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Sample records for acellular cartilage sheets

  1. The Application of Sheet Technology in Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yang; Gong, Yi Yi; Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Yanan; Fu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering started to act as a promising, even essential alternative method in the process of cartilage repair and regeneration, considering adult avascular structure has very limited self-renewal capacity of cartilage tissue in adults and a bottle-neck existed in conventional surgical treatment methods. Recent progressions in tissue engineering realized the development of more feasible strategies to treat cartilage disorders. Of these strategies, cell sheet technology has shown great clinical potentials in the regenerative areas such as cornea and esophagus and is increasingly considered as a potential way to reconstruct cartilage tissues for its non-use of scaffolds and no destruction of matrix secreted by cultured cells. Acellular matrix sheet technologies utilized in cartilage tissue engineering, with a sandwich model, can ingeniously overcome the drawbacks that occurred in a conventional acellular block, where cells are often blocked from migrating because of the non-nanoporous structure. Electrospun-based sheets with nanostructures that mimic the natural cartilage matrix offer a level of control as well as manipulation and make them appealing and widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. In this review, we focus on the utilization of these novel and promising sheet technologies to construct cartilage tissues with practical and beneficial functions.

  2. Human acellular cartilage matrix powders as a biological scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering with synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Chia-Chun; Liao, Cheng-Hao; Lin, Feng-Huei; Hsu, Yuan-Ming; Fang, Hsu-Wei

    2014-07-01

    In our previous study, we found that cartilage fragments from osteoarthritic knee promoted chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we further transformed the cartilage tissues into acellular cartilage matrix (ACM) and explored the feasibility of using ACM as a biological scaffold. Nonworn parts of cartilage tissues were obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery and were successfully fabricated into ACM powders. The ACM powders and human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) were mixed into collagen gel for in vitro culture. Histological results showed a synergistic effect of ACM powders and chondrogenic growth factors in the formation of engineered cartilage. The findings of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) suggested that ACM powders had the potential of promoting type II collagen gene expression in the growth factors-absent environment. Moreover, with growth factors induction, the ACM powders could reduce the hypertrophy in chondrogenesis of SMSCs. In summary, ACM powders could serve as a functional scaffold that benefited the chondrogenesis of SMSCs for cartilage tissue engineering.

  3. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  4. Effects of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein 1 (CDMP1) transgenic mesenchymal stem cell sheets in repairing rabbit cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Yao, M; Liu, Y; Mu, L; Zhang, B; Wu, G

    2016-06-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the abilities of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein 1 (CDMP1) transgenic cell sheets in repairing rabbit cartilage defects. Rabbit CDMP1 transgenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets (CDMP1-BMSCs) were cultured on temperature-sensitive culture dishes, and CDMP1 expression and type II collagen protein in the cell sheets were detected. Tissue-engineered cell sheets were constructed and transplanted into defect rabbit thyroid cartilage, to investigate the expression of engineered cartilage collagen protein and proteoglycan (GAG). The experiment was divided into three groups; A) BMSC sheet, B) Ad-CMV-eGFP-transfected cell sheet, and C) Ad-CMV-hCDMP1-IRES-eGFP-transfected cell sheet. The expression of CDMP1 was detected in the transgenic cell sheets. The engineered cartilage exhibited positive immunohistochemical and Alcian blue staining. The expression levels of type II collagen protein and GAG in group A were positive, whereas those in group B and group C were negative (P < 0.05). The CDMP1-BMSC sheets had a good cartilage differentiation activity, and could effectively repair rabbit laryngeal cartilage defects.

  5. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Pot, Michiel W.; Gonzales, Veronica K.; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling) compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found). For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies) was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0–100% scale. Implantation of acellular biomaterials significantly

  6. Cartilage engineering using chondrocyte cell sheets and its application in reconstruction of microtia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Libin; Ding, Ruiying; Li, Baowei; Han, Haolun; Wang, Hongnan; Wang, Gang; Xu, Bingxin; Zhai, Suoqiang; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The imperfections of scaffold materials have hindered the clinical application of cartilage tissue engineering. The recently developed cell-sheet technique is adopted to engineer tissues without scaffold materials, thus is considered being potentially able to overcome the problems concerning the scaffold imperfections. This study constructed monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheets and harvested the sheets with cell scraper instead of temperature-responsive culture dishes. The properties of the cultured chondrocyte cell sheets and the feasibility of cartilage engineering using the chondrocyte cell sheets was further investigated via in vitro and in vivo study. Primary extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and type II collagen expression was detected in the cell sheets during in vitro culture. After implanted into nude mice for 8 weeks, mature cartilage discs were harvested. The morphology of newly formed cartilage was similar in the constructs originated from monolayer and bilayer chondrocyte cell sheet. The chondrocytes were located within evenly distributed ovoid lacunae. Robust ECM formation and intense expression of type II collagen was observed surrounding the evenly distributed chondrocytes in the neocartilages. Biochemical analysis showed that the DNA contents of the neocartilages were higher than native human costal cartilage; while the contents of the main component of ECM, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline, were similar to native human costal cartilage. In conclusion, the chondrocyte cell sheet constructed using the simple and low-cost technique is basically the same with the cell sheet cultured and harvested in temperature-responsive culture dishes, and can be used for cartilage tissue engineering.

  7. Cell-sheet technology combined with a thienoindazole derivative small compound TD-198946 for cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yano, Fumiko; Hojo, Hironori; Ohba, Shinsuke; Saito, Taku; Honnami, Muneki; Mochizuki, Manabu; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Chung, Ung-il

    2013-07-01

    Articular cartilage is a permanent tissue, with poor self-regenerative capacity. Consequently, a tissue engineering approach to cartilage regenerative therapy could greatly advance the current treatment options for patients with cartilage degeneration and/or defects. A successful tissue engineering approach would require not only induction of chondrogenic differentiation, but also suppression of subsequent endochondral ossification and chondrocyte dedifferentiation. We previously reported that direct injection of the thienoindazole derivative, TD-198946, into the knee joints of mice halted the progression of osteoarthritis; the compound induced chondrogenic differentiation without promoting endochondral ossification. In the present study, we applied TD-198946 to a cell-based cartilage reconstruction model, taking advantage of the cell-sheet technology. Cartilaginous cell-sheets were generated by culturing mouse and canine costal chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells with TD-198946 on temperature-responsive dishes. The transplanted cell-sheets were then successfully used to promote the reconstruction of permanent cartilage, with no evidence of chondrocyte hypertrophy in the knee articular cartilage defects created in mice and canines. Thus, TD-198946 is a promising candidate for cell-based cartilage reconstruction therapies, enabling us to avoid any concern surrounding the use of scaffolds or cytokines to stimulate regeneration.

  8. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC: Shetty-Kim technique) - A matrix based acellular single stage arthroscopic cartilage repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Kim, Seok Jung; Shetty, Vishvas; Jang, Jae Deog; Huh, Sung Woo; Lee, Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The defects of articular cartilage in the knee joint are a common degenerative disease and currently there are several established techniques to treat this problem, each with their own advantages and shortcomings. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard but the technique is expensive, time-consuming and most versions require two stage procedures and an arthrotomy. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) is a single-stage arthroscopic procedure and we developed. This method uses microfracture technique with atelocollagen mixed with fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We introduce this ACIC techniques and its scientific background.

  9. Layering PLGA-based electrospun membranes and cell sheets for engineering cartilage-bone transition.

    PubMed

    Mouthuy, P-A; El-Sherbini, Y; Cui, Z; Ye, H

    2016-04-01

    It is now widely acknowledged that implants that have been designed with an effort towards reconstructing the transition between tissues might improve their functionality and integration in vivo. This paper contributes to the development of improved treatment for articular cartilage repair by exploring the potential of the combination of electrospinning technology and cell sheet engineering to create cartilage tissue. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was used to create the electrospun membranes. The focus being on the cartilage-bone transition, collagen type I and hydroxyapatite (HA) were also added to the scaffolds to increase the histological biocompatibility. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured in thermoresponsive dishes to allow non-enzymatic removal of an intact cell layer after reaching confluence. The tissue constructs were created by layering electrospun membranes with sheets of hMSCs and were cultured under chondrogenic conditions for up to 21 days. High viability was found to be maintained in the multilayered construct. Under chondrogenic conditions, reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry have shown high expression levels of collagen type X, a form of collagen typically found in the calcified zone of articular cartilage, suggesting an induction of chondrocyte hypertrophy in the PLGA-based scaffolds. To conclude, this paper suggests that layering electrospun scaffolds and cell sheets is an efficient approach for the engineering of tissue transitions, and in particular the cartilage-bone transition. The use of PLGA-based scaffold might be particularly useful for the bone-cartilage reconstruction, since the differentiated tissue constructs seem to show characteristics of calcified cartilage.

  10. Cartilage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Arnold I.

    1984-01-01

    Cartilage is a fundamental biological material that helps to shape the body and then helps to support it. Its fundamental properties of strength and resilience are explained in terms of the tissue's molecular structure. (JN)

  11. Driving Cartilage Formation in High-Density Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Aggregate and Sheet Constructs Without Exogenous Growth Factor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Phuong N.; Solorio, Loran D.

    2014-01-01

    An attractive cell source for cartilage tissue engineering, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) can be easily expanded and signaled to differentiate into chondrocytes. This study explores the influence of growth factor distribution and release kinetics on cartilage formation within 3D hASC constructs incorporated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-loaded gelatin microspheres. The amounts of microspheres, TGF-β1 concentration, and polymer degradation rate were varied within hASC aggregates. Microsphere and TGF-β1 loading concentrations were identified that resulted in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production comparable to those of control aggregates cultured in TGF-β1-containing medium. Self-assembling hASC sheets were then engineered for the production of larger, more clinically relevant constructs. Chondrogenesis was observed in hASC-only sheets cultured with exogenous TGF-β1 at 3 weeks. Importantly, sheets with incorporated TGF-β1-loaded microspheres achieved GAG production similar to sheets treated with exogenous TGF-β1. Cartilage formation was confirmed histologically via observation of cartilage-like morphology and GAG staining. This is the first demonstration of the self-assembly of hASCs into high-density cell sheets capable of forming cartilage in the presence of exogenous TGF-β1 or with TGF-β1-releasing microspheres. Microsphere incorporation may bypass the need for extended in vitro culture, potentially enabling hASC sheets to be implanted more rapidly into defects to regenerate cartilage in vivo. PMID:24873753

  12. Engineered Cartilage via Self-Assembled hMSC Sheets with Incorporated Biodegradable Gelatin Microspheres Releasing Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Loran D.; Vieregge, Eran L.; Dhami, Chirag D.; Dang, Phuong N.; Alsberg, Eben

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembling cell sheets have shown great potential for use in cartilage tissue engineering applications, as they provide an advantageous environment for the chondrogenic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We have engineered a system of self-assembled, microsphere-incorporated hMSC sheets capable of forming cartilage in the presence of exogenous transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) or with TGF-β1 released from incorporated microspheres. Gelatin microspheres with two different degrees of crosslinking were used to enable different cell-mediated microsphere degradation rates. Biochemical assays, histological and immunohistochemical analyses, and biomechanical testing were performed to determine biochemical composition, structure, and equilibrium modulus in unconfined compression after 3 weeks of culture. The inclusion of microspheres with or without loaded TGF-β1 significantly increased sheet thickness and compressive equilibrium modulus, and enabled more uniform matrix deposition by comparison to control sheets without microspheres. Sheets incorporated with fast-degrading microspheres containing TGF-β1 produced significantly more GAG and GAG per DNA than all other groups tested and stained more intensely for type II collagen. These findings demonstrate improved cartilage formation in microsphere-incorporated cell sheets, and describe a tailorable system for the chondrogenic induction of hMSCs without necessitating culture in growth factor-containing medium. PMID:22100386

  13. Methods for producing scaffold-free engineered cartilage sheets from auricular and articular chondrocyte cell sources and attachment to porous tantalum.

    PubMed

    Whitney, G Adam; Mera, Hisashi; Weidenbecher, Mark; Awadallah, Amad; Mansour, Joseph M; Dennis, James E

    2012-08-01

    Scaffold-free cartilage engineering techniques may provide a simple alternative to traditional methods employing scaffolds. We previously reported auricular chondrocyte-derived constructs for use in an engineered trachea model; however, the construct generation methods were not reported in detail. In this study, methods for cartilage construct generation from auricular and articular cell sources are described in detail, and the resulting constructs are compared for use in a joint resurfacing model. Attachment of cartilage sheets to porous tantalum is also investigated as a potential vehicle for future attachment to subchondral bone. Large scaffold-free cartilage constructs were produced from culture-expanded chondrocytes from skeletally mature rabbits, and redifferentiated in a chemically-defined culture medium. Auricular constructs contained more glycosaminoglycan (39.6±12.7 vs. 9.7±1.9 μg/mg wet weight, mean and standard deviation) and collagen (2.7±0.45 vs. 1.1±0.2 μg/mg wet weight, mean and standard deviation) than articular constructs. Aggregate modulus was also higher for auricular constructs vs. articular constructs (0.23±0.07 vs. 0.12±0.03 MPa, mean and standard deviation). Attachment of constructs to porous tantalum was achieved by neocartilage ingrowth into tantalum pores. These results demonstrate that large scaffold-free neocartilage constructs can be produced from mature culture-expanded chondrocytes in a chemically-defined medium, and that these constructs can be attached to porous tantalum.

  14. Human acellular dermal matrix grafts for rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David A; Oriel, Brad S

    2011-09-01

    Rhinoplasty often relies on graft material for structural support in the form of cartilage, bone grafts, or fascia. In addition, pliable grafts are often helpful for contouring and can function as a barrier. Unfortunately, grafts carry the disadvantage of requiring an additional donor site, with associated complications. Human acellular dermal matrix (ADM) biological implants offer an exciting alternative for structural support and nonstructural implantation in rhinoplasty procedures. To examine the efficacy of ADM placement in rhinoplasty and septoplasty, the authors report the results from a series of 51 patients. In this series, there were no cases of infection, skin discoloration, seroma formation, septal perforation, significant resorption, extrusion, or other complications related to ADM placement. Therefore, the authors believe that ADM offers a safe and effective alternative to traditional grafting methods for functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty.

  15. The Bioactivity of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix in Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Amanda J.; Converse, Gabriel L.; Hopkins, Richard A.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a particularly promising acellular material for cartilage regeneration given the evidence supporting its chondroinductive character. The ‘raw materials’ of cartilage matrix can serve as building blocks and signals for enhanced tissue regeneration. These matrices can be created by chemical or physical methods: physical methods disrupt cellular membranes and nuclei but may not fully remove all cell components and DNA, whereas chemical methods when combined with physical methods are particularly effective in fully decellularizing such materials. Critical endpoints include no detectable residual DNA or immunogenic antigens. It is important to first delineate between the sources of the cartilage matrix, i.e., derived from matrix produced by cells in vitro or from native tissue, and then to further characterize the cartilage matrix based on the processing method, i.e., decellularization or devitalization. With these distinctions, four types of cartilage matrices exist: decellularized native cartilage (DCC), devitalized native cartilage (DVC), decellularized cell derived matrix (DCCM), and devitalized cell derived matrix (DVCM). Delivery of cartilage matrix may be a straightforward approach without the need for additional cells or growth factors. Without additional biological additives, cartilage matrix may be attractive from a regulatory and commercialization standpoint. Source and delivery method are important considerations for clinical translation. Only one currently marketed cartilage matrix medical device is decellularized, although trends in filed patents suggest additional decellularized products may be available in the future. To choose the most relevant source and processing for cartilage matrix, qualifying testing needs to include targeting the desired application, optimizing delivery of the material, identify relevant FDA regulations, assess availability of raw materials, and immunogenic properties of the product. PMID:25044502

  16. Cartilage Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead to joint damage and deformity. Causes of cartilage problems include Tears and injuries, such as sports injuries Genetic factors Other disorders, such as some types of arthritis Osteoarthritis results from breakdown of cartilage. ...

  17. Recent advances in acellular regenerative tissue scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    The management of chronic wounds is a considerable challenge for foot and ankle surgeons. The well-established tenets of adequate vascular supply, debridement with eradication of infection, and offloading must be employed in the management of all extremity wounds. Regenerative scaffolds are a viable means of reestablishing a favorable wound environment. The matrix facilitates cell migration, chemoattraction, angiogenesis, wound bed granulation, and expedited wound closure. Although studies have demonstrated success with acellular matrices, a multimodal approach should always be employed to improve healing success. Negative pressure wound therapy, compression, offloading, and antibiotics are advocated to improve outcomes. Acellular graft selection requires a multifactorial analysis, taking into consideration the specific patient and wound characteristics as well as the differences between acellular matrices. Patient age, comorbidities, activity level, and ability to comply with protocol as well as wound etiology, duration, depth, surface area, exudate, bacterial burden, location, vascular status, ischemic status, and presentation are all critical components. To effectively choose a matrix, the clinician must have a comprehensive understanding of the products available and the data validating their use. The mechanisms by which the acellular matrix accelerates wound healing and increases the likelihood of wound healing continue to be investigated. However, it is clear that these acellular biologic tissue scaffolds are incorporating into the host tissue, with resultant revascularization and cellular repopulation. Moving forward, additional investigations examining the effectiveness of acellular biologic tissue scaffolds to improve healing in complex, nondiabetic wounds are warranted.

  18. Evolution and development of the chordates: collagen and pharyngeal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Rychel, Amanda L; Smith, Shannon E; Shimamoto, Heather T; Swalla, Billie J

    2006-03-01

    Chordates evolved a unique body plan within deuterostomes and are considered to share five morphological characters, a muscular postanal tail, a notochord, a dorsal neural tube, an endostyle, and pharyngeal gill slits. The phylum Chordata typically includes three subphyla, Cephalochordata, Vertebrata, and Tunicata, the last showing a chordate body plan only as a larva. Hemichordates, in contrast, have pharyngeal gill slits, an endostyle, and a postanal tail but appear to lack a notochord and dorsal neural tube. Because hemichordates are the sister group of echinoderms, the morphological features shared with the chordates must have been present in the deuterostome ancestor. No extant echinoderms share any of the chordate features, so presumably they have lost these structures evolutionarily. We review the development of chordate characters in hemichordates and present new data characterizing the pharyngeal gill slits and their cartilaginous gill bars. We show that hemichordate gill bars contain collagen and proteoglycans but are acellular. Hemichordates and cephalochordates, or lancelets, show strong similarities in their gill bars, suggesting that an acellular cartilage may have preceded cellular cartilage in deuterostomes. Our evidence suggests that the deuterostome ancestor was a benthic worm with gill slits and acellular gill cartilages.

  19. Discontinuities in the endothelium of epiphyseal cartilage canals and relevance to joint disease in foals.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Ingunn Risnes; Ekman, Stina; Hultenby, Kjell; Dolvik, Nils Ivar; Olstad, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage canals have been shown to contain discontinuous blood vessels that enable circulating bacteria to bind to cartilage matrix, leading to vascular occlusion and associated pathological changes in pigs and chickens. It is also inconsistently reported that cartilage canals are surrounded by a cellular or acellular wall that may influence whether bacterial binding can occur. It is not known whether equine cartilage canals contain discontinuous endothelium or are surrounded by a wall. This study aimed to examine whether there were discontinuities in the endothelium of cartilage canal vessels, and whether canals had a cellular or acellular wall, in the epiphyseal growth cartilage of foals. Epiphyseal growth cartilage from the proximal third of the medial trochlear ridge of the distal femur from six healthy foals that were 1, 24, 35, 47, 118 and 122 days old and of different breeds and sexes was examined by light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunohistochemistry. The majority of patent cartilage canals contained blood vessels that were lined by a thin layer of continuous endothelium. Fenestrations were found in two locations in one venule in a patent cartilage canal located deep in the growth cartilage and close to the ossification front in the 118-day-old foal. Chondrifying cartilage canals in all TEM-examined foals contained degenerated endothelial cells that were detached from the basement membrane, resulting in gap formation. Thirty-three percent of all canals were surrounded by a hypercellular rim that was interpreted as contribution of chondrocytes to growth cartilage. On LM, 69% of all cartilage canals were surrounded by a ring of matrix that stained intensely eosinophilic and consisted of collagen fibres on TEM that were confirmed to be collagen type I by immunohistochemistry. In summary, two types of discontinuity were observed in the endothelium of equine epiphyseal cartilage canal vessels: fenestrations were observed in

  20. Articular cartilage biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, K.E.; Schleyerbach, R.; Hascall, V.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: Cartilage Matrix Components; Biosynthesis and Characterization of Cartilage--Specific Matrix Components and Events; Cartilage Metabolism; In Vitro Studies of Articular Cartilage Metabolism; Normal and Pathologic Metabolism of Cartilage; and Destruction of the Articular Cartilage in Rheumatoid Diseases. Some of the paper topics are: magnetic resonance imaging; joint destruction; age-related changes; proteoglycan structure; and biosynthesis of cartilage proteoglycan.

  1. In vitro assessment of biodurability: acellular systems.

    PubMed Central

    de Meringo, A; Morscheidt, C; Thélohan, S; Tiesler, H

    1994-01-01

    The assessment of biodurability of man-made vitreous fibers is essential to the limitation of health hazards associated with human exposure to environments in which respirable fibers are present. In vitro acellular systems provide effective test methods of measuring fiber solubility provided care is taken to select the most suitable solvent and test conditions for the specific fiber type and dimension. PMID:7882955

  2. Data from acellular human heart matrix.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Espinosa, M Angeles; González-Nicolas, M Angeles; Acebes, Judith R; Costanza, Salvatore; Moscoso, Isabel; Rodríguez, Hugo; García, Julio; Romero, Jesús; Kren, Stefan M; Bermejo, Javier; Yotti, Raquel; Del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Elizaga, Jaime; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Perfusion decellularization of cadaveric hearts removes cells and generates a cell-free extracellular matrix scaffold containing acellular vascular conduits, which are theoretically sufficient to perfuse and support tissue-engineered heart constructs. This article contains additional data of our experience decellularizing and testing structural integrity and composition of a large series of human hearts, "Acellular human heart matrix: a critical step toward whole heat grafts" (Sanchez et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide the information about the heart decellularization technique, the valve competence evaluation of the decellularized scaffolds, the integrity evaluation of epicardial and myocardial coronary circulation, the pressure volume measurements, the primers used to assess cardiac muscle gene expression and, the characteristics of donors, donor hearts, scaffolds and perfusion decellularization process.

  3. Automatic detection of diseased regions in knee cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, Arish A.; Dam, Erik B.; Olsen, Ole F.; Nielsen, Mads; Christiansen, Claus

    2007-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by articular cartilage degradation. A central problem in clinical trials is quantification of progression and early detection of the disease. The accepted standard for evaluating OA progression is to measure the joint space width from radiographs however; there the cartilage is not visible. Recently cartilage volume and thickness measures from MRI are becoming popular, but these measures don't account for the biochemical changes undergoing in the cartilage before cartilage loss even occurs and therefore are not optimal for early detection of OA. As a first step, we quantify cartilage homogeneity (computed as the entropy of the MR intensities) from 114 automatically segmented medial compartments of tibial cartilage sheets from Turbo 3D T 1 sequences, from subjects with no, mild or severe OA symptoms. We show that homogeneity is a more sensitive technique than volume quantification for detecting early OA and for separating healthy individuals from diseased. During OA certain areas of the cartilage are affected more and it is believed that these are the load-bearing regions located at the center of the cartilage. Based on the homogeneity framework we present an automatic technique that partitions the region on the cartilage that contributes to maximum homogeneity discrimination. These regions however, are more towards the noncentral regions of the cartilage. Our observation will provide valuable clues to OA research and may lead to improving treatment efficacy.

  4. Chondrogenesis of Human Infrapatellar Fat Pad Stem Cells on Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ken; Traianedes, Kathy; Choong, Peter F. M.; Myers, Damian E.

    2016-01-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has been in clinical use for decades in numerous surgical applications. The ability for ADM to promote cellular repopulation, revascularisation and tissue regeneration is well documented. Adipose stem cells have the ability to differentiate into mesenchymal tissue types, including bone and cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential interaction between ADM and adipose stem cells in vitro using TGFβ3 and BMP6. Human infrapatellar fat pad-derived adipose stem cells (IPFP-ASC) were cultured with ADM derived from rat dermis in chondrogenic (TGFβ3 and BMP6) medium in vitro for 2 and 4 weeks. Histology, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry were performed to assess for markers of chondrogenesis (collagen Type II, SOX9 and proteoglycans). At 4 weeks, cell-scaffold constructs displayed cellular changes consistent with chondrogenesis, with evidence of stratification of cell layers and development of a hyaline-like cartilage layer superficially, which stained positively for collagen Type II and proteoglycans. Significant cell–matrix interaction was seen between the cartilage layer and the ADM itself with seamless integration between each layer. Real time qPCR showed significantly increased COL2A1, SOX9, and ACAN gene expression over 4 weeks when compared to control. COL1A2 gene expression remained unchanged over 4 weeks. We believe that the principles that make ADM versatile and successful for tissue regeneration are applicable to cartilage regeneration. This study demonstrates in vitro the ability for IPFP-ASCs to undergo chondrogenesis, infiltrate, and interact with ADM. These outcomes serve as a platform for in vivo modelling of ADM for cartilage repair. PMID:26858950

  5. Laser shaping of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil N.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Helidonis, Emmanuel S.; Kavvalos, George; Christodoulou, P. N.; Naoumidi, I.; Velegrakis, G.; Ovchinnikov, Yuriy M.; Shechter, A.

    1994-09-01

    The carbon dioxide laser has been used for the first time to change the cartilage's shape. After the laser irradiation the cartilage has the tendency to retain its new form. Different types of laser modified cartilage structures were studied. The inferred physical mechanism for cartilage shaping using the stresses relaxation process is presented. The clinical significance of the results for corrective laser surgery is discussed.

  6. Acellular organ scaffolds for tumor tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guller, Anna; Trusova, Inna; Petersen, Elena; Shekhter, Anatoly; Kurkov, Alexander; Qian, Yi; Zvyagin, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Rationale: Tissue engineering (TE) is an emerging alternative approach to create models of human malignant tumors for experimental oncology, personalized medicine and drug discovery studies. Being the bottom-up strategy, TE provides an opportunity to control and explore the role of every component of the model system, including cellular populations, supportive scaffolds and signalling molecules. Objectives: As an initial step to create a new ex vivo TE model of cancer, we optimized protocols to obtain organ-specific acellular matrices and evaluated their potential as TE scaffolds for culture of normal and tumor cells. Methods and results: Effective decellularization of animals' kidneys, ureter, lungs, heart, and liver has been achieved by detergent-based processing. The obtained scaffolds demonstrated biocompatibility and growthsupporting potential in combination with normal (Vero, MDCK) and tumor cell lines (C26, B16). Acellular scaffolds and TE constructs have been characterized and compared with morphological methods. Conclusions: The proposed methodology allows creation of sustainable 3D tumor TE constructs to explore the role of organ-specific cell-matrix interaction in tumorigenesis.

  7. Immunology and cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin; Sigal, Ian R; Grande, Daniel A

    2015-12-01

    The intrinsic regenerative capacity of avascular cartilage is limited. Cartilage injuries result in chronic, non-healing lesions requiring surgical management. Frequently, these surgical techniques make use of allogeneic cells and tissues. This review discusses the immune status of these materials. Cartilage allografts, often used in orthopedic and plastic surgeries, have rarely provoked a significant immune response. In whole cartilage transplants, the dense matrix produced by chondrocytes inhibits lymphocyte migration, preventing immune detection rendering them "antigen sequestered." It is unclear whether isolated chondrocytes are immune-privileged; chondrocytes express immune inhibitory B7 molecules, indicating that they have some ability to modulate immune reactions. Allogeneic cartilage grafts often involve a bony portion often retaining immunogenic cells and proteins-to facilitate good surgical attachment and concern that this may enhance inflammation and immune rejection. However, studies of failed cartilage grafts have not found immune responses to be a contributing factor. Meniscus allografts, which also retain a bony portion, raise similar concerns as cartilage allografts. Despite this, the plugs improved patient outcomes, indicating that the immunological effects were not clinically significant. Finally, allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) also are being investigated as a treatment for cartilage damage. MSCs have been demonstrated to have unique immunomodulatory properties including their ability to reduce immune cell infiltration and to modulate inflammation. In summary, the immunogenic properties of cartilage vary with the type of allograft used: Cartilage allografts demonstrate active immune-suppressive mechanisms as evidenced by lack of allograft rejection, while MSC allografts appear to be safe for transplantation.

  8. Cartilage viability after trochleoplasty.

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Philip B; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg; Weiler, Andreas

    2007-02-01

    Trochleoplasty is an established and accepted technique for the treatment of patellar instability because of a missing trochlear groove. In this technique, a flap of cartilage over the trochlea is carefully removed and a new trochlear groove is created in the underlying bone before the cartilaginous flap is reattached with sutures. The mid-term clinical and radiological results of this operation are promising but no information about the viability of the reattached cartilage has been reported. To evaluate cartilage viability and quality after trochleoplasty and to verify the healing process, two osteochondral biopsies were harvested from three patients 6, 8, and 9 months after trochleoplasty. One cylinder was evaluated histologically to assess cartilage, calcified cartilage (cc), and subchondral bone quality, while the other one was examined by confocal microscopy to evaluate cell viability. The histological examination showed a normal matrix and cell distribution of the cartilage, while the cc showed lacunae ingrowing from the underlying bone. The subchondral bone showed normal lamellae and histology, and the healing of the flap. Confocal microscopy showed almost exclusively viable chondrocytes. This demonstration of non-injured cartilage at short-term follow-up together with promising clinical and radiological 2- and 5-year follow-up results indicate a potential promising outlook for the long term, as further chondral damage is not expected. So trochleoplasty can be seen as a primary intervention for patellar instability because of trochlear dysplasia as the risk for cartilage damage is low.

  9. Cartilage conduction hearing.

    PubMed

    Shimokura, Ryota; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Levitt, Harry

    2014-04-01

    Sound information is known to travel to the cochlea via either air or bone conduction. However, a vibration signal, delivered to the aural cartilage via a transducer, can also produce a clearly audible sound. This type of conduction has been termed "cartilage conduction." The aural cartilage forms the outer ear and is distributed around the exterior half of the external auditory canal. In cartilage conduction, the cartilage and transducer play the roles of a diaphragm and voice coil of a loudspeaker, respectively. There is a large gap between the impedances of cartilage and skull bone, such that cartilage vibrations are not easily transmitted through bone. Thus, these methods of conduction are distinct. In this study, force was used to apply a transducer to aural cartilage, and it was found that the sound in the auditory canal was amplified, especially for frequencies below 2 kHz. This effect was most pronounced at an application force of 1 N, which is low enough to ensure comfort in the design of hearing aids. The possibility of using force adjustments to vary amplification may also have applications for cell phone design.

  10. Cartilage Engineering and Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toffanin, R.; Bader, A.; Cogoli, A.; Carda, C.; Fantazzini, P.; Garrido, L.; Gomez, S.; Hall, L.; Martin, I.; Murano, E.; Poncelet, D.; Pörtner, R.; Hoffmann, F.; Roekaerts, D.; Ronney, P.; Triebel, W.; Tummers, M.

    2005-06-01

    The complex effects of mechanical forces and growth factors on articular cartilage development still need to be investigated in order to identify optimal conditions for articular cartilage repair. Strictly controlled in vitro studies under modelled or space microgravity conditions can improve our understanding of the fundamental role of gravity in articular cartilage development. The main objective of this Topical Team is to use modelled microgravity as a tool to elucidate the fundamental science of cartilage regeneration. Particular attention is, therefore, given to the effects of physical forces under altered gravitational conditions, applied using controlled bioreactor systems, on cell metabolism, cell differentiation and tissue development. Specific attention is also directed toward the potential advantages of using magnetic resonance methods for the non-destructive characterisation of scaffolds, chondrocytes-polymer constructs and tissue engineered cartilage.

  11. Acellular dermal graft reinforcement at the hiatus.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Bruce

    2012-11-01

    The ideal technique to repair large hiatal and diaphragmatic defects remains controversial. Due to high recurrence rates with primary repair alone, attempts at crural reinforcement with various products has been investigated. Initial evaluation of synthetic mesh at the hiatus in retrospective studies led to the conclusion that there were too many serious complications with these products. The next step was to see how biologic grafts fared in this location. Beginning with porcine intestine submucosa in a laminated array and progressing through human and porcine acellular dermal matrices, multiple, retrospective studies looked at the efficacy and safety of these products. Unfortunately, most of these studies evaluated a small sample size with a relatively short follow-up period. The one study followed out to 5 years failed to show any benefit using the biologic (porcine intestinal submucosa) compared with the primary repair alone. Additional, prospective, randomized studies with ample numbers carried out for years will be necessary to see which biologic graft is not only safe but also successful in preventing recurrent herniations.

  12. Semi-automatic knee cartilage segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, Erik B.; Folkesson, Jenny; Pettersen, Paola C.; Christiansen, Claus

    2006-03-01

    Osteo-Arthritis (OA) is a very common age-related cause of pain and reduced range of motion. A central effect of OA is wear-down of the articular cartilage that otherwise ensures smooth joint motion. Quantification of the cartilage breakdown is central in monitoring disease progression and therefore cartilage segmentation is required. Recent advances allow automatic cartilage segmentation with high accuracy in most cases. However, the automatic methods still fail in some problematic cases. For clinical studies, even if a few failing cases will be averaged out in the overall results, this reduces the mean accuracy and precision and thereby necessitates larger/longer studies. Since the severe OA cases are often most problematic for the automatic methods, there is even a risk that the quantification will introduce a bias in the results. Therefore, interactive inspection and correction of these problematic cases is desirable. For diagnosis on individuals, this is even more crucial since the diagnosis will otherwise simply fail. We introduce and evaluate a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method combining an automatic pre-segmentation with an interactive step that allows inspection and correction. The automatic step consists of voxel classification based on supervised learning. The interactive step combines a watershed transformation of the original scan with the posterior probability map from the classification step at sub-voxel precision. We evaluate the method for the task of segmenting the tibial cartilage sheet from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of knees. The evaluation shows that the combined method allows accurate and highly reproducible correction of the segmentation of even the worst cases in approximately ten minutes of interaction.

  13. Three-Dimensional Printing Articular Cartilage: Recapitulating the Complexity of Native Tissue.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Lembong, Josephine; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Fisher, John P

    2016-12-27

    In the past few decades, the field of tissue engineering combined with rapid prototyping (RP) techniques has been successful in creating biological substitutes that mimic tissues. Its applications in regenerative medicine have drawn efforts in research from various scientific fields, diagnostics, and clinical translation to therapies. While some areas of therapeutics are well developed, such as skin replacement, many others such as cartilage repair can still greatly benefit from tissue engineering and RP due to the low success and/or inefficiency of current existing, often surgical treatments. Through fabrication of complex scaffolds and development of advanced materials, RP provides a new avenue for cartilage repair. Computer-aided design and three-dimensional (3D) printing allow the fabrication of modeled cartilage scaffolds for repair and regeneration of damaged cartilage tissues. Specifically, the various processes of 3D printing will be discussed in details, both cellular and acellular techniques, covering the different materials, geometries, and operational printing conditions for the development of tissue-engineered articular cartilage. Finally, we conclude with some insights on future applications and challenges related to this technology, especially using 3D printing techniques to recapitulate the complexity of native structure for advanced cartilage regeneration.

  14. Angiogenic response induced by acellular femoral matrix in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Conconi, Maria Teresa; Nico, Beatrice; Rebuffat, Piera; Crivellato, Enrico; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Ribatti, Domenico

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the angiogenic response induced by acellular femoral matrices implanted in vivo on to the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), a useful model for such investigation. The results showed that acellular matrices were able to induce a strong angiogenic response, comparable with that of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a well-known angiogenic cytokine. The angiogenic response was further increased when exogenous FGF-2 or transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) was added to the matrices and inhibited by the addition of anti-FGF-2 or anti-TGF-β1 antibodies. The response may be considered to be dependent on a direct angiogenic effect exerted by the matrices, and also in part by the presence of FGF-2 and TGF-β1 in the acellular matrices. PMID:16011546

  15. Complications of acellular dermal matrices in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Israeli, Ron

    2012-11-01

    Acellular dermal matrices have been used in breast surgery for a decade. They are widely used in implant-based breast reconstruction to provide coverage of the inferolateral aspects of the prosthesis. Numerous benefits have been reported with this approach including improved fold control, better support and control of the implant pocket with concomitant reduced risk of malposition, and improved lower pole expansion. Seroma, infection, mastectomy skin necrosis, and expander/implant loss are the most commonly reported complications with this approach, and the incidences vary widely among studies. Patient selection and adherence to established intraoperative technique principles related to acellular dermal matrix use are both critical to minimizing the risk of complications. Acellular dermal matrices are also being used in aesthetic breast surgery, revision breast surgery, and nipple reconstruction, but clinical experience is limited. This article reviews the complications associated with the use of matrices in breast surgery from the published literature.

  16. Integration of stem cell-derived exosomes with in situ hydrogel glue as a promising tissue patch for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolin; Yang, Yunlong; Li, Yan; Niu, Xin; Zhao, Bizeng; Wang, Yang; Bao, Chunyan; Xie, Zongping; Lin, Qiuning; Zhu, Linyong

    2017-03-16

    The regeneration of articular cartilage, which scarcely shows innate self-healing ability, is a great challenge in clinical treatment. Stem cell-derived exosomes (SC-Exos), an important type of extracellular nanovesicle, exhibit great potential for cartilage regeneration to replace stem cell-based therapy. Cartilage regeneration often takes a relatively long time and there is currently no effective administration method to durably retain exosomes at cartilage defect sites to effectively exert their reparative effect. Therefore, in this study, we exploited a photoinduced imine crosslinking hydrogel glue, which presents excellent operation ability, biocompatibility and most importantly, cartilage-integration, as an exosome scaffold to prepare an acellular tissue patch (EHG) for cartilage regeneration. It was found that EHG can retain SC-Exos and positively regulate both chondrocytes and hBMSCs in vitro. Furthermore, EHG can integrate with native cartilage matrix and promote cell deposition at cartilage defect sites, finally resulting in the promotion of cartilage defect repair. The EHG tissue patch therefore provides a novel, cell-free scaffold material for wound repair.

  17. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  18. Evaluation of lymphangiogenesis in acellular dermal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Cherubino, Mario; Pellegatta, Igor; Tamborini, Federico; Cerati, Michele; Sessa, Fausto; Valdatta, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Much attention has been directed towards understanding the phenomena of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in wound healing. Thanks to the manifold dermal substitute available nowadays, wound treatment has improved greatly. Many studies have been published about angiogenesis and cell invasion in INTEGRA®. On the other hand, the development of the lymphatic network in acellular dermal matrix (ADM) is a more obscure matter. In this article, we aim to characterize the different phases of host cell invasion in ADM. Special attention was given to lymphangiogenic aspects. Materials and Methods: Among 57 rats selected to analyse the role of ADM in lymphangiogenesis, we created four groups. We performed an excision procedure on both thighs of these rats: On the left one we did not perform any action except repairing the borders of the wound; while on the right one we used INTEGRA® implant. The excision biopsy was performed at four different times: First group after 7 days, second after 14 days, third after 21 days and fourth after 28 days. For our microscopic evaluation, we used the classical staining technique of haematoxylin and eosin and a semi-quantitative method in order to evaluate cellularity counts. To assess angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis development we employed PROX-1 Ab and CD31/PECAM for immunohistochemical analysis. Results: We found remarkable wound contraction in defects that healed by secondary intention while minor wound contraction was observed in defects treated with ADM. At day 7, optical microscopy revealed a more plentiful cellularity in the granulation tissue compared with the dermal regeneration matrix. The immunohistochemical process highlighted vascular and lymphatic cells in both groups. After 14 days a high grade of fibrosis was noticeable in the non-treated group. At day 21, both lymphatic and vascular endothelial cells were better developed in the group with a dermal matrix application. At day 28, lymphatic endothelial

  19. Relationship of immunogenicity to protective potency in acellular pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xing, Dorothy; Asokanathan, Catpagavalli; Xu, Ying Hua; Bolgiano, Barbara; Douglas-Bardsley, Alex; Zhang, Shumin; Wang, Junzhi; Corbel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the immunogenicity response and resistance to challenge in the modified intracerebral challenge assay induced by various acellular pertussis vaccines showed that these were not closely linked. The immunogenicity assay was effective for confirming the presence of specific antigenic components and was invaluable for detecting minor components present in co-purified vaccines. However, the magnitude of antibody responses was not consistently related to antigen concentration nor did it correlate with protection in the modified intracerebral challenge assay. The immunogenicity assay detected degradation of pertussis toxin and pertactin components but not of filamentous haemagglutinin or fimbriae 2 and 3 in denatured acellular pertussis vaccines. The modified intracerebral challenge assay was effective in detecting antigen degradation in all types of acellular pertussis vaccines including those of European/North American origin but was dominated by the response to pertussis toxin. Aerosol challenge was more sensitive in detecting denaturation of filamentous haemagglutinin or fimbriae. The modified intracerebral challenge assay was the only assay that provided a quantitative indication of protective activity. Both immunogenicity and challenge assays provided useful data on acellular pertussis vaccine properties but were complementary and not alternatives.

  20. Relationship of immunogenicity to protective potency in acellular pertussis vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Dorothy; Asokanathan, Catpagavalli; Xu, Ying Hua; Bolgiano, Barbara; Douglas-Bardsley, Alex; Zhang, Shumin; Wang, Junzhi; Corbel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the immunogenicity response and resistance to challenge in the modified intracerebral challenge assay induced by various acellular pertussis vaccines showed that these were not closely linked. The immunogenicity assay was effective for confirming the presence of specific antigenic components and was invaluable for detecting minor components present in co-purified vaccines. However, the magnitude of antibody responses was not consistently related to antigen concentration nor did it correlate with protection in the modified intracerebral challenge assay. The immunogenicity assay detected degradation of pertussis toxin and pertactin components but not of filamentous haemagglutinin or fimbriae 2 and 3 in denatured acellular pertussis vaccines. The modified intracerebral challenge assay was effective in detecting antigen degradation in all types of acellular pertussis vaccines including those of European/North American origin but was dominated by the response to pertussis toxin. Aerosol challenge was more sensitive in detecting denaturation of filamentous haemagglutinin or fimbriae. The modified intracerebral challenge assay was the only assay that provided a quantitative indication of protective activity. Both immunogenicity and challenge assays provided useful data on acellular pertussis vaccine properties but were complementary and not alternatives. PMID:25424817

  1. Articular Cartilage Injury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Mithoefer, Kai; Scopp, Jason M.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the athletic population are observed with increasing frequency and, due to limited intrinsic healing capacity, can lead to progressive pain and functional limitation over time. If left untreated, isolated cartilage lesions can lead to progressive chondropenia or global cartilage loss over time. A chondropenia curve is described to help predict the outcome of cartilage injury based on different lesion and patient characteristics. Nutriceuticals and chondroprotective agents are being investigated as tools to slow the development of chondropenia. Several operative techniques have been described for articular cartilage repair or replacement and, more recently, cartilage regeneration. Rehabilitation guidelines are being developed to meet the needs of these new techniques. Next-generation techniques are currently evaluated to optimize articular cartilage repair biology and to provide a repair cartilage tissue that can withstand the high mechanical loads experienced by the athlete with consistent long-term durability. PMID:26069548

  2. In vivo construction of tissue-engineered cartilage using adipose-derived stem cells and bioreactor technology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongjun; Lu, Shibi; Peng, Jiang; Yang, Qiang; Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jingxiang; Sui, Xiang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Aiyuan; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi; Song, Qing

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to investigate the feasibility of tissue-engineered cartilage constructed in vivo and in vitro by dynamically culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) with an articular cartilage acellular matrix in a bioreactor and subsequently implanting the cartilage in nude mice. ADSCs were proliferated, combined with three dimensional scaffolds (cell density: 5 × 10(7)/mL) and subsequently placed in a bioreactor and culture plate for 3 weeks. In the in vivo study, complexes cultured for 1 week under dynamic or static states were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice and collected after 3 weeks. Indicators such as gross morphology, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry were examined. In the in vitro study, histological observation showed that most scaffolds in the dynamic group were absorbed, and cell proliferation and matrix secretion were significant. Positive staining of safranin-O and alcian blue II collagen stain in the dynamic group was significantly stronger than that in the static culture group. In the in vivo study, cartilage-like tissues formed in the specimens of the two groups. Histological examination showed that cell distribution in the dynamic group was relatively more uniform than in the static group, and matrix secretion was relatively stronger. Bioreactor culturing can promote ADSC proliferation and cartilage differentiation and is thus a suitable method for constructing tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  3. Costal Cartilage Grafts in Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Fedok, Fred G

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage grafts are regularly used in rhinoplasty. Septal and auricular donor sites are commonly used. Many situations compel the surgeon to use other alternative donor sites, including revision rhinoplasty and trauma. Many patients have a small amount of native septal cartilage and are unable to provide adequate septal cartilage to be used for frequently performed rhinoplasty maneuvers. The rib cage provides an enormous reserve of costal cartilage that can be carved into a variety of necessary grafts. A description of the technique of harvesting costal cartilage, a review of complications and management, and illustrative cases examples are included.

  4. Tetanus–diphtheria–acellular pertussis vaccination for adults: an update

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although tetanus and diphtheria have become rare in developed countries, pertussis is still endemic in some developed countries. These are vaccine-preventable diseases and vaccination for adults is important to prevent the outbreak of disease. Strategies for tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis vaccines vary from country to country. Each country needs to monitor consistently epidemiology of the diseases and changes vaccination policies accordingly. Recent studies showed that tetanus–diphtheria–acellular pertussis vaccine for adults is effective and safe to prevent pertussis disease in infants. However, vaccine coverage still remains low than expected and seroprevalence of protective antibodies levels for tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis decline with aging. The importance of tetanus–diphtheria–acellular pertussis vaccine administration should be emphasized for the protection of young adult and elderly people also, not limited to children. PMID:28168170

  5. Cartilage hair hypoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Siggers, D. C.; Burke, J. B.; Morris, B.; Normand, I. C.; Tanner, J. M.; Williamson, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Six cases of cartilage hair hypoplasia from five kindreds are described. They demonstrate variation in the expression of clinical features such as sparsity of hair, hair calibre, radiological changes, short stature and the extent of the disproportion between sitting height and stature. Images Figs. 1-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917962

  6. Chondroptosis in Alkaptonuric Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Millucci, Lia; Giorgetti, Giovanna; Viti, Cecilia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Gambassi, Silvia; Braconi, Daniela; Marzocchi, Barbara; Paffetti, Alessandro; Lupetti, Pietro; Bernardini, Giulia; Orlandini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease that affects the entire joint. Current standard of treatment is palliative and little is known about AKU physiopathology. Chondroptosis, a peculiar type of cell death in cartilage, has been so far reported to occur in osteoarthritis, a rheumatic disease that shares some features with AKU. In the present work, we wanted to assess if chondroptosis might also occur in AKU. Electron microscopy was used to detect the morphological changes of chondrocytes in damaged cartilage distinguishing apoptosis from its variant termed chondroptosis. We adopted histological observation together with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy to evaluate morphological cell changes in AKU chondrocytes. Lipid peroxidation in AKU cartilage was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Using the above‐mentioned techniques, we performed a morphological analysis and assessed that AKU chondrocytes undergo phenotypic changes and lipid oxidation, resulting in a progressive loss of articular cartilage structure and function, showing typical features of chondroptosis. To the best of our knowledge, AKU is the second chronic pathology, following osteoarthritis, where chondroptosis has been documented. Our results indicate that Golgi complex plays an important role in the apoptotic process of AKU chondrocytes and suggest a contribution of chondroptosis in AKU pathogenesis. These findings also confirm a similarity between osteoarthritis and AKU. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 1148–1157, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25336110

  7. The bioactivity of cartilage extracellular matrix in articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Amanda J; Converse, Gabriel L; Hopkins, Richard A; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-01-07

    Cartilage matrix is a promising material for cartilage regeneration given the evidence supporting its chondroinductive character. The "raw materials" of cartilage matrix can serve as building blocks and signals for tissue regeneration. These matrices can be created by chemical or physical processing: physical methods disrupt cellular membranes and nuclei but may not fully remove all cell components and DNA, whereas chemical methods combined with physical methods are effective in fully decellularizing such materials. It is important to delineate between the sources of the cartilage matrix, that is, derived from matrix in vitro or from native tissue, and then to further characterize the cartilage matrix based on the processing method, decellularization or devitalization. With these distinctions, four types of cartilage matrices exist: decellularized native cartilage (DCC), devitalized native cartilage (DVC), decellularized cell-derived matrix (DCCM), and devitalized cell-derived matrix (DVCM). One currently marketed cartilage matrix device is decellularized, although trends in patents suggest additional decellularized products may be available in the future. To identify the most relevant source and processing for cartilage matrix, testing needs to include targeting the desired application, optimizing delivery of the material, identify relevant FDA regulations, assess availability of materials, and immunogenic properties of the product.

  8. The cartilage-bone interface.

    PubMed

    Hoemann, Caroline D; Lafantaisie-Favreau, Charles-Hubert; Lascau-Coman, Viorica; Chen, Gaoping; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica

    2012-05-01

    In the knee joint, the purpose of the cartilage-bone interface is to maintain structural integrity of the osteochondral unit during walking, kneeling, pivoting, and jumping--during which tensile, compressive, and shear forces are transmitted from the viscoelastic articular cartilage layer to the much stiffer mineralized end of the long bone. Mature articular cartilage is integrated with subchondral bone through a approximately 20 to approximately 250 microm thick layer of calcified cartilage. Inside the calcified cartilage layer, perpendicular chondrocyte-derived collagen type II fibers become structurally cemented to collagen type I osteoid deposited by osteoblasts. The mature mineralization front is delineated by a thin approximately 5 microm undulating tidemark structure that forms at the base of articular cartilage. Growth plate cartilage is anchored to epiphyseal bone, sometimes via a thin layer of calcified cartilage and tidemark, while the hypertrophic edge does not form a tidemark and undergoes continual vascular invasion and endochondral ossification (EO) until skeletal maturity upon which the growth plates are fully resorbed and replaced by bone. In this review, the formation of the cartilage-bone interface during skeletal development and cartilage repair, and its structure and composition are presented. Animal models and human anatomical studies show that the tidemark is a dynamic structure that forms within a purely collagen type II-positive and collagen type I-negative hyaline cartilage matrix. Cartilage repair strategies that elicit fibrocartilage, a mixture of collagen type I and type II, are predicted to show little tidemark/calcified cartilage regeneration and to develop a less stable repair tissue-bone interface. The tidemark can be regenerated through a bone marrow-driven growth process of EO near the articular surface.

  9. Biochemical composition of the superficial layer of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Crockett, R; Grubelnik, A; Roos, S; Dora, C; Born, W; Troxler, H

    2007-09-15

    To gain more information on the mechanism of lubrication in articular joints, the superficial layer of bovine articular cartilage was mechanically removed in a sheet of ice that formed on freezing the cartilage. Freeze-dried samples contained low concentrations of chondroitin sulphate and protein. Analysis of the protein by SDS PAGE showed that the composition of the sample was comparable to that of synovial fluid (SF). Attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy of the dried residue indicated that the sample contained mostly hyaluronan. Moreover, ATR-IR spectroscopy of the upper layer of the superficial layer, adsorbed onto silicon, showed the presence of phospholipids. A gel could be formed by mixing hyaluronan and phosphatidylcholine in water with mechanical properties similar to those of the superficial layer on cartilage. Much like the superficial layer of natural cartilage, the surface of this gel became hydrophobic on drying out. Thus, it is proposed that the superficial layer forms from hyaluronan and phospholipids, which associate by hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl chains of the phospholipids and the hydrophobic faces of the disaccharide units in hyaluronan. This layer is permeable to material from the SF and the cartilage, as shown by the presence of SF proteins and chondroitin sulphate. As the cartilage dries out after removal from the joint, the phospholipids migrate towards the surface of the superficial layer to reduce the surface tension. It is also proposed that the highly efficient lubrication in articular joints can, at least in part, be attributed to the ability of the superficial layer to adsorb and hold water on the cartilage surface, thus creating a highly viscous boundary protection.

