawesi, Seram and Flores. The results of this national-scale hazard assessment provide evidence for disaster managers to prioritise regions for risk mitigation activities and/or more detailed hazard or risk assessment.

  19. Enteric Parasites of Orangutans (Pongo Pygmaeus) in Indonesia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-27

    Rehabilitation Center at Bohorok Sumatra, and from wild and ex-captive orangutans at the Tanjung Puting Preserve in South Borneo (Kalimantan) (Figure I). This...three orangutans examined in the Tanjung Puting Reserve in Kalimantan South Borneo included twelve harboring Balantidium, thirty-six shedding hookworm...Special Report 78-9 L EVEL ENTERIC PARASITES OF ORANGUTANS (Pongo pygmaeus) IN INDONESIA Erich E. Stafford, Austin L. Moede, Richard J. Brown

  20. An evaluation of public, private, and mobile health clinic usage for children under age 5 in Aceh after the tsunami: implications for future disasters

    PubMed Central

    Rassekh, Bahie Mary; Shu, Winnie; Santosham, Mathuram; Burnham, Gilbert; Doocy, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aceh, Indonesia, was the hardest-hit area in the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, with more than 500,000 people displaced, 120,000 people dead, and total damages and losses estimated at $4.5 billion. The relief effort following the tsunami was also immense. Objectives: This study aimed to determine and assess utilization patterns of formal public versus private and mobile health services for children under age 5 with diarrhea, cough and difficulty breathing, fever, or skin disease and to identify determinants of care usage. Methods: A household survey of 962 households was administered to caretakers of children aged 1–5 years. A sample of clusters within Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar were selected and those caretakers within the cluster who fit the inclusion criteria were interviewed. Results: Of those caretakers who utilized formal health services as the first line of care for their sick child, 62% used a public health facility, 30% used a private health facility, and 8% used a mobile clinic. In terms of significant factors associated with public, private, and mobile care utilization, mobile clinics were at one side of the spectrum and private clinics were at the other side overall, with public care somewhere in between. This was true for several variables. Mobile clinic users reported the lowest cost of services and medicine and the highest perceived level of accessibility, and private care users reported the highest perceived level of satisfaction. Conclusions: Utilization of formal health services for children was quite high after the tsunami. The caretaker's perceived satisfaction with public health services could have been improved. Mobile clinics were an accessible source of health care and could be used in future disaster relief efforts to target those populations that seek less care for their sick children, including displaced populations, and those children whose parents have died. PMID:25750788

  1. Monitoring Anak Krakatau Volcano in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann-Rothe, Arne; Ibs-von Seht, Malte; Knieβ, Rudolf; Faber, Eckhard; Klinge, Klaus; Reichert, Christian; Atje Purbawinata, Mas; Patria, Cahya

    2006-12-01

    Krakatau volcano, in Indonesia, showed its destructive vigor when it exploded in 1883 [Self and Rampino, 1981]. The eruption and subsequent tsunami caused more than 35,000 casualties along the coasts of the Sunda Strait. In 1928, the `child' of Krakatau, Anak Krakatau, emerged from the sea at the same location as its predecessor and has since grown to a height of 315 meters. The volcano exhibits frequent activity-on average one large eruption every four years-yet again posing risk for the coastal population of Java and Sumatra and for the economically important shipping routes through the Sunda Strait.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Fossil-Fuel Consumption in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, J. S.; Robert, A. J.

    2005-05-01

    Applying monthly sales and consumption data of coal, petroleum and natural gas, a monthly time series of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption is created for Indonesia. These are then modeled with an autoregressive function to produce a quantitative description of the seasonal distribution and long-term pattern of CO2 emissions. Currently, Indonesia holds the 21st ranked position in total anthropogenic CO2 emissions among countries of the world. The demand for energy in Indonesia has been growing rapidly in recent years as Indonesia attempts to modernize and upgrade the standard of living for its citizens. With such a large population (a quarter of a billion people), the recent increase observed in the per capita energy use equates to a large escalation in total CO2 emissions. However, the economy and political climate is rather turbulent and thus emissions tend to fluctuate wildly. For example, Indonesia's energy consumption dropped substantially during the Asian economic crisis in the late 1990s. It is likely that the recent tsunami will also significantly impact energy consumption as the hard-hit Aceh region is the largest fuel-producing region of Indonesia. Therefore, Indonesia is a country whose emissions are more unpredictable than most countries that emit comparable levels of CO2. Complicating matters further, data collection practices in Indonesia are less diligent than in other countries with more stable economies. Thus, though CO2 emissions from Indonesia are a particular challenge to model, they are an important component to understanding the total global carbon cycle.

  3. Receiver function studies of Northern Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volti, T.; Gorbatov, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Northern Sumatra subduction zone is distinguished by the occurrence of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman megathrust earthquake and has a peculiar subduction of two major bathymetric structures; the Investigator fracture zone and the Wharton fossil ridge. Four stations in Northern Sumatra (BSI, PSI, PPI, GSI) and two stations in Malaysia (KUM and KOM) have been selected to construct migrated images based on receiver functions (RF) in order to study Earth structure and subduction processes in the region. Waveforms from 304 teleseismic earthquakes with Mb >5.5 and a distance range of 30o to 95o recorded from April 2006 to December 2008 were used for the analysis. The number of RF for each station varies from 20 to 192 depending on the signal/noise ratio. The computed RF clearly show pS conversions at major seismic velocity discontinuities associated with the subduction process where the Moho is visible at 5.5, 4, 3.5, and 2 sec for BSI, PSI, PPI, and GSI, respectively. RF for KUM and KOM have only conversions at the Moho near ~4 sec. The subducted slab is visible below Sumatra as a positive amplitude conversion preceded by a negative one, which we interpret as a low-velocity structure above the subducted slab. RF for PSI located at Toba supervolcano reveal pockets of low-velocity zones extending from a ~50 km depth down to the subducted slab. Forward modellings of RF suggest that seismic velocity contrasts can reach ~18% that is in accordance with previous local tomographic studies.

  4. Tsunami inundation modeling for western Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Borrero, José C; Sieh, Kerry; Chlieh, Mohamed; Synolakis, Costas E

    2006-12-26

    A long section of the Sunda megathrust south of the great tsunamigenic earthquakes of 2004 and 2005 is well advanced in its seismic cycle and a plausible candidate for rupture in the next few decades. Our computations of tsunami propagation and inundation yield model flow depths and inundations consistent with sparse historical accounts for the last great earthquakes there, in 1797 and 1833. Numerical model results from plausible future ruptures produce flow depths of several meters and inundation up to several kilometers inland near the most populous coastal cities. Our models of historical and future tsunamis confirm a substantial exposure of coastal Sumatran communities to tsunami surges. Potential losses could be as great as those that occurred in Aceh in 2004.

  5. Geographical Assessment of Rickettsioses in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Susana; Williams, Maya; Winoto, Imelda; Farzeli, Arik; Stoops, Craig A; Barbara, Kathryn A; Richards, Allen L; Blair, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    To expand the documentation of rickettsioses in Indonesia, we conducted an ectoparasite and small mammal investigation involving four major islands: Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, and Kalimantan. Coastal and highland regions on each island surveyed were chosen to represent different ecologies in Indonesia. Indication of the presence of Rickettsia spp. was evident in all areas sampled. Typhus group rickettsiae-specific antibodies had significantly higher prevalence among small mammals captured in Java compared to the other islands surveyed (78% in coastal and 50% in highland regions) and the prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsiae-specific antibodies was significantly higher in Kalimantan than the other islands investigated. Hosts and vectors were restricted by Rickettsia spp. but not by coastal or highland regions. Our findings expand the range in which rickettsial pathogens have been documented within the Indonesian archipelago and point to a significant risk to human health.

  6. Challenges in developing e-government for good governance in North Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, AY

    2017-01-01

    E-government as one form of public administration reform in Indonesia is increasingly related to the pursuance of good governance. This paper examines the relationship between of e-government and good governance by utilizing the case study design on the implementation of e-procurement in North Sumatra. It reveals centrality of local politics and business culture in understanding resistances of both local government officials and local business which creates loopholes’ for the practice of ‘bad governance’ in all phases of e-procurement in North Sumatra province. Data transparency does not equate and guarantee the realization of good governance. Public knowledge and understanding on government decision making processes and accountability (process and policy transparency) are central to achieve good governance through e-procurement. E-procurement system does not automatically change organizational and working culture of the implementers and suppliers. This paper provides insight to the attitude and the perception of private sector engage in e-procurement towards government in implementing e-government. Resistance, digital divide and local politics interrelatedly obstruct the realization of pursuing good governance through e-procurement.

  7. Seasonal forecasting of fire over Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spessa, A. C.; Field, R. D.; Pappenberger, F.; Langner, A.; Englhart, S.; Weber, U.; Stockdale, T.; Siegert, F.; Kaiser, J. W.; Moore, J.

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale fires occur frequently across Indonesia, particularly in the southern region of Kalimantan and eastern Sumatra. They have considerable impacts on carbon emissions, haze production, biodiversity, health, and economic activities. In this study, we demonstrate that severe fire and haze events in Indonesia can generally be predicted months in advance using predictions of seasonal rainfall from the ECMWF System 4 coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Based on analyses of long, up-to-date series observations on burnt area, rainfall, and tree cover, we demonstrate that fire activity is negatively correlated with rainfall and is positively associated with deforestation in Indonesia. There is a contrast between the southern region of Kalimantan (high fire activity, high tree cover loss, and strong non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire) and the central region of Kalimantan (low fire activity, low tree cover loss, and weak, non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire). The ECMWF seasonal forecast provides skilled forecasts of burnt and fire-affected area with several months lead time explaining at least 70% of the variance between rainfall and burnt and fire-affected area. Results are strongly influenced by El Niño years which show a consistent positive bias. Overall, our findings point to a high potential for using a more physical-based method for predicting fires with several months lead time in the tropics rather than one based on indexes only. We argue that seasonal precipitation forecasts should be central to Indonesia's evolving fire management policy.

  8. Slope Stability: Factor of Safety along the Seismically Active Continental Slope Offshore Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J. R.; Goldfinger, C.; Djadjadihardja, Y.; None, U.

    2013-12-01

    Recent papers have documented the probability that turbidites deposited along and downslope of subduction zone accretionary prisms are likely the result of strong ground shaking from great earthquakes. Given the damaging nature of these earthquakes, along with the casualties from the associated tsunamis, the spatial and temporal patterns of these earthquakes can only be evaluated with paleoseismologic coring and seismic reflection methods. We evaluate slope stability for seafloor topography along the Sunda subduction offshore Sumatra, Indonesia. We use sediment material properties, from local (Sumatra) and analogous sites, to constrain our estimates of static slope stability Factor of Safety (FOS) analyses. We then use ground motion prediction equations (GMPE's) to estimate ground motion intensity (Arias Intensity, AI) and acceleration (Peak Ground Acceleration, PGA), as possibly generated by fault rupture, to constrain seismic loads for pseudostatic slope stability FOS analyses. The ground motions taper rapidly with distance from the fault plane, consistent with ground motion - fault distance relations measured during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki subduction zone earthquake. Our FOS analyses include a Morgenstern method of slices probabilistic analysis for 2-D profiles along with Critical Acceleration (Ac) and Newmark Displacement (Dn) analysis of multibeam bathymetry of the seafloor. In addition, we also use estimates of ground motion modeled with a 2004 Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ) earthquake fault slip model, to also compare with our static FOS analyses of seafloor topography. All slope and trench sites are statically stable (FOS < 1) and sensitive to ground motions generated by earthquakes of magnitude greater than 7. We conclude that for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 9, PGA of 0.4-0.6 to 1.4-2.5 g would be expected, respectively, from existing GMPE's. However, saturation of accelerations in the accretionary wedge may limit actual accelerations to less than 1

  9. Disaster management curricula: strategy to create doctors with disaster resilience in Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyuniati, N.; Maulana, R.; Ichsan, I.

    2017-02-01

    Faculty of Medicine of Syiah Kuala University has one special block called Disaster Management block (the last block on the curricula) on Competency-Based Curriculum of Medical Sciences with the Problem-Based Learning method. This block has four credits, allocated seven weeks learning period including one week for evaluation. The placement of disaster management block in the 7th semester (last semester) aims to allow students to implement more easily the complete basic and clinical medical knowledge and then have it integrated with the management capabilities during adisaster. This article evaluates two components: 1) Disaster management module, by comparing the content of modules used in three different academic years, the academic year 2013/2014, 2014/2015 and 2015/2016, 2) The final grade, by comparing the final grade of disaster management block in 4 years (comparing students class of 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011). The results revealed that on every academic year there were additions and strengthening of the material to ensure that students achieve a complete learning experience, and there was a slight increase in student’s grades where the number of students who receive grades A has increased while the number of students who receive grades E decreased.

  10. Discovery Of Pre-2004 Tsunami Deposits On Simeulue Island, Southern Aceh Province, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, S.; Sieh, K.; Meltzner, A. J.; Yulianto, E.; Whitlow, K.; Putra, A.; Satake, K.

    2007-12-01

    Presumably, megathrust earthquakes and tsunamis occurred repeatedly along the Sunda megathrust before 2004 and 2005. To determine its past tsunami history, we conducted field surveys on Simeulue Island, which straddles the boundary of the 2004 and 2005 ruptures. Shallow excavations exposed paleo-tsunami deposits at two coastal lowland sites in southern Simeulue Island. The paleo-tsunami deposits at the Inor-Naibos and Busong Bay sites appear as laterally continuous sand layers in terrestrial sedimentary successions. Two paleo-tsunami layers exist at Busong Bay; the younger one is bounded by peat layers and the older one separates peat and underlying muddy sediment that was probably deposited in an inter-tidal or sub-tidal environment. Both tsunami deposits are rich in coral clasts. A fresh, uneroded coral boulder from the upper tsunami layer yielded a U/Th age that is consistent with emplacement in 1861, the year of an historical great (M-8.5) earthquake there. The lower tsunami layer may have been emplaced during an earlier uplift event around A.D. 1799, documented by an uplifted coral microatoll at the site. This interpretation is consistent with the sedimentary facies change from mud to peat across the lower tsunami layer, which probably represents an environmental change due to uplift. The single tsunami layer at the Inor-Naibos site demarcates a sedimentary facies change. As at Busong Bay, it is accompanied by coral boulders, which we think are likely to yield U/Th ages consistent with deposition contemporaneous with one of the layers at Busong Bay.

  11. Tsunami prevention and mitigation necessities and options derived from tsunami risk assessment in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, J.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Steinmetz, T.; Mück, M.; Strunz, G.; Riedlinger, T.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    certain area is dependent on expected tsunami intensity, inundated area, estimated tsunami arrival time and available time for evacuation. Referring to the Aceh 2004 Tsunami, an estimated amount of people affected (dead/injured) of 21000 for Kabubaten Aceh Jaya and 85000 for Kab. Banda Aceh is in a comparable range with reported values of 19661 and 78417 (JICA 2005) respectively. Hence the established methodology provides reliable estimates of people affected and people's ability to reach a safe area. Based on the spatial explicit detection of e.g. high tsunami risk areas (and the assessed root causes therefore), specific disaster risk reduction and early warning strategies can be designed. For example additional installation of technical warning dissemination device, community based preparedness and awareness programmes (education), structural and non-structural measures (e.g. land use conversion, coastal engineering), effective evacuation, contingency and household recovery aid planning can be employed and/or optimized within high tsunami risk areas as a first priority. In the context of early warning, spatially distributed information like degree of expected hazard impact, exposure of critical facilities (e.g. hospitals, schools), potential people dead/injured depending on available response times, location of safe and shelter areas can be disseminated and used for decision making. Keywords: Tsunami risk, hazard and vulnerability assessment, early warning, tsunami mitigation and prevention, Indonesia

  12. Why is Pseudosphromenus cupanus (Teleostei: Osphronemidae) reported from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, and Pakistan?

    PubMed

    Kullander, Sven O; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Norén, Michael; Mollah, Abdur Rob

    2015-07-28

    The native distribution of the small labyrinth fish species Pseudosphromenus cupanus includes southern India and Sri Lanka. According to literature it has a range including also Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Malaysia, and Indonesia (Sumatra) but there are no voucher specimens or reliable observations from those areas. The distribution record of P. cupanus was inflated partly by including P. dayi as a synonym. Pseudosphronemus dayi is native to the Western Ghats in India, but the origin of the aquarium importation in 1907 was reported as both Cochin (=Kochi) and Malacca (=Malaysia), the latter locality obviously in error. The basis for the Sumatra record is an obviously mislabeled sample of P. dayi from Pulau Weh close to Sumatra. The basis for reporting the species from Pakistan, Myanmar or Bangladesh could not be located. Misidentified museum specimens from Myanmar and Pakistan identified as P. cupanus were never published on. Pseudosphromenus cupanus has been considered recently to be extinct in Bangladesh, but in fact it never occurred there.

  13. Risk Analysis of Underestimate Cost Offer to The Project Quality in Aceh Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Hafnidar A.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of errors in the process of offer price determination could be enormous, so it can affect the possibility of project underestimate cost which can impact and reduce the profit if being implementing. Government Equipment/Service Procurement Policy Institution (LKPP) assesses that the practices of cheaper price in the government equipment/service procurement are still highly found and can be potential to decrease the project quality. This study aimed to analyze the most dominant factors happened in underestimate cost offer practice, to analyze the relationship of underestimate cost offer risk factors to road construction project quality in Aceh Province and to analyze the most potential factors of underestimate cost offer risk affecting road construction project quality in Aceh Province. Road construction projects observed the projects which have been implemented in Aceh Province since 2013 - 2015. This study conducted by interviewing Government Budget Authority (KPA), and distributing the questionnaire to the road construction contractors with the qualification of K1, K2, K3, M1, M2 and B1. Based on the data from Construction Service Development Institution (LPJK) of Aceh Province on 2016, the populations obtained are 2,717 constructors. By using Slovin Equation, the research samples obtained are 97 contractors. The most dominant factors in underestimate cost offer risk of the road construction projects in Aceh Province is Contingency Cost Factor which the mean is 4.374.

  14. A comprehensive model of postseismic deformation of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake deduced from GPS observations in northern Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Endra; Sagiya, Takeshi; Ito, Takeo; Kimata, Fumiaki; Tabei, Takao; Ohta, Yusaku; Meilano, Irwan; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Agustan; Nurdin, Irwandi; Sugiyanto, Didik

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the postseismic deformation of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (SAE) using 5 years of Global Positioning System (GPS) data located in northern Sumatra. Continuous GPS data from northern Sumatra suggest that the relaxation time in the vertical displacement is longer than horizontal displacements. This implies that there are multiple physical mechanisms that control the postseismic deformation, which refer to afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. In this study, we introduce an analysis strategy of postseismic deformation to simultaneously calculate multiple mechanisms of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. The afterslip inversion results indicate that the distribution of the afterslip and the coseismic slip are compensatory of each other. Also, afterslip has a limited contribution to vertical deformation in northern Sumatra. In our rheology model, we use a gravitational Maxwell viscoelastic response and the result indicates that the elastic layer thickness is 65 ± 5 km and the Maxwell viscosity is 8.0 ± 1.0 × 1018 Pa s. We find that afterslip plus Maxwell viscoelastic relaxation are appropriate to explain the deformation in northern Sumatra. We also find that our rheology model reproduces the long-term features of the GPS time series in Thailand. Applying our rheology model to the data in Andaman Islands our afterslip estimation is located at the down-dip part of the plate boundary. Finally, we showed that our rheology model is applicable to the GPS datasets of postseismic deformation of the 2004 SAE located in northern Sumatra, Thailand, and Andaman-Nicobar, respectively.

  15. Utilization of formal health services for children aged 1–5 in Aceh after the 2004 tsunami: Which children did not receive the health care they needed? Implications for other natural disaster relief efforts

    PubMed Central

    Rassekh, Bahie Mary; Santosham, Mathuram

    2014-01-01

    Aceh, Indonesia, was the hardest-hit area in the December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, with more than 500,000 people displaced, 120,000 people dead, and total damages and losses estimated at $4.5 billion. The relief effort following the tsunami was also immense, with billions of dollars of aid pledged to this province alone. Since then, there have been several natural disasters, including Typhoon Haiyan, which have caused great loss of life and displacement and for which these results are applicable. This study aimed to determine and assess utilization patterns of health services for children under the age of five with diarrhea, cough and difficulty breathing, fever, or skin disease and to identify determinants of formal and non-formal healthcare usage. A household survey of 1439 households was administered to caretakers of children aged 1–5 years. A sample of clusters within Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar were selected and those caretakers within the cluster who fit the inclusion criteria were interviewed. In the two weeks prior to the survey, 78.3% of respondents utilized formal health services as the first line of care for their child's illness episode. Factors significantly associated with decreased formal healthcare usage for the sick children were if the children were living in a displaced household, if the children's mother or father were not living, and if the children's caretaker was not the mother. Although utilization of formal health services for children was quite high after the tsunami, there were certain children who received significantly less care, including those who were displaced, those who were being cared for by someone other than their mother, and those for whom one or both parents had died. Among the recommendations are suggestions to target these children to ensure that they receive the health care they need. PMID:25750772

  16. Utilization of formal health services for children aged 1-5 in Aceh after the 2004 tsunami: Which children did not receive the health care they needed? Implications for other natural disaster relief efforts.

    PubMed

    Rassekh, Bahie Mary; Santosham, Mathuram

    2014-01-01

    Aceh, Indonesia, was the hardest-hit area in the December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, with more than 500,000 people displaced, 120,000 people dead, and total damages and losses estimated at $4.5 billion. The relief effort following the tsunami was also immense, with billions of dollars of aid pledged to this province alone. Since then, there have been several natural disasters, including Typhoon Haiyan, which have caused great loss of life and displacement and for which these results are applicable. This study aimed to determine and assess utilization patterns of health services for children under the age of five with diarrhea, cough and difficulty breathing, fever, or skin disease and to identify determinants of formal and non-formal healthcare usage. A household survey of 1439 households was administered to caretakers of children aged 1-5 years. A sample of clusters within Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar were selected and those caretakers within the cluster who fit the inclusion criteria were interviewed. In the two weeks prior to the survey, 78.3% of respondents utilized formal health services as the first line of care for their child's illness episode. Factors significantly associated with decreased formal healthcare usage for the sick children were if the children were living in a displaced household, if the children's mother or father were not living, and if the children's caretaker was not the mother. Although utilization of formal health services for children was quite high after the tsunami, there were certain children who received significantly less care, including those who were displaced, those who were being cared for by someone other than their mother, and those for whom one or both parents had died. Among the recommendations are suggestions to target these children to ensure that they receive the health care they need.

  17. Indonesia palm oil production without deforestation and peat conversion by 2050.

    PubMed

    Afriyanti, Dian; Kroeze, Carolien; Saad, Asmadi

    2016-07-01

    Palm oil is a promising source of cooking oil and biodiesel. The demand for palm oil has been increasing worldwide. However, concerns exist surrounding the environmental and socio-economic sustainability of palm oil production. Indonesia is a major palm oil producing country. We explored scenarios for palm oil production in Indonesia until 2050, focusing on Sumatra, Kalimantan and Papua. Our scenarios describe possible trends in crude palm oil production in Indonesia, while considering the demand for cooking oil and biodiesel, the available land for plantations, production capacity (for crude palm oil and fresh fruit bunches) and environmentally restricting conditions. We first assessed past developments in palm oil production. Next, we analysed scenarios for the future. In the past 20years, 95% of the Indonesian oil palm production area was in Sumatra and Kalimantan and was increasingly cultivated in peatlands. Our scenarios for the future indicate that Indonesia can meet a considerable part of the global and Asian demand for palm oil, while avoiding further cultivation of peatlands and forest. By 2050, 264-447Mt crude palm oil may be needed for cooking oil and biodiesel worldwide. In Indonesia, the area that is potentially suitable for oil palm is 17 to 26Mha with a potential production rate of 27-38t fresh fruit bunches/ha, yielding 130-176Mt crude palm oil. Thus Indonesia can meet 39-60% of the international demand. In our scenarios this would be produced in Sumatra (21-26%), Kalimantan (12-16%), and Papua (2%). The potential areas include the current oil palm plantation in mineral lands, but exclude the current oil palm plantations in peatlands.

  18. A~probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horspool, N.; Pranantyo, I.; Griffin, J.; Latief, H.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Kongko, W.; Cipta, A.; Bustaman, B.; Anugrah, S. D.; Thio, H. K.

    2014-05-01

    Probabilistic hazard assessments are a fundamental tool for assessing the threats posed by hazards to communities and are important for underpinning evidence based decision making on risk mitigation activities. Indonesia has been the focus of intense tsunami risk mitigation efforts following the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, but this has been largely concentrated on the Sunda Arc, with little attention to other tsunami prone areas of the country such as eastern Indonesia. We present the first nationally consistent Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment (PTHA) for Indonesia. This assessment produces time independent forecasts of tsunami hazard at the coast from tsunami generated by local, regional and distant earthquake sources. The methodology is based on the established monte-carlo approach to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) and has been adapted to tsunami. We account for sources of epistemic and aleatory uncertainty in the analysis through the use of logic trees and through sampling probability density functions. For short return periods (100 years) the highest tsunami hazard is the west coast of Sumatra, south coast of Java and the north coast of Papua. For longer return periods (500-2500 years), the tsunami hazard is highest along the Sunda Arc, reflecting larger maximum magnitudes along the Sunda Arc. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height at the coast of > 0.5 m is greater than 10% for Sumatra, Java, the Sunda Islands (Bali, Lombok, Flores, Sumba) and north Papua. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height of >3.0 m, which would cause significant inundation and fatalities, is 1-10% in Sumatra, Java, Bali, Lombok and north Papua, and 0.1-1% for north Sulawesi, Seram and Flores. The results of this national scale hazard assessment provide evidence for disaster managers to prioritise regions for risk mitigation activities and/or more detailed hazard or risk assessment.

  19. Challenges for control of taeniasis/cysticercosis in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Suroso, Thomas; Margono, Sri S; Wandra, Toni; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Taeniasis/cysticercosis has been reported from several provinces of Indonesia: Papua (=former Irian Jaya), Bali, North Sumatra, East Nusa Tenggara, South East Sulawesi, Lampung, North Sulawesi, Jakarta, West Kalimantan, and East Java. The highest level of endemicity of taeniasis/cysticercosis has been found in Papua. Recent surveys in Jayawijaya District of Papua in 2000 and 2001 showed that 5 of 58 local people (8.6%) harbored the adult tapeworm, Taenia solium, whereas 44 of 96 people (45.8%), 50 of 71 pigs (70.4%), and 7 of 64 local dogs (10.9%) were seropositive for T. solium cysticercosis. Current surveys in Bali and Samosir District, North Sumatra during 2002-2005 revealed that Taenia saginata taeniasis has increased in incidence whereas T. solium cysticercosis is now rather rare compared to one-two decades ago in Bali. Taenia asiatica taeniasis is still common in Samosir District. Data from other provinces of Indonesia are very limited or unavailable. Control of these diseases is not a priority in the health or veterinary services, neither at central or local government levels. However, limited efforts toward control of the diseases have been implemented such as training of health personnel, community education on disease prevention, and provision of anthelminthics. A working group for control of the disease in Indonesia and an international collaboration have been established among Ministry of Health, Indonesia; University of Indonesia; and Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Japan since 1996. Future goals include implementation of active case finding (active surveillance) and treatment of tapeworm carriers, sustainable public health education, establishment of a system to check the quality of beef/pork and determine the distribution of infected animals and strengthening of laboratory capacity. Efforts to motivate provinces and districts should be implemented in developing the strategic plan to control of the disease. Given the considerable differences in

  20. Subroto talks about Indonesia`s future

    SciTech Connect

    Perdue, J.M.

    1997-04-01

    Dr. Subroto became Indonesia`s Minister of Mines and Energy in 1978, and was Secretary-General of OPEC from July 1988 to June 1994, the only person to ever serve two 3-year terms in that position. He is currently the Chairman of the Indonesian Institute of Energy Economics. PEI had the opportunity to interview Subroto about Indonesia`s future outlook in oil exploration and resource development.

  1. Kinematics of Slip Partitioning in Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, K. E.; Feng, L.; Hill, E.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Sieh, K.; Daryono, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Published geological slip rates of the Sumatran Fault, slip vectors of Sunda megathrust earthquakes, and the geodetic velocity field of Sumatra and the forearc islands appear the require distributed and rapid stretching of the Sumatran forearc parallel to the Sunda Trench. We show that revised Sumatran Fault slip rates, earthquake slip vector azimuths, and the long-term geodetic velocity field are consistent instead with a non-deforming, rigid forearc block that overlies a heterogeneously coupled Sunda megathrust and is separated from the Sunda Block by the Sumatran Fault. Like previous studies, we conclude that rigid plate tectonics fails to describe the Sumatran subduction system; however, we attribute this failure to the well documented internal strain within the Eastern Indian Ocean lithosphere. We further constrain the along-strike variation in the rate of underthrusting of oceanic lithosphere beneath the Sumatran forearc, an important boundary condition for paleogeodetic studies of elastic strain accumulation within the forearc and the cycle of great Sunda megathrust earthquakes.

  2. Remotely triggered nonvolcanic tremor in Sumbawa, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, F.; Lupi, M.; Miller, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present, for the first time, evidence for triggered tremor beneath the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. We show triggered tremor in response to three teleseismic earthquakes: the Mw9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake and two oceanic strike-slip earthquakes (Mw 8.6 and Mw8.2) offshore of Sumatra in 2012. We constrain an apparent triggering threshold of 1 mm/s ground velocity that corresponds to about 8 kPa dynamic stress. Peak tremor amplitudes of about 180 nm/s are observed, and scale with the ground velocity induced by the remote earthquakes. Triggered tremor responds to 45-65 s period surface waves and predominantly correlates with Rayleigh waves, even though the 2012 oceanic events have stronger Love wave amplitudes. We could not locate the tremor because of minimal station coverage, but data indicate several potential source volumes including the Flores Thrust, the Java subduction zone, or Tambora volcano.

  3. Deformation analysis of Aceh April 11th 2012 earthquake using GPS observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulida, Putra; Meilano, Irwan; Sarsito, Dina A.; Susilo

    2015-04-01

    This research tries to estimate the co-seismic deformation of intraplate earthquake occurred off northern Sumatra coast which is about 100-200 km southwest of Sumatrasubduction zone. The earthquake mechanism was strike-slip with magnitude 8.6 and triggering aftershock with magnitude 8.2 two hours later. We estimated the co-seismic deformation by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) continuous data along western Sumatra coast. The GPS observation derived from Sumatran GPS Array (SuGAr) and Geospatial Information Agency (BIG). For data processing we used GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) to estimate the co-seismic deformation. From the GPS daily solution, the result shows that the earthquake caused displacement for the GPS stations in Sumatra. GPS stations in northern Sumatra showed the displacement to the northeast with the average displacement was 15 cm. The biggest displacement was found at station BSIM which is located at Simeuleu Island off north west Sumatra coast. GPS station in middle part of Sumatra, the displacement was northwest. The earthquake also caused subsidence for stations in northern Sumatra, but from the time series there was not sign of subsidence was found at middle part of Sumatra. In addition, the effect of the earthquake was worldwide and affected the other GPS Stations around Hindia oceanic.

  4. Deformation analysis of Aceh April 11{sup th} 2012 earthquake using GPS observation data

    SciTech Connect

    Maulida, Putra; Meilano, Irwan; Sarsito, Dina A.; Susilo

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to estimate the co-seismic deformation of intraplate earthquake occurred off northern Sumatra coast which is about 100-200 km southwest of Sumatrasubduction zone. The earthquake mechanism was strike-slip with magnitude 8.6 and triggering aftershock with magnitude 8.2 two hours later. We estimated the co-seismic deformation by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) continuous data along western Sumatra coast. The GPS observation derived from Sumatran GPS Array (SuGAr) and Geospatial Information Agency (BIG). For data processing we used GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) to estimate the co-seismic deformation. From the GPS daily solution, the result shows that the earthquake caused displacement for the GPS stations in Sumatra. GPS stations in northern Sumatra showed the displacement to the northeast with the average displacement was 15 cm. The biggest displacement was found at station BSIM which is located at Simeuleu Island off north west Sumatra coast. GPS station in middle part of Sumatra, the displacement was northwest. The earthquake also caused subsidence for stations in northern Sumatra, but from the time series there was not sign of subsidence was found at middle part of Sumatra. In addition, the effect of the earthquake was worldwide and affected the other GPS Stations around Hindia oceanic.

  5. Prevention of Tetanus Outbreak Following Natural Disaster in Indonesia: Lessons Learned from Previous Disasters.

    PubMed

    Pascapurnama, Dyshelly Nurkartika; Murakami, Aya; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Hattori, Toshio; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Egawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    In Indonesia, the Aceh earthquake and tsunami in 2004 killed 127,000 people and caused half a million injuries, while the Yogyakarta earthquake in 2006 caused 5,700 deaths and 37,000 injuries. Because disaster-affected areas are vulnerable to epidemic-prone diseases and tetanus is one such disease that is preventable, we systematically reviewed the literature related to tetanus outbreaks following previous two natural disasters in Indonesia. Based on our findings, recommendations for proper vaccination and education can be made for future countermeasures. Using specified keywords related to tetanus and disasters, relevant documents were screened from PubMed, the WHO website, and books. Reports offering limited data and those released before 2004 were excluded. In all, 16 publications were reviewed systematically. Results show that 106 cases of tetanus occurred in Aceh, with a case fatality ratio (CFR) of 18.9%; 71 cases occurred in Yogyakarta, with CFR of 36.6%. For both outbreaks, most patients had been wounded during scavenging or evacuation after the disaster occurred. Poor access to health care because of limited transportation or hospital facilities, and low vaccination coverage and lack of awareness of tetanus risk contributed to delayed treatment and case severity. Tetanus outbreaks after disasters are preventable by increasing vaccination coverage, improving wound care treatment, and establishing a regular surveillance system, in addition to good practices of disaster management and supportive care following national guidelines. Furthermore, health education for communities should be provided to raise awareness of tetanus risk reduction.

  6. Population Genetic Structure and Reproductive Strategy of the Introduced Grass Centotheca lappacea in Tropical Land-Use Systems in Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Hodač, Ladislav; Ulum, Fuad Bahrul; Opfermann, Nicole; Breidenbach, Natalie; Hojsgaard, Diego; Tjitrosoedirdjo, Sri Sudarmiyati; Vornam, Barbara; Finkeldey, Reiner; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Intensive transformation of lowland rainforest into oil palm and rubber monocultures is the most common land-use practice in Sumatra (Indonesia), accompanied by invasion of weeds. In the Jambi province, Centotheca lappacea is one of the most abundant alien grass species in plantations and in jungle rubber (an extensively used agroforest), but largely missing in natural rainforests. Here, we investigated putative genetic differentiation and signatures for adaptation in the introduced area. We studied reproductive mode and ploidy level as putative factors for invasiveness of the species. We sampled 19 populations in oil palm and rubber monocultures and in jungle rubber in two regions (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan). Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) revealed a high diversity of individual genotypes and only a weak differentiation among populations (FST = 0.173) and between the two regions (FST = 0.065). There was no significant genetic differentiation between the three land-use systems. The metapopulation of C. lappacea consists of five genetic partitions with high levels of admixture; all partitions appeared in both regions, but with different proportions. Within the Bukit Duabelas region we observed significant isolation-by-distance. Nine AFLP loci (5.3% of all loci) were under natural diversifying selection. All studied populations of C. lappacea were diploid, outcrossing and self-incompatible, without any hints of apomixis. The estimated residence time of c. 100 years coincides with the onset of rubber and oil palm planting in Sumatra. In the colonization process, the species is already in a phase of establishment, which may be enhanced by efficient selection acting on a highly diverse gene pool. In the land-use systems, seed dispersal might be enhanced by adhesive spikelets. At present, the abundance of established populations in intensively managed land-use systems might provide opportunities for rapid dispersal of C. lappacea across rural landscapes

  7. Population Genetic Structure and Reproductive Strategy of the Introduced Grass Centotheca lappacea in Tropical Land-Use Systems in Sumatra

    PubMed Central

    Hodac̆, Ladislav; Ulum, Fuad Bahrul; Opfermann, Nicole; Breidenbach, Natalie; Hojsgaard, Diego; Tjitrosoedirdjo, Sri Sudarmiyati; Vornam, Barbara; Finkeldey, Reiner; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Intensive transformation of lowland rainforest into oil palm and rubber monocultures is the most common land-use practice in Sumatra (Indonesia), accompanied by invasion of weeds. In the Jambi province, Centotheca lappacea is one of the most abundant alien grass species in plantations and in jungle rubber (an extensively used agroforest), but largely missing in natural rainforests. Here, we investigated putative genetic differentiation and signatures for adaptation in the introduced area. We studied reproductive mode and ploidy level as putative factors for invasiveness of the species. We sampled 19 populations in oil palm and rubber monocultures and in jungle rubber in two regions (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan). Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) revealed a high diversity of individual genotypes and only a weak differentiation among populations (FST = 0.173) and between the two regions (FST = 0.065). There was no significant genetic differentiation between the three land-use systems. The metapopulation of C. lappacea consists of five genetic partitions with high levels of admixture; all partitions appeared in both regions, but with different proportions. Within the Bukit Duabelas region we observed significant isolation-by-distance. Nine AFLP loci (5.3% of all loci) were under natural diversifying selection. All studied populations of C. lappacea were diploid, outcrossing and self-incompatible, without any hints of apomixis. The estimated residence time of c. 100 years coincides with the onset of rubber and oil palm planting in Sumatra. In the colonization process, the species is already in a phase of establishment, which may be enhanced by efficient selection acting on a highly diverse gene pool. In the land-use systems, seed dispersal might be enhanced by adhesive spikelets. At present, the abundance of established populations in intensively managed land-use systems might provide opportunities for rapid dispersal of C. lappacea across rural landscapes

  8. Indonesia's great frontier and migration policy.

    PubMed

    Maloney, C

    1987-01-01

    The population of Indonesia is 175 million, of which 65% live in Java. Java has only 7% of the land area, causing a population density of 2,000/square mile. This has lead the government to introduce a policy of transmigration which encourages people to move from Java to the larger outer islands. In the last 35 years 4.3 million people have moved from Java to Sumatra, Borneo, Celebes, and Irian Jaya. The total area of Indonesia stretches over 3,200 miles and has 16,000 islands of which 1,000 are inhabited. It has vast resources of oil, lumber, rubber, tin, palm oil, copra, coffee, tea, pepper, cloves, nutmeg, and quinine. Indonesia is also rich in minerals, including coal, bauxite, iron ore, and gold. Even with a national family planning program, population growth has reached 2.1% a year. 3 other islands that people are induced to move from are Madura, Bali, and Lombok, although their population densities are less then Java. The small islands near Singapore are being developed and Batam will be a free port to compete with Hong Kong. The most intense migration has been to Kalimantan (Borneo) which has 4 provinces. The migration policy began in 1905 and by 1930 100,000 people, had moved to other islands; 600,000 people were relocated to plantations in Java for labor needs. In 1979-84, a more ambitious program costing 2.3 billion moved 1.5 million people. In the most recent 1984-89 plan, a goal of 3.1 million were to be relocated but due to budgetary restrictions only 150,000 families have moved. The main social issue addresses the domination of other people by Javanese, not only in numbers but cultural differences. Some observers say the real reason for migration is political in ensuring the boundaries and geographic integrity of Indonesia.

  9. Magnetotelluric Exploration of the Sipoholon Geothermal Field, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niasari, S. W.; Muñoz, G.; Kholid, M.; Suhanto, E.; Ritter, O.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements have been carried out at 96 sites around the Sipoholon Geothermal field, in the province of North Sumatra, Indonesia. The Sipoholon geothermal field is a low enthalpy geothermal system located in a pull-apart basin controlled by the Sumatra fault system. One of the main difficulties in understanding this system is an apparently random distribution of temperatures in 15 hot springs in the area. High levels of electromagnetic noise with several high voltage power lines in a densely populated area is challenging for natural source MT measurements. Noise at long periods and in the dead band (1s to 10s) could be removed with robust remote reference processing and high frequency noise could be suppressed with a delay line filter. After dimensionality and directionality analysis of the data, we found a regional strike direction consistent with the Sumatra fault. We present results of 2D inversion of the data along several profiles perpendicular to the main strike direction. Modeling results indicate a shallow (< 1000 m) low resistivity layer, zones of high resistivity at intermediate depths (approximately 500 to 5000 m), and regions of low resistivity in the depth range of 2 to 4 km. These deep zones of low resistivity could be caused by hydrothermal alteration or hydrothermal fluids. The shallow low resistivity correlates spatially with the graben areas of the pull-apart system and is likely associated with (unconsolidated) sedimentary fill.

  10. The first geophilid centipedes from Malesia: a new genus with two new species from Sumatra (Chilopoda, Geophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bonato, Lucio; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahayu; Scheu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new genus Sundageophilus is here described for two new species of geophilid centipedes (Chilopoda: Geophilidae) from Sumatra, Indonesia. Both Sundageophilus bidentatus sp. n. and Sundageophilus poriger sp. n. feature a minute body size (less than 1 cm long with 31–35 pairs of legs), a similar structure of the maxillae, elongated forcipules, and few coxal organs. Sundageophilus bidentatus is unique among geophilids because the ultimate article of the forcipule is armed with two conspicuous denticles, one dorsal to the other, instead of a single one or none. The two species of Sundageophilus are the first genuine Geophilidae ever found in Malesia, and among the very few representatives of this family in the entire south-eastern Asia. PMID:27551212

  11. Phylogeography of the current rabies viruses in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dibia, I Nyoman; Sumiarto, Bambang; Susetya, Heru; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Scott-Orr, Helen; Mahardika, Gusti Ngurah

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a major fatal zoonotic disease in Indonesia. This study was conducted to determine the recent dynamics of rabies virus (RABV) in various areas and animal species throughout Indonesia. A total of 27 brain samples collected from rabid animals of various species in Bali, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Java, and Flores in 2008 to 2010 were investigated. The cDNA of the nucleoprotein gene from each sample was generated and amplified by one-step reverse transcription-PCR, after which the products were sequenced and analyzed. The symmetric substitution model of a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection extension of the discrete phylogeographic model of the social network was applied in BEAST ver. 1.7.5 software. The spatial dispersal was visualized in Cartographica using Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics. We demonstrated inter-island introduction and reintroduction, and dog was found to be the only source of infection of other animals. Ancestors of Indonesian RABVs originated in Java and its descendants were transmitted to Kalimantan, then further to Sumatra, Flores, and Bali. The Flores descendent was subsequently transmitted to Sulawesi and back to Kalimantan. The viruses found in various animal species were transmitted by the dog.