  10. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  11. Signaling Pathways in Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Erminia; Pulsatelli, Lia; Facchini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In adult healthy cartilage, chondrocytes are in a quiescent phase characterized by a fine balance between anabolic and catabolic activities. In ageing, degenerative joint diseases and traumatic injuries of cartilage, a loss of homeostatic conditions and an up-regulation of catabolic pathways occur. Since cartilage differentiation and maintenance of homeostasis are finely tuned by a complex network of signaling molecules and biophysical factors, shedding light on these mechanisms appears to be extremely relevant for both the identification of pathogenic key factors, as specific therapeutic targets, and the development of biological approaches for cartilage regeneration. This review will focus on the main signaling pathways that can activate cellular and molecular processes, regulating the functional behavior of cartilage in both physiological and pathological conditions. These networks may be relevant in the crosstalk among joint compartments and increased knowledge in this field may lead to the development of more effective strategies for inducing cartilage repair. PMID:24837833

  12. Cartilage analysis by reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laun, T.; Muenzer, M.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    A cartilage bioreactor with analytical functions for cartilage quality monitoring is being developed. For determining cartilage composition, reflection spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral region is evaluated. Main goal is the determination of the most abundant cartilage compounds water, collagen I and collagen II. Therefore VIS and NIR reflection spectra of different cartilage samples of cow, pig and lamb are recorded. Due to missing analytical instrumentation for identifying the cartilage composition of these samples, typical literature concentration values are used for the development of chemometric models. In spite of these limitations the chemometric models provide good cross correlation results for the prediction of collagen I and II and water concentration based on the visible and the NIR reflection spectra.

  13. MRI based knee cartilage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Dirk-Jan; Kowalski, Przemyslaw; Tekieli, Wojciech; Reeuwijk, Els; Saris, Daniel; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2012-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of pain and disability worldwide and a major health problem in developed countries due to the gradually aging population. Though the symptoms are easily recognized and described by a patient, it is difficult to assess the level of damage or loss of articular cartilage quantitatively. We present a novel method for fully automated knee cartilage thickness measurement and subsequent assessment of the knee joint. First, the point correspondence between a pre-segmented training bone model is obtained with use of Shape Context based non-rigid surface registration. Then, a single Active Shape Model (ASM) is used to segment both Femur and Tibia bone. The surfaces obtained are processed to extract the Bone-Cartilage Interface (BCI) points, where the proper segmentation of cartilage begins. For this purpose, the cartilage ASM is trained with cartilage edge positions expressed in 1D coordinates at the normals in the BCI points. The whole cartilage model is then constructed from the segmentations obtained in the previous step. An absolute thickness of the segmented cartilage is measured and compared to the mean of all training datasets, giving as a result the relative thickness value. The resulting cartilage structure is visualized and related to the segmented bone. In this way the condition of the cartilage is assessed over the surface. The quality of bone and cartilage segmentation is validated and the Dice's coefficients 0.92 and 0.86 for Femur and Tibia bones and 0.45 and 0.34 for respective cartilages are obtained. The clinical diagnostic relevance of the obtained thickness mapping is being evaluated retrospectively. We hope to validate it prospectively for prediction of clinical outcome the methods require improvements in accuracy and robustness.

  14. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  15. Whooping cough, twenty years from acellular vaccines introduction.

    PubMed

    Greco, D; Esposito, S; Tozzi, A; Pandolfi, E; Icardi, G; Giammanco, A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical pertussis resulting from infection with B. pertussis is a significant medical and public health problem, despite the huge success of vaccination that has greatly reduced its incidence. The whole cell vaccine had an undeniable success over the last 50 years, but its acceptance was strongly inhibited by fear, only partially justified, of severe side effects, but also, in the Western world, by the difficulty to enter in combination with other vaccines: today multi-vaccine formulations are essential to maintain a high vaccination coverage. The advent of acellular vaccines was greeted with enthusiasm by the public health world: in the Nineties, several controlled vaccine trials were carried out: they demonstrated a high safety and good efficacy of new vaccines. In fact, in the Western world, the acellular vaccines completely replaced the whole cells ones. In the last years, ample evidence on the variety of protection of these vaccines linked to the presence of different antigens of Bordetella pertussis was collected. It also became clear that the protection provided, on average around 80%, leaves every year a significant cohort of vaccinated susceptible even in countries with a vaccination coverage of 95%, such as Italy. Finally, it was shown that, as for the pertussis disease, protection decreases over time, to leave a proportion of adolescents and adults unprotected. Waiting for improved pertussis vaccines, the disease control today requires a different strategy that includes a booster at 5 years for infants, but also boosters for teenagers and young adults, re-vaccination of health care personnel, and possibly of pregnant women and of those who are in contact with infants (cocooning). Finally, the quest for better vaccines inevitably tends towards pertussis acellular vaccines with at least three components, which have demonstrated superior effectiveness and have been largely in use in Italy for fifteen years.

  16. Porosity of porcine bladder acellular matrix: impact of ACM thickness.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Walid; Chen, Jun; Erdeljan, Petar; Shemtov, Oren; Courtman, David; Khoury, Antoine; Yeger, Herman

    2003-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to examine the porosity of bladder acellular matrix (ACM) using deionized (DI) water as the model fluid and dextran as the indicator macromolecule, and to correlate the porosity to the ACM thickness. Porcine urinary bladders from pigs weighing 20-50 kg were sequentially extracted in detergent containing solutions, and to modify the ACM thickness, stretched bladders were acellularized in the same manner. Luminal and abluminal ACM specimens were subjected to fixed static DI water pressure (10 cm); and water passing through the specimens was collected at specific time interval. While for the macromolecule porosity testing, the diffusion rate and direction of 10,000 MW fluoroescein-labeled dextrans across the ACM specimens mounted in Ussing's chambers were measured. Both experiments were repeated on the thin stretched ACM. In both ACM types, the fluid porosity in both directions did not decrease with increased test duration (3 h); in addition, the abluminal surface was more porous to fluid than the luminal surface. On the other hand, when comparing thin to thick ACM, the porosity in either direction was higher in the thick ACM. Macromolecule porosity, as measured by absorbance, was higher for the abluminal thick ACM than the luminal side, but this characteristic was reversed in the thin ACM. Comparing thin to thick ACM, the luminal side in the thin ACM was more porous to dextran than in the thick ACM, but this characteristic was reversed for the abluminal side. The porcine bladder ACM possesses directional porosity and acellularizing stretched urinary bladders may increase structural density and alter fluid and macromolecule porosity.

  17. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket(®) regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM.

  18. Wound healing effect of acellular artificial dermis containing extracellular matrix secreted by human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young-Kwon; Song, Kye-Yong; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Jung-Keug

    2007-07-01

    In this study, an acellular artificial dermis, composed of human collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) secreted by cultured human fibroblasts on a bovine collagen sponge, was developed. Much of the newly secreted extracellular matrix (ECM) remained after the cell removal process. The main theme of this study focused on the matrix, rather than the viable cell components of the skin, as the major dermal deficit in the wound. Both the acellular artificial and bioartificial dermises, containing viable cells with ECM, were significantly less soluble than the collagen sponge, and the relative GAG content in the bioartificial and acellular artificial dermises was approximately 115-120% of the chondroitin-6-sulfate (CS) content found in the collagen sponge. In the group receiving the collagen sponge, the wound area gradually decreased to approximately 10% of its original area, while in the groups receiving the bioartificial and acellular artificial dermises, the wound area also gradually decreased to approximately 60 and 50%, respectively, of the original size over the 5 weeks after grafting. Both the bioartificial and acellular artificial dermises formed thicker, denser collagen fibers; more new blood vessel formation was observed in both cases. The basement membrane of the regenerated epidermal-dermal junction was thicker and more linear in the acellular artificial dermis graft than in the collagen sponge graft. In conclusion, the wound healing effects of acellular artificial dermis are no less than those of the bioartificial dermis, and much better than the collagen sponge graft with respect to wound contraction, angiogenesis, collagen formation, and basement membrane repair.

  19. Patellofemoral relationships and cartilage breakdown.

    PubMed

    Harilainen, A; Lindroos, M; Sandelin, J; Tallroth, K; Kujala, U M

    2005-03-01

    We evaluated the association between patellofemoral relationships and cartilage lesions in patients (age range 15-49) with anterior knee pain without patellar dislocation (n = 24) and in patients with isolated meniscal rupture without a high energy trauma (n = 21). The position of the patella was assessed from knee radiographs, and cartilage lesion was graded and mapped at arthroscopy. In subjects with lateral patellar cartilage lesion the patella tilted laterally (p < 0.01) and was clearly laterally displaced (p < 0.001), compared to those without patellar cartilage lesion. In subjects with central patellar cartilage lesion the patella located high according to the Insall-Salvati index (p < 0.01) and was somewhat laterally displaced (p < 0.05). Compared to subjects without cartilage lesion in the femoral trochlea, the patella was laterally displaced in subjects with lesion in the lateral trochlea (p < 0.001). In conclusion, our results suggest that specific malalignments predispose to patellofemoral cartilage lesion, but prospective studies are needed to confirm the finding.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds promise for the treatment of damaged and diseased tissues, especially for those tissues that do not undergo repair and regeneration readily in situ. Many techniques are available for cell and tissue culturing and differentiation of chondrocytes using a variety of cell types, differentiation methods, and scaffolds. In each case, it is critical to demonstrate the cellular phenotype and tissue composition, with particular attention to the extracellular matrix molecules that play a structural role and that contribute to the mechanical properties of the resulting tissue construct. Mass spectrometry provides an ideal analytical method with which to characterize the full spectrum of proteins produced by tissue-engineered cartilage. Using normal cartilage tissue as a standard, tissue-engineered cartilage can be optimized according to the entire proteome. Proteomic analysis is a complementary approach to biochemical, immunohistochemical, and mechanical testing of cartilage constructs. Proteomics is applicable as an analysis approach to most cartilage constructs generated from a variety of cellular sources including primary chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, proteomics can be used to optimize novel scaffolds and bioreactor applications, yielding cartilage tissue with the proteomic profile of natural cartilage.

  1. Novel strategy to engineer trachea cartilage graft with marrow mesenchymal stem cell macroaggregate and hydrolyzable scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liangqi; Wu, Wei; Tuo, Xiaoye; Geng, Wenxin; Zhao, Jie; Wei, Jing; Yan, Xingrong; Yang, Wei; Li, Liwen; Chen, Fulin

    2010-05-01

    Limited donor sites of cartilage and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during expansion, low tissue reconstruction efficiency, and uncontrollable immune reactions to foreign materials are the main obstacles to overcome before cartilage tissue engineering can be widely used in the clinic. In the current study, we developed a novel strategy to fabricate tissue-engineered trachea cartilage grafts using marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) macroaggregates and hydrolyzable scaffold of polylactic acid-polyglycolic acid copolymer (PLGA). Rabbit MSCs were continuously cultured to prepare macroaggregates in sheet form. The macroaggregates were studied for their potential for chondrogenesis. The macroaggregates were wrapped against the PLGA scaffold to make a tubular composite. The composites were incubated in spinner flasks for 4 weeks to fabricate trachea cartilage grafts. Histological observation and polymerase chain reaction array showed that MSC macroaggregates could obtain the optimal chondrogenic capacity under the induction of transforming growth factor-beta. Engineered trachea cartilage consisted of evenly spaced lacunae embedded in a matrix rich in proteoglycans. PLGA scaffold degraded totally during in vitro incubation and the engineered cartilage graft was composed of autologous tissue. Based on this novel, MSC macroaggregate and hydrolyzable scaffold composite strategy, ready-to-implant autologous trachea cartilage grafts could be successfully fabricated. The strategy also had the advantages of high efficiency in cell seeding and tissue regeneration, and could possibly be used in future in vivo experiments.

  2. Recent Advances in MRI of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Garry E.; Chen, Christina A.; Koo, Seungbum; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Bangerter, Neal K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE MRI is the most accurate noninvasive method available to diagnose disorders of articular cartilage. Conventional 2D and 3D approaches show changes in cartilage morphology. Faster 3D imaging methods with isotropic resolution can be reformatted into arbitrary planes for improved detection and visualization of pathology. Unique contrast mechanisms allow us to probe cartilage physiology and detect changes in cartilage macromolecules. CONCLUSION MRI has great promise as a noninvasive comprehensive tool for cartilage evaluation. PMID:19696274

  3. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies.

  4. Microsphere-based scaffolds encapsulating chondroitin sulfate or decellularized cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vineet; Tenny, Kevin M; Barragan, Marilyn; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix materials such as decellularized cartilage (DCC) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) may be attractive chondrogenic materials for cartilage regeneration. The goal of the current study was to investigate the effects of encapsulation of DCC and CS in homogeneous microsphere-based scaffolds, and to test the hypothesis that encapsulation of these extracellular matrix materials would induce chondrogenesis of rat bone marrow stromal cells. Four different types of homogeneous scaffolds were fabricated from microspheres of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid): Blank (poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) only; negative control), transforming growth factor-β3 encapsulated (positive control), DCC encapsulated, and CS encapsulated. These scaffolds were then seeded with rat bone marrow stromal cells and cultured for 6 weeks. The DCC and CS encapsulation altered the morphological features of the microspheres, resulting in higher porosities in these groups. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were impacted due to differences in the degree of sintering, with the CS group exhibiting the highest compressive modulus. Biochemical evidence suggested a mitogenic effect of DCC and CS encapsulation on rat bone marrow stromal cells with the matrix synthesis boosted primarily by the inherently present extracellular matrix components. An important finding was that the cell seeded CS and DCC groups at week 6 had up to an order of magnitude higher glycosaminoglycan contents than their acellular counterparts. Gene expression results indicated a suppressive effect of DCC and CS encapsulation on rat bone marrow stromal cell chondrogenesis with differences in gene expression patterns existing between the DCC and CS groups. Overall, DCC and CS were easily included in microsphere-based scaffolds; however, there is a requirement to further refine their concentrations to achieve the differentiation profiles we seek in vitro. PMID:27358376

  5. Treatment of an 8-mm Myxoma Using Acellular Corneal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyung Sup; Wee, Sung Wook

    2014-01-01

    A myxoma is a benign tumor found in the heart and in various soft tissues; however, a corneal myxoma is rare. A mucinous mass of unknown etiology was observed on the left cornea of a 32-year-old male patient. We performed deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty using acellular corneal tissue and concurrent amniotic membrane transplantation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed vacuolation of the parenchyma and myxoid change in the corneal tissue that occurred in the anterior half of the corneal parenchyma. We identified a myxoid stroma by Alcian blue staining and observed collagen fibers with denatured stroma by Masson trichrome staining. The patient's visual acuity improved from light perception to 20 / 200, and the intraocular pressure remained within the normal range for one year after surgery. The transplanted cornea survived successfully with well-maintained transparency, and recurrence was not observed one year after surgery. PMID:24505204

  6. Polymer Formulations for Cartilage Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowska, Anna; Jasionowski, Marek; Morris, J. E.; Chrisler, William B.; An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, V.

    2001-05-15

    Regeneration of destroyed articular cartilage can be induced by transplantation of cartilage cells into a defect. The best results are obtained with the use of autologus cells. However, obtaining large amounts of autologus cartilage cells causes a problem of creating a large cartilage defect in a donor site. Techniques are currently being developed to harvest a small number of cells and propagate them in vitro. It is a challenging task, however, due to the fact that ordinarily, in a cell culture on flat surfaces, chondrocytes do not maintain their in vivo phenotype and irreversibly diminish or cease the synthesis of aggregating proteoglycans. Therefore, the research is continuing to develop culture conditions for chondrocytes with the preserved phenotype.

  7. Mechanobioreactors for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Weber, Joanna F; Perez, Roman; Waldman, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is an effective method to increase extracellular matrix synthesis and to improve the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs. In this chapter, we describe valuable methods of imposing direct mechanical stimuli (compression or shear) to tissue-engineered cartilage constructs as well as some common analytical methods used to quantify the effects of mechanical stimuli after short-term or long-term loading.

  8. Model-based cartilage thickness measurement in the submillimeter range

    SciTech Connect

    Streekstra, G. J.; Strackee, S. D.; Maas, M.; Wee, R. ter; Venema, H. W.

    2007-09-15

    Current methods of image-based thickness measurement in thin sheet structures utilize second derivative zero crossings to locate the layer boundaries. It is generally acknowledged that the nonzero width of the point spread function (PSF) limits the accuracy of this measurement procedure. We propose a model-based method that strongly reduces PSF-induced bias by incorporating the PSF into the thickness estimation method. We estimated the bias in thickness measurements in simulated thin sheet images as obtained from second derivative zero crossings. To gain insight into the range of sheet thickness where our method is expected to yield improved results, sheet thickness was varied between 0.15 and 1.2 mm with an assumed PSF as present in the high-resolution modes of current computed tomography (CT) scanners [full width at half maximum (FWHM) 0.5-0.8 mm]. Our model-based method was evaluated in practice by measuring layer thickness from CT images of a phantom mimicking two parallel cartilage layers in an arthrography procedure. CT arthrography images of cadaver wrists were also evaluated, and thickness estimates were compared to those obtained from high-resolution anatomical sections that served as a reference. The thickness estimates from the simulated images reveal that the method based on second derivative zero crossings shows considerable bias for layers in the submillimeter range. This bias is negligible for sheet thickness larger than 1 mm, where the size of the sheet is more than twice the FWHM of the PSF but can be as large as 0.2 mm for a 0.5 mm sheet. The results of the phantom experiments show that the bias is effectively reduced by our method. The deviations from the true thickness, due to random fluctuations induced by quantum noise in the CT images, are of the order of 3% for a standard wrist imaging protocol. In the wrist the submillimeter thickness estimates from the CT arthrography images correspond within 10% to those estimated from the anatomical

  9. Overview of cartilage biology and new trends in cartilage stimulation.

    PubMed

    Triche, Rachel; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2013-03-01

    This article reviews the basics of articular cartilage biology, which provide a necessary foundation for understanding the evolving field of articular cartilage injury and repair. The currently popular treatment options for osteochondral injury (microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer system, osteochondral allograft, autologous chondrocyte implantation, and the use of scaffolds with autologous chondrocyte implantation) document the significant advances made in this area in the past 2 decades. Integration of newly available information and technology derived from advances in molecular biology and tissue engineering holds even greater promise for continued advances in optimal management of this challenging problem.

  10. Emergence of scaffold-free approaches for tissue engineering musculoskeletal cartilages.

    PubMed

    DuRaine, Grayson D; Brown, Wendy E; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-03-01

    This review explores scaffold-free methods as an additional paradigm for tissue engineering. Musculoskeletal cartilages-for example articular cartilage, meniscus, temporomandibular joint disc, and intervertebral disc-are characterized by low vascularity and cellularity, and are amenable to scaffold-free tissue engineering approaches. Scaffold-free approaches, particularly the self-assembling process, mimic elements of developmental processes underlying these tissues. Discussed are various scaffold-free approaches for musculoskeletal cartilage tissue engineering, such as cell sheet engineering, aggregation, and the self-assembling process, as well as the availability and variety of cells used. Immunological considerations are of particular importance as engineered tissues are frequently of allogeneic, if not xenogeneic, origin. Factors that enhance the matrix production and mechanical properties of these engineered cartilages are also reviewed, as the fabrication of biomimetically suitable tissues is necessary to replicate function and ensure graft survival in vivo. The concept of combining scaffold-free and scaffold-based tissue engineering methods to address clinical needs is also discussed. Inasmuch as scaffold-based musculoskeletal tissue engineering approaches have been employed as a paradigm to generate engineered cartilages with appropriate functional properties, scaffold-free approaches are emerging as promising elements of a translational pathway not only for musculoskeletal cartilages but for other tissues as well.

  11. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage for orbital reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Linberg, J.V.; Anderson, R.L.; Edwards, J.J.; Panje, W.R.; Bardach, J.

    1980-07-01

    Human costal cartilage is an excellent implant material for orbital and periorbital reconstruction because of its light weight, strength, homogeneous consistency and the ease with which it can be carved. Its use has been limited by the necessity of a separate surgical procedure to obtain the material. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage has been shown to have almost all the autogenous cartilage and is convenient to use. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage transplants do not elicit rejection reactions, resist infection and rarely undergo absorption.

  12. Shark cartilage contains inhibitors of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; Langer, R

    1983-09-16

    Shark cartilage contains a substance that strongly inhibits the growth of new blood vessels toward solid tumors, thereby restricting tumor growth. The abundance of this factor in shark cartilage, in contrast to cartilage from mammalian sources, may make sharks an ideal source of the inhibitor and may help to explain the rarity of neoplasms in these animals.

  13. Porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM): protein expression, mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Walid A; Chen, Jun; Haig, Jennifer; Antoon, Roula; Litman, Jessica; Sherman, Christopher; Derwin, Kathleen; Yeger, Herman

    2008-06-01

    Experimentally, porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM) that mimics extracellular matrix has excellent potential as a bladder substitute. Herein we investigated the spatial localization and expression of different key cellular and extracellular proteins in the ACM; furthermore, we evaluated the inherent mechanical properties of the resultant ACM prior to implantation. Using a proprietary decellularization method, the DNA contents in both ACM and normal bladder were measured; in addition we used immunohistochemistry and western blots to quantify and localize the different cellular and extracellular components, and finally the mechanical testing was performed using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine. The mean DNA content in the ACM was significantly lower in the ACM compared to the bladder. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed that collagen I and IV were preserved in the ACM, but possibly denatured collagen III in the ACM. Furthermore, elastin, laminin and fibronectin were mildly reduced in the ACM. Although the ACM did not exhibit nucleated cells, residual cellular components (actin, myosin, vimentin and others) were still present. There was, on the other hand, no significant difference in the mean stiffness between the ACM and the bladder. Although our decellularization method is effective in removing nuclear material from the bladder while maintaining its inherent mechanical properties, further work is mandatory to determine whether these residual DNA and cellular remnants would lead to any immune reaction, or if the mechanical properties of the ACM are preserved upon implantation and cellularization.

  14. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  15. Management of gingival recession with acellular dermal matrix graft: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, V. R.; Ramakrishnan, T.; Manikandan, D.; Lambodharan, R.; Karthikeyan, B.; Niazi, Thanvir Mohammed; Ulaganathan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Obtaining root coverage has become an important part of periodontal therapy. The aims of this studyare to evaluate the clinical efficacy of acellular dermal matrix graft in the coverage of denuded roots and also to examine the change in the width of keratinized gingiva. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 sites with more than or equal to 2 mm of recession depth were taken into the study, for treatment with acellular dermal matrix graft. The clinical parameters such as recession depth, recession width, width of keratinized gingiva, probing pocket depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured at the baseline, 8th week, and at the end of the study (16th week). The defects were treated with a coronally positioned pedicle graft combined with acellular dermal matrix graft. Results: Out of 20 sites treated with acellular dermal matrix graft, seven sites showed complete root coverage (100%), and the mean root coverage obtained was 73.39%. There was a statistically significant reduction in recession depth, recession width, and probing PD. There was also a statistically significant increase in width of keratinized gingiva and also gain in CAL. The postoperative results were both clinically and statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The results of this study were esthetically acceptable to the patients and clinically acceptable in all cases. From this study, it may be concluded that acellular dermal matrix graft is an excellent substitute for autogenous graft in coverage of denuded roots. PMID:27829749

  16. A new material for tissue engineered vagina reconstruction: Acellular porcine vagina matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Kun; Du, Run-Xuan; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Ming-le; Zhao, Shuo; Huang, Xiang-Hua; Xu, Yan-Fang

    2017-03-10

    Acellular matrix materials have been widely used to repair various tissues and organs. According to the plastic principle, when a part of the body is lost, it should be replaced with a similar material. Therefore, the use of a homologous organ-specific acellular vaginal tissue in vagina reconstruction repair surgery may show good results. However, the acellular vagina matrix (AVM) form large vertebrates is difficult to isolate. In this study, we described a multi-step method to prepare porcine AVM and evaluated the efficacy of acellularization. We also investigated the biomechanical properties, biological activity elements and biocompatibility of the porcine AVM. We then used this material to reconstruct a rat vagina and performed further morphologic and functional analyses. Small intestinal submucosa (SIS), which is a commonly used acellular matrix material, was used in a control group. Histological examination, DNA content analysis and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the decellularization procedure was effective. The AVM had acceptable biomechanical properties and sufficient growth factor production (VEGF, FGF, TGF-β1 and PDGF-BB) compared with that of the SIS. Subcutaneous transplantation in rats showed that the AVM had good biocompatibility. The tissue-engineered vagina using the AVM more resembled normal-appearing tissue than did that using SIS following morphologic and functional analyses. The AVM has great potential for application in vaginal reconstructive surgery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhinoplasty using autologous costal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Nancy; Larocca, Carlos Gil; Aponte, Ciro

    2013-06-01

    Most Latin American patients looking to have a primary septorhinoplasty share common characteristics in relation to an incorrect projection of the nasal tip complex and a low dorsal line. Thus, the frequent use of structural techniques and of surgical enhancement techniques becomes necessary to improve the nasal contour. In cases of secondary septorhinoplasty, it is also usual in our practice not to have sufficient septal cartilage available or with the required quality to give structure and support to the nasal tip complex, handle the nasal dorsum, and simultaneously correct postseptorhinoplasty deformities. For these reasons, in our practice costal cartilage represents an excellent option as autologous graft material. We present our experience using autologous costal cartilage for structural and nonstructural purposes in 286 selected patients who underwent open rhinoplasty between 2004 and 2011. We emphasize preoperative analyses, we discuss the criteria for selecting costal graft as graft material, we show key aspects of the dynamic of the surgery, and we consider the possibility of using autologous costal graft in combination with heterologous grafts. In this work we also establish the disadvantages of costal cartilage as graft material in specific areas of the surgical anatomy of the nose.

  18. Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder and necrosis is a major skeletal problem in broiler breeders since they are maintained for a long time in the farm. The etiology of this disease is not well understood. A field study was conducted to understand the basis of this metabolic disease. Six ...

  19. Asian Rhinoplasty with Rib Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung Ju; Song, Hyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    An Asian rhinoplasty is one of the most popular procedures in plastic surgery. The anatomical characteristics of the Asian nose are quite different from those of other races, including low dorsum height, short columella, a thick soft tissue covering on the tip with flaccid lower lateral cartilage, and a sunken midface with relative protrusion of the mouth due to maxilla or premaxillary retrusion. For augmentation and lengthening of the nose, a silicone implant has been commonly used in Asian countries. However, many patients suffer from silicone-related complications, which induce soft tissue contraction and deform the already fragile nasal structure. Additionally, revision surgery is also increasing in frequency due to greater patient sophistication and higher expectation that the end rhinoplasty result to be more harmonious with the patient's overall facial structure. In these circumstances, a rhinoplasty using autologous rib cartilage, giving strong support and enough amount of the cartilage to correct deformed structure and midface skeletal retrusion. If properly performed with enough experience, a rib cartilage rhinoplasty will provide excellent and long-lasting results with low risk. PMID:26648806

  20. [The effects of exercise on articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Cenk; Sarpel, Yaman; Biçer, O Sunkar

    2007-01-01

    The effect of exercise on articular cartilage has been assessed on animal models and on humans using various imaging techniques. Joint cartilage, whose water content decreases itself thanks to its unique permeable medium, maintains load distribution and joint function together with the synovial fluid under physiologic conditions and sports activities. The adaptive capacity of joint cartilage is limited under various conditions such as excessive load bearing or prolonged immobilization; however, when these factors are reversed deformed cartilage returns to its former state under normal conditions. Due to its adverse effect on joint cartilage, immobilization period following cartilage damage or operation should be as short as possible for wound healing. It is reported that exercise contributes to cartilage healing and reduces risk for injury, and that moderate exercise can even decrease the number of cases requiring arthroplasty. Conversely, excessive (harsh) exercise may be associated with increased cartilage damage or degenerative changes. Despite the presence of osteophytic changes in joint cartilage of athletes performing mild sports activities, these may not result in osteoarthritis due to the adaptive feature of joint cartilage. In contrast, the risk for osteoarthritis is increased in professional sportsmen exposed to acute repetitive impact and torsional loading. This article reviews the influence of controlled, passive-active exercise on healing, and on the development of osteoarthritis and the short- and long-term changes in articular cartilage associated with exercise and participation in sports of different duration and intensity.

  1. Locating articular cartilage in MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik; Pettersen, Paola; Olsen, Ole F.; Nielsen, Mads; Christiansen, Claus

    2005-04-01

    Accurate computation of the thickness of the articular cartilage is of great importance when diagnosing and monitoring the progress of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. A fully automated cartilage assessment method is preferable compared to methods using manual interaction in order to avoid inter- and intra-observer variability. As a first step in the cartilage assessment, we present an automatic method for locating articular cartilage in knee MRI using supervised learning. The next step will be to fit a variable shape model to the cartilage, initiated at the location found using the method presented in this paper. From the model, disease markers will be extracted for the quantitative evaluation of the cartilage. The cartilage is located using an ANN-classifier, where every voxel is classified as cartilage or non-cartilage based on prior knowledge of the cartilage structure. The classifier is tested using leave-one-out-evaluation, and we found the average sensitivity and specificity to be 91.0% and 99.4%, respectively. The center of mass calculated from voxels classified as cartilage are similar to the corresponding values calculated from manual segmentations, which confirms that this method can find a good initial position for a shape model.

  2. Pertactin deficient Bordetella pertussis present a better fitness in mice immunized with an acellular pertussis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hegerle, N; Dore, G; Guiso, N

    2014-11-20

    Bordetella pertussis is the etiologic agent of whooping cough and has been the target of vaccination for over fifty years. The latest strategies include the use of acellular pertussis vaccines that induce specific immunity against few virulence factors amongst which pertactin is included in three and five component acellular pertussis vaccines. Recently, it has been reported that B. pertussis clinical isolates loose the production of this adhesin in regions reaching high vaccine coverage with vaccines targeting this virulence factor. We here demonstrate that isolates not producing pertactin are capable of sustaining longer infection as compared to pertactin producing isolates in an in vivo model of acellular pertussis immunization. Loosing pertactin production might thus provide a selective advantage to these isolates in this background, which could account for the upraise in prevalence of these pertactin deficient isolates in the population.

  3. Acellular comet assay: a tool for assessing variables influencing the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Erin K; McNamee, James P; Prud'homme Lalonde, Louise; Jones, Trevor; Wilkinson, Diana

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an acellular modification to the alkaline comet assay to further evaluate key variables within the assay that may influence the outcome of genotoxicity studies is described. This acellular comet assay can detect differences of 0.2 Gy of (60)Co gamma-ray radiation between 0 and 1 Gy and differences of 1 Gy between 0 and 8 Gy; thus, this assay is applicable for a wide range of DNA damage levels. It is also shown that DNA damage from different radiation energies was not significantly different from (60)Co gamma-ray. This assay displayed a statistical increase in DNA damage due to uncontrolled exposure to natural light; however, the slope of the dose-response curve for light-exposed samples was similar to that for samples protected from light. A comparison of the alkaline comet assay with the acellular comet assay allowed for the intrinsic repair capacity of the alkaline comet assay to be quantified.

  4. A simple measuring device for laboratory indentation tests on cartilage.

    PubMed

    Koeller, Wolfgang; Kunow, Julius; Ostermeyer, Oliver; Stomberg, Peter; Boos, Carsten; Russlies, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Mechanical testing of articular cartilage and repair tissue enables judgment of their capacity in withstanding mechanical loading. In the past, different methods have been developed requiring a complex technical setup and extensive data analysis. Therefore, the aim of the present project was to build up a simple measuring apparatus for laboratory indentation tests. The device consists of an incremental optical displacement transducer with a sleeve bearing guided plunger and a spherical tip made of polished steel (radius: 0.75 or 1.5 mm), a sensitive load cell and a stiff frame. The indentation force results from the plunger's gravity plus the force of the spring inside the displacement transducer and levels at 0.170 N or 0.765 N. The displacement transducer is fixed to the frame via the load cell that enables one to detect the initial contact of the tip with the tissue. The load cell has a standard uncertainty of 2 mN and the displacement transducer of 1 microm. From indentation-creep tests, a "0.25-s elastic modulus" is calculated. Measurements on thin rubber sheets were carried out to determine the quality of the measuring device. Compression tests on cylinders made of these rubber sheets yielded control data, and a good agreement with the "0.25-s elastic modulus" was found. Indentation tests on cartilage at different sites of sheep femoral condyles yielded a very good repeatability of the measurement results (+/-7.5%).

  5. Acellular biological tissues containing inherent glycosaminoglycans for loading basic fibroblast growth factor promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lai, Po-Hong; Chang, Yen; Chen, Sung-Ching; Wang, Chung-Chi; Liang, Huang-Chien; Chang, Wei-Chun; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2006-09-01

    It was found in our previous study that acellular tissues derived from bovine pericardia consist primarily of insoluble collagen, elastin, and tightly bound glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). It is speculated that the inherent GAGs in acellular tissues may serve as a reservoir for loading basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration. This study was therefore designed to investigate effects of the content of GAGs in acellular bovine pericardia on the binding of bFGF and its release profile in vitro while its stimulation in angiogenesis and tissue regeneration in vivo were evaluated subcutaneously in a rat model. To control the content of GAGs, acellular tissues were treated additionally with hyaluronidase for 1 (Hase-D1), 3 (Hase-D3), or 5 days (Hase-D5). The in vitro results indicated that a higher content of GAGs in the acellular tissue resulted in an increase in bFGF binding and in a more gradual and sustained release of the growth factor. The in vivo results obtained at 1 week postoperatively showed that the density and the depth of neo-vessels infiltrated into the acellular tissue loaded with bFGF (acellular/bFGF) were significantly greater than the other test samples. At 1 month postoperatively, vascularized neo-connective tissues were found to fill the pores within each test sample, particularly for the acellular/bFGF tissue. These results suggested that the sustained release of bFGF from the acellular/ bFGF tissue continued to be effective in enhancing angiogenesis and generation of new tissues. In conclusion, the inherent GAGs present in acellular tissues may be used for binding and sustained release of bFGF to enhance angiogenesis and tissue regeneration.

  6. Polyesterurethane and acellular matrix based hybrid biomaterial for bladder engineering.

    PubMed

    Horst, Maya; Milleret, Vincent; Noetzli, Sarah; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) based biomaterials for soft tissue engineering have inherent disadvantages, such as a relative rigidity and a limited variability in the mechanical properties and degradation rates. In this study, a novel electrospun biomaterial based on degradable polyesterurethane (PEU) (DegraPol(®) ) was investigated for potential use for bladder engineering in vitro and in vivo. Hybrid microfibrous PEU and PLGA scaffolds were produced by direct electrospinning of the polymer onto a bladder acellular matrix. The scaffold morphology of the scaffold was analyzed, and the biological performance was tested in vitro and in vivo using a rat cystoplasty model. Anatomical and functional outcomes after implantation were analyzed macroscopically, histologically and by cystometry, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that PEU samples had a lower porosity (p < 0.001) and were slightly thinner (p = 0.009) than the PGLA samples. Proliferation and survival of the seeded smooth muscle cells in vitro were comparable on PEU and PLGA scaffolds. After 8 weeks in vivo, the PEU scaffolds exhibited no shrinkage. However, cystometry of the reconstructed bladders exhibited a slightly greater functional bladder capacity in the PLGA group. Morphometric analyses revealed significantly better tissue healing (p < 0.05) and, in particular, better smooth muscle regeneration, as well as a lower rate of inflammatory responses at 8 weeks in the PEU group. Collectively, the results indicated that PEU-hybrid scaffolds promote bladder tissue formation with excellent tissue integration and a low inflammatory reaction in vivo. PEU is a promising biomaterial, particularly with regard to functional tissue engineering of the bladder and other hollow organs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 658-667, 2017.

  7. Induction of inflammatory cytokines by cartilage extracts.

    PubMed

    Merly, Liza; Simjee, Shabana; Smith, Sylvia L

    2007-03-01

    Shark cartilage extracts were examined for induction of cytokines and chemokines in human peripheral blood leukocytes. Primary leukocyte cultures were exposed to a variety of aqueous and organic extracts prepared from several commercial brands of shark cartilage. From all commercial sources of shark cartilage tested the acid extracts induced higher levels of TNFalpha than other extracts. Different commercial brands of shark cartilage varied significantly in cytokine-inducing activity. TNFalpha induction was seen as early as 4 h and IFNgamma at detectable levels for up to four days. Shark cartilage extracts did not induce physiologically significant levels of IL-4. Results suggest that shark cartilage, preferentially, induces Th1 type inflammatory cytokines. When compared to bovine cartilage extract, collagen, and chondroitin sulfate, shark cartilage induced significantly higher levels of TNFalpha. Treatment with digestive proteases (trypsin and chymotrypsin) reduced the cytokine induction response by 80%, suggesting that the active component(s) in cartilage extracts is proteinaceous. The induction of Th1 type cytokine response in leukocytes is a significant finding since shark cartilage, taken as a dietary supplement for a variety of chronic degenerative diseases, would be contraindicated in cases where the underlying pathology of the chronic condition is caused by inflammation.

  8. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  9. Cryopreservation of articular cartilage. Part 3: the liquidus-tracking method.

    PubMed

    Pegg, David E; Wang, Lihong; Vaughan, David

    2006-06-01

    Although it is relatively straightforward to cryopreserve living isolated chondrocytes, at the present time there is no satisfactory method to preserve surgical grafts between the time of procurement or manufacture and actual use. In earlier papers we have established that the cryoprotectants dimethyl sulphoxide or propylene glycol do penetrate into this tissue very rapidly. Chondrocytes are not unusually susceptible to osmotic stress; in fact they appear to be particularly resistant. It appears that damage is associated with the formation of ice per se, even at cooling rates that are optimal for the cryopreservation of isolated chondrocytes. We then showed that current methods of cartilage cryopreservation involve the nucleation and growth of ice crystals within the chondrons rather than ice being restricted to the surrounding acellular matrix. This finding established the need to avoid the crystallization of ice--in other words, vitrification. Song and his colleagues have published a vitrification method that is based on the use of one of Fahy's vitrification formulations. We confirmed the effectiveness of this method but found it to be very dependent on ultra rapid warming. However, we were able to develop a 'liquidus-tracking' method that completely avoids the crystallization of ice and does not require rapid warming. The ability of cartilage preserved in this way to incorporate sulphate into newly synthesized glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) approached 70% of that of fresh control cartilage. In this method the rates of cooling and warming can be very low, which is essential for any method that is to be used in Tissue Banks to process the bulky grafts that are required by orthopaedic surgeons. Work is continuing to refine this method for Tissue Bank use.

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of a monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine in 15 month-6-year-old German children. Monovalent Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stehr, K; Heininger, U; Uhlenbusch, R; Angersbach, P; Hackell, J; Eckhardt, T

    1995-03-01

    Immunization against pertussis has been re-recommended for healthy children in Germany in 1991. In addition the former restriction of immunizing only in the first 2 years of life was abolished. In children born before 1991 immunization rates against pertussis were 15% or less. With the new recommendations physicians are now faced with an increasing demand of parents for catch-up vaccinations in these children. Since they were immunized against diphtheria and tetanus previously monovalent pertussis vaccines are needed for this indication. Therefore a monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine was studied in 249 German children 15 months to 6 years of age. Three doses were administered at 6-10 week intervals. Reactogenicity and antibody responses against the vaccine antigens pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), 69-kd antigen (pertactin) and fimbriae-2 (agglutinogen) were investigated. Local and systemic reactions were minimal in frequency and severity. Antibody responses against all vaccine antigens were pronounced with 93%-100% of vaccinees demonstrating at least four fold titre rises above pre-immunization after the third dose. These findings indicate that this monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine with excellent immunogenicity and low reactogenicity is an appropriate candidate for closing immunization gaps in older children in countries with previously low vaccination rates against pertussis. Based on the results of this study the monovalent acellular pertussis vaccine was licensed in Germany in January 1994.

  11. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  12. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  13. MRI appearance of normal articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Douglas W

    2011-05-01

    At each joint, the extracellular matrix of cartilage is arranged in a complex and characteristic organization that is specific for that joint. This structure exerts a strong influence on the appearance of magnetic resonance (MR) images through orientation-related alterations in T2 decay. As a result, the MR appearance of cartilage at each joint is predictable and specific for that joint. The diagnostic utility of MR imaging for evaluating cartilage is enhanced when the acquisition and review of the images is informed by an understanding of this relationship between normal structure and the MR appearance of cartilage.

  14. Comparative Host Response of 2 Human Acellular Dermal Matrices in a Primate Implant Model

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Maryellen; Singh, Devinder; Silverman, Ronald P.; Xu, Hui; De Deyne, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We examined the differences in capsule formation between 2 commercially available human acellular dermal matrices in a nonhuman primate model. Methods: Primates were implanted dorsally with a subcutaneously placed tissue expander and randomized into 3 groups, receiving skin coverage only, coverage with non-irradiated freeze-dried human acellular dermal matrix, or coverage with gamma-irradiated human acellular dermal matrix. After 9 weeks, soft tissue around the tissue expander was excised and evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively to assess extent of inflammation (CD68 antibodies and interleukin-6 levels), degradation and fibrosis (matrix metalloproteinase-1 and procollagen-1 staining), and mechanical (tensile) strength. Results: Histological evaluation of tissue around the tissue expander indicated differences in host response, suggesting capsule presence in the gamma-irradiated matrix group but not the freeze-dried matrix group. The extent of local inflammation was much higher in the gamma-irradiated matrix group which demonstrated mean (standard deviation) localized interleukin-6 concentration of 67.3 (53.6) vs 16.3 (6.7) pg/mg protein in the non-irradiated matrix group. There was robust degradation and fibrotic response in the gamma-irradiated matrix group versus the freeze-dried matrix group. Mechanical testing indicated mean (standard deviation) ultimate tensile strength of 12.0 (7.1) N in the gamma-irradiated matrix group versus 99.3 (48.8) N in the freeze-dried matrix group. Conclusions: Enclosure of a tissue expander with human acellular dermal matrix untreated by gamma irradiation led to minimal inflammation and minimal evidence of fibrosis/capsule around the tissue expander compared with robust capsule formation around the tissue expander that was covered by a gamma-irradiated human acellular dermal matrix. PMID:24570768

  15. Development and Characterization of Acellular Porcine Pulmonary Valve Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Korossis, Sotirios A.; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul; Jennings, Louise M; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Currently available replacement heart valves all have limitations. This study aimed to produce and characterize an acellular, biocompatible porcine pulmonary root conduit for reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract e.g., during Ross procedure. A process for the decellularization of porcine pulmonary roots was developed incorporating trypsin treatment of the adventitial surface of the scraped pulmonary artery and sequential treatment with hypotonic Tris buffer (HTB; 10 mM Tris pH 8.0, 0.1% (w/v) EDTA, and 10 KIU aprotinin), 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate in HTB, two cycles of DNase and RNase, and sterilization with 0.1% (v/v) peracetic acid. Histology confirmed an absence of cells and retention of the gross histoarchitecture. Immunohistochemistry further confirmed cell removal and partial retention of the extracellular matrix, but a loss of collagen type IV. DNA levels were reduced by more than 96% throughout all regions of the acellular tissue and no functional genes were detected using polymerase chain reaction. Total collagen levels were retained but there was a significant loss of glycosaminoglycans following decellularization. The biomechanical, hydrodynamic, and leaflet kinematics properties were minimally affected by the process. Both immunohistochemical labeling and antibody absorption assay confirmed a lack of α-gal epitopes in the acellular porcine pulmonary roots and in vitro biocompatibility studies indicated that acellular leaflets and pulmonary arteries were not cytotoxic. Overall the acellular porcine pulmonary roots have excellent potential for development of a tissue substitute for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction e.g., during the Ross procedure. PMID:24786313

  16. Effects of the decellularization method on the local stiffness of acellular lungs.

    PubMed

    Melo, Esther; Garreta, Elena; Luque, Tomas; Cortiella, Joaquin; Nichols, Joan; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Lung bioengineering, a novel approach to obtain organs potentially available for transplantation, is based on decellularizing donor lungs and seeding natural scaffolds with stem cells. Various physicochemical protocols have been used to decellularize lungs, and their performance has been evaluated in terms of efficient decellularization and matrix preservation. No data are available, however, on the effect of different decellularization procedures on the local stiffness of the acellular lung. This information is important since stem cells directly sense the rigidity of the local site they are engrafting to during recellularization, and it has been shown that substrate stiffness modulates cell fate into different phenotypes. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the decellularization procedure on the inhomogeneous local stiffness of the acellular lung on five different sites: alveolar septa, alveolar junctions, pleura, and vessels' tunica intima and tunica adventitia. Local matrix stiffness was measured by computing Young's modulus with atomic force microscopy after decellularizing the lungs of 36 healthy rats (Sprague-Dawley, male, 250-300 g) with four different protocols with/without perfusion through the lung circulatory system and using two different detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate [CHAPS]). The local stiffness of the acellular lung matrix significantly depended on the site within the matrix (p<0.001), ranging from ∼ 15 kPa at the alveolar septum to ∼ 60 kPa at the tunica intima. Acellular lung stiffness (p=0.003) depended significantly, albeit modestly, on the decellularization process. Whereas perfusion did not induce any significant differences in stiffness, the use of CHAPS resulted in a ∼ 35% reduction compared with SDS, the influence of the detergent being more important in the tunica intima. In conclusion, lung matrix stiffness is considerably inhomogeneous, and

  17. Acellular ostrich corneal stroma used as scaffold for construction of tissue-engineered cornea

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-Ning; Zhu, Xiu-Ping; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheng-Jie; Yin, Yong; Xiao, Xiang-Hua; Su, Xin; Kong, Bin; Pan, Shi-Yin; Yang, Hua; Cheng, Yan; An, Na; Mi, Sheng-Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess acellular ostrich corneal matrix used as a scaffold to reconstruct a damaged cornea. METHODS A hypertonic saline solution combined with a digestion method was used to decellularize the ostrich cornea. The microstructure of the acellular corneal matrix was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The mechanical properties were detected by a rheometer and a tension machine. The acellular corneal matrix was also transplanted into a rabbit cornea and cytokeratin 3 was used to check the immune phenotype. RESULTS The microstructure and mechanical properties of the ostrich cornea were well preserved after the decellularization process. In vitro, the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium results revealed that extracts of the acellular ostrich corneas (AOCs) had no inhibitory effects on the proliferation of the corneal epithelial or endothelial cells or on the keratocytes. The rabbit lamellar keratoplasty showed that the transplanted AOCs were transparent and completely incorporated into the host cornea while corneal turbidity and graft dissolution occurred in the acellular porcine cornea (APC) transplantation. The phenotype of the reconstructed cornea was similar to a normal rabbit cornea with a high expression of cytokeratin 3 in the superficial epithelial cell layer. CONCLUSION We first used AOCs as scaffolds to reconstruct damaged corneas. Compared with porcine corneas, the anatomical structures of ostrich corneas are closer to those of human corneas. In accordance with the principle that structure determines function, a xenograft lamellar keratoplasty also confirmed that the AOC transplantation generated a superior outcome compared to that of the APC graft. PMID:27158598

  18. Co-Graft of Acellular Dermal Matrix and Autogenous Microskin in a Child with Extensive Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X.L.; Xia, Z.F.; Fang, L.S.; Wang, Y.J.; Wang, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 6-yr-old boy was the victim of a burns accident in a public bathhouse. The burns involved the face, neck, upper and lower extremities, anterior and posterior trunk, and both buttocks, covering 72% of the total body surface area (TBSA). The lesions in the lower extremities and parts of the right upper extremity were deep partial-thickness, comprising 40% TBSA. On day 5 post-burn, the lesions in both lower extremities were excised to the extent of the fascia under general anaesthesia. Meshed J1 Jayya Acellular Dermis®, a kind of acellular allodermal (ADM) matrix, was then placed on the left knee joint. The right knee joint served as control. The wounds in both lower extremities were then overlaid with microskin autografting. At 19 days post-application, the lesions in both lower extremities had almost completely resurfaced. Follow-up at six months revealed well-healed and stable skin of acellular ADM and microskin autografts on the left knee. However, the skin of the right knee was unstable and there was a chronic residual ulcer. Both legs showed some significant hypertrophic scars. The left knee joint (acellular ADM grafted site) showed mild contractures, while the right knee joint developed a significant contracture. The "skin" of the co-graft covered site appeared thicker and more elastic. The movement range of the left knee joint was much larger than that of the right knee joint. These results suggest that co-graft of acellular dermal matrix and autogenous microskin may be an effective way to repair this functional site in children with extensive burns and to improve the functional and cosmetic results. PMID:21991120

  19. Electrospun cartilage-derived matrix scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Garrigues, N William; Little, Dianne; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Ruch, David S; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-11-01

    Macroscale scaffolds created from cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) demonstrate chondroinductive or chondro-inductive properties, but many fabrication methods do not allow for control of nanoscale architecture. In this regard, electrospun scaffolds have shown significant promise for cartilage tissue engineering. However, nanofibrous materials generally exhibit a relatively small pore size and require techniques such as multilayering or the inclusion of sacrificial fibers to enhance cellular infiltration. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare multilayer to single-layer electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering, and (2) to determine whether incorporation of CDM into the PCL fibers would enhance chondrogenesis by human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). PCL and PCL-CDM scaffolds were prepared by sequential collection of 60 electrospun layers from the surface of a grounded saline bath into a single scaffold, or by continuous electrospinning onto the surface of a grounded saline bath and harvest as a single-layer scaffold. Scaffolds were seeded with hASCs and evaluated over 28 days in culture. The predominant effects on hASCs of incorporation of CDM into scaffolds were to stimulate sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis and COL10A1 gene expression. Compared with single-layer scaffolds, multilayer scaffolds enhanced cell infiltration and ACAN gene expression. However, compared with single-layer constructs, multilayer PCL constructs had a much lower elastic modulus, and PCL-CDM constructs had an elastic modulus approximately 1% that of PCL constructs. These data suggest that multilayer electrospun constructs enhance homogeneous cell seeding, and that the inclusion of CDM stimulates chondrogenesis-related bioactivity.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  1. Acellular Endocardium as a Novel Biomaterial for the Intima of Tissue-Engineered Small-Caliber Vascular Grafts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Guan, Xin; Wu, TianYi; Qiao, JianOu; Han, ZhaoQing; Wu, JinLong; Yu, XiaoWei; You, QingJun

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to investigate whether acellular endocardium can be used as a useful biomaterial for the intima of engineered small-caliber vascular grafts. Fresh endocardium was harvested from the swine left atrium and was decellularized by digestion with the decellularization solution of Triton X-100 and SDS containing DNase I and RNase A. Surface morphological characteristics and Young's modulus were evaluated. To analyze the effect of mechanical characteristics on cell adhesion, the decellularized endocardium was stiffened with 2.5% glutaraldehyde. Small-caliber vascular grafts were constructed using decellularized endocardium treated with or without glutaraldehyde as the intima. CD34+ cells were seeded onto the luminal surface of the vascular grafts and linked to bioreactors that simulate a pulsatile blood stream. Acellular endocardium had distinct surface morphological characteristics, which were quite different from those of other materials. The compliance of acellular endocardium was higher than that of other materials tested by Young's modulus. CD34+ cells formed a monolayer structure and adhered to the inner face of the acellular endocardium. The glutaraldehyde treatment stiffened the acellular endocardium but had little impact on the surface morphological characteristics or static adhesiveness of the cells. Data from the bioreactor study showed that the detachment of the cells from the surface of glutaraldehyde-treated acellular endocardium increased dramatically when the pressure was equal or higher than 40 mm Hg, while the cells on the untreated acellular endocardium remained well and formed confluent monolayers and tight junctions under the same pressure. Acellular endocardium has distinct structures and mechanical characteristics that are beneficial for CD34+ cell adhesion and retention under dynamic fluid perfusion. Thus, it can be used as a useful biomaterial for the construction of the intima of engineered small-caliber vascular grafts.

  2. Prevalence and clinical significance of acellular mucin in locally advanced rectal cancer patients showing pathologic complete response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seok-Byung; Hong, Seung-Mo; Yu, Chang Sik; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Tae Won; Park, Jin-hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2013-01-01

    Occasionally, patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma who receive preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) show acellular mucin in resection specimens that had shown pathologic complete response (pCR), but the clinical and prognostic significance of this finding has been controversial. This study analyzed data from 217 consecutive patients showing pCR to preoperative CRT followed by resection to evaluate the clinicopathologic features and prognostic significance of acellular mucin. Patients were categorized according to the presence of acellular mucin, as identified by pathologic analysis. The clinicopathologic findings and oncologic results were compared. Acellular mucins were identified in 35 (16.1%) of 217 pCR patients. Acellular mucins were found predominantly in male patients (20.8% vs. 9.8%, P=0.039) and in those with mucinous/signet ring cell differentiation (66.7% vs. 15.1%, P=0.008). The presence of acellular mucin was more frequent in patients with a shorter (<42 d) CRT-operation interval (22.6% vs. 10.3%, P=0.017). With a mean follow-up of 41 months (range, 2 to 119 mo), the 3-year overall survival (96.8% with mucin vs. 95.9% without mucin, P=0.314) and the 3-year disease-free survival (97.0% with mucin vs. 93.0% without mucin, P=0.131) did not differ between the groups. The presence of acellular mucin in rectal cancer patients showing pCR to preoperative CRT is associated with male sex and mucinous differentiation and does not have a significant impact on oncologic outcomes. Acellular mucins are also associated with the CRT-operation interval as a phenomenon of time-dependent response to CRT.