  12. Phylogeography of the current rabies viruses in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Dibia, I Nyoman; Sumiarto, Bambang; Susetya, Heru; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Scott-Orr, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a major fatal zoonotic disease in Indonesia. This study was conducted to determine the recent dynamics of rabies virus (RABV) in various areas and animal species throughout Indonesia. A total of 27 brain samples collected from rabid animals of various species in Bali, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Java, and Flores in 2008 to 2010 were investigated. The cDNA of the nucleoprotein gene from each sample was generated and amplified by one-step reverse transcription-PCR, after which the products were sequenced and analyzed. The symmetric substitution model of a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection extension of the discrete phylogeographic model of the social network was applied in BEAST ver. 1.7.5 software. The spatial dispersal was visualized in Cartographica using Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics. We demonstrated inter-island introduction and reintroduction, and dog was found to be the only source of infection of other animals. Ancestors of Indonesian RABVs originated in Java and its descendants were transmitted to Kalimantan, then further to Sumatra, Flores, and Bali. The Flores descendent was subsequently transmitted to Sulawesi and back to Kalimantan. The viruses found in various animal species were transmitted by the dog. PMID:25643792

  13. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, T.; Pandoe, W.; Mudita, I.; Roemer, S.; Illigner, J.; Zech, C.; Galas, R.

    2011-03-01

    On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements. The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) (Rudloff et al., 2009) combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP) measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information. The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  14. Southeast Asian Summer Burning: A Micro Pulse Lidar Network Study of Aerosol Particle Physical Properties near Fires in Borneo and Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, S.; Welton, E. J.; Holben, B. N.; Campbell, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    In August and September 2012, as part of the continuing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) project, three autonomous elastic-scattering 355 nm lidars were deployed by the NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) to Sumatra and Borneo, measuring the vertical profile of aerosol particle scattering during peak burning season. In coordination with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a regional characterization of aerosol particle physical properties and distribution was performed. In addition to a permanent regional network site at Singapore, the three temporary sites established for this research include Jambi (Sumatra, Indonesia), Kuching (northwest Borneo, Malaysia) and Palangkaraya (south-central Borneo, Indonesia). In this paper, we discuss the mission and instruments, and introduce data products available to the community through the MPLNET online website. We further describe initial results of the study, including a contrast of mean vertical scattering profiles versus those observed near active fire sources at Jambi and Palangkaraya, and resolve longer-range particle evolution at receptor sites, like Kuching, that are most commonly 1-2 days downwind of larger fire complexes.

  15. Geological Investigation and analysis in response to Earthquake Induced Landslide in West Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnawati, D.; Wilopo, W.; Salahudin, S.; Sudarno, I.; Burton, P.

    2009-12-01

    Substantial socio-economical loss occurred in response to the September 30. 2009 West Sumatra Earthquake with magnitude of 7.6. Damage of houses and engineered structures mostly occurred at the low land of alluvium sediments due to the ground amplification, whilst at the high land of mountain slopes several villages were buried by massive debris of rocks and soils. It was recorded that 1115 people died due to this disasters. Series of geological investigation was carried out by Geological Engineering Department of Gadjah Mada University, with the purpose to support the rehabilitation program. Based on this preliminary investigation it was identified that most of the house and engineered structural damages at the alluvial deposits mainly due to by the poor quality of such houses and engineered structures, which poorly resist the ground amplification, instead of due to the control of geological conditions. On the other hand, the existence and distribution of structural geology (faults and joints) at the mountaineous regions are significant in controlling the distribution of landslides, with the types of rock falls, debris flows and debris falls. Despite the landslide susceptibility mapping conducted by Geological Survey of Indonesia, more detailed investigation is required to be carried out in the region surrounding Maninjau Lake, in order to provide safer places for village relocation. Accordingly Gadjah Mada University in collaboration with the local university (Andalas University) as well as with the local Government of Agam Regency and the Geological Survey of Indonesia, serve the mission for conducting rather more detailed geological and landslide investigation. It is also crucial that the investigation (survey and mapping) on the social perception and expectation of local people living in this landslide susceptible area should also be carried out, to support the mitigation effort of any future potential earthquake induced landslides.

  16. Uplift and Subsidence Associated with the Great Aceh-Andaman Earthquake of 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The magnitude 9.2 Indian Ocean earthquake of December 26, 2004, produced broad regions of uplift and subsidence. In order to define the lateral extent and the downdip limit of rupture, scientists from Caltech, Pasadena, Calif.; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.; the U.S. Geological Survey, Pasadena, Calif.; and the Research Center for Geotechnology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Bandung, Indonesia; first needed to define the pivot line separating those regions. Interpretation of satellite imagery and a tidal model were one of the key tools used to do this.

    These pre-Sumatra earthquake (a) and post-Sumatra earthquake (b) images of North Sentinel Island in the Indian Ocean, acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft, show emergence of the coral reef surrounding the island following the earthquake. The tide was 30 plus or minus 14 centimeters lower in the pre-earthquake image (acquired November 21, 2000) than in the post-earthquake image (acquired February 20, 2005), requiring a minimum of 30 centimeters of uplift at this locality. Observations from an Indian Coast Guard helicopter on the northwest coast of the island suggest that the actual uplift is on the order of 1 to 2 meters at this site.

    In figures (c) and (d), pre-earthquake and post-earthquake ASTER images of a small island off the northwest coast of Rutland Island, 38 kilometers east of North Sentinel Island, show submergence of the coral reef surrounding the island. The tide was higher in the pre-earthquake image (acquired January 1, 2004) than in the post-earthquake image (acquired February 4, 2005), requiring subsidence at this locality. The pivot line must run between North Sentinel and Rutland islands. Note that the scale for the North Sentinel Island images differs from that for the Rutland Island images.

    The tidal model used

  17. EPA Collaboration with Indonesia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Indonesia is a key actor in the global environmental arena. In addition to significant ecological resources, Indonesia also has the fourth largest population in the world and the third largest greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dailin; Becker, Nathan C.; Walsh, David; Fryer, Gerard J.; Weinstein, Stuart A.; McCreery, Charles S.; Sardiña, Victor; Hsu, Vindell; Hirshorn, Barry F.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Duputel, Zacharie; Rivera, Luis; Kanamori, Hiroo; Koyanagi, Kanoa K.; Shiro, Brian

    2012-10-01

    The April 11, 2012, magnitude 8.6 earthquake off the northern coast of Sumatra generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epicenter and at four ocean bottom pressure sensors (DARTs) in the Indian Ocean. The governments of India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States' Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) issued an Indian Ocean-wide Tsunami Watch Bulletin in its role as an Interim Service Provider for the region. Using an experimental real-time tsunami forecast model (RIFT), PTWC produced a series of tsunami forecasts during the event that were based on rapidly derived earthquake parameters, including initial location and Mwp magnitude estimates and the W-phase centroid moment tensor solutions (W-phase CMTs) obtained at PTWC and at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). We discuss the real-time forecast methodology and how successive, real-time tsunami forecasts using the latest W-phase CMT solutions improved the accuracy of the forecast.

  19. Temporal changes of surface wave velocity associated with major Sumatra earthquakes from ambient noise correlation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen J; Song, Xiaodong

    2009-08-25

    Detecting temporal changes of the medium associated with major earthquakes has implications for understanding earthquake genesis. Here we report temporal changes of surface wave velocity over a large area associated with 3 major Sumatra earthquakes in 2004, 2005, and 2007. We use ambient noise correlation to retrieve empirical Green's function (EGF) of surface waves between stations. Because the process is completely repeatable, the technique is powerful in detecting possible temporal change of medium. We find that 1 excellent station pair (PSI in Indonesia and CHTO in Thailand) shows significant time shifts (up to 1.44 s) after the 2004 and 2005 events in the Rayleigh waves at 10-20 s but not in the Love waves, suggesting that the Rayleigh time shifts are not from clock error. The time shifts are frequency dependent with the largest shifts at the period band of 11-16 s. We also observe an unusual excursion approximately 1 month before the 2004 event. We obtain a total of 17 pairs for June, 2007 to June, 2008, which allow us to examine the temporal and spatial variation of the time shifts. We observed strong anomalies (up to 0.68 s) near the epicenter after the 2007 event, but not in the region further away from the source or before the event or 3 months after the event. The observations are interpreted as stress changes and subsequent relaxation in upper-mid crust in the immediate vicinity of the rupture and the broad area near the fault zone.

  20. Use of remote sensing to establish environmental baselines: Examples from Sumatra and the Mississippi River Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Wieser, J.D.; Janks, J.S.; Prelat, A.E.

    1996-08-01

    To monitor changes in the environment, it is necessary to establish a baseline of conditions that characterize a place or thing at a particular period in time. This serves as a benchmark to which future changes can be compared and quantified. Remote sensing is an effective, fast, and low cost method to create environmental baselines. Examples of environmental baselines established by remote sensing are given for Indonesia and the USA. In Sumatra, Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) and Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite images were used to assess land cover and land use changes from 1973 to 1992. Conversion of forest to secondary vegetation was the predominant change that occurred in the area in that time period. In the environmentally-sensitive wetlands of the Mississippi River Delta, airborne digital and photographic data were used to monitor regrowth of vegetation after 3D seismic activities. The initial mission was flown shortly after collection of seismic data in 1992 and remote sensing data were used to establish a baseline. Subsequent missions were flown in 1993 and 1994. Analysis of these data sets indicates that the area is revegetating and returning to its native state with no permanent impact to wetlands.

  1. Elite Capture and Corruption in two Villages in Bengkulu Province, Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Anton

    This paper examines leadership, elite capture and corruption in two villages in Sumatra. It compares implementation and outcomes of several conservation and development projects in the context of democratization and decentralization reforms introduced in Indonesia since 1998. In examining aspects of elite control and elite capture, this paper focuses on the activities of local elites, particularly village officials, who use their positions to monopolize planning and management of projects that were explicitly intended to incorporate participatory and accountability features. While elites' use of authority and influence to benefit personally from their roles clearly reflects elite capture, there are nonetheless members of elite groups in these case studies who use their control of projects to broad community benefit. In both villages there is considerable friction between villagers and elites as well as among members of the local elite themselves over control of local resources. Differences in the structure of these cross-cutting internal relationships and of ties between local authorities and outside government and non-government agents largely explain the differences in degree of elite capture and its outcomes in the two cases.

  2. Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Dailin; Becker, Nathan C.; Walsh, David; Fryer, Gerard J.; Weinstein, Stuart A.; McCreery, Charles S.; ,

    2012-01-01

    The April 11, 2012, magnitude 8.6 earthquake off the northern coast of Sumatra generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epicenter and at four ocean bottom pressure sensors (DARTs) in the Indian Ocean. The governments of India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States' Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) issued an Indian Ocean-wide Tsunami Watch Bulletin in its role as an Interim Service Provider for the region. Using an experimental real-time tsunami forecast model (RIFT), PTWC produced a series of tsunami forecasts during the event that were based on rapidly derived earthquake parameters, including initial location and Mwp magnitude estimates and the W-phase centroid moment tensor solutions (W-phase CMTs) obtained at PTWC and at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). We discuss the real-time forecast methodology and how successive, real-time tsunami forecasts using the latest W-phase CMT solutions improved the accuracy of the forecast.

  3. An Evaluation of Infrastructure for Tsunami Evacuation in Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedillos, V.; Canney, N.; Deierlein, G.; Diposaptono, S.; Geist, E. L.; Henderson, S.; Ismail, F.; Jachowski, N.; McAdoo, B. G.; Muhari, A.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Sieh, K. E.; Toth, J.; Tucker, B. E.; Wood, K.

    2009-12-01

    Padang has one of the world’s highest tsunami risks due to its high hazard, vulnerable terrain and population density. The current strategy to prepare for tsunamis in Padang is focused on developing early warning systems, planning evacuation routes, conducting evacuation drills, and raising local awareness. Although these are all necessary, they are insufficient. Padang’s proximity to the Sunda Trench and flat terrain make reaching safe ground impossible for much of the population. The natural warning in Padang - a strong earthquake that lasts over a minute - will be the first indicator of a potential tsunami. People will have about 30 minutes after the earthquake to reach safe ground. It is estimated that roughly 50,000 people in Padang will be unable to evacuate in that time. Given these conditions, other means to prepare for the expected tsunami must be developed. With this motivation, GeoHazards International and Stanford University’s Chapter of Engineers for a Sustainable World partnered with Indonesian organizations - Andalas University and Tsunami Alert Community in Padang, Laboratory for Earth Hazards, and the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries - in an effort to evaluate the need for and feasibility of tsunami evacuation infrastructure in Padang. Tsunami evacuation infrastructure can include earthquake-resistant bridges and evacuation structures that rise above the maximum tsunami water level, and can withstand the expected earthquake and tsunami forces. The choices for evacuation structures vary widely - new and existing buildings, evacuation towers, soil berms, elevated highways and pedestrian overpasses. This interdisciplinary project conducted a course at Stanford University, undertook several field investigations, and concluded that: (1) tsunami evacuation structures and bridges are essential to protect the people in Padang, (2) there is a need for a more thorough engineering-based evaluation than conducted to-date of the suitability of existing buildings to serve as evacuation structures, and of existing bridges to serve as elements of evacuation routes, and (3) additions to Padang’s tsunami evacuation infrastructure must carefully take into account technical matters (e.g. expected wave height, debris impact forces), social considerations (e.g. cultural acceptability, public’s confidence in the structure’s integrity), and political issues (e.g. land availability, cost, maintenance). Future plans include collaboration between U.S. and Indonesian engineers in developing designs for new tsunami evacuation structures, as well as providing training for Indonesian authorities on: (1) siting, designing, and constructing tsunami evacuation structures, and (2) evaluating the suitability of existing buildings to serve as tsunami evacuation shelters.

  4. Possible Intercontinental Dispersal of Microorganisms from a Paleolake Toba in Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesner, C. A.; Barbee, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geochemical fingerprinting of glass shards and minerals have clearly demonstrated that ash from the 74 ka Toba eruption was distributed over a vast area including parts of the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Indian sub-continent, and eastern Africa. The great dispersal has been attributed to eruption column height, co-ignimbrite ash, shard morphology, and volume of the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) eruption. New evidence suggests that another contributing factor may have been a phreatomagmatic component of the eruption whereby portions of the YTT interacted with a paleolake Toba during the eruption. This evidence consists of an accretionary lapilli ash fall bed at the base of the YTT, friable lake sediment lithic fragments found within the proximal YTT ignimbrite, and organic remains in distal ash exposures. Notably, diatom frustules and sponge spicules similar to those that occur in post-YTT lacustrine sediments at Toba have now been identified in the proximal YTT ash fall bed and ignimbrite, as well as distal ash exposures in Malaysia and India. Our findings support the observations of J.B.Scrivenor (1930, 1943) who first described such microfossil occurrences in the Toba ash from sites in Malaysia, and speculated that they may have originated from Toba. Species characterization is currently underway to determine if the microflora/faunal assemblages of the Malaysian and Indian ashes are consistent with a Toba source. The preliminary results of our study lends further credence to Van Eaton et al.'s (2013) suggestion that microbiological cargo carried by phreatomagmatic tephra can provide a new tool in deciphering volcanological, paleoenvironmental, and biologic dispersal models.

  5. Impact of Lowland Rainforest Transformation on Diversity and Composition of Soil Prokaryotic Communities in Sumatra (Indonesia)

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Dominik; Engelhaupt, Martin; Allen, Kara; Kurniawan, Syahrul; Krashevska, Valentyna; Heinemann, Melanie; Nacke, Heiko; Wijayanti, Marini; Meryandini, Anja; Corre, Marife D.; Scheu, Stefan; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotes are the most abundant and diverse group of microorganisms in soil and mediate virtually all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. Thereby, they influence aboveground plant productivity and diversity. In this study, the impact of rainforest transformation to intensively managed cash crop systems on soil prokaryotic communities was investigated. The studied managed land use systems comprised rubber agroforests (jungle rubber), rubber plantations and oil palm plantations within two Indonesian landscapes Bukit Duabelas and Harapan. Soil prokaryotic community composition and diversity were assessed by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. The curated dataset contained 16,413 bacterial and 1679 archaeal operational taxonomic units at species level (97% genetic identity). Analysis revealed changes in indigenous taxon-specific patterns of soil prokaryotic communities accompanying lowland rainforest transformation to jungle rubber, and intensively managed rubber and oil palm plantations. Distinct clustering of the rainforest soil communities indicated that these are different from the communities in the studied managed land use systems. The predominant bacterial taxa in all investigated soils were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Overall, the bacterial community shifted from proteobacterial groups in rainforest soils to Acidobacteria in managed soils. The archaeal soil communities were mainly represented by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Members of the Terrestrial Group and South African Gold Mine Group 1 (Thaumarchaeota) dominated in the rainforest and members of Thermoplasmata in the managed land use systems. The alpha and beta diversity of the soil prokaryotic communities was higher in managed land use systems than in rainforest. In the case of bacteria, this was related to soil characteristics such as pH value, exchangeable Ca and Fe content, C to N ratio, and extractable P content. Archaeal community composition and diversity were correlated to pH value, exchangeable Fe content, water content, and total N. The distribution of bacterial and archaeal taxa involved in biological N cycle indicated functional shifts of the cycle during conversion of rainforest to plantations. PMID:26696965

  6. Impact of Lowland Rainforest Transformation on Diversity and Composition of Soil Prokaryotic Communities in Sumatra (Indonesia).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dominik; Engelhaupt, Martin; Allen, Kara; Kurniawan, Syahrul; Krashevska, Valentyna; Heinemann, Melanie; Nacke, Heiko; Wijayanti, Marini; Meryandini, Anja; Corre, Marife D; Scheu, Stefan; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotes are the most abundant and diverse group of microorganisms in soil and mediate virtually all biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. Thereby, they influence aboveground plant productivity and diversity. In this study, the impact of rainforest transformation to intensively managed cash crop systems on soil prokaryotic communities was investigated. The studied managed land use systems comprised rubber agroforests (jungle rubber), rubber plantations and oil palm plantations within two Indonesian landscapes Bukit Duabelas and Harapan. Soil prokaryotic community composition and diversity were assessed by pyrotag sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes. The curated dataset contained 16,413 bacterial and 1679 archaeal operational taxonomic units at species level (97% genetic identity). Analysis revealed changes in indigenous taxon-specific patterns of soil prokaryotic communities accompanying lowland rainforest transformation to jungle rubber, and intensively managed rubber and oil palm plantations. Distinct clustering of the rainforest soil communities indicated that these are different from the communities in the studied managed land use systems. The predominant bacterial taxa in all investigated soils were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Overall, the bacterial community shifted from proteobacterial groups in rainforest soils to Acidobacteria in managed soils. The archaeal soil communities were mainly represented by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Members of the Terrestrial Group and South African Gold Mine Group 1 (Thaumarchaeota) dominated in the rainforest and members of Thermoplasmata in the managed land use systems. The alpha and beta diversity of the soil prokaryotic communities was higher in managed land use systems than in rainforest. In the case of bacteria, this was related to soil characteristics such as pH value, exchangeable Ca and Fe content, C to N ratio, and extractable P content. Archaeal community composition and diversity were correlated to pH value, exchangeable Fe content, water content, and total N. The distribution of bacterial and archaeal taxa involved in biological N cycle indicated functional shifts of the cycle during conversion of rainforest to plantations.

  7. A Modern Bathymetric Survey of Lake Toba, Sumatra, Indonesia: Preliminary Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesner, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    Lake Toba, measuring 100 km by 30 km, is the largest volcanic lake in the world and the largest fresh water lake in Southeast Asia. It formed 74,000 years ago following a cataclysmic volcanic eruption that qualifies as the largest volcanic eruption on Earth in the past few million years. Explosive eruption of ~2800 km3 of magma from a shallow magma body resulted in collapse of the magma chamber roof, creating an enormous, steep sided, deep, caldera. Tropical rainfall and over 290 streams deliver water from a ~3600 km2 drainage basin to the caldera, resulting in a lake that covers 1100 km2 with depths exceeding 500 m. The only known bathymetric map of Lake Toba was produced in 1939 using lead line soundings. This map uses a contour interval of 100 m and lacks virtually any bathymetric expression that could provide insights into the collapse and subsequent uplift that occurred at the caldera. In September 2005, we initiated a detailed bathymetric survey of Lake Toba using a GPS linked acoustic sounding instrument. The survey equipment was mounted to a small watercraft traveling at a rate of 3-10 km/h. The bottom depth sampling rate was one sounding per second and over 100,000 individual soundings were recorded. During a two week period, approximately 20 line-transect surveys totaling more than 250 km in distance were measured. While this represents a small fraction of the lake bottom, the high frequency sampling rate produced lake bottom profiles with detailed bathymetric expression. The deepest parts of the lake are found at the base of the ring fracture fault, approximately 0.5 km from the shoreline, with depths of 500 m recorded along the northeastern ring fracture. Mega blocks, emplaced during the retrogressive collapse, can be interpreted from the bottom profiles and are common near the ring fracture. We discovered sublacustrine continuation of the 400-1200 m high slopes and cliffs that surround most of the caldera. Offshore from a scallop in the caldera rim near Harranggoal, a post-caldera collapse debris avalanche deposit can be recognized by its classic hummocky topography. Another semicircular embayment near Bakara can be interpreted to have formed concurrently with caldera collapse as suggested by the depth continuity of the lake floor within and beyond the boundaries of this feature. Beyond the base of the steep ring fracture slopes, vast featureless plains are found at depths of 450-490 m and dominate the large open regions of the northern and southern portions of the lake. Faults that comprise the eastern face of the Samosir Island resurgent half dome are observed in the bottom profile and can be traced to the north and south. Additional stair-step faults were discovered offshore. A sublacustrine domal feature along the southwestern ring fracture just north of Pardepur Island lava dome can be interpreted as another ring fracture lava dome. On some bottom profiles, the veneer of lacustrine sediments can be distinguished from the underlying bedrock. Completion of a modern bathymetric map of Lake Toba will provide invaluable data, allowing new insights to caldera formation as well as subsequent resurgence, lava dome emplacement, and large scale erosional events.

  8. Petroleum systems of the Northwest Java Province, Java and offshore southeast Sumatra, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, Michele G.

    2000-01-01

    Mature, synrift lacustrine shales of Eocene to Oligocene age and mature, late-rift coals and coaly shales of Oligocene to Miocene age are source rocks for oil and gas in two important petroleum systems of the onshore and offshore areas of the Northwest Java Basin. Biogenic gas and carbonate-sourced gas have also been identified. These hydrocarbons are trapped primarily in anticlines and fault blocks involving sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. These source rocks and reservoir rocks were deposited in a complex of Tertiary rift basins formed from single or multiple half-grabens on the south edge of the Sunda Shelf plate. The overall transgressive succession was punctuated by clastic input from the exposed Sunda Shelf and marine transgressions from the south. The Northwest Java province may contain more than 2 billion barrels of oil equivalent in addition to the 10 billion barrels of oil equivalent already identified.

  9. Pentobarbital poisoning in Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae).

    PubMed

    Jurczynski, Kerstin; Zittlau, Erhard

    2007-12-01

    Three Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) at the Heidelberg Zoo in Germany presented with severe neurologic signs. Physical examination and diagnostic tests did not reveal a definitive diagnosis. Two days after initial presenting signs, all of the animals appeared clinically normal. An investigation into this outbreak revealed that all animals received horse meat on the evening before the incident. A toxicologic examination was initiated and serum analysis of the affected female tiger cub and the horse meat revealed contamination with pentobarbital.

  10. Andaman-Sumatra island arc: II. The December 26, 2004 earthquake as one of the key episodes in seismogenic activation of the arc in the beginning of XXI century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakina, L. M.; Moskvina, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the nature and parameters of the source for the earthquake that occurred in Sumatra on December 26, 2004 is suggested. Our study relies on a variety of data on the geological structure of the region, long-term seismicity, spatial distribution of the foreshocks and aftershocks, and focal mechanisms; and the pattern of shaking and tsunami, regularities in the occurrence of the earthquakes, and the genetic relationship between the seismic and geological parameters inherent in various types of seismogenic zones including island arcs. The source of the Sumatran earthquake is a steep reverse fault striking parallel to the island arc and dipping towards the ocean. The length of the fault is ˜450 km, and its probable bedding depth is ˜70-100 km. The magnitude of this seismic event corresponding to the length of its source is 8.9-9.0. The vertical displacement in the source probably reached 9-13 m. The fault is located near the inner boundary of the Aceh Depression between the epicenter of the earthquake and the northern tip of the depression. The strike-slip and strike-slip reverse the faults cutting the island arc form the northern and southern borders of the source. The location and source parameters in the suggested interpretation account quite well for the observed pattern of shaking and tsunami. The Aceh Depression and its environs probably also host other seismic sources in the form of large reverse faults. The Sumatran earthquake, which was the culmination of the seismogenic activation of the Andaman-Sumatra island arc in the beginning of XXI century, is a typical tsunamigenic island-arc earthquake. By its characteristics, this event is an analogue to the M W = 9 Kamchatka earthquake of November 4, 1952. The spatial distribution of the epicenters and the focal mechanisms of the aftershocks indicate that the repeated shocks during the Sumatran event were caused by the activation of a complex system of geological structures in various parts of

  11. Geothermal exploration in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Radja, V.T.

    1984-03-01

    Indonesia is blessed with geothermal resources. This fortunate aspect is directly related to the fact that the archipelago is an island arc created by a subduction zone. Evidence of geothermal activity is common throughout the Islands. Among the islands' many active volcanos are numerous geothermal phenomena. Almost half of the volcanic centers in Indonesia (88 out of 177 centers) contain fumarole and sulfatare features. A brief history of the exploration for geothermal energy in Indonesia is presented.

  12. El Habano and the world it has shaped: Cuba, Connecticut, and Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In the half century since the 1959 Cuban Revolution, El Habano remains the premium cigar the world over; but both before and since 1959, the seed, agricultural and industrial know-how, and human capital have been transplanted to replicate that cigar in a process accentuated by upheavals and out-migration. The focus here is on a little-known facet of the interconnected island and offshore Havana cigar history, linking Cuba with Connecticut and Indonesia: from when tobacco was taken from the Americas to Indonesia and gave rise to the famed Sumatra cigar wrapper leaf; through the rise and demise of its sister shade wrapper in Connecticut, with Cuban and Sumatra seed, ultimately overshadowed by Indonesia; and the resulting challenges facing Cuba today. The article highlights the role of Dutch, U.S., British, and Swedish capital to explain why in 2009 the two major global cigar corporations, British Imperial Tobacco and Swedish Match, were lobbying Washington, respectively, for and against the embargo on Cuba. As the antismoking, antitobacco lobby gains ground internationally, the intriguing final question is whether the future lies with El Habano or smokeless Swedish snus.

  13. Taeniases and cysticercosis in Indonesia: past and present situations.

    PubMed

    Wandra, Toni; Ito, Akira; Swastika, Kadek; Dharmawan, Nyoman S; Sako, Yasuhito; Okamoto, Munehiro

    2013-11-01

    The main aim of this study is to overview the past and present situations of human taeniases and cysticercosis in Indonesia and including future perspectives. Through joint projects from 1996, we have confirmed the occurrence of Taenia saginata (beef tapeworm) in Bali, of Taenia solium (pork tapeworm) mainly in Papua and sporadically in Bali, and of Taenia asiatica in North Sumatra. These taeniases were caused through eating uncooked pork and pig viscera for T. solium and T. asiatica, respectively, and beef for T. saginata. The distribution of these tapeworms in Indonesia is basically highly restricted by the traditional cultural and religious backgrounds in each island. T. saginata is relatively common in Bali although people consume pork 'lawar' more than beef 'lawar'. Taeniases due to T. saginata or T. asiatica and T. solium and cysticercosis due to T. solium have also been sporadically reported in some other islands. Among these species, T. solium is exceptional since humans can be infected not only by larval stages (cysticerci) in pork but also by eggs released from human tapeworm carriers. Cysticercosis has been confirmed in Indonesia in humans, pigs and even dogs.

  14. A review on earthquake and tsunami hazards of the Sumatran plate boundary: Observing expected and unexpected events after the Aceh-Andaman Mw 9.15 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natawidjaja, D.

    2013-12-01

    The 600-km Mentawai megathrust had produced two giant historical earthquakes generating big tsunamies in 1797 and 1833. The SuGAr (Sumatran GPS continuous Array) network, first deployed in 2002, shows that the subduction interface underlying Mentawai Islands and the neighboring Nias section in the north are fully locked, thus confirming their potential hazards. Outreach activities to warn people about earthquake and tsunamies had been started since 4 months prior to the 26 December 2004 in Aceh-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.15). Later in March 2005, the expected megathrust earthquake (Mw 8.7) hit Nias-Simelue area and killed about 2000 people, releasing the accumulated strain since the previous 1861 event (~Mw 8.5). After then many Mw 7s and smaller events occured in Sumatra, filling areas between and around two giant ruptures and heighten seismicities in neighboring areas. In March 2007, the twin earthquake disaster (Mw 6.3 and Mw 6.4) broke two consecutive segments of the transcurrent Sumatran fault in the Singkarak lake area. Only six month later, in September 2007, the rapid-fire-failures of three consecutive megathrust patches (Mw 8.5, Mw 7.9 and Mw 7.0) ruptured a 250-km-section of the southern part of the Mentawai. It was a big surprise since this particular section is predicted as a very-low coupled section from modelling the SuGAr data, and hence, bypassing the more potential fully coupled section of the Mentawai in between the 2005 and 2007 ruptures. In September 2009, a rare unexpected event (Mw 7.6) suddenly ruptured an intracrustal fault in the subducted slab down under Padang City and killed about 500 people. Padang had been in preparation for the next tsunami but not for strong shakes from near by major earthquake. This event seems to have remotely triggered another Mw 6.7 on the Sumatran fault near kerinci Lake, a few hundred kilometers south of Padang, in less than a day. Just a year later, in November 2010, again an unexpected large slow-slip event of

  15. Spatio-temporal analysis on land transformation in a forested tropical landscape in Jambi Province, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melati, Dian N.; Nengah Surati Jaya, I.; Pérez-Cruzado, César; Zuhdi, Muhammad; Fehrmann, Lutz; Magdon, Paul; Kleinn, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) in forested tropical landscapes is very dynamically developing. In particular, the pace of forest conversion in the tropics is a global concern as it directly impacts the global carbon cycle and biodiversity conservation. Expansion of agriculture is known to be among the major drivers of forest loss especially in the tropics. This is also the case in Jambi Province, Sumatra, Indonesia where it is the mainly expansion of tree crops that triggers deforestation: oil palm and rubber trees. Another transformation system in Jambi is the one from natural forest into jungle rubber, which is an agroforestry system where a certain density of forest trees accompanies the rubber tree crop, also for production of wood and non-wood forest products. The spatial distribution and the dynamics of these transformation systems and of the remaining forests are essential information for example for further research on ecosystem services and on the drivers of land transformation. In order to study land transformation, maps from the years 1990, 2000, 2011, and 2013 were utilized, derived from visual interpretation of Landsat images. From these maps, we analyze the land use/land cover change (LULCC) in the study region. It is found that secondary dryland forest (on mineral soils) and secondary swamp forest have been transformed largely into (temporary) shrub land, plantation forests, mixed dryland agriculture, bare lands and estate crops where the latter include the oil palm and rubber plantations. In addition, we present some analyses of the spatial pattern of land transformation to better understand the process of LULC fragmentation within the studied periods. Furthermore, the driving forces are analyzed.

  16. Temporal changes of surface wave velocity associated with major Sumatra earthquakes from ambient noise correlation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen J.; Song, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Detecting temporal changes of the medium associated with major earthquakes has implications for understanding earthquake genesis. Here we report temporal changes of surface wave velocity over a large area associated with 3 major Sumatra earthquakes in 2004, 2005, and 2007. We use ambient noise correlation to retrieve empirical Green's function (EGF) of surface waves between stations. Because the process is completely repeatable, the technique is powerful in detecting possible temporal change of medium. We find that 1 excellent station pair (PSI in Indonesia and CHTO in Thailand) shows significant time shifts (up to 1.44 s) after the 2004 and 2005 events in the Rayleigh waves at 10–20 s but not in the Love waves, suggesting that the Rayleigh time shifts are not from clock error. The time shifts are frequency dependent with the largest shifts at the period band of 11–16 s. We also observe an unusual excursion ∼1 month before the 2004 event. We obtain a total of 17 pairs for June, 2007 to June, 2008, which allow us to examine the temporal and spatial variation of the time shifts. We observed strong anomalies (up to 0.68 s) near the epicenter after the 2007 event, but not in the region further away from the source or before the event or 3 months after the event. The observations are interpreted as stress changes and subsequent relaxation in upper-mid crust in the immediate vicinity of the rupture and the broad area near the fault zone. PMID:19667205

  17. Mining outlook in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The outlook for mining in Indonesia is presented. Coal appears to be the most promising growth area for Indonesian mining interests, with production slated to reach 1.5 million t/yr by 1985, up from 0.5 million ton in 1983. Also discussed production and trends, aluminum, copper, nickel, silver, gold, tin and iron sands in Indonesia.

  18. Removal of Metal Iron from Groundwater Using Aceh Natural Zeolite and Membrane Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyati, S.; Arahman, N.; Syawaliah; Mukramah

    2017-03-01

    The adsorption and the ultrafiltration processes were combined for removal of Fe2+ in water sample solution. Aceh natural zeolite used as an adsorbent, and three kind of ultrafiltration membranes (M10K, M30K, and MPVP) were used in this study. The concentration of Fe2+ in the product of adsorption and ultrafiltration is about 0.254 mg/L. This value is below the permissible limit of ferrous metal (0.3 mg/L) in drinking water. The combination of adsorption and ultrafiltration can be used as an alternative treatment of excess iron content in groundwater

  19. Patterns and Determinants of Treatment Seeking among Previously Untreated Psychotic Patients in Aceh Province, Indonesia: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Marthoenis, Marthoenis; Aichberger, Marion C.; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2016-01-01

    Immediate treatment of first-episode psychosis is essential in order to achieve a positive outcome. However, Indonesian psychiatric patients often delay accessing health services, the reason for which is not yet fully understood. The current study aimed to understand patterns of treatment seeking and to reveal determinants of the delay in accessing psychiatric care among first-time user psychotic patients. Qualitative interviews were conducted with sixteen family members who accompanied the patients to a psychiatric hospital. Many families expressed beliefs that mental illness appertains to village sickness and not hospital sickness; therefore, they usually take the patients to traditional or religious healers before taking them to a health professional. They also identified various factors that potentially delay accessing psychiatric treatment: low literacy and beliefs about the cause of the illness, stigmatisation, the role of extended family, financial problems, and long distance to the psychiatric hospital. On the other hand, the family mentioned various factors related to timely help seeking, including being a well-educated family, living closer to health facilities, previous experience of successful psychotic therapy, and having more positive symptoms of psychosis. The findings call for mental health awareness campaigns in the community. PMID:27382501

  20. Coupling eruption and tsunami records: the Krakatau 1883 case study, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Raphaël; Wassmer, Patrick; Lavigne, Franck; Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Iskandarsyah, Yan; Benbakkar, Mhammed; Ontowirjo, Budianto; Mazzoni, Nelly

    2014-04-01

    The well-documented 1883 eruption of Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) offers an opportunity to couple the eruption's history with the tsunami record. The aim of this paper is not to re-analyse the scenario for the 1883 eruption but to demonstrate that the study of tsunami deposits provides information for reconstructing past eruptions. Indeed, though the characteristics of volcanogenic tsunami deposits are similar to those of other tsunami deposits, they may include juvenile material (e.g. fresh pumice) or be interbedded with distal pyroclastic deposits (ash fall, surges), due to their simultaneity with the eruption. Five kinds of sedimentary and volcanic facies related to the 1883 events were identified along the coasts of Java and Sumatra: (1) bioclastic tsunami sands and (2) pumiceous tsunami sands, deposited respectively before and during the Plinian phase (26-27 August); (3) rounded pumice lapilli reworked by tsunami; (4) pumiceous ash fall deposits and (5) pyroclastic surge deposits (only in Sumatra). The stratigraphic record on the coasts of Java and Sumatra, which agrees particularly well with observations of the 1883 events, is tentatively linked to the proximal stratigraphy of the eruption.

  1. Post-seismic relaxation following the great 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on a compressible self-gravitating Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Burgmann, R.; Banerjee, P.

    2006-01-01

    he Mw ??? 9.0 2004 December 26 Sumatra-Andaman and Mw =8.7 2005 March 28 Nias earthquakes, which collectively ruptured approximately 1800 km of the Andaman and Sunda subduction zones, are expected to be followed by vigorous viscoelastic relaxation involving both the upper and lower mantle. Because of these large spatial dimensions it is desirable to fully account for gravitational coupling effects in the relaxation process. We present a stable method of computing relaxation of a spherically-stratified, compressible and self-gravitating viscoelastic Earth following an impulsive moment release event. The solution is cast in terms of a spherical harmonic expansion of viscoelastic normal modes. For simple layered viscoelastic models, which include a low-viscosity oceanic asthenosphere, we predict substantial post-seismic effects over a region several 100s of km wide surrounding the eastern Indian Ocean. We compare observed GPS time-series from ten regional sites (mostly in Thailand and Indonesia), beginning in 2004 December, with synthetic time-series that include the coseismic and post-seismic effects of the 2004 December 26 and 2005 March 28 earthquakes. A viscosity structure involving a biviscous (Burgers body) rheology in the asthenosphere explains the pattern and amplitude of post-seismic offsets remarkably well. ?? 2006 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2006 RAS.

  2. Precipitation microstructure in different Madden-Julian Oscillation phases over Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Shibagaki, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    Intraseasonal variations of precipitation and its microstructure are investigated using measurements of the Equatorial Atmospheric Radar (EAR) facilities at Kototabang, west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). Raindrop size distribution (DSD) observations are obtained from a 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) with a near continuous record of operation over eight consecutive years (2003-2010). Precipitation types are classified using 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation, and are partitioned according to active and inactive convective phases of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). It is found that precipitation systems during the inactive phase are more continental in nature than those during the active phase. Cloud propagation from brightness temperature data indicates that Sumatra receives the rainfall mainly from maritime clouds during the active phase, while it is mainly from the continental clouds (land-based convection) during the inactive phase. Other remarkable differences between active and inactive phase precipitation systems are also observed from the vertical structure of precipitation. The precipitation during the inactive phase has deeper storms, a higher reflectivity aloft, more lightning activity and less stratiform characteristics, as compared to the active phase. Assessment of cloud effective radius of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data also shows a slight difference in the cloud droplet between the active and the inactive MJO phases. Different convective storms in different MJO phases lead to different DSD characteristics and Z-R relationships. The DSD during the inactive phase tends to have a higher concentration of medium and large-size drops than the active counterpart, consistent with the previous study during the first campaign of Coupling Processes in the Equatorial Atmosphere project. Although the DSD parameters and coefficient of Z-R relationships fall within the range of tropical maritime

  3. Permanent GPS Geodetic Array in Southern California (PGGA) and GPS observations in Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Yehuds

    1994-01-01

    The Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) is a network of permanent monitoring GPS stations in southern California devoted to the continuous measurement of crustal deformation in near real-time. The PGGA plays a unique role in studies of the kinematics of crustal deformation and the earthquake cycle in southern California because it is also providing temporally dense geodetic measurements of crustal motion over periods of minutes to variations in regional crustal strain. As it expands and matures the PGGA will play an increasingly important role in the study of active tectonics of southern California by bridging the frequency range between seismology, observatory geodesy, paleoseismology, and geology. In Indonesia GPS data is used for measurement of a large scale crustal deformation, extending from north China to the Indonesian archipelago. Indonesia offers a tremendous laboratory to study some of the processes that build continents, and mountains are active there. We began GPS observations in August 1989 on mainland Sumatra and the Mentawai Islands to study the phenomena of oblique plate convergence. We have analyzed the Indonesian data in conjunction with data collected on Christmas and Cocos Islands and at Darwin, Australia, and with the triangulation data in Sumatra.

  4. U.S. Warning System Detected the Sumatra Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, Jim; González, Frank

    2006-03-01

    Although the December 2004 great Sumatra earthquake and the resulting tsunami were very distant from the northeast Pacific Ocean, the U.S. Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) array in the northeast Pacific successfully demonstrated high sensitivity and provides useful data for understanding the propagation of the tsunami. At the time of the tsunami, the Pacific DART network already was one of the most sophisticated tsunami detection systems in operation. The network, which then consisted of eight stations (seven U.S. and one Chilean), now consists of 11 stations (10 U.S. and one Chilean) [González et al., 2005] (Figure 1). Each station is equipped with a bottom pressure recorder (BPR) transmitting data acoustically from the ocean bottom to a surface buoy, which then passes the data to tsunami warning centers and other land stations by satellite communication links.

  5. Interpretation of Geoelectric Structure at Hululais Prospect Area, South Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Mulyadi

    1995-01-01

    Schlumberger resistivity surveys were conducted in 1993 as part of a combined geological, geophysical and geological program to investigate a geothermal prospect in the Hululais area, Southern Sumatra. These resistivity data resolved the upper conductive layer and were interpreted to define the shallow extent of a possible geothermal system. A follow-up magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out to probe deeper than the dc resistivity survey results achieved. However, the resistive sub-stratum below the conductive layer was still poorly resolved. Possible reasons for this include a preferential channeling of the telluric current within the thick shallow very conductive layer, thus limiting the penetration depth of the magnetotelluric signals and poor resolution due to high noise levels caused by significant rain and sferics.