  3. [Cartilage biopsy for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI)].

    PubMed

    Pestka, J M; Salzmann, G M; Südkamp, N P; Niemeyer, P

    2013-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established two-step procedure for the treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee. Cartilage harvest from the affected knee joint represents the first step of this procedure and is essential for further in vitro expansion of autologous chondrocytes. Nevertheless, the cartilage biopsy process itself is underrepresented in the scientific literature and currently there is only a limited amount of data available addressing this process. Biopsy location as well as the technique itself and instruments used for cartilage collection are not well defined and only little standardisation can be found. The article describes the relevant aspects of the biopsy in the context of ACI with regard to the literature available. Follow-up studies to better define and standardise the cartilage biopsy process are thus required.

  4. Laser-induced regeneration of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil; Shekhter, Anatoly; Guller, Anna; Baum, Olga; Baskov, Andrey

    2011-08-01

    Laser radiation provides a means to control the fields of temperature and thermo mechanical stress, mass transfer, and modification of fine structure of the cartilage matrix. The aim of this outlook paper is to review physical and biological aspects of laser-induced regeneration of cartilage and to discuss the possibilities and prospects of its clinical applications. The problems and the pathways of tissue regeneration, the types and features of cartilage will be introduced first. Then we will review various actual and prospective approaches for cartilage repair; consider possible mechanisms of laser-induced regeneration. Finally, we present the results in laser regeneration of joints and spine disks cartilages and discuss some future applications of lasers in regenerative medicine.

  5. Comparison of structural, architectural and mechanical aspects of cellular and acellular bone in two teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Liat; Dean, Mason; Shipov, Anna; Atkins, Ayelet; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Shahar, Ron

    2012-06-01

    The histological diversity of the skeletal tissues of fishes is impressive compared with that of other vertebrate groups, yet our understanding of the functional consequences of this diversity is limited. In particular, although it has been known since the mid-1800s that a large number of fish species possess acellular bones, the mechanical advantages and consequences of this structural characteristic - and therefore the nature of the evolution of this feature - remain unclear. Although several studies have examined the material properties of fish bone, these have used a variety of techniques and there have been no direct contrasts of acellular and cellular bone. We report on a comparison of the structural and mechanical properties of the ribs and opercula between two freshwater fish - the common carp Cyprinus carpio (a fish with cellular bone) and the tilapia Oreochromis aureus (a fish with acellular bone). We used light microscopy to show that the bones in both fish species exhibit poor blood supply and possess discrete tissue zones, with visible layering suggesting differences in the underlying collagen architecture. We performed identical micromechanical testing protocols on samples of the two bone types to determine the mechanical properties of the bone material of opercula and ribs. Our data support the consensus of literature values, indicating that Young's moduli of cellular and acellular bones are in the same range, and lower than Young's moduli of the bones of mammals and birds. Despite these similarities in mechanical properties between the bone tissues of the fish species tested here, cellular bone had significantly lower mineral content than acellular bone; furthermore, the percentage ash content and bone mineral density values (derived from micro-CT scans) show that the bone of these fishes is less mineralized than amniote bone. Although we cannot generalize from our data to the numerous remaining teleost species, the results presented here suggest

  6. New Insights on the Composition and the Structure of the Acellular Extrinsic Fiber Cementum by Raman Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colard, Thomas; Falgayrac, Guillaume; Bertrand, Benoit; Naji, Stephan; Devos, Olivier; Balsack, Clara; Delannoy, Yann; Penel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Acellular extrinsic fiber cementum is a mineralized tissue that covers the cervical half of the tooth root surface. It contains mainly extrinsic or Sharpey’s fibers that run perpendicular to the root surface to anchor the tooth via the periodontal ligament. Acellular cementum is continuously and slowly produced throughout life and exhibits an alternating bright and dark pattern under light microscopy. However, although a better understanding of the structural background of acellular cementum is relevant to many fields, such as cementochronology, periodontology and tissue engineering, acellular cementum remains rarely studied and poorly understood. In this work, we studied the acellular cementum at the incremental line scale of five human mandibular canines using polarized Raman spectroscopy. We provided Raman imaging analysis and polarized acquisitions as a function of the angular orientation of the sample. The results showed that mineral crystals were always parallel to collagen fibrils, and at a larger scale, we proposed an organizational model in which we found radial collagen fibers, “orthogonal” to the cementum surface, and “non-orthogonal” fibers, which consist of branching and bending radial fibers. Concerning the alternating pattern, we observed that the dark lines corresponded to smaller, more mineralized and probably more organized bands, which is consistent with the zoological assumption that incremental lines are produced during a winter rest period of acellular cementum growth. PMID:27936010

  7. Gender-specific distribution of glycosaminoglycans during cartilage mineralization of human thyroid cartilage.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Horst; Werner, Jochen

    2004-11-01

    The role of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in the process of cartilage mineralization, especially in the hypertrophic zone of growth plates, is not yet fully understood. Human thyroid cartilage can serve as a model to observe matrix changes associated with cartilage mineralization because the processes follow a distinct route, progress very slowly and show sexual differences. Histochemical staining for low sulphated GAG (chondroitin-4- and -6-sulphates) was decreased in the interterritorial matrix of thyroid cartilage starting at the beginning of the fifth decade, but not in the pericellular or territorial matrix of chondrocytes. Because cartilage mineralization progressed in the interterritorial matrix it seems likely that a decreasing content of chondroitin-4- and -6-sulphates is involved in the mineralization process. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that immunostaining for chondroitin-4- and -6-sulphates was weaker in mineralized cartilage areas than in unmineralized areas, whereas there was no difference in staining for keratan sulphate. In all life decades, female thyroid cartilages contained more chondrocytes with a territorial rim of chondroitin-4- and -6-sulphates probably preventing cartilage mineralization compared with age-matched male specimens. Taken together, the characteristic distribution pattern of chondroitin-4- and -6-sulphates being more concentrated in female than in male thyroid cartilages provided evidence that these macromolecules decrease in cartilage mineralization.

  8. Blocking aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan interglobular domain abrogates cartilage erosion and promotes cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Little, Christopher B.; Meeker, Clare T.; Golub, Suzanne B.; Lawlor, Kate E.; Farmer, Pamela J.; Smith, Susan M.; Fosang, Amanda J.

    2007-01-01

    Aggrecan loss from cartilage in arthritis is mediated by aggrecanases. Aggrecanases cleave aggrecan preferentially in the chondroitin sulfate–2 (CS-2) domain and secondarily at the E373↓374A bond in the interglobular domain (IGD). However, IGD cleavage may be more deleterious for cartilage biomechanics because it releases the entire CS-containing portion of aggrecan. Recent studies identifying aggrecanase-2 (ADAMTS-5) as the predominant aggrecanase in mouse cartilage have not distinguished aggrecanolysis in the IGD from aggrecanolysis in the CS-2 domain. We generated aggrecan knockin mice with a mutation that rendered only the IGD resistant to aggrecanases in order to assess the contribution of this specific cleavage to cartilage pathology. The knockin mice were viable and fertile. Aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan IGD was not detected in knockin mouse cartilage in situ nor following digestion with ADAMTS-5 or treatment of cartilage explant cultures with IL-1α. Blocking cleavage in the IGD not only diminished aggrecan loss and cartilage erosion in surgically induced osteoarthritis and a model of inflammatory arthritis, but appeared to stimulate cartilage repair following acute inflammation. We conclude that blocking aggrecanolysis in the aggrecan IGD alone protects against cartilage erosion and may potentiate cartilage repair. PMID:17510707

  9. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Remodeling in Response to Focal Lesions in a Mini-Pig Model: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Matthew B.; Belkin, Nicole S.; Milby, Andrew H.; Henning, Elizabeth A.; Bostrom, Marc; Kim, Minwook; Pfeifer, Christian; Meloni, Gregory; Dodge, George R.; Burdick, Jason A.; Schaer, Thomas P.; Steinberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Preclinical large animal models are essential for evaluating new tissue engineering (TE) technologies and refining surgical approaches for cartilage repair. Some preclinical animal studies, including the commonly used minipig model, have noted marked remodeling of the subchondral bone. However, the mechanisms underlying this response have not been well characterized. Thus, our objective was to compare in-vivo outcomes of chondral defects with varied injury depths and treatments. Design: Trochlear chondral defects were created in 11 Yucatan minipigs (6 months old). Groups included an untreated partial-thickness defect (PTD), an untreated full-thickness defect (FTD), and FTDs treated with microfracture, autologous cartilage transfer (FTD-ACT), or an acellular hyaluronic acid hydrogel. Six weeks after surgery, micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantitatively assess defect fill and subchondral bone remodeling. The quality of cartilage repair was assessed using the ICRS-II histological scoring system and immunohistochemistry for type II collagen. A finite element model (FEM) was developed to assess load transmission. Results: Using μCT, substantial bone remodeling was observed for all FTDs, but not for the PTD group. The best overall histological scores and greatest type II collagen staining was found for the FTD-ACT and PTD groups. The FEM confirmed that only the FTD-ACT group could initially restore appropriate transfer of compressive loads to the underlying bone. Conclusions: The bony remodeling observed in this model system appears to be a biological phenomena and not a result of altered mechanical loading, with the depth of the focal chondral defect (partial vs. full thickness) dictating the bony remodeling response. The type of cartilage injury should be carefully controlled in studies utilizing this model to evaluate TE approaches for cartilage repair. PMID:25318414

  10. Simultaneous segmentation of the bone and cartilage surfaces of a knee joint in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Zhang, X.; Anderson, D. D.; Brown, T. D.; Hofwegen, C. Van; Sonka, M.

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel framework for the simultaneous segmentation of multiple interacting surfaces belonging to multiple mutually interacting objects. The method is a non-trivial extension of our previously reported optimal multi-surface segmentation. Considering an example application of knee-cartilage segmentation, the framework consists of the following main steps: 1) Shape model construction: Building a mean shape for each bone of the joint (femur, tibia, patella) from interactively segmented volumetric datasets. Using the resulting mean-shape model - identification of cartilage, non-cartilage, and transition areas on the mean-shape bone model surfaces. 2) Presegmentation: Employment of iterative optimal surface detection method to achieve approximate segmentation of individual bone surfaces. 3) Cross-object surface mapping: Detection of inter-bone equidistant separating sheets to help identify corresponding vertex pairs for all interacting surfaces. 4) Multi-object, multi-surface graph construction and final segmentation: Construction of a single multi-bone, multi-surface graph so that two surfaces (bone and cartilage) with zero and non-zero intervening distances can be detected for each bone of the joint, according to whether or not cartilage can be locally absent or present on the bone. To define inter-object relationships, corresponding vertex pairs identified using the separating sheets were interlinked in the graph. The graph optimization algorithm acted on the entire multiobject, multi-surface graph to yield a globally optimal solution. The segmentation framework was tested on 16 MR-DESS knee-joint datasets from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. The average signed surface positioning error for the 6 detected surfaces ranged from 0.00 to 0.12 mm. When independently initialized, the signed reproducibility error of bone and cartilage segmentation ranged from 0.00 to 0.26 mm. The results showed that this framework provides robust, accurate, and

  11. [Effect of two different acellular lung matrices on α-SMA expression in A549 cells].

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Wang, Z Y; Weng, J; Wang, Z B; Mei, J; Du, X H; Wang, L

    2017-01-24

    Objective: To explore the effect of acellular normal and fibrotic lung matrices on alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Methods: Twenty adult SD rats were randomly divided into normal group and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis(IPF)group (n=10 each). The pulmonary fibrosis was induced by Bleomycin. Normal and fibrotic decellularized lungs were made, then sections with 500 μm thick were cut by a standard Vibratome. None scaffold was set as control group. A549 cells were seeded dropwise into different slices (normal and fibrotic scaffolds), and cultured for one week in vitro. The expression of α-SMA was measured by immunofluorescence staining and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results: In control group, the expression of α-SMA protein was positive in A549 cells by immunofluorescence staining. However, it expressed weakly both in normal and fibrotic scaffold group, and the fluorescence intensity in fibrotic scaffold group was significant lower than that in normal group (P<0.05). The relative expression amount of α-SMA mRNA in normal and fibrotic scaffold group were (0.70±0.11) and (0.55±0.12), which were significant lower than that of control group (1.28±0.21) (P<0.05). Moreover, the relative expression of α-SMA mRNA in fibrotic scaffold group was decreased compared to that in normal scaffold group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Acellular normal and fibrotic lung scaffold can downregulate the expression of α-SMA in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. It may inhibit the movement of A549 cells in acellular normal and fibrotic lung matrices, especially in acellular fibrotic lung scaffold.

  12. Method and apparatus for cartilage reshaping by radiofrequency heating

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Brian J.; Milner, Thomas E.; Sobol, Emil N.; Keefe, Michael W.

    2003-07-08

    A method and apparatus for reshaping cartilage using radiofrequency heating. The cartilage temperature is raised sufficiently for stress relaxation to occur in the cartilage, but low enough so that significant denaturation of the cartilage does not occur. The RF electrodes may be designed to also function as molds, preses, clamps, or mandrills to deform the cartilage tissue. Changes in various properties of the cartilage associated with stress relaxation in the cartilage may be measured in order to provide the control signal to provide effective reshaping without denaturation.

  13. A New Technique for Conchal Cartilage Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Young; Jeong, Ji Won

    2017-01-01

    The goal of auricular cartilage harvest is to obtain a sufficient amount for reconstruction and to minimize the change in ear shape. The cartilage can be harvested by a posterior or anterior approach, and each method has advantages and disadvantages. The posterior approach presents the advantage of scar concealment, but there are limits to the amount of cymba cartilage that may be harvested. In contrast, the anterior approach may cause a noticeable scar. However, as cartilage is collected, the anterior approach provides a view that facilitates the preservation ear structure. In addition, it is possible to obtain a greater amount of cartilage. From January 2014 to December 2015, we harvested auricular cartilage graft material in 17 patients. To prevent the development of trapdoor scars or linear scar contracture, short incisions were made on the superior border of the cymba and cavum. Two small and narrow incisions were made, resulting in suboptimal exposure of the surgical site, which heightens the potential for damaging the cartilage when using existing tools. To minimize this, the authors used a newly invented ball-type elevator. All patients recovered without complications after surgery and reported satisfaction with the shape of the ear. PMID:28352607

  14. A cartilage-inspired lubrication system.

    PubMed

    Greene, George W; Olszewska, Anna; Osterberg, Monika; Zhu, Haijin; Horn, Roger

    2014-01-14

    Articular cartilage is an example of a highly efficacious water-based, natural lubrication system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads and sliding velocities. One of the secrets of cartilage's superior tribology comes from a unique, multimodal lubrication strategy consisting of both a fluid pressurization mediated lubrication mechanism and a boundary lubrication mechanism supported by surface bound macromolecules. Using a reconstituted network of highly interconnected cellulose fibers and simple modification through the immobilization of polyelectrolytes, we have recreated many of the mechanical and chemical properties of cartilage and the cartilage lubrication system to produce a purely synthetic material system that exhibits some of the same lubrication mechanisms, time dependent friction response, and high wear resistance as natural cartilage tissue. Friction and wear studies demonstrate how the properties of the cellulose fiber network can be used to control and optimize the lubrication and wear resistance of the material surfaces and highlight what key features of cartilage should be duplicated in order to produce a cartilage-mimetic lubrication system.

  15. Thickness Distribution of Glenohumeral Joint Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Schleich, Christoph; Bittersohl, Bernd; Antoch, Gerald; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Zilkens, Christoph; Kircher, Jörn

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution 3-dimensional cartilage-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 3 T to test the following hypotheses: (1) there is a nonuniform cartilage thickness distribution both on the proximal humerus and on the glenoid surface and (2) the glenohumeral joint as a combined system is congruent with the level of the joint cartilage surface without substantial radial mismatch. Inclusion of 38 volunteers (19 females, mean age 24.34 ± 2.22 years; range 21-29 years) in a prospective study. Measurements of: cartilage thickness in 3 regions and 3 zones; radius of both circles (glenoid and humeral cartilage) for congruency calculation using 3-T MRI with 3-dimensional dual-echo steady-state sequence with water excitation. A homogenous mean cartilage thickness (1.2-1.5 mm) and slightly higher values for the glenoidal articulating surface radii both in the mid-paracoronar section (2.4 vs. 2.1 cm, P < 0.001) and in the mid-paraaxial section (2.4 vs. 2.1 cm, P < 0.001) compared with the humeral side were observed. The concept of a radial mismatch between the humeral head and the glenoid in healthy human subjects can be confirmed. This study provides normative data for the comparison of joint cartilage changes at the shoulder for future studies.

  16. Autologous Diced Cartilage in Nasal Septoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sersar, Sameh Ibrahim; Yassin, Ibrahim; Eldin Aly, Mohammed Saad

    2016-01-01

    Diced rib cartilage is an acceptable option in severe nasal deformities. We present our preliminary experience in KAMC in nasal septoplasties using the autologous diced costal cartilage. This is a retrospective study of the 22 cases who needed the autologous diced costal cartilage in our centre in 4 years. All our patients needed autologous diced rib cartilages. Twelve were wrapped with temporalis fascia, eight needed rectus fascia and perichondrium was used in only 2 cases. The naso-frontal angle for the whole series decreased by a mean of 4.41° (p=0.008) for the group using the rectus fascia diced cartilage graft. From the aesthetic point of view, all cases were satisfied except 3 (13.6%); two in the group of diced cartilage temporalis fascia; group 1. From the functional breathing view, only 1 case was not satisfied. He was in group 1. Autologous rib cartilage was shown to be a good graft in nasal septoplasty especially if wrapped with rectus fascia. PMID:27853694

  17. Repair of articular cartilage defects with a novel injectable in situ forming material in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Kawamura, Daisuke; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Tsukuda, Yukinori; Ohzawa, Nobuo; Ito, Masayuki; Izumisawa, Yasuharu; Minami, Akio

    2012-01-01

    We developed an ultra-purified in situ forming gel as an injectable delivery vehicle of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Our objective was to assess reparative tissues treated with autologous BMSCs implanted using the injectable implantation system into osteochondral defects in a canine model. Forty-eight osteochondral defects in the patella groove of the knee joint were created in 12 adult beagle dogs (two defects in each knee). The defects were divided into a defect group (n = 16), an acellular novel material implantation (material) group (n = 16), and a BMSCs implantation using the current vehicle system (material with BMSCs) group (n = 16). The reparative tissues at 16 weeks postoperatively were assessed through gross, histological, and mechanical analyses. The reparative tissues of the material with BMSCs group were substituted with firm and smooth hyaline-like cartilage tissue that was perfectly integrated into the host tissues. This treatment group obviously enhanced the subchondral bone reconstruction. The compressive modulus of the reparative tissues was significantly higher in the material with BMSCs group than the other groups. This study demonstrated that the implantation of BMSCs using our novel in situ forming material induced a mature hyaline-like cartilage repair of osteochondral defects in a canine model.

  18. Development and characterization of a full-thickness acellular porcine cornea matrix for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Du, Liqun; Wu, Xinyi

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to produce a natural, acellular matrix from porcine cornea for use as a scaffold in developing a tissue-engineered cornea replacement. Full-thickness, intact porcine corneas were decellularized by immersion in 0.5% (wt/vol) sodium dodecyl sulfate. The resulting acellular matrices were then characterized and examined specifically for completeness of the decellularization process. Histological analyses of decellularized corneal stromas showed that complete cell and α-Gal removal was achieved, while the major structural proteins including collagen type I and IV, laminin, and fibronectin were retained. DAPI staining did not detect any residual DNA within the matrix, and the DNA contents, which reflect the presence of cellular materials, were significantly diminished in the decellularized cornea. The collagen content of the decellularized cornea was well maintained compared with native tissues. Uniaxial tensile testing indicated that decellularization did not significantly compromise the ultimate tensile strength of the tissue (P > 0.05). In vitro cytotoxicity assays using rabbit corneal fibroblast cultures excluded the presence of soluble toxins in the biomaterial. In vivo implantation to rabbit interlamellar stromal pockets showed good biocompability. In summary, a full-thickness natural acellular matrix retaining the major structural components and strength of the cornea has been successfully developed. The matrix is biocompatible with cornea-derived cells and has potential for use in corneal transplantation and tissue-engineering applications.

  19. Mechanical properties of acellular mouse lungs after sterilization by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Juan J; Nonaka, Paula N; Campillo, Noelia; Palma, Renata K; Melo, Esther; de Oliveira, Luis V F; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-12-01

    Lung bioengineering using decellularized organ scaffolds is a potential alternative for lung transplantation. Clinical application will require donor scaffold sterilization. As gamma-irradiation is a conventional method for sterilizing tissue preparations for clinical application, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of lung scaffold sterilization by gamma irradiation on the mechanical properties of the acellular lung when subjected to the artificial ventilation maneuvers typical within bioreactors. Twenty-six mouse lungs were decellularized by a sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent protocol. Eight lungs were used as controls and 18 of them were submitted to a 31kGy gamma irradiation sterilization process (9 kept frozen in dry ice and 9 at room temperature). Mechanical properties of acellular lungs were measured before and after irradiation. Lung resistance (RL) and elastance (EL) were computed by linear regression fitting of recorded signals during mechanical ventilation (tracheal pressure, flow and volume). Static (Est) and dynamic (Edyn) elastances were obtained by the end-inspiratory occlusion method. After irradiation lungs presented higher values of resistance and elastance than before irradiation: RL increased by 41.1% (room temperature irradiation) and 32.8% (frozen irradiation) and EL increased by 41.8% (room temperature irradiation) and 31.8% (frozen irradiation). Similar increases were induced by irradiation in Est and Edyn. Scanning electron microscopy showed slight structural changes after irradiation, particularly those kept frozen. Sterilization by gamma irradiation at a conventional dose to ensure sterilization modifies acellular lung mechanics, with potential implications for lung bioengineering.

  20. Generation and characterization of a human acellular meniscus scaffold for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, G H; Eichhorn, S; Vogt, S; Adamczyk, C; Aryee, S; Hoberg, M; Milz, S; Imhoff, A B; Tischer, T

    2009-11-01

    Meniscus tears are frequent indications for arthroscopic evaluation which can result in partial or total meniscectomy. Allografts or synthetic meniscus scaffolds have been used with varying success to prevent early degenerative joint disease in these cases. Problems related to reduced initial and long-term stability, as well as immunological reactions prevent widespread clinical use so far. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a new construct for tissue engineering of the human meniscus based on an acellular meniscus allograft. Human menisci (n = 16) were collected and acellularized using the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate as the main ingredient or left untreated as control group. These acellularized menisci were characterized biomechanically using a repetitive ball indentation test (Stiffness N/mm, residual force N, relative compression force N) and by histological (hematoxylin-eosin, phase-contrast) as well as immunohistochemical (collagen I, II, VI) investigation. The processed menisci histologically appeared cell-free and had biomechanical properties similar to the intact meniscus samples (p > 0.05). The collagen fiber arrangement was not altered, according to phase-contrast microscopy and immunohistochemical labeling. The removal of the immunogenic cell components combined with the preservation of the mechanically relevant parts of the extracellular matrix could make these scaffolds ideal implants for future tissue engineering of the meniscus.

  1. Preparation and characterization of an acellular bovine pericardium intended for manufacture of valve bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    Goissis, Gilberto; Giglioti, Aparecida de Fátima; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2011-05-01

    Major problems with biological heart valves post-implantation are associated with progressive structural deterioration and calcification attributed to glutaraldehyde processing, dead cells, and cell fragments present in the native tissue. In spite of these problems, glutaraldehyde still is the reagent of choice. The results with acellular matrix xenograft usually prepared by detergent treatment in association with enzymes are rather conflicting because while preserving mechanical properties, tissue morphology and collagen structure are process dependent. This work describes a chemical approach for the preparation of an acellular bovine pericardium matrix intended for the manufacture of heart valve bioprostheses. Cell removal was performed by an alkaline extraction in the presence of calcium salts for periods ranging from 6 to 48 h. The results showed that cell removal was achieved after 12 h, with swelling and negative charge increasing with processing time. Nevertheless, collagen fibril structure, ability to form fibrils, and stability to collagenase were progressive after 24-h processing. There was no denaturation of the collagen matrix. A process is described for the preparation of acellular bovine pericardium matrices with preserved fibril structure and morphology for the manufacture of cardiac valve bioprostheses and may be used in other applications for tissue reconstruction.

  2. Advanced cell therapies for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Catarina; Santhagunam, Aruna; Salgueiro, João B; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2015-01-01

    Advanced cell-based therapies are promising approaches for stimulating full regeneration of cartilage lesions. In addition to a few commercially available medicinal products, several clinical and preclinical studies are ongoing worldwide. In preclinical settings, high-quality cartilage tissue has been produced using combination strategies involving stem or progenitor cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules to generate a construct for implantation at the lesion site. Cell numbers and mechanical stimulation of the constructs are not commonly considered, but are important parameters to be evaluated in forthcoming clinical studies. We review current clinical and preclinical studies for advanced therapy cartilage regeneration and evaluate the progress of the field.

  3. Mandibular Cartilage Collagen Network Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mandibular condyle cartilage (MCC) has a unique structure among articular cartilages; however, little is known about its nanoscale collagen network architecture, hampering design of regeneration therapies and rigorous evaluation of regeneration experiment outcomes in preclinical research. Helium ion microscopy is a novel technology with a long depth of field that is uniquely suited to imaging open 3D collagen networks at multiple scales without obscuring conductive coatings. Objective The objective of this research was to image, at the micro- and nanoscales, the depth-dependent MCC collagen network architecture. Design MCC was collected from New Zealand white rabbits. Images of MCC zones were acquired using helium ion, transmission electron, and light microscopy. Network fibril and canal diameters were measured. Results For the first time, the MCC was visualized as a 3D collagen fibril structure at the nanoscale, the length scale of network assembly. Fibril diameters ranged from 7 to 110 nm and varied by zone. The articular surface was composed of a fine mesh that was woven through thin layers of larger fibrils. The fibrous zone was composed of approximately orthogonal lamellae of aligned fibrils. Fibrocyte processes surrounded collagen bundles forming extracellular compartments. The proliferative, mature, and hypertrophic zones were composed of a branched network that was progressively remodeled to accommodate chondrocyte hypertrophy. Osteoid fibrils were woven around osteoblast cytoplasmic processes to create numerous canals similar in size to canaliculi of mature bone. Conclusion This multiscale investigation advances our foundational understanding of the complex, layered 3D architecture of the MCC collagen network. PMID:27375843

  4. Processed xenogenic cartilage as innovative biomatrix for cartilage tissue engineering: effects on chondrocyte differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Silke; Elsaesser, Alexander F; Koerber, Ludwig; Goldberg-Bockhorn, Eva; Seitz, Andreas M; Bermueller, Christian; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Breiter, Roman; Rotter, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    One key point in the development of new bioimplant matrices for the reconstruction and replacement of cartilage defects is to provide an adequate microenvironment to ensure chondrocyte migration and de novo synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). A recently developed decellularization and sterilization process maintains the three-dimensional (3D) collagen structure of native septal cartilage while increasing matrix porosity, which is considered to be crucial for cartilage tissue engineering. Human primary nasal septal chondrocytes were amplified in monolayer culture and 3D-cultured on processed porcine nasal septal cartilage scaffolds. The influence of chondrogenic growth factors on neosynthesis of ECM proteins was examined at the protein and gene expression levels. Seeding experiments demonstrated that processed xenogenic cartilage matrices provide excellent environmental properties for human nasal septal chondrocytes with respect to cell adhesion, migration into the matrix and neosynthesis of cartilage-specific ECM proteins, such as collagen type II and aggrecan. Matrix biomechanical stability indicated that the constructs retrieve full stability and function during 3D culture for up to 42 days, proportional to collagen type II and GAG production. Thus, processed xenogenic cartilage offers a suitable environment for human nasal chondrocytes and has promising potential for cartilage tissue engineering in the head and neck region.

  5. [Articular cartilage regeneration using stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kanamoto, Takashi; Nakamura, Norimasa; Nakata, Ken; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2008-12-01

    Articular cartilage plays pivotal roles in securing smooth joint kinematics and act as a shock absorber, however, it has minimal healing potential. Chondral injury could lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and therefore is a major clinical concern. There have been marrow stimulating technique and osteochondral transplantation explored to promote cartilage repair. In addition, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been developed by Peterson and Brittberg and more than 20,000 cases underwent the procedure all over the world. Recent progress in stem cell research has raised the potential application of stem cell therapy to cartilage repair. In this review, potential application of bone marrow or synovial-derived mesenchymal cells to promote cartilage repair would be discussed.

  6. Calcification of in vitro developed hypertrophic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Tacchetti, C.; Quarto, R.; Campanile, G.; Cancedda, R.

    1989-04-01

    We have recently reported that dedifferentiated cells derived from stage 28-30 chick embryo tibiae, when transferred in suspension culture in the presence of ascorbic acid, develop in a tissue closely resembling hypertrophic cartilage. Ultrastructural examination of this in vitro formed cartilage showed numerous matrix vesicles associated with the extracellular matrix. In the present article we report that the in vitro developed hypertrophic cartilage undergoes calcification. We indicate a correlation between the levels of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition at different times of development. Following the transfer of cells into suspension culture and an initial lag phase, the level of alkaline phosphatase activity rapidly increased. In most experiments the maximum of activity was reached after 5 days of culture. When alkaline phosphatase activity and /sup 45/Ca deposition were measured in the same experiment, we observed that the increase in alkaline phosphatase preceded the deposition of nonwashable calcium deposits in the cartilage.

  7. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology.

  8. Harnessing biomechanics to develop cartilage regeneration strategies.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Responte, Donald J; Brown, Wendy E; Hu, Jerry C

    2015-02-01

    As this review was prepared specifically for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers H.R. Lissner Medal, it primarily discusses work toward cartilage regeneration performed in Dr. Kyriacos A. Athanasiou's laboratory over the past 25 years. The prevalence and severity of degeneration of articular cartilage, a tissue whose main function is largely biomechanical, have motivated the development of cartilage tissue engineering approaches informed by biomechanics. This article provides a review of important steps toward regeneration of articular cartilage with suitable biomechanical properties. As a first step, biomechanical and biochemical characterization studies at the tissue level were used to provide design criteria for engineering neotissues. Extending this work to the single cell and subcellular levels has helped to develop biochemical and mechanical stimuli for tissue engineering studies. This strong mechanobiological foundation guided studies on regenerating hyaline articular cartilage, the knee meniscus, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) fibrocartilage. Initial tissue engineering efforts centered on developing biodegradable scaffolds for cartilage regeneration. After many years of studying scaffold-based cartilage engineering, scaffoldless approaches were developed to address deficiencies of scaffold-based systems, resulting in the self-assembling process. This process was further improved by employing exogenous stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, growth factors, and matrix-modifying and catabolic agents, both singly and in synergistic combination to enhance neocartilage functional properties. Due to the high cell needs for tissue engineering and the limited supply of native articular chondrocytes, costochondral cells are emerging as a suitable cell source. Looking forward, additional cell sources are investigated to render these technologies more translatable. For example, dermis isolated adult stem (DIAS) cells show potential as a source of

  9. Animal Models for Cartilage Regeneration and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Szczodry, Michal; Bruno, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury and degeneration are leading causes of disability. Animal studies are critically important to developing effective treatments for cartilage injuries. This review focuses on the use of animal models for the study of the repair and regeneration of focal cartilage defects. Animals commonly used in cartilage repair studies include murine, lapine, canine, caprine, porcine, and equine models. There are advantages and disadvantages to each model. Small animal rodent and lapine models are cost effective, easy to house, and useful for pilot and proof-of-concept studies. The availability of transgenic and knockout mice provide opportunities for mechanistic in vivo study. Athymic mice and rats are additionally useful for evaluating the cartilage repair potential of human cells and tissues. Their small joint size, thin cartilage, and greater potential for intrinsic healing than humans, however, limit the translational value of small animal models. Large animal models with thicker articular cartilage permit study of both partial thickness and full thickness chondral repair, as well as osteochondral repair. Joint size and cartilage thickness for canine, caprine, and mini-pig models remain significantly smaller than that of humans. The repair and regeneration of chondral and osteochondral defects of size and volume comparable to that of clinically significant human lesions can be reliably studied primarily in equine models. While larger animals may more closely approximate the human clinical situation, they carry greater logistical, financial, and ethical considerations. A multifactorial analysis of each animal model should be carried out when planning in vivo studies. Ultimately, the scientific goals of the study will be critical in determining the appropriate animal model. PMID:19831641

  10. [Therapeutic algorithm for traumatic cartilage injuries].

    PubMed

    Miltner, Oliver; Hagemann, Lars; Ristan, Steven; Siebert, Christian H

    2009-02-01

    Reports regarding sport injuries frequently pertain to the knee. Although ligament and meniscus damage are the most common, cartilage injuries are of great interest. Even with the great variety of treatment modalities available, the healing of these cartilage injuries remains problematic. Due to the complex structure of hyaline cartilage joint surface, repair has proven to be very difficult. The conservative treatment options range from orthotic devices and physical therapy to systemic and intraarticular medication. In case of failure, a wide variety of surgical interventions exist. Among these surgical treatment forms, one must differentiate between the repair and the reconstruction of hyaline joint surfaces. In the latter group only the osteochondral autologous transplantation procedures allow for the reconstruction of a cartilaginous lesion with hyaline cartilage as part of a single procedure. This paper will provide an overview of most common therapeutic approaches to cartilage injuries available today. Even with the ongoing discussions with regard to cartilage healing, the basics such as the ligamentous stability of the affected joint, the mechanical axis of the extremity and good neuromuscular control must always be part of the algorithm.

  11. Histological differences between invasive ductal carcinoma with a large central acellular zone and matrix-producing carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuka; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ueda, Shigeto; Asakawa, Hideki; Seki, Kunihiko; Murata, Tetsuya; Kuriki, Ken; Tamai, Seiichi; Matsubara, Osamu

    2009-06-01

    Carcinoma with a large central acellular zone (central acellular carcinoma, CAC) and matrix-producing carcinoma (MPC) have been recently noted as basal-like-type breast cancers, but the two entities are often confused. To clarify their histological differences, the histopathological sections of 15 CAC and seven MPC were examined and the following features were compared by reviewing slides: (i) mode of invasion; (ii) alteration of cancer cell adhesion in the transitional area between cellular and acellular zones; (iii) staining of the stromal matrix; (iv) lymphocyte infiltration; and (v) tumor grade. Complete agreement was required between two observers for the assessments of these features. All CAC had relatively sharp margins but showed infiltrative growth accompanied by eosinophilic intercellular matrix. In CAC there was abrupt transition between peripheral cellular and central acellular zones without alteration of cancer cell adhesion. In contrast, all MPC showed expansive growth with a well circumscribed margin, accompanied by basophilic and myxoid intercellular matrix. In MPC there was gradual transition from cellular to acellular areas with gradual loss of cancer cell adhesion. Histological grade 3 and peripheral lymphocyte infiltration were common features. It is suggested that CAC and MPC are histologically distinct entities, and that the aforementioned features are helpful for differential diagnosis.

  12. Evaluating acellular versus cellular perfusate composition during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion after initial cold ischaemia for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Becker, Simon; Steinmeyer, Jasmin; Avsar, Murat; Höffler, Klaus; Salman, Jawad; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Ochs, Matthias; Schnapper, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has developed as a powerful technique to evaluate particularly marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. In this study, acellular and cellular perfusate compositions were compared in an identical experimental setting as no consensus has been reached on a preferred technique yet. Porcine lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h on the basis of an acellular or a cellular perfusate composition after 24 h of cold ischaemia as defined organ stress. During perfusion, haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. After EVLP, the lung condition was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Aerodynamic parameters did not show significant differences between groups and remained within the in vivo range during EVLP. Mean oxygenation indices were 491 ± 39 in the acellular group and 513 ± 53 in the cellular group. Groups only differed significantly in terms of higher pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance in the cellular group. Lung histology and ultrastructure were largely well preserved after prolonged EVLP and showed only minor structural alterations which were similarly present in both groups. Prolonged acellular and cellular EVLP for 12 h are both feasible with lungs prechallenged by ischaemic organ stress. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis showed no superiority of either acellular or cellular perfusate composition.

  13. Limited integrative repair capacity of native cartilage autografts within cartilage defects in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Gelse, Kolja; Riedel, Dominic; Pachowsky, Milena; Hennig, Friedrich F; Trattnig, Siegfried; Welsch, Götz H

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate integration and cellular outgrowth of native cartilage autografts transplanted into articular cartilage defects. Native cartilage autografts were applied into chondral defects in the femoral condyle of adult sheep. Within the defects, the calcified cartilage layer was either left intact or perforated to induce bone marrow stimulation. Empty defects served as controls. The joints were analyzed after 6 and 26 weeks by macroscopic and histological analysis using the ICRS II Score and Modified O'Driscoll Scores. Non-treated defects did not show any endogenous regenerative response and bone marrow stimulation induced fibrous repair tissue. Transplanted native cartilage grafts only insufficiently integrated with the defect borders. Cell death and loss of proteoglycans were present at the margins of the grafts at 6 weeks, which was only partially restored at 26 weeks. Significant cellular outgrowth from the grafts or defect borders could not be observed. Bonding of the grafts could be improved by additional bone marrow stimulation providing ingrowing cells that formed a fibrous interface predominantly composed of type I collagen. Transplanted native cartilage grafts remain as inert structures within cartilage defects and fail to induce integrative cartilage repair which rather demands additional cells provided by additional bone marrow stimulation.

  14. Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Yun, Sol; Wie, Jeong Jae; Zhang, Xu; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Park, Ho Seok

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a cartilage-inspired superelastic and ultradurable nanocomposite strategy for the selective inclusion of viscoelastic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) into graphene sheet junctions to create effective stress-transfer pathways within three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogels (GAs). Inspired by the joint architectures in the human body, where small amounts of soft cartilage connect stiff (or hard) but hollow (and thus lightweight) bones, the 3D internetworked GA@PDMS achieves synergistic toughening. The resulting GA@PDMS nanocomposites exhibit fully reversible structural deformations (99.8% recovery even at a 90% compressive strain) and high compressive mechanical strength (448.2 kPa at a compressive strain of 90%) at repeated compression cycles. Owing to the combination of excellent mechanical and electrical properties, the GA@PDMS nanocomposites are used as signal transducers for strain sensors, showing very short response and recovery times (in the millisecond range) with reliable sensitivity and extreme durability. Furthermore, the proposed system is applied to electronic scales with a large detectable weight of about 4600 times greater than its own weight. Such bio-inspired cartilage architecture opens the door to fabricate new 3D multifunctional and mechanically durable nanocomposites for emerging applications, which include sensors, actuators, and flexible devices.In this study, we demonstrate a cartilage-inspired superelastic and ultradurable nanocomposite strategy for the selective inclusion of viscoelastic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) into graphene sheet junctions to create effective stress-transfer pathways within three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogels (GAs). Inspired by the joint architectures in the human body, where small amounts of soft cartilage connect stiff (or hard) but hollow (and thus lightweight) bones, the 3D internetworked GA@PDMS achieves synergistic toughening. The resulting GA@PDMS nanocomposites exhibit fully

  15. Tissue engineering strategies to study cartilage development, degeneration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Coburn, Jeannine; Centola, Matteo; Murab, Sumit; Barbero, Andrea; Kaplan, David L; Martin, Ivan; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on the generation of grafts to repair cartilage defects due to traumatic injury and disease. However engineered cartilage tissues have also a strong scientific value as advanced 3D culture models. Here we first describe key aspects of embryonic chondrogenesis and possible cell sources/culture systems for in vitro cartilage generation. We then review how a tissue engineering approach has been and could be further exploited to investigate different aspects of cartilage development and degeneration. The generated knowledge is expected to inform new cartilage regeneration strategies, beyond a classical tissue engineering paradigm.

  16. Cartilage putty: a novel use of fibrin glue with morselised cartilage grafts for rhinoplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Susan; Hodgkinson, Peter D

    2014-11-01

    Cartilage grafts have multiple purposes within rhinoplasty surgery. The senior author has previously used wrapped diced cartilage grafts but found it difficult to maintain the integrity of the graft "package" during placement. Introduction of Tisseel fibrin glue stabilises the cartilage fragments producing a rubbery mass that can be used like "cartilage putty." This malleable construct can be inserted and moulded with less risk of dispersal. This technique has now been used on nineteen patients. It has provided a valuable method of reconstruction especially in complex cases such as revision rhinoplasty and patients with a thin dorsal skin envelope. There has been no evidence of graft absorption or requirement for additional surgery to date. The addition of Tisseel to wrapped diced cartilage grafts, has proven in this series of complex rhinoplasty patients, to be a useful adjunct which aids insertion and contouring. Furthermore, beneficial effects on healing have been demonstrated which contributes to good quality long-term cosmetic results. Level of Evidence V.

  17. Cell sheet approach for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Utoh, Rie; Nagase, Kenichi; Okano, Teruo

    2014-09-28

    After the biotech medicine era, regenerative medicine is expected to be an advanced medicine that is capable of curing patients with difficult-to-treat diseases and physically impaired function. Our original scaffold-free cell sheet-based tissue engineering technology enables transplanted cells to be engrafted for a long time, while fully maintaining their viability. This technology has already been applied to various diseases in the clinical setting, including the cornea, esophagus, heart, periodontal ligament, and cartilage using autologous cells. Transplanted cell sheets not only replace the injured tissue and compensate for impaired function, but also deliver growth factors and cytokines in a spatiotemporal manner over a prolonged period, which leads to promotion of tissue repair. Moreover, the integration of stem cell biology and cell sheet technology with sufficient vascularization opens possibilities for fabrication of human three-dimensional vascularized dense and intact tissue grafts for regenerative medicine to parenchymal organs.

  18. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  19. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of ...

  20. Uterine Fibroids Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Uterine fibroids fact sheet (PDF, 950 KB) FDA warning on power morcellators in treatment for uterine ... Topics Uterine fibroids fact sheet (PDF, 950 KB) FDA warning on power morcellators in treatment for uterine ...

  1. Enhanced cartilage repair in 'healer' mice-New leads in the search for better clinical options for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a poor capacity to undergo intrinsic repair. Current strategies for the repair of large cartilage defects are generally unsatisfactory because the restored cartilage does not have the same resistance to biomechanical loading as authentic articular cartilage and degrades over time. Recently, an exciting new research direction, focused on intrinsic cartilage regeneration rather than fibrous repair by external means, has emerged. This review explores the new findings in this rapidly moving field as they relate to the clinical goal of restoration of structurally robust, stable and non-fibrous articular cartilage following injury.

  2. Adjuvant neurotrophic factors in peripheral nerve repair with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-reduced acellular nerve allografts

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Richard B.; Sexton, Kevin W.; Rodriguez-Feo, Charles L.; Nookala, Ratnam; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Tisdale, Keonna Y.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Shack, R. Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acellular nerve allografts are now standard tools in peripheral nerve repair due to decreased donor site morbidity and operative time savings. Preparation of nerve allografts involves several steps of decellularization and modification of extracellular matrix to remove chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth through a poorly understood mechanism involving RhoA and ECM-integrin interactions. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) is an enzyme that degrades CSPG molecules and has been shown to promote neurite outgrowth following injury of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Variable results following chondroitinase ABC treatment make it difficult to predict the effects of this drug in human nerve allografts, especially in the presence of native extracellular signaling molecules. Several studies have shown cross-talk between neurotrophic factor and CSPG signaling pathways, but their interaction remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the adjuvant effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on neurite outgrowth post-injury in CSPG-reduced substrates and acellular nerve allografts. Materials and Methods E12 chicken DRG explants were cultured in medium containing ChABC, ChABC + NGF, ChABC + GDNF or control media. Explants were imaged at 3 d and neurite outgrowths measured. The rat sciatic nerve injury model involved a 1-cm sciatic nerve gap that was microsurgically repaired with ChABC pre-treated acellular nerve allografts. Prior to implantation, nerve allografts were incubated in NGF, GDNF or sterile water. Nerve histology was evaluated at 5d and 8wk post-injury. Results The addition of GDNF in vitro produced significant increase in sensory neurite length at 3 d compared to ChABC alone (P < 0.01), while NGF was not significantly different from control. In vivo adjuvant NGF produced increases in total myelinated axon count (P < 0.005) and motor axon

  3. Automatic knee cartilage delineation using inheritable segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dries, Sebastian P. M.; Pekar, Vladimir; Bystrov, Daniel; Heese, Harald S.; Blaffert, Thomas; Bos, Clemens; van Muiswinkel, Arianne M. C.

    2008-03-01

    We present a fully automatic method for segmentation of knee joint cartilage from fat suppressed MRI. The method first applies 3-D model-based segmentation technology, which allows to reliably segment the femur, patella, and tibia by iterative adaptation of the model according to image gradients. Thin plate spline interpolation is used in the next step to position deformable cartilage models for each of the three bones with reference to the segmented bone models. After initialization, the cartilage models are fine adjusted by automatic iterative adaptation to image data based on gray value gradients. The method has been validated on a collection of 8 (3 left, 5 right) fat suppressed datasets and demonstrated the sensitivity of 83+/-6% compared to manual segmentation on a per voxel basis as primary endpoint. Gross cartilage volume measurement yielded an average error of 9+/-7% as secondary endpoint. For cartilage being a thin structure, already small deviations in distance result in large errors on a per voxel basis, rendering the primary endpoint a hard criterion.

  4. Anisotropic hydraulic permeability in compressed articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    The extent to which articular cartilage hydraulic permeability is anisotropic is largely unknown, despite its importance for understanding mechanisms of joint lubrication, load bearing, transport phenomena, and mechanotransduction. We developed and applied new techniques for the direct measurement of hydraulic permeability within statically compressed adult bovine cartilage explant disks, dissected such that disk axes were perpendicular to the articular surface. Applied pressure gradients were kept small to minimize flow-induced matrix compaction, and fluid outflows were measured by observation of a meniscus in a glass capillary under a microscope. Explant disk geometry under radially unconfined axial compression was measured by direct microscopic observation. Pressure, flow, and geometry data were input to a finite element model where hydraulic permeabilities in the disk axial and radial directions were determined. At less than 10% static compression, near free-swelling conditions, hydraulic permeability was nearly isotropic, with values corresponding to those of previous studies. With increasing static compression, hydraulic permeability decreased, but the radially directed permeability decreased more dramatically than the axially directed permeability such that strong anisotropy (a 10-fold difference between axial and radial directions) in the hydraulic permeability tensor was evident for static compression of 20-40%. Results correspond well with predictions of a previous microstructurally-based model for effects of tissue mechanical deformations on glycosaminoglycan architecture and cartilage hydraulic permeability. Findings inform understanding of structure-function relationships in cartilage matrix, and suggest several biomechanical roles for compression-induced anisotropic hydraulic permeability in articular cartilage.

  5. Can Glucosamine Supplements Protect My Knee Cartilage from Osteoarthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cartilage in osteoarthritis? Can glucosamine supplements protect my knee cartilage from osteoarthritis? Answers from Brent A. Bauer, M.D. Study results on this question have been mixed, with some suggesting possible ...

  6. Mechanical properties of natural cartilage and tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Little, Christopher James; Bawolin, Nahshon Kenneth; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2011-08-01

    There has been much research over the past two decades with the aim of engineering cartilage constructs for repairing or restoring damaged cartilage. To engineer healthy neocartilage, the constructs must have mechanical properties matching those of native cartilage as well as appropriate for the loading conditions of the joint. This article discusses the mechanical behavior of native cartilage and surveys different types of tensile, compressive, and shear tests with their limitations. It also comprehensively reviews recent work and achievements in developing the mathematical models representing the mechanical properties of both native and engineered cartilage. Different methods for enhancing the mechanical properties of engineered cartilage are also discussed, including scaffold design, mechanical stimulation, and chemical stimulation. This article concludes with recommendations for future research aimed at achieving engineered cartilage with mechanical properties matching those found in native cartilage.

  7. Clinical and MRI considerations in sports-related knee joint cartilage injury and cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Richard J; Houlihan-Burne, David G

    2011-02-01

    Cartilage injuries of the knee occur frequently in professional and amateur athletes and can be associated with severe debilitation and morbidity. They are commonly associated with ligament injuries but also may be frequently isolated. Increasing awareness and advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to increasing diagnosis and recognition of these injuries. Articular cartilage is just 2 to 4 mm thick and is avascular, alymphatic, and aneural. It has a limited capacity for healing, and there has been increasing use of cartilage repair techniques to treat these lesions in the active population. Strategies for cartilage repair include marrow stimulation techniques such as microfracture/drilling, osteochondral grafting, and autologous chondrocyte transplants. MRI is an important tool in the diagnosis and grading of cartilage injury and is useful in the follow-up and monitoring of these repair procedures. It is important for radiologists and clinicians to be aware of the capabilities and limitations of MRI in assessing cartilage injury and to be familiar with common postsurgical appearances to facilitate assessment and follow-up in this population. This article reviews the clinical findings and MRI imaging appearances of cartilage injury. The management options are discussed as well as common postsurgical appearances following the various interventions.

  8. Role of Chondrocytes in Cartilage Formation, Progression of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akkiraju, Hemanth; Nohe, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) covers the diarthrodial joints and is responsible for the mechanical distribution of loads across the joints. The majority of its structure and function is controlled by chondrocytes that regulate Extracellular Matrix (ECM) turnover and maintain tissue homeostasis. Imbalance in their function leads to degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis (OA). OA is characterized by cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and stiffening of joints. Cartilage degeneration is a consequence of chondrocyte hypertrophy along with the expression of proteolytic enzymes. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS) are an example of these enzymes that degrade the ECM. Signaling cascades involved in limb patterning and cartilage repair play a role in OA progression. However, the regulation of these remains to be elucidated. Further the role of stem cells and mature chondrocytes in OA progression is unclear. The progress in cell based therapies that utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) infusion for cartilage repair may lead to new therapeutics in the long term. However, many questions are unanswered such as the efficacy of MSCs usage in therapy. This review focuses on the role of chondrocytes in cartilage formation and the progression of OA. Moreover, it summarizes possible alternative therapeutic approaches using MSC infusion for cartilage restoration. PMID:27347486

  9. Cartilage Space Width in Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: The Relationship to Cartilage Necrosis 1

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, John A.; Simon, Theodore R.; Southwick, Wayne O.