  6. Apes in Space: Saving an Imperilled Orangutan Population in Sumatra

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Smith, Gail; Campbell-Smith, Miran; Singleton, Ian; Linkie, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Deforestation rates in Sumatra are amongst the highest in the tropics. Lowland forests, which support the highest densities of orangutans, are particularly vulnerable to clearance and fragmentation because they are highly accessible. Consequently, many orangutans will, in the future, live in strictly or partially isolated populations. Whilst orangutans have been extensively studied in primary forests, their response to living in human-dominated landscapes remains poorly known, despite it being essential for their future management. Here, we focus on an isolated group of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) that co-exist with farmers in a mixed agroforest system consisting of degraded natural forest, smallholder (predominantly rubber) farms and oil palm plantations. Over 24 months we conducted the first ever spatial assessment of orangutan habitat use in the human-transformed landscape of Batang Serangan, North Sumatra. From 1,204 independent crop-raiding incidents recorded, orangutans showed strong foraging preference for mixed farmland/degraded forest habitat over oil palm patches. The core home range areas of the eight adult orangutans encompassed only 14% of the available study area. Monthly home range sizes averaged 423 ha (±139, SD) for males, and 131±46 ha for females, and were positively influenced by wild and cultivated fruit presence, and by crop consumption. The average daily distance travelled was similar for both adult males (868 m±350, SD) and females (866 m±195), but increased when orangutans raided crops. These findings show that orangutans can survive, demographically, in certain types of degraded landscapes, foraging on a mixture of crops and wild fruits. However, the poor quality habitat offered to orangutans by oil palm plantations, in terms of low food availability and as a barrier to female movements, is cause for concern since this is the land use type that is most rapidly replacing the preferred forest habitat across

  7. Apes in space: saving an imperilled orangutan population in Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Smith, Gail; Campbell-Smith, Miran; Singleton, Ian; Linkie, Matthew

    2011-02-16

    Deforestation rates in Sumatra are amongst the highest in the tropics. Lowland forests, which support the highest densities of orangutans, are particularly vulnerable to clearance and fragmentation because they are highly accessible. Consequently, many orangutans will, in the future, live in strictly or partially isolated populations. Whilst orangutans have been extensively studied in primary forests, their response to living in human-dominated landscapes remains poorly known, despite it being essential for their future management. Here, we focus on an isolated group of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) that co-exist with farmers in a mixed agroforest system consisting of degraded natural forest, smallholder (predominantly rubber) farms and oil palm plantations. Over 24 months we conducted the first ever spatial assessment of orangutan habitat use in the human-transformed landscape of Batang Serangan, North Sumatra. From 1,204 independent crop-raiding incidents recorded, orangutans showed strong foraging preference for mixed farmland/degraded forest habitat over oil palm patches. The core home range areas of the eight adult orangutans encompassed only 14% of the available study area. Monthly home range sizes averaged 423 ha (±139, SD) for males, and 131 ± 46 ha for females, and were positively influenced by wild and cultivated fruit presence, and by crop consumption. The average daily distance travelled was similar for both adult males (868 m ± 350, SD) and females (866 m ± 195), but increased when orangutans raided crops. These findings show that orangutans can survive, demographically, in certain types of degraded landscapes, foraging on a mixture of crops and wild fruits. However, the poor quality habitat offered to orangutans by oil palm plantations, in terms of low food availability and as a barrier to female movements, is cause for concern since this is the land use type that is most rapidly replacing the preferred forest habitat

  8. Indonesia lowers infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Bain, S

    1991-11-01

    Indonesia's success in reaching World Health Organization (WHO) universal immunization coverage standards is described as the result of a strong national program with timely, targeted donor support. USAID/Indonesia's Expanded Program for Immunization (EPI) and other USAID bilateral cooperation helped the government of Indonesia in its goal to immunize children against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, tuberculosis, and measles by age 1. The initial project was to identify target areas and deliver vaccines against the diseases, strengthen the national immunization organization and infrastructure, and develop the Ministry of Health's capacity to conduct studies and development activities. This EPI project spanned the period 1979-90, and set the stage for continued expansion of Indonesia's immunization program to comply with the full international schedule and range of immunizations of 3 DPT, 3 polio, 1 BCG, and 1 measles inoculation. The number of immunization sites has increased from 55 to include over 5,000 health centers in all provinces, with additional services provided by visiting vaccinators and nurses in most of the 215,000 community-supported integrated health posts. While other contributory factors were at play, program success is at least partially responsible for the 1990 infant mortality rate of 58/1,000 live births compared to 72/1,000 in 1985. Strong national leadership, dedicated health workers and volunteers, and cooperation and funding from UNICEF, the World Bank, Rotary International, and WHO also played crucially positive roles in improving immunization practice in Indonesia.

  9. Crustal shear-wave velocity structure beneath Sumatra from receiver function modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-05-01

    We estimated the shear-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs ratio of the crust beneath the Sumatra region by inverting stacked receiver functions from five three-component broadband seismic stations, located in diverse geologic setting, using a well known non-linear direct search approach, Neighborhood Algorithm (NA). Inversion results show significant variation of sediment layer thicknesses from 1 km beneath the backarc basin (station BKNI and PMBI) to 3-7 km beneath the coastal part of Sumatra region (station LHMI and MNAI) and Nias island (station GSI). Average sediment layer shear velocity (Vss) beneath all the stations is observed to be less (∼1.35 km/s) and their corresponding Vp/Vs ratio is very high (∼2.2-3.0). Crustal thickness beneath Sumatra region varies between 27 and 35 km, with exception of 19 km beneath Nias island, with average crustal Vs ∼3.1-3.4 km/s (Vp/Vs ∼1.8). It is well known that thick sediments with low Vs (and high Vp/Vs) amplify seismic waves even from a small-magnitude earthquake, which can cause huge damage in the zone. This study can provide the useful information of the crust for the Sumatra region. Since, Sumatra is an earthquake prone zone, which suffered the strong shaking of Great Andaman-Sumatra earthquake; this study can also be helpful for seismic hazard assessment.

  10. Wake Vortices and Tropical Cyclogenesis Downstream of Sumatra over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, Caitlin Marie

    A myriad of processes acting singly or in concert may contribute to tropical cyclogenesis, including convectively coupled waves, breakdown of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ), or upper-level troughs. This thesis investigates the role that topographic effects from the island of Sumatra may play in initiating tropical cyclogenesis (TC genesis) in the eastern Indian Ocean. If easterly flow is split by the mountains of Sumatra, counter-rotating lee vortices may form downstream. Because Sumatra straddles the equator, though the wake vortices rotate in opposite directions, they will both be cyclonic when winds are easterly upon Sumatra, and may intensify further into tropical cyclones. The phenomenon of crossequatorial cyclone pairs, or "twin" tropical cyclones, in the Indian Ocean originating from Sumatra was first noted by Kuettner (1989). TC genesis appears to be particularly favored during the pre-onset phase of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO), when easterly flow encroaches upon Sumatra and the resulting cyclonic wake vortices encounter convectively coupled waves and enhanced moisture associated with the MJO in the Indian Ocean. Operational analysis data from the Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) and Dynamics of the Madden Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) campaigns were used to evaluate the impacts of Sumatra's topography upon the flow. The YOTC data encompass two years, from May 2008 to April 2010, while the special observing period of DYNAMO was conducted from October to December 2011. This research also presents three case studies of twin tropical cyclones west of Sumatra in the Indian Ocean, which were all determined to originate from Sumatran wake vortices and occurred between October and December of 2008, 2009, and 2011. Multiple cyclonic wake vortices and vorticity streamers were observed downstream of Sumatra during periods of easterly flow, most frequently between October and December. Froude numbers calculated for the region upstream of Sumatra

  11. Gynecological cancer in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M Farid

    2009-03-01

    To overview the status of gynecologic cancer in Indonesia. Information regarding Indonesia obtained from World Bank Report and Statistical Yearbook of Indonesia 2007, epidemiological data obtained from Histopathological Data of Cancer in Indonesia 2002, Department of Health-Registry Body of Indonesian Specialist of Pathology Association-Indonesian Cancer Society; Various Hospitals in big Cities in Indonesia. Indonesia is an Archipelago with a total area of 1,922,570.00 km(2), the population is 222,192,000 (2006), the fourth world rank. Female is 49.86% with life expectancy 69 years. Gross National Product per Capita is 690.00 USD. Histopathological report in 2002 revealed that cervical cancer, ovarian cancer and uterine cancer were the most frequent cancer among female, which were the first (2,532 cases), the third (829 cases) and the eighth (316 cases) rank respectively. The peak age for cervical, uterine and ovarian cancer was 45-54 years. HPV 16, 18 were found in 82% of invasive cervical. Data from various academic hospitals in 2007 showed that cervical cancer is the most common malignancy followed by ovary, uterus, vulva and vagina. Five-year survival rate of stage I, II, III, IV cervical cancer were 50%, 40%, 20%, and 0% respectively. Overall five-year survival rate of carcinoma of the ovary was 54.8%. If sub-classified by stage, five-year survival rate are 94.3%, 75.0%, 31%, and 11.7% for stage I, II, III, and IV respectively. Five-year disease-free survival rate of endometrial cancer was 71.9%. Indonesia is the biggest Archipelago with a dense population but the income per capita still low (poor country). The most common gynecologic cancer is cervical cancer, followed by ovarian and uterine cancer. These cancers are included in top ten cancers in Indonesia. HPV 16, 18 were the most cause of cervical cancer. The five-year survival rates are comparable with world report.

  12. Taeniasis/cysticercosis in Papua (Irian Jaya), Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Margono, Sri S; Wandra, Toni; Swasono, Meutia F; Murni, Sri; Craig, Philip S; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Reports showed that an important parasitic zoonotic disease caused by Taenia solium, Taenia saginata and Taenia asiatica is found endemic in several areas of Indonesia including Papua, Bali and North Sumatra. At present it is known that the highest prevalence of taeniasis/cysticercosis in Indonesia, caused by T. solium is among the indigenous communities in Papua (formerly Irian Jaya). In the early 1970s, 8-9% of stool samples from the Enarotali hospital, Paniai District (Irian Jaya) were found positive with Taenia eggs. The samples were from members of the Ekari (Kapauku) ethnic group. Stool samples from the Moni ethnic group, living east of surrounding lakes, were egg negative. Cysticerci of T. solium were discovered in pigs. During the years 1973-1976 cases of burns increased and were ultimately found to be primarily associated with epileptic seizures induced by neurocysticercosis cases. Among 257 cases of burns, 88 cases (62.8%) were suffering from epileptic seizures before or during hospitalization. In the year 1981 T. solium seropositive persons were mostly (16%) found in the endemic Obano village. In 1997 the parasite was discovered in Jayawijaya District, which is located approximately 250 km east of Paniai District. During 1991-1995, a local health center in Assologaima, Jayawijaya District reported 1120 new cases with burns and a further 293 new cases of epileptic seizures among 15,939 inhabitants. The histopathologic appearance and mitochondrial DNA analysis found the cysts to be similar to those of T. solium from other regions of the world. Sensitive and specific serological diagnostic methods were used and improved. Cysticerci were detected in dogs, as well as in pigs. A coproantigen test for detection of adult tapeworms in patients was carried out. Medical treatment with praziquantel for taeniasis and albendazole for cysticercosis (with prednisone and sodium phenytoin treatment in cases with neurocysticercosis) was undertaken. Lifestyle, religion, and

  13. Impact of the Economic Growth and Acquisition of Land to the Construction Cost Index in North Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarmizi, H. B.; Daulay, M.; Muda, I.

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to test the aggregation of the economic growth of North Sumatra and the influence of the Tax on Acquisition of Land and Building to the Construction Cost Index in North Sumatra. This type of research is explanatory survey with quantitative methods. The population and the sample district in North Sumatra with the observation time series and cross sectional. The analysis tool used is multiple regression. The results showed that there was economic growth aggregation of North Sumatra and the influence of the Tax on Acquisition of Land and Building affect the Construction Cost Index.

  14. Remotely triggered nonvolcanic tremor in Sumbawa, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Florian; Lupi, Matteo; Miller, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Nonvolcanic (or tectonic) tremor is a seismic phenomenom which can provide important information about dynamics of plate boundaries but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Tectonic tremor is often associated with slow-slip (termed episodic tremor and slip) and understanding the mechanisms driving tremor presents an important challenge because it is likely a dominant aspect of the evolutionary processes leading to tsunamigenic, megathrust subduction zone earthquakes. Tectonic tremor is observed worldwide, mainly along major subduction zones and plate boundaries such as in Alaska/Aleutians, Cascadia, the San Andreas Fault, Japan or Taiwan. We present, for the first time, evidence for triggered tremor beneath the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia. The island of Sumbawa, Indonesia, is part of the Lesser Sunda Group about 250 km north of the Australian/Eurasian plate collision at the Java Trench with a convergence rate of approximately 70 mm/yr. We show surface wave triggered tremor beneath Sumbawa in response to three teleseismic earthquakes: the Mw9.0 2011 Tohoku earthquake and two oceanic strike-slip earthquakes (Mw 8.6 and Mw8.2) offshore of Sumatra in 2012. Tremor amplitudes scale with ground motion and peak at 180 nm/s ground velocity on the horizontal components. A comparison of ground motion of the three triggering events and a similar (nontriggering) Mw7.6 2012 Philippines event constrains an apparent triggering threshold of approximately 1 mm/s ground velocity or 8 kPa dynamic stress. Surface wave periods of 45-65 s appear optimal for triggering tremor at Sumbawa which predominantly correlates with Rayleigh waves, even though the 2012 oceanic events have stronger Love wave amplitudes and triggering potential. Rayleigh wave triggering, low-triggering amplitudes, and the tectonic setting all favor a model of tremor generated by localized fluid transport. We could not locate the tremor because of minimal station coverage, but data indicate several

  15. Disaster budgeting of Banda Aceh’s local government: Trends and analysis of post-tsunami Aceh 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktari, R. S.; Fahlevi, H.; Irawati, W.

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to analyze Disaster Risk Management (DRM) related funds that budgeted by the government of Banda Aceh. The specific objectives of this study were: i) to assess and analyze the budget allocation related the DRM investment in the government of Banda Aceh, ii) to provide an update on achievements and key trends in DRM investments in government of Banda Aceh, iii) to evaluate the implementation of DRM budget and challenges on mainstreaming with DRM perspectives into policy of local budgeting, and iii) to propose appropriate recommendations for improvement. The study utilized both primary and secondary sources of data to achieve the objective. The method in this study included the following steps: searching/ collecting, checking, compiling, classifying, measuring, accounting and analyzing the existing budget document. The results of the data analysis showed that a large proportion of DRM investments was allocated after 2011. This study recommended some actions to be taken by the government and related stakeholder to increase the quantity and quality of DRM investments.

  16. My Classroom: Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balazs, Erica

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the teaching experiences of Alief Noor Farida--a junior lecturer at Indonesia's "Universitas Negeri Semarang" (Semarang State University [UNNES]). Now teaching her fourth semester and an alumna of the English Education program at UNNES, Ms. Farida is an especially motivated and dedicated educator. She teaches 18…

  17. Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae): a review of conservation status.

    PubMed

    Wibisono, Hariyo T; Pusparini, Wulan

    2010-12-01

    The majority of wild Sumatran tigers are believed to live in 12 Tiger Conservation Landscapes covering approximately 88,000 km(2) . However, the actual distribution of tigers across Sumatra has never been accurately mapped. Over the past 20 years, conservation efforts focused on the Sumatran tigers have increased, but the population continues to decline as a result of several key threats. To identify the status of the Sumatran tiger distribution across the island, an island-wide questionnaire survey comprised of 35 respondents from various backgrounds was conducted between May and June 2010. The survey found that Sumatran tigers are positively present in 27 habitat patches larger than 250 km(2) and possibly present in another 2. In addition, a review on major published studies on the Sumatran tiger was conducted to identify the current conservation status of the Sumatran tiger. Collectively, these studies have identified several key factors that have contributed to the decline of Sumatran tiger populations, including: forest habitat fragmentation and loss, direct killing of tigers and their prey, and the retaliatory killing of tigers due to conflict with villagers. The present paper provides management authorities and the international community with a recent assessment and a base map of the actual distribution of Sumatran tigers as well as a general overview on the current status and possible future conservation challenges of Sumatran tiger management.

  18. Landslides and mass wasting offshore Sumatra - results from the Sumatra Earthquake HMS Scott survey January-February 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappin, D. R.; Henstock, T.; McNeill, L.; Grilli, S.; Biscontin, G.; Watts, P.

    2005-12-01

    Earthquakes are a commonly cited mechanism for triggering submarine landslides that have the potential to generate damaging tsunamis (e.g. Papua New Guinea 1998). Notwithstanding, the Indian Ocean earthquake of December 26th 2005 has been cited as the cause of both far field and local tsunami runups that have been measured at over 35 metres on the west coast of Sumatra. On the basis of present modelling this seems to be the case. However, if earthquakes are such a common trigger for landslides then the magnitude 9.3 earthquake of December 26th might be expected to have caused numerous seabed failures within the area of rupture that may have contributed to local tsunami runup. This contribution discusses the seabed morphology offshore of Sumatra acquired during the survey carried out by HMS Scott in January and February 2005. Utilising a unique high resolution 12 kHz, 361-beam hull-mounted Sass IV sonar, over 40,000 square kilometres of seabed were mapped. The objective was to identify seabed movements that were the result of the earthquake and to identify submarine slope failures that may have contributed to the tsunami. This paper reports on the results of the survey using Fledermaus imaging software. The area mapped is an accretionary complex formed as the two plates have converged over the past 40 million years. From the data several seabed failure mechanisms of different ages have been identified. Along the plate margin in the west of the survey area the deformation front comprises a series of young thrust folds up to 1000m in elevation and tens of kilometres in length. In places the seaward faces of these folds have failed cohesively and slumped blocks 100's of metres high and up to several kilometres long have been displaced up to 13 kilometres onto the inner trench floor. At other locations older episodes of failure are identified by the presence of displaced slumped blocks located on the crests of the folds; the slumps thus predating uplift. Where young

  19. Diversity of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Indonesian populations of Sumatra, Sulawesi and Moluccas Islands.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, M; Velickovic, Z; Panigoro, R; Dunckley, H

    2010-10-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the activity of natural killer and T cells through interaction with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules on target cells. Like HLA class I genes that are characterised by extreme allelic polymorphism, KIR genes are diverse and vary in both gene content and allelic polymorphism. Population studies conducted over the last several years have showed that KIR gene frequencies (GF) and genotype content vary among different ethnic groups, indicating the extent of KIR diversity. Some studies have also shown the effect of the presence or absence of specific KIR genes in human disease. We have recently reported the distribution of KIR genes in populations from Java (Central Javanese and the Sundanese of West Java), East Timor (Timorese), Kalimantan provinces of Indonesian Borneo (Dayaks) and Irian Jaya (Western half of the island of New Guinea; Melanese). We here extend analysis of the KIR genes in populations from North Sulawesi (Minahasans), West Sumatra (Minangs) and Moluccas Islands. All 16 KIR genes were observed in all three populations. Variation in GF between populations was observed, except for the KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, KIR3DL3 and KIR3DP1 genes, which were present in every individual tested. When comparing KIR GF between populations, both principal component analysis and phylogenetic tree analyses showed a close relationship between Minahasan and Moluccan populations that are clustered with Timorese in the same clade. The Minang tribe lies between the Javanese/Kalimantan and the Timorese/Minahasan/Moluccan clades, whereas Irianese show the greatest genetic distances from other Indonesian populations. The results correspond well with the history of migration in Indonesia and will contribute to the understanding of the genetic as well as the geographic history of the region.

  20. Glacial to Holocene dynamics of Indonesian precipitation - New insights from plant-wax dD off Northwest Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeyer, E. M.; Mohtadi, M.; Sessions, A. L.; Feakins, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    We used the stable hydrogen and stable carbon isotopic composition (dD and d13C, respectively) of terrestrial plant leaf waxes as a proxy for past rainfall variations over northwestern Indonesia. Our study site lies within the western boundary of the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP), a key evaporative site for the global hydrologic cycle. At present, rainfall intensity in tropical Indonesia is influenced by the Pacific Ocean El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (see Kirono et al., 1999), the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) mode (Saji et al., 1999), and to some extend by the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) (e.g. Koutavas and Lynch-Stieglitz, 2005). Paleoclimate studies show that these systems have varied in the past, however, the impact of these changes on regional paelo-hydrology of Indonesia is yet unknown. We worked on marine sediment core SO189-144KL (1°09,300 N; 98°03,960 E) retrieved at 480 m water depth off Northwest Sumatra from the eastern Indian Ocean. Sediments consist of material from marine and terrestrial sources, and radiocarbon dating indicates an age of ~300 years at the core top and of ~24,000 years at the base. We used d13C and dD values of the n-C30 alkanoic acid as proxies for changes in vegetation composition (C3 vs. C4 plants) and rainfall variability on land, respectively. Values of d13C show only little variation and suggest persistent dominance of tropical trees throughout the past 24,000 years. Values of dD display distinct variability throughout the record, however, mean rainfall intensities during the late Last Glacial compare to those during the Holocene. This is in agreement with rather consistent vegetation at the study site but in sharp contrast with reconstructions of contemporaneous rainfall patterns at the nearby islands Borneo (Partin et al., 2007) and Flores (Griffiths et al., 2009), indicating multiple controls on regional hydrology of Indonesia. In combination with previous studies of late Pleistocene to Holocene

  1. Reconstructing hydrologic changes in Indonesia by deuterium isotope compositions of plant waxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesierich, K.; Schefuss, E.; Hebbeln, D.; Mohtadi, M.; Behling, H.; Jennerjahn, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Indonesian region plays an essential role as a center of atmospheric heat and moisture source of the Earth's climate system and is known for its characteristic abundant rainfall throughout the year. Here, we examine hydrological variability during the Late Quaternary in Indonesia from a NW-SE transect from Sumatra to Flores based on compound-specific plant leaf wax isotope measurements. The five investigated coring sites are located on the continental shelf in the Indian Ocean, spanning the last 20 ka. The transect covers a pronounced gradient in climate and vegetation. Sumatra is located in an area with sufficient rainfall throughout the year, whereas in eastward direction rainfall decreases and a dry season exist. Compound specific analyses of n-alkanes of plant leaf waxes (D/H and δ13C) give insights into continental hydrologic changes and the distribution of C3 and C4 vegetation. We compared data from 4 time intervals that characterize the last glacial maximum (20 ka), the Heinrich event 1 (15 ka) and the Holocene with maximum in summer insolation (8 ka) and minimum in summer insolation at 30°N (3 ka). Our results show that estimated D/H values of precipitation, i.e., by vegetation-correction of compound-specific D/H values of n-alkanes, in the Holocene (3 and 8 ka) coincide with modern averaged D/H values of rain water. In contrast, during glacial times the results deviate significantly to lighter values, which would indicate higher rainfall intensity due to the amount-effect. The largest deviations to lighter values are found in the Java region, whereas Sumatra and Flores shows only slightly changes. Previous studies and the δ13C values of the n-alkanes, however, suggest that climate in Indonesia, especially in the eastern part, was drier during the last glacial, including Heinrich 1, and C4 grasses were more abundant, respectively. This discrepancy must be explained by other effects on the isotopic composition of rainfall that occurred in the

  2. Fire emissions and regional air quality impacts from fires in oil palm, timber, and logging concessions in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlier, Miriam E.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Kim, Patrick S.; Koplitz, Shannon N.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Myers, Samuel S.

    2015-08-01

    Fires associated with agricultural and plantation development in Indonesia impact ecosystem services and release emissions into the atmosphere that degrade regional air quality and contribute to greenhouse gas concentrations. In this study, we estimate the relative contributions of the oil palm, timber (for wood pulp and paper), and logging industries in Sumatra and Kalimantan to land cover change, fire activity, and regional population exposure to smoke concentrations. Concessions for these three industries cover 21% and 49% of the land area in Sumatra and Kalimantan respectively, with the highest overall area in lowlands on mineral soils instead of more carbon-rich peatlands. In 2012, most remaining forest area was located in logging concessions for both islands, and for all combined concessions, there was higher remaining lowland and peatland forest area in Kalimantan (45% and 46%, respectively) versus Sumatra (20% and 27%, respectively). Emissions from all combined concessions comprised 41% of total fire emissions (within and outside of concession boundaries) in Sumatra and 27% in Kalimantan for the 2006 burning season, which had high fire activity relative to decadal emissions. Most fire emissions were observed in concessions located on peatlands and non-forested lowlands, the latter of which could include concessions that are currently under production, cleared in preparation for production, or abandoned lands. For the 2006 burning season, timber concessions from Sumatra (47% of area and 88% of emissions) and oil palm concessions from Kalimantan (33% of area and 67% of emissions) contributed the most to concession-related fire emissions from each island. Although fire emissions from concessions were higher in Kalimantan, emissions from Sumatra contributed 63% of concession-related smoke concentrations for the population-weighted region because fire sources were located closer to population centers. In order to protect regional public health, our results

  3. The future of forests and orangutans (Pongo abelii) in Sumatra: predicting impacts of oil palm plantations, road construction, and mechanisms for reducing carbon emissions from deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaveau, David L. A.; Wich, Serge; Epting, Justin; Juhn, Daniel; Kanninen, Markku; Leader-Williams, Nigel

    2009-09-01

    Payments for reduced carbon emissions from deforestation (RED) are now attracting attention as a way to halt tropical deforestation. Northern Sumatra comprises an area of 65 000 km2 that is both the site of Indonesia's first planned RED initiative, and the stronghold of 92% of remaining Sumatran orangutans. Under current plans, this RED initiative will be implemented in a defined geographic area, essentially a newly established, 7500 km2 protected area (PA) comprising mostly upland forest, where guards will be recruited to enforce forest protection. Meanwhile, new roads are currently under construction, while companies are converting lowland forests into oil palm plantations. This case study predicts the effectiveness of RED in reducing deforestation and conserving orangutans for two distinct scenarios: the current plan of implementing RED within the specific boundary of a new upland PA, and an alternative scenario of implementing RED across landscapes outside PAs. Our satellite-based spatially explicit deforestation model predicts that 1313 km2 of forest would be saved from deforestation by 2030, while forest cover present in 2006 would shrink by 22% (7913 km2) across landscapes outside PAs if RED were only to be implemented in the upland PA. Meanwhile, orangutan habitat would reduce by 16% (1137 km2), resulting in the conservative loss of 1384 orangutans, or 25% of the current total population with or without RED intervention. By contrast, an estimated 7824 km2 of forest could be saved from deforestation, with maximum benefit for orangutan conservation, if RED were to be implemented across all remaining forest landscapes outside PAs. Here, RED payments would compensate land users for their opportunity costs in not converting unprotected forests into oil palm, while the construction of new roads to service the marketing of oil palm would be halted. Our predictions suggest that Indonesia's first RED initiative in an upland PA may not significantly reduce

  4. Indonesia's migration transition.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G

    1995-01-01

    This article describes population movements in Indonesia in the context of rapid and marked social and economic change. Foreign investment in Indonesia is increasing, and global mass media is available to many households. Agriculture is being commercialized, and structural shifts are occurring in the economy. Educational levels are increasing, and women's role and status are shifting. Population migration has increased over the decades, both short and long distance, permanent and temporary, legal and illegal, and migration to and between urban areas. This article focuses specifically on rural-to-urban migration and international migration. Population settlements are dense in the agriculturally rich inner areas of Java, Bali, and Madura. Although the rate of growth of the gross domestic product was 6.8% annually during 1969-94, the World Bank ranked Indonesia as a low-income economy in 1992 because of the large population size. Income per capita is US $670. Indonesia is becoming a large exporter of labor to the Middle East, particularly women. The predominance of women as overseas contract workers is changing women's role and status in the family and is controversial due to the cases of mistreatment. Malaysia's high economic growth rate of over 8% per year means an additional 1.3 million foreign workers and technicians are needed. During the 1980s urban growth increased at a very rapid rate. Urban growth tended to occur along corridors and major transportation routes around urban areas. It is posited that most of the urban growth is due to rural-to-urban migration. Data limitations prevent an exact determination of the extent of rural-to-urban migration. More women are estimated to be involved in movements to cities during the 1980s compared to the 1970s. Recruiters and middlemen have played an important role in rural-to-urban migration and international migration.

  5. Abortion in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Ball, Haley

    2008-09-01

    Each year in Indonesia, millions of women become pregnant unintentionally, and many choose to end their pregnancies, despite the fact that abortion is generally illegal. Like their counterparts in many developing countries where abortion is stigmatized and highly restricted, Indonesian women often seek clandestine procedures performed by untrained providers, and resort to methods that include ingesting unsafe substances and undergoing harmful abortive massage. Though reliable evidence does not exist, researchers estimate that about two million induced abortions occur each year in the country and that deaths from unsafe abortion represent 14-16% of all maternal deaths in Southeast Asia. Preventing unsafe abortion is imperative if Indonesia is to achieve the fifth Millennium Development Goal of improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality. Current Indonesian abortion law is based on a national health bill passed in 1992. Though the language on abortion was vague, it is generally accepted that the law allows abortion only if the woman provides confirmation from a doctor that her pregnancy is life-threatening, a letter of consent from her husband or a family member, a positive pregnancy test result and a statement guaranteeing that she will practice contraception afterwards. This report presents what is currently known about abortion in Indonesia. The findings are derived primarily from small-scale, urban, clinic-based studies of women's experiences with abortion. Some studies included women in rural areas and those who sought abortions outside of clinics, but none were nationally representative. Although these studies do not give a full picture of who is obtaining abortions in Indonesia or what their experiences are, the evidence suggests that abortion is a common occurrence in the country and that the conditions under which abortion takes place are often unsafe.

  6. [Circular migration in Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Mantra, I B

    1979-12-01

    The author examines circular migration in Indonesia, with primary focus on the 1970s. It is found that circular, or repeated return migration, generally occurs over short distances and for short periods and is more frequent than lifetime migration. The relationships between improvements in the national transport system, access to labor force opportunities in both the formal and informal sectors of the economy, and circular migration are discussed.

  7. Urologic cancer in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Umbas, Rainy; Safriadi, Ferry; Mochtar, Chaidir A; Djatisoesanto, Wahjoe; Hamid, Agus Rizal A H

    2015-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases, including cancer, start to become more common in Indonesia. According to the government statement, incidence of malignant diseases increased annually up to 8% in the last decade and these diseases become the seventh leading cause of death in Indonesia. On the basis of the latest Globocan report on cancer incidence in Indonesia, prostate cancer ranks sixth; followed by bladder (12th) and kidney (18th). More than half of patients with kidney cancer are diagnosed in the advanced stage. Besides renal cell carcinoma, there are significant number of people affected with squamous cell and transitional cell carcinoma because of kidney stones. Radical nephrectomy or cytoreductive nephrectomy was the primary treatment, mostly done as an open procedure. Transitional cell carcinoma is the commonest histology type in bladder cancer cases followed by squamous cell carcinoma, which almost always related to bladder stones. Unfortunately, >70% of our cases were diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancer, and ∼60% of these patients refused further radical treatment. Incidence of prostate cancer is increasing rapidly and it becomes the third most common cancer in men. However, most of our patients are diagnosed in the advanced stage. Radical prostatectomy or external beam radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in localized disease. Nearly 40% of the elderly patients are treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy. Therefore, it requires more research by the Indonesian urologists and other healthcare providers to diagnose these cancers in earlier stage as well as community education for prevention.

  8. Exploring Indonesia: Past and Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schelander, Bjorn

    This book provides an overview of Indonesia's history and culture. The book begins with prehistoric times and continues through nationhood. Each chapter provides background information along with student activities and project suggestions. Chapters include: (1) "Introduction to the Lands and Peoples of Indonesia"; (2) "Early…

  9. Emergence of Melioidosis in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Tauran, Patricia M; Sennang, Nurhayana; Rusli, Benny; Wiersinga, W Joost; Dance, David; Arif, Mansyur; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2015-12-01

    Melioidosis is known to be highly endemic in parts of southeast Asia and northern Australia; however, cases are rarely reported in Indonesia. Here we report three cases of melioidosis in Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia occurring between 2013 and 2014. Two patients died and the other was lost to follow-up. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates from all three cases were identified by the VITEK2 Compact installed in the hospital in 2012. None of the three patients reported received antimicrobials recommended for melioidosis because of the delayed recognition of the organism. We reviewed the literature and found only seven reports of melioidosis in Indonesia. Five were reported before 1960. We suggest that melioidosis is endemic throughout Indonesia but currently under-recognized. Training on how to identify B. pseudomallei accurately and safely in all available microbiological facilities should be provided, and consideration should be given to making melioidosis a notifiable disease in Indonesia.

  10. Emergence of Melioidosis in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Tauran, Patricia M.; Sennang, Nurhayana; Rusli, Benny; Wiersinga, W. Joost; Dance, David; Arif, Mansyur; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is known to be highly endemic in parts of southeast Asia and northern Australia; however, cases are rarely reported in Indonesia. Here we report three cases of melioidosis in Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia occurring between 2013 and 2014. Two patients died and the other was lost to follow-up. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates from all three cases were identified by the VITEK2 Compact installed in the hospital in 2012. None of the three patients reported received antimicrobials recommended for melioidosis because of the delayed recognition of the organism. We reviewed the literature and found only seven reports of melioidosis in Indonesia. Five were reported before 1960. We suggest that melioidosis is endemic throughout Indonesia but currently under-recognized. Training on how to identify B. pseudomallei accurately and safely in all available microbiological facilities should be provided, and consideration should be given to making melioidosis a notifiable disease in Indonesia. PMID:26458777

  11. Geologic impacts of the 2004 Indian ocean tsunami on Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, B.M.; Jaffe, B.E.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Morton, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was generated by a large submarine earthquake (magnitude ???9.1) with an epicenter located under the seafloor in the eastern Indian Ocean near northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The resulting tsunami was measured globally and had significant geologic impacts throughout the Indian Ocean basin. Observations of tsunami impacts, such as morphologic change, sedimentary deposits, and water-level measurements, are used to reconstruct tsunamogenic processes. Data from Sumatra, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives provide a synoptic view of tsunami characteristics from a wide range of coastal environments both near- and far-field from the tsunami origin. Impacts to the coast as a result of the tsunami varied depending upon the height of the wave at impact, orientation of the coast with regard to direction of wave approach, and local topography, bathymetry, geology, and vegetation cover. Tsunami deposits were observed in all the countries visited and can be generally characterized as relatively thin sheets (<80 cm), mostly of sand. ?? 2006 Gebru??der Borntraeger.

  12. Piloting the One Health Systems Mapping and Analysis Resource Toolkit in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Errecaborde, Kaylee Myhre; Pelican, Katharine M; Kassenborg, Heidi; Prasarnphanich, Ong-Orn; Valeri, Linda; Yuuzar, Erinaldi; Fauzi, Rama Prima Syahti; Budayanti, Nyoman Sri; Suwandono, Agus; Artama, Wayan T; Adisasmito, Wiku; Dutcher, Tracey

    2017-03-01

    As a global network, countries are being asked to meet goals set forth in the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) for a workforce capable of effective and efficient prevention, detection and response to infectious disease threats. There is great need for a cross-sectoral workforce that can innovate and problem-solve. To achieve GHSA goals, countries need a way to visualize their existing system, identify opportunities for improvement, and achieve improved cross-sectoral interactions. The One Health Systems Mapping and Analysis Resource Toolkit (OH-SMART) was successfully piloted in West Sumatra, Indonesia, and was used to enhance multi-agency collaboration around infectious disease outbreaks and proved to be an adaptable, scalable process requiring minimal resources. The authors present OH-SMART as a potential tool to help countries analyze their existing health system and create relevant action steps to improve cross-sectoral collaborations.

  13. Primal Alternatives to Talk Therapy: The Batak "Tondi" of North Sumatra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that the Toba Batak of North Sumatra provide internalized means of mediating mental health through religious-based notion of the tondi, or source of power, inside the person as the source of mental-physical health and illness. Discusses rituals necessary for maintaining health with rationale supporting those rituals. Describes applications…

  14. The phylogeography of orangutan foamy viruses supports the theory of ancient repopulation of Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Verschoor, Ernst J; Langenhuijzen, Susan; Bontjer, Ilja; Fagrouch, Zahra; Niphuis, Henk; Warren, Kristin S; Eulenberger, K; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2004-11-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of foamy virus sequences obtained from Bornean and Sumatran orangutans showed a distinct clustering pattern. One subcluster was represented by both Bornean and Sumatran orangutan simian foamy viruses (SFV). Combined analysis of host mitochondrial DNA and SFV phylogeny provided evidence for the hypothesis of the repopulation of Sumatra by orangutans from Borneo.

  15. Deformations Associated With Large Interplate Earthquakes Along the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.; Fukushima, Y.; Katagi, T.; Hashizume, M.; Satomura, M.; Wu, P.; Kato, T.

    2008-12-01

    Since the occurrence of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw9.2), the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction zone has attracted geophysicists' attention. We have been carrying on CGPS observation in Thailand and Myanmar to detect postseismic deformation following this gigantic event. Since CGPS on land is not enough to clarify the detailed image of postseismic deformation, we also make InSAR analyses in Andaman and Phuket Islands. On September 12, 2007, another Mw8.4 event occurred SW off Sumatra. We report deformations observed with GPS and SAR including co- and postseismic deformation following this event. We have analyzed CGPS data up to the end of 2007 and detected postseismic displacements all over the Indochina peninsula. Phuket, which suffered from about 26cm coseismic displacement, has shifted by 26cm southwestward till July, 2007. Postseismic transient is clearly recognized and already exceeds coseismic movements at remote sites such as Bangkok and Chiang Mai in Thailand. We processed ALOS/PALSAR data in Andaman and Phuket islands. No remarkable deformation is found in Andaman and Phuket Islands, since the operation period of ALOS/PALSAR is not long enough and the wavelength of postseismic deformation may be much longer than the swath. We try to synthesize the postseismic displacement using a 3-D viscoelastic FEM model. Its results imply that viscoelastic relaxation in mantle with a typical mantle viscosity may play an important role for the observed postseismic transients except during the first six month. An extremely low viscosity is not required beneath the Andaman Sea, though this back arc is now actively opening. Coseismic motion following the 2007 Sumatra event is detected north of Benkgulu on the coast of southern Sumatra with InSAR. The largest LOS displacement of about 35cm is observed 100km NW of Bengkulu. Coseismic westward displacements of 3.5cm from the 2007 Sumatra event are also observed at Singapore, whose epicentral distance is about 700km, with

  16. Measurement of momentum flux using two meteor radars in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Riggin, Dennis M.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Two nearly identical meteor radars were operated at Koto Tabang (0.20° S, 100.32° E), West Sumatra, and Biak (1.17° S, 136.10° E), West Papua, in Indonesia, separated by approximately 4000 km in longitude on the Equator. The zonal and meridional momentum flux, u'w' and v'w', where u, v, and w are the eastward, northward, and vertical wind velocity components, respectively, were estimated at 86 to 94 km altitudes using the meteor radar data by applying a method proposed by Hocking (2005). The observed u'w' at the two sites agreed reasonably well at 86, 90, and 94 km during the observation periods when the data acquisition rate was sufficiently large enough. Variations in v'w' were consistent between 86, 90, and 94 km altitudes at both sites. The climatological variation in the monthly averaged u'w' and v'w' was investigated using the long-term radar data at Koto Tabang from November 2002 to November 2013. The seasonal variations in u'w' and v'w' showed a repeatable semiannual and annual cycles, respectively. u'w' showed eastward values in February-April and July-September and v'w' was northward in June to August at 90-94 km, both of which were generally anti-phase with the mean zonal and meridional winds, having the same periodicity. Our results suggest the usefulness of the Hocking method.

  17. The hemoglobin O mutation in Indonesia: distribution and phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Daud, D; Harahap, A; Setianingsih, I; Nainggolan, I; Tranggana, S; Pakasi, R; Marzuki, S

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated hemoglobin O Indonesia (HbOIna) in related ethnic populations of the Indonesian archipelago: 1725 individuals of the five ethnic populations of South Sulawesi (Bugis, Toraja, Makassar, Mandar, and Kajang) and 959 individuals of the neighboring islands, who were divided into five phylogenetic groups: (a) Batak; (b) Malay from Padang, Pakanbaru, and Palembang in the island of Sumatra; (c) Javanese-related populations (Java, Tengger, and Bali) from the islands of Java and Bali; (d) populations of the Lesser Sunda Islands of Lombok, Sumba, and Sumbawa; and (e) the Papuan-languagespeaking population of Alor Island. Nineteen individuals heterozygous for HbO(Ina) were identified from the Bugis, Toraja, Makassar, and Kajang ethnic populations, but none from the other populations. In all cases, the underlying mutation was found to be in codon 116 (GAG to AAG) of the alpha1-globin gene, resulting in the Glull6Lys amino acid change. The level of HbO in the 17 individuals plus 12 additional family members carrying the mutation was found to be 11.6 +/- 1.0%, significantly lower than the expected 17%-22%, indicating the instability of HbO.

  18. Infant malnutrition in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Oomen, H. A. P. C.

    1953-01-01

    Infant malnutrition, resulting frequently in the death of children of pre-school age, is a problem requiring urgent solution in Indonesia. Children suffering from malnutrition show a variety of symptoms, the most characteristic being emaciation, growth retardation, liver changes, dyspigmentation of skin and hair, other skin lesions, oedema, muscular wasting, anaemia, and xerophthalmia. The indicative value of xerophthalmia, which often leads to the development of keratomalacia, in the diagnosis of malnutrition is stressed by the author. Further research is required to determine the causes—and particularly the part played by diet—of the clinical differences observed in malnutrition cases. Far greater interest in the problem of malnutrition must be shown by the entire medical profession in Indonesia if treatment is to be carried out successfully. The specific symptom, xerophthalmia, is easily curable with cod-liver oil. General malnutrition can be prevented only if sufficient amounts, both quantitatively and qualitatively, of protein, vitamin A, and calories are provided for every child. The Indonesian must be taught, by practical example, the necessity of adequate feeding, and be encouraged to make maximum use of locally available foods. It is hoped that the centres to deal with malnutrition, envisaged by the Ministry of Health, will provide both curative and preventive treatment and facilities for propaganda and research. ImagesFIG. 1-2FIG. 3-4FIG. 5-6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:13106702

  19. Inventory of Forts in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinandi, N.; Suryaningsih, F.

    2015-08-01

    The great archipelago in Indonesia with its wealthy and various nature, the products and commodities of tropic agriculture and the rich soil, was through the centuries a region of interest for other countries all over the world. For several reasons some of these countries came to Indonesia to establish their existence and tried to monopolize the trading. These countries such as the Portuguese, the Spanish, the Dutch and the British built strengthened trade stations which later became forts all over Indonesia to defend their interest. The archipelago of Indonesia possesses a great number of fortification-works as legacies of native rulers and those which were built by European trading companies and later became colonial powers in the 16th to the 19th centuries. These legacies include those specific structures built as a defence system during pre and within the period of World War II. These fortresses are nowadaysvaluable subjects, because they might be considered as shared heritage among these countries and Indonesia. It's important to develop a vision to preserve these particular subjects of heritage, because they are an interesting part of the Indonesian history and its cultural treasures. The Government of the Republic of Indonesia has national program to compile a comprehensive documentation of the existing condition of these various types of forts as cultural heritage. The result of the 3 years project was a comprehensive 442 forts database in Indonesia, which will be very valuable to the implementation of legal protection, preservation matters and adaptive re-use in the future.

  20. The 339 Years of Living Dangerously in Indonesia: Earthquakes and Tsunamis in the Indonesian Region from 1538 to 1877

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. A.; Major, J.

    2013-05-01

    Using 339 years of Dutch records of geophysical events in Indonesia and tsunami modeling, we have identified previously unknown mega-thrust earthquake sources in eastern Indonesia that caused severe devastation in the past and are likely to reoccur in the near future. Indonesia has experienced some of the most extreme geohazards known (Toba, Krakatoa, Tambora, Indian Ocean tsunami). Although most of well known events occurred in western Indonesia, historical records reveal that eastern Indonesia is actually more hazardous. Strain rates in eastern Indonesia are twice those in Sumatra and tsunamis are much more frequent. Adding to the disaster potential in Indonesia is its rapid population growth and urbanization, especially in coastal regions. When the events documented in historical records reoccur in eastern Indonesia, as they have in western Indonesia, ten times more people and assets will be in harms way. Arthur Wichmann's Die Erdbeben Des Indischen Archipels [The Earthquakes of the Indian Archipelago] (1918) documents >100 destructive earthquakes and 68 tsunamis between 1600 and 1877. The largest and best documented are the events of 1629, 1674 and 1852 in the Banda Sea region, 1770 and 1859 in the Molucca Sea region, 1820 in Makassar, 1857 in Dili, Timor, 1815 in Bali and Lombak, 1699, 1771, 1780, 1815, 1848 and 1852 in Java and 1799, 1833 and 1861 in Sumatra. All of these events caused damage over a broad region notwithstanding high seismic attenuation rates, and are associated with years of temporal and spatial clustering of earthquakes. Several tsunami are recorded with run-up heights > 15 meters. Many islands were engulfed and coastal communities washed away. The earthquakes associated with these events were felt over a region as large as the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake in Japan and were followed by decades of aftershocks. Over the past 160 years no major shallow earthquakes have struck eastern Indonesia, which is characterized as an area incapable of mega

  1. Cultural Mapping of the Heritage Districts in Medan, North Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitri, I.; Ratna; Sitorus, R.; Affan, M.

    2017-03-01

    Medan as one of the historical towns in Indonesia is rich with architectural and urban heritages; however, there still has no integrated plan to safeguard them. This paper discusses the cultural mapping of the seven heritage conservation districts in the city of Medan. It focuses on exploring the process and challenges of the study from the initial step of data collections to the building of the cultural maps with web based GIS. Multi-method of data collection tactics or triangulation such as field survey, interviews was done to cover the cultural data resources including both tangible (or quantitative) and intangible (or qualitative). Participation of the local community is essential to identify mainly the intangibles one. Based on the preliminary analysis of the seven heritage districts in Medan city, Merdeka-Kesawan area had whole categories of the cultural assets and resources compared to other six heritage areas. Consequently, it influences the enhancement its cultural heritage significance. By using our methods, we emphasized the importance of the cultural mapping in preparing the conservation policies and strategies of the seven heritage districts in Medan.

  2. English Language Teaching in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musthafa, Bachrudin

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the education system in Indonesia, the development of a national English syllabus, English in elementary and secondary schools and in higher education, private sector English courses, teacher preparation and professional development, and expatriate English teachers. (Author/VWL)

  3. Women at risk: Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Lubis, I

    1996-01-01

    In Indonesia, women, commercial sex workers, truck drivers, migrant workers, and people who live in port areas easily accessible to tourists and fishermen are particularly at risk of becoming infected with HIV. Recognizing the country's potential vulnerability to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the government and the World Bank agreed to fund a $35.4 million, 3-year HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) prevention project to strengthen the capacity of government, nongovernmental organizations, and community-based organizations to carry out the basics of HIV/AIDS prevention, extend the sentinel surveillance system, ensure blood safety, launch public education campaigns, educate health workers on universal precautions and safe waste disposal, promote safer sex skills and behavioral change, and test the sensitivity of certain antibiotics to syphilis and gonorrhea. The program will also establish a STD control program and address the economic impact of the disease by improving the livelihood strategies of HIV/AIDS-affected communities.

  4. Prehospital care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, E; Pusponegoro, A

    2005-01-01

    Current system: Hospitals of varying standards are widespread but have no system of emergency ambulance or patient retrieval. Indonesia's only public emergency ambulance service, 118, is based in five of the biggest cities and is leading the way in paramedic training and prehospital care. Challenges and developments: There are many challenges faced including the culture of acceptance, vast geographical areas, traffic, inadequate numbers of ambulances, and access to quality training resources. Recently there have been a number of encouraging developments including setting up of a disaster response brigade, better provision of ambulances, and development of paramedic training. Conclusions: An integrated national regionalised hospital and prehospital system may seem fantastic but with the enthusiasm of those involved and perhaps some help from countries with access to training resources it may not be an unrealistic goal. PMID:15662073

  5. Family planning Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Singarimbun, M

    1968-06-01

    The growth of family planning activities in Indonesia in the Postwar period is traced; and future prospects for family planning are assessed. Transmigration projects initiated by the Dutch and supported by President Sukarno after Indonesian independence as a means of decreasing population pressure on the island of Java, are identified as the only official response to the population problem until 1965. In the face of the government's opposition to the idea of birth control as a population control measure, the activities of the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) after its founding in 1957 were limited to advising mothers on spacing of their children for health reasons. Statements made in support of a national family planning program by government officials at a 1967 IPPA Congress and on other occasions are noted. The major components of an approved national family planning program to start in 1969 are described. However, the government's policy as of late 1967 and early 1968 is characterized as one of mainly benevolent encouragement and help to voluntary organizations. The chief impediment to family planning in Indonesia is said to be a lack of motivation and the force of traditional values that favor large families. On the positive side are: 1) Studies showing considerable interest in birth control by the rural population; 2) A long history of traditional birth control practices; 3) The absence of outright opposition by religious groups to the principle of family planning. However, financial costs, the need for the training of personnel, and a general unawareness of the magnitude of the task lying ahead constitute other formidable obstacles.

  6. Gravitational gradient changes following the 2004 December 26 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake inferred from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Shum, C. K.; Jekeli, Christopher

    2012-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) spaceborne gravimetry data are capable of observing coseismic gravity changes resulting from great earthquakes, such as the 2004 December 26 Sumatra-Andaman event (Mw 9.1-9.3). Here, we show for the first time that refined deformation signals from the 2004 December 26 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake (Mw 9.1-9.3) together with the 2005 March 28 Nias earthquake (Mw 8.6) can be revealed by deriving the full gravitational gradient tensor from GRACE monthly gravitational field. The GRACE-inferred coseismic gravitational gradient changes agree well with coseismic slip model predictions. Since the high-frequency contents in gravitational field variation can be amplified by deriving the gravitational gradients, the GRACE-derived coseismic gravitational gradient changes clearly delineate the fault lines, locate significant slips, and better define the extent of the coseismic deformation.

  7. Deep Seismic Reflection Images of the Sumatra Seismic and Aseismic Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Hananto, N. D.; Chauhan, A.; Carton, H. D.; Midenet, S.; Djajadihardja, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is seismically most active region on the Earth, and has been the site of three great earthquakes only in the last four years. The first of the series, the 2004 Boxing Day earthquake, broke 1300 km of the plate boundary and produced the devastating tsunami around the Indian Ocean. The second great earthquake occurred three months later in March 2005, about 150 km SE of the 2004 event. The Earth waited for three years, and then broke again in September 2007 at 1300 km SE of the 2004 event producing a twin earthquake of magnitudes of 8.5 and 7.9 at an interval of 12 hours, leaving a seismic gap of about 600 km between the second and third earthquake, the Sumatra Seismic Gap. Seismological and geodetic studies suggest that this gap is fully locked and may break any time. In order to study the seismic and tsunami risk in this locked region, a deep seismic reflection survey (Tsunami Investigation Deep Evaluation Seismic -TIDES) was carried out in May 2009 using the CGGVeritas vessel Geowave Champion towing a 15 long streamer, the longest ever used during a seismic survey, to image the nature of the subducting plate and associated features, including the seismogenic zone, from seafloor down to 50 km depth. A total of 1700 km of deep seismic reflection data were acquired. Three dip lines traverse the Sumatra subduction zone; one going through the Sumatra Seismic Gap, one crossing the region that broke during the 2007 great earthquake, and one going through the aseismic zone. These three dip profiles should provide insight about the locking mechanism and help us to understand why an earthquake occurs in one zone and not in aseismic zone. A strike-line was shot in the forearc basin connecting the locked zone with broken zone profiles, which should provide insight about barriers that might have stopped propagation of 2007 earthquake rupture further northward.

  8. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA's) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 - April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  9. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    SciTech Connect

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  10. Viscoelastic relaxation in a heterogeneous Earth following the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Kelly; Bürgmann, Roland; Freed, Andrew M.; Banerjee, Paramesh

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of the three-dimensional heterogeneity of mantle rheology allows models of viscoelastic relaxation following the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake to simultaneously fit both the observed far-field and near-field postseismic deformation. We use horizontal and vertical campaign and continuous GPS observations from the Andaman, Nicobar, and Sumatran forearc islands, mainland Sumatra, Thailand, the Malay Peninsula, the Indian Ocean, and southern India, spanning the first five years of postseismic deformation. The postseismic relaxation models consider contributions from the 2004 Mw 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman, the 2005 Mw 8.7 Nias, and 2007 Mw 8.4 Bengkulu earthquakes. Far-field motions to the east of the ruptures are equally well fit by homogeneous or laterally variable earth models. However, only models with contrasting rheology across the subducting slab, a ten-times higher mantle viscosity under the Indian Ocean lithosphere than the backarc mantle, can also produce the observed enduring postseismic uplift along the forearc and lack of far-field transient displacements in southern India. While postseismic uplift of forearc stations can also be produced by rapid and enduring down-dip afterslip, the inferred rheology structure is consistent with the distribution of mantle temperature inferred from seismic tomography.

  11. Diurnal Convection Peaks over the Eastern Indian Ocean over Sumatra during Different MJO Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, M.; Nasuno, T.; Yoneyama, K.

    2015-12-01

    The diurnal convection peak characteristics over the eastern Indian Ocean over the island of Sumatra during different phases of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) were investigated. During MJO phases 2 to 3 (P2 and P3) defined by Wheeler and Hendon (2004), prominent diurnal variation in convection was observed by satellites when moderate low-level westerly winds were dominant over the eastern Indian Ocean. The diurnal convection peaks were prominent over the island of Sumatra in the evening, while migrations of the convection toward the Indian Ocean were observed in the early morning. By using the Global Positioning System around the western region offshore of Sumatra, a significant reduction in water vapor was observed from evening until midnight, compensating for the upward motion over the island. During midnight to early morning, the water vapor increased in the western offshore region as the convections migrated from the island. During P2 to P3, the atmosphere over the eastern Indian Ocean contains abundant water vapor, while the Maritime Continent is fairly well heated by solar radiation under calm conditions. This situation should be favorable for the development of two diurnal convection peaks: the evening convection over the land induced by solar radiative heating and the midnight convection over the ocean triggered by convergence of the low-level westerly wind and the land breeze.

  12. Eastern Indonesia Megaregional Project - principles and results of a regional study

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N.G.; Bertagne, A.J.; Samuel, L.

    1995-06-01

    The International Megaregional Project is a worldwide project involving the compilation and interpretation of long regional seismic lines which cross several basins with the same transect. The goal of the project is to synthesize the current geologic knowledge of the areas traversed and to identify new areas of exploration interest. The International Megaregional framework which has been established serves as a focus for the geologic efforts and seismic data compilation. This project was conducted with the cooperation of a consortium of multinational oil companies as well as Pertamina and CGG. Megaregional lines can provide new insights into: (1) what is and is not basement, (2) maturation history and migration pathways, (3) regional structure, and (4) regional stratigraphy. The lines can thereby lead to the development of new exploration concepts. The project is based on 4900 km, of state-of-the-art marine seismic data acquired in 1993. The poster session includes examples of several Megaregional lines from three areas in Eastern Indonesia and another area east of Natuna Island. Key geologic features imaged by the transacts include, subduction zones (lava Trench, Timor Trough) Island Arcs (Sumatra/Bali Arc), back arc basins (eg.. Bali Basin) and major wrench zones (Sorong Fault). The seismic expression of reef plays (Natuna Sea, Salawati Basin), deltaic plays (eg, Mahakam Delta), and other plays is well illustrated. These lines provide an unprecedented perspective on the petroleum setting of Eastern Indonesia.

  13. Isozyme evidence for three sibling species in the Anopheles sundaicus complex from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sukowati, S; Baimai, V; Harun, S; Dasuki, Y; Andris, H; Efriwati, M

    1999-10-01

    Electrophoretic studies of isoenzymes in three chromosomally distinct forms (A, B and C) of the mosquito Anopheles sundaicus Theobald (Diptera: Culiciae) were undertaken on wild samples collected from six geographically isolated populations in Indonesia. Analyses of 12 enzyme systems comprising 15 loci revealed significant allelic variations, genetic polymorphism, within and among the populations of the An. sundaicus complex. Phylogenetic dendrograms produced by analysis using the Biosys-1 program based on UPGMA methods show that all the populations of form A fall into one cluster, which is closely related to the form C cluster, whereas the populations of form B belong to a more distinct cluster. Allelic frequency and Wright's F statistics of Mpi (mannose phosphate isomerase) are sufficient to identify individuals of each cytological form. This isozyme data correlates with our previous cytological evidence for the existence of three isomorphic species within the taxon An. sundaicus in Indonesia. These three species of the An. sundaicus complex were found together sympatrically at one locality, Asahan in North Sumatra.

  14. A Preliminary Case Study for Rectenna Sites in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwanto, Y.; Collins, P.

    2004-12-01

    include the possibilities of environmental damage due to the high intensity electromagnetic energy from outer space. As is well known, most Indonesian land areas consist of tropical forest which is rich with flora and fauna; these may face risks from receiving such electromagnetic energy illumination. It is considered that rectenna location selection in the main islands (like Java, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Irian, etc.) which are densely populated should be avoided. The same conditions should also be considered for the location in the forest, due to the flora and fauna damage possibilities during the physical development process. From this study it can be considered that the appropriate rectenna location should be placed on uninhabited small coral islands (atoll) sized about 5x5 km 2 , which are located along the equator. Such coral islands are vailable in the western and eastern parts of Indonesia. It is also considered that such coral islands should be located not too far from major inhabited islands, that is about 5-10 km offshore due to the convenience of physical rectenna development and electric energy distribution to the mainland. Such a coral island is to be considered to suffer minimal effects if the surface is illuminated by microwave energy. The same effect suffered by resident creatures like birds and reptiles should also be minimal. Because of the very limited infrastructure available on the mainland (and likely no facilities at all), a rectenna development study should consider all technical risks. For example, antenna installation and building of other support components should be done in such a location so that sea surface transportation can be easily performed. Communication system may be performed only by radio transceivers and satellite systems. The existence of human resources, that are needed to physically develop buildings, must be considered since the location is a remote island. There will also be no expert staff available, so that they will

  15. Breastfeeding practices in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Suharyono; Paul, M

    1997-01-01

    Official efforts to promote breast feeding in Indonesia and to urge hospitals to adopt "baby-friendly" policies have increased the proportion of breast-fed infants to 97%. The duration of exclusive breast feeding is less than 3 months, however, despite official advocacy of breast milk only for 4 months. Moreover, the proportion of infants exclusively breast fed for 4 months actually declined from 51% in 1991 to 47% in 1994. Factors associated with the early introduction of infant formula and solid foods include lack of sufficient quantity of breast milk, suckling problems, inverted nipple, formula advertisements, mothers' desire to be "modern," low support from husbands, hospitals' failure to implement rooming-in, and the special difficulties faced by working mothers. The Indonesian Government has launched an IEC campaign to achieve an exclusive breast feeding rate of 80-100% by the year 2000. This goal will require the referral of women who experience difficulties with breast feeding to lactation clinics, the provision of opportunities for women to breast feed at workplaces (e.g., employment-based day care centers), extension of the pregnancy leave further into the postpartum period, and establishment of baby-friendly communities and districts.

  16. Atmospheric processes in reaction of Northern Sumatra Earthquake sequence Dec 2004-Apr 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S.; Cervone, G.; Singh, R.; Taylor, P.

    2005-05-01

    This work describes our first results in analyzing data from different and independent sources ûemitted long-wavelength radiation (OLR), surface latent heat flux (SHLF) and GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) collected from ground based (GPS) and satellite TIR (thermal infra-red) data sources (NOAA/AVHRR, MODIS). We found atmosphere and ionosphere anomalies one week prior to both the Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake (Dec 26, 2004) and M 8.7 - Northern Sumatra, March 28, 2005. We analyzed 118 days of data from December 1, 2004 through April 1, 2005 for the area (0°-10°,north latitude and 90°-100° east longitude) which included 125 earthquakes with M>5.5. Recent analysis of the continuous OLR from the Earth surface indicates anomalous variations (on top of the atmosphere) prior to a number of medium to large earthquakes. In the case of M 9.0 - Sumatra-Andaman Islands event, compared to the reference fields for the months of December between 2001 and 2004, we found strongly OLR anomalous +80 W/m2 signals (two sigma) along the epicentral area on Dec 21, 2004 five days before the event. In the case of M8.7 March 28, 2005 anomalues signatures over the epicenter appears on March 26 is much weaker (only +20W/m2) and have a different topology. Anomalous values of SHLF associated with M9.0 - Sumatra-Andaman Islands were found on Dec 22, 2005 (SLHF +280Wm2) and less intensity on Mar 23, 2005 (SLHF +180Wm2). Ionospheric variations (GPS/TEC) associated with the Northern Sumatra events were determine by five Regional GPS network stations (COCO, BAKO, NTUS, HYDE and BAST2). For every station time series of the vertical TEC (VTEC) were computed together with correlation with the Dst index. On December 22, four days prior to the M9.0 quake GPS/TEC data reach the monthly maximum for COCO with minor DST activity. For the M 8.7-March 28 event, the increased values of GPS/TEC were observed during four days (March 22-25) in quiet geomagnetic background. Our results need additional

  17. Subducting fracture zones control earthquake distribution and upper plate properties: examples from Sumatra and Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaedicke, C.; Freitag, R.; Barckhausen, U.; Franke, D.; Ladage, S.; Schnabel, M.; Tsukanov, N.

    2010-12-01

    With newly acquired marine geophysical data from the oceanic crust off Sumatra and Kamchatka (SO186 and SO201) we investigate the influence of the relief of the downgoing plate on seismicity and fore arc structure, architecture and properties along two different active margins, namely the Sumatra and the Kamchatka subduction zones. Off northern Sumatra two mega-thrust events occurred on 26.12.2004 (Mw=9.1-9.3) and on 28.03.2005 (Mw=8.6). Seismological investigations, GPS measurements and in-situ and remote observation of vertical motion on fore arc islands show both, an abrupt southern termination of the large 12/2004 rupture and a sharp northern termination of the rupture zone of the 03/2005 mega-thrust. Wide-angle/refraction seismic and MCS data show an abrupt arc parallel depth change of 3 km within 40 km in the oceanic crust beneath the fore arc SW of Simeulue Island. We interpret the abrupt depth change originates from a ramp or tear in the subducted oceanic crust. The discontinuity in the oceanic crust likely trends NNE and is located east of a continuation of an extinct FZ on the subducting Indo-Australian plate. This indicates a pervasive lower plate control on margin structure, particularly its segmentation. The tear might be the reason for rupture propagation termination of the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquakes. During RV Sonne cruise SO201 we collected geophysical profiles in the NW Pacific off Kamchatka and the Aleutian arc crossing the Emperor Seamount Chain and the Krusenstern FZ. The Krusenstern FZ is being subducted at the Kamchatka margin. It comprises a maximum vertical offset of about 1080 m. From our data we suggest that the Krusenstern FZ is reactivated in the vicinity of the Kamchatka margin due to the load of the subducting/colliding Meiji Guyot. It enters the subduction zone right off Kronotsky Peninsula, where a major segment boundary separates domains of different properties of the fore arc: It differs in terms of exhumation, uplift and

  18. Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Asou, T; Rachmat, J

    1998-10-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia first developed thanks to the cooperation of various cardiac centers abroad. The establishment of the 'Harapan Kita' National Cardiac Center in 1985 was one of the most important initial steps. Thereafter, the discipline advanced remarkably in terms of the number of the operations performed and the variety of the diseases treated and, as a result, the surgical outcome also improved. Numerous problems remain to be solved. Only 1% of the children with congenital heart disease are today properly treated in Indonesia. Some of the underlying problems responsible for this situation include a shortage of pediatric cardiac professionals, the lack of the information and education on the part of the patients, and a shortage of funding, both privately and publicly. It would thus be welcome for pediatric cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and nurses in Indonesia to learn about congenital heart disease from doctors and nurses in advanced countries in order to improve the outlook at home.

  19. Interseismic deformation and creep along the Sumatran fault, Indonesia from InSAR time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Sandwell, D. T.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The fast subduction (~60 mm/yr) of the Indo-Australia plate underneath the Sunda microplate in Southeast Asia causes major seismic and tsunami hazards to surrounding regions. Previous land-based GPS studies have revealed that the plate motion composes of ~45 mm/yr of subduction directed normal to the Sunda trench and ~23 mm/yr of right-lateral strike-slip along the 1000km long Sumatran fault. The decoupling of the forearc blocks from the overriding plate leads to slip partitioning at this highly oblique subduction zone. Geological and geodetic studies have suggested that the long-term fault slip rate along the Sumatran fault increases significantly from southern to northern Sumatra. We analyzed the SAR data from the L-band ALOS-1 satellite to image the interseismic deformation along the Sumatran fault. To extract the deformation signal from the interferometric phase observations, we have improved the conventional SBAS methodology by including the decorrelation information of the interferograms into the inverse problem. Instead of discarding the noisy data present in a fraction of the interferograms, we keep all the pixels in the processing chain and weight the observed phase data based on the correlation using the covariance matrix. This new InSAR technique is less prone to the unwrapping errors and it results in a spatially coherent signal with dense coverage and high precision. The InSAR time-series analysis has detected up to ~20 mm/yr of fault creep on the Aceh segment along the Northern Sumatran fault. The spatial extent of the aseismic creep reaches at least 100 km, measured from N5.2, E95.7 to N4.5, E96.5. The along-strike variation of the aseismic creep has an inverse "U" shape. We will present new line-of-sight interseismic velocity and along-strike variation of fault creep rate along the Northern Sumatran fault in Southeast Asia.

  20. Effectively addressing the mid- and long-term needs of young people affected by the tsunami in Aceh: an on-site assessment.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Michael J

    2006-06-01

    Within two months of the Asian tsunami, a team of four individuals conducted an assessment on the post-disaster needs of young people in Aceh Province. In addition to assessing current needs, the team examined the extent to which young people (aged 14-24) were involved in the planning and implementation of ongoing rebuilding and relief efforts. Finally, the team assessed the degree to which young people could be involved in such efforts as the recovery process moves forward. The team: reviewed all existing documents developed and/or compiled by the UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance (UNOCHA) from the inception of the disaster relief response to the present; met with approximately 20 organizations including UN agencies as well as international and local programs presently working in Banda Aceh and Maulaboh; and conducted direct discussions with young people in a variety of settings.

  1. Indonesia: persues ICPD Action Programme.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    Since the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), the focus of Indonesia's population policies have utilized people- and family-centered approaches, emphasizing poverty alleviation as a central challenge for development initiatives. However, the ongoing economic crisis in the country is hampering its efforts to extend reproductive health services to the people. The crisis also resulted in loss of jobs, price increases, and a drop in the purchasing power of families. Despite these conditions, Indonesia will still pursue its implementation of the ICPD Program of Action, and the international community should help the country achieve the goals of the ICPD amidst the economic crisis.

  2. Social Impact of Solar Eclipse in Indonesia: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumpuni, Emanuel S.; Hidayat, Bambang

    2012-09-01

    The social impact and public comprehension of the natural phenomenon varies depending on how a particular cultural background perceives the phenomenon and how the interaction between general public and the authoritative bodies has persisted. While astronomers and scientists have taken for granted that solar eclipse is a natural phenomenon and subjected it to various scientific studies, large percentages of the population have been left uninformed scientifically and have responded to the phenomena quite differently. The technical and scientific aspects of the earliest expedition, to Padang (Sumatra) in 1901, have recently been discussed at length.Two major solar eclipses, namely the 1926 and 1929, offered many scientific outputs as well as results on observations of societies: anthropology, demography, and culinary habits of the local inhabitants. Those days, science was the preserve of a few selected. To a certain degree, many old perceptions of on natural phenomena, with their ruling deities still lingered on. The purpose of this paper is to show the changing views of the endogenous population in particular after the government's massive efforts to enlighten the people and to empower the younger generations in comprehending natural phenomena. The great efforts of the Government of Indonesia's Institute of Sciences (LIPI) related to the June 1983 solar eclipse produced a dramatic change in the sense of appreciation of solar eclipse as a natural phenomenon in consequence of relative motions of the Sun, Moon and the Earth. It took however another five years, till the time of the great eclipse in 1988, to a full fruition in which younger generations as well as older ones abandoned almost completely the old views and embarked on the understanding the value of solar eclipse for science.

  3. Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

  4. Future fire emissions associated with projected land use change in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlier, M. E.; DeFries, R. S.; Pennington, D.; Ordway, E.; Nelson, E.; Mickley, L.; Koplitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    Indonesia has experienced rapid land use change in past decades as forests and peatlands are cleared for agricultural development, including oil palm and timber plantations1. Fires are the predominant method of clearing and the subsequent emissions can have important public health impacts by contributing to regional particulate matter and ozone concentrations2. This regional haze was dramatically seen in Singapore during June 2013 due to the transport of emissions from fires in Sumatra. Our study is part of a larger project that will quantify the public health impact of various land use development scenarios for Sumatra over the coming decades. Here, we describe how we translate economic projections of land use change into future fire emissions inventories for GEOS-Chem atmospheric transport simulations. We relate past GFED3 fire emissions3 to detailed 1-km land use change data and MODIS fire radiative power observations, and apply these relationships to future estimates of land use change. The goal of this interdisciplinary project is to use modeling results to interact with policy makers and influence development strategies in ways that protect public health. 1Miettinen et al. 2011. Deforestation rates in insular Southeast Asia between 2000 and 2010. Glob. Change Biol.,17 (7), 2261-2270. 2Marlier et al. 2013. El Niño and health risks from landscape fire emissions in southeast Asia. Nature Clim. Change, 3, 131-136. 3van der Werf et al. 2010. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009). Atmos. Chem. Physics, 10 (23), 11707-11735.

  5. The challenge of installing a tsunami early warning system in the vicinity of the Sunda Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterjung, J.; Münch, U.; Rudloff, A.

    2010-04-01

    Indonesia is located along the most prominent active continental margin in the Indian Ocean, the so-called Sunda Arc and, therefore, is one of the most threatened regions of the world in terms of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis. On 26 December 2004 the third largest earthquake ever instrumentally recorded (magnitude 9.3, Stein and Okal, 2005) occurred off-shore northern Sumatra and triggered a mega-tsunami affecting the whole Indian Ocean. Almost a quarter of a million people were killed, as the region was not prepared either in terms of early-warning or in terms of disaster response. In order to be able to provide, in future, a fast and reliable warning procedure for the population, Germany, immediately after the catastrophe, offered during the UN World Conference on Disaster Reduction in Kobe, Hyogo/Japan in January 2005 technical support for the development and installation of a tsunami early warning system for the Indian Ocean in addition to assistance in capacity building in particular for local communities. This offer was accepted by Indonesia but also by other countries like Sri Lanka, the Maldives and some East-African countries. Anyhow the main focus of our activities has been carried out in Indonesia as the main source of tsunami threat for the entire Indian Ocean. Challenging for the technical concept of this warning system are the extremely short warning times for Indonesia, due to its vicinity to the Sunda Arc. For this reason the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) integrates different modern and new scientific monitoring technologies and analysis methods.

  6. Bicentennial Earthquake Supercycles Inferred from Relative Sealevel Changes in Corals off West Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, K.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Meltzner, A. J.; Shen, C.; Suwargadi, B. W.; Galetzka, J.; Li, K.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R.

    2008-12-01

    Records of strain accumulation and relief extracted from corals of the Mentawai islands, Sumatra, imply that this 700-km-long section of the Sunda megathrust has generated sequences of great earthquakes about every two centuries for at least the past 700 years. Episodes in the 14th and 16th/17th centuries resemble broadly the great rupture pair of 1797-1833. The MW8.4 earthquake of September 2007 represents the first in a series of large partial failures of the Mentawai section that will likely occur within the next several decades.

  7. Widespread Triggered Tremor In Japan Following the 2012 Mw8.6 Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K.; Obara, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep "non-volcanic" tremor has been observed at many major plate-boundary faults around the Pacific Rim. Recent studies have shown that the tremor triggered by the surface waves of teleseismic earthquake occurs on the same fault patches as the ambient tremor (i.e., those occurring spontaneously). The observations suggest that the triggered tremor can be used as a proxy to estimate the background tremor activity. Triggered and ambient tremors have been well studied along the Nankai subduction zone in southwest Japan. Recently, new identified triggered tremor sources were found in Hokkaido in northernmost Japan (Obara, 2012, submitted manuscript), suggesting, contrary to previous beliefs, that tremor can be observed in various tectonic environments. Here, we systematically search for triggered tremor on the main islands of Japan (i.e., Kyushu, Shikoku, Honshu, and Hokkaido) following the 2012/04/11 Mw 8.6 Sumatra earthquake. We examined a total of about 1300 seismic stations from the Hi-net operated by NIED (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention) and other arrays operated by universities and other organizations. We first identified triggered tremor as a high-frequency, non-impulsive signal in phase with the large-amplitude teleseismic waves and then located the triggered tremor sources using a standard envelope cross-correlation technique. We also compared the tremor triggering potential with Love and Rayleigh waves by shifting the seismograms of tremor and surface waves back to the best tremor source. We observed clear triggered tremor following the 2012 Sumatra mainshock in Shikoku, Kii, and Tokai, where ambient tremors are very active and triggered tremors have been identified previously. Moreover, we successfully detected new triggered tremor sources in Hokkaido, Kyushu, and Kanto. In central Hokkaido, tremor triggered by the 2012 Sumatra earthquake was located at the same place where tremor was triggered by the 2004 Sumatra

  8. A 15 year slow-slip event on the Sunda megathrust offshore Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Louisa L. H.; Meltzner, Aron J.; Philibosian, Belle; Hill, Emma M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Sieh, Kerry

    2015-08-01

    In the Banyak Islands of Sumatra, coral microatoll records reveal a 15 year-long reversal of interseismic vertical displacement from subsidence to uplift between 1966 and 1981. To explain these coral observations, we test four hypotheses, including regional sea level changes and various tectonic mechanisms. Our results show that the coral observations likely reflect a 15 year-long slow-slip event (SSE) on the Sunda megathrust. This long-duration SSE exceeds the duration of previously reported SSEs and demonstrates the importance of multidecade geodetic records in illuminating the full spectrum of megathrust slip behavior at subduction zones.

  9. MORTALITY, THE FAMILY AND THE INDIAN OCEAN TSUNAMI

    PubMed Central

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Gillespie, Thomas; Preston, Samuel; Sikoki, Bondan; Thomas, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Over 130,000 people died in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. The correlates of survival are examined using data from the Study of the Tsunami Aftermath and Recovery (STAR), a population-representative survey collected in Aceh and North Sumatra, Indonesia, before and after the tsunami. Children, older adults and females were the least likely to survive. Whereas socio-economic factors mattered relatively little, the evidence is consistent with physical strength playing a role. Pre-tsunami household composition is predictive of survival and suggests that stronger members sought to help weaker members: men helped their wives, parents and children, while women helped their children. PMID:25866413

  10. Indigenous knowledge management to enhance community resilience to tsunami risk: lessons learned from Smong traditions in Simeulue island, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A.; Sakurai, A.; Munadi, K.

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge accumulation and production embedded in communities through social interactions meant that the Smong tradition of indigenous knowledge of tsunami risk successfully alerted people to the 2004 tsunami, on the island of Simeulue, in Aceh, Indonesia. Based on this practical example, an indigenous management model was developed for Smong information. This knowledge management method involves the transformation of indigenous knowledge into applicable ways to increase community resilience, including making appropriate decisions and taking action in three disaster phases. First, in the pre-disaster stage, the community needs to be willing to mainstream and integrate indigenous knowledge of disaster risk reduction issues into related activities. Second, during disasters, the Smong tradition should make the community able to think clearly, act based on informed decisions, and protect themselves and others by using their indigenous knowledge. Last, in the post-disaster phase, the community needs to be strong enough to face challenges and support each other and “building back better” efforts, using local resources. The findings for the Smong tradition provide valuable knowledge about community resilience. Primary community resilience to disasters is strongly related to existing knowledge that triggers appropriate decisions and actions during pre-disaster, disaster, and post-disaster phases.

  11. The tears have not stopped, the violence has not ended: political upheaval, ethnicity, and violence against women in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wandita, G

    1998-11-01

    The view of women as the sexual property of men becomes heightened during periods of political unrest. The rape of Chinese-Indonesian women in Jakarta, Indonesia, during the May 1998 student demonstrations confirms this observation. This article describes interviews with Jakarta rape victims conducted by Volunteers for Humanity--a coalition of nongovernmental organizations established after attacks on the opposition Indonesian Democratic Party in 1996. By July 1998, Volunteers for Humanity had documented 152 rapes in Jakarta and 20 rape-related deaths. The result of this fact-collecting was formation of the National Commission on Violence Against Women. Women's groups originally established to address violence against women are now incorporating racism into their campaign agendas. National publicity of these assaults led to further reports of violence against minority-group women perpetuated by the military, paramilitary forces, or civilian men in powerful positions in other areas of the country (e.g., Aceh, East Timor, and Irian Jaya/West Papua). In recent months, a backlash has developed, with official denial that any rapes occurred and intimidation and threats of sexual violence against potential witnesses. Future responses must involve multiethnic, multireligious groups to prevent further isolation/victimization of Chinese-Indonesian women.

  12. Persistent Behaviors of the Sunda Megathrust in Sumatra: Opportunities to Forecast Destructive Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, K.

    2007-12-01

    The 2000-km-long Sumatran section of the Sunda megathrust is a treasure trove of information about the long- term behavior of a great active fault. This is due principally to the presence of an island chain along the Sumatran outer arc, which provides a platform for both man-made and natural instruments atop the shallow, seismogenic part of the megathrust. My students, colleagues and I have been using these "instruments" to understand the megathrust's past and to forecast its future behavior. We recognize three long segments that produce great earthquakes separated by two short patches of low seismic coupling. Two of the long segments have just ruptured and the other is nearing the end of its seismic cycle. The largest seismic rupture along the Sumatran megathrust in the 20th century was a M 7.7 earthquake at the Equator in 1935 (G&R, 1954). GPS geodesy and coral paleogeodesy, historical seismograms and coral paleoseismology show that the rupture is embedded in a 120-km section of the megathrust that slips primarily aseismically. The ~2.3-m rupture of 1935 is the largest seismic event on this Batu Islands patch in at least the past 250 years, despite its high (45 mm/yr) rate of plate convergence. Immediately north of the Equator is the 350-km-long section of the megathrust that generated the Mw8.7 Nias- Simeulue earthquake of 2005. Analysis of records from several continuous GPS stations above the rupture and about a hundred vertically displaced living corals shows that large seismic slippage was confined to depths between 14 and 35 km. In contrast, post-seismic deformations recorded at the cGPS stations reflect concentrations of slip updip and downdip of the seismic rupture. Fossil corals record previous large earthquakes in 1861 and in about 1800 and 1845. This history, though still incomplete, suggests that a cluster of three overlapping large seismic ruptures ended the previous earthquake cycle there. The 1600-km Mw9.15 Aceh-Andaman rupture of 2004 began still

  13. mtDNA sequence diversity of orangutans from the islands of Borneo and Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Muir, C C; Galdikas, B M; Beckenbach, A T

    2000-11-01

    A comparison of mitochondrial DNA sequences was undertaken for two genes among orangutans from Borneo and Sumatra. The distribution of haplotypes among 42 individuals for NADH dehydrogenease subunit 3 and 39 individuals for cytochrome B was used to infer population structure. The haplotypes among all Bornean orangutans form a cluster of closely related individuals for both genes, with two distinct haplotypes occupying different regions of the island. Sumatran haplotypes fall into three distinct, and highly diverged, groups. Strikingly, one of the Sumatran haplotypes shares sequence identity with the most widespread Bornean haplotype. This haplotype distribution is considered in the context of the highly complex geological history for the area around the Malay Archipelago. Alternating periods of geographic isolation and reunion, resulting from glacially induced land bridge formation, presented substantial opportunity for population dispersal between periodically isolated demes. We present a paleodispersal model that is consistent with genetic, geological, paleoecological, and fossil data. The disparity of sequences present in orangutan populations argues against a simple Sumatra-Borneo dichotomy. Our evidence, and that of others, suggests that the Sumatran population alone contains the remnants of at least three separate lineages.

  14. Mittigating the effects of large subduction-zone earthquakes in Western Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieh, K.; Stebbins, C.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Suwargadi, B. W.

    2004-12-01

    No giant earthquakes have struck the outer-arc islands of western Sumatra since the sequence of 1797, 1833 and 1861. Paleoseismic studies of coral microatolls reveal that failure of the subduction interface occurs in clusters of such earthquakes about every 230 years. Thus, the next such sequence may well be no more than a few decades away. In the meantime, GPS measurements and paleogeodetic observations show that the islands continue to submerge, dragged down by the downgoing oceanic slab, in preparation for the next failures of the subduction interface. Uplift of the islands and seafloor one to two meters during large events leads to large tsunamis and substantial changes in the coastal environments of the islands, including the seaward retreat of fringing reef, beach and mangrove environments. Having spent a decade characterizing the seismic history of western coastal Sumatra, we are now beginning to work with the inhabitants of the islands and the mainland coast to mitigate the associated hazards. Thus far, we have begun to creat and distribute posters and brochures aimed at educating the islanders about their natural tectonic environment and guiding them in preparing for future large earthquakes and tsunamis. We are also installing a continuous GPS network, in order to monitor ongoing strain accumulation and possible transients.

  15. Probabilities of Earthquake Occurrences along the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pailoplee, Santi

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake activities along the Sumatra-Andaman Subduction Zone (SASZ) were clarified using the derived frequency-magnitude distribution in terms of the (i) most probable maximum magnitudes, (ii) return periods and (iii) probabilities of earthquake occurrences. The northern segment of SASZ, along the western coast of Myanmar to southern Nicobar, was found to be capable of generating an earthquake of magnitude 6.1-6.4 Mw in the next 30-50 years, whilst the southern segment of offshore of the northwestern and western parts of Sumatra (defined as a high hazard region) had a short recurrence interval of 6-12 and 10-30 years for a 6.0 and 7.0 Mw magnitude earthquake, respectively, compared to the other regions. Throughout the area along the SASZ, there are 70- almost 100% probabilities of the earthquake with Mw up to 6.0 might be generated in the next 50 years whilst the northern segment had less than 50% chance of occurrence of a 7.0 Mw earthquake in the next 50 year. Although Rangoon was defined as the lowest hazard among the major city in the vicinity of SASZ, there is 90% chance of a 6.0 Mw earthquake in the next 50 years. Therefore, the effective mitigation plan of seismic hazard should be contributed.

  16. Updip rupture of the 2004 Sumatra earthquake extended by thick indurated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Sean P. S.; Austin, James A.; McNeill, Lisa C.; Bangs, Nathan L. B.; Martin, Kylara M.; Henstock, Timothy J.; Bull, Jonathan M.; Dean, Simon; Djajadihardja, Yusuf S.; Permana, Haryadi

    2011-07-01

    During subduction, weak, unlithified sediments are scraped off the down-going plate and accumulate near the subduction trench axis. The weak nature of the sediments usually impedes the propagation of fault rupture during an earthquake. However, measurements of slip during the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Mw 9.2 earthquake show that fault rupture propagatedupdip, extending unusually close to the subduction trench, in the southern part of the rupture area. Here we present seismic reflection images of the southern part of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake rupture area. We show that sedimentary strata, greater than 4km in thickness, form coherent blocks that have been thrust onto the continental margin during subduction. The blocks form a 130-km-wide plateau overlying the seismogenic zone and the plate boundary megathrust lies near to the base of the sediments. The sediments consist of the Nicobar and Bengal Fan turbidites and exhibit strong internal cohesion. We suggest that dewatering and lithification of the sediments during burial made them unusually competent and strong, thus enabling rupture during the 2004 earthquake to propagate beneath the plateau, close to the Sunda Trench. Extending fault rupture so close to the trench, and thus further seaward, may have enhanced the tsunami hazard by displacing a greater thickness of water.

  17. Indonesia a US Foreign Policy Dilemma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-04-08

    THESIS XCD INDONESIA , A US FOREIGN POLICY DILEMMA By JAMES N. LOTHROP, JR. Lieutenant Colonel, Ordnance Corpfc LIBRARY JUL IS  lU^RM...ELEMENT (Thesis) INDONESIA , A US FOREIGN POLICY DILEMMA by Lt Col James N. Lothrop, Jr. Ordnance US Army War College Carlisle Barracks...policy ...... 19 3. STRATEGIC VALUE OF INDONESIA . . . . 21 Social aspects . 21 Economic aspects ..... 22 Geographic aspects 26 Military and

  18. Burden of stroke in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Y; Venketasubramanian, N; Kiemas, L S; Misbach, J

    2009-10-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of death among Indonesians above five years of age, comprising 15.4% of all deaths, age-gender-standardised death rate 99/100 000, and age-gender-standardised disability-adjusted life years lost 685/100 000. Stroke prevalence is 0.0017% in rural Indonesia, 0.022% in urban Indonesia, 0.5% among urban Jakarta adults, and 0.8% overall. Frequent risk factors include hypertension, smoking and hypercholesterolaemia. The mean age of stroke patients is 58.8 years. Subarachnoid haemorrhage is found in 1.4% of patients, intracerebral haemorrhage in 18.5%, and ischaemic stroke in 42.9%. Only city hospitals have neurology, neurosurgery and neuroimaging services. Indonesia has 40 stroke units. Commonly used medications for stroke are easily available. Hospital-based rehabilitative services are available in large hospitals. Traditional medicine is widely practiced. Efforts to combat stroke include education, more stroke units and rehabilitative services especially in the rural areas.

  19. A decade process of coastal land use changes in Peukan Bada-Aceh after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, M.; Syamsidik; Fatimah, E.; Al’ala, M.

    2017-02-01

    Sudden environmental changes due to the impacts of the 2004 tsunami demolished a vast area of land around Peukan Bada of Aceh Besar. There were paddy fields and ponds as major livelihoods supports for coastal communities around this area. However, the tsunami waves demolished all the paddy fields and ponds around this sub-district. Since the 2004, a number of interventions were made to recovery the paddy fields and ponds. This study was aimed at monitoring the land use changes, in term of paddy fields and ponds, during 12-year of recovery process. Geographic Information System tools were used to map every 100 meter of interval in this area to observe the recovery process of the two land use types. After 12-year of the recovery process, total areas successfully being recovered in Peukan Bada were about 80% and only 19% for paddy fields and ponds, respectively. Some reasons were behind these changes. Two of the most frequent reasons are the changes of job types of the residents and the low productivity of the tsunami affected ponds/paddy fields.

  20. Development of Web GIS for information of renewable energy in Aceh Province after rehabilitation and reconstruction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamuddin; Hizir; Ardiansyah; Pertiwi, D.; Handayani, P.