    1977-01-01

    The radiolucent cartilage space of eighty-three patients with unilateral or bilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis was measured by a standardized technique. In the majority of patients, whether unilateral or bilateral involvement, there was bilateral narrowing of the cartilage space. In the unaffected hip of unilaterally involved patients, there was a progressive narrowing as skeletal maturity was attained. A concomitant anatomical study of cadaver hips, removed at autopsy from adolescent patients, showed a progressive narrowing of the cartilage as the proximal femur matured. Black females showed most narrowing (minimum cartilage space width), had the narrowest final cartilage space widths, and took the longest to attain this final width. While other racial, sexual and therapeutic groups failed to demonstrate statistically significant differences, the general trend was for females, Blacks, and patients treated by osteotomy to have more joint space narrowing. However, rewidening occurred in most of these affected joint spaces, in contrast to the progressive linear decrease observed in unaffected hips and anatomical specimens. On the basis of this study, we feel that cartilage space narrowing may be anticipated in the post-operative period in most patients treated for slipped capital femoral epiphysis. This narrowing appears to improve with time. Narrowing of greater than one-half the original width, in association with pain and limitation of joint function, probably represents “cartilage necrosis,” or pathologic joint space narrowing. Unless the narrowing remains less than one-half to two-thirds of the initial cartilage space for more than twenty-four to thirty-six months, probably no specific surgical treatment should be undertaken, other than observation and protected weight bearing during any painful phase. Plotting the roentgenographic cartilage space width during the three month to thirty-six month phase may be useful in monitoring and predicting the

  10. Altered function in cartilage derived mesenchymal stem cell leads to OA-related cartilage erosion

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zenan; Ma, Pei; Wu, Nan; Su, Xinlin; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Chao; Liu, Sen; Chen, Weisheng; Ma, Bupeng; Yang, Xu; Ma, Yufen; Weng, Xisheng; Qiu, Guixing; Huang, Shishu; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    A portion of osteoarthritis (OA) patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) had monocondylar destruction in medial femoral condyle, but healthy-appearant cartilage in lateral side. However, there is limited information concerning functional differences of cartilage derived mesenchymal stem cell (CMSC) between these two locations in the same donor and its possible role in the pathogenesis of OA. Cells isolated from the degraded cartilage in medial condyle and normal cartilage in lateral side from OA patients were identified with co-expressed markers CD105 and CD166 and confirmed as CMSCs by immunophenotype. The relative percentage, proliferation activity, multi-lineage differentiation potential and miRNA expression profile of CMSCs in two groups were compared by flow cytometry, CCK-8 assay, cytochemical staining, immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and miRNA microarray analysis. Our study suggested that the percentage (10.61±6.97% vs. 18.44±9.97%, P<0.05) and proliferation rate (P<0.01) of CD105+/CD166+ CMSCs from the degraded cartilage were significantly reduced compared with those from the normal cartilage. CMSCs from the degraded cartilage also showed stronger osteogenic (P<0.05), weaker adipogenic (P<0.01), and comparable chondrogenic potential (P>0.05) during differentiation. MiR-31-5p and miR-424-5p were down regulated in CMSCs from the degraded cartilage. In conclusion, altered function such as reduced percentage and proliferation ability, as well as changes in differentiation profile of CMSC contributed to homeostasis imbalance, leading to OA-related cartilage erosion. Furthermore, regulatory networks of multiple miRNAs may be partially responsible for the dysfunction of CMSCs. PMID:27158337

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  12. Confocal imaging of mouse mandibular condyle cartilage

    PubMed Central

    He, Y.; Zhang, M.; Huang, A. Y.; Cui, Y.; Bai, D.; Warman, M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Mice are commonly used to study the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to model human TMJ disease. However, evaluating TMJ pathology in mice using standard histologic methods is time consuming, labor intensive, and dependent upon investigators’ expertise at consistently orienting and sectioning across tiny specimens. We describe a method that uses confocal microscopy to rapidly and reliably assess indicators of mandibular condyle cartilage pathology in mice. We demonstrate the utility of this method for detecting abnormalities in chondrocyte distribution in mice lacking lubricin (Prg4), the major boundary lubricant of articular cartilage. We further show that the method can provide information about recombination sites and efficiency in mandibular cartilage for Cre-driver strains. Because specimen preparation and data acquisition with confocal microscopy are simple and fast, the method can serve as a primary screening tool for TMJ pathology, before proceeding to complicated, time consuming, secondary analyses. PMID:28266618

  13. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkovits, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  14. Tissue engineering of biphasic joint cartilage transplants.

    PubMed

    Kreklau, B; Sittinger, M; Mensing, M B; Voigt, C; Berger, G; Burmester, G R; Rahmanzadeh, R; Gross, U

    1999-09-01

    In isolated posttraumatic or idiopathic joint defects the chondral layers and adjacent subchondral spongy bone are usually destructed. For regeneration we suggest the in vitro formation of a cartilage-coated biomaterial carriers (biphases) in order to fill the correspondingjoint defects. In this study Biocoral, a natural coralline material made of calcium carbonate, and calcite, a synthetic calcium carbonate, were used as supports for the cultivation of bovine chondrocytes in a three-dimensional polymer fleece. The cell-polymer-structure was affixed to the biomaterial with a fibrin-cell-solution. The artificial cartilage formed a new matrix and fused with the underlying biomaterial. The results indicate a promising technical approach to anchor tissue engineered cartilage in joint defects.

  15. Synovium and cartilage biomarkers in hemophilic arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Some promising cartilage and synovium biomarkers are at various stages of development and awaiting further validation in larger patient populations with osteoarthritis (OA). Various reports have shown increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers, both locally (synovial fluid) and systemically (serum and plasma) in such patients. The clinical value of these parameters in combination with imaging biomarkers in order to predict early onset and the burden of OA is being investigated. This review article aims to describe the potential usefulness of synovial and cartilage biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of hemophilic arthropathy (HA) by using the existing literature on OA as an applicable model. A systematic review found that serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (sCOMP) is elevated in patients with knee OA and is sensitive to OA disease progression.

  16. Morphogenesis of the second pharyngeal arch cartilage (Reichert's cartilage) in human embryos.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sánchez-Montesinos, I; Mérida-Velasco, J A

    2006-02-01

    This study was performed on 50 human embryos and fetuses between 7 and 17 weeks of development. Reichert's cartilage is formed in the second pharyngeal arch in two segments. The longer cranial or styloid segment is continuous with the otic capsule; its inferior end is angulated and is situated very close to the oropharynx. The smaller caudal segment is in contact with the body and greater horn of the hyoid cartilaginous structure. No cartilage forms between these segments. The persistent angulation of the inferior end of the cranial or styloid segment of Reichert's cartilage and its important neurovascular relationships may help explain the symptomatology of Eagle's syndrome.

  17. Morphogenesis of the second pharyngeal arch cartilage (Reichert's cartilage) in human embryos

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sánchez-Montesinos, I; Mérida-Velasco, J A

    2006-01-01

    This study was performed on 50 human embryos and fetuses between 7 and 17 weeks of development. Reichert's cartilage is formed in the second pharyngeal arch in two segments. The longer cranial or styloid segment is continuous with the otic capsule; its inferior end is angulated and is situated very close to the oropharynx. The smaller caudal segment is in contact with the body and greater horn of the hyoid cartilaginous structure. No cartilage forms between these segments. The persistent angulation of the inferior end of the cranial or styloid segment of Reichert's cartilage and its important neurovascular relationships may help explain the symptomatology of Eagle's syndrome. PMID:16441562

  18. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies.

  19. Triiodothyronine stimulates cartilage growth and maturation by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, W.M.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1987-02-01

    The mechanisms by which triiodothyronine (T3) stimulates growth and maturation of growth-plate cartilage in vitro were studied by incubating embryonic chick pelvic cartilages in serum-free medium in the presence and absence of T3 for 3 days. To determine whether T3 might stimulate production of somatomedins by the cartilage, medium from cartilage incubated with and without T3 was assayed for somatomedin C( Sm-C) by radioimmunoassay. No difference in Sm-C content was found. However, cartilage incubated with T3 and increasing amounts of human Sm-C (0.5-20 ng/ml) weighed more and had greater amounts of glycosaminoglycan that cartilage incubated in the same concentrations of Sm-C without T3, suggesting that T3 enhances the growth effect of somatomedin. The authors added a monoclonal antibody to Sm-C (anti-Sm-C) to the organ culture to determine whether T3's stimulatory effect on cartilage growth could be blocked. The anti-Sm-C inhibited growth of cartilage incubated in medium alone and blocked the growth response to T3. They propose two different mechanisms by which T3 affects growth-plate cartilage: (1) T3 promotes cartilage growth primarily through enhancing the effect of somatomedin, and (2) T3 stimulates cartilage maturation possibly by accelerating the normal process of cartilage differentiation from proliferative to hypertrophic chondrocytes.

  20. Cartilage morphogenetic proteins: role in joint development, homoeostasis, and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reddi, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Articular cartilage homoeostasis is critical for joint function. The steady state homoeostasis of articular cartilage is a balance between anabolic morphogens such as cartilage derived morphogenetic proteins (CDMPs) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) of the BMP family and catabolic cytokines such as interleukin (IL)1, IL17, and tumour necrosis factor α. Although bone and articular cartilage are adjacent tissues, there is a profound difference in their regeneration potential. Bone has the highest potential for regeneration. On the other hand, articular cartilage is recalcitrant to repair. Objective: To examine the hypothesis that the feeble innate regeneration ability of cartilage is due to the preponderance of catabolic cytokines such as IL1 and IL17. Results: During a systematic investigation of CDMPs and cytokines IL17B (chondroleukin) was found in bovine articular cartilage. Discussion and conclusions: BMP-7 and IL17B are present in articular cartilage and synthesised in chondrocytes as shown by northern blots and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The coexistence of anabolic morphogens and catabolic cytokines in articular cartilage has important implications for cartilage homoeostasis and regeneration. The networks of signalling systems of morphogens and cytokines determine the net capacity for regenerative morphogenesis of articular cartilage. Finally, the feeble innate capacity for articular cartilage may be improved by targeted therapy by soluble receptors to block catabolic cytokines. PMID:14532155

  1. Acellular components of Chlamydia pneumoniae stimulate cytokine production in human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Netea, M G; Selzman, C H; Kullberg, B J; Galama, J M; Weinberg, A; Stalenhoef, A F; Van der Meer, J W; Dinarello, C A

    2000-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae is associated with atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Inflammation is important in the initial phase of atherogenesis, and cytokines are important in the initiation and progression of inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of acellular components of C. pneumoniae to stimulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated in vitro with sonicated C. pneumoniae. Significant amounts of TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) were produced. Inhibition of endotoxin using polymyxin B revealed that chlamydial endotoxin plays a minor role in the cytokine induction. Neutralization of TNF by TNF-binding protein and blockade of IL-1 receptors by IL-1 receptor antagonist revealed that TNF, IL-1 and IL-6 production was independent from each other, whereas IL-8 synthesis was strongly dependent on endogenous TNF and IL-1. In contrast, synthesis of MCP-1 and MIP-1alpha was dependent on endogenous TNF, but not IL-1. In conclusion, acellular components of C. pneumoniae are a potent stimulus for cytokine production, and this mechanism may have an important role in the inflammatory aspects of atherogenesis.

  2. Cellular Immune Responses of Preterm Infants after Vaccination with Whole-Cell or Acellular Pertussis Vaccines▿

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Françoise; Verscheure, Virginie; Damis, Eliane; Vermeylen, Danièle; Leloux, Gaëlle; Dirix, Violette; Locht, Camille; Mascart, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Based on studies reporting specific antibody titers, it is recommended to vaccinate preterm infants against Bordetella pertussis according to their chronological age. However, as specific T-cell responses also are involved in the protection against B. pertussis, we have determined whether highly preterm infants (<31 weeks) are able to mount these immune responses during vaccination. Forty-eight premature infants were vaccinated at 2, 3, and 4 months of their chronological age with an acellular (Pa; n = 24) or a whole-cell (Pw; n = 24) tetravalent diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio vaccine, and blood samples were collected at 2, 3, and 6 months of age. Most of the Pa- and Pw-vaccinated infants developed at 3 or 6 months of age a gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response to the B. pertussis antigens, accompanied by an interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 secretion for the Pa-vaccinated infants. No association was found between a very low infant birth weight, the occurrence of severe infections, and corticosteroid treatment or the administration of gammaglobulins with a low level of antigen-induced IFN-γ secretion. We conclude that like full-term infants, most preterm infants are able to mount a specific cellular immune response to the administration of the first doses of an acellular or a whole-cell pertussis vaccine. PMID:20016042

  3. Creation and implantation of acellular rat renal ECM-based scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Andrea; Ferrario, Jacopo; Maiga, Benedetta; Benzoni, Ilaria; Bianco, Carolina; Citro, Antonio; Currao, Manuela; Malara, Alessandro; Gaspari, Annalisa; Balduini, Alessandra; Abelli, Massimo; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Dionigi, Paolo; Orlando, Giuseppe; Maestri, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Kidney transplantation is the only potentially curative treatment for patient facing end-stage renal disease, and it is now routinely used. Its use is mainly limited by the supply of transplantable donor organs, which far exceeds the demand. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering offer promising means for overcoming this shortage. In the present study, we developed and validated a protocol for producing acellular rat renal scaffolds. Left kidneys were removed from 26 male Lewis rats (weights: 250–350 g) and decellularized by means of aortic anterograde perfusion with ionic and anionic detergents (Triton X-100 1% and SDS 1%, respectively). 19 scaffolds thus obtained (and contralateral native kidneys as controls) were deeply characterized in order to evaluate the decellularization quality, the preservation of extracellular matrix components and resultant micro-angioarchitecture structure. The other 7 were transplanted into 7 recipient rats that had undergone unilateral nephrectomy. Recipients were sacrificed on post-transplantation day 7 and the scaffolds subjected to histologic studies. The dual-detergent protocol showed, with only 5 h of perfusion per organ, to obtain thoroughly decellularized renal scaffolds consisting almost exclusively of extracellular matrix. Finally the macro- and the microarchitecture of the renal parenchyma were well preserved, and the grafts were implanted with ease. Seven days after transplant, the scaffolds were morphologically intact although all vascular structures were obstructed with thrombi. Production and implantation of acellular rat renal scaffolds is a suitable platform for further studies on regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. PMID:26186418

  4. Acellular Urethra Bioscaffold: Decellularization of Whole Urethras for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Simões, Irina N; Vale, Paulo; Soker, Shay; Atala, Anthony; Keller, Daniel; Noiva, Rute; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Conceição; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Eberli, Daniel; da Silva, Cláudia L; Baptista, Pedro M

    2017-02-06

    Patients with stress urinary incontinence mainly suffer from malfunction of the urethra closure mechanism. We established the decellularization of porcine urethras to produce acellular urethra bioscaffolds for future tissue engineering applications, using bioscaffolds or bioscaffold-derived soluble products. Cellular removal was evaluated by H&E, DAPI and DNA quantification. The presence of specific ECM proteins was assessed through immunofluorescence staining and colorimetric assay kits. Human skeletal muscle myoblasts, muscle progenitor cells and adipose-derived stromal vascular fractions were used to evaluate the recellularization of the acellular urethra bioscaffolds. The mechanochemical decellularization system removed ~93% of tissue's DNA, generally preserving ECM's components and microarchitecture. Recellularization was achieved, though methodological advances are required regarding cell seeding strategies and functional assessment. Through microdissection and partial digestion, different urethra ECM-derived coating substrates were formulated (i.e. containing smooth or skeletal muscle ECM) and used to culture MPCs in vitro. The skeletal muscle ECM substrates enhanced fiber formation leading to the expression of the main skeletal muscle-related proteins and genes, as confirmed by immunofluorescence and RT-qPCR. The described methodology produced a urethra bioscaffold that retained vital ECM proteins and was liable to cell repopulation, a crucial first step towards the generation of urethra bioscaffold-based Tissue Engineering products.

  5. Alternatives to HIST for acellular pertussis vaccines: progress and challenges in replacement

    PubMed Central

    Arciniega, J.; Wagner, L.; Prymula, R.; Sebo, P.; Isbrucker, R.; Descampe, B.; Chapsal, J.M.; Costanzo, A.; Hendriksen, C.; Hoonaker, M.; Nelson, S.; Lidster, K.; Casey, W.; Allen, D.

    2016-01-01

    The ‘International Workshop on Alternatives to the Murine Histamine Sensitization Test for Acellular Pertussis Vaccines: Progress and Challenges in the Replacement of HIST’ was held on 24 August 2014, in Prague, Czech Republic, as a satellite meeting to the 9 th World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences. Participants discussed the progress and challenges associated with the development, validation, and implementation of in vitro assays as replacements for the histamine sensitisation test (HIST) for acellular pertussis vaccines. Discussions focused on the consistency approach, the necessary framework for regulatory acceptance of a harmonised method, and recent international efforts towards the development of in vitro assays to replace the HIST. Workshop participants agreed that acceptable alternatives to the HIST should be based on ADP ribosylation-mediated cell intoxication and therefore that the CHO cell clustering assay, which measures cell intoxication, should be further pursued and developed as a possible replacement for the HIST. Participants also agreed to continue ongoing multinational discussions involving national and international standardisation authorities to reach consensus and to organise collaborative studies in this context for assay characterisation and calibration of reference materials. PMID:27506225

  6. Acellular Urethra Bioscaffold: Decellularization of Whole Urethras for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Irina N.; Vale, Paulo; Soker, Shay; Atala, Anthony; Keller, Daniel; Noiva, Rute; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Conceição; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.; Eberli, Daniel; da Silva, Cláudia L.; Baptista, Pedro M.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with stress urinary incontinence mainly suffer from malfunction of the urethra closure mechanism. We established the decellularization of porcine urethras to produce acellular urethra bioscaffolds for future tissue engineering applications, using bioscaffolds or bioscaffold-derived soluble products. Cellular removal was evaluated by H&E, DAPI and DNA quantification. The presence of specific ECM proteins was assessed through immunofluorescence staining and colorimetric assay kits. Human skeletal muscle myoblasts, muscle progenitor cells and adipose-derived stromal vascular fractions were used to evaluate the recellularization of the acellular urethra bioscaffolds. The mechanochemical decellularization system removed ~93% of tissue’s DNA, generally preserving ECM’s components and microarchitecture. Recellularization was achieved, though methodological advances are required regarding cell seeding strategies and functional assessment. Through microdissection and partial digestion, different urethra ECM-derived coating substrates were formulated (i.e. containing smooth or skeletal muscle ECM) and used to culture MPCs in vitro. The skeletal muscle ECM substrates enhanced fiber formation leading to the expression of the main skeletal muscle-related proteins and genes, as confirmed by immunofluorescence and RT-qPCR. The described methodology produced a urethra bioscaffold that retained vital ECM proteins and was liable to cell repopulation, a crucial first step towards the generation of urethra bioscaffold-based Tissue Engineering products. PMID:28165009

  7. The acellular matrix (ACM) for bladder tissue engineering: A quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret; Loai, Yasir; Beaumont, Marine; Farhat, Walid A

    2010-08-01

    Bladder acellular matrices (ACMs) derived from natural tissue are gaining increasing attention for their role in tissue engineering and regeneration. Unlike conventional scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers or gels, ACMs possess native biomechanical and many acquired biologic properties. Efforts to optimize ACM-based scaffolds are ongoing and would be greatly assisted by a noninvasive means to characterize scaffold properties and monitor interaction with cells. MRI is well suited to this role, but research with MRI for scaffold characterization has been limited. This study presents initial results from quantitative MRI measurements for bladder ACM characterization and investigates the effects of incorporating hyaluronic acid, a natural biomaterial useful in tissue-engineering and regeneration. Measured MR relaxation times (T(1), T(2)) and diffusion coefficient were consistent with increased water uptake and glycosaminoglycan content observed on biochemistry in hyaluronic acid ACMs. Multicomponent MRI provided greater specificity, with diffusion data showing an acellular environment and T(2) components distinguishing the separate effects of increased glycosaminoglycans and hydration. These results suggest that quantitative MRI may provide useful information on matrix composition and structure, which is valuable in guiding further development using bladder ACMs for organ regeneration and in strategies involving the use of hyaluronic acid.

  8. Deficiency in acellular cementum and periodontal attachment in bsp null mice.

    PubMed

    Foster, B L; Soenjaya, Y; Nociti, F H; Holm, E; Zerfas, P M; Wimer, H F; Holdsworth, D W; Aubin, J E; Hunter, G K; Goldberg, H A; Somerman, M J

    2013-02-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues of the skeleton and dentition. BSP is multifunctional, affecting cell attachment and signaling through an RGD integrin-binding region, and acting as a positive regulator for mineral precipitation by nucleating hydroxyapatite crystals. BSP is present in cementum, the hard tissue covering the tooth root that anchors periodontal ligament (PDL) attachment. To test our hypothesis that BSP plays an important role in cementogenesis, we analyzed tooth development in a Bsp null ((-/-)) mouse model. Developmental analysis by histology, histochemistry, and SEM revealed a significant reduction in acellular cementum formation on Bsp (-/-) mouse molar and incisor roots, and the cementum deposited appeared hypomineralized. Structural defects in cementum-PDL interfaces in Bsp (-/-) mice caused PDL detachment, likely contributing to the high incidence of incisor malocclusion. Loss of BSP caused progressively disorganized PDL and significantly increased epithelial down-growth with aging. Bsp (-/-) mice displayed extensive root and alveolar bone resorption, mediated by increased RANKL and the presence of osteoclasts. Results collected here suggest that BSP plays a non-redundant role in acellular cementum formation, likely involved in initiating mineralization on the root surface. Through its importance to cementum integrity, BSP is essential for periodontal function.

  9. Deficiency in Acellular Cementum and Periodontal Attachment in Bsp Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foster, B.L.; Soenjaya, Y.; Nociti, F.H.; Holm, E.; Zerfas, P.M.; Wimer, H.F.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Aubin, J.E.; Hunter, G.K.; Goldberg, H.A.; Somerman, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues of the skeleton and dentition. BSP is multifunctional, affecting cell attachment and signaling through an RGD integrin-binding region, and acting as a positive regulator for mineral precipitation by nucleating hydroxyapatite crystals. BSP is present in cementum, the hard tissue covering the tooth root that anchors periodontal ligament (PDL) attachment. To test our hypothesis that BSP plays an important role in cementogenesis, we analyzed tooth development in a Bsp null (-/-) mouse model. Developmental analysis by histology, histochemistry, and SEM revealed a significant reduction in acellular cementum formation on Bsp-/- mouse molar and incisor roots, and the cementum deposited appeared hypomineralized. Structural defects in cementum-PDL interfaces in Bsp-/- mice caused PDL detachment, likely contributing to the high incidence of incisor malocclusion. Loss of BSP caused progressively disorganized PDL and significantly increased epithelial down-growth with aging. Bsp-/- mice displayed extensive root and alveolar bone resorption, mediated by increased RANKL and the presence of osteoclasts. Results collected here suggest that BSP plays a non-redundant role in acellular cementum formation, likely involved in initiating mineralization on the root surface. Through its importance to cementum integrity, BSP is essential for periodontal function. PMID:23183644

  10. Boundary cartilage lubrication: review of current concepts.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Matej

    2014-03-01

    Effective lubrication of synovial joints is important to prevent cartilage degeneration and to keep the joints healthy. This paper sets out the basics of engineering lubrication with respect to the composition and properties of synovial fluid constituents. Two basic types of boundary lubrication are discussed: the presence of highly hydrophilic proteoglycans that provide a water liquid film, and the existence of multilamellar phospholipids lubricating layers at the surface ofarticular cartilage. Based on current knowledge, we may conclude that no single mechanism of boundary lubrication exists, and that effective boundary lubrication of synovial joints is maintained by the synergic effect of all synovial fluid constituents.

  11. Body Weight Independently Affects Articular Cartilage Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Denning, W. Matt; Winward, Jason G.; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J. Ty; Seeley, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key points Walking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration. Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  12. [Chondrocyte mecanobiology. Application in cartilage tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Stoltz, Jean François; Netter, Patrick; Huselstein, Céline; de Isla, Natalia; Wei Yang, Jing; Muller, Sylvaine

    2005-11-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue that withstands and distributes mechanical forces within joints. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain cartilaginous tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Some mechanotransduction mechanisms are known, while many others no doubt remain to be discovered. Various aspects of chondrocyte mechanobiology have been applied to tissue engineering, with the creation of replacement tissue in vitro from bioresorbable or non-bioresorbable scaffolds and harvested cells. The tissues are maintained in a near-physiologic mechanical and biochemical environment. This paper is an overview of both chondrocyte mechanobiology and cartilage tissue engineering

  13. Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Yun, Sol; Wie, Jeong Jae; Zhang, Xu; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing; Park, Ho Seok

    2016-07-14

    In this study, we demonstrate a cartilage-inspired superelastic and ultradurable nanocomposite strategy for the selective inclusion of viscoelastic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) into graphene sheet junctions to create effective stress-transfer pathways within three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogels (GAs). Inspired by the joint architectures in the human body, where small amounts of soft cartilage connect stiff (or hard) but hollow (and thus lightweight) bones, the 3D internetworked GA@PDMS achieves synergistic toughening. The resulting GA@PDMS nanocomposites exhibit fully reversible structural deformations (99.8% recovery even at a 90% compressive strain) and high compressive mechanical strength (448.2 kPa at a compressive strain of 90%) at repeated compression cycles. Owing to the combination of excellent mechanical and electrical properties, the GA@PDMS nanocomposites are used as signal transducers for strain sensors, showing very short response and recovery times (in the millisecond range) with reliable sensitivity and extreme durability. Furthermore, the proposed system is applied to electronic scales with a large detectable weight of about 4600 times greater than its own weight. Such bio-inspired cartilage architecture opens the door to fabricate new 3D multifunctional and mechanically durable nanocomposites for emerging applications, which include sensors, actuators, and flexible devices.

  14. Influence of dynamic load on friction behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel as artificial cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Su, Yonglin; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Wang, Chengtao

    2010-01-01

    Many biomaterials are being developed to be used for cartilage substitution and hemiarthroplasty implants. The lubrication property is a key feature of the artificial cartilage. The frictional behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel were investigated under cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact, cartilage-on-cartilage contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact using pin-on-plate method. Tests under static load, cyclic load and 1 min load change were used to evaluate friction variations in reciprocating motion. The results showed that the lubrication property of cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact were restored in both 1 min load change and cyclic load tests. The friction coefficient of PVA hydrogel decreased from 0.178 to 0.076 in 60 min, which was almost one-third of the value under static load in continuous sliding tests. In each test, the friction coefficient of cartilage-on-cartilage contact maintained far lower value than other contacts. It is indicated that a key feature of artificial cartilage is the biphasic lubrication properties.

  15. Decellularized cartilage matrix as a novel biomatrix for cartilage tissue-engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Silke; Koerber, Ludwig; Elsaesser, Alexander F; Goldberg-Bockhorn, Eva; Seitz, Andreas M; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Walther, Paul; Breiter, Roman; Rotter, Nicole

    2012-11-01

    Damage of cartilage structures in the head and neck region as well as in orthopedic sites are frequently caused by trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. Despite a high demand in many clinical fields, until today, no adequate cartilage replacement matrix is available for these fields of application. Materials that are clinically applied for joint cartilage repair still need optimization due to difficult intraoperative handling and risk of early mechanical damage. We have developed and applied a novel chemical process to completely decellularize and sterilize human and porcine cartilage tissues (meniscus cartilage and nasal septum) to generate a new type of bioimplant matrix. To characterize this matrix and to determine the effect of the decellularization process, the content of denatured collagen (w(D)) and the content of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) (w(G)) were determined. Possible cytotoxic effects and cellular compatibility of the matrix in vitro have been examined by seeding processed cartilage biomatrices with human primary chondrocytes as well as murine fibroblasts (L929). Vitality and state of metabolism of cells were measured using MTS assays. Both cell types adhered to scaffold surfaces and proliferated. No areas of growth inhibition or cytotoxic effects were detected. New synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix was observed. By histological staining, electron microscopy, and μCT analysis, an increase of matrix porosity, complete cell elimination, and high GAG removal were demonstrated. Being from natural-origin, processed xenogenic and allogeneic cartilage biomatrices are highly versatile with regard to shape, size, and biomechanics, making them promising candidates for various biomedical applications.

  16. Fetal jaw movement affects condylar cartilage development.

    PubMed

    Habib, H; Hatta, T; Udagawa, J; Zhang, L; Yoshimura, Y; Otani, H

    2005-05-01

    Using a mouse exo utero system to examine the effects of fetal jaw movement on the development of condylar cartilage, we assessed the effects of restraint of the animals' mouths from opening, by suture, at embryonic day (E)15.5. We hypothesized that pre-natal jaw movement is an important mechanical factor in endochondral bone formation of the mandibular condyle. Condylar cartilage was reduced in size, and the bone-cartilage margin was ill-defined in the sutured group at E18.5. Volume, total number of cells, and number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive cells in the mesenchymal zone were lower in the sutured group than in the non-sutured group at E16.5 and E18.5. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were larger, whereas fewer apoptotic chondrocytes and osteoclasts were observed in the hypertrophic zone in the sutured group at E18.5. Analysis of our data revealed that restricted fetal TMJ movement influences the process of endochondral bone formation of condylar cartilage.

  17. Intraoperative knee anthropometrics: correlation with cartilage wear.

    PubMed

    Rooney, N; Fitzpatrick, D P; Beverland, D E

    2006-08-01

    Accurate knee morphology is of value in determining the correct sizing of prosthetic implants. Intraoperative measurement of key linear dimensional variables was carried out on 196 Caucasian knees (osteoarthritic patients: 68 male and 128 female). Of the 196 knees measured, 70 had extensive cartilage degeneration. Statistical analysis was carried out on this large sample size of data. Summary statistics and correlation coefficients between variables were determined and compared between subgroups. Male knees were on average larger than female knees. Higher correlation was found between variables for males than between variables for females. Overall, the patellar dimensions were seen to correlate least well with other anatomical variables. High correlation between femoral variables supports current femoral sizing procedure, although routine patellar resection practices are called into question. Average values for the 70 knees with extensive cartilage degeneration were significantly smaller (P < 0.01) than their counterparts for the other 126 knees. For a measurement not containing cartilage, such as femoral epicondylar width, this difference cannot be accounted for by the loss of cartilage owing to wear. This suggests that, for similar height and weight, a naturally narrower femoral epicondylar width may be associated with severe osteoarthritis.

  18. Knee Articular Cartilage Repair and Restoration Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Dustin L.; Schenck, Robert C.; Wascher, Daniel C.; Treme, Gehron

    2015-01-01

    Context: Isolated chondral and osteochondral defects of the knee are a difficult clinical challenge, particularly in younger patients for whom alternatives such as partial or total knee arthroplasty are rarely advised. Numerous surgical techniques have been developed to address focal cartilage defects. Cartilage treatment strategies are characterized as palliation (eg, chondroplasty and debridement), repair (eg, drilling and microfracture [MF]), or restoration (eg, autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI], osteochondral autograft [OAT], and osteochondral allograft [OCA]). Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for treatment articles using the keywords knee, articular cartilage, and osteochondral defect, with a focus on articles published in the past 5 years. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: In general, smaller lesions (<2 cm2) are best treated with MF or OAT. Furthermore, OAT shows trends toward greater longevity and durability as well as improved outcomes in high-demand patients. Intermediate-size lesions (2-4 cm2) have shown fairly equivalent treatment results using either OAT or ACI options. For larger lesions (>4 cm2), ACI or OCA have shown the best results, with OCA being an option for large osteochondritis dissecans lesions and posttraumatic defects. Conclusion: These techniques may improve patient outcomes, though no single technique can reproduce normal hyaline cartilage. PMID:26502188

  19. [Biogenic stimulants of metabolism in articular cartilage].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V E; Novikova, A V

    2011-01-01

    The review considers issues of pharmacodynamics and clinical applications of drugs with the metabolic type of action, which stimulate regeneration and provide the protective action on articular cartilage in cases of osteoarthritis. Published data of the experimental and clinical trials of the main chondroprotective agents are analyzed.

  20. Gap junctional communication during limb cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Kosher, R A

    1991-03-01

    The onset of cartilage differentiation in the developing limb bud is characterized by a transient cellular condensation process in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells become closely apposed to one another prior to initiating cartilage matrix deposition. During this condensation process intimate cell-cell interactions occur which are necessary to trigger chondrogenic differentiation. In the present study, we demonstrate that extensive cell-cell communication via gap junctions as assayed by the intercellular transfer of lucifer yellow dye occurs during condensation and the onset of overt chondrogenesis in high density micromass cultures prepared from the homogeneous population of chondrogenic precursor cells comprising the distal subridge region of stage 25 embryonic chick wing buds. Furthermore, in heterogeneous micromass cultures prepared from the mesodermal cells of whole stage 23/24 limb buds, extensive gap junctional communication is limited to differentiating cartilage cells, while the nonchondrogenic cells of the cultures that are differentiating into the connective tissue lineage exhibit little or no intercellular communication via gap junctions. These results provide a strong incentive for considering and further investigating the possible involvement of cell-cell communication via gap junctions in the regulation of limb cartilage differentiation.

  1. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  2. Elastic and osmotic properties of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, David; Dimitriadis, Emilios; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Horkay, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves cellular and biochemical processes linked to mechanical stress. A better understanding of the mechanism of these processes and how they cause changes in the composition, macro- and micro-structure, and mechanical properties of cartilage is necessary for developing effective preventative and treatment strategies. In this study, elastic and osmotic swelling properties of tissue-engineered cartilage were explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a tissue osmometer. AFM was also used to image the surface of the specimens while chemical composition was determined by biochemical analysis. Estimation of the Young's moduli of the tissue from AFM force-indentation data was performed using an optimization approach to fit appropriate models to the data. Force-indentation data were acquired both with sharp, pyramidal and with microspherical probes. The procedure has been validated by making measurements on model gel systems of known elastic properties. This approach is presented as a robust method of optimally extracting Young's moduli of soft, crosslinked materials from AFM data. Gross inhomogeneities at different scales in the cartilage tissue are manifested in the high degree of variance in local Young's moduli values obtained from both AFM and osmotic swelling data. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of cartilage are affected by the local macromolecular composition.

  3. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingjie; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ma, Ning; Hao, Chunxiang; Guo, Weimin; Zou, Gengyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Mingxue; Gao, Shuang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2017-01-01

    The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed. PMID:28246531

  4. The effects of exercise on human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, F; Hudelmaier, M; Putz, R

    2006-01-01

    The effects of exercise on articular hyaline articular cartilage have traditionally been examined in animal models, but until recently little information has been available on human cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging now permits cartilage morphology and composition to be analysed quantitatively in vivo. This review briefly describes the methodological background of quantitative cartilage imaging and summarizes work on short-term (deformational behaviour) and long-term (functional adaptation) effects of exercise on human articular cartilage. Current findings suggest that human cartilage deforms very little in vivo during physiological activities and recovers from deformation within 90 min after loading. Whereas cartilage deformation appears to become less with increasing age, sex and physical training status do not seem to affect in vivo deformational behaviour. There is now good evidence that cartilage undergoes some type of atrophy (thinning) under reduced loading conditions, such as with postoperative immobilization and paraplegia. However, increased loading (as encountered by elite athletes) does not appear to be associated with increased average cartilage thickness. Findings in twins, however, suggest a strong genetic contribution to cartilage morphology. Potential reasons for the inability of cartilage to adapt to mechanical stimuli include a lack of evolutionary pressure and a decoupling of mechanical competence and tissue mass. PMID:16637874

  5. Zn deposition at the bone cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Moger, C. J.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 μm and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  6. Extracellular matrix production in vitro in cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Lin; Duan, Li; Zhu, Weimin; Xiong, Jianyi; Wang, Daping

    2014-04-05

    Cartilage tissue engineering is arising as a technique for the repair of cartilage lesions in clinical applications. However, fibrocartilage formation weakened the mechanical functions of the articular, which compromises the clinical outcomes. Due to the low proliferation ability, dedifferentiation property and low production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) of the chondrocytes, the cartilage synthesis in vitro has been one of the major limitations for obtaining high-quality engineered cartilage constructs. This review discusses cells, biomaterial scaffolds and stimulating factors that can facilitate the cartilage-specific ECM production and accumulation in the in vitro culture system. Special emphasis has been put on the factors that affect the production of ECM macromolecules such as collagen type II and proteoglycans in the review, aiming at providing new strategies to improve the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  7. Depletion of Gangliosides Enhances Articular Cartilage Repair in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Masatake; Onodera, Tomohiro; Homan, Kentaro; Sasazawa, Fumio; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Momma, Daisuke; Baba, Rikiya; Hontani, Kazutoshi; Joutoku, Zenta; Matsubara, Shinji; Yamashita, Tadashi; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of the healing mechanisms in damaged tissues is a critical step for establishing breakthroughs in tissue engineering. Articular cartilage is clinically one of the most successful tissues to be repaired with regenerative medicine because of its homogeneous extracellular matrix and few cell types. However, we only poorly understand cartilage repair mechanisms, and hence, regenerated cartilage remains inferior to the native tissues. Here, we show that glycosylation is an important process for hypertrophic differentiation during articular cartilage repair. GM3, which is a precursor molecule for most gangliosides, was transiently expressed in surrounding damaged tissue, and depletion of GM3 synthase enhanced cartilage repair. Gangliosides also regulated chondrocyte hypertrophy via the Indian hedgehog pathway. These results identify a novel mechanism of cartilage healing through chondrocyte hypertrophy that is regulated by glycosylation. Manipulation of gangliosides and their synthases may have beneficial effects on articular cartilage repair. PMID:28252046

  8. Recent developments in scaffold-guided cartilage tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shi, Kun; Ding, Qiuxia; Qu, Ying; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage repair is one of the most challenging problems in biomedical engineering because the regenerative capacity of cartilage is intrinsically poor. The lack of efficient treatment modalities motivates researches into cartilage tissue engineering such as combing cells, scaffolds and growth factors. In this review we summarize the current developments on scaffold systems available for cartilage tissue engineering. The factors that are critical to successfully design an ideal scaffold for cartilage regeneration were discussed. Then we present examples of selected material types (natural polymers and synthetic polymers) and fabricated forms of the scaffolds (three-dimensional scaffolds, micro- or nanoparticles, and their composites). In the end of review, we conclude with an overview of the ways in which biomedical nanotechnology is widely applied in cartilage tissue engineering, especially in the design of composite scaffolds. This review attempts to provide recommendations on the combination of qualities that would produce the ideal scaffold system for cartilage tissue engineering.

  9. Perforating Thin Metal Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Sheets only few mils thick bonded together, punched, then debonded. Three-step process yields perforated sheets of metal. (1): Individual sheets bonded together to form laminate. (2): laminate perforated in desired geometric pattern. (3): After baking, laminate separates into individual sheets. Developed for fabricating conductive layer on blankets that collect and remove ions; however, perforated foils have other applications - as conductive surfaces on insulating materials; stiffeners and conductors in plastic laminates; reflectors in antenna dishes; supports for thermal blankets; lightweight grille cover materials; and material for mockup of components.

  10. Development of an artificial articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Oka, M; Noguchi, T; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Yamamuro, T; Hyon, S H; Ikada, Y

    1990-01-01

    We have attempted to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. We investigated poly(vinyl alcohol)-hydrogel (PVA-H) which has been recognized as a rubber-like gel and have improved the mechanical properties of this gel through a new synthetic process. In this article we report the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new, improved PVA-H from the aspect of its usefulness as artificial articular cartilage. As regards the lubrication, we measured the change of thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading and found that the PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressure than polyethylene (PE). The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times as large as that of PE. Histological findings of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around the PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammatory nor degenerative changes. The PVA-H artificial articular cartilage could be attached to the underlying bone using an osteochondral composite material. Although there remain still some problems to solve, PVA-H seems to be a very interesting and promising material which meets the requirements of artificial articular cartilage.

  11. Multiscale modeling of growth plate cartilage mechanobiology.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Williams, John L; Roan, Esra

    2017-04-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes are responsible for bone growth through proliferation and differentiation. However, the way they experience physiological loads and regulate bone formation, especially during the later developmental phase in the mature growth plate, is still under active investigation. In this study, a previously developed multiscale finite element model of the growth plate is utilized to study the stress and strain distributions within the cartilage at the cellular level when rapidly compressed to 20 %. Detailed structures of the chondron are included in the model to examine the hypothesis that the same combination of mechanoregulatory signals shown to maintain cartilage or stimulate osteogenesis or fibrogenesis in the cartilage anlage or fracture callus also performs the same function at the cell level within the chondrons of growth plate cartilage. Our cell-level results are qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with tissue-level theories when both hydrostatic cellular stress and strain are considered simultaneously in a mechanoregulatory phase diagram similar to that proposed at the tissue level by Claes and Heigele for fracture healing. Chondrocytes near the reserve/proliferative zone border are subjected to combinations of high compressive hydrostatic stresses ([Formula: see text] MPa), and cell height and width strains of [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] respectively, that maintain cartilage and keep chondrocytes from differentiating and provide conditions favorable for cell division, whereas chondrocytes closer to the hypertrophic/calcified zone undergo combinations of lower compressive hydrostatic stress ([Formula: see text] MPa) and cell height and width strains as low as [Formula: see text] to +4 %, respectively, that promote cell differentiation toward osteogenesis; cells near the outer periphery of the growth plate structure experience a combination of low compressive hydrostatic stress (0 to [Formula: see text] MPa) and

  12. Accuracy of 3D cartilage models generated from MR images is dependent on cartilage thickness: laser scanner based validation of in vivo cartilage.

    PubMed

    Koo, Seungbum; Giori, Nicholas J; Gold, Garry E; Dyrby, Chris O; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2009-12-01

    Cartilage morphology change is an important biomarker for the progression of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of in vivo cartilage thickness measurements from MR image-based 3D cartilage models using a laser scanning method and to test if the accuracy changes with cartilage thickness. Three-dimensional tibial cartilage models were created from MR images (in-plane resolution of 0.55 mm and thickness of 1.5 mm) of osteoarthritic knees of ten patients prior to total knee replacement surgery using a semi-automated B-spline segmentation algorithm. Following surgery, the resected tibial plateaus were laser scanned and made into 3D models. The MR image and laser-scan based models were registered to each other using a shape matching technique. The thicknesses were compared point wise for the overall surface. The linear mixed-effects model was used for statistical test. On average, taking account of individual variations, the thickness measurements in MRI were overestimated in thinner (<2.5 mm) regions. The cartilage thicker than 2.5 mm was accurately predicted in MRI, though the thick cartilage in the central regions was underestimated. The accuracy of thickness measurements in the MRI-derived cartilage models systemically varied according to native cartilage thickness.

  13. Gravity related behavior of the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, I.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the experiment is to investigate the effect of near weightlessness on a single cell. The test object is the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum. This cell is composed of a network of protoplastic strands which perform rhythmic contractions in the minute range. These contractions of the strands' ectoplastic walls generate the force to drive the vigorous shuttle streaming of fluid protoplasm inside the strands (hydrostatic pressure flow). A net transport of protoplasm in one direction determines the direction of the cell's locomotion itself. In this way, gravity modifies the contraction rhythm of the strands, the streaming velocity of protoplasm in the strands, and the direction of locomotion of the whole slime mold (geotaxis). The other parts of this experiment will address the major question of how this cell, which does not possess any specialized gravireceptors, gets the information about the direction of the gravity vector. Details of the experimental setup are given.

  14. Is Sterile Better Than Aseptic? Comparing the Microbiology of Acellular Dermal Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gabriel M.; Nasser, Ahmed E.; Phillips, Brett T.; Gersch, Robert P.; Fourman, Mitchell S.; Lilo, Sarit E.; Fritz, Jason R.; Khan, Sami U.; Dagum, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Postoperative infections are a major complication associated with tissue-expander-based breast reconstruction. The use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in this surgery has been identified as a potential reservoir of infection, prompting the development of sterile ADM. Although aseptic and sterile ADMs have been investigated, no study has focused on the occurrence and clinical outcome of bacterial colonization before implantation. Methods: Samples of aseptic AlloDerm, sterile Ready-To-Use AlloDerm, and AlloMax were taken before implantation. These samples were incubated in Tryptic soy broth overnight before being streaked on Trypticase soy agar, MacConkey agar, and 5% blood agar plates for culture and incubated for 48 hours. Culture results were cross-referenced with patient outcomes for 1 year postoperatively. Results: A total of 92 samples of ADM were collected from 63 patients. There were 15 cases of postoperative surgical site infection (16.3%). Only 1 sample of ADM (AlloMax) showed growth of Escherichia coli, which was likely a result of contamination. That patient did not develop any infectious sequelae. Patient outcomes showed no difference in the incidence of seroma or infection between sterile and aseptic ADMs. Conclusions: This study evaluates the microbiology of acellular dermal matrices before use in breast reconstruction. No difference was found in the preoperative bacterial load of either aseptic or sterile ADM. No significant difference was noted in infection or seroma formation. Given these results, we believe aseptic processing used on ADMs is equivalent to sterile processing in our patient cohort in terms of clinical infection and seroma occurrence postoperatively. PMID:27482500

  15. Adaptive bone formation in acellular vertebrae of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.).

    PubMed

    Kranenbarg, Sander; van Cleynenbreugel, Tim; Schipper, Henk; van Leeuwen, Johan

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian bone is an active tissue in which osteoblasts and osteoclasts balance bone mass. This process of adaptive modelling and remodelling is probably regulated by strain-sensing osteocytes. Bone of advanced teleosts is acellular yet, despite the lack of osteocytes, it is capable of an adaptive response to physical stimuli. Strenuous exercise is known to induce lordosis. Lordosis is a ventrad curvature of the vertebral column, and the affected vertebrae show an increase in bone formation. The effects of lordosis on the strain distribution in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) vertebrae are assessed using finite element modelling. The response of the local tissue is analyzed spatially and ontogenetically in terms of bone volume. Lordotic vertebrae show a significantly increased strain energy due to the increased load compared with normal vertebrae when loaded in compression. High strain regions are found in the vertebral centrum and parasagittal ridges. The increase in strain energy is attenuated by a change in architecture due to the increased bone formation. The increased bone formation is seen mainly at the articular surfaces of the vertebrae, although some extra bone is formed in the vertebral centrum. Regions in which the highest strains are found do not spatially correlate with regions in which the most extensive bone apposition occurs in lordotic vertebrae of sea bass. Mammalian-like strain-regulated bone modelling is probably not the guiding mechanism in adaptive bone modelling of acellular sea bass vertebrae. Chondroidal ossification is found at the articular surfaces where it mediates a rapid adaptive response, potentially attenuating high stresses on the dorsal zygapophyses.

  16. Effect of schedule on reactogenicity and antibody persistence of acellular and whole-cell pertussis vaccines: value of laboratory tests as predictors of clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Miller, E; Ashworth, L A; Redhead, K; Thornton, C; Waight, P A; Coleman, T

    1997-01-01

    The performance of four acellular pertussis vaccines containing between two and five pertussis antigens combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids was compared with that of British whole-cell diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis (DTP) vaccine both in laboratory assays for potency, toxicity and immunogenicity, and for reactogenicity and immunogenicity in infants. Clinical responses were evaluated in double blind randomized Phase II trials using 3/5/9 month and 2/3/4 month schedules. The acellular DTPs had much lower toxicity than whole-cell DTP in laboratory tests and were significantly less pyrogenic than whole-cell DTP under both schedules. Local reactions were not consistently lower in acellular than whole-cell vaccinees and varied with the source of the diphtheria and tetanus antigens used. Differences in endotoxin level and content of active pertussis toxin (PT) between acellular DTP vaccines were not clinically significant. The reactogenicity advantage of the acellular vaccines was substantially reduced under the 2/3/4 month schedule due to the reduced reactogenicity of the whole-cell DTP vaccine when given at a younger age. There was no relationship between antigen content measured in micrograms per dose and ELISA antibody responses to filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA) and PT in infants, nor was murine immunogenicity predictive of immunogenicity in humans. Antibody response to PT was attenuated in the whole-cell group under the 2/3/4 month schedule but was unaffected in the group receiving acellular vaccines with individually purified components; antibody response to pertactin (69 kDa antigen) was similar in recipients of the whole-cell and component acellular vaccines under the 2/3/4 month schedule. PT antibody persistence until 4-5 years of age was significantly better in recipients of the component acellular than either the whole-cell vaccine or the co-purified acellular vaccine under the 3/5/9 month schedule. However, diphtheria antitoxin levels were reduced in

  17. Cartilage issues in football—today's problems and tomorrow's solutions

    PubMed Central

    Mithoefer, Kai; Peterson, Lars; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is prevalent in football players and results from chronic joint stress or acute traumatic injuries. Articular cartilage injury can often result in progressive painful impairment of joint function and limit sports participation. Management of articular cartilage injury in athletes aims to return the player to competition, and requires effective and durable joint surface restoration that resembles normal hyaline articular cartilage that can withstand the high joint stresses of football. Existing articular cartilage repair techniques can return the athlete with articular cartilage injury to high-impact sports, but treatment does not produce normal articular cartilage, and this limits the success rate and durability of current cartilage repair in athletes. Novel scientific concepts and treatment techniques that apply modern tissue engineering technologies promise further advancement in the treatment of these challenging injuries in the high demand athletic population. We review the current knowledge of cartilage injury pathophysiology, epidemiology and aetiology, and outline existing management algorithms, developing treatment options and future strategies to manage articular cartilage injuries in football players. PMID:25878075

  18. Anti-rheumatic drugs and cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P

    1988-08-01

    In this chapter an attempt has been made to draw together the known biology of cartilage and some of the mechanisms thought to be responsible for its failure in arthritis. The picture is far from complete but we are now in a good position to use this information to help appraise the pros and cons of the wide range of drugs now available to treat articular disorders. For convenience, these drugs were classified as NSAIDs, corticosteroids and chondroprotective agents. The influence of each of these classes on the metabolism of cartilage was examined in the light of published laboratory and clinical studies. It has been clearly shown that not all NSAIDs are the same. While many of the older drugs provided no benefit to cartilage metabolism, and in some instances suppressed it, the more recently discovered molecules appear to be free of these undesirable effects. Tiaprofenic acid, diclofenac and piroxicam emerged as drugs with little or no harmful effects on cartilage metabolism when used at concentrations within the human therapeutic range. For all NSAIDs, their potential effects on cartilage must be weighed against their respective anti-inflammatory potency, half-life, and effects on the gastric mucosa and other tissues. Other chapters in this book have addressed these important problems. The long-acting corticosteroids, betamethasone and triamcinolone hexacetonide, also appear to offer some benefit in the management of OA; however, as in RA, their use should be restricted to short-term applications. In terms of cartilage metabolism the chondroprotective agents pentosan polysulphate, Arteparon and Rumalon have been the most extensively studied class of drugs. While the laboratory studies have provided convincing evidence of their chondroprotective efficacy, it has been difficult to prove this clinically. This dichotomy of opinion (laboratory versus clinical) stems largely from the inadequacy of the methodologies currently available for the objective clinical

  19. Mechanics of Sheeting Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical breakdown of rock across a broad scale spectrum involves fracturing. In many areas large fractures develop near the topographic surface, with sheeting joints being among the most impressive. Sheeting joints share many geometric, textural, and kinematic features with other joints (opening-mode fractures) but differ in that they are (a) discernibly curved, (b) open near the topographic surface, and (c) form subparallel to the topographic surface. Where sheeting joints are geologically young, the surface-parallel compressive stresses are typically several MPa or greater. Sheeting joints are best developed beneath domes, ridges, and saddles; they also are reported, albeit rarely, beneath valleys or bowls. A mechanism that accounts for all these associations has been sought for more than a century: neither erosion of overburden nor high lateral compressive stresses alone suffices. Sheeting joints are not accounted for by Mohr-Coulomb shear failure criteria. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, together with the mechanical effect of a curved topographic surface, do provide a basis for understanding sheeting joint growth and the pattern sheeting joints form. Compressive stresses parallel to a singly or doubly convex topographic surface induce a tensile stress perpendicular to the surface at shallow depths; in some cases this alone could overcome the weight of overburden to open sheeting joints. If regional horizontal compressive stresses, augmented by thermal stresses, are an order of magnitude or so greater than a characteristic vertical stress that scales with topographic amplitude, then topographic stress perturbations can cause sheeting joints to open near the top of a ridge. This topographic effect can be augmented by pressure within sheeting joints arising from water, ice, or salt. Water pressure could be particularly important in helping drive sheeting joints downslope beneath valleys. Once sheeting joints have formed, the rock sheets between

  20. Significance of Epigenetic Landscape in Cartilage Regeneration from the Cartilage Development and Pathology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingting; Ohliger, James

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative therapies for cartilage defects have been greatly advanced by progress in both the stem cell biology and tissue engineering fields. Despite notable successes, significant barriers remain including shortage of autologous cell sources and generation of a stable chondrocyte phenotype using progenitor cells. Increasing demands for the treatment of degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, highlight the importance of epigenetic remodeling in cartilage regeneration. Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms, such as microRNAs, DNA methylation, and histone modifications, have been intensively studied due to their direct regulatory role on gene expression. However, a thorough understanding of the environmental factors that initiate these epigenetic events may provide greater insight into the prevention of degenerative diseases and improve the efficacy of treatments. In other words, if we could identify a specific factor from the environment and its downstream signaling events, then we could stop or retard degradation and enhance cartilage regeneration. A more operational definition of epigenetic remodeling has recently been proposed by categorizing the signals during the epigenetic process into epigenators, initiators, and maintainers. This review seeks to compile and reorganize the existing literature pertaining to epigenetic remodeling events placing emphasis on perceiving the landscape of epigenetic mechanisms during cartilage regeneration with the new operational definition, especially from the environmental factors' point of view. Progress in understanding epigenetic regulatory mechanisms could benefit cartilage regeneration and engineering on a larger scale and provide more promising therapeutic applications. PMID:24555773

  1. Hypotonic challenge modulates cell volumes differently in the superficial zone of intact articular cartilage and cartilage explant.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Siru M; Lammi, Mikko J; Saarakkala, Simo; Koistinen, Arto; Korhonen, Rami K

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sample preparation on the biomechanical behaviour of chondrocytes. We compared the volumetric and dimensional changes of chondrocytes in the superficial zone (SZ) of intact articular cartilage and cartilage explant before and after a hypotonic challenge. Calcein-AM labelled SZ chondrocytes were imaged with confocal laser scanning microscopy through intact cartilage surfaces and through cut surfaces of cartilage explants. In order to clarify the effect of tissue composition on cell volume changes, Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy was used for estimating the proteoglycan and collagen contents of the samples. In the isotonic medium (300 mOsm), there was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the SZ cell volumes and aspect ratios between intact cartilage samples and cartilage explants. Changes in cell volumes at both short-term (2 min) and long-term (2 h) time points after the hypotonic challenge (180 mOsm) were significantly different (p < 0.05) between the groups. Further, proteoglycan content was found to correlate significantly (r(2) = 0.63, p < 0.05) with the cell volume changes in cartilage samples with intact surfaces. Collagen content did not correlate with cell volume changes. The results suggest that the biomechanical behaviour of chondrocytes following osmotic challenge is different in intact cartilage and in cartilage explant. This indicates that the mechanobiological responses of cartilage and cell signalling may be significantly dependent on the integrity of the mechanical environment of chondrocytes.