    2017-02-01

    There are a lot of renewable energy potentials that is spread in numerous locations in Aceh Province. These potentials can be developed into energy source that can be utilized to fulfill the need of energy in the area. It is unfortunate that the information about the potentials is still hard to find, regardless the abundance of spatial data that were produced during the rehabilitation and reconstruction process, including data related to the renewable energy. Therefore, this research was conducted to develop an application of information technology, especially Web Geographic Information System (GIS) for renewable energy potential. The objective of this research was to fulfill the needs of relevant agencies for the Web GIS-based information technology applications to manage information on renewable energy potential in an interactive and integrated way. This research used components of Free Open Source System (FOSS) to develop a Web-based geospatial information technology application. The component consists of GeoServer as a GIS server, PostgreSQL as a geographic databases management system, QGIS as Desktop GIS for spatial data preparation and GeoExt as the framework in developing user interfaces for the Web GIS. The result of combining those components was a Web GIS that displayed areas with its renewable energy potential which was organized for each area along with legends for the map information. The Web GIS is equipped with search feature and tooltips function to select any areas and bring up detailed information of renewable energy potential of the area.

  1. The species of Thalerosphyrus Eaton, 1881 (Insecta, Ephemeroptera, Heptageniidae, Ecdyonurinae) in Java and Sumatra, with some comments on the diversity of the genus in the Oriental Realm.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Three species belonging to the genus Thalerosphyrus Eaton, 1881 are reported from Java and Sumatra. The nymphs of Th. determinatus (Walker, 1853) from Java, Th. sinuosus (Navás, 1933) from Java and Sumatra and Th. lamuriensis Sartori, 2014 from Sumatra are redescribed. The egg morphology of the three species is also presented for the first time. A key to the nymphs is proposed. General considerations on the composition of the genus Thalerosphyrus in the Oriental Realm are given. The distribution of the genus is greatly expended, and currently ranges over the Himalaya and Sumbawa in the Sunda Islands.

  2. How Robust are Science-Based Disaster Preparedness Strategies? Lessons from Western Sumatra (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R.; McCloskey, J.; McDowell, S.

    2009-12-01

    Forecasts of the next likely megathrust earthquake which will occur off the western coast of Sumatra, possibly in the near future, indicate that it will likely be tsunamigenic and could be more devastating than the 2004 event. Hundreds of simulations of potential earthquakes and their tsunamis show that, while the earthquake is fundamentally unpredictable, many scenarios would see dangerous inundation of low-lying areas along the west coast of Sumatra; the cities of Padang and Bengkulu broadside-on to the areas of highest seismic potential have a combined population of over one million. Understanding how the science of unpredictable, high probability events is absorbed by society is essential for the development of effective mitigation and preparedness campaigns. A five month field investigation conducted in Padang and Bengkulu aimed to conceptualise the main issues driving risk perception of tsunami hazard, and explore its influence upon preparedness. Of specific interest was the role of scientifically quantified hazard information upon risk perception and hazard preparedness. Target populations were adult community members (n=270) and senior high school students (n=90). Preliminary findings indicate that scientific knowledge of earthquake and tsunami threat amongst respondents in both cities is good. However the relationship between respondent’s hazard knowledge, desired risk perception, and the adoption of preparedness measures was often non-linear and is susceptible to the negative effects of unscientific forecasts disseminated by government and mass media. Evidence suggests that ‘mystic’ predictions often portrayed in the media as being scientific, have been readily absorbed by the public; when these fail to materialise the credibility of authentic science and scientists plummets. As a result levels of sustainable earthquake and tsunami preparedness measures adopted by those living in tsunami threatened areas can be detrimentally impacted. It is

  3. Tsunamigenic potential due to frontal rupturing in the Sumatra locked zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncoro, Alvina K.; Cubas, Nadaya; Singh, Satish C.; Etchebes, Marie; Tapponnier, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is one of the most seismically active subduction zones. Although there have been three Mw ≥ 8.4 earthquakes in the region, including the disastrous 2004 Mw = 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, a 500 km long patch around Mentawai Islands is still locked and could produce a large megathrust earthquake. If the rupture propagates to the subduction front, as it most likely occurred during the 2004 earthquake, it may lead to a devastating tsunami. Here, we present high-resolution reflection seismic data from the Sumatra locked zone that shows the subduction interface down to 20 km depth. The seismic data also show that the wedge is composed of two layers: a shallow layer formed by mixed to landward vergent thrusts, termed as pop-ups, and a deeper layer showing sub-horizontal reflectors. The lower layer is most probably formed by duplexes, whose roof serves as a pseudo-décollement for the mixed to landward thrust systems. Based on the seismic results, we perform mechanical modeling in order to understand the formation of these structures and to retrieve the associated frictional properties. We first show that the activation of the pseudo-décollement requires (1) either a sudden increase of effective friction along the plate interface or an irregular geometry of the plate interface, (2) a lower effective friction along the pseudo-décollement than along the plate interface. We then show that low effective frictional values (≤0.1) are required to reproduce the observed frontal structures. The low effective friction along the pseudo-décollement could either be due to the presence of a long-term high pore pressure layer or to dynamic weakening associated with earthquakes. Since similar structures are present in the 2010 tsunami earthquake area, we favor the dynamic weakening hypothesis. According to the mechanical modeling, if the next rupture propagates up to the toe rupturing the three most frontal pop-up structures, we could expect at least

  4. Telecommunications and National Goals in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Don M.

    This discussion of the cultural aspects of mass media in Indonesia covers the following topics: (1) PALAPA, the Indonesian communications satellite; (2) cultural, demographic, and economic characteristics of Indonesia; (3) television policies and programming; (4) the number of government- and privately-owned radio stations; (5) a longitudinal…

  5. Special Education in Indonesia (Scope and Development).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semiawan, Conny

    The paper covers characteristics of Indonesia's special education program. Considered are the scope of special education, some viewpoints on the impact of culture on the perspective of special education in Indonesia (including programs, services, teacher training, and financial resources). The scope of special education is considered; and some…

  6. Report on Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, Charles Elroy

    This resource packet was compiled by a participant in the Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia. The materials provide information for teaching about the diaspora of Hinduism and Islamic beliefs throughout the southeast Asia archipelagoes and their influence on art and culture. The handouts supplement information on Indonesia as part of an Asian…

  7. Islam in Indonesia’s Political Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    vastly out of proportion to its representation in society. A central challenge to understanding Islamist politics in Indonesia today is to...ideals, Thalib clearly wants to have an impact on Muslim politics in Indonesia . No matter how aggressive his actions in Maluku or his propaganda

  8. Culture Project: Imaginary Travel to Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornhill, Harold, Jr.

    When U.S. citizens travel to Indonesia, it is hard for the majority of them to understand the country's culture and people. This project outlines some of the major fallacies individuals have when in Indonesia, and how they can avoid them by studying ahead of time. The project begins by requiring the individuals to plan their trip properly, know…

  9. Classification of earthquake site effects by shallow reflection seismics using a shear-wave land-streamer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, S.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Touched in the SW by the Great Sumatra Fault, the densely populated delta of the Krueng Aceh River consists mainly of young alluvial sediments of clay, sand and gravel with partially high organic content. The depth of this sediment body and its internal structure are widely unknown. Whereas traditional timber constructed buildings are mostly unaffected by strong earthquakes, the change to concrete building techniques added a significant new and locally unknown seismic risk in this region. The classification of earthquake site effects in the city of Banda Aceh and the surrounding region of Aceh Besar was the aim of a high-resolution shear-wave reflection seismic survey in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. In cooperation with the Government of Indonesia and local counterparts, this was part of the Project "Management of Georisk" of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources. Using shear-wave reflection seismics in combination with a land streamer has proven to be an enormously useful method in the sedimentary regions of the Aceh province with an easy and fast recording operation. In addition, the specialized seismic system accounts for compacted soil surfaces which allows a wide range of applications within cities, industrial sites, paved roads and also on small dirt roads. Using a vibrator seismic source, this technique was applied successfully also in areas of high building density in the city of Banda Aceh or in the surrounding mostly agricultural environment. Combined with standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests, it was possible to evaluate the soil stiffness in populated urban areas down to 100 m depth in terms of the IBC2003. This is important for the exploration of new areas for save building foundation and groundwater aquifer detection in the tsunami-flooded region.

  10. Population change and economic development in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ananta, A; Pungut, U H

    1992-07-01

    Standard demographic transition theory holds that transition takes place concurrently with socioeconomic development. Oshima has generalized that the pace of demographic transition in Indonesia has been slow and in keeping with standard theory. This article, however, challenges Oshima's contentions and points out that Indonesia has been able to attain a level of demographic transition with a lower level of economic development than that experienced by present-day developed countries during their transitions from high fertility and mortality to low fertility and mortality. Sections consider the theory of demographic transition, population and economic change in Indonesia, and the likely impact of demographic changes on the future of Indonesia's economy. The more rapid demographic transition experienced in Indonesia may be used to stimulate even faster economic progress in the country.

  11. A Case Study of SSP for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostavan, A.; Kaya, N.

    2002-01-01

    The market of the Solar Power Satellite must be worldwide, because it can be provide electricity anywhre in the world from the Earth's orbits. We have perform case studies of various countries to understand their benefits and disadvantages provide by the Space Solar Power, because each country has much different condition on energy from other countries. We are starting the international collaboration between Indonesia and Japan to carry out the case study for Indonesia. In Japan, METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) has already organized a committee to investigate the feasibility of the Space Solar Power and to make a plan to launch a space demonstration of the Solar Power Satellite. While, Indonesia is quickly developing economy and increasing their energy demand. We are investigating the detailed energy conditions of Indonesia and the benefits and disadvantages of he SSP for Indonesia. Especially, we will perform the investigation on the receiving system for the Japanese pilot SPS.

  12. Superconducting Gravimeter Data for the IRIS Seismology Database: Application to Normal Modes from the Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, D.; Rivera, L.; Hinderer, J.; Rosat, S.

    2009-04-01

    For several years, it has been the goal of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) to convert high rate acceleration data recorded on superconducting gravimeters (SG) to a format compatible with the seismic data archived at IRIS. The problem for the GGP community has been to properly establish the metadata for characterizing the response of the instrument, particularly its phase characteristics. Although SG data exists at IRIS from the Membach GGP station in Belgium, up to now most of the data from the GGP network has been on hold until the response problem was solved. This we have now been able to do, and we hope to show that data from the Strasbourg SG station will be at IRIS and available. We will also upload all the data from the SGs from after the Sumatra earthquake and show some results on normal mode analysis that demonstrates the benefit of the good amplitude calibration feature and high precision of the SG instruments.

  13. On reported occurrences of shock-deformed clasts in the volcanic ejecta from Toba caldera, Sumatra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpton, V. L.; Schuraytz, B. C.

    1989-01-01

    Reports of shock-deformed phenocrysts from the Toba ignimbrite deposits, Sumatra, have prompted considerable debate over whether shock-deformation products are clear evidence of a meteorite impact origin for the K/T boundary deposits as well as terresrial 'cryptoexplosion' structures. Evidence presented in favor of volcanically induced shock at Toba includes kinked biotites and rare occurrences of single set of lamellae in quartz grains but rests most heavily upon occurrences of mosaic extinction patterns in plagioclase phenocrysts. The present analysis of several of the same Toba samples reveals that these mosaic patterns ae related to distinct compositional zoning and cannot be attributed to deformation of the crystal lattice that shock would produce. Additionally, in more than 200 quartz grains examined, no occurrences of microdeformation features or mosaic textures similar to those associated with known impact structures and the K/T boundary are detected. It is concluded that evidence of shock deformation in the Toba deposits has not been demonstrated.

  14. Geodetic Observations of Interseismic Strain Segmentation at the Sumatra Subduction Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prawirodirdjo, L.; Bock, Y.; McCaffrey, R.; Genrich, J.; Calais, E.; Puntodewo, S. S. O.; Subarya, C.; Rais, J.; Zwick, P.; Fauzi

    1997-01-01

    Deformation above the Sumatra subduction zone, revealed by Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic surveys, shows nearly complete coupling of the forearc to the subducting plate south of 0.5 deg S and half as much to north. The abrupt change in plate coupling coincides with the boundary between the rupture zones of the 1833 and 1861 (Mw greater than 8) thrust earthquakes. The rupture boundary appears as an abrupt change in strain accumulation well into the interseismic cycle, suggesting that seismic segmentation is controlled by properties of the plate interface that persist occupied through more than one earthquake cycle. Structural evidence indicates that differences in basal shear stress may be related to elevated pore pressure in the north.

  15. Ambient seismic noise tomography reveals a hidden caldera and its relation to the Tarutung pull-apart basin at the Sumatran Fault Zone, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryberg, Trond; Muksin, Umar; Bauer, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the noise recordings of a short-period seismic network to derive a shallow crustal S-wave velocity model at the Sumatra Fault in Northern Sumatra, Indonesia. By correlating the noise of 40 seismic stations' recording for 9 months, we could recover Rayleigh waves from vertical component recordings with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. Group velocities of the Rayleigh waves could be determined in the period range from 0.71 to 4.4 s. These group velocities were used to invert for 2D group velocity maps at specific periods. Finally, the derived group velocity maps were inverted for a 3D S-wave velocity model. This model shows a region of a strong velocity decrease off the Great Sumatran Fault Zone, at the northeastern margin of the young Tarutung pull-apart basin. This observed low velocity block coincides with a caldera-like morphological feature which is interpreted as the surface expression of a hidden volcanic caldera. Considering the surface manifestations of geothermal activity around this anomaly, we conclude that the caldera is still acting as a heat source. On the other hand, the weak morphological expression at the surface indicates a certain age of the caldera which might be older than the Tarutung pull-apart basin. The findings provide important constraints on general concepts for the formation of pull-apart basins along the Sumatran fault and their relation to volcanism.

  16. Using Isotopes to Reconstruct Mammalian Diet, Migration and Paleoenvironment for Hominin Sites in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wershow, H.; Janssen, R.; Vonhof, H.; Lubbe, J. V. D.; Joordens, J. J.; Koutamanis, D. S.; Puspaningrum, M. R.; de Vos, J.; Reijmer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate plays a prominent role in ecosystem development in the biodiversity hotspot Sundaland (Malaysia and western Indonesia) throughout the Quaternary. Recurrent isolation and connection of the islands to mainland Asia due to sea level fluctuations has enabled repeated biotic migrations and encouraged genetic speciation. These migration waves also brought Homo erectus to Java. Together with extensive and well-documented collections of other terrestrial species, these hominin fossils form faunal assemblages of which the paleoenvironmental and paleogeographical background is poorly known. Using carbon, oxygen and strontium isotopes, we have reconstructed the paleoenvironmental and paleoecological conditions of several Holocene and Pleistocene fossil sites on Sumatra and Java, Indonesia. Carbon (∂13C) and oxygen (∂18O) isotope analysis of well-preserved herbivore teeth enamel reveals a marked contrast between C3-dominated diets in warmer periods, and C4-dominated diets in cooler periods, reflecting the distinct changes in Sundaland vegetation cover between glacials and interglacials. These isotope patterns allow us to assign the appropriate climatic background to some of the older fossil assemblages from Java, for which dating uncertainty does not allow direct assignment to glacial or interglacial conditions. The stable isotope signatures of herbivores from Trinil and Sangiran, sites well-known for the fossil occurrence of Homo erectus, indicate glacial conditions. The isotope data of several H. erectus fossils from these sites seem to be in line with such an interpretation. Furthermore, we applied strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope analyses to a sample subset. The preliminary data show distinct Sr-isotope ratios for different sites, providing clues for the applicability of this isotope technique in detecting climate-related mobility of Sundaland fossil faunas.

  17. Geological Features Inferred from Local Seismic Tomography in the Sunda Strait and West Java regions, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Sakti, A. P.; Rohadi, S.; Widiyantoro, S.

    2012-12-01

    We have conducted seismic tomographic inversions to obtain a P-wave seismic velocity structure beneath the Sunda Strait and West Java regions, Indonesia. The Sunda Strait is located in a complex geological system i.e. in the transition from the oblique subduction beneath Sumatra to the nearly perpendicular subduction below Java. The Krakatau active volcano is located in the Sunda Strait. In this study, we have used selected P-wave arrival times from the data catalogs of the SeisComP-BMKG network (from 2009 to 2011) and the BMKG BALAI II network (from 1992 to 2011) compiled by Badan Meteorologi,Klimatologi dan Geofisika (BMKG), Indonesia. In total, there are 1,598 local earthquakes and 10,366 P-wave phases from 25 seismographic stations that have been used for the tomographic inversions. We have also relocated the hypocenter locations along with velocity inversions simultaneously. Our preliminary results depict some prominent geological features that include: (1) a low velocity anomaly beneath north of the Ujung Kulon region, which coincides with a low gravity anomaly resulting from a previous study, (2) a low velocity anomaly alignment beneath the Krakatau volcano in the Sunda Strait, (3) a sharp contrast in velocity anomalies extending from Pelabuhan Ratu towards Jakarta with a strike of SW-NE, and (4) a low velocity anomaly in the offshore of Pelabuhan Ratu that may be correlated with the continuation of the Cimandiri fault zone. More detailed information will be presented during the meeting. Keywords: tomography, Sunda Strait, West Java, velocity anomaly

  18. Tsunami remote sensing from and with satellites: observations and perspectives after Sumatra 2004 and Tohoku 2011.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, Philippe; Makela, Jonathan J.; Astafyeva, Elvira; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Rolland, Lucie; McCoy, Bob; Hebert, Helene; Coisson, Pierdavide; De Raucourt, Sebastien; Lamouroux, Julien

    2012-07-01

    With various observations following the Sumatra 2004 and Tohoku 2011 tsunamis, space observations have demonstrated their capability for the monitoring of the tsunami propagation in open ocean. Observations are very diverse and based on spaceborn optical high resolution imaging of the tsunami arrival on the coast, on the monitoring by space altimeters of the sea level displacement, but also on the ionospheric perturbation generated by the tsunami, detected by altimeters and GNSS receivers. New ground airglow observations performed in Hawaii for the Tohoku tsunami have furthermore opened new perspectives for real time observations from space, based on visible or UV airglow monitoring. We review the different observations and show that the most interesting perspectives are associated to the ionospheric observations, able to detect very small tsunamis in amplitudes and even to open perspective in the detection of possible slow slip precursors of the giant quakes. We illustrate these observations with transoceanic tsunamis of the last decade (Sumatra, 2004, Kuril, 2006, Samoa, 2009, Chili, 2010, Tohoku, 2011) and present the coupling mechanisms responsible for these observations. A special focus is given on the observations and modeling performed during the Tohoku 2011 tsunami, with observations from GPS ionospheric sounding over Japan and further in the Pacific ocean, with joint observation from GPS, Jason and airglow. We show that the first ionospheric signals generated by the rupture have been not only observed about 17 minutes before the arrival of the tsunami on the japanese east-coast, but also that a precursor signal has been generated before the earthquake, likely associated with a slow slip event which has triggered the giant earthquake. We also show that the ionospheric monitoring has been able to follow and image the propagation of the tsunami. We finally present the perspectives and focus on two different approaches and associated projects aiming to monitor

  19. Seismic-stratigraphic framework of the forearc basin off central Sumatra, Sunda Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudry, Desiree; Moore, Gregory F.

    1981-06-01

    New multichannel seismic reflection data provide information on the stratigraphic framework and geologic history of the forearc basin west of central Sumatra. We recognize six seismic-stratigraphic sequences that reflect the Cenozoic history and development of the outer continental shelf and forearc basin southeast of Nias Island. These sequences indicate several episodes of uplift of the subduction complex and filling of the forearc basin. Early in the development of this margin, Paleogene slope deposits prograded onto the adjacent basin floor. Onlapping this assemblage are two units interpreted as younger Paleogene(?) trough deposits. Uplift associated with rejuvenation of subduction in the late Oligocene led to erosion of the Sumatra shelf and formation of a regional unconformity. The early Miocene was a period of significant progradation. A Miocene limestone unit partly downlaps and partly onlaps the older Paleogene deposits. It is characterized by shallow shelf and oblique progradational facies passing into basin floor facies. A buried reef zone occurs near the shelf edge. The cutting of an erosional unconformity on the shelf and slope in late Miocene/early Pliocene time culminated this episode of deposition. In the late Pliocene, a large flexure developed at the western boundary of the basin, displacing the outer-arc ridge upward relative to the basin. Over 1 km of Pliocene to Recent sediment was deposited as a wedge in the deep western portion of the basin landward of the outer-arc ridge. These deposits are characterized by flat-lying, high-amplitude, continuous reflections that overstep the late Miocene unconformity. Up to 800 m of shallow-water limestone have been deposited on the shelf since mid-Pliocene time.

  20. Precursory seismic quiescence along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukrungsri, Santawat; Pailoplee, Santi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the seismic quiescence prior to hazardous earthquakes was analyzed along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ). The seismicity data were screened statistically with mainshock earthquakes of M w ≥ 4.4 reported during 1980-2015 being defined as the completeness database. In order to examine the possibility of using the seismic quiescence stage as a marker of subsequent earthquakes, the seismicity data reported prior to the eight major earthquakes along the SASZ were analyzed for changes in their seismicity rate using the statistical Z test. Iterative tests revealed that Z factors of N = 50 events and T = 2 years were optimal for detecting sudden rate changes such as quiescence and to map these spatially. The observed quiescence periods conformed to the subsequent major earthquake occurrences both spatially and temporally. Using suitable conditions obtained from successive retrospective tests, the seismicity rate changes were then mapped from the most up-to-date seismicity data available. This revealed three areas along the SASZ that might generate a major earthquake in the future: (i) Nicobar Islands (Z = 6.7), (ii) the western offshore side of Sumatra Island (Z = 7.1), and (iii) western Myanmar (Z = 6.7). The performance of a stochastic test using a number of synthetic randomized catalogues indicated these levels of anomalous Z value showed the above anomaly is unlikely due to chance or random fluctuations of the earthquake. Thus, these three areas have a high possibility of generating a strong-to-major earthquake in the future.

  1. The preservation of past tsunami deposits along the Sumatran coastline, Padang, western Sumatra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logsdon, M. G.; Yulianto, E.; Rubin, C.

    2006-12-01

    Tsunamis triggered by the 2004 and 2005 Sumatran megathrust earthquakes left clear geologic signatures in the wake of their devastating impacts. Although the record of past great, megathrust earthquakes along the Sumatran subduction zone has been documented by extracting paleo-sea-level history from coral microatoll stratigraphy, evidence for past tsunamis along the western coast of Sumatra has not been examined. South of the 2004 and 2005 Sumatra ruptures, between 00 and 20S, the 1797 and 1833 earthquakes dominate the historical seismic record of the Sumatran subduction zone. Anecdotal reports from Dutch shipping records suggest widespread strong shaking with accompanying large tsunamis in the town of Padang. In this region, beach-parallel ridge and swale topography preserve thin sand layers within the topographically low swales. The sand sheets occur within thick peat deposits that accumulate in the swales between beach ridges. These sand layers could represent tsunami, storm, or fluvial flood deposits. Ongoing paleoecologic analyses will help constrain the source of the sand sheets, whether marine or terrestrial. By dating the peat deposits just below these sand layers, we expect to find the maximum age of sand deposition for each event. These data, combined with an examination of local geomorphic processes, allow us to better understand the timing and nature of the evolution of the Sumatran coastline. If indeed these sands are derived from tsunamis, they will provide better constraints on the repeat times and inundation extents of past tsunamis, and extend the geologic record of prehistoric tsunamis generated by great, megathrust earthquakes along this portion of the Sumatran subduction zone.

  2. Regional air quality impacts of future fire emissions in Sumatra and Kalimantan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlier, Miriam E.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Kim, Patrick S.; Gaveau, David L. A.; Koplitz, Shannon N.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Margono, Belinda A.; Myers, Samuel S.

    2015-05-01

    Fire emissions associated with land cover change and land management contribute to the concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, which can affect regional air quality and climate. Mitigating these impacts requires a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between fires and different land cover change trajectories and land management strategies. We develop future fire emissions inventories from 2010-2030 for Sumatra and Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo) to assess the impact of varying levels of forest and peatland conservation on air quality in Equatorial Asia. To compile these inventories, we combine detailed land cover information from published maps of forest extent, satellite fire radiative power observations, fire emissions from the Global Fire Emissions Database, and spatially explicit future land cover projections using a land cover change model. We apply the sensitivities of mean smoke concentrations to Indonesian fire emissions, calculated by the GEOS-Chem adjoint model, to our scenario-based future fire emissions inventories to quantify the different impacts of fires on surface air quality across Equatorial Asia. We find that public health impacts are highly sensitive to the location of fires, with emissions from Sumatra contributing more to smoke concentrations at population centers across the region than Kalimantan, which had higher emissions by more than a factor of two. Compared to business-as-usual projections, protecting peatlands from fires reduces smoke concentrations in the cities of Singapore and Palembang by 70% and 40%, and by 60% for the Equatorial Asian region, weighted by the population in each grid cell. Our results indicate the importance of focusing conservation priorities on protecting both forested (intact or logged) peatlands and non-forested peatlands from fire, even after considering potential leakage of deforestation pressure to other areas, in order to limit the impact of fire emissions on atmospheric smoke concentrations and

  3. A Science Teacher Experience in the Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami Offshore Survey Expedition of May 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, K.; Holt, S.; Grilli, S.

    2005-12-01

    Through the NSF-funded ARMADA Project, K-12 teachers can participate in scientific expeditions to gain a first-hand, and usually exciting, research experience. ARMADA Master Teachers decode this research opportunity that includes data collection and experimentation, into methodology development, and technology for use in their classrooms. Their experiences have broader impact because each teacher mentors other teachers in their school district and directly participates in the National Science Teachers Association Annual Convention to share the knowledge to an even broader educational audience. A science teacher, Susan Holt (from Arcadia High School in Phoenix, Arizona) participated as part of an international scientific party on a recent cruise to study the seafloor in the area of the December 26th Great Sumatra earthquake and tsunami-the Sumatra Earthquake And Tsunami Offshore Survey (SEATOS). She participated in all aspects of the expedition: geophysical surveys, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) "watch", sample preparation and recovery, science planning and review meetings, and by interacting with the expert ship's crew. Susan posted reports regularly on a website and prepared a daily log that that was useful not only for her students, but also for other teachers in the Scottsdale Unified School District in Arizona and the Montgomery County School District in Tennessee, science team members' families, friends, and local press. Overall, the experience benefited all parties: the teacher by learning and experiencing a shipboard geophysical operation; the scientists by Susan's fresh perspective that encouraged everyone to re-examine their first assumptions and interpretations; the SEATOS expedition by Susan's assistance in science operations; and the shipboard environment where she was able to break down the typical artificial barriers between the science `crew' and the ship's crew through frank and open dialogue. We present a summary of the SEATOS expedition, the

  4. Wind profiler dedicated in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, Ken

    A dedication ceremony was recently held in Biak, Indonesia, to commemorate the opening of the Biak VHF wind profiler. The wind profiler, which operates at 50 MHz, was constructed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Aeronomy Laboratory in cooperation with the Indonesian National Institute of Aeronautics and Space (LAPAN). The Biak facility completes the NOAA'Colorado University trans-Pacific wind-profiler network. Other stations in the network, which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, are Piura, Peru; Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia; and Christmas Island in Kirabati. The Christmas Island facility is supported by NOAA's Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Program Project Office.

  5. Hepatitis E Virus in Indonesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    SAD-A284017 \\ITATION PAGE ""i. *to at. e .. ic. .ewo 1O’ U * p . 21s .ffens. - I. AGENCY USE ONLY tLeav blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES...COVERED 1. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Hepatitis E virus in Indonesia / PE - 62787A PR -ool .Ol 6.AUTHOR(S) Jennings GB; Lubis 1...Listiyaningsih E ; Burans JP; Hyams KC TA- ENX 1AJ - 1438 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMiNG ORGANIZATIONNaval Medical Research

  6. Quantifying changes in the rates of forest clearing in Indonesia from 1990 to 2005 using remotely sensed data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Matthew C.; Stehman, Stephen V.; Potapov, Peter V.; Arunarwati, Belinda; Stolle, Fred; Pittman, Kyle

    2009-07-01

    Timely and accurate data on forest change within Indonesia is required to provide government, private and civil society interests with the information needed to improve forest management. The forest clearing rate in Indonesia is among the highest reported by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), behind only Brazil in terms of forest area lost. While the rate of forest loss reported by FAO was constant from 1990 through 2005 (1.87 Mha yr-1), the political, economic, social and environmental drivers of forest clearing changed at the close of the last century. We employed a consistent methodology and data source to quantify forest clearing from 1990 to 2000 and from 2000 to 2005. Results show a dramatic reduction in clearing from a 1990s average of 1.78 Mha yr-1 to an average of 0.71 Mha yr-1 from 2000 to 2005. However, annual forest cover loss indicator maps reveal a near-monotonic increase in clearing from a low in 2000 to a high in 2005. Results illustrate a dramatic downturn in forest clearing at the turn of the century followed by a steady resurgence thereafter to levels estimated to exceed 1 Mha yr-1 by 2005. The lowlands of Sumatra and Kalimantan were the site of more than 70% of total forest clearing within Indonesia for both epochs; over 40% of the lowland forests of these island groups were cleared from 1990 to 2005. The method employed enables the derivation of internally consistent, national-scale changes in the rates of forest clearing, results that can inform carbon accounting programs such as the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (REDD) initiative.

  7. The black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) of the Lesser Sunda Archipelago, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Ya'cob, Zubaidah; Chen, Chee Dhang; Lau, Koon Weng; Low, Van Lun; Suana, I Wayan

    2017-05-01

    Surveys of pupae and larvae of black flies were carried out in Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa and Flores in the Lesser Sunda Archipelago, Indonesia, where 10 species were known. A total of 14 simuliid species including four new species and five new records of the genus Simulium were collected, bringing the number of species from the Lesser Sunda Archipelago to 19. They are classified into four subgenera: two in Nevermannia, nine in Gomphostilbia, seven in Simulium and one in Wallacellum. One of four new species, Simulium (Simulium) baliense, is described based on females, males, pupae and larvae from Bali and Lombok. This new species, which is placed in the Simulium striatum species-group of the subgenus Simulium, is closely related to S. (S.) argyrocinctum De Meijere from Java and Sumatra, but it is distinguished from the latter species by the smaller number of the male enlarged upper-eye facets and larval abdomen lacking dorsal pairs of conical protuberances. The distribution record of S. (S.) upikae Takaoka & Davies from Flores is corrected as that of S. (S.) eximium De Meijere. Some aberrant characters of the pupal gill filaments of S. (G.) atratum De Meijere, S. (G.) floresense Takaoka, Hadi & Sigit and S. (G.) sunapii Takaoka, Sofian-Azirun & Suana are illustrated. Characteristics of the fauna of black flies in this archipelago are briefly noted. Keys to all 19 species are provided for females, males, pupae and larvae.

  8. Monitoring 137Cs and 134Cs at marine coasts in Indonesia between 2011 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Suseno, Heny; Prihatiningsih, Wahyu Retno

    2014-11-15

    Environmental samples (seawater, sediments and biota) were collected along the eastern and western Indonesian coasts between 2011 and 2013 to anticipate the possible impacts of the Fukushima radioactive releases in Indonesia. On the eastern coasts (south and north Sulawesi), the (137)Cs concentrations in the seawater and sediments were 0.12-0.32 Bq m(-3) and 0.10-1.03 Bq kg(-1), respectively. On the western coasts (West Sumatra, Bangka Island, North Java, South Java and Madura island), the (137)Cs concentrations in the seawater and sediments were 0.12-0.66 Bq m(-3) and 0.19-1.64 Bq kg(-1), respectively. In general, the (137)Cs concentrations in the fish from several Indonesian coasts were

  9. Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

    2007-06-01

    Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

  10. The molecular and clinical features of dengue during outbreak in Jambi, Indonesia in 2015.

    PubMed

    Haryanto, Sotianingsih; Hayati, Rahma F; Yohan, Benediktus; Sijabat, Lanceria; Sihite, Ifo F; Fahri, Sukmal; Meutiawati, Febrina; Halim, Jonathan A N; Halim, Stefanie N; Soebandrio, Amin; Sasmono, R Tedjo

    2016-05-01

    Dengue is hyperendemic in Indonesia. In 2015, reported cases of dengue fever doubled those of 2014 in the Jambi municipality of Sumatra. We examined viral aetiology and its relationship with disease outcome in Jambi. Dengue-suspected patients' sera were collected and NS1 detection and IgM/IgG serology were performed. Dengue virus (DENV) serotyping was performed using real-time RT-PCR. Envelope genes were sequenced to determine the genotypes of DENV. Clinical, haematologic, and demographic data were recorded. Of 210 dengue-suspected patients, 107 were confirmed. The disease manifested as Dengue Fever (62%), Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (36%), and Dengue Shock Syndrome (2%). The serotypes of 94 DENV were determined. All DENV serotypes were detected with DENV-1 as the predominant serotype (66%). Genotypically, the DENV-1 viruses belong to Genotype I, DENV-2 was of Cosmopolitan genotype, DENV-3 as Genotype I, and DENV-4 belonged to Genotype II. Comparison with historical data revealed serotype predominance switched from DENV-3 to DENV-1, and the replacement of Genotype IV of DENV-1 with Genotype I. In summary, DENV-1 predominated during the 2015 dengue outbreak in Jambi. The full spectrum of dengue disease occurred and was characterized by a switch in predominant serotypes.

  11. Evaluation of environmental effect of coal stockpile in Muara Telang, Banyuasin, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusdianasari; Arita, Susila; Ibrahim, Eddy; Ngudiantoro

    2013-04-01

    Stockpile commonly serves as a temporary dump before the coal is transported through the waterways. This study investigated the effects of coal stockpiles on the surrounding environment: air, water, and soil. The location of the study is in the estuary of Telang, South-Sumatra, Indonesia, which is located at the edge of the river of Telang and close to the residential community. The monitoring of the environmental impact from the stockpile is intended to conduct an environmental assessment owing the existence and operations of coal accumulation. Enviromental impact analysis was conducted based on the value of the effluent, air pollution (dust), soil and water by determining the parameters of the coal wastewater pH, total suspended solid, ferrous dan ferrous metals contents. The results indicate that the total suspended particulate, total suspended solids, noise level, ferrous metal and manganese metal were 10-14 μg/Nm3 249-355 mg/L, 41.3 to 50.3 dBA, 6.074 to7.579 mg/L, and 1.987 to 2.678 mg/L, respectively. Meanwhile the pH of water and soil were 3 to 4 and 2.83 to 4.02 respectively. It is concluded that the pH value are beyond the threshold standard.

  12. KrakMon: A new Multi-parameter Monitoring System on Krakatau Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann-Rothe, A.; Ibs-von Seht, M.; Kniess, R.; Krakmon Team, { v21C-0625 v21C-0625

    2005-12-01

    A new multi-parameter monitoring system has been installed this year on Krakatau island volcano in Indonesia. The two main objectives are: (i) To improve early warning procedures for volcanic risk in the Sunda Strait and adjacent densely populated areas of South Sumatra and West Java. (ii) To achieve a better understanding of dynamic processes inside the volcano and of external forcings that may influence the activity of Anak Krakatau. The system is designed for long-term continuous monitoring of various geophysical and environmental parameters such as: seismic signals, electromagnetic fields, deformation, ground temperature, meteorological parameters, sea-level and chemical and physical parameters of fumarolic gases. A digital camera allows for visual control of volcanic activity. Installations on the edifice of Anak Krakatau itself consist of three sites in a triangular setting around the volcanic cone. Each site is equipped with a seismometer, either short period or broad-band, differential GPS and ground temperature sensors, forming the backbone of the system. All measuring sites are connected by WLAN. The data acquisition center is located on Java and receives the data streams via radio links. Additional to the permanent installations a network of nine temporary seismic stations is set up in the Sunda Strait region. This paper gives an overview of the installations on the Krakatau island group. We would like to encourage discussion on the difficulties and possibilities of such monitoring systems on island volcanoes.

  13. Redescription and resurrection of Bertiella satyri (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae) parasitizing the orangutan (Pongo abelii) in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Foitová, Ivona; Mašová, Sárka; Tenora, František; Koubková, Božena; Hodová, Iveta; Vyskočilová, Martina; Baruš, Vlastimil; Nurcahyo, Wisnu

    2011-09-01

    The tapeworm species Bertiella satyri from a semi-wild Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii: Ponginae) is redescribed and the sequence of its 18S rDNA is presented. The tapeworms parasitizing the genera Pan, Pongo, Homo and Hylobates from Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris and from Muséum d´Histoire Naturelle, Genève are also presented. The validity of B. satyri is confirmed. B. satyri (BSA) differs from the most similar species Bertiella studeri (BSTU) in the following characteristics: (1) testes number, BSTU 300-400; BSA 116-124, (2) genital opening, BSTU regularly alternate; BSA irregularly alternate, (3) Cirrus-sac, BSTU short, 0.250-0.320, does not reach excretory ducts; BSA long, 0.630 × 0.495, reaches excretory ducts, (4) egg size, BSTU 0.053-0.060; BSA 0.030-0.051, (5) host BSTU Pan troglodytes, Africa; BSA Pongo pygmaeus, P. abelii, Indonesia (Borneo, Sumatra). Both species differ according to our material and the name B. satyri (Blanchard, 1891) is resurrected.

  14. Eastward traverse of equatorial plasma plumes observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Tayama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Saito, S.

    2006-07-01

    The zonal structure of radar backscatter plumes associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF), probably modulated by atmospheric gravity waves, has been investigated with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in West Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20° S, 100.32° E; dip latitude 10.1° S) and the FM-CW ionospheric sounders on the same magnetic meridian as the EAR. The occurrence locations and zonal distances of the ESF plumes were determined with multi-beam observations with the EAR. The ESF plumes drifted eastward while keeping distances of several hundred to a thousand kilometers. Comparing the occurrence of the plumes and the F-layer uplift measured by the FM-CW sounders, plumes were initiated within the scanned area around sunset only, when the F-layer altitude rapidly increased. Therefore, the PreReversal Enhancement (PRE) is considered as having a zonal variation with the scales mentioned above, and this variation causes day-to-day variability, which has been studied for a long time. Modulation of the underlying E-region conductivity by gravity waves, which causes inhomogeneous sporadic-E layers, for example, is a likely mechanism to determine the scale of the PRE.

  15. Development of Learning Devices through Problem Based Learning Model Based on the Context of Aceh Cultural to Improve Mathematical Communication Skills and Social Skills of SMPN 1 Muara Batu Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aufa, Mahrani; Saragih, Sahat; Minarni, Ani

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were:1) Developed problem-based on learning tools in the cultural context of Aceh (PBM-BKBA) who meet the criteria are valid, practical and effective; 2) Described the improvement of communication capabilities mathematics and social skills of students using the PBM-BKBA developed; and 3) Described the process of student…

  16. Indonesia to build methanol plant

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-08-05

    P.T. Kaltim Methanol Industri (Jakarta), a company set up to build a new methanol plant in Indonesia, expects to award contracts for the construction of a new plant, Indonesia's second methanol unit, by the end of this year. P.T. Kaltim Methanol is a private company owned by P.T. Humpuss, an industrial group active in transport, airlines, and shipping of LNG and methanol. The 2,000-m.t./day plant will be built at Bontang, Kalimantan Island, close to the fertilizer producer P.T. Pupuk Kaltim and near the country's largest natural gas reserves. The site is also a deepsea port, handy for transportation of ready product. Three groups are in discussions with the investor on plant supply as well as methanol offtake deals. They are H G/Kockner; John Brown/Davy/Lucky Goldstar, offering the ICI process independently; and Lurgi/Metallgesellschaft (MG), proposing the Lurgi process. At least 60% of the output is expected to be exported, and both ICI and MG are understood to be interested in selling product from the future plant. Japan, Southeast Asia, and the US are targeted.

  17. Tectonic map of Indonesia: A progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, Warren Bell

    1970-01-01

    Orogeny, volcanism, and seismicity are now intensely active in Indonesia. Many Dutch tectonists--Brouwer, Umbgrove, van Bemifielen, Smit4Sibinga, Vening Meinesz, Westerveld, and others--recognized that this complex cluster of islands represents an early stage in the evolution of orogenic belts. Not until Indonesia is understood can we comprehend the Alps. This report summarizes some aspects of work to date on the Tectonic Map of Indonesia. The preparation of this map is a joint project of the Geological Survey of Indonesia and the United States Geological Survey, sponsored by the Government of Indonesia and the United States Agency for International Development. The Tectonic Map of Indonesia will be published at a scale of 1:5,000,000. Adjacent regions in other countries will be included to provide a broader context. The map limits presently envisaged are the parallels of 12° N. and 15° S., and the meridians of 91° and 148° E. Tectonic features will be shown in many colors and patterns. Bathymetry is being newly compiled, and will be shown with contours and shades of blue. Figure 1 shows the islands of Indonesia.

  18. Rural Indonesia women’s traditional beliefs about antenatal care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Indonesia Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) of 420/100.00 live births remains among the highest in East Asia while coverage of births assisted by skilled providers is still low. Traditional beliefs have been a key factor associated with the choice between midwives or traditional birth attendants (TBA) and the low number of antenatal care visits in rural West Sumatra. Methods We conducted three focus groups with 16 women from rural West Java to describe their perception regarding issues related to traditional beliefs. Focus group discussions provided data for the content analysis. Results The majority of the 16 women interviewed was from Village Dago, West Java and had only an elementary school education. Their ages ranged from 19 to 40 years. Most were multiparous housewives with an income of IDR 918.750 per month, which was lower than the monthly income in West Java (IDR. 1.172.060). Emerging from the focus group discussion were four main themes regarding their pregnancy and traditional beliefs: 1) pregnancy was a normal cycle in women’s life (pregnancy is a natural phenomena, not a sickness; no recognition of danger signs during pregnancy and death of baby or mother during pregnancy was brought about by God’s will); 2) women followed the traditional beliefs (positive motivation to follow the traditional beliefs and fear of not following the traditional beliefs); 3) relying on TBA called paraji rather than midwife (parajis are kind, tolerant and patient and have more experience than midwives; more accessibility than midwives and encouragement of natural birth) and 4) midwives are more secure than paraji; (they use a medical standard of care). Conclusions Women’s beliefs grounded in religion and tradition permeated the village culture making it difficult to counter their long held health practices with practices based on recent advances in health care. Use of TBA in this village was still dominant and women believed that following traditional

  19. Automated and Rapid Determinations of Earthquake Source Parameters in Indonesia: Comparisons with Global CMT Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Yamashina, T.; Kumagai, H.; Inoue, H.; S.; F.