  2. [Allograft of cultured chondrocytes into articular cartilage defects in rabbits--experimental study of the repair of articular cartilage injuries].

    PubMed

    Tsuge, H; Sasaki, T; Susuda, K; Abe, K

    1983-08-01

    Articular cartilage defects were created by dill holes, 2 mm wide and 3 mm deep, through the articular cartilage into the subchondral bone in the patellar groove of the femur in mature rabbits. The defects received graft of cultured chondrocytes and the matrix obtained from the primary culture of chondrocytes isolated from the articular cartilage or auricular cartilage in immature rabbits. The isolated cells were cultured for 10 to 14 days. For graft, the cultured chondrocytes together with the matrix were detached from the culture chamber using rubber policemen and centrifuged. The repair of the grafted defects or defects without graft (control) was histologically studied 2 to 12 weeks after operation. The defects without the graft were progressively filled with fibrous tissue containing spindle shaped cells, fibers perpendicular to the surface, and matrix showing weak metachromasia with toluidin blue at 8 weeks. The defects received articular cartilage cell graft were occupied by new cartilage tissue consisting colonylike crumps of chondrocytes 2 weeks after operation. The crumps showed strong metachromasia with toluidin blue and strong stainability for safranin-O. By 4-8 weeks, the defects were filled with homogeneous cartilage. At 12 weeks, arrangement of the chondrocytes of the superficial layer of the new cartilage became columnar as seen in the normal articular cartilage. The defects received elastic cartilage cell graft were filled by reformed cartilage with chondrocytes surrounded by elastic fibers 2-12 weeks after operation. The results indicate that allograft of cultured chondrocytes with matrix into the articular cartilage defects accerated the repair process of the defects by formation of the new cartilage derived from the grafted chondrocytes.

  3. Mechanical properties of septal cartilage homografts

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgold, M.J.; Kato, Y.P.; Christiansen, D.; Hauge, J.A.; Glasgold, A.I.; Silver, F.H.

    1988-10-01

    The compressive mechanical properties of untreated and chemically and physically treated nasal septum homografts were determined. Mechanical properties of control, saline-, thimerosal (Merthiolate)- and Alcide-treated specimens were similar. At high strains, the stiffness of treated cartilage ranged from 12.8 to 22.5 MPa and was unaffected by storage time. In comparison, irradiated and freeze-dried nasal septum exhibited stiffnesses of 35 and 37.5 MPa, respectively, after approximately 1 month of storage. These values of stiffness were significantly different from controls at a 0.95 confidence level. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that Alcide and Merthiolate treatment did not alter the compressive mechanical properties of cartilage and that a combination of these treatments may adequately sterilize and preserve nasal septum homografts.

  4. Cartilage stem cells: regulation of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M

    1989-01-01

    The developing limb bud is a useful source of cartilage stem cells for studies on the regulation of chondrogenesis. In high density cultures these cells can progress through all stages of chondrogenesis to produce mineralized hypertrophic cartilage. If the cells are maintained in a spherical shape, single stem cells can progress through a similar sequence. The actin cytoskeleton is implicated in the regulation of chondrogenesis since conditions that favor its disruption promote chondrogenesis and conditions that favor actin assembly inhibit chondrogenesis. Since a number of extracellular matrix receptors mediate effects of the extracellular matrix on cytoskeletal organization and some of these receptors are developmentally regulated, it is proposed that matrix receptor expression plays a central role in the divergence of connective tissue cells during development.

  5. Strategies to minimize hypertrophy in cartilage engineering and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Fu, Peiliang; Cong, Ruijun; Wu, HaiShan; Pei, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Due to a blood supply shortage, articular cartilage has a limited capacity for self-healing once damaged. Articular chondrocytes, cartilage progenitor cells, embryonic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells are candidate cells for cartilage regeneration. Significant current attention is paid to improving chondrogenic differentiation capacity; unfortunately, the potential chondrogenic hypertrophy of differentiated cells is largely overlooked. Consequently, the engineered tissue is actually a transient cartilage rather than a permanent one. The development of hypertrophic cartilage ends with the onset of endochondral bone formation which has inferior mechanical properties. In this review, current strategies for inhibition of chondrogenic hypertrophy are comprehensively summarized; the impact of cell source options is discussed; and potential mechanisms underlying these strategies are also categorized. This paper aims to provide guidelines for the prevention of hypertrophy in the regeneration of cartilage tissue. This knowledge may also facilitate the retardation of osteophytes in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26000333

  6. Proprotein convertase activation of aggrecanases in cartilage in situ.

    PubMed

    Malfait, Anne-Marie; Arner, Elizabeth C; Song, Ruo-Hua; Alston, James T; Markosyan, Stella; Staten, Nicholas; Yang, Zhiyong; Griggs, David W; Tortorella, Micky D

    2008-10-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the major cartilage macromolecules, aggrecan and type II collagen, is a key pathological event in osteoarthritis (OA). ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5, the primary aggrecanases capable of cartilage aggrecan cleavage, are synthesized as latent enzymes and require prodomain removal for activity. The N-termini of the mature proteases suggest that activation involves a proprotein convertase, but the specific family member responsible for aggrecanase activation in cartilage in situ has not been identified. Here we describe purification of a proprotein convertase activity from human OA cartilage. Through biochemical characterization and the use of siRNA, PACE4 was identified as a proprotein convertase responsible for activation of aggrecanases in osteoarthritic and cytokine-stimulated cartilage. Posttranslational activation of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 was observed in the extracellular milieu of cartilage, resulting in aggrecan degradation. These findings suggest that PACE4 represents a novel target for the development of OA therapeutics.

  7. Cartilage-targeting drug delivery: can electrostatic interactions help?

    PubMed

    Bajpayee, Ambika G; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2017-03-01

    Current intra-articular drug delivery methods do not guarantee sufficient drug penetration into cartilage tissue to reach cell and matrix targets at the concentrations necessary to elicit the desired biological response. Here, we provide our perspective on the utilization of charge-charge (electrostatic) interactions to enhance drug penetration and transport into cartilage, and to enable sustained binding of drugs within the tissue's highly negatively charged extracellular matrix. By coupling drugs to positively charged nanocarriers that have optimal size and charge, cartilage can be converted from a drug barrier into a drug reservoir for sustained intra-tissue delivery. Alternatively, a wide variety of drugs themselves can be made cartilage-penetrating by functionalizing them with specialized positively charged protein domains. Finally, we emphasize that appropriate animal models, with cartilage thickness similar to that of humans, must be used for the study of drug transport and retention in cartilage.

  8. Processed bovine cartilage: an improved biosynthetic implant for contour defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ersek, R.A.; Hart, W.G. Jr.; Greer, D.; Beisang, A.A.; Flynn, P.J.; Denton, D.R.

    1984-05-01

    Irradiated human cartilage has been found to be a superior implant material for correction of contour defects; however, availability problems have prevented this material from gaining wide acceptance. Implantation of processed irradiated bovine cartilage in primates and rabbits, as described here, provides strong evidence that this material performs like irradiated allograft cartilage antigenically and has certain cosmetic advantages over allograft cartilage. Our studies in primates have shown that there is no systemically measurable antibody-antigen reaction, either cellular or noncellular, to irradiated processed bovine cartilage. Neither primary nor second-set provocative implantations produced any measurable rejection. In rabbits, composite grafts of two pieces of irradiated bovine cartilage adjacent to each other were also well tolerated, with no measurable absorption and with capsule formation typical of a foreign body reaction to an inert object.

  9. Bone–cartilage crosstalk: a conversation for understanding osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, David M; Kuliwaba, Julia S

    2016-01-01

    Although cartilage degradation is the characteristic feature of osteoarthritis (OA), it is now recognized that the whole joint is involved in the progression of OA. In particular, the interaction (crosstalk) between cartilage and subchondral bone is thought to be a central feature of this process. The interface between articular cartilage and bone of articulating long bones is a unique zone, which comprises articular cartilage, below which is the calcified cartilage sitting on and intercalated into the subchondral bone plate. Below the subchondral plate is the trabecular bone at the end of the respective long bones. In OA, there are well-described progressive destructive changes in the articular cartilage, which parallel characteristic changes in the underlying bone. This review examines the evidence that biochemical and biomechanical signaling between these tissue compartments is important in OA disease progression and asks whether such signaling might provide possibilities for therapeutic intervention to halt or slow disease development. PMID:27672480

  10. The fine structure of developing elastic cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R W; Peacock, M A

    1977-01-01

    The fine structure of the elastic cartilage of the pinna has been examined in young rabbits aged from 1 day to 1108 days. Changes associated with growth and development are related not only to age but also to the actual situation in the pinna. In the midline, progressive changes are seen from the tip to the base. The changes in the chondroblasts with time are compared with those described in hyaline cartilage. Structures occur that, except for the presence of crystals, are apparently morphologically identical with the matrix vesicles of calcifying cartilage. These matrix vesicles, however, become very prominent with age, and aggregations of them appear to be released into the intercellular tissue from vacuoles at the periphery of the chondroblasts. There is no obvious association with calcification. Occasional single cilia, desmosomes and giant mitochondria are seen. Elastica is present at birth, and eventually every cell is separated from its neighbours by a partial investment of elastica. The quantity of matrix seems to increase with time, and with distance from the tip of the ear. This is accompanied by a marked increase in cell size with time. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:870470

  11. Tissue engineering of cartilage in space

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Lisa E.; Langer, Robert; Martin, Ivan; Pellis, Neal R.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    1997-01-01

    Tissue engineering of cartilage, i.e., the in vitro cultivation of cartilage cells on synthetic polymer scaffolds, was studied on the Mir Space Station and on Earth. Specifically, three-dimensional cell-polymer constructs consisting of bovine articular chondrocytes and polyglycolic acid scaffolds were grown in rotating bioreactors, first for 3 months on Earth and then for an additional 4 months on either Mir (10−4–10−6 g) or Earth (1 g). This mission provided a unique opportunity to study the feasibility of long-term cell culture flight experiments and to assess the effects of spaceflight on the growth and function of a model musculoskeletal tissue. Both environments yielded cartilaginous constructs, each weighing between 0.3 and 0.4 g and consisting of viable, differentiated cells that synthesized proteoglycan and type II collagen. Compared with the Earth group, Mir-grown constructs were more spherical, smaller, and mechanically inferior. The same bioreactor system can be used for a variety of controlled microgravity studies of cartilage and other tissues. These results may have implications for human spaceflight, e.g., a Mars mission, and clinical medicine, e.g., improved understanding of the effects of pseudo-weightlessness in prolonged immobilization, hydrotherapy, and intrauterine development. PMID:9391122

  12. Antiangiogenic and anticancer molecules in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Patra, Debabrata; Sandell, Linda J

    2012-01-19

    Cartilage is one of the very few naturally occurring avascular tissues where lack of angiogenesis is the guiding principle for its structure and function. This has attracted investigators who have sought to understand the biochemical basis for its avascular nature, hypothesising that it could be used in designing therapies for treating cancer and related malignancies in humans through antiangiogenic applications. Cartilage encompasses primarily a specialised extracellular matrix synthesised by chondrocytes that is both complex and unique as a result of the myriad molecules of which it is composed. Of these components, a few such as thrombospondin-1, chondromodulin-1, the type XVIII-derived endostatin, SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) and the type II collagen-derived N-terminal propeptide (PIIBNP) have demonstrated antiangiogenic or antitumour properties in vitro and in vivo preclinical trials that involve several complicated mechanisms that are not completely understood. Thrombospondin-1, endostatin and the shark-cartilage-derived Neovastat preparation have also been investigated in human clinical trials to treat several different kinds of cancers, where, despite the tremendous success seen in preclinical trials, these molecules are yet to show success as anticancer agents. This review summarises the current state-of-the-art antiangiogenic characterisation of these molecules, highlights their most promising aspects and evaluates the future of these molecules in antiangiogenic applications.

  13. Cartilage Engineering from Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goepfert, C.; Slobodianski, A.; Schilling, A. F.; Adamietz, P.; Pörtner, R.

    Mesenchymal progenitor cells known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from various tissues. Since they are able to differentiate along the mesenchymal lineages of cartilage and bone, they are regarded as promising sources for the treatment of skeletal defects. Tissue regeneration in the adult organism and in vitro engineering of tissues is hypothesized to follow the principles of embryogenesis. The embryonic development of the skeleton has been studied extensively with respect to the regulatory mechanisms governing morphogenesis, differentiation, and tissue formation. Various concepts have been designed for engineering tissues in vitro based on these developmental principles, most of them involving regulatory molecules such as growth factors or cytokines known to be the key regulators in developmental processes. Growth factors most commonly used for in vitro cultivation of cartilage tissue belong to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) super-family, and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family. In this chapter, in vivo actions of members of these growth factors described in the literature are compared with in vitro concepts of cartilage engineering making use of these growth factors.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Chick Epiphyseal Cartilage Matrix Vesicle Proteolipid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Epiphyseal growth plate cartilage from the proximal portion of 49-52 day old broiler strain chickens was digested in collagenase for 15 hours. Plasma...cartilage from the proximal portion of 49-52 day old broiler strain chickens was digested in collagenase for 15 hours. Plasma membranes and matrix...ATPASE ACTIVITY. Epiphyseal growth plate cartilage from the proximal portion of 49-52 day old broiler strain chickens was digested in collagenase for 15

  15. MR imaging of the articular cartilage of the knee.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Douglas W

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the knee is capable of accurately identifying and characterizing cartilage injuries and degeneration. Optimal cartilage imaging requires an understanding of the relationship between cartilage structure and the MR image, acquisition of images with adequate resolution, a purposeful interrogation of the images by a reviewer possessing an understanding of the appearance of tissue pathology as well as common pitfalls and artifacts, and finally, the accurate and consistent reporting of results.

  16. The Meckel's cartilage in human embryonic and early fetal periods.

    PubMed

    Wyganowska-Świątkowska, Marzena; Przystańska, Agnieszka

    2011-06-01

    The Meckel's cartilage itself and the mandible are derived from the first branchial arch, and their development depends upon the contribution of the cranial neural crest cells. The prenatal development of the Meckel's cartilage, along with its relationship to the developing mandible and the related structures, were studied histologically in human embryos and fetuses. The material was obtained from a collection of the Department of Anatomy, and laboratory procedures were used to prepare sections, which were stained according to standard light-microscopy methods. The formation of the Meckel's cartilage and its related structures was observed and documented. Some critical moments in the development of the Meckel's cartilage are suggested. The sequential development of the Meckel's cartilage started as early as stage 13 (32 days) with the appearance of condensation of mesenchymal cells within the mandibular prominence. During stage 17 (41 days), the primary ossification center of the mandible appeared on the inferior margin of the Meckel's cartilage. The muscular attachments to the Meckel's cartilage in embryos were observed at stage 18 (44 days). Their subsequent movement into the developing mandible during the 10th week seemed to diminish the role of the Meckel's cartilage as the supportive core; simultaneously, the process of regression within the cartilage was induced. During the embryonic period, the bilateral Meckel's cartilages were in closest contact at the posterior surface of their superior margins, preceding formation of the symphyseal cartilage at this site. The event sequence in the development of the Meckel's cartilage is finally discussed.

  17. Stress relaxation and cartilage shaping under laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil N.; Sviridov, Alexander P.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Ovchinnikov, Yuriy M.; Shekhter, Anatoliy B.; Downes, S.; Howdle, Steven; Jones, Nicholas; Lowe, J.

    1996-05-01

    The problem of a purposeful change of the shape of cartilage is of great importance for otolaryngology, orthopaedics, and plastic surgery. In 1992 we have found a possibility of controlled shaping of cartilage under moderate laser heating. This paper presents new results in studies of that phenomenon. We have measured temperature and stress in a tissue undergoing to irradiation with a Holmium laser. Study of cartilage structure allowed us to find conditions for laser shaping without pronounced alterations in the structure of matrix.

  18. Harvesting Rib Cartilage in Primary and Secondary Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Christopher Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Satisfactory and consistent long-term results in primary and secondary rhinoplasty rely on adequately resupporting or reconstructing the nasal osseocartilagenous framework. Autogenous rib cartilage has been our graft material of choice for major nasal reconstruction when sufficient septal cartilage is not available. The rib provides the most abundant source of cartilage for graft fabrication and is the most reliable when structural support is needed.

  19. Three-dimensional scaffolds of acellular human and porcine lungs for high throughput studies of lung disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy E.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Sokocevic, Dino; DeSarno, Michael; Borg, Zachary; Parsons, Charles; Brooks, Elice M.; Platz, Joseph; Khalpey, Zain; Hoganson, David M.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying Wai; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular scaffolds from complex whole organs such as lung are being increasingly studied for ex vivo organ generation and for in vitro studies of cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We have established effective methods for efficient de- and recellularization of large animal and human lungs including techniques which allow multiple small segments (∼1–3cm3) to be excised that retain 3-dimensional lung structure. Coupled with the use of a synthetic pleural coating, cells can be selectively physiologically inoculated via preserved vascular and airway conduits. Inoculated segments can be further sliced for high throughput studies. Further, we demonstrate thermography as a powerful noninvasive technique for monitoring perfusion decellularization and for evaluating preservation of vascular and airway networks following human and porcine lung decellularization. Collectively, these techniques are a significant step forward as they allow high throughput in vitro studies from a single lung or lobe in a more biologically relevant, three-dimensional acellular scaffold. PMID:24411675

  20. Liquid sheet radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; White, K. Alan, III

    1987-01-01

    A new external flow radiator concept, the liquid sheet radiator (LSR), is introduced. The LSR sheet flow is described and an expression for the length/width (l/w), ratio is presented. A linear dependence of l/w on velocity is predicted that agrees with experimental results. Specific power for the LSR is calculated and is found to be nearly the same as the specific power of a liquid droplet radiator, (LDR). Several sheet thicknesses and widths were experimentally investigated. In no case was the flow found to be unstable.

  1. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Drost, M. Kevin; McDonald, Carolyn E.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  2. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K..; McDonald, C.E.

    1997-03-18

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 14 figs.

  3. Silicon sheet technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1982-09-01

    A classification of silicon sheet growth methods by meniscus geometry permits them to be discussed in three groups: short meniscus techniques, high meniscus techniques, and extended meniscus or large solid/liquid interface area techniques. A second parameter, meniscus shaper interaction with the liquid silicon, is also instrumental in determining the characteristics of the various sheet processes. The current status of each process is discussed in the context of meniscus geometry and shaper/melt interaction. One aspect of sheet growth, surface area generation rate, is quantitatively compared with combined ingot growth and wafering surface area generation rates.

  4. [Cartilage reshaping by laser in stomatology and maxillofacial surgery].

    PubMed

    Mordon, S

    2004-02-01

    The restoration of congenital and traumatic malformations of the head and neck, together with the defects resulting from the trauma of ablative surgery, continue to pose significant problems to surgeons. The post-operative results are not always satisfactory because of the difficulty of shaping the cartilage and because of the tendency of cartilage to return to its original shape. Better understanding of laser-cartilage interaction and the development of a specific instrumentation Lasers (CO2, Nd: YAG, Ho: YAG) has enabled ex situ and in situ cartilage reshaping. A recent clinical study has demonstrated that nondestructive laser irradiation can reshape septal deviations

  5. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. PMID:26416680

  6. Alteration of cartilage glycosaminoglycan protein acceptor by somatomedin and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, B S; McNatt, M L; Meador, S; Lee, J A; Hughes, E R; Elders, M J

    1979-02-01

    The effect of somatomedin and cortisol on embryonic chick cartilage in vitro indicates that somatomedin stimulates 35SO4 uptake while cortisol decreases it with no effect on glycosaminoglycan turnover. Xylosyltransferase activity is increased in crude fractions of somatomedin-treated cartilage but decreased in cortisol-treated cartilage. By using a Smith-degraded proteoglycan as an exogenous acceptor, xylosyltransferase activities from both treatments were equivalent, suggesting that the enzyme was not rate limiting. The results of xylosyltransferase assays conducted by mixing enzyme and endogenous acceptor from control, cortisol-treated and somatomedin-treated cartilage, suggest both effects to be at the level of the acceptor protein.

  7. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-10-19

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis.

  8. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Alida M; Hall, Brian K; Horner, John R

    2013-01-01

    The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae). This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors.

  9. Cartilage-Specific Near-Infrared Fluorophores for Biomedical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Hoon; Owens, Eric A; Wada, Hideyuki; Levitz, Andrew; Park, GwangLi; Park, Min Ho; Frangioni, John V; Henary, Maged; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-07-20

    A novel class of near-infrared fluorescent contrast agents was developed. These agents target cartilage with high specificity and this property is inherent to the chemical structure of the fluorophore. After a single low-dose intravenous injection and a clearance time of approximately 4 h, these agents bind to all three major types of cartilage (hyaline, elastic, and fibrocartilage) and perform equally well across species. Analysis of the chemical structure similarities revealed a potential pharmacophore for cartilage targeting. Our results lay the foundation for future improvements in tissue engineering, joint surgery, and cartilage-specific drug development.

  10. Review: tissue engineering for regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Temenoff, J S; Mikos, A G

    2000-03-01

    Joint pain due to cartilage degeneration is a serious problem, affecting people of all ages. Although many techniques, often surgical, are currently employed to treat this affliction, none have had complete success. Recent advances in biology and materials science have pushed tissue engineering to the forefront of new cartilage repair techniques. This review seeks to condense information for the biomaterialist interested in developing materials for this application. Articular cartilage anatomy, types of injury, and current repair methods are explained. The need for biomaterials, current commonly used materials for tissue-engineered cartilage, and considerations in scale-up of cell-biomaterial constructs are summarized.

  11. Fascia versus cartilage graft in type I tympanoplasty: audiological outcome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Oh, Jung Ho; Lee, Hwan Ho

    2012-11-01

    Various materials such as fascia, perichondrium, and cartilage have been used for reconstruction of the tympanic membrane in middle ear surgery. Because of its stiffness, cartilage is resistant to resorption and retraction. However, cartilage grafts result in increased acoustic impedance, the main limitation to their use. The aim of this study was to compare the hearing results after cartilage tympanoplasty versus fascia tympanoplasty. This study included 114 patients without postoperative tympanic membrane perforation who underwent tympanoplasty type I between 2007 and 2010, 31 with fascia and 83 with cartilage. Preoperative and 1 year postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) and postoperative gain in ABG at frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz were assessed. Both groups were statically similar in terms of the severity of middle ear pathology and the preoperative hearing levels. Overall, postoperative successful hearing results showed 77.4% of the fascia group and 77.1% of the cartilage group. Mean postoperative gains in ABG were 9.70 dB for the fascia group and 9.78 dB for the cartilage group. These results demonstrate that hearing after cartilage tympanoplasty is comparable to that after fascia tympanoplasty. Although cartilage is the ideal grafting material in problematic cases, it may be used in less severe cases, such as in type I tympanoplasty, without fear of impairing hearing.

  12. Extraction of high-quality RNA from human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Le Bleu, Heather K; Kamal, Fadia A; Kelly, Meghan; Ketz, John P; Zuscik, Michael J; Elbarbary, Reyad A

    2017-02-01

    Extracting high-quality RNA from articular cartilage is challenging due to low cellularity and high proteoglycan content. This problem hinders efficient application of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis in studying cartilage homeostasis. Here we developed a method that purifies high-quality RNA directly from cartilage. Our method optimized the collection and homogenization steps so as to minimize RNA degradation, and modified the conventional TRIzol protocol to enhance RNA purity. Cartilage RNA purified using our method has appropriate quality for RNA-seq experiments including an RNA integrity number of ∼8. Our method also proved efficient in extracting high-quality RNA from subchondral bone.

  13. Augmentation of engineered cartilage to bone integration using hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Dua, Rupak; Centeno, Jerry; Ramaswamy, Sharan

    2014-07-01

    Articular cartilage injuries occur frequently in the knee joint. Photopolymerizable cartilage tissue engineering approaches appear promising; however, fundamentally, forming a stable interface between the subchondral bone and tissue engineered cartilage components remains a major challenge. We investigated the utility of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles to promote controlled bone-growth across the bone-cartilage interface in an in vitro engineered tissue model system using bone marrow derived stem cells. Samples incorporated with HA demonstrated significantly higher interfacial shear strength (at the junction between engineered cartilage and engineered bone) compared with the constructs without HA (p < 0.05), after 28 days of culture. Interestingly, this increased interfacial shear strength due to the presence of HA was observed as early as 7 days and appeared to have sustained itself for an additional three weeks without interacting with strength increases attributable to subsequent secretion of engineered tissue matrix. Histological evidence showed that there was ∼7.5% bone in-growth into the cartilage region from the bone side. The mechanism of enhanced engineered cartilage to bone integration with HA incorporation appeared to be facilitated by the deposition of calcium phosphate in the transition zone. These findings indicate that controlled bone in-growth using HA incorporation permits more stable anchorage of the injectable hydrogel-based engineered cartilage construct via augmented integration between bone and cartilage.

  14. Visualization of Transport Phenomena in Regenerated Cartilage Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haari, Kenta

    2005-11-01

    We studied the macroscopic transport phenomena in regenerated articular cartilage tissue. Regenerated cartilage tissue is proposed for the substitution of artificial cartilage as a new medical treatment, to the patient of articular disease such as osteoarthritis. When regenerated cartilage tissue is selected as the therapeutic approach, it should possess not only structural strength as supporting material, but also physiological and biological functions, such as transport of necessary materials to sustain cell activity. Cartilage tissue is significantly different from other tissues for its rich highly sulfated extra cellular matrix (ECM), and is peculiar in its avascularity, hence materials, such as nutrition and oxygen are transported from connected tissue or eriosteum mainly by diffusion. Therefore we focused on this mass diffusion process in cartilage tissue. We engineered regenerated cartilage tissue by seeding chondrocyte into the scaffold of agarose. Diffusion process was visualized by fluorescent tracers saturated in regenerated cartilage tissue. Diffusion measurements were performed during fluorescent tracer desorption from regenerated cartilage tissue to PBS (pH7.4).

  15. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal cells on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a tissue engineered nerve scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuping; Wang, Jiao; Ling, Shixin; Li, Zhuo; Li, Mingsheng; Li, Qiongyi; Ma, Zongren; Yu, Sijiu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a scaffold for supporting the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neural cells following induction with neural differentiation medium. We performed long-term, continuous observation of cell morphology, growth, differentiation, and neuronal development using several microscopy techniques in conjunction with immunohistochemistry. We examined specific neuronal proteins and Nissl bodies involved in the differentiation process in order to determine the neuronal differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The results show that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells that differentiate on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix display neuronal morphology with unipolar and bi/multipolar neurite elongations that express neuronal-specific proteins, including βIII tubulin. The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells grown on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix and induced for long periods of time with neural differentiation medium differentiated into a multilayered neural network-like structure with long nerve fibers that was composed of several parallel microfibers and neuronal cells, forming a complete neural circuit with dendrite-dendrite to axon-dendrite to dendrite-axon synapses. In addition, growth cones with filopodia were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Paraffin sectioning showed differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with the typical features of neuronal phenotype, such as a large, round nucleus and a cytoplasm full of Nissl bodies. The data suggest that the biological scaffold fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix is capable of supporting human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into functional neurons and the subsequent formation of tissue engineered nerve. PMID:25598779

  16. Treatment of knee cartilage defect in 2010.

    PubMed

    Versier, G; Dubrana, F

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of knee cartilage defect, a true challenge, should not only reconstruct hyaline cartilage on a long-term basis, but also be able to prevent osteoarthritis. Osteochondral knee lesions occur in either traumatic lesions or in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). These lesions can involve all the articular surfaces of the knee in its three compartments. In principle, this review article covers symptomatic ICRS grade C or D lesions, depth III and IV, excluding management of superficial lesions, asymptomatic lesions that are often discovered unexpectedly, and kissing lesions, which arise prior to or during osteoarthritis. For clarity sake, the international classifications used are reviewed, for both functional assessment (ICRS and functional IKDC for osteochondral fractures, Hughston for osteochondritis) and morphological lesion evaluations (the ICRS macroscopic evaluation for fractures, the Bedouelle or SOFCOT for osteochondritis, and MOCART for MRI). The therapeutic armamentarium to treat these lesions is vast, but accessibility varies greatly depending on the country and the legislation in effect. Many comparative studies have been conducted, but they are rarely of high scientific quality; the center effect is nearly constant because patients are often referred to certain centers for an expert opinion. The indications defined herein use algorithms that take into account the size of the cartilage defect and the patient's functional needs for cases of fracture and the vitality, stability, and size of the fragment for cases of osteochondritis dissecans. Fractures measuring less than 2 cm(2) are treated with either microfracturing or mosaic osteochondral grafting, between 2 and 4 cm(2) with microfractures covered with a membrane or a culture of second- or third-generation chondrocytes, and beyond this size, giant lesions are subject to an exceptional allografting procedure, harvesting from the posterior condyle, or chondrocyte culture on a 3D matrix to restore

  17. A peek into the possible future of management of articular cartilage injuries: gene therapy and scaffolds for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hubert T; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Mizuno, Shuichi; Abelow, Stephen; Safran, Marc R

    2006-10-01

    Two rapidly progressing areas of research will likely contribute to cartilage repair procedures in the foreseeable future: gene therapy and synthetic scaffolds. Gene therapy refers to the transfer of new genetic information to cells that contribute to the cartilage repair process. This approach allows for manipulation of cartilage repair at the cellular and molecular level. Scaffolds are the core technology for the next generation of autologous cartilage implantation procedures in which synthetic matrices are used in conjunction with chondrocytes. This approach can be improved further using bioreactor technologies to enhance the production of extracellular matrix proteins by chondrocytes seeded onto a scaffold. The resulting "neo-cartilage implant" matures within the bioreactor, and can then be used to fill cartilage defects.

  18. An international collaborative study of the effect of active pertussis toxin on the modified Kendrick test for acellular pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xing, Dorothy; Gaines Das, Rose; Douglas-Bardsley, Alex; Asokanathan, Catpagavalli; Corbel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Speculation that the Japanese modified intra-cerebral challenge assay, which is used in several countries for control of acellular pertussis vaccines, depends on the presence of small amounts of active pertussis toxin led to an assumption that it may not be appropriate for highly toxoided or genetically detoxified vaccines. Consequently, at the recommendation of a World Health Organisation AD Hoc Working Group on mouse protection models for testing and control of acellular pertussis vaccine, the effect of pertussis toxin on the modified intra-cerebral challenge assay (modified Kendrick, MICA) was evaluated in an international collaborative study. Results of this study showed that for genetically detoxified vaccines both with and without active pertussis toxin the MICA clearly distinguished mice vaccinated with acellular vaccines from unvaccinated mice and gave a significant dose-response relationship. However, vaccine samples containing active pertussis toxin (5 or 50 ng/single human dose) appeared to be more potent than the equivalent sample without active pertussis toxin. Similar results were also given by two respiratory infection models (intranasal and aerosol) included in the study. The results also indicated that the effect of pertussis toxin may vary depending on mouse strain.

  19. In-vivo study and histological examination of laser reshaping of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridov, Alexander P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Ovchinnikov, Yuriy M.; Shekhter, Anatoliy B.; Svistushkin, Valeriy M.; Shinaev, Andrei A.; Nikiforova, G.; Jones, Nicholas

    1999-06-01

    The results of recent study of cartilage reshaping in vivo are reported. The ear cartilage of piglets of 8-12 weeks old have been reshaped in vivo using the radiation of a holmium laser. The stability of the shape and possible side effects have been examined during four months. Histological investigation shown that the healing of irradiated are could accompany by the regeneration of ear cartilage. Finally, elastic type cartilage has been transformed into fibrous cartilage or cartilage of hyaline type.

  20. Sepsis Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Remains Mysterious Life After Traumatic Injury: How the Body Responds Other NIGMS Fact Sheets Related Links Up to top This page last reviewed on February 01, 2017 Social Media Links Bookmark & Share Free Subscriptions Twitter Facebook YouTube ...

  1. Chlamydia - CDC Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    Chlamydia – CDC Fact Sheet Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can be easily cured. If left ... DSTDP) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www. cdc. gov/ std CDC-INFO Contact Center 1-800- ...

  2. CMAQ Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For more than a decade, EPA and states have used EPA’s Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System, a powerful computational tool for air quality management. Learn more about CMAQv5.2 by browsing our fact sheet.

  3. Avian Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    NWCC Wildlife Work Group

    2004-12-01

    OAK-B135 After conducting four national research meetings, producing a document guiding research: Metrics and Methods for Determining or Monitoring Potential Impacts on Birds at Existing and Proposed Wind Energy Sites, 1999, and another paper, Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States, 2001, the subcommittee recognized a need to summarize in a short fact sheet what is known about avian-wind interaction and what questions remain. This fact sheet attempts to summarize in lay terms the result of extensive discussion about avian-wind interaction on land. This fact sheet does not address research conducted on offshore development. This fact sheet is not intended as a conclusion on the subject; rather, it is a summary as of Fall/Winter 2002.

  4. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  5. Biodiesel Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-06-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends, which blends are best for which vehicles, where to buy biodiesel, how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance, how biodiesel performs in cold weather, whether biodiesel use will plug vehicle filters, how long-term biodiesel use may affect engines, biodiesel fuel standards, and whether biodiesel burns cleaner than diesel fuel. The fact sheet also dismisses the use of vegetable oil as a motor fuel.

  6. Energy information sheets

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  7. Collaborative study on a Guinea pig serological method for the assay of acellular pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, R; Sesardic, D; Daas, A; Terao, E; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2009-10-01

    An international collaborative study (coded BSP083) was performed under the aegis of the Biological Standardisation Programme supported by the Council of Europe and the European Commission, with the aim of replacing the in vivo challenge assays for potency determination of combined acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines by a refined procedure also allowing reduction of animal use. This study investigates whether the immunogenicity of aP vaccine components could be assayed in a guinea pig (gp) serology model, using the same vaccine immunising doses as for D and T components potency testing, instead of using separate animals as is currently done. The BSP83 project is a follow up of 3 former collaborative studies (coded BSP019, BSP034 and BSP035) on serological methods for the potency testing of tetanus (T) and diphtheria (D) vaccines for human use. The use of gp instead of mice serology has the advantage of providing a larger volume of good quality antiserum for the assay of several vaccine components in the same sample, hence providing the opportunity for animal sparing. The results of Phase I of the study demonstrated that gp serology may be a useful method for the immunogenicity assay of acellular pertussis vaccines. This was confirmed in Phase II of the study, using 7 different combined aP vaccines in an international collaborative study involving 17 laboratories from both public and private sectors. Clear dose-response relationships were observed for different vaccines by ELISA, for antibodies against aP antigens, i.e. pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), fimbrial agglutinogens-2/3 (Fim 2/3) and pertactin (PRN). Intra- and inter-laboratory variations of aP ELISA results were found to be within an acceptable range. For some combined vaccines, however, the range of vaccine dilutions for immunisation confirmed to be optimal for D and T potency testing may not provide optimal dose-response for all aP components. Method adjustments may thus be required

  8. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  9. Optical clearing of articular cartilage: a comparison of clearing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Alexander; Hautala, Tapio; Kinnunen, Matti; Popov, Alexey; Karhula, Sakari; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tuchin, Valery

    2015-07-01

    Optical clearing technique was applied to the problem of OCT imaging of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. We show that optical clearing significantly enhances visualization of articular cartilage and cartilage-bone interface. The effect of different clearing agents was analyzed. For the clearing, iohexol solution and propylene glycol (PG) were used. Clearing was performed in vitro at room temperature by immersion method. Cylindrical osteochondral samples (d=4.8mm) were drilled from bovine lateral femur and stored in phosphate-buffered saline at -20°C until clearing. Monitoring of clearing process was performed using high-speed spectral-domain OCT system providing axial resolution of 5.8μm at 930nm. Total duration of experiment was 90-100min to ensure saturation of clearing. We have shown that iohexol solution and PG are capable to optically clear articular cartilage enabling reliable characterization of cartilagebone interface with OCT. Being a low osmolarity agent, iohexol provides minimal changes to the thickness of cartilage sample. Clearing saturation time for the cartilage sample with the thickness of 0.9 mm measured with OCT is of 50 min. However, less than 15 min is enough to reliably detect the rear cartilage boundary. Alternatively, PG significantly (60%) reduces the cartilage thickness enabling better visualization of subchondral bone. It was observed that PG has higher clearing rate. The clearing saturation time is of 30 min, however less than 5 min is enough to detect cartilage-bone interface. We conclude that iohexol solution is superior for OCT imaging of cartilage and cartilage-bone interface, while PG suits better for subhondral bone visualization.

  10. Underestimating the safety benefits of a new vaccine: the impact of acellular pertussis vaccine versus whole-cell pertussis vaccine on health services utilization.

    PubMed

    Hawken, Steven; Manuel, Douglas G; Deeks, Shelley L; Kwong, Jeffrey C; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Wilson, Kumanan

    2012-12-01

    The population-level safety benefits of the acellular pertussis vaccine may have been underestimated because only specific adverse events were considered, not overall impact on health services utilization. Using the Vaccine and Immunization Surveillance in Ontario (VISION) system, the authors analyzed data on 567,378 children born between April 1994 and March 1996 (before introduction of acellular pertussis vaccine) and between April 1998 and March 2000 (after introduction of acellular pertussis vaccine) in Ontario, Canada. Using the self-controlled case series study design, they examined emergency room visits and hospital admissions occurring after routine pediatric vaccinations. The authors determined the relative incidence of events taking place before introduction of the acellular vaccine versus after introduction by calculating relative incidence ratios (RIRs). The observed RIRs demonstrated a highly statistically significant reduction in relative incidence after introduction of the acellular vaccine. RIRs for vaccine administered at ages 2, 4, 6, and 18 months were 1.82 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.64, 2.01), 1.91 (95% CI: 1.71, 2.13), 1.54 (95% CI: 1.38, 1.72), and 1.51 (95% CI: 1.34, 1.69), respectively, comparing event rates before the introduction of acellular vaccine with those after introduction. The authors estimated that approximately 90 emergency room visits and 9 admissions per month were avoided by switching to the acellular vaccine, which is a 38-fold higher impact than when they considered only admissions for febrile and afebrile convulsions. Future analyses comparing vaccines for safety should examine specific endpoints and general health services utilization.

  11. Histology of epiphyseal cartilage calcification and endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Amizuka, Norio; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Oda, Kimimitsu; Luiz de Freitas, Paulo Henrique; Hoshi, Kazuto; Li, Minqi; Ozawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage calcification is carried out by chondrocytes as they hypertrophy and begin to secrete matrix vesicles. Calcification initiates when calcium phosphates appear inside these matrix vesicles, forming hydroxyapatite crystals that eventually break through the membrane to form calcifying globules, as in bone calcification. However, the extracellular environment in cartilage is different from that in bone: cartilage is abundant in proteoglycans but contains a small amount of osteopontin. Hypertrophic chondrocytes secrete vesicles in the cartilaginous matrix of intercolumnar septae only, forming well-calcified longitudinal septae and poorly-calcified transverse partitions. Such pattern of vesicle deposition permits the invasion of endothelial cells, which infiltrate into cartilage and induce migration of osteogenic and osteoclastic cells. Osteoclasts resorb the excess of calcified globules in the partitions, shaping calcified cartilage cores paralleling the longitudinal axis of long bones. After the formation of these calcified cartilage cores, endochondral ossification involves a series of well-defined events in which osteogenic cells deposit new bone onto the cartilage core and form primary trabecules. This review presents the histology of epiphyseal cartilage calcification and endochondral ossification.

  12. The role of muscle cells in regulating cartilage matrix production

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Dana M.; Lee, Philip G.; Uchimura, Tomoya; Seufert, Christopher R.; Kwon, Heenam; Zeng, Li

    2009-01-01

    Muscle is one of the tissues located in close proximity to cartilage tissue. Although it has been suggested that muscle could influence skeletal development through generating mechanical forces by means of contraction, very little is known regarding whether muscle cells release biochemical signals to regulate cartilage gene expression. We tested the hypothesis that muscle cells directly regulate cartilage matrix production by analyzing chondrocytes co-cultured with muscle cells in 2D or 3D conditions. We found that chondrocytes cultured with C2C12 muscle cells exhibited enhanced alcian blue staining and elevated expression of collagen II and collagen IX proteins. While non-muscle cells do not promote cartilage matrix production, converting them into muscle cells enhanced their pro-chondrogenic activity. Furthermore, muscle cell-conditioned medium led to increased cartilage matrix production, suggesting that muscle cells secrete pro-chondrogenic factors. Taken together, our study suggests that muscle cells may play an important role in regulating cartilage gene expression. This result may ultimately lead to the discovery of novel factors that regulate cartilage formation and homeostasis, and provide insights into improving the strategies for regenerating cartilage. PMID:19813241

  13. Incidence and development of the human supracochlear cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mérida Velasco, J R; Rodríguez Vázquez, J F; de la Cuadra Blanco, C; Sanz Casado, J V; Mérida Velasco, J A

    2011-01-01

    The supracochlear cartilage is known as an accessory cartilage of the chondrocranium situated between the otic capsule and the trigeminal ganglion. Although claimed to appear regularly during human development, its incidence and development have been reported only scarcely in the literature. The aim of this study was to describe the position and relationships of the supracochlear cartilage during its development. This study was made in 96 human specimens of 7-17 weeks of development, belonging to a collection of the Embryology Institute of Complutense University of Madrid. In addition, three-dimensional reconstruction of the supracochlear cartilage was made from 1 specimen. This cartilage, spherical in shape, appeared bilaterally in 23 specimens and unilaterally (left side) in 5. In our results, the supracochlear cartilage was found in 26.5% of the cases and was related to the trigeminal ganglion, the dura mater of the trigeminal cavity and the otic capsule. In 4 specimens, bilaterally, the supracochlear cartilage was continuous with the otic capsule. This work suggests that, based on the structures to which the supracochlear cartilage is related, it could be derived from the cranial neural crest.

  14. Improvement of PHBV scaffolds with bioglass for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Xue, Ke; Li, Haiyan; Sun, Junying; Liu, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Polymer scaffold systems consisting of poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) have proven to be possible matrices for the three-dimensional growth of chondrocyte cultures. However, the engineered cartilage grown on these PHBV scaffolds is currently unsatisfactory for clinical applications due to PHBV's poor hydrophilicity, resulting in inadequate thickness and poor biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage. It has been reported that the incorporation of Bioglass (BG) into PHBV can improve the hydrophilicity of the composites. In this study, we compared the effects of PHBV scaffolds and PHBV/BG composite scaffolds on the properties of engineered cartilage in vivo. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were seeded into PHBV scaffolds and PHBV/BG scaffolds. Short-term in vitro culture followed by long-term in vivo transplantation was performed to evaluate the difference in cartilage regeneration between the cartilage layers grown on PHBV and PHBV/BG scaffolds. The results show that the incorporation of BG into PHBV efficiently improved both the hydrophilicity of the composites and the percentage of adhered cells and promoted cell migration into the inner part the constructs. With prolonged incubation time in vivo, the chondrocyte-scaffold constructs in the PHBV/BG group formed thicker cartilage-like tissue with better biomechanical properties and a higher cartilage matrix content than the constructs in the PHBV/BG group. These results indicate that PHBV/BG scaffolds can be used to prepare better engineered cartilage than pure PHBV.

  15. Two dimensional spectral camera development for cartilage monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, A.; Graf, A.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Miller, R.; Mantz, H.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    In the joint project "BioopTiss" between the Ulm University Medical Center and Ulm University of Applied Sciences, a bioreactor is under development to grow facial cartilage by the methods of tissue engineering. In order to ensure a sufficient quality of the cartilage for implantation, the cartilage growth must be monitored continuously. Current monitoring methods destroy the cultured cartilage so that it is no longer suitable for implantation. Alternatively, it is possible to analyze the cartilage using fluorescence spectroscopy with UV light excitation. This allows a non-invasive assessment of cartilage in terms of composition and quality. The cultured cartilage tissue can reach a size of several square centimeters. For recording fluorescence spectra of every point of the cartilage sample, a highly sensitive spectral camera has been developed which allows distinguishing collagen I from collagen II non-invasively by their fluorescence. This spectral camera operates according to the computed tomography imaging spectrometry (CTIS) principle, which allows obtaining many spectra of a small area with only one snapshot.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair: A Review.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Welsch, Goetz H; Potter, Hollis G

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries.

  17. Does Acellular Dermal Matrix Thickness Affect Complication Rate in Tissue Expander Based Breast Reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. While the benefits of using acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in breast reconstruction are well described, their use has been associated with additional complications. The purpose of this study was to determine if ADM thickness affects complications in breast reconstruction. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed including all tissue expander based breast reconstructions with AlloDerm (LifeCell, Branchburg, NJ) over 4 years. We evaluated preoperative characteristics and assessed postoperative complications including seroma, hematoma, infection, skin necrosis, and need for reintervention. We reviewed ADM thickness and time to Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain removal. Results. Fifty-five patients underwent 77 ADM-associated tissue expander based breast reconstructions, with average age of 48.1 years and average BMI of 25.9. Average ADM thickness was 1.21 mm. We found higher complication rates in the thick ADM group. Significant associations were found between smokers and skin necrosis (p < 0.0001) and seroma and prolonged JP drainage (p = 0.0004); radiated reconstructed breasts were more likely to suffer infections (p = 0.0085), and elevated BMI is a significant predictor for increased infection rate (p = 0.0037). Conclusion. We found a trend toward increased complication rates with thicker ADMs. In the future, larger prospective studies evaluating thickness may provide more information. PMID:27190645

  18. Acellular dermal matrix slings in tissue expander breast reconstruction: are there substantial benefits?

    PubMed

    Collis, George N; TerKonda, Sarvam P; Waldorf, James C; Perdikis, Galen

    2012-05-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) slings in breast reconstruction are increasingly used but are not yet validated. This study compares immediate, expander-based breast reconstruction with and without the use of inferolateral ADM slings. There were 63 patients (106 breasts) in the ADM group and 42 patients (68 breasts) in the control group. Initial intraoperative fill volumes were significantly greater in the ADM group, median 69% full (250 mL) versus 50% full (180 mL; P < 0.001). However, the number of days to complete expansion between the 2 groups was similar. One less office visit was required to complete the fills in the ADM group (P < 0.01). Drains were removed 3 days later in the ADM group (P < 0.01). Overall complication rate was greater in the ADM group (18.9% vs. 7.4%, P < 0.05), with a slightly higher percentage of expanders requiring removal due to infection in the ADM group (5.7% vs. 4.4%, P = NS). This study suggests inferolateral ADM slings in expander-based breast reconstruction allow for significantly increased initial fill volumes and may offer an aesthetic advantage; however, its use is costly and increases complications.

  19. Human keratinocyte growth and differentiation on acellular porcine dermal matrix in relation to wound healing potential.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, Robert; Mandys, Vaclav; Mestak, Ondrej; Sevcik, Jan; Königova, Radana; Matouskova, Eva

    2012-01-01

    A number of implantable biomaterials derived from animal tissues are now used in modern surgery. Xe-Derma is a dry, sterile, acellular porcine dermis. It has a remarkable healing effect on burns and other wounds. Our hypothesis was that the natural biological structure of Xe-Derma plays an important role in keratinocyte proliferation and formation of epidermal architecture in vitro as well as in vivo. The bioactivity of Xe-Derma was studied by a cell culture assay. We analyzed growth and differentiation of human keratinocytes cultured in vitro on Xe-Derma, and we compared the results with formation of neoepidermis in the deep dermal wounds treated with Xe-Derma. Keratinocytes cultured on Xe-Derma submerged in the culture medium achieved confluence in 7-10 days. After lifting the cultures to the air-liquid interface, the keratinocytes were stratified and differentiated within one week, forming an epidermis with basal, spinous, granular, and stratum corneum layers. Immunohistochemical detection of high-molecular weight cytokeratins (HMW CKs), CD29, p63, and involucrin confirmed the similarity of organization and differentiation of the cultured epidermal cells to the normal epidermis. The results suggest that the firm natural structure of Xe-Derma stimulates proliferation and differentiation of human primary keratinocytes and by this way improves wound healing.

  20. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of the Microstructure of Human Acellular Nerve Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuang; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Yang, Weihong; Jian, Yutao; Zhou, Xiang; He, Bo; Gu, Liqiang; Yan, Liwei; Lin, Tao; Xiang, Jianping; Qi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The exact inner 3D microstructure of the human peripheral nerve has been a mystery for decades. Therefore, it has been difficult to solve several problems regarding peripheral nerve injury and repair. We used high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography (microCT) to scan a freeze-dried human acellular nerve allograft (hANA). The microCT images were then used to reconstruct a 3D digital model, which was used to print a 3D resin model of the nerve graft. The 3D digital model of the hANA allowed visualization of all planes. The magnified 3D resin model clearly showed the nerve bundles and basement membrane tubes of the hANA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyse the microstructure of the hANA. Compared to the SEM images, the microCT image clearly demonstrated the microstructure of the hANA cross section at a resolution of up to 1.2 μm. The 3D digital model of the hANA facilitates a clear and easy understanding of peripheral nerve microstructure. Furthermore, the enlarged 3D resin model duplicates the unique inner structure of each individual hANA. This is a crucial step towards achieving 3D printing of a hANA or nerve that can be used as a nerve graft. PMID:27476584

  1. Glycerolized Reticular Dermis as a New Human Acellular Dermal Matrix: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Pietro Maria; Balmativola, Davide; Cambieri, Irene; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Annaratone, Laura; Casarin, Stefania; Fumagalli, Mara; Stella, Maurizio; Sapino, Anna; Castagnoli, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    Human Acellular Dermal Matrices (HADM) are employed in various reconstructive surgery procedures as scaffolds for autologous tissue regeneration. The aim of this project was to develop a new type of HADM for clinical use, composed of glycerolized reticular dermis decellularized through incubation and tilting in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM). This manufacturing method was compared with a decellularization procedure already described in the literature, based on the use of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), on samples from 28 donors. Cell viability was assessed using an MTT assay and microbiological monitoring was performed on all samples processed after each step. Two surgeons evaluated the biomechanical characteristics of grafts of increasing thickness. The effects of the different decellularization protocols were assessed by means of histological examination and immunohistochemistry, and residual DNA after decellularization was quantified using a real-time TaqMan MGB probe. Finally, we compared the results of DMEM based decellularization protocol on reticular dermis derived samples with the results of the same protocol applied on papillary dermis derived grafts. Our experimental results indicated that the use of glycerolized reticular dermis after 5 weeks of treatment with DMEM results in an HADM with good handling and biocompatibility properties. PMID:26918526

  2. Biopolymer gel matrix as acellular scaffold for enhanced dermal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Judith, Rangasamy; Nithya, Mariappan; Rose, Chellan; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-07-01

    Biological grafts have drawbacks such as donor scarcity, disease transmission, tissue infection, while the scaffolds of either collagen or chitosan fabrics fail to become part of the tissue at the wound site, though they favor the formation of connective tissue matrix. This study developed a novel composite consisting of the combination of atelocollagen and chitosan in order to provide a biodegradable molecular matrix in gel form as a biomimetic surface for cell attachment, to promote the wound healing in excision wounds. We found that the topical application of biopolymer composite on the wound promoted cell proliferation, migration and collagen deposition overtime. The enhanced cellular activity in the collagen-chitosan treated wound tissue was also assed by increased levels of Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and Nerve growth factor (NGF) associated with elevated levels of antioxidants and decreased level of lipid peroxidation. The acellular matrix-like topical application material is designed to guide the eventual re-establishment of an anatomically normal skin. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of multi-cell regeneration on a molecular system that mimics tissue engineering in vivo.