    2008-12-01

    Rapid determinations of the earthquake source parameters are important for early disaster response and tsunami warning issue. After the devastation of the 2004 great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, a nationwide broadband seismograph network in Indonesia has been developed by international cooperations among Meteorological and Geophysical Agency of Indonesia (BMG), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Germany (GFZ), the China Earthquake Administration (CEA), and the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Japan (NIED). This seismic network is intended to improve the capabilities for monitoring seismic activity and tsunami generation in Indonesia, and is a part of the Indonesia Tsunami Early Warning System (InaTEWS). We developed an automated system for rapid determinations of the earthquake source parameters called SWIFT (Source parameter determinations based on Waveform Inversion of Fourier Transformed seismograms) using data from the seismic network in Indonesia. This paper describes the SWIFT system and its performance. We also compare the obtained source parameters with those obtained by the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) project (http://www.globalcmt.org/). The SWIFT system is based on the waveform inversion method of Nakano et al. (2008, GJI, 173, 1000-1011). In this method, waveform inversion is carried out in the frequency domain to rapidly and routinely estimate both the focal mechanism and moment function. A pure double-couple focal mechanism from a point source is assumed in order to stabilize the inversion using data from a small number of seismic stations. The fault and slip orientation angles are estimated by a grid search with respect to the dip, strike, and rake angles. The source centroid location is determined by a spatial grid search, in which we adopt adaptive grid spacings for an efficient search. The moment function is reconstructed from its bandpassed form obtained from the inversion. This system is triggered by

  20. Women and tobacco in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Barraclough, S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To present a broad exploration of the relationship of women and tobacco in Indonesia and to describe action on tobacco and health specific to women taken by government and non-government agencies.
DATA SOURCES—Published and unpublished prevalence surveys, official documents, vernacular newspapers, secondary sources, unstructured interviews, and personal observations.
STUDY SELECTION—Data on smoking prevalence among women was primarily sought from official household surveys but several smaller scale local surveys were also examined. The only representative national household data on smoking prevalence from 1995 suggested a national prevalence for occasional and regular smoking of 2.6% for women aged 20 years or older. Smaller, local level surveys had reported rates varying from 4% for junior high school girls, and 2.9% for women undergraduates at a provincial university, to 6.4% of women in a representative sample in Jakarta. Claims that the incidence of female smoking is increasing cannot be confirmed due to an absence of comparable national longitudinal data.
CONCLUSION—Although Indonesian women are conspicuous in growing and processing tobacco, their rates of smoking are low in comparison with their male compatriots and internationally. Anecdotal evidence suggests that their disinclination to smoke is commonly attributed to cultural values, which stigmatise women smokers as morally flawed, while at the same time sanctioning smoking by men. Although there is little evidence of tobacco advertising directly targeting women, Indonesian health activists interviewed by the author felt that women are increasingly taking up smoking due to a weakening of stigma and to Western cultural influences. Cultural factors in the low rates of smoking among Indonesian women deserve closer investigation as they have proved to be a major source of health protection, albeit within a stigmatising context. More also needs to be known about the dynamics of

  1. 78 FR 74115 - Monosodium Glutamate From the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Indonesia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Indonesia: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the Countervailing Duty Investigations AGENCY... (PRC)); Nicholas Czajkowski at (202) 482- 1395 (the Republic of Indonesia (Indonesia)), AD/CVD... investigations of monosodium glutamate from Indonesia and the PRC.\\1\\ Currently, the preliminary...

  2. Tracking the rupture of the Mw = 9.3 Sumatra earthquake over 1,150 km at teleseismic distance.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Frank; Ohrnberger, Matthias

    2005-06-16

    On 26 December 2004, a moment magnitude Mw = 9.3 earthquake occurred along Northern Sumatra, the Nicobar and Andaman islands, resulting in a devastating tsunami in the Indian Ocean region. The rapid and accurate estimation of the rupture length and direction of such tsunami-generating earthquakes is crucial for constraining both tsunami wave-height models as well as the seismic moment of the events. Compressional seismic waves generated at the hypocentre of the Sumatra earthquake arrived after about 12 min at the broadband seismic stations of the German Regional Seismic Network (GRSN), located approximately 9,000 km from the event. Here we present a modification of a standard array-seismological approach and show that it is possible to track the propagating rupture front of the Sumatra earthquake over a total rupture length of 1,150 km. We estimate the average rupture speed to be 2.3-2.7 km s(-1) and the total duration of rupture to be at least 430 s, and probably between 480 and 500 s.

  3. Assessment of biomass open burning emissions in Indonesia and potential climate forcing impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permadi, Didin Agustian; Kim Oanh, Nguyen Thi

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an emission inventory (EI) for biomass open burning (OB) sources including forest, agro-residue and municipal solid waste (MSW) in Indonesia for year 2007. The EI covered toxic air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) and was presented as annual and monthly average for every district, and further on a grid of 0.25° × 0.25°. A rigorous analysis of activity data and emission factor ranges was done to produce the low, best and high emission estimates for each species. Development of EI methodology for MSW OB which, to our best knowledge, has not been presented in detail in the literature was a focus of this paper. The best estimates of biomass OB emission of toxic air pollutants for the country, in Gg, were: 9.6 SO2; 98 NOx; 7411 CO; 335 NMVOC; 162 NH3; 439 PM10; 357 PM2.5; 24 BC; and 147 OC. The best emission estimates of GHGs, in Gg, were: 401 CH4, 57,247 CO2; and 3.6 N2O. The low and high values of the emission estimates for different species were found to range from -86% to +260% of the corresponding best estimates. Crop residue OB contributed more than 80% of the total biomass OB emissions, followed by forest fire of 2-12% (not including peat soil fire emission) and MSW (1-8%). An inter-annual active fires count for Indonesia showed relatively low values in 2007 which may be attributed to the high rainfall intensity under the influence of La Niña climate pattern in the year. Total estimated net climate forcing from OB in Indonesia was 110 (20 year horizon) and 73 (100 year horizon) Tg CO2 equivalents which is around 0.9-1.1% of that reported for the global biomass OB for both time horizons. The spatial distribution showed higher emissions in large urban areas in Java and Sumatra Island, while the monthly emissions indicated higher values during the dry months of August-October.

  4. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Parola, P.; Vogelaers, D.; Roure, C.; Janbon, F.; Raoult, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers. PMID:9866749

  5. A boost for maternal health in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L

    1998-01-01

    High maternal mortality has long been a major problem in Indonesia. Complications of abortion, such as hemorrhage and infection, account for 15-30% of maternal mortality in the country. The manager of AVSC's program in Indonesia expects the situation to worsen in the context of recent domestic economic and political crises. The current shortage of contraceptives will result in more unintended pregnancies and may increase the incidence of induced abortion. Because abortion is illegal in Indonesia, it is often performed under unsafe conditions, increasing the risk of complications and maternal death. To help reduce the consequences of unsafe abortion, AVSC launched a postabortion care (PAC) program in Indonesia in September 1997. Its goal is to improve the quality and availability of emergency services for managing postabortion complications, postabortion family planning counseling and services, and referrals for other reproductive health services. Implementing strategies to avoid treatment delays is part of the goal of AVSC's PAC program.

  6. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Parola, P; Vogelaers, D; Roure, C; Janbon, F; Raoult, D

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers.

  7. Earthquake and tsunami hazard in West Sumatra: integrating science, outreach, and local stakeholder needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, J.; Lubis, A. M.; Huang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Hill, E. M.; Eriksson, S.; Sieh, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) is building partnerships with local to provincial government agencies, NGOs, and educators in West Sumatra to inform their policymaking, disaster-risk-reduction, and education efforts. Geodetic and paleoseismic studies show that an earthquake as large as M 8.8 is likely sometime in the coming decades on the Mentawai patch of the Sunda megathrust. This earthquake and its tsunami would be devastating for the Mentawai Islands and neighboring areas of the western Sumatra coast. The low-lying coastal Sumatran city of Padang (pop. ~800,000) has been the object of many research and outreach efforts, especially since 2004. Padang experienced deadly earthquakes in 2007 and 2009 that, though tragedies in their own right, served also as wake-up calls for a larger earthquake to come. However, there remain significant barriers to linking science to policy: extant hazard information is sometimes contradictory or confusing for non-scientists, while turnover of agency leadership and staff means that, in the words of one local advocate, "we keep having to start from zero." Both better hazard knowledge and major infrastructure changes are necessary for risk reduction in Padang. In contrast, the small, isolated villages on the outlying Mentawai Islands have received relatively fewer outreach efforts, yet many villages have the potential for timely evacuation with existing infrastructure. Therefore, knowledge alone can go far toward risk reduction. The tragic October 2010 Mentawai tsunami has inspired further disaster-risk reduction work by local stakeholders. In both locations, we are engaging policymakers and local NGOs, providing science to help inform their work. Through outreach contacts, the Mentawai government requested that we produce the first-ever tsunami hazard map for their islands; this aligns well with scientific interests at EOS. We will work with the Mentawai government on the presentation and explanation of the hazard map, as

  8. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-10-14

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia.

  9. Amateur Astronomy Network Development in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamani, Avivah

    2015-03-01

    Indonesia is a very big country with over 238 million people. And we only have one higher learning institution on astronomy, so how do we reach and convey astronomical information effectively to the whole country? The answer lies in Astronomy Clubs who play an increasingly important role to communicate and educate the public. As part of South East Asia, Indonesia is actively involved in the region to develop astronomy.

  10. Indonesia: places people at centre of development.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    Indonesia's population increased from 119.2 to 201.4 million in the past 26 years, but its population growth rate has declined to an estimated 1.6%, and its total fertility rate has dropped from 5.6 during 1967-70 to less than 2.9. A decline in Indonesia's infant mortality rate from 150 in 1961 to 50 in 1997 has led to an almost 20-year increase in life expectancy.

  11. Rickettsia Felis in Xenopsylla Cheopis, Java, Indonesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Gonzalez JP, et al. Identification of Rickettsia spp. and Bartonella spp. in fleas from the Thai-Myanmar border. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2003;990:173–81. 6...Oriental rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collect- ed from rodents and shrews in Java, Indonesia. We describe the first evidence of R. felis in...Indonesia and nat- urally occurring R. felis in Oriental rat fleas . Murine typhus (endemic typhus, fleaborne typhus),caused by Rickettsia typhi, is

  12. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia. PMID:26478663

  13. Locomotor ecology of wild orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) in the Gunung Leuser Ecosystem, Sumatra, Indonesia: a multivariate analysis using log-linear modelling.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Susannah K S; Crompton, Robin H

    2005-05-01

    The large body mass and exclusively arboreal lifestyle of Sumatran orangutans identify them as a key species in understanding the dynamic between primates and their environment. Increased knowledge of primate locomotor ecology, coupled with recent developments in the standardization of positional mode classifications (Hunt et al. [1996] Primates 37:363-387), opened the way for sophisticated multivariate statistical approaches, clarifying complex associations between multiple influences on locomotion. In this study we present a log-linear modelling approach used to identify key associations between orangutan locomotion, canopy level, support use, and contextual behavior. Log-linear modelling is particularly appropriate because it is designed for categorical data, provides a systematic method for testing alternative hypotheses regarding interactions between variables, and allows interactions to be ranked numerically in terms of relative importance. Support diameter and type were found to have the strongest associations with locomotor repertoire, suggesting that orangutans have evolved distinct locomotor modes to solve a variety of complex habitat problems. However, height in the canopy and contextual behavior do not directly influence locomotion: instead, their effect is modified by support type and support diameter, respectively. Contrary to classic predictions, age-sex category has only limited influence on orangutan support use and locomotion, perhaps reflecting the presence of arboreal pathways which individuals of all age-sex categories follow. Effects are primarily related to a tendency for adult, parous females to adopt a more cautious approach to locomotion than adult males and immature subjects.

  14. Exploration of the taxonomy of some Pleistocene Cervini (Mammalia, Artiodactyla, Cervidae) from Java and Sumatra (Indonesia): a geometric- and linear morphometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruwier, Ben; de Vos, John; Kovarovic, Kris

    2015-07-01

    Third molars of extant- and fossil Southeast Asian deer were metrically compared using a linear- and geometric morphometric approach and discussed in relation to known taxonomic information from the literature. Our analysis suggests the presence of medium sized deer of the genus Axis and large sized taxa of the genus Cervus s. l. in Java. Axis lydekkeri and Axis javanicus are considered valid taxa, with A. lydekkeri probably related to the subgenus Hyelaphus. The large deer, such as Cervus kendengensis, Cervus stehlini and Cervus problematicus are most likely of the subgenus Rusa, the former two closely related to extant Cervus timorensis. The Sumatran fossils are members of the subgenus Rusa, but not necessarily conspecific with extant Cervus (Rusa) unicolor.

  15. Seismological studies of tectonics in the Toba region and in the Banda sea, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi

    By using arrival time data from the Indonesian Meteorological and Geophysical Agency (MGA), International Seismological Center (ISC) and United State Geological Survey (USGS), and the Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions of Harvard, I studied the tectonic features in north Sumatra and Banda arc, Indonesia. In north Sumatra, the study was focused on the subducted slab and attenuation beneath Toba---the world's largest Quaternary caldera. In the Banda arc, I studied the unusual shape of the slab where a part of Australian continent has been subducted under the oceanic plate. Toba was formed 75ka, resulting in a caldera of the area of 25km x 100km. The age and area of the caldera suggest that the magma remains partially molten. Seismograms at the stations near the caldera showed that P- and S-waves have been attenuated. This attenuation was studied using both qualitative and quantitative method to locate the magma system. By applying both methods, the results indicate that the magma chamber is shallower than 20km. In Banda area, hypocenters were determined using a combination of local and teleseismic data to reveal the slab geometry. Because a flat-lying slab at 600km depth is unusual, the accuracy of the hypocenters within this slab was studied in more detail. Statistically several hypocenters in this region have been accurately located using probability density functions. The shape of the slab shown by the hypocenter distribution reveals high contortion beneath the Banda sea. The stress distribution revealed from the P,T and B axes of fault plane solutions suggests that the stress field is controlled by both gravity and contortion within the slab. The subduction process in Banda region has changed since the Australian continent plate collided with the Banda arc. Strike slip earthquakes seem to concentrate along the extension of the Terera-Aiduna fault to the southwest in Wetar backarc thrust. I conclude that the extension of Terera-Aiduna fault in the subducted

  16. Deep-sea observations and modeling of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami in Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Woodworth, Philip L.; Titov, Vasily V.

    2011-08-01

    The 2004 Sumatra tsunami was clearly recorded by two UK bottom pressure gauges, DPN and DPS, deployed in Drake Passage between South America and Antarctica. These open-ocean records were examined to estimate characteristics of the tsunami waves and to compare the results of numerical simulations with the observations. Maximum wave heights measured at these gauges were 4.9 cm at DPN and 7.4 cm at DPS; the travel times from the source area were 19 h 46 min and 19 h 39 min respectively, consistent with the times obtained from the nearby coastal tide gauges. The numerical model described well the frequency content, amplitudes and general structure of the observed waves, with only small time shifts probably related to wave dispersion effects. The shifts were 15 min for DPN and 10 min for DPS, with the modeled waves leading the observations in each case. Further inspection of the simulated and observed records revealed that the identified tsunami waves are related to the second (main) train of waves propagating by the energy conserving route along the mid-ocean ridges, while the first train of waves travelling by the fastest route across the ocean remained unrecognizable in the observed DPS and DPN records and undetectable in the records of coastal tide gauges because of their insignificant amplitudes compared to the background variability.

  17. Evaluating physiological stress in Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) managed in Australian zoos.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Tempe; Narayan, Edward J; Magrath, Michael J L; Roe, Sheila; Clark, Giles; Nicolson, Vere; Martin-Vegue, Patrick; Mucci, Al; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoid quantification using non-invasive methods provides a powerful tool for assessing the health and welfare of wildlife in zoo-based programmes. In this study, we provide baseline data on faecal-based glucocorticoid (cortisol) monitoring of Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) managed at the Melbourne Zoo in Victoria, Australia. We sampled five tigers daily for 60 days. Faecal cortisol metabolites (FCMs) in tiger faecal extracts were quantified using enzyme immunoassays that were successfully validated using parallelism and accuracy recovery checks. Two female tigers had significantly higher mean FCM levels than the two males and another female, suggesting that females may have higher FCM levels. A significant elevation was noted in the FCM levels for one female 2 days after she was darted and anaesthetized; however, the FCM levels returned to baseline levels within 3 days after the event. Comparative analysis of FCM levels of tigers sampled at Melbourne Zoo with tigers sampled earlier at two other Australian Zoos (Dreamworld Themepark and Australia Zoo) showed that FCM levels varied between zoos. Differences in the enclosure characteristics, timing of sampling, size and composition of groupings and training procedures could all contribute to this variation. Overall, we recommend the use of non-invasive sampling for the assessment of adrenocortical activity of felids managed in zoos in Australia and internationally in order to improve the welfare of these charismatic big cats.

  18. Congenital vestibular disease in captive Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) in Australasia.

    PubMed

    Wheelhouse, Jaimee L; Hulst, Frances; Beatty, Julia A; Hogg, Carolyn J; Child, Georgina; Wade, Claire M; Barrs, Vanessa R

    2015-11-01

    The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) is a critically endangered species in the wild. To ensure that demographic and genetic integrity are maintained in the longer term, those Sumatran tigers held in captivity are managed as a global population under a World Association of Zoos and Aquariums Global Species Management Plan (GSMP). A retrospective study, including segregation and pedigree analysis, was conducted to investigate potential cases of congenital vestibular disease (CVD) in captive Sumatran tigers in Australasian zoos using medical and husbandry records, as well as video footage obtained from 50 tigers between 1975 and 2013. Data from the GSMP Sumatran tiger studbook were made available for pedigree and segregation analysis. Fourteen cases of CVD in 13 Sumatran tiger cubs and one hybrid cub (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae × Panthera tigris) were identified. Vestibular signs including head tilt, circling, ataxia, strabismus and nystagmus were observed between birth and 2 months of age. These clinical signs persisted for a median of 237 days and had resolved by 2 years of age in all cases. Pedigree analysis revealed that all affected tigers were closely related and shared a single common ancestor in the last four generations. A genetic cause for the disease is suspected and, based on pedigree and segregation analysis, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is likely. Further investigations to determine the world-wide prevalence and underlying pathology of this disorder are warranted.

  19. Physics of the environment: possible Sumatra Tsunami warning times for large animals in Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David G.; Scheifele, Peter M.; Vonwinkle, William A.

    2005-04-01

    There has previously been significant anecdotal evidence that animals can anticipate or sense seismic events. It is known that large animals, specifically elephants, sense and utilize low frequency sound. The object of this paper is to estimate the possible warning times that large animals in Sri Lanka could have had of the Sumatra Tsunami, assuming they could sense low frequency wave transmission from the initial earthquake arriving by either atmospheric, ocean, or bottom paths. The atmospheric path appears to be the least efficient due to relatively high attenuation and poor coupling to the source. It would also give the shortest warning time: approximately 30 minutes. The ocean path via the deep sound channel, which has been shown by a previous Bermuda experiment to be an efficient means of coupling seismic energy to an island, would give a warning time of more than 1.5 hours. The bottom path(s), which gave strong received signals at a Sri Lanka seismic station, would give a warning time of about 2 hours. These estimates should provide a context for animal behavior reports.

  20. Evaluating physiological stress in Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) managed in Australian zoos

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Tempe; Narayan, Edward J.; Magrath, Michael J. L.; Roe, Sheila; Clark, Giles; Nicolson, Vere; Martin-Vegue, Patrick; Mucci, Al; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoid quantification using non-invasive methods provides a powerful tool for assessing the health and welfare of wildlife in zoo-based programmes. In this study, we provide baseline data on faecal-based glucocorticoid (cortisol) monitoring of Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris ssp. sumatrae) managed at the Melbourne Zoo in Victoria, Australia. We sampled five tigers daily for 60 days. Faecal cortisol metabolites (FCMs) in tiger faecal extracts were quantified using enzyme immunoassays that were successfully validated using parallelism and accuracy recovery checks. Two female tigers had significantly higher mean FCM levels than the two males and another female, suggesting that females may have higher FCM levels. A significant elevation was noted in the FCM levels for one female 2 days after she was darted and anaesthetized; however, the FCM levels returned to baseline levels within 3 days after the event. Comparative analysis of FCM levels of tigers sampled at Melbourne Zoo with tigers sampled earlier at two other Australian Zoos (Dreamworld Themepark and Australia Zoo) showed that FCM levels varied between zoos. Differences in the enclosure characteristics, timing of sampling, size and composition of groupings and training procedures could all contribute to this variation. Overall, we recommend the use of non-invasive sampling for the assessment of adrenocortical activity of felids managed in zoos in Australia and internationally in order to improve the welfare of these charismatic big cats. PMID:27293659

  1. Tsunami heights and damage along the Myanmar coast from the December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Kenji; Aung, Than Tin; Sawai, Yuki; Okamura, Yukinobu; Win, Kyaw Soe; Swe, Win; Swe, Chit; Swe, Tint Lwin; Tun, Soe Thura; Soe, Maung Maung; Oo, Thant Zin; Zaw, Saw Htwe

    2006-02-01

    The tsunami heights from the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake were between 0.4 and 2.9 m along the Myanmar coast, according to our post tsunami survey at 22 sites in Ayeyarwaddy Delta and the Taninthayi coast. Interviews to coastal residents indicate that the tsunami heights were lower than high tide level in rainy season, probably by storm surge. They also testified that the arrival times were between 2 and 5.5 hours after the earthquake but the reliability may be low because nobody felt ground shaking. Much smaller tsunami than the neighboring Thai coast, where the tsunami heights were 5 to 20 m, explains relatively slighter tsunami damage in Myanmar; the casualties were reported as 71, compared to about 8300 in Thailand. The smaller tsunami was probably due to the fact that the main tsunami source did not extend to Andaman Islands. The tsunami travel times and maximum heights computed from a 700 km long source are basically consistent with the observations. For a nearby tsunami source, the tsunami hazard would be more significant in Myanmar, because coastal houses are unprotected for tsunamis and no infrastructure exists to disseminate tsunami warning information.

  2. Theft of electricity in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priatna, Dedy Supriadi

    In 1996, among 196 million Indonesian people, only 47.6% had access to electricity; 45.4% in rural areas and 51.5% in urban. 64% of population lived in 61,975 villages, and electric power was supplied to 69% of villages. The government has set a goal to achieve nearly universal services by the year 2014. The government can use existing installed capacity of PLN's system more efficiently. Theft of electricity, which currently constitutes a large share of PLN's losses, should be reduced. The potential of the private sector including captive power and local communities, to participate in electric power generation can also be utilized. The large interest that has been shown by the private sector might be followed by making electric power provision profitable and therefore attractive for the private sector. PLN profits, that in 1996 were only 5.22% instead of the 8% recommended by the World Bank as the best practice for Indonesia, have to be increased by improving their performance levels. The government should also seek solutions for the extremely poor households who will never be able to afford both connection charges and a monthly bill. In 1996 the extremely poor households included 5,251,788 households, constituting 12.1% of the total Indonesian households. Only 1.2% of these households had access to electricity. The objective of this study is to seek the policies that can be implemented in Indonesia that will make it possible to generate and deliver electricity profitably, and reduce theft while providing nearly universal services. For this purpose, the options that are proposed in this study are reducing theft of electricity; something like the CAMPFIRE that has successfully reduced poaching of elephants in Africa: that is, consumer-owned systems, both partially (distribution facilities) and completely (generation and distribution facilities); performance-based regulation (PBR); and solutions for supplying the extremely poor based on the minimum subsidies from the

  3. Presence and species identification of the gapeworm Mammomonogamus laryngeus (Railliet, 1899) (Syngamidae: Nematoda) in a semi-wild population of Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Foitová, I; Koubková, B; Barus, V; Nurcahyo, W

    2008-04-01

    One adult syngamid nematode parasite couple was found during routine clinical observation in quarantine at the former Bohorok Rehabilitation Station from sputum of Pongo abelli and determined as Mammomonogamus laryngeus [Railliet, A., 1899. Syngame laryngieu du boeuf. Comptes Rendus Hebdomadaires des Séances et Mémoires de la Société de Biologie 11, 18-21]. This finding confirmed previous record of ova and adult syngamid nematodes, determined by Collet et al. [Collet, J.-Z., Galdikas, B.M.F., Sugarjito, J., Jojosudharmo, S., 1986. A coprological study of parasitism in orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in Indonesia. Journal of Medical Primatology 15, 121-129] as Mammomonogamus sp. only, in orangutans kept in the Bohorok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre (Northern Sumatra, Indonesia) and presented a serious health hazard to rehabilitants in this locality. Morphometrical features and the first description of the parasite from orang-utan were presented and documented. Coprological monitoring of infection in rehabilitants in this area as well as among the wild population of orangutan is necessary.

  4. Assessment of Natural Regeneration of Mangrove Species at Tsunami Affected Areas in Indonesia and Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onrizal; Ahmad, A. G.; Mansor, M.

    2017-03-01

    Indian Ocean tsunami caused extensive damage on human life and coastal environments, including fragmented mangroves prior to 2004 tsunami. The natural regeneration of mangrove woody species was assessed in four tidal coasts of Aceh and Peninsular Malaysia during August 2015 to August 2016. A total of 23 mangrove woody species was recorded and they having good ability in term of natural regeneration at tsunami affected areas. The North coast of Aceh was recorded as richest mangrove with 22 species, followed by East coast of Aceh (17 species) and Peninsular Malaysia coast (13 species). In addition, the poorest mangrove was found in West coast of Aceh (7 species). Some species, such as Rhizophora apiculata, R. mucronata, Nypa fruticans, Scaevola taccada and Sonneratia caseolaris are found growing well in all sites. In contrast, Bruguiera cylindrica is only found in West coast of Peninsular Malaysia as same as Ceriops tagal, Phoenix paludosa and Sonneratia ovata are only found in North coast of Aceh. To date, some areas of natural regenerated mangrove were ruined by negative activities, such as illegal cutting and encroachment. Therefore, public consultations and community participations were needed to develop and conserve the important natural assets.

  5. Epidemiology of Plasmodium vivax in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Surjadjaja, Claudia; Surya, Asik; Baird, J. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Endemic malaria occurs across much of the vast Indonesian archipelago. All five species of Plasmodium known to naturally infect humans occur here, along with 20 species of Anopheles mosquitoes confirmed as carriers of malaria. Two species of plasmodia cause the overwhelming majority and virtually equal shares of malaria infections in Indonesia: Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The challenge posed by P. vivax is especially steep in Indonesia because chloroquine-resistant strains predominate, along with Chesson-like strains that relapse quickly and multiple times at short intervals in almost all patients. Indonesia's hugely diverse human population carries many variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, most of them exhibiting severely impaired enzyme activity. Therefore, the patients most likely to benefit from primaquine therapy by preventing aggressive relapse, may also be most likely to suffer harm without G6PD deficiency screening. Indonesia faces the challenge of controlling and eventually eliminating malaria across > 13,500 islands stretching > 5,000 km and an enormous diversity of ecological, ethnographic, and socioeconomic settings, and extensive human migrations. This article describes the occurrence of P. vivax in Indonesia and the obstacles faced in eliminating its transmission. PMID:27708185

  6. Agarwood-planted tree inventory in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turjaman, Maman; Hidayat, Asep

    2017-01-01

    Indonesia has as a country that has a high diversity of agarwood-producing trees (APT) species compared to other countries in Asia. Unfortunately, the populations of APT species have declined significantly. The purpose of this study was to record and maps the agarwood-planted trees in Indonesia as a baseline for future management of this species. The questioners were distributed to 31 of provinces in Indonesia. The feedback came from 21 prefectures (67.7%), consisting from 121 regencies (36.6%) those in detail came from 579 district, 1,257 villages and 4,757 farmers group. The major of APT species planted by farmer groups are Aquilaria malaccensis, A. microcarpa, and Gyrinops versteegii. The potency of APT in Indonesia is 3.4 million trees, consisting from 0.2 million tree with DBH > 20 cm and 3.2 million tree with DBH < 20 cm. The highest APT in Indonesia is located in Central Kalimantan (24.7%) followed by North Sumatera (17.9%). The prediction of agarwood products and its derivate will be obtained in 2020 with economic value might be reached 1.6 trillion rupiahs if the inoculation technique used the standard procedure recommended by FORDA. These results showed how huge the potential of APT will be developed in the future.

  7. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in subheading... United States at less than fair value (LTFV) and subsidized by the Governments of China and Indonesia....

  8. Socio-Economic Factors on Indonesia Education Disparity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzizah, Yuni

    2015-01-01

    Since 1998, regional governments in Indonesia have had greater autonomy due to the commencement of a reformation movement across Indonesia. Large portions of education management were delegated to the regional governments. Because of this, the education level varies strongly across Indonesia' provinces. Referring to the data provided by the…

  9. Time for a New Theater Security Cooperation Plan for Indonesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-14

    be one of the most potentially rewarding examples of a new Muslim democracy. Indonesia stands 4 out from the Muslim Middle East because Islam in Indonesia is...by many Indonesians, the moderate nature of Islam in Indonesia creates conditions which are receptive to American engagement and PACOM TSC. THE

  10. Translating Developing Science into Public Awareness and Social Organisation in W. Sumatra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R.; McDowell, S.; McCloskey, J.

    2009-04-01

    Social idiosyncrasies confounding cross-cultural scientific interventions on an intra-regional and international scale continue to blight the positive benefits robust science offers to vulnerable communities inhabiting areas prone to natural hazards. The sustained malice inflicted by these phenomena upon socioeconomic systems epitomises the perilous task facing mitigation bodies attempting to communicate scientific forecasts and interweave technical knowledge into social policy internationally. This quandary continues to confront disaster officials and scientists in Sumatra. Palaeoseismological studies, coupled with a developing understanding of stress transference between earthquakes, reveal that the Mentawai segment of the Sumatran forearc is the most plausible candidate for future rupture. Simulations of tsunami propagation and inundation illustrate that the coastal regions of western Sumatran, inhabited by approximately 2 million people, lie in immediate mortal threat. Many Sumatrans' live with stark memories of the 1600 km megathrust rupture in December 2004, which spawned one of the worst global natural atrocities of recent time. The earthquake accelerated collaboration between seismologists, geophysicists and geologists and has produced unrivalled advances in understanding fault locations, geometries and potential rupture characteristics of the Sumatran forearc. Nowhere else on earth are scientists more aware of the impending threat of another magnitude 8+ megathrust earthquake. However with the twenty-first century being tainted by natural disasters which have typified the blatantly ambiguous linkages which exist between science and society, assessing to what extent this notion is exemplified in the Sumatran context is imperative. Here we begin to present the results from a social survey, conducted in the Sumatran cities of Padang and Bengkulu between May and September 2008. The campaign sought to dissect the broader societal complexities and moral values

  11. Long-period spectral features of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 earthquake rupture process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clévédé, E.; Bukchin, B.; Favreau, P.; Mostinskiy, A.; Aoudia, A.; Panza, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the spatial variability of the seismic radiation spectral content of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 earthquake. We determine the integral estimates of source geometry, duration and rupture propagation given by the stress glut moments of total degree 2 of different source models. These models are constructed from a single or a joint use of different observations including seismology, geodesy, altimetry and tide gauge data. The comparative analysis shows coherency among the different models and no strong contradictions are found between the integral estimates of geodetic and altimetric models, and those retrieved from very long period seismic records (up to 2000-3000 s). The comparison between these results and the integral estimates derived from observed surface wave spectra in period band from 500 to 650 s suggests that the northern part of the fault (to the north of 8°N near Nicobar Islands) did not radiate long period seismic waves, that is, period shorter than 650 s at least. This conclusion is consistent with the existing composite short and long rise time tsunami model: with short rise time of slip in the southern part of the fault and very long rise time of slip at the northern part. This complex space-time slip evolution can be reproduced by a simple dynamic model of the rupture assuming a crude phenomenological mechanical behaviour of the rupture interface at the fault scales combining an effective slip-controlled exponential weakening effect, related to possible friction and damage breakdown processes of the fault zone, and an effective linear viscous strengthening effect, related to possible interface lubrication processes. While the rupture front speed remains unperturbed with initial short slip duration, a slow creep wave propagates behind the rupture front in the case of viscous effects accounting for the long slip duration and the radiation characteristics in the northern segment.

  12. Seismotectonics of a diffuse plate boundary: Observations off the Sumatra-Andaman trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aderhold, K.; Abercrombie, R. E.

    2016-05-01

    The actively deforming Indo-Australian intraplate region off the Sumatra-Andaman trench hosted the largest strike-slip earthquake recorded by modern instruments, the 2012 Mw 8.6 Wharton Basin earthquake, closely followed by a Mw 8.2 aftershock. These two large events ruptured either parallel north-south trending faults or a series of north-south and nearly perpendicular east-west fault planes. No active east-west faults had been identified in the region prior to these earthquakes, and the seismic rupture for these two earthquakes extended past the 800°C isotherm for lithosphere of this age, deep into the oceanic mantle and possibly beyond the inferred transition to ductile failure. To investigate the seismic behavior of this region, we calculate moment tensors with teleseismic body waves for 6.0 ≤ Mw ≤ 8.0 intraplate strike-slip earthquakes. The centroid depths are located throughout the seismogenic mantle and could extend through the oceanic crust, but are generally well constrained by the 600°C isotherm and do not appear to rupture beyond the 800°C isotherm. We conclude that while many earthquakes are consistent with a thermal limit to depth, large magnitude earthquakes may be able to rupture typically aseismic zones. We also perform finite-fault modeling for Mw ≥ 7.0 earthquakes and find a slight preference for rupture on east-west oriented faults for the 2012 Mw 7.2 and 2005 Mw 7.2 earthquakes. This lends support for the presence of active east-west faults in this region, consistent with the majority of previously published models of the 2012 M8+ earthquakes.

  13. Forest structure and support availability influence orangutan locomotion in Sumatra and Borneo.

    PubMed

    Manduell, Kirsten L; Harrison, Mark E; Thorpe, Susannah K S

    2012-12-01

    The influence of habitat structure and support availability on support use is an important aspect of understanding locomotor behavior in arboreal primates. We compared habitat structure and support availability in three orangutan study sites-two on Sumatra (Pongo abelii) in the dry-lowland forest of Ketambe and peat swamp forest of Suaq Balimbing, and one on Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) in the disturbed peat swamp forest of Sabangau-to better understand orangutan habitat use. Our analysis revealed vast differences in tree and liana density between the three sites. Sabangau had a much higher overall tree density, although both Sumatran sites had a higher density of larger trees. The two peat swamp forests were more similar to each other than to Ketambe, particularly with regard to support availability. Ketambe had a wider variety of supports of different sizes and types, and a higher density of larger lianas than the two peat swamps. Orangutans in all three sites did not differ substantially in terms of their preferred supports, although Sumatran orangutans had a strong tendency to use lianas, not observed in Sabangau. Differences in observed frequencies of locomotor behavior suggest the homogeneous structure of Sabangau limits the locomotor repertoire of orangutans, with high frequencies of fewer behaviors, whereas the wider range of supports in Ketambe appears to have facilitated a more varied locomotor repertoire. There were no differences among age-sex classes in the use of arboreal pathways in Suaq Balimbing, where orangutans selected larger trees than were typically available. This was less apparent in Sabangau, where orangutans generally used trees in relation to their environmental abundance, reflecting the homogeneous nature of disturbed peat swamp forest. These results demonstrate that forest architecture has an important influence on orangutan locomotion, which may become increasingly important as the structure of orangutan habitat continues to be

  14. Constructivist learning at the science-policy interface: tsunami science informing disaster policy in West Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, J.; Dewi, P. R.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Sieh, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    Science communication often falls short when it is based on the blank-slate assumption that if we can just get the message right, then the information will be received and understood as intended. In contrast, constructivist learning theory and practice suggest that we all actively construct our knowledge from a variety of information sources and through particular, novel associations with our prior knowledge. This constructed knowledge can be quite different from any of its original sources, such as a particular science communication. Successful communication requires carefully examining how people construct their knowledge of the topic of interest. Examples from our outreach work to connect hazard-science research with disaster-risk reduction practice in West Sumatra illustrate the mismatch between expert and stakeholder/public mental models of the characteristics of tsunamigenic earthquakes. There are incorrect conceptions that seawater always withdraws before a tsunami, and that a tsunami can be produced by an earthquake only if the epicenter is located at the ocean trench. These incorrect conceptions arise from generalizations based on recent, local earthquake experiences, as well as from unintended consequences of science outreach, science education, and, in one case, the way that tsunami modelling is graphically presented in scientific journals. We directly address these incorrect conceptions in our discussions with government officials and others; as a result, the local disaster-management agency has changed its policies to reflect an increased understanding of the hazard. This outreach success would not have been possible without eliciting the prior knowledge of our audiences through dialogue.

  15. Post Tsunami Survey along the Myanmar Coast due to the December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aung, T.; Satake, K.; Okamura, Y.; Sawai, Y.; Win, K. S.; Swe, W.; Swe, C.; Swe, T. L.; Tun, S. T.; Soe, M. M.; Oo, T. Z.; Zaw, S. H.

    2005-12-01

    Post tsunami survey along the Myanmar coast indicates that the maximum tsunami heights from the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake were less than 3 m and the damage was limited with total number of casualties of 61. Our interviews indicate that nobody felt the earthquake ground shaking around the origin time (07:28 in Myanmar local time). Measurements of tsunami heights, on the basis of eyewitness accounts, debris line and water marker, were made at 22 sites in Ayeyarwaddy Delta and the Taninthayi coast. In Ayeyarwaddy Delta, six measurements indicate that the tsunami heights were between 0.6 and 2.3 m above the sea level at the time of tsunami arrival, which is reported as between 11:00 and 11:45. The casualties were reported as 25 around the delta. Around Dawei, seven measurements indicate the tsunami heights between 0.9 and 2.9 m and arrival times between 10:00 and 14:00. Two measurements around Myeik show that the heights were 0.7 and 2.2 m and the arrival times were 11:00 and 12:00. Around Kawthaung near Thai boarder, seven measurements show the heights between 0.4 and 2.6 m, and the arrival times between 10:30 and 11:45. Much smaller tsunami heights than the neighboring Thai coast, where the tsunami heights were between 5 to 20 m with casualties about 8300, explain relatively less tsunami damage in Myanmar. The reason for the smaller tsunami was probably due to the fact the tsunami source did not extend to Andaman Islands. The tsunami travel times and maximum heights computed from a 700 km long source are basically consistent with the observation. For a nearby tsunami source, the tsunami hazard would be more significant in Myanmar, because coastal houses are unprotected for tsunamis and no infrastructure exists to disseminate tsunami warning information.

  16. Simulation of the minor tsunami generated by the September 30 2009 earthquake near Padang, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wekerle, C.; Harig, S.; Pranowo, W.; Behrens, J.; Androsov, A.; Schroeter, J.; Hiller, W.

    2009-12-01

    The magnitude 7.6 earthquake (USGS) on September 30, 2009 at 10:16 UTC close to the city of Padang in West Sumatra generated a minor tsunami. Earthquakes in this region however have the potential to generate destructive waves as it was shown in historical and recent events. Taking into account the large number of casualties due to this earthquake it is important to prepare for possible future events which might be accompanied by a tsunami. Due to the geographical setting of Padang a tsunami might have disastrous impact. An effective early warning system is crucial. The tsunami modeling group of Alfred Wegener Institute is part of the GITEWS project (German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System) and is responsible for creating a database of pre-calculated tsunami scenarios of various magnitudes and epicenter locations covering the Sunda Trench. These scenarios are calculated with the newly developed model TsunAWI. It is based on the nonlinear shallow water equations and employs the finite element method in unstructured meshes. In case of a tsunamigenic earthquake, sensor data (comprising seismometers, GPS instruments, tide gauges, buoys and ocean bottom pressure sensors) will be evaluated. The most probable scenario will be selected and used to forecast arrival times and estimated wave height along the coast. The unstructured discretisation employed in TsunAWI allows for a high resolution around the city of Padang. In this presentation we show preliminary examples of the results of the GITEWS simulation system. We evaluate our pre-computed scenarios and analyze their deficiencies. Additional simulations based on diverse source models are performed to analyze the predictability of near-field tsunamis within short time. We compare simulation results to tide gauge data from Padang harbor and find good agreement.

  17. Differences in tsunami generation between the December 26, 2004 and March 28, 2005 Sumatra earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Bilek, S.L.; Arcas, D.; Titov, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    Source parameters affecting tsunami generation and propagation for the Mw > 9.0 December 26, 2004 and the Mw = 8.6 March 28, 2005 earthquakes are examined to explain the dramatic difference in tsunami observations. We evaluate both scalar measures (seismic moment, maximum slip, potential energy) and finite-source repre-sentations (distributed slip and far-field beaming from finite source dimensions) of tsunami generation potential. There exists significant variability in local tsunami runup with respect to the most readily available measure, seismic moment. The local tsunami intensity for the December 2004 earthquake is similar to other tsunamigenic earthquakes of comparable magnitude. In contrast, the March 2005 local tsunami was deficient relative to its earthquake magnitude. Tsunami potential energy calculations more accurately reflect the difference in tsunami severity, although these calculations are dependent on knowledge of the slip distribution and therefore difficult to implement in a real-time system. A significant factor affecting tsunami generation unaccounted for in these scalar measures is the location of regions of seafloor displacement relative to the overlying water depth. The deficiency of the March 2005 tsunami seems to be related to concentration of slip in the down-dip part of the rupture zone and the fact that a substantial portion of the vertical displacement field occurred in shallow water or on land. The comparison of the December 2004 and March 2005 Sumatra earthquakes presented in this study is analogous to previous studies comparing the 1952 and 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquakes and tsunamis, in terms of the effect slip distribution has on local tsunamis. Results from these studies indicate the difficulty in rapidly assessing local tsunami runup from magnitude and epicentral location information alone.

  18. Evidence of self organization in great Sumatra earthquake recurrence times: Implications for coupling of tidal forcing and tectonic stress accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R. K.; Puli, K.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed inter- event time series of earthquake activities (M≥ 5) of Sumatra region spanning over 1973 to 2009 using techniques of nonlinear dynamics. The earthquake data were taken from the USGS catalogue centered on latitude 3.240N and longitude 95.825E. As a first step, in our analyses we computed the rank order statistics which revealed mixed response of earthquake dynamics indicating distinct breaks in slope of the rank order. This suggests that earthquake dynamics in this region is partly unstable and partly "self-organized" with a random tail. Comparison of return maps of the earthquakes inter- event time series with those representing random, stochastic and chaotic processes shows a quasi-deterministic behavior of earthquake genesis in the region. We further assessed the dimensionality of earthquake-generating mechanisms using a nonlinear predictor technique on two dimensional phase portrait constructed by recurrence time series. The nonlinear forecasting analysis suggests that the earthquake processes in the Sumatra region evolve on a non-random low-dimensional chaotic plane. Further, "K2" Entropy revealed a coherent structure indicating the deterministic dynamical pattern. This analysis is consistent with "self-organized" processes which could be explained invoking earth's internal dynamics, where, impulsively derived interdependencies cascades through the stress generated by tectonic plate movement. Our results, however, do not preclude the role of coupling of the above self-organized system with tidal forcing. Evidence for such a coupling in this region exists as 'triggering force". Keywords: Sumatra Earthquakes, Quasi-deterministic, Stochastic, Chaotic, Self-organized, K2 entropy, Phase portrait.

  19. Implications of the diffuse deformation of the Indian Ocean lithosphere for slip partitioning of oblique plate convergence in Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, K. E.; Feng, L.; Hill, E. M.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Sieh, K.

    2017-01-01

    Oblique plate convergence between Indian Ocean lithosphere and continental crust of the Sunda plate is distributed between subduction on the Sunda megathrust and upper plate strike-slip faulting on the Sumatran Fault Zone, in a classic example of slip partitioning. Over the last decade, a destructive series of great earthquakes has brought renewed attention to the mechanical properties of these faults and the intervening fore-arc crustal block. While observations of fore-arc deformation over the earthquake cycle indicate that the fore-arc crust is fundamentally elastic, the spatial pattern of slip vector azimuths for earthquakes sourced by rupture of the Sunda megathrust is strongly inconsistent with relative motion of two rigid plates. Permanent and distributed deformation therefore occurs in either the downgoing lithospheric slab or the overriding fore-arc crust. Previous studies have inferred from geodetic velocities and geological slip rates of the Sumatran Fault that the fore-arc crust is undergoing rapid trench-parallel stretching. Using new geological slip rates for the Sumatran Fault and an updated decadal GPS velocity field of Sumatra and the fore-arc islands, we instead show that permanent deformation within the fore-arc sliver is minor and that the Sumatran Fault is a plate boundary strike-slip fault. The kinematic data are best explained by diffuse deformation within the oceanic lithosphere of the Wharton Basin, which accommodates convergence between the Indian and Australian plates and has recently produced several large earthquakes well offshore of Sumatra. The slip partitioning system in Sumatra is fundamentally linked with the mechanical properties of the subducting oceanic lithosphere.

  20. Information on the Earth's Deep Interior Conveyed by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake Using Superconducting Gravimeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosat, S.; Watada, S.; Sato, T.; Tamura, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The recent Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of magnitude Mw > 9 on 2004 December 26th has strongly excited the low-frequency seismic modes and, in particular, the degree one 2S1 mode is observed for the first time without any stacking. This mode corresponds to the first overtone of the sub-seismic mode 1S1, the so-called Slichter triplet (Slichter, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 1961). On the one hand, theoretical computations suggest that the Slichter modes could not have been excited with sufficient amplitude to be detected by superconducting gravimeters (SGs) on the Earth's surface. The maximum surface gravity effect of 1S1 after Sumatra event is 0.3 nGal, that is to say 0.3 10-12 g, where g is the mean absolute gravity value on the Earth's surface, corresponding to a free air displacement of 10-3 mm (1 nm). On the other hand, the core-sensitive mode 3S2 and the fundamental radial mode 0S0 were strongly excited, meaning that the earthquake radiated much energy toward the core. 0S0 is a radial fundamental spheroidal mode called "breathing mode" of the Earth and corresponds to changes in the Earth's circumference. The high stability of SG records has enabled us to follow the time decay of 0S0 amplitude till the second Sumatra event on March 28th 2005 and to estimate 0S0 quality factor at a value of 5513 +- 8 from the weighted mean of 12 SG record estimates. Amplitude measurements of 0S0 at most SG sites in the world reveal a latitude dependency that we try to explain by theory. The amplitude deviation of 0S0 reaches +- 2% while the calibration errors of SGs are usually less than 0.2%.

  1. The 2004 Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami: Lessons Learned in Subduction Zone Science and Emergency Management for the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, John F.

    2015-03-01

    The 26 December 2004, Mw 9.3 Sumatra earthquake and tsunami was a pivotal turning point in our awareness of the dangers posed by subduction zone earthquakes and tsunamis. This earthquake was the world's largest in 40 years, and it produced the world's deadliest tsunami. This earthquake ruptured a subduction zone that has many similarities to the Cascadia Subduction Zone. In this article, I summarize lessons learned from this tragedy, and make comparisons with potential rupture characteristics, slip distribution, deformation patterns, and aftershock patterns for Cascadia using theoretical modeling and interseismic observations. Both subduction zones are approximately 1,100-1,300 km in length. Both have similar convergence rates and represent oblique subduction. Slip along the subduction fault during the 26 December earthquake is estimated at 15-25 m, similar to values estimated for Cascadia. The width of the rupture, ~80-150 km estimated from modeling seismic and geodetic data, is similar to the width of the "locked and transition zone" estimated for Cascadia. Coseismic subsidence of up to 2 m along the Sumatra coast is also similar to that predicted for parts of northern Cascadia, based on paleoseismic evidence. In addition to scientific lessons learned, the 2004 tsunami provided many critical lessons for emergency management and preparedness. As a result of that tragedy, a number of preparedness initiatives are now underway to promote awareness of earthquake and tsunami hazards along the west coast of North America, and plans are underway to develop prototype tsunami and earthquake warning systems along Cascadia. Lessons learned from the great Sumatra earthquake and tsunami tragedy, both through scientific studies and through public education initiatives, will help to reduce losses during future earthquakes in Cascadia and other subduction zones of the world.

  2. Indonesia; World Bank assists Second Population Project.

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    Indonesia's First Population Project, funded jointly by the International Development Association and UNFPA, was started in 1972 and provided for construction of service and training facilities, equipment, research and evaluation studies, education, and communication activities. The national family planning program has made progress in the last 20 years. Acceptor and family planning personnel statistics are given. The World Bank has recently awarded Indonesia a loan to fund its Second Population Project, to aid in reaching the goal of a 50% reduction in fertility by 2000.

  3. Coping with pollution in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1989-01-01

    The plight of fishermen from Jakarta Bay and Muara Angke, Indonesia, is described. Lack of general education and education in modern fishing techniques and pollution in the coastal areas has reduced the quantity and quality of fish caught. The changes in the Bay are recounted by Sho Boen Seng, the 78-year old unofficial head of Muara Angke who remembers when fish were plentiful and catches available closer to the shoreline. The fishing community north of Jakarta suffers from degraded resources, not just from the loss of coral reefs and mangroves, but from millions of tons of industrial and municipal dumping of wastewaters. There has also been construction of port facilities and fish farming which has thrust sedimentation into the Bay and wiped out near-shore spawning areas for shrimp and clams. Coliform bacteria counts and toxic metals in the Bay exceed US standards, and parts of the Bay are oxygen starved (eutropic). Current and tidal patterns have been changed. Fishermen have travel 6 hours and fish 12 miles out from the shore. Poor fishing families fish close to shore and eat the contaminated fish; as a consequence many suffer from chronic intestinal and stomach disorders. Conditions are similar to Ambon Bay and the Flores Sea and other coastal areas, because 75% of Indonesian cities follow the 54,716 miles of coastline. Conditions for the fishermen of Muara Angke are hampered by low prices paid for fish due to the money lenders who control finance in the village. The Indonesian government has provided loans to small fisherman to buy motors for their boats and halted trawler fishing in the Bay. These efforts have not been effective because too many fishermen still use the old ways, and the regulations came after the Bay had already been overfished and was too shallow for much of a catch. More help from government is needed to provide general and fishing education.

  4. Gender and advocacy in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ray-ross, S

    1997-01-01

    The Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) and the Indonesian Midwives Association (IBI) have developed a two-phase training program regarding gender issues for the association's midwives. The first phase focuses on the leadership, management, and advocacy skills necessary to articulate program needs and to take part in making decisions regarding family planning and reproductive health. The second phase concerns the integration of gender into project design. Proposals developed by the midwives include the following: 1) to improve counseling services for women in a district where 70% of the women using contraception do not decide for themselves which methods to use; 2) to reduce maternal mortality in a district where it has increased by 20% and where women have died while waiting for husbands or fathers-in-law to make the decision to bring them to hospitals; 3) to develop gender-sensitive materials concerning HIV/AIDS; and 4) to expand gender training to all levels of IBI, to provide follow-up technical support, and to integrate gender into the mission statement of the organization. Dr. Nafsiah Mboi (member of Parliament and vice chair of the Global Commission on Women's Health), Dr. Widyastuti Wibisana (director of community participation in the Ministry of Health), Dr. Kokila Vaidya (WHO Medical Officer), Carla Bianpoen (gender specialist with the World Bank), and Titi Sumbung (director of the Melati Foundation) helped to develop and to conduct the program. IBI, which has 65,000 members, provides family planning, reproductive health, and maternal and child health services throughout Indonesia.

  5. Natural product of wild Zingiberaceae Elettariopsis slahmong: biopesticide to control the vector of banana blood disease bacterium in West Sumatera, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Nasir, N; Dharma, A; Efdi, M; Yuhendra; Eliesti, F

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the most important food crops in Indonesia. Its production is greater than any other agricultural commodity. With the population of 230 million in 2010, banana was consumed up to three million tons in this country. However, Banana Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB), one of the most devastating banana pathogens in the world, which is only found in Indonesia, threatens not only the growth of this plant but also the lives and the livelihoods for most of the Indonesian society. BDB is caused by a lethal bacteria, Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotype-4, which infects a wide range of bananas, from bananas used for consumption to wild bananas. In West Sumatera, the disease killed 1.40% of bananas in 1998, and then increased dramatically to 37.9% in 2003. The total banana production dropped to 62% in this province. The search for controlling the vector has led to the pre-investigation of Wild Zingiberaceae Elettariopsis slahmong C.K. Lim which has a stink bug odour similar to a methidathion insecticide. The plant was collected around the conservation area of Lembah Anal in West Sumatra. The goal of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of natural insecticides compound contained in E. slahmong against D. melanogaster. This study tested the effect of E. slahmong on the mortality, anti-feedant and repellent levels against Drosophila melanogaster, the vector of BDB. The essential oil of E. slahmong was obtained by steam distillation of fresh rhizomes, pseudo stems and leaves. We found that the extract of E. slahmong significantly affected the mortality of D. melanogaster of 30-40% and also acted as an antifeedant (with success rate of 73-93%) and repellent (with success rate of 99-99.6%). The long- term objective of this study is to develop green biopesticide to control BDB in Indonesia, based on an environmentally friendly pest management.

  6. Genetic variation and population genetic structure of Rhizophora apiculata (Rhizophoraceae) in the Greater Sunda Islands, Indonesia using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Andi Fadly; Hyun, Jung Oh; Lee, Jae Ho; Kim, Yong Yul; Lee, Kyung Mi; Hong, Kyung Nak; Kim, Seung-Chul

    2014-03-01

    Genetic variations within and among Rhizophora apiculata populations in the Greater Sunda Islands of Indonesia were studied using microsatellite markers. The study found 38 alleles on five loci in 15 populations. The observed (H(o)) and expected (H(e)) heterozygosity values are 0.338 and 0.378, respectively. Inbreeding effect from self-pollination might explain its heterozygote deficiency. Population genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.381) was similar to other mangrove species. The genetic diversity of R. apiculata populations along the coastline inside the archipelago (e.g., Buleleng, Donggala, Mamuju, and Takalar) was higher than those of population along the coastline outside the archipelago, especially northern Sumatra populations (i.e., Langkat, Tapanuli Tengah, Dumai, and Padang). The isolation by distances and sea currents directions as well as their connectivity might affect the gene flow and genetic exchange. The more isolated with fewer connections by sea currents, the smaller gene flow and genetic exchange observed between populations. The higher genetic exchange, on the contrary, occurred when population location was closer to the meeting point of the sea currents. The study also showed that the patterns of sea current movement seemed to have influence genetic clustering of populations which fell into three main groups (Sunda Shelf Mangroves) and one isolated population (New Guinea Mangroves).

  7. Studies of a peatified angiosperm log cross section from Indonesia by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analytical pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Lerch, H. E.; Cecil, C.B.; Neuzil, S.G.; ,

    1991-01-01

    Samples from a 10 cm cross-sectional radius of a peatified angiosperm log from Sumatra, Indonesia, were examined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and pyrolysis-gas chromatography in order to understand chemical changes due to the peatification process. NMR results show degradation by selective loss of carbohydrates in all parts of the log section compared with fresh wood; however, the degree of degradation is less near the center of the log section. The degree of ring substitution of aromatic lignin monomeric units, as measured by dipolar dephasing NMR methods, appears to be less at the center of the log section than at the periphery. The methoxyl carbon content of lignin in the log is lower than in unaltered angiospermous lignin but does not appear to change as a function of either radial position or the degree of aromatic ring substitution. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography indicates higher yields of catechols in the outer areas relative to the heartwood. Other than the variations in catechol contents and in the yields of carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis products (e.g. levoglucosan, angelicalactones), the pyrolysis results do not show significant changes related to radial position, indicating that the lignin is not significantly altered across the log section. ?? 1991.

  8. Tsunami Source of the 2010 Mentawai, Indonesia Earthquake Inferred from Tsunami Field Survey and Waveform Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Kenji; Nishimura, Yuichi; Putra, Purna Sulastya; Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Sunendar, Haris; Fujii, Yushiro; Tanioka, Yuichiro; Latief, Hamzah; Yulianto, Eko

    2013-09-01

    The 2010 Mentawai earthquake (magnitude 7.7) generated a destructive tsunami that caused more than 500 casualties in the Mentawai Islands, west of Sumatra, Indonesia. Seismological analyses indicate that this earthquake was an unusual "tsunami earthquake," which produces much larger tsunamis than expected from the seismic magnitude. We carried out a field survey to measure tsunami heights and inundation distances, an inversion of tsunami waveforms to estimate the slip distribution on the fault, and inundation modeling to compare the measured and simulated tsunami heights. The measured tsunami heights at eight locations on the west coasts of North and South Pagai Island ranged from 2.5 to 9.3 m, but were mostly in the 4-7 m range. At three villages, the tsunami inundation extended more than 300 m. Interviews of local residents indicated that the earthquake ground shaking was less intense than during previous large earthquakes and did not cause any damage. Inversion of tsunami waveforms recorded at nine coastal tide gauges, a nearby GPS buoy, and a DART station indicated a large slip (maximum 6.1 m) on a shallower part of the fault near the trench axis, a distribution similar to other tsunami earthquakes. The total seismic moment estimated from tsunami waveform inversion was 1.0 × 1021 Nm, which corresponded to Mw 7.9. Computed coastal tsunami heights from this tsunami source model using linear equations are similar to the measured tsunami heights. The inundation heights computed by using detailed bathymetry and topography data and nonlinear equations including inundation were smaller than the measured ones. This may have been partly due to the limited resolution and accuracy of publically available bathymetry and topography data. One-dimensional run-up computations using our surveyed topography profiles showed that the computed heights were roughly similar to the measured ones.

  9. Evidence for high fluid/melt content beneath Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhaksybulatov, Kayrly; Koulakov, Ivan; Ibs-von Seht, Malte; Klinge, Klaus; Reichert, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Within the KRAKMON project for multiparameter monitoring of Anak Krakatau volcano (Indonesia), a network of temporary stations was installed on the islands of the Krakatau complex as well as in the surrounding areas of the Sunda Strait, Sumatra and Java. The network was operated from June 2005 until January 2006. More than 700 local events were recorded during this experiment, and travel times from these events were used to perform a tomographic inversion for P and S velocities and for the Vp/Vs ratio based on the LOTOS code. Special attention was paid to the validation of the computed model based on different tests, such as: inversion of independent data subsets, using different starting models, as well as various synthetic tests. Although the network configuration and the distribution of the events are not favorable for high-quality tomographic imaging, we have obtained some important and robust features which give information on deep sources of volcanic activity in the Krakatau complex. Large anomalies of low P and S velocities are observed around the Krakatau complex including Sebesi volcanic Island. At the same time, a smaller isometrical pattern of ~5 km diameter with an anomalously high Vp/Vs ratio is concentrated just beneath Anak Krakatau. We suppose that low velocities beneath the volcanic complexes in the Sunda Strait are mostly due to elevated temperatures. However, normal and low values of Vp/Vs ratio in most areas indicate that this temperature anomaly does not lead to melting. Only beneath Anak Krakatau, where most of the volcanic activity takes place, we found a zone of anomalously high Vp/Vs ratio which reflects high fluid/melt content. We suppose that this pattern is an indicator for a magma chamber beneath this one of the most active volcanoes in the world.

  10. Evidence for high fluid/melt content beneath Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Koulakov, Ivan; Seht, Malte Ibs-von; Klinge, Klaus; Reichert, Christian; Dahren, Börje; Troll, Valentin R.

    2011-09-01

    Within the KRAKMON project for multiparameter monitoring of Anak Krakatau volcano (Indonesia), a network of temporary stations was installed on the islands of the Krakatau complex as well as in the surrounding areas of the Sunda Strait, Sumatra and Java. The network was operated from June 2005 until January 2006. More than 700 local events were recorded during this experiment, and travel times from these events were used to perform a tomographic inversion for P and S velocities and for the Vp/Vs ratio. In this study, special attention was paid to the validation of the computed model based on different tests, such as inversion of independent data subsets and synthetic modeling. Although the network configuration and the distribution of the events are not favorable for high-quality tomographic imaging, we have obtained some important and robust features which give information about sources of volcanic activity in the Krakatau complex. The most interesting feature of this study is a zone of high Vp/Vs ratio beneath the Krakatau complex. At depths down to 4 km depth we observe anticorrelation of higher P- and lower S-velocities that leads to Vp/Vs ratio higher than 2. This is a probable indicator of the presence of partially molten and/or with high fluid content material with a composition corresponding to deeper layers. It is important that the anomaly of high Vp/Vs ratio beneath the Krakatau complex appears to be separated in two parts at a depth of 5-6 km. This fits to results of geobarometric analysis that presume the existence of several levels of magma chambers beneath Anak Krakatau.

  11. Bird Responses to Lowland Rainforest Conversion in Sumatran Smallholder Landscapes, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Prabowo, Walesa Edho; Darras, Kevin; Clough, Yann; Toledo-Hernandez, Manuel; Arlettaz, Raphael; Mulyani, Yeni A; Tscharntke, Teja

    2016-01-01

    Rapid land-use change in the tropics causes dramatic losses in biodiversity and associated functions. In Sumatra, Indonesia, lowland rainforest has mainly been transformed by smallholders into oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) monocultures, interspersed with jungle rubber (rubber agroforests) and a few forest remnants. In two regions of the Jambi province, we conducted point counts in 32 plots of four different land-use types (lowland rainforest, jungle rubber, rubber plantation and oil palm plantation) as well as in 16 nearby homegardens, representing a small-scale, traditional agricultural system. We analysed total bird abundance and bird abundance in feeding guilds, as well as species richness per point count visit, per plot, and per land-use system, to unveil the conservation importance and functional responses of birds in the different land-use types. In total, we identified 71 species from 24 families. Across the different land-use types, abundance did not significantly differ, but both species richness per visit and per plot were reduced in plantations. Feeding guild abundances between land-use types were variable, but homegardens were dominated by omnivores and granivores, and frugivorous birds were absent from monoculture rubber and oil palm. Jungle rubber played an important role in harbouring forest bird species and frugivores. Homegardens turned out to be of minor importance for conserving birds due to their low sizes, although collectively, they are used by many bird species. Changes in functional composition with land-use conversion may affect important ecosystem functions such as biological pest control, pollination, and seed dispersal. In conclusion, maintaining forest cover, including degraded forest and jungle rubber, is of utmost importance to the conservation of functional and taxonomic bird diversity.

  12. Bird Responses to Lowland Rainforest Conversion in Sumatran Smallholder Landscapes, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Yann; Toledo-Hernandez, Manuel; Arlettaz, Raphael; Mulyani, Yeni A.; Tscharntke, Teja

    2016-01-01

    Rapid land-use change in the tropics causes dramatic losses in biodiversity and associated functions. In Sumatra, Indonesia, lowland rainforest has mainly been transformed by smallholders into oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) monocultures, interspersed with jungle rubber (rubber agroforests) and a few forest remnants. In two regions of the Jambi province, we conducted point counts in 32 plots of four different land-use types (lowland rainforest, jungle rubber, rubber plantation and oil palm plantation) as well as in 16 nearby homegardens, representing a small-scale, traditional agricultural system. We analysed total bird abundance and bird abundance in feeding guilds, as well as species richness per point count visit, per plot, and per land-use system, to unveil the conservation importance and functional responses of birds in the different land-use types. In total, we identified 71 species from 24 families. Across the different land-use types, abundance did not significantly differ, but both species richness per visit and per plot were reduced in plantations. Feeding guild abundances between land-use types were variable, but homegardens were dominated by omnivores and granivores, and frugivorous birds were absent from monoculture rubber and oil palm. Jungle rubber played an important role in harbouring forest bird species and frugivores. Homegardens turned out to be of minor importance for conserving birds due to their low sizes, although collectively, they are used by many bird species. Changes in functional composition with land-use conversion may affect important ecosystem functions such as biological pest control, pollination, and seed dispersal. In conclusion, maintaining forest cover, including degraded forest and jungle rubber, is of utmost importance to the conservation of functional and taxonomic bird diversity. PMID:27224063

  13. Th-230 Dates of MIS 5e Coral Terraces in Kisar Island, Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, H. W.; Harris, R. A.; Prasetyadi, C.; Shen, C. C.; Chiu, T. C.; Cox, N. L.; Chen, Y. G.

    2010-05-01

    2004 Sumatra earthquakes caused a devastating tsunami and cost the lives of nearly 260,000 people in the South Asian region. These earthquakes and associated tsunami are sourced from convergence of the Indo-Australian and Asian Plates. In the eastern part of this plate boundary the Australian continent is colliding with Asia. The first turbiditic sand in Timor island was around 5 Ma and the collision propagated to the southwestern until ~2 Ma. But the activities of the neighborhood of the Timor island in the Quaternary or the Holocene is unknown. This study provides the new 230Th dates from the raised coral terraces at Kisar Island, eastern Indonesia. Eight fossil corals were measured by MC-ICP-MS at the National Taiwan University with permil-level precision. Two out of the eight samples having ~1.5 % calcite and acceptable δ234Uinitial showed robust ages of 123-121 ka. Another three open-system model ages were from 125-119 ka by Thompson et al.'s method (2003). These different elevated fossil corals with ages of 125-119 ka favored the two-peak sea-level curve in MIS 5e explained by Chappell and Veeh (1978). New age results relocated the second peak should be about three thousand years earlier than their proposed 119 ka. A minimum uplift rate of 0.1 m/kyrs is derived from the highest-position fossil corals. The 230Th-dated fossils in the north coast of Timor-Leste suggest the MIS 5e terraces could reach 55 m high, hence a referable uplift rate of ~0.4 m/kyrs could be a maximum estimate. The uplift rate of 0.1-0.4 m/ka since late Pleistocene is well consistent with published values from Atauro Island and Timor-Leste in eastern Indonesia. Based on the uplift rate, the terraces in eastern Kisar, with elevation lower than 100 m, expectedly located at MIS 7, 9, or 11; while the higher western terraces ranged from MIS 9-15. Besides, no remanet of Holocene fringe reefs around Kisar Island also suggests a relatively low activity of tectonics, in agreement with the modern

  14. Effect of 3-D viscoelastic structure on post-seismic relaxation from the 2004 M = 9.2 Sumatra earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.; Banerjee, P.; Grijalva, K.; Nagarajan, B.; Burgmann, R.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 M=9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake profoundly altered the state of stress in a large volume surrounding the ???1400 km long rupture. Induced mantle flow fields and coupled surface deformation are sensitive to the 3-D rheology structure. To predict the post-seismic motions from this earthquake, relaxation of a 3-D spherical viscoelastic earth model is simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The quasi-static deformation basis set and solution on the 3-D model is constructed using: a spherically stratified viscoelastic earth model with a linear stress-strain relation; an aspherical perturbation in viscoelastic structure; a 'static'mode basis set consisting of Earth's spheroidal and toroidal free oscillations; a "viscoelastic" mode basis set; and interaction kernels that describe the coupling among viscoelastic and static modes. Application to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake illustrates the profound modification of the post-seismic flow field at depth by a slab structure and similarly large effects on the near-field post-seismic deformation field at Earth's surface. Comparison with post-seismic GPS observations illustrates the extent to which viscoelastic relaxation contributes to the regional post-seismic deformation. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 RAS.

  15. Astro Talk in Social Media - Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamani, A.; Soegijoko, W.

    2015-03-01

    Social media is a new trend in communicating and connecting to people. It is also a good choice to build awareness of astronomy as issues spread easily and quickly, creating hot topics. This paper will analyze the trend of astro talk in Indonesia and hope to inspire astronomers to use social media in raising awareness.

  16. Public Health and Midwifery in Indonesia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    JPRS: ^472 21 March 1961 PUBLIC HEALTH AND MIDWIFERY IN INDONESIA 3y M. Joedono DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release...established to service the translation and research needs of the various government departments. ,-^’ JPRS: J^72 CSO: 1335-S/d PUBLIC HEALTH AND MIDWIFERY

  17. Seismic risk assessment for road in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyfur, Mona Foralisa; Pribadi, Krishna S.

    2016-05-01

    Road networks in Indonesia consist of 446,000 km of national, provincial and local roads as well as toll highways. Indonesia is one of countries that exposed to various natural hazards, such as earthquakes, floods, landslides, etc. Within the Indonesian archipelago, several global tectonic plates interact, such as the Indo-Australian, Pacific, Eurasian, resulting in a complex geological setting, characterized by the existence of seismically active faults and subduction zones and a chain of more than one hundred active volcanoes. Roads in Indonesia are vital infrastructure needed for people and goods movement, thus supporting community life and economic activities, including promoting regional economic development. Road damages and losses due to earthquakes have not been studied widely, whereas road disruption caused enormous economic damage. The aim of this research is to develop a method to analyse risk caused by seismic hazard to roads. The seismic risk level of road segment is defined using an earthquake risk index, adopting the method of Earthquake Disaster Risk Index model developed by Davidson (1997). Using this method, road segments' risk level can be defined and compared, and road risk map can be developed as a tool for prioritizing risk mitigation programs for road networks in Indonesia.

  18. Child Labor and Trade Liberalization in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kis-Katos, Krisztina; Sparrow, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We examine the effects of trade liberalization on child work in Indonesia, identifying geographical differences in the effects of trade policy through district level exposure to reduction in import tariff barriers, from 1993 to 2002. The results suggest that increased exposure to trade liberalization is associated with a decrease in child work…

  19. Local Responses to Decentralization Policy in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjork, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Ethnographic fieldwork in six junior high schools in East Java, Indonesia, focused on local responses to a national policy devolving authority over the curriculum to the schools. Interviews and observations in the schools revealed little change in teacher actions. The objectives of decentralization clashed with deeply rooted ideas about authority,…

  20. Language in education: The case of Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nababan, P. W. J.

    1991-03-01

    Although over 400 languages are spoken in Indonesia, by 1986 60% of the population had some competence in the Indonesian national language, a substantial increase over 1971. Bahasa Indonesia was declared the state language in the 1945 constitution, and reformed spelling was agreed in 1972. It is the sole medium of instruction, except in the first three grades of elementary school in nine regions, where vernaculars may be used transitionally. Thereafter vernaculars are taught as school subjects. Bilingualism, and even multilingualism in Indonesian and one or more vernaculars and/or foreign languages is increasing, and despite the use of Indonesian for official documentary purposes at all levels it does not appear that vernaculars are dying out, although their spheres of use are restricted. Bahasa Indonesia fulfils the four functions: cognitive, instrumental, integrative and cultural, while vernaculars are only integrative and cultural. The curriculum of Indonesian, established centrally, is pragmatic or communicative. It is expressed in a standard syllabus for course books. This approach equally applies to foreign languages, which are introduced at secondary level, although here receptive reading is given more weight than productive skills. A full description of the syllabus organization of the various languages is given. Nonformal language learning also takes place, in the national basic education and literacy programme, which teaches Bahasa Indonesia, and in vocational courses in foreign languages for commerce.

  1. The Lamaholot Language of Eastern Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaya, Naonori

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the grammar of the Lewotobi dialect of Lamaholot, an Austronesian language spoken in the eastern part of Flores Island and neighboring islands of Indonesia. Lamaholot belongs to the Central Malayo-Polynesian subgroup of Austronesian, within which it is in a subgroup with the languages of Timor and Roti. The number of speakers…

  2. Difficulties in Initial Algebra Learning in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paul; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Within mathematics curricula, algebra has been widely recognized as one of the most difficult topics, which leads to learning difficulties worldwide. In Indonesia, algebra performance is an important issue. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007, Indonesian students' achievement in the algebra domain was…

  3. Situation Report [--Fiji, Indonesia, Israel, and Philippines].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This is a series of four situation reports prepared by the International Planned Parenthood Federation for informational and consultative purposes. The countries reported on are Fiji, Indonesia, Israel, and the Philippines. Some of the latest statistical figures for each country are listed. They are area, population and growth rate, birth, death,…

  4. Cancer in Indonesia, present and future.

    PubMed

    Tjindarbumi, Didid; Mangunkusumo, Rukmini

    2002-03-01

    Cancer control has been in effect in Indonesia since the early 1920s. It was the Dutch Colonial Government who started with the Institution for Cancer Control, which was closed by the Japanese Occupation Administration between 1942 and 1945. After the independence of the Republic of Indonesia, a Cancer Control Foundation was established in 1962. At present, clinical and non-clinical departments in government teaching hospitals (there are 13 teaching hospitals) usually handle all cancer problems. In 1993, Dharmais Cancer Center in Jakarta was established and has become the top referral cancer hospital for Indonesia. Until now, there have been no nationwide accurate data on cancer registration, owing to a lack of funds and manpower. Cancer data collection is usually provided as a relative frequency study from several departments of the teaching hospitals. It is currently estimated that there will be at least 170-190 new cancer cases annually for each 100 000 people. The most frequent and primary cancers are cervix, breast, lymph node, skin and nasopharynx. Since Indonesia is now in a transition phase and has many problems concerning the economy and health care, we suggested a well-planned cancer control program. It includes the primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of cancer in cities, where inhabitants can afford to subsidize a certain proportion of the budgets for the implementation of this program.

  5. Cultural Beliefs about Autism in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riany, Yulina Eva; Cuskelly, Monica; Meredith, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Cultural beliefs about parenting have an important influence on parenting behaviours, including considerations about appropriate ways to parent children with autism. Although Indonesia has one of the largest and most ethnically diverse populations in the world, little is known about cultural beliefs regarding children with autism within Indonesian…

  6. Developmental Book Activities and Needs in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Stanley A.; And Others

    This report is the fourth in a series of six studies of developmental book activity in East Asia. The scope of work in the Republic of Indonesia included assessment of books and materials in the educational process; books used by individuals for the improvement of reading skills and for learning enrichment; books for technical and professional…

  7. Radiocarbon Content of Intermediate Waters off West Sumatra During the Last 45,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pol-Holz, R.; Mohtadi, M.; Southon, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon content of intermediate waters originating from the Southern Ocean is held as a likely smoking gun of the events that triggered the atmospheric CO2 rise and its radiocarbon decline during the last glacial-interglacial transition. Late Glacial depleted radiocarbon water masses have been found at intermediate depths off the coast of Baja California, the Galapagos, the Arabian Sea, but not unequivocally elsewhere. Knowing the route of the old water is therefore central for the required mechanistic linkage of Southern Ocean processes and the atmospheric response. A common approach to search for the old water reservoir is the radiocarbon difference between planktonic and benthic foraminifera or 'apparent ventilation age'. Caveats of this approach are due to the fact that it relies strongly on the knowledge of the surface water reservoir age. In this study, we present a high-resolution radiocarbon difference between surface and intermediate depth waters off west Sumatra in the attempt to elucidate a possible route of the old water from its hypothetical source in the high latitudes near Antarctica on its way to the lower latitude sites where it has been observed. Samples come from core SO189-39KL (0°47'S, 99°55'E, 517 m), a 1350 cm hemipelagic sedimentary sequence that spans the last 45,000 years. Radiocarbon determinations were made at centennial time resolution on both planktonic and benthic species. Calibration of the planktonic radiocarbon as age control points allowed us to infer the Δ14C of the intermediate waters. Our results show that throughout the LGM and the entire deglaciation, radiocarbon content of intermediate depths in the area remained with an almost constant age difference with the contemporaneous atmosphere. Unless we have grossly underestimated the local planktonic reservoir age, our results discard this area as a probable route for the spreading of the old water along its way to northern latitudes. In light of recent evidence from the

  8. Large scale dynamic rupture scenario of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman megathrust earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Thomas; Madden, Elizabeth H.; Wollherr, Stephanie; Gabriel, Alice A.

    2016-04-01

    The Great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 26 December 2004 is one of the strongest and most devastating earthquakes in recent history. Most of the damage and the ~230,000 fatalities were caused by the tsunami generated by the Mw 9.1-9.3 event. Various finite-source models of the earthquake have been proposed, but poor near-field observational coverage has led to distinct differences in source characterization. Even the fault dip angle and depth extent are subject to debate. We present a physically realistic dynamic rupture scenario of the earthquake using state-of-the-art numerical methods and seismotectonic data. Due to the lack of near-field observations, our setup is constrained by the overall characteristics of the rupture, including the magnitude, propagation speed, and extent along strike. In addition, we incorporate the detailed geometry of the subducting fault using Slab1.0 to the south and aftershock locations to the north, combined with high-resolution topography and bathymetry data.The possibility of inhomogeneous background stress, resulting from the curved shape of the slab along strike and the large fault dimensions, is discussed. The possible activation of thrust faults splaying off the megathrust in the vicinity of the hypocenter is also investigated. Dynamic simulation of this 1300 to 1500 km rupture is a computational and geophysical challenge. In addition to capturing the large-scale rupture, the simulation must resolve the process zone at the rupture tip, whose characteristic length is comparable to smaller earthquakes and which shrinks with propagation distance. Thus, the fault must be finely discretised. Moreover, previously published inversions agree on a rupture duration of ~8 to 10 minutes, suggesting an overall slow rupture speed. Hence, both long temporal scales and large spatial dimensions must be captured. We use SeisSol, a software package based on an ADER-DG scheme solving the spontaneous dynamic earthquake rupture problem with high

  9. Coral 13C/12C records of vertical seafloor displacement during megathrust earthquakes west of Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagan, Michael K.; Sosdian, Sindia M.; Scott-Gagan, Heather; Sieh, Kerry; Hantoro, Wahyoe S.; Natawidjaja, Danny H.; Briggs, Richard W.; Suwargadi, Bambang W.; Rifai, Hamdi

    2015-12-01

    The recent surge of megathrust earthquakes and tsunami disasters has highlighted the need for a comprehensive understanding of earthquake cycles along convergent plate boundaries. Space geodesy has been used to document recent crustal deformation patterns with unprecedented precision, however the production of long paleogeodetic records of vertical seafloor motion is still a major challenge. Here we show that carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the skeletons of massive Porites corals from west Sumatra record abrupt changes in light exposure resulting from coseismic seafloor displacements. Validation of the method is based on the coral δ13C response to uplift (and subsidence) produced by the March 2005 Mw 8.6 Nias-Simeulue earthquake, and uplift further south around Sipora Island during a M ∼ 8.4 megathrust earthquake in February 1797. At Nias, the average step-change in coral δ13C was 0.6 ± 0.1 ‰ /m for coseismic displacements of +1.8 m and -0.4 m in 2005. At Sipora, a distinct change in Porites microatoll growth morphology marks coseismic uplift of 0.7 m in 1797. In this shallow water setting, with a steep light attenuation gradient, the step-change in microatoll δ13C is 2.3 ‰ /m, nearly four times greater than for the Nias Porites. Considering the natural variability in coral skeletal δ13C, we show that the lower detection limit of the method is around 0.2 m of vertical seafloor motion. Analysis of vertical displacement for well-documented earthquakes suggests this sensitivity equates to shallow events exceeding Mw ∼ 7.2 in central megathrust and back-arc thrust fault settings. Our findings indicate that the coral 13C /12C paleogeodesy technique could be applied to convergent tectonic margins throughout the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian oceans, which host prolific coral reefs, and some of the world's greatest earthquake catastrophes. While our focus here is the link between coral δ13C, light exposure and coseismic crustal deformation, the

  10. Faecal cortisol metabolites in Bengal (Panthera tigris tigris) and Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Parnell, Tempe; Clark, Giles; Martin-Vegue, Patrick; Mucci, Al; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-12-01

    The tiger (Panthera tigris) faces a great risk of extinction as its wild numbers have plummeted due to poaching and habitat destruction so ex-situ conservation programs are becoming ever more necessary. Reliable non-invasive biomarkers of the stress hormone (cortisol) are necessary for assessing the health and welfare of tigers in captivity. To our knowledge, non-invasive stress endocrinology methods have not been tested as widely in tigers. The first aim of this study was to describe and validate a faecal cortisol metabolite enzyme-immmunoassay (FCM EIA) for two tiger sub-species, the Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and the Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae). Individual tigers (n=22) were studied in two large Zoos in Queensland, Australia (Dreamworld Theme Park and Australia Zoo). Fresh faecal samples (<12 h old) were collected each morning from both Zoos over a study period of 21 days. Biological validation was conducted separately by collecting feces 5 days before and 5 days after blood was taken from four male and five female tigers. Results showed that mean FCM levels increased by 138% and 285% in the male and female tigers within 1 day after bloods were taken, returning to baseline in 5 days. Laboratory validations of the FCM EIA were done using an extraction efficiency test and parallelism. Results showed >89% recovery of the cortisol standard that was added to tiger faecal extract. We also obtained parallel displacement of the serially diluted cortisol standard against serially diluted tiger faecal extract. Our second aim was to determine whether the FCM levels were significantly different between tiger sub-species and sex. Results showed no significant difference in mean FCM levels between the Bengal and Sumatran tiger sub-species. Mean levels of FCMs were significantly higher in females than in male tigers. Those male and female tigers with reported health issues during the study period expressed higher FCM levels than the reportedly healthy

  11. Coral 13C/12C records of vertical seafloor displacement during megathrust earthquakes west of Sumatra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gagan, Michael K.; Sosdian, Sindia M.; Scott-Gagan, Heather; Sieh, Kerry; Hantoro, Wahyoe S.; Natawidjaja, Danny H.; Briggs, Richard W.; Suwargadi, Bambang W.; Rifai, Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    The recent surge of megathrust earthquakes and tsunami disasters has highlighted the need for a comprehensive understanding of earthquake cycles along convergent plate boundaries. Space geodesy has been used to document recent crustal deformation patterns with unprecedented precision, however the production of long paleogeodetic records of vertical seafloor motion is still a major challenge. Here we show that carbon isotope ratios () in the skeletons of massive Porites   corals from west Sumatra record abrupt changes in light exposure resulting from coseismic seafloor displacements. Validation of the method is based on the coral  response to uplift (and subsidence) produced by the March 2005 Mw 8.6 Nias–Simeulue earthquake, and uplift further south around Sipora Island during a M∼8.4 megathrust earthquake in February 1797. At Nias, the average step-change in coral  was 0.6±0.1‰/m for coseismic displacements of +1.8 m and −0.4 m in 2005. At Sipora, a distinct change in Porites  microatoll growth morphology marks coseismic uplift of 0.7 m in 1797. In this shallow water setting, with a steep light attenuation gradient, the step-change in microatoll  is2.3‰/m, nearly four times greater than for the Nias Porites  . Considering the natural variability in coral skeletal , we show that the lower detection limit of the method is around 0.2 m of vertical seafloor motion. Analysis of vertical displacement for well-documented earthquakes suggests this sensitivity equates to shallow events exceedingMw∼7.2 in central megathrust and back-arc thrust fault settings. Our findings indicate that the coral  paleogeodesy technique could be applied to convergent tectonic margins throughout the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian oceans, which host prolific coral reefs, and some of the world's greatest earthquake catastrophes. While our focus here is the link between coral , light exposure and coseismic crustal deformation, the same principles

  12. 78 FR 13325 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...-815] Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia... frozen warmwater shrimp from the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia... of China,Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of...

  13. The energy radiated by the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake estimated from 10-minute P-wave windows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Boatwright, J.

    2007-01-01

    The rupture process of the Mw 9.1 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake lasted for approximately 500 sec, nearly twice as long as the teleseismic time windows between the P and PP arrival times generally used to compute radiated energy. In order to measure the P waves radiated by the entire earthquake, we analyze records that extend from the P-wave to the S-wave arrival times from stations at distances ?? >60??. These 8- to 10-min windows contain the PP, PPP, and ScP arrivals, along with other multiply reflected phases. To gauge the effect of including these additional phases, we form the spectral ratio of the source spectrum estimated from extended windows (between TP and TS) to the source spectrum estimated from normal windows (between TP and TPP). The extended windows are analyzed as though they contained only the P-pP-sP wave group. We analyze four smaller earthquakes that occurred in the vicinity of the Mw 9.1 mainshock, with similar depths and focal mechanisms. These smaller events range in magnitude from an Mw 6.0 aftershock of 9 January 2005 to the Mw 8.6 Nias earthquake that occurred to the south of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake on 28 March 2005. We average the spectral ratios for these four events to obtain a frequency-dependent operator for the extended windows. We then correct the source spectrum estimated from the extended records of the 26 December 2004 mainshock to obtain a complete or corrected source spectrum for the entire rupture process (???600 sec) of the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. Our estimate of the total seismic energy radiated by this earthquake is 1.4 ?? 1017 J. When we compare the corrected source spectrum for the entire earthquake to the source spectrum from the first ???250 sec of the rupture process (obtained from normal teleseismic windows), we find that the mainshock radiated much more seismic energy in the first half of the rupture process than in the second half, especially over the period range from 3 sec to 40 sec.