  3. Characterization of acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) prepared by two different methods.

    PubMed

    Walter, R J; Matsuda, T; Reyes, H M; Walter, J M; Hanumadass, M

    1998-03-01

    The efficacy of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in the treatment of full-thickness skin injuries as a dermal substitute depends on its low antigenicity, capacity for rapid vascularization, and stability as a dermal template. These properties will be determined largely by the final composition of the ADM. We have treated human skin with either Dispase followed by Triton X-100 detergent or NaCl followed by SDS detergent, cryosectioned the resulting ADMs, and then characterized them immunohistochemically. Staining for cell-associated antigens (HLA-ABC, HLA-DR, vimentin, desmin, talin), extracellular matrix components (chondroitin sulfate, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, hyaluronic acid), elastin, and collagen type VII was dramatically reduced or absent from ADMs prepared by both methods. However, significant amounts of elastin, keratan sulfate, laminin, and collagen types III and IV were still observed in both ADMs. Both methods of ADM preparation resulted in extensive extraction of both cellular and extracellular components of the skin but retention of the basic dermal architecture. In general, ADM prepared by the NaCl-SDS method retained larger amounts of each antigen than did that prepared by the Dispase-Triton method. This was most evident for laminin and type VII collagen but larger amounts of type IV collagen, fibronectin, desmin, elastin, and HLA-DR were also evident in the NaCl-SDS ADM.

  4. Preparation and characterization of an advanced collagen aggregate from porcine acellular dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to extract and characterize an advanced collagen aggregate (Ag-col) from porcine acellular dermal matrix (pADM). Based on histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), Ag-col was composed of the D-periodic cross-striated collagen fibrils and thick collagen fiber bundles with uneven diameters and non-orientated arrangement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of pADM, Ag-col and Col were similar and revealed the presence of the triple helix. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis exhibited a slightly higher content of α-helix but inappreciably less amount of random coil structure in Ag-col compared to Col. Moreover, imino acid contents of pADM, Ag-col and Col were 222.43, 218.30 and 190.01 residues/1000 residues, respectively. From zeta potential analysis, a net charge of zero was found at pH 6.45 and 6.11 for Ag-col and Col, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study suggested that the Td of Ag-col was 20°C higher than that of Col as expected, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that Ag-col possessed a higher storage modulus but similar loss factor compared to Col. Therefore, the collagen aggregate from pADM could serve as a better alternative source of collagens for further applications in food and biological industries.

  5. Does tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccination interfere with serodiagnosis of pertussis infection?

    PubMed

    Pawloski, Lucia C; Kirkland, Kathryn B; Baughman, Andrew L; Martin, Monte D; Talbot, Elizabeth A; Messonnier, Nancy E; Tondella, Maria Lucia

    2012-06-01

    An anti-pertussis toxin (PT) IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was analytically validated for the diagnosis of pertussis at a cutoff of 94 ELISA units (EU)/ml. Little was known about the performance of this ELISA in the diagnosis of adults recently vaccinated with tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, which contains PT. The goal of this study was to determine when the assay can be used following Tdap vaccination. A cohort of 102 asymptomatic health care personnel (HCP) vaccinated with Tdap (Adacel; Sanofi Pasteur) were aged 19 to 79 years (median, 47 years) at vaccination. For each HCP, specimens were available for evaluation at 2 to 10 time points (prevaccination to 24 months postvaccination), and geometric mean concentrations (GMC) for the cohort were calculated at each time point. Among 97 HCP who responded to vaccination, a mixed-model analysis with prediction and tolerance intervals was performed to estimate the time at which serodiagnosis can be used following vaccination. The GMCs were 8, 21, and 9 EU/ml at prevaccination and 4 and 12 months postvaccination, respectively. Eight (8%) of the 102 HCP reached antibody titers of ≥94 EU/ml during their peak response, but none had these titers by 6 months postvaccination. The calculated prediction and tolerance intervals were <94 EU/ml by 45 and 75 days postvaccination, respectively. Tdap vaccination 6 months prior to testing did not confound result interpretation. This seroassay remains a valuable diagnostic tool for adult pertussis.

  6. Speed-accuracy trade-offs during foraging decisions in the acellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Latty, Tanya; Beekman, Madeleine

    2011-02-22

    Speed-accuracy trade-offs (SATs) are thought to be a fundamental feature of biological information processing, yet most evidence of SATs comes from animals. Here, we examine SATs in the foraging decisions of an acellular, amoeboid organism: the slime mould Physarum polycephalum. Slime moulds were given a simple discrimination task: selecting the highest-quality food item from a set of three options. We investigated the effect of two stressors, light exposure and hunger, on the speed and accuracy of decision-making. We also examined the effect of task difficulty. When given a difficult discrimination task, stressed individuals tend to make faster decisions than non-stressed individuals. This effect was reversed in plasmodia given easy discrimination tasks, where stressed individuals made slower decisions than non-stressed individuals. We found evidence of SATs, such that individuals who made fast decisions were more likely to make costly errors by selecting the worst possible food option. Our results suggest that SATs occur in a wider range of taxa than previously considered.

  7. Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccination among women of childbearing age-United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Alissa C; Lu, Peng-Jun; Williams, Walter W; Ding, Helen; Meyer, Sarah A

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of pertussis in the United States has increased since the 1990s. Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination of pregnant women provides passive protection to infants. Tdap vaccination is currently recommended for pregnant women during each pregnancy, but coverage among pregnant women and women of childbearing age has been suboptimal. Data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to determine national and state-specific Tdap vaccination coverage among women of childbearing age by self-reported pregnancy status at the time of the survey. Although this study could not assess coverage of Tdap vaccination received during pregnancy because questions on whether Tdap vaccination was received during pregnancy were not asked in BRFSS and NHIS, demographic and access-to-care factors associated with Tdap vaccination coverage in this population were assessed. Tdap vaccination coverage among all women 18-44 years old was 38.4% based on the BRFSS and 23.3% based on the NHIS. Overall, coverage did not differ by pregnancy status at the time of the survey. Coverage among all women 18-44 years old varied widely by state. Age, race and ethnicity, education, number of children in the household, and access-to-care characteristics were independently associated with Tdap vaccination in both surveys. We identified associations of demographic and access-to-care characteristics with Tdap vaccination that can guide strategies to improve vaccination rates in women during pregnancy.

  8. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Koolen, Pieter G. L.; Ashraf, Azra A.; Kim, Kuylhee; Mureau, Marc A. M.; Lee, Bernard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in plastic surgery have become increasingly popular particularly for breast reconstruction. Despite their advantages, questions exist regarding their association with a possible increased incidence of complications. We describe a collective experience of plastic surgeons’ use of ADMs in reconstructive breast surgery using an internet-based survey. Methods: Members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons were recruited through voluntary, anonymous participation in an online survey. The web-based survey garnered information about participant demographics and their experience with ADM use in breast reconstruction procedures. After responses were collected, all data were anonymously processed. Results: Data were ascertained through 365 physician responses of which 99% (n = 361) completed the survey. The majority of participants were men (84.5%) between 51 and 60 years (37.4%); 84.2% used ADM in breast reconstruction, including radiated patients (79.7%). ADM use was not favored for nipple reconstruction (81.5%); 94.6% of participants used drains, and 87.8% administered antibiotics postoperatively. The most common complications were seroma (70.9%) and infection (16%), although 57.4% claimed anecdotally that overall complication rate was unchanged after incorporating ADM into their practice. High cost was a deterrent for ADM use (37.5%). Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours. PMID:25973359

  9. Using genipin-crosslinked acellular porcine corneal stroma for cosmetic corneal lens implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Zhou, Qiang; Zhu, Jixiang; Xiao, Jianhui; Wan, Pengxia; Zhou, Chenjing; Huang, Zheqian; Qiang, Na; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Zheng; Quan, Daping; Wang, Zhichong

    2012-10-01

    Acellular porcine corneal stroma (APCS) has been proven to maintain the matrix microenvironment and is therefore an ideal biomaterial for the repair and reconstruction of corneal stroma. This study aims to develop a method to prepare cosmetic corneal lens implants for leukoma using genipin-crosslinked APCS (Gc-APCS). The Gc-APCS was prepared from APCS immersed in 1.0% genipin aqueous solution (pH 5.5) for 4 h at 37 °C, followed by lyophilization at -10 °C. The color of the Gc-APCS gradually deepened to dark-blue. The degree of crosslinking was 45.7 ± 4.6%, measured by the decrease of basic and hydroxy amino acids. The porous structure and ultrastructure of collagenous lamellae were maintained, and the porosity and BET SSA were 72.7 ± 4.6% and 23.01 ± 3.45 m(2)/g, respectively. The Gc-APCS rehydrated to the physiological water content within 5 min and was highly resistant to collagenase digestion. There were no significant differences in the areal modulus and curvature variation between Gc-APCS and nature porcine cornea. The dark-blue pigments were stable to pH, light and implantation in vivo. Gc-APCS extracts had no inhibitory effects on the proliferation of keratocytes. Corneal neovascularization, graft degradation and corneal rejection were not observed within 6 months.

  10. The histocompatibility research of hair follicle stem cells with bladder acellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Wang, Wenguang; Li, Jiuzhi; Rexiati, Mulati; An, Henqing; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) were reported to have multidirectional differentiation ability and could be differentiated into melanocytes, keratin cells, smooth muscle cells, and neurons. However, the functionality of HFSCs in bladder tissue regeneration is unknown. Methods: This study was conducted to build HFSCs vs bladder acellular matrix (BAM) complexes (HFSCs–BAM complexes) in vitro and evaluated whether HFSCs have well biocompatibility with BAM. HFSCs were separated from SD rats. BAM scaffold was prepared from the submucosa of rabbit bladder tissue. Afterwards, HFSCs were inoculated on BAM. Results: HFSCs–BAM complexes grew rapidly through inverted microscope observation. Cell growth curve showed the proliferation was in stagnate phase at 7th and 8th day. Cytotoxicity assay showed the toxicity grading of BAM was 0 or 1. Scanning electron microscopy, HE staining, and masson staining showed that cells have germinated on the surface of scaffold. Conclusion: The results provide evidence that HFSCs–BAM complexes have well biocompatibility and accumulate important experimental basis for clinical applying of tissue engineering bladder. PMID:27828841

  11. Development and characterization of an acellular porcine medial meniscus for use in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Thomas W; Ingram, Joanne; Katta, Jaynath; Knight, Richard; Korossis, Sotirios; Fisher, John; Ingham, Eileen

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize fresh porcine menisci and develop a decellularization protocol with a view to the generation of a biocompatible and biomechanically functional scaffold for use in tissue engineering/regeneration of the meniscus. Menisci were decellularized by exposing the tissue to freeze-thaw cycles, incubation in hypotonic tris buffer, 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate in hypotonic buffer plus protease inhibitors, nucleases, hypertonic buffer followed by disinfection using 0.1% (v/v) peracetic acid and final washing in phosphate-buffered saline. Histological, immunohistochemical, and biochemical analyses of the decellularized tissue confirmed the retention of the major structural proteins. There was, however, a 59.4% loss of glycosaminoglycans. The histoarchitecture was unchanged, and there was no evidence of the expression of the major xenogeneic epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose. Biocompatibility of the acellular scaffold was determined by using contact cytotoxicity and extract cytotoxicity tests. Decellularized tissue and extracts were not cytotoxic to cells. Biomechanical properties were determined by indentation and tensile tests, which confirmed the retention of biomechanical properties following decellularization. In conclusion, this study has generated data on the production of a biocompatible, biomechanically functional scaffold for use in meniscal repair.

  12. Nanopatterned acellular valve conduits drive the commitment of blood-derived multipotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Liddo, Rosa; Aguiari, Paola; Barbon, Silvia; Bertalot, Thomas; Mandoli, Amit; Tasso, Alessia; Schrenk, Sandra; Iop, Laura; Gandaglia, Alessandro; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years toward elucidating the correlation among nanoscale topography, mechanical properties, and biological behavior of cardiac valve substitutes. Porcine TriCol scaffolds are promising valve tissue engineering matrices with demonstrated self-repopulation potentiality. In order to define an in vitro model for investigating the influence of extracellular matrix signaling on the growth pattern of colonizing blood-derived cells, we cultured circulating multipotent cells (CMC) on acellular aortic (AVL) and pulmonary (PVL) valve conduits prepared with TriCol method and under no-flow condition. Isolated by our group from Vietnamese pigs before heart valve prosthetic implantation, porcine CMC revealed high proliferative abilities, three-lineage differentiative potential, and distinct hematopoietic/endothelial and mesenchymal properties. Their interaction with valve extracellular matrix nanostructures boosted differential messenger RNA expression pattern and morphologic features on AVL compared to PVL, while promoting on both matrices the commitment to valvular and endothelial cell-like phenotypes. Based on their origin from peripheral blood, porcine CMC are hypothesized in vivo to exert a pivotal role to homeostatically replenish valve cells and contribute to hetero- or allograft colonization. Furthermore, due to their high responsivity to extracellular matrix nanostructure signaling, porcine CMC could be useful for a preliminary evaluation of heart valve prosthetic functionality. PMID:27789941

  13. Changing from whole-cell to acellular pertussis vaccines would trade superior tolerability for inferior protection.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Notifications of infant deaths, assumed to be related to the introduction of new pentavalent DTwP-Hib-HBV childhood vaccines, caused, during 2008-2010 in few Asian countries, temporary interruptions of the respective vaccination programs. The sudden appearance of fatal cases was due to increased awareness/publicity and improved safety monitoring/reporting in countries with relatively high background infant mortalities. WHO investigations could not establish any causal relationships and vaccinations were again resumed. Recently, questions were raised in one concerned country as to why not to change to less reactogenic acellular pertussis (aP)-containing vaccines that are available in private practice and are generally perceived as 'better'. For resource-poor countries, the financial impacts render such a switch impossible and would also not be supported by external funding. Furthermore, it would be a disservice to the children, as in recent years evidence of inferior long-term efficacy of aP vaccines has accumulated. This report summarizes current knowledge on comparative whole-cell pertussis (wP) and aP vaccine performance, outlines the new July 2014 WHO guidance on the choice of pertussis vaccines and presents recent data on outbreak protection, antibody waning, long-term protection, wP-priming, pathogen adaptation, transmission and herd immunity.

  14. Epiphyseal and physeal cartilage: normal gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Renfa; Li, Yonggang; Tang, Lihua; Hu, Junwu; Xu, Anhui

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the normal appearance of epiphyseal and physeal cartilage on Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging. The appearance and enhancement ratios of 20 proximal and distal femoral epiphyses in 10 normal piglets were analyzed on Gd-enhanced MR images. The correlation of the MR imaging appearance with corresponding histological findings of immature epiphyses was examined. Our results showed that Gd-enhanced MRI could differentiate the differences in enhancement between physeal and epiphyseal cartilage and show vascular canals within the epiphyseal cartilage. Enhanced ratios in the physeal were greater than those in the epiphyseal cartilage (P < 0.005). It is concluded that Gd-enhanced MR imaging reveals epiphyseal vascular canals and shows difference in enhancement of physeal and epiphyseal cartilage.

  15. [Histomorphology of secondary cartilage in human fetal mandibles].

    PubMed

    Martinez, G; Caltabiano, C; Leonardi, R; Caltabiano, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a histomorphological analysis of some secondary cartilages of mandible and temporal bone as observed in human fetuses 18-22 weeks old. The behavior of cartilage was studied in both these regions, which were decalcified, cut at 10 mu, stained with Mallory staining and examined by optical microscopy. In mandible symphysis menti and condylar cartilage were described. The symphysis appeared to be formed by a fibrous cartilagineous structure surrounded by membranous bone. This structure seems be round in the caudal sections and ovoidal in the rostral sections with the major axis perpendicular to the mean sagittal plane. Meanwhile the condyle is formed by secondary cartilage which may be appreciated in this development stage 5 zona. Secondary cartilage was observed also in the temporal bone nearby the primitive glenoid fossa. The development and the importance of these cartilagineous structures are discussed.

  16. Articular cartilage: structural and developmental intricacies and questions

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage has obvious and fundamental roles in joint function and body movement. Much is known about its organization, extracellular matrix and phenotypic properties of its cells, but less is known about its developmental biology. Incipient articular cartilage in late embryos and neonates is a thin tissue with scanty matrix and small cells, while adult tissue is thick and zonal and contains large cells and abundant matrix. What remains unclear is not only how incipient articular cartilage forms, but how it then grows and matures into a functional, complex and multifaceted structure. This review focuses on recent and exciting discoveries on the developmental biology and growth of articular cartilage, frames them within the context of classic studies, and points to lingering questions and research goals. Advances in this research area will have significant relevance to basic science, and also considerable translational value to design superior cartilage repair and regeneration strategies. PMID:26408155

  17. Surgical repair of cartilage defects of the patella.

    PubMed

    Atik, O S; Korkusuz, F

    2001-08-01

    The structure and biomechanical forces on the patellar joint challenges researchers to define an ideal method for resurfacing the patellar cartilage. The articular surface of the patella presents variability between individuals, and has various minor articulations that bear partial or total compressive, shear, and combined forces during movement. Surgical techniques for the repair of patellar cartilage defects have evolved from cumulative advances in basic science and technology. Such surgeries include the techniques that promote either fibrocartilage formation or hyalinelike cartilage formation. Techniques promoting the formation of fibrocartilage yield short-term solutions because fibrocartilage lacks the durability and the mechanical properties of articular hyaline cartilage. Currently, there is no ideal method for the repair of patellar cartilage defects; all methods are considered experimental. Additional controlled and randomized clinical studies with large series of patients and long-term followup are required.

  18. The potential therapeutic use of stem cells in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Perera, Jonathan R; Jaiswal, Parag K; Khan, Wasim S

    2012-03-01

    As our population demographics change, osteoarthritis and cartilage defects are becoming more prevalent. The discovery of stems cells and their ability for indefinite regeneration has revolutionised the way cartilage problems are viewed. Tissue engineering has been shown to be the ideal way of repairing articular cartilage lesions, i.e. back to native tissue. Cartilage is an ideal tissue engineering target as it is avascular, aneural and alymphatic. The two main types of stem cells being investigated in chondrogenesis are embryological and mesenchymal stem cells. Research into embryological stem cells has been surrounded by controversy because of ethical, religious and social concerns. We discuss the use of embryological and mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage repair and the various factors involved in the differentiation into chondrocytes. We also discuss commonly used mesenchymal stem cell markers and their limitations.

  19. Engineering cell attachments to scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, Andrew J.; Liu, Yongxing; Wagner, Diane R.

    2011-04-01

    One of the challenges of tissue engineering, a promising cell-based treatment for damaged or diseased cartilage, is designing the scaffold that provides structure while the tissue regenerates. In addition to the scaffold material's biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and ease of manufacturing, scaffold interactions with the cells must also be considered. In cartilage tissue engineering, a range of scaffolds with various degrees of cell attachment have been proposed, but the attachment density and type have yet to be optimized. Several techniques have been developed to modulate cell adhesion to the scaffold. These studies suggest that the need for cell attachment in cartilage tissue engineering may vary with cell type, stage of differentiation, culture condition, and scaffold material. Further studies will elucidate the role of cell attachment in cartilage regeneration and enhance efforts to engineer cell-based cartilage therapies.

  20. Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Consolidation Measurement of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  1. Engineering superficial zone features in tissue engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tony; Hilton, Matthew J; Brown, Edward B; Zuscik, Michael J; Awad, Hani A

    2013-05-01

    A major challenge in cartilage tissue engineering is the need to recreate the native tissue's anisotropic extracellular matrix structure. This anisotropy has important mechanical and biological consequences and could be crucial for integrative repair. Here, we report that hydrodynamic conditions that mimic the motion-induced flow fields in between the articular surfaces in the synovial joint induce the formation of a distinct superficial layer in tissue engineered cartilage hydrogels, with enhanced production of cartilage matrix proteoglycan and Type II collagen. Moreover, the flow stimulation at the surface induces the production of the surface zone protein Proteoglycan 4 (aka PRG4 or lubricin). Analysis of second harmonic generation signature of collagen in this superficial layer reveals a highly aligned fibrillar matrix that resembles the alignment pattern in native tissue's surface zone, suggesting that mimicking synovial fluid flow at the cartilage surface in hydrodynamic bioreactors could be key to creating engineered cartilage with superficial zone features.

  2. Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwei; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Andriotis, Orestis G.; Ching, Kuan Y.; Jonnalagadda, Umesh S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Hill, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage grafts generated using conventional static tissue engineering strategies are characterised by low cell viability, suboptimal hyaline cartilage formation and, critically, inferior mechanical competency, which limit their application for resurfacing articular cartilage defects. To address the limitations of conventional static cartilage bioengineering strategies and generate robust, scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes, the present study utilised custom-built microfluidic perfusion bioreactors with integrated ultrasound standing wave traps. The system employed sweeping acoustic drive frequencies over the range of 890 to 910 kHz and continuous perfusion of the chondrogenic culture medium at a low-shear flow rate to promote the generation of three-dimensional agglomerates of human articular chondrocytes, and enhance cartilage formation by cells of the agglomerates via improved mechanical stimulation and mass transfer rates. Histological examination and assessment of micromechanical properties using indentation-type atomic force microscopy confirmed that the neocartilage grafts were analogous to native hyaline cartilage. Furthermore, in the ex vivo organ culture partial thickness cartilage defect model, implantation of the neocartilage grafts into defects for 16 weeks resulted in the formation of hyaline cartilage-like repair tissue that adhered to the host cartilage and contributed to significant improvements to the tissue architecture within the defects, compared to the empty defects. The study has demonstrated the first successful application of the acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactors to bioengineer scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes that have the potential for subsequent use in second generation autologous chondrocyte implantation procedures for the repair of partial thickness cartilage defects. PMID:25272195

  3. Fate of Meckel's cartilage chondrocytes in ocular culture

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, J.M.; Diewert, V.M.

    1988-09-01

    Modulation of the chondrocyte phenotype was observed in an organ culture system using Meckel's cartilage. First branchial arch cartilage was dissected from fetal rats of 16- and 17-day gestation. Perichondrium was mechanically removed, cartilage was split at the rostral process, and each half was grafted into the anterior chamber of an adult rat eye. The observed pattern of development in nonirradiated specimens was the following: hypertrophy of the rostral process and endochondral-type ossification, fibrous atrophy in the midsection, and mineralization of the malleus and incus. A change in matrix composition of the implanted cartilage was demonstrated with immunofluorescence staining for cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG). After 15 days of culture, CSPG was found in the auricular process but not in the midsection or rostral process. In order to mark the implanted cells and follow their fate, cartilage was labeled in vitro with (3H)thymidine (3H)TdR). Immediately after labeling 20% of the chondrocytes contained (3H)TdR. After culturing for 5 days, 20% of the chondrocytes were still labeled and 10% of the osteogenic cells also contained radioactive label. The labeling index decreased in both cell types with increased duration of culture. Multinucleated clast-type cells did not contain label. Additional cartilages not labeled with (3H)TdR were exposed to between 20000 and 6000 rad of gamma irradiation before ocular implantation. Irradiated cartilage did not hypertrophy or form bone but a fibrous region developed in the midsection. Cells of the host animal were not induced to form bone around the irradiated cartilage. Our studies suggest that fully differentiated chondrocytes of Meckel's cartilage have the capacity to become osteocytes, osteoblasts, and fibroblasts.

  4. Direct Human Cartilage Repair Using Three-Dimensional Bioprinting Technology

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Breitenkamp, Kurt; Finn, M.G.; Lotz, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies cannot as yet fabricate new tissue that is indistinguishable from native cartilage with respect to zonal organization, extracellular matrix composition, and mechanical properties. Integration of implants with surrounding native tissues is crucial for long-term stability and enhanced functionality. In this study, we developed a bioprinting system with simultaneous photopolymerization capable for three-dimensional (3D) cartilage tissue engineering. Poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) with human chondrocytes were printed to repair defects in osteochondral plugs (3D biopaper) in layer-by-layer assembly. Compressive modulus of printed PEGDMA was 395.73±80.40 kPa, which was close to the range of the properties of native human articular cartilage. Printed human chondrocytes maintained the initially deposited positions due to simultaneous photopolymerization of surrounded biomaterial scaffold, which is ideal in precise cell distribution for anatomic cartilage engineering. Viability of printed human chondrocytes increased 26% in simultaneous polymerization than polymerized after printing. Printed cartilage implant attached firmly with surrounding tissue and greater proteoglycan deposition was observed at the interface of implant and native cartilage in Safranin-O staining. This is consistent with the enhanced interface failure strength during the culture assessed by push-out testing. Printed cartilage in 3D biopaper had elevated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content comparing to that without biopaper when normalized to DNA. These observations were consistent with gene expression results. This study indicates the importance of direct cartilage repair and promising anatomic cartilage engineering using 3D bioprinting technology. PMID:22394017

  5. Special pattern of endochondral ossification in human laryngeal cartilages: X-ray and light-microscopic studies on thyroid cartilage.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Horst; Schicht, Martin; Sel, Saadettin; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2014-04-01

    Endochondral ossification is a process that also occurs in the skeleton of the larynx. Differences in the ossification mechanism in comparison to growth plates are not understood until now. To get deeper insights into this process, human thyroid cartilage was investigated by the use of X-rays and a series of light-microscopic stainings. A statistical analysis of mineralization was done by scanning areas of mineralized cartilage and of ossification. We detected a special mode of endochondral ossification which differs from the processes in growth plates. Thyroid cartilage ossifies very slowly and in a gender-specific manner. Compared with age-matched women, bone formation in thyroid cartilage of men is significantly higher in the age group 41-60 years. Endochondral ossification is prepared by internal changes of extracellular matrix leading to areas of asbestoid fibers with ingrowing cartilage canals. In contrast to growth plates, bone is deposited on large areas of mineralized cartilage, which appear at the rims of cartilage canals. Furthermore, primary parallel fibered bone was observed which was deposited on woven bone. The predominant bone type is cancellous bone with trabeculae, whereas compact bone with Haversian systems was seldom found. Trabeculae contain a great number of reversal and arresting lines meaning that the former were often reconstructed and that bone formation was arrested and resumed again with advancing age. It is hypothesized that throughout life trabeculae of ossified thyroid cartilage undergo adaptation to different loads due to the use of voice.

  6. Type I collagen-based fibrous capsule enhances integration of tissue-engineered cartilage with native articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yueh-Hsun; Ard, Mary B; Halper, Jaroslava T; Barabino, Gilda A

    2014-04-01

    Successful integration of engineered constructs with host tissues is crucial for cartilage repair, yet achieving it remains challenging. A collagen I-based fibrous capsule characterized by increased cell density and decreased glycosaminoglycan deposition usually forms at the periphery of tissue-engineered cartilage. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of a solid fibrous capsule on construct integration with native articular cartilage. To this end, capsule-containing (CC) and capsule-free (CF) constructs were grown by culturing chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds with insulin-like growth factor-1 and transforming growth factor-β1, respectively, in a wavy-walled bioreactor that imparts hydrodynamic forces for 4 weeks. The ability of harvested constructs to integrate with native cartilage was determined using a cartilage explant model. Our results revealed that adhesive stress between native cartilage and the CC constructs was 57% higher than that in the CF group, potentially due to the absence of glycosaminoglycans and increased cell density in the capsule region and deposition of denser and thicker collagen fibrils at the integration site. The present work demonstrates that the fibrous capsule can effectively enhance early integration of engineered and native cartilage tissues and thus suggests the need to include the capsule as a variable in the development of cartilage tissue engineering strategies.

  7. Energy information sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-02

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. Written for the general public, the EIA publication Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption and capability. The information contained herein pertains to energy data as of December 1991. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other EIA publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  8. Light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

  9. Curved cap corrugated sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Jackson, L. R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The report describes a structure for a strong, lightweight corrugated sheet. The sheet is planar or curved and includes a plurality of corrugation segments, each segment being comprised of a generally U-shaped corrugation with a part-cylindrical crown and cap strip, and straight side walls and with secondary corrugations oriented at right angles to said side walls. The cap strip is bonded to the crown and the longitudinal edge of said cap strip extends beyond edge at the intersection between said crown and said side walls. The high strength relative to weight of the structure makes it desirable for use in aircraft or spacecraft.

  10. 46. HANDRAILING, DETAILS TYPE 'B' (Sheet 12 of 14 sheets), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. HANDRAILING, DETAILS TYPE 'B' (Sheet 12 of 14 sheets), April 5, 1932 - West End-North Side Bridge, Spanning Ohio River, approximately 1 mile downstream from confluence of Monongahela & Allegheny rivers, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  11. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Taken from drawing sheet, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Taken from drawing sheet, SHEET #21, Showing the house as restored since Survey. (Dormer windows omitted as not authentic) - Samuel des Marest House, River Road, New Milford, Bergen County, NJ

  12. 71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 3; DECEMBER 20, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Enhanced cartilage repair in ‘healer’ mice—New leads in the search for better clinical options for cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a poor capacity to undergo intrinsic repair. Current strategies for the repair of large cartilage defects are generally unsatisfactory because the restored cartilage does not have the same resistance to biomechanical loading as authentic articular cartilage and degrades over time. Recently, an exciting new research direction, focused on intrinsic cartilage regeneration rather than fibrous repair by external means, has emerged. This review explores the new findings in this rapidly moving field as they relate to the clinical goal of restoration of structurally robust, stable and non-fibrous articular cartilage following injury. PMID:27130635

  14. Acellular allogeneic nerve grafting combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for the repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects: biomechanics and validation of mathematical models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-jun; Zhao, Bao-lin; Lv, Hao-ze; Qin, Zhi-gang; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft used in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be an effective treatment for long-segment sciatic nerve defects. To test this, we established rabbit models of 30 mm sciatic nerve defects, and treated them using either an autograft or a chemically decellularized allogeneic nerve graft with or without simultaneous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We compared the tensile properties, electrophysiological function and morphology of the damaged nerve in each group. Sciatic nerves repaired by the allogeneic nerve graft combined with stem cell transplantation showed better recovery than those repaired by the acellular allogeneic nerve graft alone, and produced similar results to those observed with the autograft. These findings confirm that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is an effective method of repairing long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:27651781

  15. Algal Biofuels Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    This fact sheet provides information on algal biofuels, which are generating considerable interest around the world. They may represent a sustainable pathway for helping to meet the U.S. biofuel production targets set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  16. Ethanol Myths Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    Ethanol is a clean, renewable fuel that is helping to reduce our nation’s dependence on oil and can offer additional economic and environmental benefits in the future. This fact sheet is intended to address some common misconceptions about this important alternative fuel.

  17. Quick Information Sheets. 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Trace Center.

    The Trace Center gathers and organizes information on communication, control, and computer access for handicapped individuals. The information is disseminated in the form of brief sheets describing print, nonprint, and organizational resources and listing addresses and telephone numbers for ordering or for additional information. This compilation…

  18. Quick Information Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Trace Center.

    This compilation of "Trace Quick Sheets" provides descriptions, prices, and ordering information for products and services that assist with communication, control, and computer access for disabled individuals. Product descriptions or product sources are included for: adaptive toys and toy modifications; head pointers, light pointers, and…

  19. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  20. Insulation Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    Heating and cooling account for 50-70% of the energy consumed in the average American home. Heating water accounts for another 20%. A poorly insulated home loses much of this energy, causing drafty rooms and high energy bills. This fact sheet discusses how to determine if your home needs more insulation, the additional thermal resistance (called…

  1. GED Testing Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GED Testing Service, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This GED Testing fact sheet provides information on: (1) GED[R] Tests; (2) Versions and Editions of the GED Tests; (3) Earning a Credential; (4) GED Testing Service[R]; (5) History of the GED Tests; (6) Who Accepts the GED Credential; (7) Public/Private Partnership of GEDTS; (8) Renowned GED Credential Recipients; (9) GED Testing Numbers for 2008;…

  2. Youth Demographics. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Mark Hugo; Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2006-01-01

    This fact sheet compares the numbers of 18-25 year-old residents and citizens by gender, race, ethnicity, geographic distribution, marital status, military status, unemployment, educational attainment, and assesses population trends from 1968-2006. It explores such demographic characteristics of young people using data from the March Annual…

  3. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  4. Shark cartilage, cancer and the growing threat of pseudoscience.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Gary K; Cheng, Keith C; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Wolfe, Marilyn J

    2004-12-01

    The promotion of crude shark cartilage extracts as a cure for cancer has contributed to at least two significant negative outcomes: a dramatic decline in shark populations and a diversion of patients from effective cancer treatments. An alleged lack of cancer in sharks constitutes a key justification for its use. Herein, both malignant and benign neoplasms of sharks and their relatives are described, including previously unreported cases from the Registry of Tumors in Lower Animals, and two sharks with two cancers each. Additional justifications for using shark cartilage are illogical extensions of the finding of antiangiogenic and anti-invasive substances in cartilage. Scientific evidence to date supports neither the efficacy of crude cartilage extracts nor the ability of effective components to reach and eradicate cancer cells. The fact that people think shark cartilage consumption can cure cancer illustrates the serious potential impacts of pseudoscience. Although components of shark cartilage may work as a cancer retardant, crude extracts are ineffective. Efficiencies of technology (e.g., fish harvesting), the power of mass media to reach the lay public, and the susceptibility of the public to pseudoscience amplifies the negative impacts of shark cartilage use. To facilitate the use of reason as the basis of public and private decision-making, the evidence-based mechanisms of evaluation used daily by the scientific community should be added to the training of media and governmental professionals. Increased use of logical, collaborative discussion will be necessary to ensure a sustainable future for man and the biosphere.

  5. Cartilage tissue engineering using PHBV and PHBV/Bioglass scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingshu; Yu, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Scaffolds have an important role in cartilage tissue engineering. Poly(hydroxybutyrate‑co‑hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) has been demonstrated to have potential as a scaffold for the three dimensional construction of engineered cartilage tissue. However, the poor hydrophilicity and mechanical strength associated with PHBV affects its clinical applications as a scaffold in cartilage tissue engineering. The incorporation of Bioglass (BG) into PHBV has been shown to improve the hydrophilicity and mechanical strength of PHBV matrices. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the properties of PHBV scaffolds and PHBV scaffolds containing 10% BG (w/w) (PHBV/10% BG) and to investigate the effects of these scaffolds on the properties of engineered cartilage in vivo. Rabbit auricular chondrocytes were seeded onto PHBV and PHBV/10% BG scaffolds. Differences in cartilage regeneration were compared between the neocartilage grown on the PHBV and the PHBV/10% BG scaffolds after 10 weeks of in vivo transplantation. The incorporation of BG into PHBV was observed to improve the hydrophilicity and compressive strength of the scaffold. Furthermore, after 10 weeks incubation in vivo, the cartilage‑like tissue formed using the PHBV/10% BG scaffolds was observed to be thicker, exhibit enhanced biomechanical properties and have a higher cartilage matrix content than that generated using the pure PHBV scaffolds. The results of this study demonstrate that the incorporation of BG into PHBV may generate composite scaffolds with improved properties for cartilage engineering.

  6. Transport of solutes through cartilage: permeability to large molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Maroudas, A

    1976-01-01

    A review of the transport of solutes through articular cartilage is given, with special reference to the effect of variations in matrix composition. Some physiological implications of our findings are discussed. Also, results of an experimental study of the permeability of articular cartilage to large globular proteins are presented. Because of the very low partition coefficients of large solutes between cartilage and an external solution new experimental techniques had to be devised, particularly for the study of diffusion. The partition coefficients of solutes were found to decrease very steeply with increase in size, up to serum albumin. There was, however, no further decrease for IGG. The diffusion coefficient of serum albumin in cartilage was relatively high (one quarter of the value in aqueous solution). These two facts taken together suggest that there may be a very small fraction of relatively large pores in cartilage through which the transport of large molecules is taking place. The permeability of cartilage to large molecules is extremely sensitive to variations in the glycosaminoglycan content: for a threefold increase in the latter there is a hundredfold decrease in the partition coefficient. For cartilage of fixed charge density around 0-19 m-equiv/g, there is no penetration at all of globular proteins of size equal to or larger than serum albumin. PMID:1002608

  7. New Technology in Imaging Cartilage of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Markus M; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Zbýň, Štefan; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Apprich, Sebastian; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of osteochondral lesions, as well as osteoarthritis of the ankle joint following osteochondritis dissecans and trauma, has been reappraised in recent years. Consequently, an increasing number of surgical interventions using different cartilage repair techniques is performed in the ankle joint, which has resulted in a growing demand for repetitive and objective assessment of cartilage tissue and its repair. While morphological imaging does enable monitoring of macroscopic changes with increasing precision, it fails to provide information about the ultrastructural composition of cartilage. The significance of molecular changes in cartilage matrix composition, however, is increasingly recognized, as it is assumed that macroscopic cartilage degeneration is preceded by a loss in glycosaminoglycans and a disorganization of the collagen network. Recent advances in biochemical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have yielded sequences sensitive to these changes, thus providing invaluable insight into both early cartilage degeneration and maturation of repair tissue, on a molecular level. The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive overview of these techniques, including water and collagen-sensitive T2/T2* mapping, as well as glycosaminoglycan-sensitive sequences such as delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage dGEMRIC, and sodium imaging, and describe their applications for the ankle joint.

  8. The Functions of BMP3 in Rabbit Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Yiting; Shi, Yanping; Lei, Chen; Du, Bo; Li, Xuemin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-10-29

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in skeletal development and repair. Previously, we found fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) induced up-regulation of BMP2, 3, 4 in the process of rabbit articular cartilage repair, which resulted in satisfactory repair effects. As BMP2/4 show a clearly positive effect for cartilage repair, we investigated the functions of BMP3 in rabbit articular cartilage repair. In this paper, we find that BMP3 inhibits the repair of partial-thickness defect of articular cartilage in rabbit by inducing the degradation of extracellular matrix, interfering with the survival of chondrocytes surrounding the defect, and directly inhibiting the expression of BMP2 and BMP4. Meanwhile BMP3 suppress the repair of full-thickness cartilage defect by destroying the subchondral bone through modulating the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and directly increasing the expression of BMP4. Although BMP3 has different functions in the repair of partial and full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in rabbit, the regulation of BMP expression is involved in both of them. Together with our previous findings, we suggest the regulation of the BMP signaling pathway by BMP3 is essential in articular cartilage repair.

  9. Tissue-engineered cartilage with inducible and tunable immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Glass, Katherine A; Link, Jarrett M; Brunger, Jonathan M; Moutos, Franklin T; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is mediated in part by inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 (IL-1), which promote degradation of articular cartilage and prevent human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. In this study, we combined gene therapy and functional tissue engineering to develop engineered cartilage with immunomodulatory properties that allow chondrogenesis in the presence of pathologic levels of IL-1 by inducing overexpression of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in MSCs via scaffold-mediated lentiviral gene delivery. A doxycycline-inducible vector was used to transduce MSCs in monolayer or within 3D woven PCL scaffolds to enable tunable IL-1Ra production. In the presence of IL-1, IL-1Ra-expressing engineered cartilage produced cartilage-specific extracellular matrix, while resisting IL-1-induced upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases and maintaining mechanical properties similar to native articular cartilage. The ability of functional engineered cartilage to deliver tunable anti-inflammatory cytokines to the joint may enhance the long-term success of therapies for cartilage injuries or osteoarthritis.

  10. A novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model for assessing the regeneration of focal cartilage defects with biocompatible bacterial nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current therapies for articular cartilage defects fail to achieve qualitatively sufficient tissue regeneration, possibly because of a mismatch between the speed of cartilage rebuilding and the resorption of degradable implant polymers. The present study focused on the self-healing capacity of resident cartilage cells in conjunction with cell-free and biocompatible (but non-resorbable) bacterial nanocellulose (BNC). This was tested in a novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Standardized bovine cartilage discs with a central defect filled with BNC were cultured for up to eight weeks with/without stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Cartilage formation and integrity were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Content, release and neosynthesis of the matrix molecules proteoglycan/aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I were also quantified. Finally, gene expression of these molecules was profiled in resident chondrocytes and chondrocytes migrated onto the cartilage surface or the implant material. Results Non-stimulated and especially TGF-β1-stimulated cartilage discs displayed a preserved structural and functional integrity of the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix, remained vital in long-term culture (eight weeks) without signs of degeneration and showed substantial synthesis of cartilage-specific molecules at the protein and mRNA level. Whereas mobilization of chondrocytes from the matrix onto the surface of cartilage and implant was pivotal for successful seeding of cell-free BNC, chondrocytes did not immigrate into the central BNC area, possibly due to the relatively small diameter of its pores (2 to 5 μm). Chondrocytes on the BNC surface showed signs of successful redifferentiation over time, including increase of aggrecan/collagen type II mRNA, decrease of collagen type I mRNA and initial deposition of proteoglycan and collagen type II in long-term high-density pellet cultures

  11. Functional analysis of CTRP3/cartducin in Meckel's cartilage and developing condylar cartilage in the fetal mouse mandible.

    PubMed

    Yokohama-Tamaki, Tamaki; Maeda, Takashi; Tanaka, Tetsuya S; Shibata, Shunichi

    2011-05-01

    CTRP3/cartducin, a novel C1q family protein, is expressed in proliferating chondrocytes in the growth plate and has an important role in regulating the growth of both chondrogenic precursors and chondrocytes in vitro. We examined the expression of CTRP3/cartducin mRNA in Meckel's cartilage and in condylar cartilage of the fetal mouse mandible. Based on in situ hybridization studies, CTRP3/cartducin mRNA was not expressed in the anlagen of Meckel's cartilage at embryonic day (E)11.5, but it was strongly expressed in Meckel's cartilage at E14.0, and then reduced in the hypertrophic chondrocytes at E16.0. CTRP3/cartducin mRNA was not expressed in the condylar anlagen at E14.0, but was expressed in the upper part of newly formed condylar cartilage at E15.0. At E16.0, CTRP3/cartducin mRNA was expressed from the polymorphic cell zone to the upper part of the hypertrophic cell zone, but was reduced in the lower part of the hypertrophic cell zone. CTRP3/cartducin-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-ODN) treatment of Meckel's cartilage and condylar anlagen from E14.0 using an organ culture system indicated that, after 4-day culture, CTRP3/cartducin abrogation induced curvature deformation of Meckel's cartilage with loss of the perichondrium and new cartilage formation. Aggrecan, type I collagen, and tenascin-C were simultaneously immunostained in this newly formed cartilage, indicating possible transformation from the perichondrium into cartilage. Further, addition of recombinant mouse CTRP3/cartducin protein to the organ culture medium with AS-ODN tended to reverse the deformation. These results suggest a novel function for CTRP3/cartducin in maintaining the perichondrium. Moreover, AS-ODN induced a deformation of the shape, loss of the perichondrium/fibrous cell zone, and disorder of the distinct architecture of zones in the mandibular condylar cartilage. Additionally, AS-ODN-treated condylar cartilage showed reduced levels of mRNA expression of aggrecan, collagen types I

  12. Acellular Dermal Matrix as a Core Strut for Projection in Nipple Reconstruction: Approaches for Three Different Methods of Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gui-Yong; Cho, Hee-Eun; Lee, Byung-Il; Park, Seung-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this paper was to describe a novel technique for improving the maintenance of nipple projection in primary nipple reconstruction by using acellular dermal matrix as a strut in one of three different configurations, according to the method of prior breast reconstruction. The struts were designed to best fill the different types of dead spaces in nipple reconstruction depending on the breast reconstruction method. Methods A total of 50 primary nipple reconstructions were performed between May 2012 and May 2015. The prior breast reconstruction methods were latissimus dorsi (LD) flap (28 cases), transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap (10 cases), or tissue expander/implant (12 cases). The nipple reconstruction technique involved the use of local flaps, including the C-V flap or star flap. A 1×2-cm acellular dermal matrix was placed into the core with O-, I-, and L-shaped struts for prior LD, TRAM, and expander/implant methods, respectively. The projection of the reconstructed nipple was measured at the time of surgery and at 3, 6, and 9 months postoperatively. Results The nine-month average maintenance of nipple projection was 73.0%±9.67% for the LD flap group using an O-strut, 72.0%±11.53% for the TRAM flap group using an I-strut, and 69.0%±10.82% for the tissue expander/implant group using an L-strut. There were no cases of infection, wound dehiscence, or flap necrosis. Conclusions The application of an acellular dermal matrix with a different kind of strut for each of 3 breast reconstruction methods is an effective addition to current techniques for improving the maintenance of long-term projection in primary nipple reconstruction. PMID:27689049

  13. Structural and redox behavior of OxyVita, a zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin: comparison with natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Harrington, John P; Orlik, Kseniya; Orlig, Kseniya; Zito, Samantha L; Wollocko, Jacek; Wollocko, Hanna

    2010-04-01

    A zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin (OxyVita Hb) has been developed for application as an acellular therapeutic hemoglobin-based-oxygen-carrier (HBOC). For effective and safe oxygen binding, transport and delivery, an HBOC must meet essential molecular requirements related to its structural integrity and redox stability. OxyVita is a super polymer possessing an average M.wt. of 17 x 10(6) Da. Structural integrity was determined by unfolding studies of OxyVita in the presence of increasing concentrations of urea. The unfolding midpoints (D(1/2)) of different preparations of OxyVita (solution and powder forms) were compared to Lumbricus Hb (LtHb) and Arenicola Hb (ArHb), natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins, which are serving as models for an effective and safe acellular HBOC. Reduction studies of OxyVita Hb using endogenous reducing agents were also investigated. Results from these studies indicate that: 1) OxyVita Hb exhibits greater resistance to conformational change than either LtHb or ArHb in the reduced (oxyHb) state; and 2) the reduction of met OxyVita Hb to oxyHb occurs slowly in the presence of either ascorbic acid (70% reduction in 560 min.) or beta-NADH (40% reduction in 90 min.). These studies provide consistent evidence that OxyVita Hb possesses physiochemical properties that exhibit structural integrity and redox behavior necessary for functioning as an effective and safe HBOC within clinical applications. These results are in agreement with observations made by other investigators as to the reduction in heme-loss of OxyVita Hb, essential for the reversible binding/release of molecular oxygen within the circulatory system.

  14. Alternatives to Acellular Dermal Matrix: Utilization of a Gore DualMesh Sling as a Cost-Conscious Adjunct for Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, James; Petty, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study seeks an alternative to acellular dermal matrix in 2-staged breast reconstruction while minimizing cost. It was hypothesized that use of a Gore DualMesh would allow for similar intraoperative tissue expander fill volumes, time to second-stage reconstruction, and number of postoperative fills compared with acellular dermal matrix at only a fraction of the expense. Methods: Retrospective analysis comparing Gore DualMesh (59 breasts, 34 patients), acellular dermal matrix (13 breasts, 8 patients), and total muscle coverage (25 breasts, 14 patients) for postmastectomy breast reconstruction was performed. Time to second-stage reconstruction, number of expansions, and relative initial fill volumes were compared between the 3 groups. Secondarily, complication rates were also considered, including seroma, infection, expander/implant explantation, removal of mesh, and capsular contracture. Statistical analysis was performed utilizing the Fisher exact test and the χ2 test for categorical variables and the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables. Results: Relative initial fill volumes, number of expansions, and time to second-stage reconstruction showed no statistical difference between the acellular dermal matrix and Gore DualMesh groups (P = .494, P = .146, and P = .539, respectively). Furthermore, the Gore DualMesh group underwent significantly fewer fills (P < .001) and had a higher relative initial fill volume (P < .001) than the total muscle coverage group. The additional cost per breast as a result of including DualMesh was on average $385 versus $4287 for acellular dermal matrix. Complication rates were similar between all 3 groups without statistically significant differences. Conclusions: Gore DualMesh represents a safe alternative to acellular dermal matrix for breast reconstruction with similar aesthetic results in certain patients at a fraction of the cost. PMID:28261372

  15. Delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects with non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix compared with conventional staged repair: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Synthetic mesh has been used traditionally to repair abdominal wall defects, but its use is limited in the case of bacterial contamination. New biological materials are now being used successfully for delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects. The costs of biological materials may prevent surgeons from using them. We compared the conventional staged repair of contaminated abdominal wall defects with a single-stage procedure using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix. Methods A total of 14 cases with Grade 3 contaminated abdominal wall defects underwent delayed primary closure of the abdomen using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™ Reconstructive Tissue Matrix, LifeCell Corp., Branchburg, NJ, USA). The results were compared with a group of 14 patients who had received conventional treatment for the repair of contaminated abdominal wall defects comprising a staged repair during two separate hospital admissions employing synthetic mesh. Treatment modalities, outcomes, and costs were compared. Results In all cases treated with delayed primary closure employing non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix, there were no complications related to its use. Two patients died due to unrelated events. Although treatment costs were estimated to be similar in the two groups, the patients treated with porcine acellular dermal matrix spent less time as an inpatient than those receiving conventional two-stage repair. Conclusions Delayed primary closure of contaminated abdominal wall defects using a non-crosslinked porcine acellular dermal matrix may be a suitable alternative to conventional staged repair. In our patients, it resulted in early restoration of abdominal wall function and shorter hospitalization. The costs for treating contaminated abdominal wall defects using porcine acellular dermal matrix during a single hospital admission were not higher than costs for conventional two-stage repair

  16. Simple Correction of Alar Retraction by Conchal Cartilage Extension Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Sung Min; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Alar retraction is a challenging condition in rhinoplasty marked by exaggerated nostril exposure and awkwardness. Although various methods for correcting alar retraction have been introduced, none is without drawbacks. Herein, we report a simple procedure that is both effective and safe for correcting alar retraction using only conchal cartilage grafting. Methods Between August 2007 and August 2009, 18 patients underwent conchal cartilage extension grafting to correct alar retraction. Conchal cartilage extension grafts were fixed to the caudal margins of the lateral crura and covered with vestibular skin advancement flaps. Preoperative and postoperative photographs were reviewed and analyzed. Patient satisfaction was surveyed and categorized into 4 groups (very satisfied, satisfied, moderate, or unsatisfied). Results According to the survey, 8 patients were very satisfied, 9 were satisfied, and 1 considered the outcome moderate, resulting in satisfaction for most patients. The average distance from the alar rim to the long axis of the nostril was reduced by 1.4 mm (3.6 to 2.2 mm). There were no complications, except in 2 cases with palpable cartilage step-off that resolved without any aesthetic problems. Conclusions Conchal cartilage alar extension graft is a simple, effective method of correcting alar retraction that can be combined with aesthetic rhinoplasty conveniently, utilizing conchal cartilage, which is the most similar cartilage to alar cartilage, and requiring a lesser volume of cartilage harvest compared to previously devised methods. However, the current procedure lacks efficacy for severe alar retraction and a longer follow-up period may be required to substantiate the enduring efficacy of the current procedure. PMID:27896189

  17. [Research progress of cell sheet technology and its applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine].

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongyang; Ren, Liling; Mao, Tianqiu

    2014-10-01

    Cell sheet engineering is an important technology to harvest the cultured cells in the form of confluent monolayers using a continuous culture method and a physical approach. Avoiding the use of enzymes, expended cells can be harvested together with endogenous extracellular matrix, cell-matrix contacts, and cell-cell contacts. With high efficiency of cell loading ability and without using exogenous scaffolds, cell sheet engineering has several advantages over traditional tissue engineering methods. In this article, we give an overview on cell sheet technology about its applications in the filed of tissue regeneration, including the construction of soft tissues (corneal, mucous membrane, myocardium, blood vessel, pancreas islet, liver, bladder and skin) and hard tissues (bone, cartilage and tooth root). This techonoly is promising to provide a novel strategy for the development of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. And further works should be carried out on the operability of this technology and its feasibility to construct thick tissues.