  14. From Sumatra 2004 to Tuhoku-Oki 2011: what we learn about Tsunami detection by ionospheric sounding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, G.; Rolland, L. M.; Watada, S.; Coisson, P.; Aden-Antoniow, F.; Bablet, A.; Lognonne, P. H.; Makela, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The recent tsunamigenic Tohoku earthquake (2011) strongly affirms, again, after the 26 December 2004, the necessity to open new paradigms in oceanic monitoring. Detection of ionospheric anomalies following the Sumatra earthquake tsunami (e.g., Occhipinti et al. 2006) demonstrated that ionosphere is sensitive to earthquake and tsunami propagation: ground and oceanic vertical displacement induces acoustic-gravity waves propagating within the neutral atmosphere and detectable in the ionosphere. Observations supported by modelling proved that tsunamigenic ionospheric anomalies are deterministic and reproducible by numerical modeling via the ocean/neutral-atmosphere/ionosphere coupling mechanism (Occhipinti et al., 2008). To prove that the tsunami signature in the ionosphere is routinely detected we show here perturbations of total electron content (TEC) measured by GPS and following tsunamigenic eartquakes from 2004 to 2010 (Rolland et al. 2010, Occhipinti et al., 2013), nominally, Sumatra (26 December, 2004 and 12 September, 2007), Chile (14 November, 2007), Samoa (29 September, 2009) and the recent Tohoku-Oki (11 Mars, 2011). In addition to GPS/TEC observations close to the epicenter and measured by GEONET network, new exciting measurements in the far-field were performed by Airglow measurement in Hawaii: those measurements show the propagation of the IGWs induced by the Tohoku tsunami in the Pacific Ocean (Occhipinti et al., 2011). Based on the observations close to the epicenter, mainly performed by GPS networks located in Sumatra, Chile and Japan, we highlight the TEC perturbation observed within the first hour after the seismic rupture. This perturbation contains informations about the ground displacement, as well as the consequent sea surface displacement resulting in the tsunami. In this talk we present all this new tsunami observations in the ionosphere and we discuss, under the light of modelling, the potential role of ionospheric sounding in the oceanic

  15. Civil-Military Relations in Indonesia: Reformasi and Beyond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    4 (July). Crouch, Harold. 1988. The Army and Politics in Indonesia . Revised edition, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. -----. 1999. “Wiranto and...University of North Carolina Press. Kammen, Douglas and Siddharth Chandra. 1999. A Tour of Duty: Changing Patterns of Military Politics in Indonesia in...1996. The Dual Function of the Indonesian Armed Forces: Military Politics in Indonesia . Canberra: Australian Defence Studies Centre. Mohammed Fajrul

  16. Influence of source extension of 26 December 2004 Sumatra earthquake on character of tsunami wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazova, Raissa; Kisel'Man, Broneslav; Baranova, Natalya; Lobkovsky, Leopold

    2010-05-01

    for second series of calculations, the wave front, as it was expected, becomes to be more elongated, and the time of approach of the wave front up to east Indian coast is decreased, as compared with the case of wave generation by only Sumatra segment. At turning on of third segment wave field is characterized by else more elongated to north wave front, and time of approach of wave front the south-east Indian coast is more decreased. It's seen that from the source side faced to Bengal bay there are well pronounced three wave fronts in correspondence with marked segments. These fronts evolve then in plane enough united front with bend in the region of Nicobar islands. The change of wave field character for three taken cases is well seen on accounted satellite altimetry. Adequateness of the calculations performed was verified by comparison of mareograms, obtained from real mareographs with records of virtual mareographs placed us in calculating basin and obtained by us for each scenario. The same verification was performed by comparison of real altimetric records of satellite "Yason-1" with virtual altimetric record obtained by us for each scenario. The computations performed explain the complex character of tsunami wave propagation for given earthquake. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project no. 08-05-01027 1.Lobkovsky L.I., Mazova R.Kh. The mechanism of source of Indian Ocean tsunami 2004: analysis and numerical simulation // Physics of Earth, v.43, № 7, pp.46-56, 2007. 2.Lobkovsky L.I., Mazova R.Kh., Garagash I.A., Kataeva L.Yu., Nardin I. To analysis of source mechanism of the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Russ.J.Earth Sci. V.8, ES5001, doi:10.2205/2006ES000208 http://dx.doi.org/ 10.2205/2006ES000208 (2006b).

  17. Geophysics: The size and duration of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake from far-field static offsets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banerjee, P.; Pollitz, F.F.; Burgmann, R.

    2005-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Sumatra earthquake produced static offsets at continuously operating GPS stations at distances of up to 4500 kilometers from the epicenter. We used these displacements to model the earthquake and include consideration of the Earth's shape and depth-varying rigidity. The results imply that the average slip was >5 meters along the full length of the rupture, including the ???650-kilometer-long Andaman segment. Comparison of the source derived from the far-field static offsets with seismically derived estimates suggests that 25 to 35% of the total moment release occurred at periods greater than 1 hour. Taking into consideration the strong dip dependence of moment estimates, the magnitude of the earthquake did not exceed Mw = 9.2.

  18. [Demographic characteristics of consumers in Indonesia?].

    PubMed

    Ananta, A

    1993-06-01

    "This paper presents a mosaic of business opportunities arising from the different demographic characteristics of the provinces in the western part of Indonesia. The author discusses the total number of population, density, and per capita income to [shed] some light on the volume of the market. He also presents the business impact of the [changes] in fertility, mortality, and the...life style of those aged 40-64." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  19. Major Land Clearing Fires, Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    These many and intense land clearing fires in the Kalimantan region of the island of Borneo, Indonesia (3.5S, 113.5E) are indicative of the many deforestation activities on a worldwide scale. In order to feed and house ever increasing populations, more cleared land is required for agriculture to feed ever increasing populations. More pasture lands are needed for livestock. And, more cleared lands are needed for housing.

  20. Indonesia 1979: The Record of Three Decades,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Foreign reporting on Indonesia is, in my opinion, excessively biased against the Soeharto regime. Its failures are magnified, while its achievements are...predictive power. In judging the achievements of the "Generation of 1945" and es- pecially those of the Soeharto regime, I assume--within the mainstream of...from the Western political tradition, the government that evolved after General Soeharto took charge in March 1966 is probably as a whole as good as

  1. The history of transmigration in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Supadi, D T

    1980-12-01

    The author outlines the historical development of the transmigration program in Indonesia since it was initiated by the Dutch colonial government at the beginning of the twentieth century. Comparisons are made between the prewar, colonial period of migration, which lasted from 1905 to 1941, and the postwar period of migration, which began with independence in 1945. Information is included on the selectivity of migrants, the extent and direction of migration, and the objectives and results of the transmigration program.

  2. Efficient post-disaster patient transportation and transfer: experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue in Aceh after the 2004 Asian tsunami.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Hui; Zheng, Jing-Chen

    2014-08-01

    This descriptive study aimed to present experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue after the 2004 Asian tsunami in terms of transportation and transfer of patients and coordination of medical rescue forces. After the tsunami, numerous rescue institutions and international organizations rushed to Aceh province to aid in the rescue work. To coordinate various aspects of medical rescue efforts, an airport-based joint patient transfer center was developed. Within the framework of the joint transport center, rescue teams, militaries, and international institutions worked together to jointly triage, rapidly treat, and transfer patients. As members of the Chinese International Search and Rescue team, we were involved in the rescue efforts in the joint patient transfer center, and treated and transferred a total of 217 injured patients, the majority of whom were triaged as level II, followed by level III, and level I. The top three diseases were trauma/wound infection, respiratory system disease, and digestive system disease. The airport-based joint patient transfer center provided an efficient mechanism for successfully coordinating various aspects of the medical rescue efforts to transfer patients. Large-scale air transport, available health resources, and effective triage criteria also played an essential role in patient transportation and transfer.

  3. Variation in perikymata counts between repetitive episodes of linear enamel hypoplasia among orangutans from Sumatra and Borneo.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Mark F

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate whether repetitive linear enamel hypoplasia (rLEH) in apes is ecologically informative. LEH, which appears as grooves of thinner enamel often caused by malnutrition and/or disease, is a permanent record of departures from developmental homeostasis in infant and juvenile apes. Orangutans were selected for the study as they are a threatened species, have a remarkably high prevalence of rLEH, and because Sumatra is deemed a better habitat for orangutans than is Borneo, facilitating an ecological comparison. Objectives are to determine: a) whether periodicity of rLEH in orangutans corresponds to monsoon-mediated cycles in precipitation or food; and b) whether patterning of rLEH supports the view that Borneo is an inferior habitat. This study compares the counts of perikymata between adjacent LEH from 9 Sumatran and 26 Bornean orangutans to estimate the periodicity of rLEH. A total of 131 nonredundant inter-LEH perikymata counts were transformed to natural log values to reveal clusters of counts in a multiplicative series. Using a value of 10 days to form one perikyma, rLEH tends to recur semiannually in both populations. However, Sumatran orangutans show significantly fewer semiannual intervals and more annually recurring episodes. Bornean orangutans show mostly semiannual intervals and are more variable in inter-LEH perikymata counts. It is concluded that: a) developmental conditions for infant orangutans in Sumatra protect them somewhat from seasonal and environmental variation; b) temporal patterning of rLEH indicates that Borneo is the poorer habitat for orangutans; and c) the study of rLEH can be ecologically informative.

  4. Unfocused response to AIDS in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Maclaren, L

    1997-01-01

    Indonesia has a population of more than 200 million among which less than 500 official cases of HIV/AIDS have been recorded. The number of estimated cases is far greater. High rates of male migration, widespread prostitution, high rates of sexually transmitted disease infection, the absence of sex education for youth, women's low status, and the absence of a national AIDS awareness campaign were cited in 1993 as reasons why HIV would spread quickly throughout Indonesia. Access to basic information about AIDS remains a problem for both urban and rural populations in Indonesia. A national AIDS strategy was made public in 1993 by President Suharto. Supported by the Australians, the plan comprehensively covers almost every key aspect in managing HIV/AIDS. The plan since its release, however, has been largely ignored and the government has done little aside from a handful of television public service announcements, a few pamphlets distributed by the Department of Health, a few small HIV surveillance projects which have yielded little useful information, and the training of government officials to provide AIDS education. Approximately 15 nongovernmental organizations have been actively and successfully conducting AIDS prevention work.

  5. CO₂ efflux from shrimp ponds in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Frida; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of mangrove forest to aquaculture ponds has been increasing in recent decades. One of major concerns of this habitat loss is the release of stored 'blue' carbon from mangrove soils to the atmosphere. In this study, we assessed carbon dioxide (CO₂) efflux from soil in intensive shrimp ponds in Bali, Indonesia. We measured CO₂ efflux from the floors and walls of shrimp ponds. Rates of CO₂ efflux within shrimp ponds were 4.37 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the walls and 1.60 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the floors. Combining our findings with published data of aquaculture land use in Indonesia, we estimated that shrimp ponds in this region result in CO₂ emissions to the atmosphere between 5.76 and 13.95 Tg y⁻¹. The results indicate that conversion of mangrove forests to aquaculture ponds contributes to greenhouse gas emissions that are comparable to peat forest conversion to other land uses in Indonesia. Higher magnitudes of CO₂ emission may be released to atmosphere where ponds are constructed in newly cleared mangrove forests. This study indicates the need for incentives that can meet the target of aquaculture industry without expanding the converted mangrove areas, which will lead to increased CO₂ released to atmosphere.

  6. Along-arc geochemical and isotopic variations in Javanese volcanic rocks: 'crustal' versus 'source' contamination at the Sunda arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, H.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Turner, S.; Macpherson, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    lavas. This information presented will help elucidate the nature of the transition between the continental and oceanic basement to the arc, which is expected to lie between Sumatra and East Java. Whitford, D.J. (1975) Strontium isotopic studies of the volcanic rocks of the Sunda arc, Indonesia, and their petrogenesis. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 39: 12871302. Handley, H.K., Macpherson, C. G., Davidson, J. P., Berlo, K. & Lowry, D. (2007). Constraining Fluid and Sediment Contributions to Subduction-Related Magmatism in Indonesia: Ijen Volcanic Complex. J. Petrol. 48, 1155-1183. Handley, H.K., Davidson, J.P., Macpherson, C.G. & Stimac .J.A. (2008). Untangling differentiation in arc lavas: constraints from unusual minor and trace element variations at Salak Volcano, Indonesia. Chem. Geol. 255, 360-376. Handley, H.K., Macpherson, C.G., Davidson, J.P. (2010). Geochemical and Sr-O isotopic constraints on magmatic differentiation at Gede Volcanic Complex, Java, Indonesia. Contrib. Mineral. Pet. 159, 885-908. Handley, H.K., Turner, S., Macpherson, C.G., Gertisser, R., Davidson, J.P. (2011) Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: limitations of Hf anomalies and Sm/Hf ratios as input indicators. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 304, 212-223.

  7. Structures and sedimentary deposition in the Sunda Strait, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilohadi, Susilohadi; Gaedicke, Christoph; Djajadihardja, Yusuf

    2009-03-01

    The Sunda Strait lies between the islands of Java and Sumatra and separates the nearly orthogonal subduction along the south of Java and oblique subduction beneath Sumatra. The Sumatra fault accommodating most of the trench parallel shear of the oblique subduction initiates in the Sunda Strait. This setting implies that the Sunda Strait is an attractive area to study the geodynamic evolution of the western Indonesian region. Thirteen multichannel seismic lines acquired in the Sunda Strait have allowed a detailed study of the structure, sedimentation patterns and volcanic activities that occurred in the Sunda Strait. The Sunda Strait evolution has been strongly tied with the development of the Sumatra fault in this area. The opening of the Sunda Strait initiated in the early Late Miocene following the commencement of the Sumatra fault system in the Middle Miocene. Since then, three major graben systems have been evolved, which are referred to as the West and East Semangko Grabens, and the Krakatau Graben. These graben systems can be regarded as pull-apart basins developed within the releasing fault overstep area in between the main strand of the Sumatra fault and its relay faults south off Ujung Kulon. Prior to the Late Miocene most of the Sunda Strait and the surroundings probably developed in a non-marine environment. In Late Miocene the Sunda Strait started to open and volcanism began and has been the main source of clastics. Three major sedimentary units can be identified which represent Late Miocene, Pliocene and Pleistocene sediments respectively. The Late Miocene unit has been developed in the shelfal area on top of the Middle Miocene unconformity following a relative rapid sea level rise, and a subsequent highstand prior to the sea level fall at the end of Miocene. Its lower part has syn-structurally been deposited into the Late Miocene basement block faulting. The early deposition of the Pliocene unit was in response to the Pliocene sea level rise and

  8. An optimal renewable energy mix for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Sylvain; Patrizio, Piera; Yowargana, Ping; Kraxner, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Indonesia has experienced a constant increase of the use of petroleum and coal in the power sector, while the share of renewable sources has remained stable at 6% of the total energy production during the last decade. As its domestic energy demand undeniably continues to grow, Indonesia is committed to increase the production of renewable energy. Mainly to decrease its dependency on fossil fuel-based resources, and to decrease the anthropogenic emissions, the government of Indonesia has established a 23 percent target for renewable energy by 2025, along with a 100 percent electrification target by 2020 (the current rate is 80.4 percent). In that respect, Indonesia has abundant resources to meet these targets, but there is - inter alia - a lack of proper integrated planning, regulatory support, investment, distribution in remote areas of the Archipelago, and missing data to back the planning. To support the government of Indonesia in its sustainable energy system planning, a geographic explicit energy modeling approach is applied. This approach is based on the energy systems optimization model BeWhere, which identifies the optimal location of energy conversion sites based on the minimization of the costs of the supply chain. The model will incorporate the existing fossil fuel-based infrastructures, and evaluate the optimal costs, potentials and locations for the development of renewable energy technologies (i.e., wind, solar, hydro, biomass and geothermal based technologies), as well as the development of biomass co-firing in existing coal plants. With the help of the model, an optimally adapted renewable energy mix - vis-à-vis the competing fossil fuel based resources and applicable policies in order to promote the development of those renewable energy technologies - will be identified. The development of the optimal renewable energy technologies is carried out with special focus on nature protection and cultural heritage areas, where feedstock (e.g., biomass

  9. Multiple Magma Batches Recorded in Tephra Deposits from the Toba Complex, Sumatra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, N. J. G.; Westgate, J.; Gatti, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Toba Caldera Complex is the largest Quaternary caldera on Earth, and has generated three voluminous and compositionally similar rhyolitic tuffs, viz. the Oldest (OTT, 800 ka), Middle (MTT, ~500 ka) and Youngest Toba Tuffs (YTT, 75 ka). These tephra deposits are widespread across Indonesia, Malaysia, South China Sea, Sea of Bengal, India and Indian Ocean and provide useful stratigraphic markers in oceanic, lacustrine and terrestrial environments. Single shard trace element analysis of these deposits reveals the changing availability of different batches of magma through time, with Sr, Ba and Y contents defining 5 discrete magma populations in YTT, 4 populations in MTT and only a single, low Ba population in OTT. Within an individual eruption these populations are clearly distinct, but between eruptions (e.g. MTT and YTT) some of these populations overlap while others do not, indicating both the longevity (and/or continuous supply of fresh material) and evolution of these magma batches in the Toba Complex. Major element compositions of the different groups show equilibration at different pressures (based on Q'-Ab'-Or'), with the equilibration of low Ba populations at ~160 MPa, increasing to depths of ~210 MPa for the highest Ba population. The proportions of different populations of glass in distal YTT shows that relatively little of the high Ba population makes it into the distal record across India, and that this population appears to be over-represented in the proximal free glass and pumice from the caldera walls. This data may shed light on magma availability and tephra dispersal during the YTT eruption. Similarly, the glass composition of individual pumices from proximal deposits record regional, compositional and temporal differences in the erupted products. These show, for example, the apparent mingling of some of the magma batches and also that the high Ba population appears early (i.e. stratigraphically lower) in the northern caldera wall.

  10. The Development of Educational Evaluation Models in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasoetion, N.; And Others

    The primary purpose of this project was to develop model evaluation procedures that could be applied to large educational undertakings in Indonesia. Three programs underway in Indonesia were selected for the development of evaluation models: the Textbook-Teacher Upgrading Project, the Development School Project, and the Examinations (Item Bank)…

  11. Avian influenza in Indonesia: Observations of disease detection in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza, subtype H5N1, also known as highly pathogenic notifiable avian influenza (HPNAI), has spread throughout Indonesia since 2003. As of June 2007 there have been a total of 100 documented human cases in Indonesia, 80 of which have been fatal. Although efforts have be...

  12. Sculpture of Indonesia. [Teacher's Packet for a Teacher Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, CA.

    This teacher's packet accompanies a slide presentation on the sculpture found in Indonesia. The packet contains: (1) a slide list with descriptions listing time period and dimensions of each piece; (2) an introductory essay describing the setting of Indonesia, the Central Javanese Period and the Eastern Javanese Period; (3) descriptions of how to…

  13. Indonesia: Internal Conditions, the Global Economy, and Regional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Helga; Sheppard, Eric S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes recent trends in the economic and regional development of Indonesia and examines the internal and external forces influencing the process. Shows how these forces account for the rise of a strong centralized state. Discusses Indonesia's current problems. Includes tables, maps, and graphs of economic investment figures, world trade, and…

  14. Educational Decentralization and Behavior Change Needs in Indonesia. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Joseph

    This working paper examines behavior change as a key element in creating an enabling environment to sustain educational reform in Indonesia. It recommends elevating the importance of a formalized behavior change framework and methodology so that future plans for educational reform in Indonesia will include social marketing as a planned…

  15. Mari Belajar Sopan Santun Bahasa Indonesia. [Multimedia Kit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFon, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    Filmed on location in East Java, Indonesia, the Mari Belajar Sopan Santun Bahasa Indonesia set consists of two videotapes, a manual, and extended notes on the individual video scenarios. The videos present interactions among Indonesian native speakers and foreign language learners as they engage in tasks and activities of everyday life. The…

  16. Urban shear-wave reflection seismics: Reconstruction support by combined shallow seismic and engineering geology investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, U.; Guenther, A.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, P.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    After the big 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the massive reconstruction activities in the Aceh province (Northern Sumatra) were promoted by the Republic of Indonesia and the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development. The aims of the project MANGEONAD (Management of Georisk Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam). are to establish geoscientific on the ground support for a sustainable development and management of save building constructions, lifelines, infrastructure and also natural resources. Therefore, shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in close combination to engineering geology investigations in the period between 2005-2009 since depth and internal structure of the Krueng Aceh River delta (mainly young alluvial sediments) were widely unknown. Due to the requirements in the densely populated Banda Aceh region, lacking also traffic infrastructure, a small and lightweight engineering seismic setup of high mobility and high subsurface resolution capability was chosen. The S-wave land streamer system with 48 channels was applied successfully together with the ELVIS vibratory source using S- and P-waves on paved roads within the city of Banda Aceh. The performance of the S-wave system enabled the detailed seismic investigation of the shallow subsurface down to 50-150 m depth generating shaking frequencies between 20 Hz to 200 Hz. This also provides depth information extending the maximum depths of boreholes and Standard Penetrometer Testings (SPT), which could only be applied to max. 20 m depth. To integrate the results gained from all three methods, and further to provide a fast statistical analysis tool for engineering use, the Information System Engineering Geology (ISEG, BGR) was developed. This geospatial information tool includes the seismic data, all borehole information, geotechnical SPT and laboratory results from samples available in the investigation area. Thereby, the geotechnical 3D analysis of the subsurface units is enabled. The

  17. Therapeutic apheresis in Asia: An Indonesia single center experience.

    PubMed

    Triyono, Teguh; Vrielink, Hans

    2015-06-01

    In developing countries, like Indonesia, apheresis is still a relative new procedure. Nowadays, therapeutic apheresis procedures are performed in the field of hematology and neurology, especially in the teaching hospitals in Indonesia. Therapeutic apheresis procedure, that is, leukocytapheresis, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), and thrombocytapheresis are already performed. In the period 2009-2013, 204 apheresis procedures in 137 patients to reduce the leukocytes, 72 TPE procedures in 17 patients, and 14 thrombocyte reductions were performed in the Sardjito hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. In the future, to improve the therapeutic apheresis implementation, it is important to increase the insurance coverage and also should be considered to introduce the apheresis medicine into the curriculum of appropriate physician programs in Indonesia. Especially in Indonesia, a lot of efforts are still being needed to improve implementation of therapeutic apheresis.

  18. Indonesia ergonomics roadmap: where we are going?

    PubMed

    Wignjosoebroto, Sritomo

    2007-12-01

    There are so many definitions for ergonomics terms such as human factors, human factors engineering, human engineering, human factors psychology, engineering psychology, applied ergonomics, occupational ergonomics, industrial ergonomics and industrial engineering. The most inclusive terms are ergonomics and human factors. Both represent the study of work and the interaction between people and their work environmental systems. The main objective is especially fitting with the need to design, develop, implement and evaluate human-machine and environment systems that are productive, comfortable, safe and satisfying to use. The work of the ergonomists in Indonesia--most of them are academicians--have one thing in common, i.e. with the appropriate type of ergonomic approaches to interventions; there would be improvements in productivity, quality of working conditions, occupational safety and health (OSH), costs reduction, better environment, and increase in profits. So many researches, training, seminars and socialization about ergonomics and OSH have been done concerning micro-to-macro themes; but it seems that we are practically still running at the same place up to now. In facts, workers are still working using their traditional or obsolete methods in poor working conditions. Accidents are still happening inside and outside industry with the main root-cause being human "unsafe behavior" and errors. Industrial products cannot compete in the global market, and so many manufacturing industries collapsed or relocated to foreign countries. This paper discusses such a roadmap and review what we ergonomists in Indonesia have done and where we are going to? This review will be treated in the field of ergonomics and OSH to take care the future Indonesia challenges. Some of the challenges faced are care for the workers, care for the people, care for the quality and productivity of work, care for the new advanced technologies, care for the environment, and last but not least

  19. Coseismic ionospheric disturbance of the large strike-slip earthquakes in North Sumatra in 2012: Mw dependence of the disturbance amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyadi, Mokhamad Nur; Heki, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    We studied ionospheric responses to the 2012 April 11 Mw 8.6 North Sumatra earthquake using total electron content (TEC) measurements with the regional Global Navigation Satellite System network. This earthquake ruptured the oceanic lithosphere off the Indian Ocean coast of North Sumatra, and is known as the largest strike-slip earthquake ever recorded. Coseismic ionospheric disturbances (CIDs) with rapid TEC enhancement of a few TEC units propagated northward with a speed of acoustic waves (˜1 km s-1). Resonant atmospheric oscillation with a frequency ˜4 mHz have been found as monochromatic oscillation of TEC lasting for an hour after the main shock and the largest aftershock. We compared CID amplitudes of 21 earthquakes world-wide with moment magnitudes (Mw) 6.6-9.2. They roughly obeyed a law such that CID amplitude increases by two orders of magnitude for the Mw increase of three. The 2012 North Sumatra earthquakes slightly deviated negatively from the trend possibly reflecting their strike-slip mechanisms, that is small vertical crustal movements for their magnitudes.

  20. Intraplate Splay Faults and Near-field Tsunami Generation during Giant Megathrust Earthquakes in Chile, Alaska, and Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plafker, G.; Savage, J. C.; Lee, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Mw 9.5 Chile earthquake sequence (21-22/05/1960), the largest instrumentally-recorded seismic event in history, was generated by a megathrust rupture of the southern end of the Peru-Chile Arc about 850 km long and 60-150 km wide down dip. Within Chile, the accompanying tsunami reached 15 m high and took an estimated 1,000 of the more than 2,000 lives lost. The trans-Pacific tsunami killed 230 people in Japan, Hawaii and the Philippine Islands. The tsunami source was primarily due to regional offshore upwarp, with possible superimposed larger local uplift due to displacement on splay faults. The Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake (27/03/1964) ruptured major segments of the eastern Aleutian Arc 800 km long by 250-350 km wide down dip. Coseismic uplift along splay faults offshore generated a major near-field tsunami reaching 13 m high in Alaska that took at least 21 lives. Local earthquake-triggered submarine landslides in fiords along the rugged Kenai and Chugach mountains generated local (non-tsunami) waves with run up to 52 m high that took about 77 lives and caused major damage to coastal communities. Tectonically-generated tsunami waves were also generated over the continental shelf and slope due to regional uplift that averaged about 2 m; these waves added to the damage in coastal Alaska and caused 15 deaths and local property damage as far away as Oregon and California. The Mw 9.15 Sumatra earthquake (26/12/2004) ruptured segments of the Sunda Arc more than 1200 km long by 150-200 km wide down dip. The accompanying near-field tsunami was as high as 36 m in northern Sumatra where it caused 169,000 casualties along 200 km of shoreline while the far-field tsunami took an additional 63,000 lives throughout the Indian Ocean region. This made it the deadliest tsunami in recorded history. In addition to a few meters of regional uplift caused by slip on the megathrust, large-slip splay fault sources are inferred from intraplate seismicity, and from early tsunami arrival

  1. Injury, disability and quality of life after the 2009 earthquake in Padang, Indonesia: a prospective cohort study of adult survivors

    PubMed Central

    Sudaryo, Mondastri K.; Besral; Endarti, Ajeng Tias; Rivany, Ronnie; Phalkey, Revati; Marx, Michael; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2012-01-01

    Background On 30 September 2009, a 7.6 magnitude earthquake severely hit the coast of Padang city in West Sumatra, Indonesia leaving about 1,117 people dead and injuring another 3,515. Health consequences such as physical injury, co-morbidity, disability and quality of life over time are seldom reported among survivors after earthquakes. Objectives To investigate the associations between injury, disability and quality of life amongst adult survivors in Padang city after the 2009 earthquake. Design/Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted to compare adult injured (184) and adult non-injured (93) subjects over a 6-month period. Data on physical injury, co-morbidities, disability and quality of life were collected through interviews and measured quantitatively in three phases, i.e. at baseline, end of 3 and 6 months. Results Disability scores were consistently and significantly higher among injured subjects compared to non-injured, even when adjusted for co-morbidities (i.e. acute symptoms and chronic diseases). The highest disability score amongst injured subjects was attributed to ‘feeling discomfort/pain’. Quality of life attribute (QLA) scores, were significantly lower amongst injured people as compared to those non-injured even when adjusted for co-morbidities. The lowest QLA item score amongst the injured was ‘pain, depression and anxiety’. Significant and consistent negative correlations were found between disability and QLA scores in both the injured and non-injured groups. Conclusion Physical injury is significantly correlated with both higher disability and lower quality of life, while disability has significant negative correlation with quality of life. The findings suggest that, through disability, injury may contribute to decreased quality of life. It is therefore recommended to promptly and adequately treat injuries after disasters to prevent any potential for disability and hence restore quality of life. PMID:22629236

  2. Poverty and mental health in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Tampubolon, Gindo; Hanandita, Wulung

    2014-04-01

    Community and facility studies in developing countries have generally demonstrated an inverse relationship between poverty and mental health. However, recent population-based studies contradict this. In India and Indonesia the poor and non-poor show no difference in mental health. We revisit the relationship between poverty and mental health using a validated measure of depressive symptoms (CES-D) and a new national sample from Indonesia - a country where widespread poverty and deep inequality meet with a neglected mental health service sector. Results from three-level overdispersed Poisson models show that a 1% decrease in per capita household expenditure was associated with a 0.05% increase in CES-D score (depressive symptoms), while using a different indicator (living on less than $2 a day) it was estimated that the poor had a 5% higher CES-D score than the better off. Individual social capital and religiosity were found to be positively associated with mental health while adverse events were negatively associated. These findings provide support for the established view regarding the deleterious association between poverty and mental health in developed and developing countries.

  3. Onshore Boulder Deposits Near Krakatau Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setja Atmadja, C. M.

    2007-05-01

    Onshore coral blocks were found at two sites in 60 km radial distance from Krakatau volcano which erupted and triggered tsunamis in Sunda Strait in the years 416 and 1883. The greatest of the 1883 eruptions generated a tsunami that ran up as high as 36m and reportedly moved coral boulders larger than 300 m3. At one of these sites, Gubug Garam on the east shore of Lampung Bay, Sumatra (S 5° 36' E 105° 24'), more than 40 boulders rest on a 70m wide horizontal coral platform in the inter tidal region. Their volumes range from 1 m3 to > 4m3. Their long axes increasingly align with the trend of the coastline the farther the blocks were transported. Inland, on ground underlain by beach sand and volcano-clastic deposits, more than 20 coral blocks up to 3 m3 as much as 500 m from the shore were found. Most of these boulders are embedded in the sediments. Digging beneath six of the boulders, it was found that they rest on top of pumice and tuff, which in turn overlies former topsoil. Above the pumice and tuff, the material surrounding the blocks is the present topsoil which consists of clayey silt or silty clay with some shell and branching coral fragment. The other site, near Anyer, Java (S 6° 4' E 105° 53'), has a similar topographic setting. The reef platform, 75 m wide, is littered with more than 20 blocks as large as 3 m3. Inland, as much as 150 m from the coastline, 5 very large coral blocks, the largest measuring 300 m3 were found. As at Gubug Garam, these blocks rest on pumice and tuff that are underlain by former topsoil. We thus infer that the blocks at both locations where displaced during the same event.

  4. Public health responses to climate change health impacts in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Wirawan, I Made Ady

    2010-01-01

    Although climate change is a global concern, there are particular considerations for Indonesia as an archipelagic nation. These include the vulnerability of people living in small islands and coastal areas to rising sea levels; the expansion of the important mosquito-borne diseases, particularly malaria and dengue, into areas that lack of immunity; and the increase in water-borne diseases and malnutrition. This article proposes a set of public health responses to climate change health impacts in Indonesia. Some important principles and practices in public health are highlighted, to develop effective public health approaches to climate change in Indonesia.

  5. Population status, demography and habitat preferences of the threatened lipstick palm Cyrtostachys renda Blume in Kerumutan Reserve, Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyatmoko, Didik; Burgman, Mark A.; Guhardja, Edi; Mogea, Johanis P.; Walujo, Eko B.; Setiadi, Dede

    2005-09-01

    Population status and demography of a population of the threatened lipstick palm Cyrtostachys renda in a peat swamp ecosystem of Kerumutan Reserve, Sumatra (one of the largest remaining populations) was documented at 16 different sites, covering a wide range of forest and habitat types, vegetation associations, and population sizes. Population sizes were dominated by suckers comprising 89% of the total population. Individuals with stem heights between 0 and 4 m (47.5%), stem diameters between 4 and 10 cm (82.0%), and leaf scar numbers between 0 and 60 (69.2%) dominated. Ages of individuals were estimated and used to fit a curvilinear relationship between age and stem height. Wild plants reach reproductive maturity within 25-30 years, or when they have stem heights in excess of 2.0 m, or when they have 15-25 leaf scars. They can survive more than 80 years. Cultivated plants appear to reproduce earlier and produce more seeds than wild plants. Individual growth was plant size-dependent with the adult stage being the most productive. Higher mortality was experienced by suckers, especially in continuously waterlogged conditions and locations with dense canopies. Sucker growth was faster than seedling growth, an adaptation that may allow the species to cope with periodically waterlogged conditions. Population abundances varied with habitat types; well-drained areas were the most suitable habitat. To conserve the most important remaining populations of the lipstick palm, it is crucial to protect well-drained sites in Kerumutan Reserve.

  6. Determination of the onset time in polarization power ratio Z/H for precursor of Sumatra earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Ahadi, S.; Puspito, N. T.; Ibrahim, G.; Saroso, S.

    2014-09-25

    Determination of onset time precursors of strong earthquakes (Mw > 5) and distance (d < 500 km) using geomagnetic data from Geomagnetic station KTB, Sumatra and two station references DAV, Philippine and DAW, Australia. separate techniques are required in its determination. Not the same as that recorded in the kinetic wave seismograms can be determined by direct time domain. Difficulties associated with electromagnetic waves seismogenic activities require analysis of the transformed signal in the frequency domain. Determination of the frequency spectrum will determine the frequency of emissions emitted from the earthquake source. The aim is to analyze the power amplitude of the ULF emissions in the horizontal component (H) and vertical component (Z). Polarization power ratio Z/H is used for determining the sign of earthquake precursors controlled by the standard deviation. The pattern recognition polarization ratio should be obtained which can differentiate emissions from seismogenic effects of geomagnetic activity. ULF emission patterns generated that seismogenic effect has duration > 5 days and the dominance of emission intensity recorded at the Z component and for the dominance of the emission intensity of geomagnetic activity recorded in the component H. The result shows that the onset time is determined when the polarization power ratio Z/H standard deviation over the limit (p ± 2 σ) which has a duration of > 5 days.

  7. Ionospheric signatures of gravity waves produced by the 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yonghui; Wang, Wenqing; Hickey, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric fluctuations inferred from observations of total electron content have previously been attributed to tsunamis and have confirmed the strong coupling between Earth's ocean and ionosphere via atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). To further advance our understanding of this wave coupling process we employ a linear full-wave model and a nonlinear time-dependent model to examine the ionospheric response to the AGW perturbations induced by the 2004 Sumatra and the 2011 Tohoku tsunamis. In the 2004 case, our modeling analyses reveal that one component of the propagating AGWs becomes dynamically unstable in the E-region ionosphere at a range exceeding 2000 km in a direction 340° clockwise from north. Another component becomes convectively unstable in the E-region ionosphere at a range exceeding 700 km in a direction 250° clockwise from north. In the 2011 case, a significant enhancement in the ionospheric disturbance occurs in a direction northwest from the epicenter about 1 h following the tsunami onset, in general agreement with observations. Our simulations also indicate that the AGW propagating toward the southeast is responsible for a traveling ionospheric disturbance that remains of an observable amplitude for over 4 h during which time it propagates horizontally almost 4000 km.

  8. Percutaneous ureteral stent placement for the treatment of a benign ureteral obstruction in a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae).

    PubMed

    Delk, Katie W; Wack, Raymund F; Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Palm, Carrie A; Zwingenberger, Allison; Glaiberman, Craig B; Ferguson, Kenneth H; Culp, William T N

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old, 113 kg intact male Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) was evaluated for weight loss, polydipsia, and intermittent hematuria. The tiger was immobilized for diagnostic testing including blood work, urinalysis, and abdominal ultrasound. Laboratory testing demonstrated macro- and microhematuria, azotemia, and an increased urine protein:creatinine ratio. Abdominal ultrasound revealed bilateral ureterolithiasis as well as hydronephrosis and ureteral dilation. Ultrasonography performed 5 months later revealed worsening of the right-sided hydronephrosis and hydroureter and a decrease in the severity of dilation on the left side presumably from passage of the left-sided ureteral calculi. Nephroureteral decompression via the placement of a stent was elected. A pigtail ureteral catheter (8.2 French diameter) was placed in the right ureter via an antegrade percutaneous approach utilizing ultrasound and fluoroscopic-guidance. Following stent placement, macrohematuria resolved although microhematuria was noted in opportunistic urine samples. Five months after stent placement, the azotemia had mildly progressed, the urine protein:creatinine ratio was improved, the right hydronephrosis and hydroureter had completely resolved, and the ureteral stent remained in the appropriate position. The tiger had clinically improved with a substantial increase in appetite, weight, and activity level. Ureteral stenting allowed for nephroureteral decompression in the captive large felid of this report, and no complications were encountered. Ureteral stenting provided a minimally invasive method of managing ureteral obstruction in this patient and could be considered in future cases due to the clinical improvement and low morbidity.

  9. Stress changes along the Sunda trench following the 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman and 28 March 2005 Nias earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Banerjee, P.; Burgmann, R.; Hashimoto, M.; Choosakul, N.

    2006-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Mw = 9.2 and 28 March 2005 Mw = 8.7 earthquakes on the Sumatra megathrust altered the state of stress over a large region surrounding the earthquakes. We evaluate the stress changes associated with coseismic and postseismic deformation following these two large events, focusing on postseismic deformation that is driven by viscoelastic relaxation of a low-viscosity asthenosphere. Under Coulomb failure stress (CFS) theory, the December 2004 event increased CFS on the future hypocentral zone of the March 2005 event by about 0.25 bar, with little or no contribution from viscous relaxation. Coseismic stresses around the rupture zones of the 1797 and 1833 Sunda trench events are negligible, but postseismic stress perturbations since December 2004 are predicted to result in CFS increases of 0.1 to 0.2 bar around these rupture zones between 2 and 8 years after the December 2004 event. These are considerable stress perturbations given that the 1797 and 1833 rupture zones are likely approaching the end of a complete seismic cycle. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Communicating Tsunami Preparedness Through the Lessons Learned by Survivors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlow, I.

    2015-12-01

    Often times science communication is reactive and it minimizes the perceptions of the general public. The Tsunami of New Dreams is a film with the testimonies of survivors of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar in West Sumatra, Indonesia. Production of the film spanned over five years and dozens of interviews, and is based on a unique geographic, demographic and experiential sampling of the local population. This documentary feature film underscores the importance of Earth science and science communication in building sustainable communities. The film is a lesson in survival and sustainability, and it provides a simple but powerful testimony of what to do and what not to do before and during a tsunami. The film also highlights the direct relationship that exists between disaster survival rates and the knowledge of basic Earth science and preparedness facts. We hope that the human stories presented in the film will serve as a strong motivator for general audiences to learn about natural hazards, preparedness, and Earth science. These engaging narratives can touch the minds and hearts of general audiences much faster than technical lectures in a classroom. Some of the testimonies are happy and others are sad, but they all present the wide range of beliefs that influenced the outcomes of the natural disaster. The interviews with survivors are complemented with unique archival footage of the tsunami and unique footage of daily life in Aceh. Hand-drawn illustrations are used to recreate what survivors did immediately after the earthquake, and during the extreme moments when they faced the tsunami waves. Animated visuals, maps and diagrams enhance the understanding of earthquake and tsunami dynamics. The film is a production of the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) in collaboration with the International Center for Aceh and Indian Ocean Studies (ICAIOS) in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. The film is scheduled for release in late 2015. This is a unique

  11. The role of home-based records in the establishment of a continuum of care for mothers, newborns, and children in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Keiko; Hattori, Tomoko; Kosen, Soewarta

    2013-01-01

    Background The provision of appropriate care along the continuum of maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) service delivery is a challenge in developing countries. To improve this, in the 1990s, Indonesia introduced the maternal and child health (MCH) handbook, as an integrated form of parallel home-based records. Objective This study aimed to identify the roles of home-based records both before and after childbirth, especially in provinces where the MCH handbook (MCHHB) was extensively promoted, by examining their association with MNCH service uptake. Design This was a cross-sectional study using nationally representative data sets, the Indonesia Demographic and Health Surveys (IDHSs) from 1997, 2002–2003, and 2007. The IDHS identifies respondents’ ownership of home-based records before and after childbirth. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between record ownership and service utilisation in national data and data from two provinces, West Sumatra and North Sulawesi, where ownership of pre- and post-natal records served as a proxy for MCHHB ownership. Results Pre- and post-natal record ownership increased from 1997 to 2007. Provincial data from 2007 showed that handbook ownership was associated with having delivery assisted by trained personnel [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–4.25], receiving maternal care (aOR: 3.92, 95% CI: 2.35–6.52), completing 12 doses of child immunisation for seven diseases (aOR: 4.86, 95% CI: 2.37–9.95), and having immunisation before and after childbirth (aOR: 5.40, 95% CI: 2.28–12.76), whereas national data showed that service utilisation was associated with ownership of both records compared with owning a single record or none. Conclusion Our results suggest that pre- and post-natal home-based record use may be effective for ensuring service utilisation. In addition, since the handbook is an efficient home-based record for use throughout children's life

  12. Malaria Modeling and Surveillance in Thailand and Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Soebiyanto, Radina

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of malaria transmission in Thailand and Indonesia to assist in the understanding and reducing the incidence of the deadly disease. Satellite observations are being integrated into this work, and this is described herein.

  13. Indonesia 1997: results from the Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    The Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) was conducted by the Central Bureau of Statistics, State Ministry of Population/National Family Planning Coordinating Board, and Ministry of Health, Jakarta, Indonesia, within the framework of the DHS Program of Macro International. Data from the DHS were collected from 34,255 households and complete interviews were conducted with 28,810 women aged 15-49. The interviews took place between September 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997. The summary statistics presented were taken from the Indonesia country report with exception as noted. Included in this article are table and charts presenting valuable data on Indonesia general characteristics of the population, fertility, contraceptive use, and knowledge about contraception, marital and contraceptive status, infant mortality, and health.

  14. AGE-STRUCTURAL TRANSITION IN INDONESIA

    PubMed Central

    Kreager, Philip; Schröder-Butterfill, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This paper responds to recent calls for empirical study of the impact of age-structural transition. It begins by reviewing evidence of cohort oscillations in twentieth-century Indonesia, which indicates that current older generations are likely to have smaller numbers of children on whom they may rely than generations before and after them. However, to assess whether the imbalances implied by this situation are actually influencing people’s lives, attention to further factors shaping the availability and reliability of younger generations, notably differences in socio-economic status and in patterns of inter-generational support flows, is required. Community-level Indonesian data confirm that elders in the lower social strata are child-poor. Social structural and family network patterns, however, have a greater influence on the availability of inter-generational support than cohort differentials. PMID:27158254

  15. Marriage and Socioeconomic Change in Contemporary Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, Jenna; Buttenheim, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between economic trends and entry into marriage in a rapidly developing setting. We examine Indonesian marriage in the 1990’s, a decade of substantial economic growth followed by a sudden financial collapse in 1998. We use discrete-time hazard models to analyze information on 4,078 women and 4,496 men from the Indonesia Family Life Survey. While previous research has shown that marriages may be postponed after economic downturn, we find no evidence of such delays at the national level following the 1998 financial crisis. In contrast, we use regional wage rate data to show that entry into marriage is inversely related to economic growth throughout the decade for all women and for men from lower socioeconomic strata. PMID:26336321

  16. GHG Effect on Surface Temperature in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyono, W. E.

    The increasing of green house gas emissons into the atmosphere could influence the Climate and Earth Ecosystem. The increasing CO_2 emmision in developed countries and developing countries are influenced by economic growth factor, cheaped price fuel without tax and there is not regulation yet for making arrangement energy efficiency. The result of inventarisation CO_2 emmision related to energy sector between 1990 until 2000 in Indonesia are having increased trend, and the CO_2 emmision percapita is still lower then OECD countries. The green house gas concentrations are measured continously in Bandung, Jakarta, and the others place. The CO_2 and CH_4 concentration ever had results higher than globally mean. The fluctuation of green house gas concentrations are influenced by activities of surounding research location.