  18. [Agrecan and articular cartilage: assessment of glycosyltransferases for the restoration of cartilage matrix in osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Magdalou, Jacques; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a connective tissue containing a single type of cells, chondrocytes, which synthesise a dense extracellular matrix, mainly composed of collagens, hyaluronic acid and proteoglycans. These macromolecules play a major role in the resistance and elastic properties of the tissue. They also favour interactions with small active substances, such as growth factors and cytokines. Chondrocytes have a low metabolic capacity in relatively hypoxic conditions and absence of vascular supply. In physiopathological conditions, such as osteoarthritis (OA), progressive and irreversible degradation of matrix components is occurring. With the aim of developing new and efficient therapies against OA, we investigated the molecular mechanisms that initiate the disease, in order to identify key-proteins. These targets should hopefully lead to the design of new drugs able to stop degradation and restore cartilage. One of the earliest molecular events in OA is the degradation of aggrecan, the most abundant proteoglycan. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, chondroitin-sulfate, attached on the core protein, are subjected to hydrolysis into smaller fragments. We were interested in the glycosyltransferases that catalyse the formation of the polysaccharidic chains, namely those involved in the common tetrasaccharidic protein linkage region, GlcAbeta1,3Galbeta1,3Galbeta 1,4Xyl-O-Serine. The galactose beta1,3-glucuronosyltransférase-I (GlcAT-I) which catalyses the final step of this primer and which is markedly repressed during OA is an attractive target in that respect. Indeed, the human recombinant enzyme was found to play a pivotal role in GAG synthesis. Moreover, overexpression of GlcAT-I in cartilage explants treated with IL1beta was able to fully counteract proteoglycan depletion induced by the cytokine. These results prompted us to investigate the structure, function and regulation of this enzyme. This study provides the basis for several therapy approaches (gene

  19. Rubella - Fact Sheet for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Redirect for the Rubella fact sheet page. The current fact sheet can ... http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases/child/rubella.html Print page Share Compartir File Formats Help: ...

  20. A New Approach to Minimize Acellular Dermal Matrix Use in Prosthesis-based Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hadad, Ivan; Liu, Allen S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) are often used to improve lower-pole contour, as well as allow for single-stage reconstruction, but numerous studies have shown an increased complication rate using ADM. As such, our group has developed a minimal-ADM-use technique to lower complications while effectively recreating lower-pole contour. Methods: A total of 380 postmastectomy prosthesis-based breast reconstructions were performed in 265 patients by a single surgeon. One hundred eight reconstructions were performed using the traditional ADM technique, with a large piece of ADM along the entire inferior and lateral borders. Two hundred twenty-five reconstructions were performed with the minimal-use technique, patching only the lateral area of the reconstruction. Thirty-five reconstructions were performed without the use of any ADM for high-risk reconstructions, most often in morbidly obese patients. Results: Comparing the traditional technique with the minimal-use technique, the seroma rate dropped from 3% to 0%. The rate of infection and reconstruction loss fell from 9% to 1%. Upon greatly reducing or eliminating the use of ADM use in obese patients, the seroma rate decreased from 15.4% to 5.7%, and the reconstruction loss rate decreased from 38% to 9%. Conclusions: This article describes a new surgical approach to minimize the amount of ADM necessary to create an aesthetically pleasing breast reconstruction. We believe that this approach helps avoid the complications of seroma, infection, and loss of the reconstruction. In certain obese patients, total avoidance of ADM may be the better choice. PMID:26301161

  1. Histologic, Molecular, and Clinical Evaluation of Explanted Breast Prostheses, Capsules, and Acellular Dermal Matrices for Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Poppler, Louis; Cohen, Justin; Dolen, Utku Can; Schriefer, Andrew E.; Tenenbaum, Marissa M.; Deeken, Corey; Chole, Richard A.; Myckatyn, Terence M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subclinical infections, manifest as biofilms, are considered an important cause of capsular contracture. Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) are frequently used in revision surgery to prevent recurrent capsular contractures. Objective We sought to identify an association between capsular contracture and biofilm formation on breast prostheses, capsules, and ADMs in a tissue expander/implant (TE/I) exchange clinical paradigm. Methods Biopsies of the prosthesis, capsule, and ADM from patients (N = 26) undergoing TE/I exchange for permanent breast implant were evaluated for subclinical infection. Capsular contracture was quantified with Baker Grade and intramammary pressure. Biofilm formation was evaluated with specialized cultures, rtPCR, bacterial taxonomy, live:dead staining, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Collagen distribution, capsular histology, and ADM remodeling were quantified following fluorescent and light microscopy. Results Prosthetic devices were implanted from 91 to 1115 days. Intramammary pressure increased with Baker Grade. Of 26 patients evaluated, one patient had a positive culture and one patient demonstrated convincing evidence of biofilm morphology on SEM. Following PCR amplification 5 samples randomly selected for 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated an abundance of suborder Micrococcineae, consistent with contamination. Conclusions Our data suggest that bacterial biofilms likely contribute to a proportion, but not all diagnosed capsular contractures. Biofilm formation does not appear to differ significantly between ADMs or capsules. While capsular contracture remains an incompletely understood but common problem in breast implant surgery, advances in imaging, diagnostic, and molecular techniques can now provide more sophisticated insights into the pathophysiology of capsular contracture. Level of Evidence PMID:26229126

  2. Subcutaneous Implant-based Breast Reconstruction with Acellular Dermal Matrix/Mesh: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Salibian, Ara A.; Frey, Jordan D.; Choi, Mihye

    2016-01-01

    Background: The availability of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) and synthetic mesh products has prompted plastic surgeons to revisit subcutaneous implant-based breast reconstruction. The literature is limited, however, with regards to evidence on patient selection, techniques, and outcomes. Methods: A systematic review of the Medline and Cochrane databases was performed for original studies reporting breast reconstruction with ADM or mesh, and subcutaneous implant placement. Studies were analyzed for level of evidence, inclusion/exclusion criteria for subcutaneous reconstruction, reconstruction characteristics, and outcomes. Results: Six studies (186 reconstructions) were identified for review. The majority of studies (66.7%) were level IV evidence case series. Eighty percent of studies had contraindications for subcutaneous reconstruction, most commonly preoperative radiation, high body mass index, and active smoking. Forty percent of studies commenting on patient selection assessed mastectomy flap perfusion for subcutaneous reconstruction. Forty-five percent of reconstructions were direct-to-implant, 33.3% 2-stage, and 21.5% single-stage adjustable implant, with ADM utilized in 60.2% of reconstructions versus mesh. Pooled complication rates included: major infection 1.2%, seroma 2.9%, hematoma 2.3%, full nipple-areola complex necrosis 1.1%, partial nipple-areola complex necrosis 4.5%, major flap necrosis 1.8%, wound healing complication 2.3%, explantation 4.1%, and grade III/IV capsular contracture 1.2%. Conclusions: Pooled short-term complication rates in subcutaneous alloplastic breast reconstruction with ADM or mesh are low in preliminary studies with selective patient populations, though techniques and outcomes are variable across studies. Larger comparative studies and better-defined selection criteria and outcomes reporting are needed to develop appropriate indications for performing subcutaneous implant-based reconstruction. PMID:27975034

  3. Direct Hospital Cost of Outcome Pathways in Implant-Based Reconstruction with Acellular Dermal Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ali A.; Broderick, Kristen; Funk, Susan; Reaven, Nancy; Tenenbaum, Marissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Current cost data on tissue expansion followed by exchange for permanent implant (TE/I) reconstruction lack a necessary assessment of the experience of a heterogenous breast cancer patient population and their multiple outcome pathways. We extend our previous analysis to that of direct hospital cost as bundling of payments is likely to follow the changing centralization of cancer care at the hospital level. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis (2003–2009) of TE/I reconstructions with or without an acellular dermal matrix (ADM), namely Alloderm RTM. Postreconstructive events were analyzed and organized into outcome pathways as previously described. Aggregated and normalized inpatient and outpatient hospital direct costs and physician reimbursement were generated for each outcome pathway with or without ADM. Results: Three hundred sixty-seven patients were analyzed. The average 2-year hospital direct cost per TE/I breast reconstruction patient was $11,862 in the +ADM and $12,319 in the −ADM groups (P > 0.05). Initial reconstructions were costlier in the +ADM ($6,868) than in the −ADM ($5,615) group, but the average cost of subsequent postreconstructive events within 2 years was significantly lower in +ADM ($5,176) than −ADM ($6,704) patients (P < 0.05). When a complication occurred, but reconstruction was still completed within 2 years, greater costs were incurred in the −ADM than in the +ADM group for most scenarios, leading to a net equalization of cost between study groups. Conclusion: Although direct hospital cost is an important factor for resource and fund allocation, it should not remain the sole factor when deciding to use ADM in TE/I reconstruction. PMID:27622099

  4. Plastic Surgery and Acellular Dermal Matrix: Highlighting Trends from 1999 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Daar, David A; Gandy, Jessica R; Clark, Emily G; Mowlds, Donald S; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Wirth, Garrett A

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has ushered in a rapidly expanding global discussion regarding acellular dermal matrix (ADM) applications, economic analyses, technical considerations, benefits, and risks, with recent emphasis on ADM use in breast surgery. This study aims to evaluate global trends in ADM research using bibliometric analysis. The top nine Plastic Surgery journals were determined by impact factor (IF). Each issue of the nine journals between 1999 and 2013 was accessed to compile a database of articles discussing ADM. Publications were further classified by IF, authors’ geographic location, study design, and level of evidence (LOE, I-V). Productivity index and productivity share were calculated for each region. In total, 256 ADM articles were accessed. The annual global publication volume increased significantly by 4.2 (0.87) articles per year (p<0.001), with a mean productivity index of 36.3 (59.0). The mean impact factor of the nine journals increased significantly from 0.61 (0.11) to 2.47 (0.99) from 1993 to 2013 (p<0.001). Despite this increase in the global ADM literature, the majority of research was of weaker LOE (level I: 2.29% and level II: 9.17%). USA contributed the most research (87%), followed by Asia (4.76%) and Western Europe (4.71%). USA contributed the greatest volume of research. Regarding clinical application of ADM, the majority of publications focused on ADM use in breast surgery, specifically breast reconstruction (154 articles, 60.2%). The majority of research was of lower LOE; thus, efforts should be made to strengthen the body of literature, particularly with regard to cost analysis. PMID:27579264

  5. Complication Rates With Human Acellular Dermal Matrices: Retrospective Review of 211 Consecutive Breast Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Carman, Claire M.; Tobin, Chase; Chase, Serena A.; Rossmeier, Kerri A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human acellular dermal matrix (HADM) is commonly used to provide coverage and support for breast reconstruction. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the complication rates associated with breast reconstruction procedures when performed in conjunction with multiple types of HADM in a consecutive series. Methods: After receiving institutional review board approval, medical records from a single surgeon were retrospectively reviewed for 126 consecutive patients (170 breasts and 211 procedures) who received a breast reconstruction or revision with implantation of HADM between 2012 and 2014. Patient demographics, surgical technique, and the complication profile of 4 major types of HADM were evaluated by procedure. Complication data were primarily evaluated for infection, seroma formation, necrosis, and other complications requiring additional surgery. Results: The total complication rate was 19.4%. The complication rates were not statistically different between all 4 types of HADM: Alloderm (n = 143); Alloderm RTU (n = 19); FlexHD (n = 18); hMatrix (n = 32) (P > 0.05). Smokers and large-breasted women (≥500 g) had a significantly higher complication rate than the rest of the population (P < 0.01 and P < 0.03, respectively). The complication rates associated with all other patient cohorts analyzed (age, body mass index, comorbid conditions, cancer diagnosis, prepectoral technique) showed no influence on complication rates (P > 0.05). Conclusions: In characteristically similar cohorts, there was no statistically significant difference in complication rates based on type of HADM; however, certain risk factors and anatomy should be considered before HADM-assisted breast reconstruction. PMID:27975023

  6. Application of bladder acellular matrix in urinary bladder regeneration: the state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Gubanska, Iga; Drewa, Gerard; Drewa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Construction of the urinary bladder de novo using tissue engineering technologies is the "holy grail" of reconstructive urology. The search for the ideal biomaterial for urinary bladder reconstruction has been ongoing for decades. One of the most promising biomaterials for this purpose seems to be bladder acellular matrix (BAM). In this review we determine the most important factors, which may affect biological and physical properties of BAM and its regeneration potential in tissue engineered urinary bladder. We also point out the directions in modification of BAM, which include incorporation of exogenous growth factors into the BAM structure. Finally, we discuss the results of the urinary bladder regeneration with cell seeded BAM.

  7. CT and MRI of aggressive osteoblastoma of thyroid cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Graham, R.J.; Panella, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    We present a unique case of aggressive osteoblastoma arising from thyroid cartilage. A 52-year-old man presented with a 10 month history of neck discomfort but without frank pain. CT and MR examinations disclosed a well defined mass arising from the thyroid cartilage. This lesion had areas of coarse calcifications and a central area of lucency. The appearance suggested chondrosarcoma. Hemilaryngectomy was performed to remove the mass en bloc. Surgical pathology diagnosed aggressive osteoblastoma arising from thyroid cartilage. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Growing Three-Dimensional Cartilage-Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F.; Prewett, Tacey L.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Process for growing three-dimensional cultures of mammalian cartilage from normal mammalian cells devised. Effected using horizontal rotating bioreactor described in companion article, "Simplified Bioreactor for Growing Mammalian Cells" (MSC-22060). Bioreactor provides quiescent environment with generous supplies of nutrient and oxygen. Initiated with noncartilage cells. Artificially grown tissue resembles that in mammalian cartilage. Potential use in developing therapies for damage to cartilage by joint and back injuries and by such inflammatory diseases as arthritis and temporal-mandibular joint disease. Also used to test nonsteroid anti-inflammation medicines.

  9. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  10. Editorial Commentary: Microfracture for Focal Cartilage Defects: Is the Hip Like the Knee?

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2016-01-01

    Reading about microfracture for focal cartilage defects of the hip, we ponder whether the hip resembles the knee with regard to focal cartilage defects. Minimally invasive microfracture has been a first-line therapy for focal cartilage defects. Microfracture results in fibrous cartilage and unpredictable repair volume, which could be better than absent cartilage, particularly if knee symptoms abate. However, of late, microfracture is not recommended because destruction of subchondral anatomy may result in subchondral cyst formation.

  11. A comparative study of the proteoglycan of growth cartilage of normal and rachitic chicks.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, I R; Roughley, P J

    1978-01-01

    1. Proteoglycan was isolated from growth cartilage of normal and rachitic chicks. 2. The proteoglycan from normal cartilage showed differences in chemical composition and physical properties from a comparable fraction isolated from bovine nasal cartilage. 3. The proteoglycan from rachitic-chick cartilage was of smaller size than tis normal counterpart, though of similar average chemical composition. 4. Differences between proteoglycan from normal and rachitic cartilages can be explained in terms of limited proteolytic cleavage. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:666731

  12. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats’ articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway. PMID:26639318

  13. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis: Cartilage Degradation and Inflammation Are Associated with Upregulation of Cartilage Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Anke; Pham, That Minh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n = 76) was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical parameters indicating a higher disease severity (p < 0.03) excluding the incidence of sepsis. Additionally, intra-articular IL-1β levels correlated with inflammatory serum parameters as leucocyte counts (LC) and C-reactive protein concentrations (p < 0.05) but not with age or comorbidity. Both higher LC and synovial IL-1β levels were associated with increased intra-articular collagen type II cleavage products (C2C) indicating cartilage degradation. Joints with preinfectious lesions had higher C2C levels. Intra-articular inflammation led to increased concentrations of typical cartilage metabolites as bFGF, BMP-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG. PMID:27688601

  14. Skill Sheets for Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This set of 33 skill sheets for agricultural mechanics was developed for use in high school and vocational school agricultural mechanics programs. Some sheets teach operational procedures while others are for simple projects. Each skill sheet covers a single topic and includes: (1) a diagram, (2) a step-by-step construction or operational…

  15. Fact Sheets on Selected Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This paper provides 1- to 6-page fact sheets on 15 programs administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families. Each fact sheet provides information on program services and funding. The fact sheets cover the following programs: Youth Gang Drug Prevention, Refugee Assistance, Runaway and…

  16. The Physics of Ice Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassis, J. N.

    2008-01-01

    The great ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland are vast deposits of frozen freshwater that contain enough to raise sea level by approximately 70 m if they were to completely melt. Because of the potentially catastrophic impact that ice sheets can have, it is important that we understand how ice sheets have responded to past climate changes and…

  17. Beginning Child Care Fact Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, Pat

    These six fact sheets from Child Care Aware are designed to help parents ease their children's transition to child care. The first fact sheet, "Before Your Child's First Day," discusses tips such as: (1) "prepare your child"; (2) read and look at picture books about child care; and (3) "prepare yourself." The second fact sheet, "First Day Tips,"…

  18. Mechanical behavior of cartilage during laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2001-07-01

    Internal stress σ(t), diffuse transmitted light intensity I(t) from a He-Ne probe laser (λ= 632.8 nm), and radiometric surface temperature Ts(t) were measured during the photothermal heating of porcine septal cartilage using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (λ= 1.32 μm). Rectangular specimens, 1-4 mm thick, were secured to a tensile force testing rig and laser irradiated. Force measurements during heating showed significant variation in the rate of deformation, which were found to be strong dependent on tissue orientation; revealing the anisotropic nature of its thermo-mechanical properties. These finding suggest that the collagen and proeoglycan networks lie in a preferential orientation within the extracellular matrix, which must be addressed before this procedure can be used on a wider basis.

  19. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  20. Experimental validation of arthroscopic cartilage stiffness measurement using enzymatically degraded cartilage samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyyra, T.; Arokoski, J. P. A.; Oksala, N.; Vihko, A.; Hyttinen, M.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Kiviranta, I.

    1999-02-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of the arthroscopic indentation instrument, originally developed for the measurement of cartilage stiffness during arthroscopy, to detect cartilage degeneration, we compared changes in the stiffness with the structural and constitutional alterations induced by enzymes on the tissue in vitro. The culturing of osteochondral plugs on Petri dishes was initiated in Minimum Essential Medium with Earle's salts and the baseline stiffness was measured. Then, the experimental specimens were digested using trypsin for 24 h, chondroitinase ABC or purified collagenase (type VII) for 24 h or 48 h ( n = 8-15 per group). The control specimens were incubated in the medium. After the enzyme digestion, the end-point stiffness was measured and the specimens for the microscopic analyses were processed. The proteoglycan (PG) distribution was analysed using quantitative microspectrophotometry and the quantitative evaluation of the collagen network was made using a computer-based polarized light microscopy analysis. Decrease of cartilage stiffness was found after 24 h trypsin (36%) and 48 h chondroitinase ABC (24%) digestion corresponding to a decrease of up to 80% and up to 30% in the PG content respectively. Decrease of the superficial zone collagen content or arrangement (78%, ) after 48 h collagenase digestion also induced a decrease (30%, ) in cartilage stiffness. We conclude that our instrument is capable of

  1. microRNAs in Cartilage Development, Homeostasis, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirzamohammadi, Fatemeh; Papaioannou, Garyfallia

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression mainly at the posttranscriptional level. Many different miRNAs are expressed in chondrocytes, and each individual miRNA can regulate hundreds of target genes, creating a complex gene regulatory network. Experimental evidence suggests that miRNAs play significant roles in various aspects of cartilage development, homeostasis, and pathology. The possibility that miRNAs can be novel therapeutic targets for cartilage diseases led to vigorous investigations to understand the role of individual miRNAs in skeletal tissues. Here, we summarize our current understanding of miRNAs in chondrocytes and cartilage. In the first part, we discuss roles of miRNAs in growth plate development and chondrocyte differentiation. In the second part, we put a particular focus on articular cartilage and discuss the significance of variety of findings in the context of osteoarthritis, the most common degenerative joint disease. PMID:25091054

  2. Unpredicted effects of Ankaferd® on cartilage tissue

    PubMed Central

    Evren, Cenk; Uğur, Mehmet Birol; Yıldırım, Burhan; Bektaş, Sibel; Yiğit, Volkan Bilge; Çınar, Fikret

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the histopathological changes secondary to the administration of Ankaferd Blood Stopper® (ABS) into the auricular cartilage. Materials and methods: Both of the auricular cartilages of thirty New Zealand rabbits were marked with tattoo ink. A 0.2-cc ABS (study group, n: 30) and 0.2 cc physiological saline (control group, n: 30) were subcutaneously infused into the right auricle and left auricle, respectively. All layers were removed at 14 days. Results: The ABS group had significantly higher level of fibrosis, necrosis, foreign body reaction, inflammation, and cartilage degeneration, compared to the controls. Conclusion: Our study results showed that ABS administration into a closed cavity led to a significantly increased fibrosis and necrosis in the auricular cartilage. PMID:25785076

  3. Effects of mechanical stimuli on adaptive remodeling of condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sriram, D; Jones, A; Alatli-Burt, I; Darendeliler, M A

    2009-05-01

    Trabecular bone has been shown to be responsive to low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical stimuli. This study aimed to assess the effects of these stimuli on condylar cartilage and its endochondral bone. Forty female 12-week-old C3H mice were divided into 3 groups: baseline control (killed at day 0), sham (killed at day 28 without exposure to mechanical stimuli), and experimental (killed following 28 days of exposure to mechanical stimuli). The experimental group was subjected to mechanical vibration of 30 Hz, for 20 minutes per day, 5 days per week, for 28 days. The specimens were analyzed by micro-computed tomography. The experimental group demonstrated a significant decrease in the volume of condylar cartilage and also a significant increase in bone histomorphometric parameters. The results suggest that the low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical stimuli enhance adaptive remodeling of condylar cartilage, evidenced by the advent of endochondral bone replacing the hypertrophic cartilage.

  4. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of bovine and shark cartilage as a treatment for people with cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  5. Cartilage reshaping: an overview of the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Sobol, Emil N.; Rasouli, Alexandre; Nelson, J. Stuart; Milner, Thomas E.; Wong, Brian J.

    2001-05-01

    The laser irradiation of cartilage results in a plastic deformation of the tissue allowing for the creation of new stable shapes. During photothermal stimulation, mechanically deformed cartilage undergoes a temperature dependent phase transition, which results in accelerated stress relaxation of the tissue matrix. Cartilage specimens thus reshaped can be used to recreate the underlying framework of structures in the head and neck. Optimization of this process has required an understanding of the biophysical processes accompanying reshaping and also determination of the laser dosimetry parameters, which maintain graft viability. Extensive in vitro, ex-vivo, and in vivo animal investigations, as well as human trials, have been conducted. This technology is now in use to correct septal deviations in an office-based setting. While the emphasis of clinical investigation has focused on septoplasty procedures, laser mediated cartilage reshaping may have application in surgical procedures involving the trachea, laryngeal framework, external ear, and nasal tip. Future directions for research and device design are discussed.

  6. Mineralized cartilage in the skeleton of chondrichthyan fishes.

    PubMed

    Dean, Mason N; Summers, Adam P

    2006-01-01

    The cartilaginous endoskeleton of chondrichthyan fishes (sharks, rays, and chimaeras) exhibits complex arrangements and morphologies of calcified tissues that vary with age, species, feeding behavior, and location in the body. Understanding of the development, evolutionary history and function of these tissue types has been hampered by the lack of a unifying terminology. In order to facilitate reciprocal illumination between disparate fields with convergent interests, we present levels of organization in which crystal orientation/size delimits three calcification types (areolar, globular, and prismatic) that interact in two distinct skeletal types, vertebral and tessellated cartilage. The tessellated skeleton is composed of small blocks (tesserae) of calcified cartilage (both prismatic and globular) overlying a core of unmineralized cartilage, while vertebral cartilage usually contains all three types of calcification.

  7. Human stem cells and articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, J-F; Huselstein, C; Schiavi, J; Li, Y Y; Bensoussan, D; Decot, V; De Isla, N

    2012-12-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage are one of the most challenging issues of musculoskeletal medicine due to the poor intrinsic ability of this tissue for repair. Despite progress in orthopaedic surgery, cell-based surgical therapies such as autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) have been in clinical use for cartilage repair for over a decade but this approach has shown mixed results. Moreover, the lack of efficient modalities of treatment for large chondral defects has prompted research on cartilage tissue engineering combining cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. This paper focuses on the main parameters in tissue engineering and in particular, on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative to cells derived from patient tissues in autologous transplantation and tissue engineering. We discussed the prospects of using autologous chondrocytes or MSCs in regenerative medicine and summarized the advantages and disadvantages of these cells in articular cartilage engineering.

  8. Embryonic versus mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Perera, Jonathan R; Jaiswal, Parag K; Khan, Wasim S; Adesida, Adetola

    2012-01-01

    As our population changes osteoarthritis and cartilage defects are becoming more prevalent. The discovery of stems cells and their ability for indefinite regeneration has revolutionised the way cartilage problems are viewed. Tissue engineering has been shown to be the ideal way of repairing articular cartilage lesions, i.e. back to native tissue. The two main types of stem cells being investigated in chondrogenesis are embryological and mesenchymal stem cells. Research into embryological stem cells has been surrounded by controversy because of tumour formation and damaging embryos during the harvest of cells. We discuss the use of embryological and mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage repair and the various factors involved in the differentiation into chondrocytes.

  9. [T-cartilage tympanoplasty for an open oval window].

    PubMed

    Helms, J; Mlynski, R; Phleps, G

    2011-08-01

    A T shaped cartilage, placed into the open oval window, functions as a stapes. The transvers part of the T prevents a too deep insertion into the vestibule. If necessary small stripes of connective tissue seal the vestibule.

  10. Starch-modified magnetite nanoparticles for impregnation into cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soshnikova, Yulia M.; Roman, Svetlana G.; Chebotareva, Natalia A.; Baum, Olga I.; Obrezkova, Mariya V.; Gillis, Richard B.; Harding, Stephen E.; Sobol, Emil N.; Lunin, Valeriy V.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents preparation and characterization of starch-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous dispersion after impregnation into healthy and damaged types of cartilage. We show that starch-modified dispersion has a narrower size distribution than a non-stabilized one. The average hydrodynamic radius of magnetite NPs in a dispersion used for impregnation into cartilage is (48 ± 1) nm with the width of the distribution from 5 to 200 nm. We investigate stability of aqueous magnetite NPs dispersions during storage and with increase in temperature (up to 70 °C). We find that polydisperse magnetite NPs can penetrate into cartilage and the size and concentration of impregnated particles depend on the organization of the tissue structure. The results confirm the possibility of application of magnetite NPs in diagnostics and laser treatment of degenerative cartilage deceases.

  11. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of bovine and shark cartilage as a treatment for people with cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  12. SHEET PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, O.A.

    1962-07-17

    An ion-electron plasma heating apparatus of the pinch tube class was developed wherein a plasma is formed by an intense arc discharge through a gas and is radially constricted by the magnetic field of the discharge. To avoid kink and interchange instabilities which can disrupt a conventional arc shortiy after it is formed, the apparatus is a pinch tube with a flat configuration for forming a sheet of plasma between two conductive plates disposed parallel and adjacent to the plasma sheet. Kink instabilities are suppressed by image currents induced in the conductive plates while the interchange instabilities are neutrally stable because of the flat plasma configuration wherein such instabilities may occur but do not dynamically increase in amplitude. (AEC)

  13. Reducing slide sheet injury.

    PubMed

    Varcin-Coad, Lynn

    2008-12-01

    Slide sheets are often stated to be the cause of hand and forearm injuries. While there are many other possible reasons injuries to nursing staff, carer and client occur, the most important linking factors relating to musculoskeletal disorders and manual handling of people is the ongoing inappropriateness or lack of suitably designed and equipped work areas. As physiotherapist Lynn Varcin-Coad writes, staff are bearing the brunt of inefficiencies of design and lack of high order risk control.

  14. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  15. Ultrasonographic evaluation of knee joint cartilage in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Batalov, A Z; Kuzmanova, S I; Penev, D P

    2000-01-01

    The non-invasive methods used to study joint cartilage are restricted in their scope. No direct visualization of the joint cartilage is possible in conventional radiology and tomography and the decrease in joint space is only indirect evidence for joint destruction. CT is a radiologic method for direct visualization of joint cartilage but its diagnostic precision in the evaluation of early cartilage lesions is limited because it can not produce an image in a plane other than the transversal plane perpendicular to the direction of the main axis of the body and because it has limited spatial resolution. Other methods for direct visualization of joint cartilage are arthrography and arthroscopy which are little used in clinical practice because of their invasiveness and limited indications. MRI is a promising technique but its usage is limited by the high price and limited accessibility. Our object in the present study was to evaluate the significance of arthro-sonography in the diagnosis of early arthritic lesions of knee cartilage, based on the ultrasonographic assessment of the joint surface and cartilage thickness. Femoral cartilage was our choice for the study as there is statistically well documented high incidence of early arthritic changes in this area; moreover, the area is easily accessible for ultrasound evaluation using a scan perpendicular to the articular surface, incl. the cases with complete flexion of the knee joint, where the pressure areas of the condyles are apositioned to the tibial plateau. Using a 7.5 MHz transducer we managed to measure and document early arthritic changes in joint thickness and the contour of the joint surfaces before they can be detected using routine radiologic methods.

  16. Cell and matrix response of temporomandibular cartilage to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Utreja, Achint; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Yadav, Sumit; Villa, Max M.; Li, Yingcui; Jiang, Xi; Nanda, Ravindra; Rowe, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The generation of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) has greatly aided our understanding of the development of connective tissues such as bone and cartilage. Perturbation of a biological system such as the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) within its adaptive remodeling capacity is particularly useful in analyzing cellular lineage progression. The objectives of this study were to determine: (i) if GFP reporters expressed in the TMJ indicate the different stages of cell maturation in fibrocartilage and (ii) how mechanical loading affects cellular response in different regions of the cartilage. Design/Methods Four-week-old transgenic mice harboring combinations of fluorescent reporters (Dkk3-eGFP, Col1a1(3.6kb)-GFPcyan, Col1a1(3.6kb)-GFPtpz, Col2a1-GFPcyan, and Col10a1-RFPcherry) were used to analyze the expression pattern of transgenes in the mandibular condylar cartilage. To study the effect of TMJ loading, animals were subjected to forced mouth opening with custom springs exerting 50 grams force for 1 hour/day for 5 days. Dynamic mineralization and cellular proliferation (EdU-labeling) were assessed in loaded vs control mice. Results Dkk3 expression was seen in the superficial zone of the mandibular condylar cartilage, followed by Col1 in the cartilage zone, Col2 in the prehypertrophic zone, and Col10 expression hypertrophic zone at and below the tidemark. TMJ loading increased expression of the GFP reporters and EdU-labeling of cells in the cartilage, resulting in a thickness increase of all layers of the cartilage. In addition, mineral apposition increased resulting in Col10 expression by unmineralized cells above the tidemark. Conclusion The TMJ responded to static loading by forming thicker cartilage through adaptive remodeling. PMID:26362410

  17. Mechanical Properties of Porcine Cartilage After Uniform RF Heating

    PubMed Central

    Zemek, Allison J.; Protsenko, Dmitry E.; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Thermally mediated modalities of cartilage reshaping utilize localized heating of cartilage combined with mechanical deformation to achieve new geometries. We sought to determine the steady state elastic modulus of thermally modified cartilage without deformation, as this provides a constraint in mechanical models of the shape change process. Study Design/Materials and Methods The main objective of this study was to characterize the steady state elastic modulus of porcine septal cartilage after uniform heating with radiofrequency (RF) to peak temperatures of 50 ± 5, 65 ± 5, and 85 ± 5°C. The cartilage was divided into three equally sized regions, designated as anterior, middle and posterior. Each region was then sectioned into two specimens with the proximal component serving as a paired control. Results The data confirm that there is high baseline variability in control steady state elastic moduli between animals. Also, the control values confirm a decreasing steady state elastic modulus from anterior to posterior. There is no statistical significance (P > 0.05) found between the elastic moduli of control and treated samples. Conclusions Although shape change and retention have been fairly well characterized, little is known about the specific relation between steady state elastic modulus of cartilage and maximum treatment temperature. We determined that the difference of steady state elastic modulus between control and treated porcine septal samples was not statistically significant after uniform heating with RF to peak temperatures of 50 ± 5, 65 ± 5, and 85 ± 5°C. Ultimately, the results of this study do not pertain to the regions of heated cartilage that are shaped to hold a new form; however, it does show that the regions that are not mechanically deformed do return to the original pre-treatment elastic modulus. This is still useful information that may be used in finite element models to predict changes in internal stress

  18. Evaluation of tissue-engineered bone constructs using rabbit fetal osteoblasts on acellular bovine cancellous bone matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi; Pathak, Rekha; Amarpal; Aithal, H. P.; Kinjavdekar, P.; Pawde, A. M.; Tiwari, A. K.; Sangeetha, P.; Tamilmahan, P.; Manzoor, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to generate composite bone graft and investigate the rabbit fetal osteoblasts adhesion, proliferation and penetration on acellular matrices of cancellous bone. Materials and Methods: Acellular cancellous bone was prepared and developed as in the previous study with little modification. These matrices were decellularized by rapid freeze and thaw cycle. To remove the cell debris, they were then treated with hydrogen peroxide (3%) and ethanol to remove antigenic cellular and nuclear materials from the scaffold. Primary osteoblast cells were harvested from 20 to 22 days old rabbit fetal long and calvarial bone. These cells were cultured and characterized using a specific marker. The third passaged fetal osteoblast cells were then seeded on the scaffold and incubated for 14 days. The growth pattern of the cells was observed. Scanning electron microscope and hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to investigate cells proliferation. Results: The cells were found to be growing well on the surface of the scaffold and were also present in good numbers with the matrix filopodial extensions upto inside of the core of the tissue. Conclusion: Thus, a viable composite scaffold of bone could be developed which has a great potential in the field of bone tissue engineering. PMID:28344398

  19. Acellular Dermal Matrices and Radiotherapy in Breast Reconstruction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Valdatta, Luigi; Scamoni, Stefano; Minuti, Anna; Cherubino, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of commercially available acellular dermis matrices for postmastectomy breast reconstruction seems to have simplified the surgical procedure and enhanced the outcome. These materials, generally considered to be highly safe or with only minor contraindications due to the necessary manipulation in preparatory phases, allow an easier one-phase surgical procedure, in comparison with autologous flaps, offering a high patient satisfaction. Unfortunately, the claim for a higher rate of complications associated with irradiation at the implant site, especially when the radiation therapy was given before the reconstructive surgery, suggested a careful behaviour when this technique is preferred. However, this hypothesis was never submitted to a crucial test, and data supporting it are often discordant or incomplete. To provide a comprehensive analysis of the field, we searched and systematically reviewed papers published after year 2005 and registered clinical trials. On the basis of a meta-analysis of data, we conclude that the negative effect of the radiotherapy on the breast reconstruction seems to be evident even in the case of acellular dermis matrices aided surgery. However, more trials are needed to make solid conclusions and clarify the poor comprehension of all the factors negatively influencing outcome. PMID:24987526

  20. A dynamic distention protocol for whole-organ bladder decellularization: histological and biomechanical characterization of the acellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Consolo, F; Brizzola, S; Tremolada, G; Grieco, V; Riva, F; Acocella, F; Fiore, G B; Soncini, M

    2016-02-01

    A combined physical-chemical protocol for whole full-thickness bladder decellularization is proposed, based on organ cyclic distention through repeated infusion/withdrawal of the decellularization agents through the urethra. The dynamic decellularization was intended to enhance cell removal efficiency, facilitating the delivery of detergents within the inner layers of the tissue and the removal of cell debris. The use of mild chemical detergents (hypotonic solution and non-ionic detergent) was employed to limit adverse effects upon matrix 3D ultrastructure. Inspection of the presence of residual DNA and RNA was carried out on decellularized matrices to verify effective cell removal. Histological investigation was focused on assessing the retention of adequate structural and functional components that regulate the biomechanical behaviour of the acellular tissue. Biomechanical properties were evaluated through uniaxial tensile loading tests of tissue strips and through ex vivo filling cystometry to evaluate the whole-organ mechanical response to a physiological-like loading state. According to our results, a dynamic decellularization protocol of 17 h duration with a 5 ml/min detergent infusion flow rate revealed higher DNA removal efficiency than standard static decellularization, resulting in residual DNA content < 50 ng/mg dry tissue weight. Furthermore, the collagen network and elastic fibres distribution were preserved in the acellular ECM, which exhibited suitable biomechanical properties in the perspective of its future use as an implant for bladder augmentation.

  1. The effect of mesenchymal stem cell sheets on structural allograft healing of critical sized femoral defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Teng; Zhu, Zhenan; Awad, Hani A; Schwarz, Edward M; Hilton, Matthew J; Dong, Yufeng

    2014-03-01

    Structural bone allografts are widely used in the clinic to treat critical sized bone defects, despite lacking the osteoinductive characteristics of live autografts. To address this, we generated revitalized structural allografts wrapped with mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell (MSC) sheets, which were produced by expanding primary syngenic bone marrow derived cells on temperature-responsive plates, as a tissue-engineered periosteum. In vitro assays demonstrated maintenance of the MSC phenotype in the sheets, suggesting that short-term culturing of MSC sheets is not detrimental. To test their efficacy in vivo, allografts wrapped with MSC sheets were transplanted into 4-mm murine femoral defects and compared to allografts with direct seeding of MSCs and allografts without cells. Evaluations consisted of X-ray plain radiography, 3D microCT, histology, and biomechanical testing at 4- and 6-weeks post-surgery. Our findings demonstrate that MSC sheets induce prolonged cartilage formation at the graft-host junction and enhanced bone callus formation, as well as graft-host osteointegration. Moreover, a large periosteal callus was observed spanning the allografts with MSC sheets, which partially mimics live autograft healing. Finally, biomechanical testing showed a significant increase in the structural and functional properties of MSC sheet grafted femurs. Taken together, MSC sheets exhibit enhanced osteogenicity during critical sized bone defect repair, demonstrating the feasibility of this tissue engineering solution for massive allograft healing.

  2. Specific premature epigenetic aging of cartilage in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Bralo, Laura; Lopez-Golan, Yolanda; Mera-Varela, Antonio; Rego-Perez, Ignacio; Horvath, Steve; Zhang, Yuhua; del Real, Álvaro; Zhai, Guangju; Blanco, Francisco J; Riancho, Jose A.; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease affecting multiple tissues of the joints in the elderly, but most notably articular cartilage. Premature biological aging has been described in this tissue and in blood cells, suggesting a systemic component of premature aging in the pathogenesis of OA. Here, we have explored epigenetic aging in OA at the local (cartilage and bone) and systemic (blood) levels. Two DNA methylation age-measures (DmAM) were used: the multi-tissue age estimator for cartilage and bone; and a blood-specific biomarker for blood. Differences in DmAM between OA patients and controls showed an accelerated aging of 3.7 years in articular cartilage (95 % CI = 1.1 to 6.3, P = 0.008) of OA patients. By contrast, no difference in epigenetic aging was observed in bone (0.04 years; 95 % CI = −1.8 to 1.9, P = 0.3) and in blood (−0.6 years; 95 % CI = −1.5 to 0.3, P = 0.2) between OA patients and controls. Therefore, premature epigenetic aging according to DNA methylation changes was specific of OA cartilage, adding further evidence and insight on premature aging of cartilage as a component of OA pathogenesis that reflects damage and vulnerability. PMID:27689435

  3. Emerging technologies and fourth generation issues in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Michael W; Ackerman, George; Dines, Joshua S; Grande, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    The goals of successful cartilage repair include reducing pain, improving symptoms, and long-term function; preventing early osteoarthritis and subsequent total knee replacements; and rebuilding hyaline cartilage instead of fibrous tissue. Current methods such as microfracture, osteoarticular autograft transfer system, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation are somewhat successful in regenerating cartilage; however, they also have significant limitations. The future of fourth generation cartilage repair focuses on gene therapy, the use of stem cells (bone marrow, adipose, or muscle derived), and tissue engineering. Emerging techniques include creating elastin-like polymers derived from native elastin sequences to serve as biocompatible scaffolds; using hydrogels to obtain a homogeneous distribution of cells within a 3-dimensional matrix; and using nonviral gene delivery via nucleofection to allow mesenchymal stem cells the ability to express osteogenic growth factors. Although many of the techniques mentioned have yet to be used in a cartilage regeneration model, we have tried to anticipate how methods used in other specialties may facilitate improved cartilage repair.

  4. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2016-03-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis.

  5. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286

  6. Radiation synovectomy stimulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis by normal articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.L.; Slowman, S.D.; Brandt, K.D.

    1989-07-01

    Radiation synovectomy has been considered a therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy. Whether intraarticular irradiation affects the composition or biochemistry, and therefore the biomechanical properties, of normal articular cartilage has not been established. In the present study, yttrium 90 silicate was injected into one knee of nine normal adult dogs, and three other dogs received nonradioactive yttrium silicate. When the animals were killed 4 to 13 weeks after the injection, synovium from the irradiated knees showed areas of necrosis and fibrosis. Up to 29% less hyaluronate was synthesized in vitro by the synovial intima from irradiated knees than by the intima from the contralateral knees (mean difference 18%). Morphologic abnormalities were not observed in articular cartilage from either the irradiated or control knees, nor did the water content or concentrations of uronic acid or DNA in cartilage from the irradiated knees differ from that in cartilage from the contralateral knees. However, net /sup 35/SO/sub 4/-labeled glycosaminoglycan synthesis in organ cultures of cartilage from irradiated knees was increased (mean difference 21%, p = 0.03) in comparison with that in cultures of contralateral knee cartilage.

  7. Matrix disruptions, growth, and degradation of cartilage with impaired sulfation.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Edward L; Facchini, Marcella; Pham, Anna T; Gualeni, Benedetta; De Leonardis, Fabio; Rossi, Antonio; Forlino, Antonella

    2012-06-22

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is an incurable recessive chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 transporter responsible for sulfate uptake by chondrocytes. The mutations cause undersulfation of glycosaminoglycans in cartilage. Studies of dtd mice with a knock-in Slc26a2 mutation showed an unusual progression of the disorder: net undersulfation is mild and normalizing with age, but the articular cartilage degrades with age and bones develop abnormally. To understand underlying mechanisms, we studied newborn dtd mice. We developed, verified and used high-definition infrared hyperspectral imaging of cartilage sections at physiological conditions, to quantify collagen and its orientation, noncollagenous proteins, and chondroitin chains, and their sulfation with 6-μm spatial resolution and without labeling. We found that chondroitin sulfation across the proximal femur cartilage varied dramatically in dtd, but not in the wild type. Corresponding undersulfation of dtd was mild in most regions, but strong in narrow articular and growth plate regions crucial for bone development. This undersulfation correlated with the chondroitin synthesis rate measured via radioactive sulfate incorporation, explaining the sulfation normalization with age. Collagen orientation was reduced, and the reduction correlated with chondroitin undersulfation. Such disorientation involved the layer of collagen covering the articular surface and protecting cartilage from degradation. Malformation of this layer may contribute to the degradation progression with age and to collagen and proteoglycan depletion from the articular region, which we observed in mice already at birth. The results provide clues to in vivo sulfation, DTD treatment, and cartilage growth.

  8. The Role of Sirtuins in Cartilage Homeostasis and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona; Mobasheri, Ali; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has witnessed many advances in the understanding of sirtuin biology and related regulatory circuits supporting the capacity of these proteins to serve as energy-sensing molecules that contribute to healthspan in various tissues, including articular cartilage. Hence, there has been a significant increase in new investigations that aim to elucidate the mechanisms of sirtuin function and their roles in cartilage biology, skeletal development, and pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD). The majority of the work carried out to date has focused on SIRT1, although SIRT6 has more recently become a focus of some investigations. In vivo work with transgenic mice has shown that Sirt1 and Sirt6 are essential for maintaining cartilage homeostasis and that the use of sirtuin-activating molecules such as resveratrol may have beneficial effects on cartilage anabolism. Current thinking is that SIRT1 exerts positive effects on cartilage by encouraging chondrocyte survival, especially under stress conditions, which may provide a mechanism supporting the use of sirtuin small-molecule activators (STACS) for future therapeutic interventions in OA and other degenerative pathologies of joints, especially those that involve articular cartilage.

  9. Permeability and shear modulus of articular cartilage in growing mice.

    PubMed

    Berteau, J-Ph; Oyen, M; Shefelbine, S J

    2016-02-01

    Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Understanding the changes in mechanical tissues properties during growth is a critical step in advancing strategies for orthopedics and for cell- and biomaterial- based therapies dedicated to cartilage repair. We hypothesize that at the microscale, the articular cartilage tissue properties of the mouse (i.e., shear modulus and permeability) change with the growth and are dependent on location within the joint. We tested cartilage on the medial femoral condyle and lateral femoral condyle of seven C57Bl6 mice at different ages (2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 17 weeks old) using a micro-indentation test. Results indicated that permeability decreased with age from 2 to 17 weeks. Shear modulus reached a peak at the end of the growth (9 weeks). Within an age group, shear modulus was higher in the MFC than in the LFC, but permeability did not change. We have developed a method that can measure natural alterations in cartilage material properties in a murine joint, which will be useful in identifying changes in cartilage mechanics with degeneration, pathology, or treatment.

  10. Resurfacing Damaged Articular Cartilage to Restore Compressive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Stephanie; Donnelly, Patrick E.; Gittens, Jamila; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Surface damage to articular cartilage is recognized as the initial underlying process causing the loss of mechanical function in early-stage osteoarthritis. In this study, we developed structure-modifying treatments to potentially prevent, stabilize or reverse the loss in mechanical function. Various polymers (chondroitin sulfate, carboxymethylcellulose, sodium hyaluronate) and photoinitiators (riboflavin, irgacure 2959) were applied to the surface of collagenase-degraded cartilage and crosslinked in situ using UV light irradiation. While matrix permeability and deformation significantly increased following collagenase-induced degradation of the superficial zone, resurfacing using tyramine-substituted sodium hyaluronate and riboflavin decreased both values to a level comparable to that of intact cartilage. Repetitive loading of resurfaced cartilage showed minimal variation in the mechanical response over a 7 day period. Cartilage resurfaced using a low concentration of riboflavin had viable cells in all zones while a higher concentration resulted in a thin layer of cell death in the uppermost superficial zone. Our approach to repair surface damage initiates a new therapeutic advance in the treatment of injured articular cartilage with potential benefits that include enhanced mechanical properties, reduced susceptibility to enzymatic degradation and reduced adhesion of macrophages. PMID:25468298

  11. In Vitro Engineering of High Modulus Cartilage-Like Constructs.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Scott; Seedhom, Bahaa B; Carey, Duane O; Bulpitt, Andy J; Treanor, Darren E; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    To date, the outcomes of cartilage repair have been inconsistent and have frequently yielded mechanically inferior fibrocartilage, thereby increasing the chances of damage recurrence. Implantation of constructs with biochemical composition and mechanical properties comparable to natural cartilage could be advantageous for long-term repair. This study attempted to create such constructs, in vitro, using tissue engineering principles. Bovine synoviocytes were seeded on nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate fiber scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 4 weeks, after which uniaxial compressive loading was applied using an in-house bioreactor for 1 h per day, at a frequency of 1 Hz, for a further 84 days. The initial loading conditions, determined from the mechanical properties of the immature constructs after 4 weeks in chondrogenic culture, were strains ranging between 13% and 23%. After 56 days (sustained at 84 days) of loading, the constructs were stained homogenously with Alcian blue and for type-II collagen. Dynamic compressive moduli were comparable to the high end values for native cartilage and proportional to Alcian blue staining intensity. We suggest that these high moduli values were attributable to the bioreactor setup, which caused the loading regime to change as the constructs developed, that is, the applied stress and strain increased with construct thickness and stiffness, providing continued sufficient cell stimulation as further matrix was deposited. Constructs containing cartilage-like matrix with response to load similar to that of native cartilage could produce long-term effective cartilage repair when implanted.

  12. Rapid isolation of intact, viable fetal cartilage models

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.R.; Chepenik, K.P.; Paynton, B.V.; Cotler, J.M.

    1982-04-01

    A rapid procedure is described for the isolation of viable, intact, femoral cartilage models (humeri and femora) obtained from pregnant rats on the 18th day of gestation. Viability of these models is demonstrated in an in vitro system where the incorporation of /sup 35/S-sulfate was linear with time of incubation and with numbers of cartilage models utilized. Treatment of cartilage models with ice-cold trichloroacetic acid and a boiling water bath prior to incubation with radiolabel, reduced the amount of radioactivity incorporated to 1.3% of that observed for models incubated by routine procedures. Furthermore, digestion of cartilage model homogenates with protease yielded a supernatant from which 51% to 57% of the radioactivity was precipitated as GAG. This method may also be used to isolate fetal cartilage models as early as the 16th day of gestation. with this system, specific biochemical parameters of mammalian fetal chondrogenesis may be surveyed in normally and abnormally developing fetal cartilage free of surrounding soft tissue.

  13. Elucidating the Molecular Composition of Cartilage by Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Ming-Feng; Khabut, Areej; Kjellström, Sven; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2016-02-05

    Articular cartilage consists of chondrocytes and two major components, a collagen-rich framework and highly abundant proteoglycans. Most prior studies defining the zonal distribution of cartilage have extracted proteins with guanidine-HCl. However, an unextracted collagen-rich residual is left after extraction. In addition, the high abundance of anionic polysaccharide molecules extracted from cartilage adversely affects the chromatographic separation. In this study, we established a method for removing chondrocytes from cartilage sections with minimal extracellular matrix protein loss. The addition of surfactant to guanidine-HCl extraction buffer improved protein solubility. Ultrafiltration removed interference from polysaccharides and salts. Almost four-times more collagen peptides were extracted by the in situ trypsin digestion method. However, as expected, proteoglycans were more abundant within the guanidine-HCl extraction. These different methods were used to extract cartilage sections from different cartilage layers (superficial, intermediate, and deep), joint types (knee and hip), and disease states (healthy and osteoarthritic), and the extractions were evaluated by quantitative and qualitative proteomic analyses. The results of this study led to the identifications of the potential biomarkers of osteoarthritis (OA), OA progression, and the joint specific biomarkers.

  14. Quasi-static elastography comparison of hyaline cartilage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCredie, A. J.; Stride, E.; Saffari, N.

    2009-11-01

    Joint cartilage, a load bearing structure in mammals, has only limited ability for regeneration after damage. For tissue engineers to design functional constructs, better understanding of the properties of healthy tissue is required. Joint cartilage is a specialised structure of hyaline cartilage; a poroviscoelastic solid containing fibril matrix reinforcements. Healthy joint cartilage is layered, which is thought to be important for correct tissue function. However, the behaviour of each layer during loading is poorly understood. Ultrasound elastography provides access to depth-dependent information in real-time for a sample during loading. A 15 MHz focussed transducer provided details from scatterers within a small fixed region in each sample. Quasi-static loading was applied to cartilage samples while ultrasonic signals before and during compressions were recorded. Ultrasonic signals were processed to provide time-shift profiles using a sum-squared difference method and cross-correlation. Two structures of hyaline cartilage have been tested ultrasonically and mechanically to determine method suitability for monitoring internal deformation differences under load and the effect of the layers on the global mechanical material behaviour. Results show differences in both the global mechanical properties and the ultrasonically tested strain distributions between the two structures tested. It was concluded that these differences are caused primarily by the fibril orientations.

  15. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and hyaluronic acid are sensitive serum biomarkers for early cartilage lesions in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qiang; Wei, Lei; Chen, Chongwei; Li, Pengcui; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Guo, Li; Zhang, Congming; Wei, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between five previously established serum osteoarthritis biomarkers and the severity of cartilage lesions in the knee. Cartilage damage (classified according to the Outerbridge scoring system) and serum concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen type II C-telopeptide (CTX-II), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), collagen type III N-propeptide, (PIIINP), and hyaluronic acid (HA) were determined in 79 patients who underwent knee arthroscopy or total knee replacement. HA and COMP concentrations were significantly higher in the Outerbridge score 1 and 2 groups, respectively. These results suggest that serum COMP and HA concentrations can be used to predict early cartilage lesions in the knee.

  16. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease.

  17. Image processing techniques for noise removal, enhancement and segmentation of cartilage OCT images.

    PubMed

    Rogowska, Jadwiga; Brezinski, Mark E

    2002-02-21

    Osteoarthritis, whose hallmark is the progressive loss of joint cartilage, is a major cause of morbidity worldwide. Recently, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has demonstrated considerable promise for the assessment of articular cartilage. Among the most important parameters to be assessed is cartilage width. However, detection of the bone cartilage interface is critical for the assessment of cartilage width. At present, the quantitative evaluations of cartilage thickness are being done using manual tracing of cartilage-bone borders. Since data is being obtained near video rate with OCT, automated identification of the bone-cartilage interface is critical. In order to automate the process of boundary detection on OCT images, there is a need for developing new image processing techniques. In this paper we describe the image processing techniques for speckle removal, image enhancement and segmentation of cartilage OCT images. In particular, this paper focuses on rabbit cartilage since this is an important animal model for testing both chondroprotective agents and cartilage repair techniques. In this study, a variety of techniques were examined. Ultimately, by combining an adaptive filtering technique with edge detection (vertical gradient, Sobel edge detection), cartilage edges can be detected. The procedure requires several steps and can be automated. Once the cartilage edges are outlined, the cartilage thickness can be measured.

  18. The Role of Inorganic Polyphosphates in the Formation of Bioengineered Cartilage Incorporating a Zone of Calcified Cartilage In Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe

    The development of bioengineered cartilage for replacement of damaged articular cartilage has gained momentum in recent years. One such approach has been developed in the Kandel lab, whereby cartilage is formed by seeding primary articular chondrocytes on the top surface of a porous biodegradable calcium polyphosphate (CPP) bone substitute, permitting anchorage of the tissue within the pores of the substrate; however, the interfacial shear properties of the tissue-substrate interface of these biphasic constructs are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than the native cartilage-subchondral bone interface. To overcome this limitation, a strategy was devised to generate a zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC), thereby mimicking the native architecture of the osteochondral junction; however, the ZCC was located slightly above the cartilage-CPP interface. Thus, it was hypothesized that polyphosphate released from the CPP substrate and accumulating in the tissue inhibits the formation of the ZCC at the tissue-substrate interface. Based on this information, a strategy was devised to generate biphasic constructs incorporating a properly located ZCC. This approach involved the application of a thin calcium phosphate film to the surfaces of porous CPP via a sol-gel procedure, thereby limiting the accumulation of polyphosphate in the cartilaginous tissue. This modification to the substrate surface did not negatively impact the quality of the in vitro-formed cartilage tissue or the ZCC. Interfacial shear testing of biphasic constructs demonstrated significantly improved interfacial shear properties in the presence of a properly located ZCC. These studies also led to the observation that chondrocytes produce endogenous polyphosphate and that its levels in deep zone cartilage appear inversely related to mineral deposition within the tissue. Using an in vitro model of cartilage calcification, it was demonstrated that polyphosphate levels are modulated in part by the inhibitory effects

  19. Capsular contracture in implant based breast reconstruction—the effect of porcine acellular dermal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Ho-Asjoe, Mark; Junge, Klaus; Farhadi, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Background Irradiation of implant-based breast reconstructions (BR) is known to increase capsular contracture (CC) rates on average by 4-fold over non-irradiated reconstructions. The use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has been associated with lower CC rates in non-irradiated reconstructions (0-3%). Experimental and clinical studies suggest that ADM may also reduce CC rates in irradiated breasts. The aim of this study was to evaluate CC rates in non-irradiated and irradiated one- and two-stage BRs performed with the assistance of porcine ADM (PADM). Methods A single centre, retrospective, cohort study was designed from December 2008 to October 2012. A total of 200 immediate implant-based BRs were performed using PADM for inferior pole reinforcement. We included non-irradiated BR with a minimum follow up of 6 month from primary surgery (one stage) or from explantation of expander and implantation of the definitive implant (two stage). Of the postoperatively irradiated BR we included patients with 1 year or more follow up time from termination of radiotherapy. CC was graded using the conventional Spear-Baker classification and modified version for irradiated BR. According to the literature Grade III and IV CC were defined as clinically significant CC. Results Of 200 BRs with PADM, 122 were included in this study (84 non-irradiated and 38 irradiated). Sixty-five BR were one stage and 57 were two stage BR. Grade III/IV CC was remarkable low in non-irradiated (6%) and irradiated BR (13%). There was a non-significant trend to increased Grade III and IV CC in irradiated BR vs. non-irradiated BR (13% vs. 6%, P=0.216). In this study follow up time (P<0.001) and the stage of ADM reconstruction (two vs. one stage, P=0.022) were significant risk factors for occurrence of grade III/IV CC on univariate analysis and remained significant for the follow up time (P=0.013) and remarkable for the stages (P=0.093) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Our data support the current

  20. Combined application of acellular bovine pericardium and hyaluronic acid in prevention of postoperative pericardial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia; Xu, Zhi Wei

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was designed to find the suitable acellular bovine pericardium (ABP) patch in pericardial cavity reconstruction and to evaluate the effect of sodium hyaluronic acid (NaHA) on inflammatory reaction in prevention of pericardial adhesions. The pericardial adhesion model was established in 20 rabbits, weighing from 3.2 to 3.6 kg. Groups were classified as follows: Group A (n = 5), the control group, the pericardium was directly closed; Group B (n = 5), 0.15% glutaraldehyde-treated ABP (low cross-link degree); Group C, 0.3% glutaraldehyde-treated ABP (middle cross-link degree); Group D, 0.15% glutaraldehyde-treated ABP + NaHA solution. Blood samples were collected at 6 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 5 days, to assay postoperative inflammatory reaction. The tenacity and severity of adhesions were evaluated 2 months after operation, by macroscopic and microscopic examinations, and Q-PCR (real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction) test was used to quantitatively analyze the associated genes with adhesion. Pericardium regeneration was demonstrated by immunohistochemical technique to identify mesothelial cells. In Group D, the serum concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was significantly lower in the early postoperative period, and the mean adhesion score (adhesion between the epicardium and ABP) was significantly lower compared with the control group (Groups D vs. A: 0.20 ± 0.45 vs. 2.00 ± 0.71, P = 0.009*). The signs of degradation of the ABPs were observed 2 months postoperation in Groups D and B. Immunohistochemically, the positive cytokeratin AE1 staining results demonstrated the relatively total regeneration of the pericardium in Group D. Signs of regeneration were observed in Group D. Compared with the control group, the level of TGF-β2 in Group D was significantly lower (0.00132 ± 0.00114, P = 0.022*). The TGF-β3 level was statistically significant, being highest in Group D (0.00805 ± 0.00136, P = 0.029*). The mean quantity of Smad6 in

  1. An in situ hybridization study of perlecan, DMP1, and MEPE in developing condylar cartilage of the fetal mouse mandible and limb bud cartilage.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, K; Yokohama-Tamaki, T; Morita, T; Baba, O; Qin, C; Shibata, S

    2015-09-25

    The main purpose of this in situ hybridization study was to investigate mRNA expression of three bone/cartilage matrix components (perlecan, DMP1, and MEPE) in developing primary (tibial) and secondary (condylar) cartilage. Perlecan mRNA expression was first detected in newly formed chondrocytes in tibial cartilage at E13.0, but this expression decreased in hypertrophic chondrocytes at E14.0. In contrast, at E15.0, perlecan mRNA was first detected in the newly formed chondrocytes of condylar cartilage; these chondrocytes had characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes, which confirmed the previous observation that progenitor cells of developing secondary cartilage rapidly differentiate into hypertrophic chondrocytes. DMP1 mRNA was detected in many chondrocytes within the lower hypertrophic cell zone in tibial cartilage at E14.0. In contrast, DMP1 mRNA expression was only transiently detected in a few chondrocytes of condylar cartilage at E15.0. Thus, DMP1 may be less important in the developing condylar cartilage than in the tibial cartilage. Another purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that MEPE may be a useful marker molecule for cartilage. MEPE mRNA was not detected in any chondrocytes in either tibial or condylar cartilage; however, MEPE immunoreactivity was detected throughout the cartilage matrix. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that MEPE antibody recognized two bands, one of 67 kDa and another of 59 kDa, in cartilage-derived samples. Thus MEPE protein may gradually accumulate in the cartilage, even though mRNA expression levels were below the limits of detection of in situ hybridization. Ultimately, we could not designate MEPE as a marker molecule for cartilage, and would modify our original hypothesis.

  2. An In Situ Hybridization Study of Perlecan, DMP1, and MEPE in Developing Condylar Cartilage of the Fetal Mouse Mandible and Limb Bud Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, K.; Yokohama-Tamaki, T.; Morita, T.; Baba, O.; Qin, C.; Shibata, S.

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this in situ hybridization study was to investigate mRNA expression of three bone/cartilage matrix components (perlecan, DMP1, and MEPE) in developing primary (tibial) and secondary (condylar) cartilage. Perlecan mRNA expression was first detected in newly formed chondrocytes in tibial cartilage at E13.0, but this expression decreased in hypertrophic chondrocytes at E14.0. In contrast, at E15.0, perlecan mRNA was first detected in the newly formed chondrocytes of condylar cartilage; these chondrocytes had characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes, which confirmed the previous observation that progenitor cells of developing secondary cartilage rapidly differentiate into hypertrophic chondrocytes. DMP1 mRNA was detected in many chondrocytes within the lower hypertrophic cell zone in tibial cartilage at E14.0. In contrast, DMP1 mRNA expression was only transiently detected in a few chondrocytes of condylar cartilage at E15.0. Thus, DMP1 may be less important in the developing condylar cartilage than in the tibial cartilage. Another purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that MEPE may be a useful marker molecule for cartilage. MEPE mRNA was not detected in any chondrocytes in either tibial or condylar cartilage; however, MEPE immunoreactivity was detected throughout the cartilage matrix. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that MEPE antibody recognized two bands, one of 67 kDa and another of 59 kDa, in cartilage-derived samples. Thus MEPE protein may gradually accumulate in the cartilage, even though mRNA expression levels were below the limits of detection of in situ hybridization. Ultimately, we could not designate MEPE as a marker molecule for cartilage, and would modify our original hypothesis. PMID:26428891

  3. Protective Mechanism of Articular Cartilage to Severe Loading: Roles of Lubricants, Cartilage Surface Layer, Extracellular Matrix and Chondrocyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Teruo; Sawae, Yoshinori; Ihara, Maki

    The natural synovial joints have excellent tribological performance known as very low friction and very low wear for various daily activities in human life. These functions are likely to be supported by the adaptive multimode lubrication mechanism, in which the various lubrication modes such as elastohydrodynamic lubrication, weeping, boundary and gel film lubrication appear to operate to protect articular cartilage, depending on the severity of the rubbing conditions. In this paper, various protective roles of synovial fluid, cartilage surface layer, extracellular matrix and chondrocyte to severe loading are described. In the first part, the protective mechanism by adsorbed films and underlying gel films was described on the basis of the frictional behaviors of articular cartilage against articular cartilage or glass. It was discussed that the replenishment of gel film removed during severe rubbing is likely to be controlled by supply of proteoglycan from the extracellular matrix, where the chondrocyte plays the main role in the metabolism. In the second part, the time-dependent local deformation of biphasic articular cartilage under constant total compressive strain condition was evaluated in the finite element analyses. The importance of clarification of actual stress-strain in chondrocyte was indicated in relation to the tribological property of articular cartilage.

  4. Anomalous NMR relaxation in cartilage matrix components and native cartilage: fractional-order models.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L; Li, Weiguo; Pilar Velasco, M; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G

    2011-06-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena (T(1) and T(2)). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T(1) and T(2) relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T(2) relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter (α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T(1) was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T(2) measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for micro-structural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T(2) NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues.

  5. Anomalous NMR Relaxation in Cartilage Matrix Components and Native Cartilage: Fractional-Order Models

    PubMed Central

    Magin, Richard L.; Li, Weiguo; Velasco, M. Pilar; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A.; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena (T1 and T2). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T1 and T2 relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T2 relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter (α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T1 was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T2 measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for microstructural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T2 NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues. PMID:21498095

  6. Anomalous NMR relaxation in cartilage matrix components and native cartilage: Fractional-order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Li, Weiguo; Pilar Velasco, M.; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A.; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G.

    2011-06-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena ( T1 and T2). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T1 and T2 relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T2 relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter ( α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T1 was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T2 measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for micro-structural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T2 NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues.

  7. Bioreactors for Tissue Engineering of Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concaro, S.; Gustavson, F.; Gatenholm, P.

    The cartilage regenerative medicine field has evolved during the last decades. The first-generation technology, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) involved the transplantation of in vitro expanded chondrocytes to cartilage defects. The second generation involves the seeding of chondrocytes in a three-dimensional scaffold. The technique has several potential advantages such as the ability of arthroscopic implantation, in vitro pre-differentiation of cells and implant stability among others (Brittberg M, Lindahl A, Nilsson A, Ohlsson C, Isaksson O, Peterson L, N Engl J Med 331(14):889-895, 1994; Henderson I, Francisco R, Oakes B, Cameron J, Knee 12(3):209-216, 2005; Peterson L, Minas T, Brittberg M, Nilsson A, Sjogren-Jansson E, Lindahl A, Clin Orthop (374):212-234, 2000; Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Feyerabend F, Petersen JP, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, et al. Bioprocess Biosyst Eng 27(4):273-280, 2005; Portner R, Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, J Biosci Bioeng 100(3):235-245, 2005; Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, Portner R, J Biotechnol 121(4):486-497, 2006; Heyland J, Wiegandt K, Goepfert C, Nagel-Heyer S, Ilinich E, Schumacher U, et al. Biotechnol Lett 28(20):1641-1648, 2006). The nutritional requirements of cells that are synthesizing extra-cellular matrix increase along the differentiation process. The mass transfer must be increased according to the tissue properties. Bioreactors represent an attractive tool to accelerate the biochemical and mechanical properties of the engineered tissues providing adequate mass transfer and physical stimuli. Different reactor systems have been [5] developed during the last decades based on different physical stimulation concepts. Static and dynamic compression, confined and nonconfined compression-based reactors have been described in this review. Perfusion systems represent an attractive way of culturing constructs under dynamic conditions. Several groups showed increased matrix

  8. Validation of cartilage thickness calculations using indentation analysis.

    PubMed

    Koff, Matthew F; Chong, Le Roy; Virtue, Patrick; Chen, Dan; Wang, Xioanan; Wright, Timothy; Potter, Hollis G

    2010-04-01

    Different methods have been used to cross-validate cartilage thickness measurements from magnetic resonance images (MRIs); however, a majority of these methods rely on interpolated data points, regional mean and/or maximal thickness, or surface mean thickness for data analysis. Furthermore, the accuracy of MRI cartilage thickness measurements from commercially available software packages has not necessarily been validated and may lead to an under- or overestimation of cartilage thickness. The goal of this study was to perform a matching point-to-point validation of indirect cartilage thickness calculations using a magnetic resonance (MR) image data set with direct cartilage thickness measurements using biomechanical indentation testing at the same anatomical locations. Seven bovine distal femoral condyles were prepared and a novel phantom filled with dilute gadolinium solution was rigidly attached to each specimen. High resolution MR images were acquired, and thickness indentation analysis of the cartilage was performed immediately after scanning. Segmentation of the MR data and cartilage thickness calculation was performed using semi-automated software. Registration of MR and indentation data was performed using the fluid filled phantom. The inter- and intra-examiner differences of the measurements were also determined. A total of 105 paired MRI-indentation thickness data points were analyzed, and a significant correlation between them was found (r=0.88, p<0.0001). The mean difference (+/-std. dev.) between measurement techniques was 0.00+/-0.23 mm, with Bland-Altman limits of agreement of 0.45 mm and -0.46 mm. The intra- and inter-examiner measurement differences were 0.03+/-0.22 mm and 0.05+/-0.24 mm, respectively. This study validated cartilage thickness measurements from MR images with thickness measurements from indentation by using a novel phantom to register the image-based and laboratory-based data sets. The accuracy of the measurements was comparable to

  9. Potential regulation of cartilage metabolism in osteoarthritis by fibronectin fragments.

    PubMed

    Homandberg, G A

    1999-10-15

    There are few candidates for biochemical pathways that either initiate or amplify catabolic processes involved in osteoarthritis (OA). Perhaps, one of the most likely sources for such pathways may be within the extracellular matrix itself. This review focuses on an example of how specific degradation products of the extracellular matrix of cartilage, produced during proteolytic damage, have the potential to enhance OA-like processes. In this example, these products can induce or activate other factors, such as catabolic cytokines, that amplify the damage. The damage, in turn, enhances levels of the degradation products themselves, as in a positive feedback loop. Since these products are derived from the cartilage matrix, they could be considered barometers of the health of the cartilage that signal to the chondrocyte, through outside to inside signaling, the health or status of the surrounding matrix. The best example and most characterized system is that of fragments of the matrix protein, fibronectin (Fn), although as discussed later, other recently discovered fragment systems may also have the potential to regulate cartilage metabolism. In the case of Fn fragments (Fn-fs), the Fn-fs enhance levels of catabolic cytokines as in OA and, thus, are potentially earlier damage mediators than catabolic cytokines. The Fn-fs up-regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression, significantly enhance degradation and loss of proteoglycan (PG) from cartilage and temporarily suppress PG synthesis, all events observed in OA. However, this Fn-f system may be involved in normal cartilage homeostasis as well. For example, low concentrations of Fn-fs enhance anabolic activities and could play a role in normal homeostasis. This system may also be involved in not only amplifying damage but also coupling damage to repair. For example, high concentrations of Fn-fs that might arise in OA temporarily offset the anabolic response of lower Fn-f concentrations and cause short

  10. Needle electrode-based electromechanical reshaping of cartilage.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Cyrus T; Foulad, Allen; Protsenko, Dmitriy E; Sepehr, Ali; Wong, Brian J F

    2010-11-01

    Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) of cartilage provides an alternative to the classic surgical techniques of modifying the shape of facial cartilages. The original embodiment of EMR required surface electrodes to be in direct contact with the entire cartilage region being reshaped. This study evaluates the feasibility of using needle electrode systems for EMR of facial cartilage and evaluates the relationships between electrode configuration, voltage, and application time in effecting shape change. Flat rabbit nasal septal cartilage specimens were deformed by a jig into a 90° bend, while a constant electric voltage was applied to needle electrodes that were inserted into the cartilage. The electrode configuration, voltage (0-7.5 V), and application time (1-9 min) were varied systematically to create the most effective shape change. Electric current and temperature were measured during voltage application, and the resulting specimen shape was assessed in terms of retained bend angle. In order to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of EMR, the most effective and practical settings from the septal cartilage experimentation were used to reshape intact rabbit and pig ears ex vivo. Cell viability of the cartilage after EMR was determined using confocal microscopy in conjunction with a live/dead assay. Overall, cartilage reshaping increased with increased voltage and increased application time. For all electrode configurations and application times tested, heat generation was negligible (<1 °C) up to 6 V. At 6 V, with the most effective electrode configuration, the bend angle began to significantly increase after 2 min of application time and began to plateau above 5 min. As a function of voltage at 2 min of application time, significant reshaping occurred at and above 5 V, with no significant increase in the bend angle between 6 and 7.5 V. In conclusion, electromechanical reshaping of cartilage grafts and intact ears can be effectively performed with

  11. Needle Electrode-Based Electromechanical Reshaping of Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Cyrus T.; Foulad, Allen; Protsenko, Dmitriy E.; Sepehr, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) of cartilage provides an alternative to the classic surgical techniques of modifying the shape of facial cartilages. The original embodiment of EMR required surface electrodes to be in direct contact with the entire cartilage region being reshaped. This study evaluates the feasibility of using needle electrode systems for EMR of facial cartilage and evaluates the relationships between electrode configuration, voltage, and application time in effecting shape change. Flat rabbit nasal septal cartilage specimens were deformed by a jig into a 90° bend, while a constant electric voltage was applied to needle electrodes that were inserted into the cartilage. The electrode configuration, voltage (0–7.5 V), and application time (1–9 min) were varied systematically to create the most effective shape change. Electric current and temperature were measured during voltage application, and the resulting specimen shape was assessed in terms of retained bend angle. In order to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of EMR, the most effective and practical settings from the septal cartilage experimentation were used to reshape intact rabbit and pig ears ex vivo. Cell viability of the cartilage after EMR was determined using confocal microscopy in conjunction with a live/dead assay. Overall, cartilage reshaping increased with increased voltage and increased application time. For all electrode configurations and application times tested, heat generation was negligible (<1 °C) up to 6 V. At 6 V, with the most effective electrode configuration, the bend angle began to significantly increase after 2 min of application time and began to plateau above 5 min. As a function of voltage at 2 min of application time, significant reshaping occurred at and above 5 V, with no significant increase in the bend angle between 6 and 7.5 V. In conclusion, electromechanical reshaping of cartilage grafts and intact ears can be effectively performed with

  12. Cartilage tissue engineering: recent advances and perspectives from gene regulation/therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuei-Chang; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2015-05-01

    Diseases in articular cartilages affect millions of people. Despite the relatively simple biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages, the self-repair ability of cartilage is limited. Successful cartilage tissue engineering requires intricately coordinated interactions between matrerials, cells, biological factors, and phycial/mechanical factors, and still faces a multitude of challenges. This article presents an overview of the cartilage biology, current treatments, recent advances in the materials, biological factors, and cells used in cartilage tissue engineering/regeneration, with strong emphasis on the perspectives of gene regulation (e.g., microRNA) and gene therapy.

  13. The Rib Cartilage Concept in Microtia.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Henning

    2015-12-01

    There is a long history of rib cartilage use in reconstruction for microtia. This article aims to describe the modern techniques of autologous auricular reconstruction in detail, to elucidate the modifications for certain anatomical or disease-related conditions, and to contrast the different strategies used by other surgeons. The two mainstays of successful reconstruction with excellent results are the fabrication of the framework and soft tissue management. A three-dimensional framework mimics the curves, indentations, and peaks of a normal ear with maximal stability. Recently, the creation of a conchal bowl and an additional tragal strut has become a standard procedure. Soft tissue management is highly specific to each patient and equally contributes to the final result of the procedure. The correct position of the incision line and the trimming of the local flaps require thorough planning. Most of the individual modifications must be made in soft tissue management, particularly in patients with a low hairline and facial asymmetry. Autologous auricular reconstruction is a standard procedure that needs to be individualized to each patient. However, it is challenging and requires intensive training. In experienced hands, patients experience excellent results.

  14. Abnormal mandibular growth and the condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Peltomäki, Timo; Müller, Lukas; Luder, Hans U

    2009-02-01

    Deviations in the growth of the mandibular condyle can affect both the functional occlusion and the aesthetic appearance of the face. The reasons for these growth deviations are numerous and often entail complex sequences of malfunction at the cellular level. The aim of this review is to summarize recent progress in the understanding of pathological alterations occurring during childhood and adolescence that affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and, hence, result in disorders of mandibular growth. Pathological conditions taken into account are subdivided into (1) congenital malformations with associated growth disorders, (2) primary growth disorders, and (3) acquired diseases or trauma with associated growth disorders. Among the congenital malformations, hemifacial microsomia (HFM) appears to be the principal syndrome entailing severe growth disturbances, whereas growth abnormalities occurring in conjunction with other craniofacial dysplasias seem far less prominent than could be anticipated based on their often disfiguring nature. Hemimandibular hyperplasia and elongation undoubtedly constitute the most obscure conditions that are associated with prominent, often unilateral, abnormalities of condylar, and mandibular growth. Finally, disturbances of mandibular growth as a result of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and condylar fractures seem to be direct consequences of inflammatory and/or mechanical damage to the condylar cartilage.

  15. Nasal reconstruction with articulated irradiated rib cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, C.S.; Cook, T.A.; Guida, R.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Nasal structural reconstruction is a formidable task in cases where there is loss of support to both the nasal dorsum and tip. A multitude of surgical approaches and materials have been used for the correction of the saddle-nose deformity with varying degrees of success. Articulated irradiated rib cartilage inserted through an external rhinoplasty approach was used to reconstruct nasal deformities in 18 patients over a 6-year period. Simultaneous use of a midline forehead flap to reconstruct the overlying soft tissue was required in four cases. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean, 2.8 years). Results were rewarding in most cases with marked improvement in nasal support and airway. Revision and/or replacement secondary to trauma or warping of the graft was required in four cases. None of the patients exhibited infection, extrusion, or noticeable resorption. A description of the surgical technique, review of all the cases, and recommendation for continued use of this graft material are discussed.

  16. Molecular trafficking in tissue engineered cartilage constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosa, Enrica

    2005-03-01

    Tissue processing in vitro requires an effective trafficking of biologically active agents within three-dimensional constructs for induction of appropriate and enhanced cellular growth, biosynthesis and tissue remodeling. Moreover, nutrients and waste products need to move freely through the cellular constructs to minimize the presence of regions with necrotic and/or apoptotic cells. In tissue-engineered cartilage, for example, during the time of culture, cells seeded within the three-dimensional constructs lay-down their own extracellular matrix and this may lead to a heterogeneous distribution of transport properties both in time and space. In this work the diffusion coefficient of BSA and 500kDa dextran has been measured with FRAP thecnique in agarose gel chondrocytes constructs at different position and time during the culture. The diffusion coefficient of both molecular probes within the developing tissue well correlated with the ECM production and assembly. Moreover the comparision between BSA and dextran transport parameters revealed a selective hindrance effect of the neo tissue on high interacting molecules.

  17. The plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Lennartsson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A spatially distinct, temporally variable, transition region between the magnetotail lobes and the central plasma sheet designated the plasma sheet boundary layer has been identified from a survey of particle spectra and three-dimensional distributions as sampled by the ISEE 1 LEPEDEA. The instrumentation and data presentation are described, and the signatures of the magnetotail plasma regimes are presented and discussed for the central plasma sheet and lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer. Comparisons of plasma parameters and distribution fucntions are made and the evolution of ion velocity distributions within the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed. The spatial distribution of the plasma sheet boundary layer is considered and ion composition measurements are presented.

  18. Correlation between Focal Nodular Low Signal Changes in Hoffa's Fat Pad Adjacent to Anterior Femoral Cartilage and Focal Cartilage Defect Underlying This Region and Its Possible Implication

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wuey Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigates the association between focal nodular mass with low signal in Hoffa's fat pad adjacent to anterior femoral cartilage of the knee (FNMHF) and focal cartilage abnormality in this region. Method. The magnetic resonance fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition sequence (MR FIESTA) sagittal and axial images of the B1 and C1 region (described later) of 148 patients were independently evaluated by two reviewers and categorized into four categories: normal, FNMHF with underlying focal cartilage abnormality, FNMHF with normal cartilage, and cartilage abnormality with no FNMHF. Results. There was a significant association (p = 0.00) between FNMHF and immediate adjacent focal cartilage abnormality with high interobserver agreement. The absence of focal nodular lesions next to the anterior femoral cartilage has a very high negative predictive value for chondral injury (97.8%). Synovial biopsy of focal nodular lesion done during arthroscopy revealed some fibrocollagenous tissue and no inflammatory cells. Conclusion. We postulate that the FNMHF adjacent to the cartilage defects is a form of normal healing response to the cartilage damage. One patient with FHMHF and underlying cartilage abnormality was rescanned six months later. In this patient, the FNMHF disappeared and normal cartilage was observed in the adjacent region which may support this theory. PMID:27213085

  19. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Design Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. Results The tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau–tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints. PMID:26425258

  20. Tissue engineered cartilage on collagen and PHBV matrices.

    PubMed

    Köse, Gamze Torun; Korkusuz, Feza; Ozkul, Aykut; Soysal, Yasemin; Ozdemir, Taner; Yildiz, Cemil; Hasirci, Vasif

    2005-09-01

    Cartilage engineering is a very novel approach to tissue repair through use of implants. Matrices of collagen containing calcium phosphate (CaP-Gelfix), and matrices of poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) (PHBV) were produced to create a cartilage via tissue engineering. The matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron diffraction spectroscopy (EDS). Porosity and void volume analysis were carried out to characterize the matrices. Chondrocytes were isolated from the proximal humerus of 22 week-old male, adult, local albino rabbits. For cell type characterization, Type II collagen was measured by Western Blot analysis. The foams were seeded with 1x10(6) chondrocytes and histological examinations were carried out to assess cell-matrix interaction. Macroscopic examination showed that PHBV (with or without chondrocytes) maintained its integrity for 21 days, while CaP-Gelfix was deformed and degraded within 15 days. Cell-containing and cell-free matrices were implanted into full thickness cartilage defects (4.5 mm in diameter and 4 mm in depth) at the patellar groove on the right and left knees of eight rabbits, respectively. In vivo results at 8 and 20 weeks with chondrocyte seeded PHBV matrices presented early cartilage formation resembling normal articular cartilage and revealed minimal foreign body reaction. In CaP-Gelfix matrices, fibrocartilage formation and bone invasion was noted in 20 weeks. Cells maintained their phenotype in both matrices. PHBV had better healing response than CaP-Gelfix. Both matrices were effective in cartilage regeneration. These matrices have great potential for use in the repair of joint cartilage defects.

  1. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Background: We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. Methods: We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. Results: The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. Conclusions: The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage. PMID:26069691

  2. The Influence of Articular Cartilage Thickness Reduction on Meniscus Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Witkowski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the biomechanical interaction between meniscus and cartilage in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Methods The finite element method was used to simulate knee joint contact mechanics. Three knee models were created on the basis of knee geometry from the Open Knee project. We reduced the thickness of medial cartilages in the intact knee model by approximately 50% to obtain a medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) model. Two variants of medial knee OA model with congruent and incongruent contact surfaces were analysed to investigate the influence of congruency. A nonlinear static analysis for one compressive load case was performed. The focus of the study was the influence of cartilage degeneration on meniscal extrusion and the values of the contact forces and contact areas. Results In the model with incongruent contact surfaces, we observed maximal compressive stress on the tibial plateau. In this model, the value of medial meniscus external shift was 95.3% greater, while the contact area between the tibial cartilage and medial meniscus was 50% lower than in the congruent contact surfaces model. After the non-uniform reduction of cartilage thickness, the medial meniscus carried only 48.4% of load in the medial compartment in comparison to 71.2% in the healthy knee model. Conclusions We have shown that the change in articular cartilage geometry may significantly reduce the role of meniscus in load transmission and the contact area between the meniscus and cartilage. Additionally, medial knee OA may increase the risk of meniscal extrusion in the medial compartment of the knee joint. PMID:27936066

  3. Transient Hypoxia Improves Matrix Properties in Tissue Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Yodmuang, Supansa; Gadjanski, Ivana; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage is a hypoxic tissue, with oxygen tension ranging from <10% at the cartilage surface to <1% in the deepest layers. In addition to spatial gradients, cartilage development is also associated with temporal changes in oxygen tension. However, a vast majority of cartilage tissue engineering protocols involves cultivation of chondrocytes or their progenitors under ambient oxygen concentration (21% O2), that is, significantly above physiological levels in either developing or adult cartilage. Our study was designed to test the hypothesis that transient hypoxia followed by normoxic conditions results in improved quality of engineered cartilaginous ECM. To this end, we systematically compared the effects of normoxia (21% O2 for 28 days), hypoxia (5% O2 for 28 days) and transient hypoxia—reoxygenation (5% O2 for 7 days and 21% O2 for 21 days) on the matrix composition and expression of the chondrogenic genes in cartilage constructs engineered in vitro. We demonstrated that reoxygenation had the most effect on the expression of cartilaginous genes including COL2A1, ACAN, and SOX9 and increased tissue concentrations of amounts of glycosaminoglycans and type II collagen. The equilibrium Young’s moduli of tissues grown under transient hypoxia (510.01 ± 28.15 kPa) and under normoxic conditions (417.60 ± 68.46 kPa) were significantly higher than those measured under hypoxic conditions (279.61 ± 20.52 kPa). These data suggest that the cultivation protocols utilizing transient hypoxia with reoxygenation have high potential for efficient cartilage tissue engineering, but need further optimization in order to achieve higher mechanical functionality of engineered constructs. PMID:23203946

  4. Incidence of knee cartilage surgery in Norway, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Engen, Cathrine Nørstad; Årøen, Asbjørn; Engebretsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic and long-term data collection on the treatment of focal cartilage defects (FCDs) of the knee is needed. This can be achieved through the foundation of a National Knee Cartilage Defect Registry. The aim of this study was to establish the nationwide burden of knee cartilage surgery, defined as knee surgery in patients with an FCD. We also aimed to identify any geographical differences in incidence rates, patient demographics or trends within this type of surgery. Setting A population-based study with retrospective identification of patients undergoing knee cartilage surgery in Norway through a mandatory public health database from 2008 to 2011. Participants We identified all patients undergoing cartilage surgery, or other knee surgery in patients with an FCD. All eligible surgeries were assessed for inclusion on the basis of certain types of ICD-10 and NOMESKO Classification of Surgical Procedures codes. Primary and secondary outcome measures The variables were diagnostic and surgical codes, geographic location of the performing hospital, age and sex of the patients. Yearly incidence and incidence rates were calculated. Age-adjusted incidences for risk ratios and ORs between geographical areas were also calculated. Results A total of 10 830 cases of knee cartilage surgery were identified, with slight but significant decreases from 2008 to 2011 (p<0.0003). The national incidence rate was 56/100 000 inhabitants and varied between regions, counties and hospitals. More than 50% of the procedures were palliative and nearly 400 yearly procedures were reparative or restorative. Conclusions Knee cartilage surgery is common in Norway, counting 2500 annual cases with an age-adjusted incidence rate of 68.8/100 000 inhabitants. There are significant geographical variations in incidence and trends of surgery and in trends between public and private hospitals. We suggest that a national surveillance system would be beneficial for the future evaluation

  5. Noninvasive Determination of Knee Cartilage Deformation During Jumping

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Nenad; Vulovic, Radun; Peulic, Aleksandar; Radakovic, Radivoje; Kosanic, Djordje; Ristic, Branko

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to use a combination of image processing, force measurements and finite element modeling to calculate deformation of the knee cartilage during jumping. Professional athletes performed jumps analyzed using a force plate and high-speed video camera system. Image processing was performed on each frame of video using a color recognition algorithm. A simplified mass-spring-damper model was utilized for determination of global force and moment on the knee. Custom software for fitting the coupling characteristics was created. Simulated results were used as input data for the finite element calculation of cartilage deformation in the athlete’s knee. Computer simulation data was compared with the average experimental ground reaction forces. The results show the three-dimensional mechanical deformation distribution inside the cartilage volume. A combination of the image recognition technology, force plate measurements and the finite element cartilage deformation in the knee may be used in the future as an effective noninvasive tool for prediction of injury during jumping. Key points Even there are many existing mathematical models of force distribution during running or jumping (Liu et al, 1998), to our knowledge there is no interdisciplinary approach where imaging processing, finite element modeling and experimental force plate system are employed. The aim is to explore noninvasive deformation in the knee cartilage during athlete’s jumping on the force plate. An original image algorithms and software were developed as well as complex mathematical models using high-performance computational power of finite element modeling together with one-dimensional dynamics model. The initial results showed cartilage deformation in the knee and future research will be focused on the methodology and more precisely determination of the stress and strain distribution in the knee cartilage during training phase of sportsman. PMID:24149600

  6. Clinical application and long-term follow-up study of porcine acellular dermal matrix combined with autoskin grafting.

    PubMed

    Jiong, Chen; Jiake, Chai; Chunmao, Han; Yingen, Pan; Qiuhe, Wu; Zhouxi, Fang; Xiangsheng, Feng

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical effects of porcine acellular dermal matrix combined with autoskin grafting on full-thickness skin defects using long-term clinical follow-up study and histologic examination. One hundred fifty-two patients with deep burn or trauma hospitalized from February 2000 to July 2003 were repaired with porcine acellular dermal matrix and split-thickness autoskin graft. Take rate of the grafts was calculated on 1 week after operation. Scar hyperplasia was examined on 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after operation. At the same time, the contracture rates of grafted areas were also calculated. Skin biopsy was performed on five patients for histologic examination, as well as transmission electron microscopy 78 months after operation. The take rate of grafts of 116 patients (76.3%) was 100%, and the take rate of the rest of the patients (36 patients, 23.7%) was more than 95%. No one needed skin transplantation for the second time. One hundred twenty-seven patients were followed up on 1 month after operation; grafts showed mild contraction. There was slight cicatricle at skin junction with tender texture. There was no obvious pruritus and blister. One hundred one patients were followed up on 3 months after operation. The graft contraction showed obvious relief with good articular function. Eighty-two patients were followed up on 6 months after operation. The color and texture of the grafts were similar to normal skin without obvious cicatricial hyperplasia. Fifty-eight patients were followed up on 12 months after operation. The grafts were similar to normal skin without obvious rejection. There were no significant differences between the contracture rates at 3, 6, and 12 months and 1 month after the second surgery. Sixteen patients were followed up on 78 months after operation. The appearance of grafts was slightly dry compared with normal skin. Tissue structure of grafts was similar to normal skin with sweat gland-like structure

  7. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  8. An overview of multiphase cartilage mechanical modelling and its role in understanding function and pathology.

    PubMed

    Klika, Václav; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Chen, Ying-Chun; Brown, Cameron P

    2016-09-01

    There is a long history of mathematical and computational modelling with the objective of understanding the mechanisms governing cartilage׳s remarkable mechanical performance. Nonetheless, despite sophisticated modelling development, simulations of cartilage have consistently lagged behind structural knowledge and thus the relationship between structure and function in cartilage is not fully understood. However, in the most recent generation of studies, there is an emerging confluence between our structural knowledge and the structure represented in cartilage modelling. This raises the prospect of further refinement in our understanding of cartilage function and also the initiation of an engineering-level understanding for how structural degradation and ageing relates to cartilage dysfunction and pathology, as well as informing the potential design of prospective interventions. Aimed at researchers entering the field of cartilage modelling, we thus review the basic principles of cartilage models, discussing the underlying physics and assumptions in relatively simple settings, whilst presenting the derivation of relatively parsimonious multiphase cartilage models consistent with our discussions. We proceed to consider modern developments that start aligning the structure captured in the models with observed complexities. This emphasises the challenges associated with constitutive relations, boundary conditions, parameter estimation and validation in cartilage modelling programmes. Consequently, we further detail how both experimental interrogations and modelling developments can be utilised to investigate and reduce such difficulties before summarising how cartilage modelling initiatives may improve our understanding of cartilage ageing, pathology and intervention.

  9. PEDF Is Associated with the Termination of Chondrocyte Phenotype and Catabolism of Cartilage Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, P.; Ferrazzi, F.; Hotfiel, T.; Swoboda, B.; Aigner, T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the expression and target genes of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in cartilage and chondrocytes, respectively. Methods. We analyzed the expression pattern of PEDF in different human cartilaginous tissues including articular cartilage, osteophytic cartilage, and fetal epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage, by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time (qRT) PCR. Transcriptome analysis after stimulation of human articular chondrocytes with rhPEDF was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and confirmed by qRT-PCR. Results. Immunohistochemically, PEDF could be detected in transient cartilaginous tissue that is prone to undergo endochondral ossification, including epiphyseal cartilage, growth plate cartilage, and osteophytic cartilage. In contrast, PEDF was hardly detected in healthy articular cartilage and in the superficial zone of epiphyses, regions that are characterized by a permanent stable chondrocyte phenotype. RNA-Seq analysis and qRT-PCR demonstrated that rhPEDF significantly induced the expression of a number of matrix-degrading factors including SAA1, MMP1, MMP3, and MMP13. Simultaneously, a number of cartilage-specific genes including COL2A1, COL9A2, COMP, and LECT were among the most significantly downregulated genes. Conclusions. PEDF represents a marker for transient cartilage during all neonatal and postnatal developmental stages and promotes the termination of cartilage tissue by upregulation of matrix-degrading factors and downregulation of cartilage-specific genes. These data provide the basis for novel strategies to stabilize the phenotype of articular cartilage and prevent its degradation. PMID:28191465

  10. PEDF Is Associated with the Termination of Chondrocyte Phenotype and Catabolism of Cartilage Tissue.

    PubMed

    Klinger, P; Lukassen, S; Ferrazzi, F; Ekici, A B; Hotfiel, T; Swoboda, B; Aigner, T; Gelse, K

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the expression and target genes of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in cartilage and chondrocytes, respectively. Methods. We analyzed the expression pattern of PEDF in different human cartilaginous tissues including articular cartilage, osteophytic cartilage, and fetal epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage, by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time (qRT) PCR. Transcriptome analysis after stimulation of human articular chondrocytes with rhPEDF was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and confirmed by qRT-PCR. Results. Immunohistochemically, PEDF could be detected in transient cartilaginous tissue that is prone to undergo endochondral ossification, including epiphyseal cartilage, growth plate cartilage, and osteophytic cartilage. In contrast, PEDF was hardly detected in healthy articular cartilage and in the superficial zone of epiphyses, regions that are characterized by a permanent stable chondrocyte phenotype. RNA-Seq analysis and qRT-PCR demonstrated that rhPEDF significantly induced the expression of a number of matrix-degrading factors including SAA1, MMP1, MMP3, and MMP13. Simultaneously, a number of cartilage-specific genes including COL2A1, COL9A2, COMP, and LECT were among the most significantly downregulated genes. Conclusions. PEDF represents a marker for transient cartilage during all neonatal and postnatal developmental stages and promotes the termination of cartilage tissue by upregulation of matrix-degrading factors and downregulation of cartilage-specific genes. These data provide the basis for novel strategies to stabilize the phenotype of articular cartilage and prevent its degradation.

  11. Perchlorate Regulatory Determination Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact sheets have been developed for the perchlorate regulatory determination corresponding to the following stages published in the Federal Register: Final, Supplemental request for comments, and Preliminary.

  12. Ice sheets and nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land–atmosphere and ocean–atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2–3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas. PMID:23713125

  13. Ice sheets and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric W

    2013-07-05

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2-3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas.

  14. Intra-Articular Injections of Polyphenols Protect Articular Cartilage from Inflammation-Induced Degradation: Suggesting a Potential Role in Cartilage Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Venkatachalam; Madhan, Balaraman; Tiku, Moti L.

    2015-01-01

    Arthritic diseases, such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, inflict an enormous health care burden on society. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease with high prevalence among older people, and rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease, both lead to irreversible structural and functional damage to articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of polyphenols such as catechin, quercetin, epigallocatechin gallate, and tannic acid, on crosslinking type II collagen and the roles of these agents in managing in vivo articular cartilage degradation. The thermal, enzymatic, and physical stability of bovine articular cartilage explants following polyphenolic treatment were assessed for efficiency. Epigallocatechin gallate and tannic acid-treated explants showed >12 °C increase over native cartilage in thermal stability, thereby confirming cartilage crosslinking. Polyphenol-treated cartilage also showed a significant reduction in the percentage of collagen degradation and the release of glycosaminoglycans against collagenase digestion, indicating the increase physical integrity and resistance of polyphenol crosslinked cartilage to enzymatic digestion. To examine the in vivo cartilage protective effects, polyphenols were injected intra-articularly before (prophylactic) and after (therapeutic) the induction of collagen-induced arthritis in rats. The hind paw volume and histomorphological scoring was done for cartilage damage. The intra-articular injection of epigallocatechin gallate and tannic acid did not significantly influence the time of onset or the intensity of joint inflammation. However, histomorphological scoring of the articular cartilage showed a significant reduction in cartilage degradation in prophylactic- and therapeutic-groups, indicating that intra-articular injections of polyphenols bind to articular cartilage and making it resistant to degradation despite ongoing inflammation. These studies establish

  15. Laminated sheet composites reinforced with modular filament sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reece, O. Y.

    1968-01-01

    Aluminum and magnesium composite sheet laminates reinforced with low density, high strength modular filament sheets are produced by diffusion bonding and explosive bonding. Both processes are accomplished in normal atmosphere and require no special tooling or cleaning other than wire brushing the metal surfaces just prior to laminating.

  16. 17. INTAKE PIER, BRIDGE STRESS SHEET, SHEET 8 OF 117, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTAKE PIER, BRIDGE STRESS SHEET, SHEET 8 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  17. Solute transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chin, Hooi Chuan; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-07-15

    Solute transport through extracellular matrix (ECM) is important to physiology and contrast agent-based clinical imaging of articular cartilage. Mechanical injury is likely to have important effects on solute transport since it involves alteration of ECM structure. Therefore it is of interest to characterize effects of mechanical injury on solute transport in cartilage. Using cartilage explants injured by an established mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusivities of solutes for transport across the articular surface were measured. A range of fluorescent solutes (fluorescein isothiocyanate, 4 and 40kDa dextrans, insulin, and chondroitin sulfate) and an X-ray contrast agent (sodium iodide) were used. Mechanical injury was associated with a significant increase in effective diffusivity versus uninjured explants for all solutes studied. On the other hand, mechanical injury had no effects on effective partition coefficients for most solutes tested, except for 40kDa dextran and chondroitin sulfate where small but significant changes in effective partition coefficient were observed in injured explants. Findings highlight enhanced diffusive transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage, which may have important implications for injury and repair situations. Results also support development of non-equilibrium methods for identification of focal cartilage lesions by contrast agent-based clinical imaging.

  18. Enhanced cartilage regeneration in MIA/CD-RAP deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schmid, R; Schiffner, S; Opolka, A; Grässel, S; Schubert, T; Moser, M; Bosserhoff, A-K

    2010-11-11

    Melanoma inhibitory activity/cartilage-derived retinoic acid-sensitive protein (MIA/CD-RAP) is a small soluble protein secreted from chondrocytes. It was identified as the prototype of a family of extracellular proteins adopting an SH3 domain-like fold. In order to study the consequences of MIA/CD-RAP deficiency in detail we used mice with a targeted gene disruption of MIA/CD-RAP (MIA-/-) and analyzed cartilage organisation and differentiation in in vivo and in vitro models. Cartilage formation and regeneration was determined in models for osteoarthritis and fracture healing in vivo, in addition to in vitro studies using mesenchymal stem cells of MIA-/- mice. Interestingly, our data suggest enhanced chondrocytic regeneration in the MIA-/- mice, modulated by enhanced proliferation and delayed differentiation. Expression analysis of cartilage tissue derived from MIA-/- mice revealed strong downregulation of nuclear RNA-binding protein 54-kDa (p54(nrb)), a recently described modulator of Sox9 activity. In this study, we present p54(nrb) as a mediator of MIA/CD-RAP to promote chondrogenesis. Taken together, our data indicate that MIA/CD-RAP is required for differentiation in cartilage potentially by regulating signaling processes during differentiation.

  19. Modeling the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Basu, Reshmi; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2002-06-01

    Cartilage laser thermoforming, also known as laser reshaping, is a new surgical procedure that allows in-situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. During laser irradiation, cartilage becomes sufficiently subtle or deformable for stretching and shaping into new stable configurations. This study describes the experimental and theoretical characterization of the thermal response of porcine cartilage to laser irradiation (Nd:YAG). The surface temperature history of cartilage specimens was monitored during heating and thermal relaxation; using laser exposure times ranging between 1 and 15 s and laser powers of 1 to 10 W. The experimental results were then used to validate a finite element model, which accounts for heat diffusion, light propagation in tissue, and heat loss due to water evaporation. The simultaneous solution of the energy and mass diffusion equations resulted in predictions of temperature distribution in cartilage that were in good agreement with experiments. The model simulations will provide insights to the relationship between the laser treatment parameters (exposure time, laser beam diameter, and power) and the onset of new molecular arrangements and cell thermal injury in the material, thus conceiving basic guidelines of laser thermoforming.

  20. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput.

  1. A High Throughput Mechanical Screening Device for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Greg R.; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Dodge, George R.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying ‘hits’, or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. PMID:24275442

  2. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution.

  3. Matrilin-3 Role in Cartilage Development and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Muttigi, Manjunatha S.; Han, Inbo; Park, Hun-Kuk; Park, Hansoo; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage performs essential functions in differentiation and chondroprogenitor cell maintenance during development and regeneration. Here, we discuss the vital role of matrilin-3, an ECM protein involved in cartilage development and potential osteoarthritis pathomechanisms. As an adaptor protein, matrilin-3 binds to collagen IX to form a filamentous network around cells. Matrilin-3 is an essential component during cartilage development and ossification. In addition, it interacts directly or indirectly with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) eventually regulates chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophic differentiation. Interestingly, matrilin-3 increases interleukin receptor antagonists (IL-Ra) in chondrocytes, suggesting its role in the suppression of IL-1β-mediated inflammatory action. Matrilin-3 downregulates the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes, such as a disintegrin metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 (ADAMTS4) and ADAMTS5, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13), and collagen X, a hypertrophy marker during development and inflammatory conditions. Matrilin-3 essentially enhances collagen II and aggrecan expression, which are required to maintain the tensile strength and elasticity of cartilage, respectively. Interestingly, despite these attributes, matrilin-3 induces osteoarthritis-associated markers in chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Existing data provide insights into the critical role of matrilin-3 in inflammation, matrix degradation, and matrix formation in cartilage development and osteoarthritis. PMID:27104523

  4. Endoscopic laser reshaping of rabbit tracheal cartilage: preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Walter; Lam, Anthony; Protsenko, Dmitry; Wong, Brian J.

    2005-04-01

    Background: Tracheal cartilage deformities due to trauma, prolonged endotracheal intubation or infection are difficult to correct. Current treatment options such as dilation, laser ablation, stent placement, and segmental resection are only temporary or carry significant risks. The objectives of this project were to design and test a laser activated endotracheal stent system that can actively modify the geometry of tracheal cartilage, leading to permanent retention of a new and desirable tracheal geometry. Methods: Ex vivo rabbit tracheal cartilage (simulating human neonate trachea) were irradiated with an Er: Glass laser, (λ= 1.54um, 0.5W-2.5W, 1 sec to 5 sec). Shape change and gross thermal injury were assessed visually to determine the best laser power parameters for reshaping. A rigid endoscopic telescope and hollow bronchoscope were used to record endoscopic images. The stent was constructed from nitinol wire, shaped into a zigzag configuration. An ex vivo testing apparatus was also constructed. Results: The best laser power parameter to produce shape change was 1 W for 6-7 seconds. At this setting, there was significant shape change with only minimal thermal injury to the tracheal mucosa, as assessed by visual inspection. The bronchoscopy system functioned adequately during testing in the ex vivo testing apparatus. Conclusion: We have successfully designed instrumentation and created the capability to endoscopically reshape tracheal cartilage in an ex vivo rabbit model. The results obtained in ex vivo tracheal cartilage indicated that reshaping using Er: Glass laser can be accomplished.

  5. Cartilage formation in the CELLS 'double bubble' hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, P. J.; Arizpe, Jorge; Montufar-Solis, Dina

    1991-01-01

    The CELLS experiment scheduled to be flown on the first International Microgravity Laboratory is designed to study the effect of microgravity on the cartilage formation, by measuring parameters of growth in a differentiating cartilage cell culture. This paper investigates the conditions for this experiment by studying cartilage differentiation in the 'bubble exchange' hardware with the 'double bubble' design in which the bubbles are joined by a flange which also overlays the gasket. Four types of double bubbles (or double gas permeable membranes) were tested: injection-molded bubbles 0.01- and 0.005-in. thick, and compression molded bubbles 0.015- and 0.01-in. thick. It was found that double bubble membranes of 0.005- and 0.010-in. thickness supported cartilage differentiation, while the 0.015-in. bubbles did not. It was also found that nodule count, used in this study as a parameter, is not the best measure of the amount of cartilage differentiation.

  6. Protease inhibitors decrease rabbit cartilage degradation after meniscectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, C.B.; Sygowski, L.A.; Patton, S.P.; Wolanin, D.J.; Shaw, A.; Roberts, R.A.; DiPasquale, G.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and release were measured on cartilage removed from rabbit knees within 1 week of meniscectomy. Three days following partial lateral meniscectomy, 72% of the femurs and 82% of the tibias had visible ulcers. Cartilage from the weight-bearing areas incorporated 2.0-2.9 times more /sup 35/S-sulfate in vitro than cartilage from the opposite, unoperated knees. /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was 2.5-3.4 times higher for surgical than control groups. /sup 35/S-sulfate incorporation by the surgical group was inhibited by 22% in the presence of 10(-4) M U24522, an inhibitor of rabbit chondrocyte metalloprotease (CMP). /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by the surgical group was inhibited by 28% by 10(-4) M U24522. In vitro PG release from cartilage removed 2 days after surgery was 1.6-3.7 times higher for the surgical than the control group. PG release by the surgical group after 22 h of incubation was reduced to the control level by three CMP inhibitors, U24278, U24279, and U24522. PG release by cartilage from the nonsurgical group was also reduced by these compounds at 22 h. These results suggest that both the anabolic and catabolic processes that are stimulated by surgery can be isolated in vitro and that CMP may be involved in the catabolic process.

  7. Matrilin-3 Role in Cartilage Development and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Muttigi, Manjunatha S; Han, Inbo; Park, Hun-Kuk; Park, Hansoo; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2016-04-20

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage performs essential functions in differentiation and chondroprogenitor cell maintenance during development and regeneration. Here, we discuss the vital role of matrilin-3, an ECM protein involved in cartilage development and potential osteoarthritis pathomechanisms. As an adaptor protein, matrilin-3 binds to collagen IX to form a filamentous network around cells. Matrilin-3 is an essential component during cartilage development and ossification. In addition, it interacts directly or indirectly with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) eventually regulates chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophic differentiation. Interestingly, matrilin-3 increases interleukin receptor antagonists (IL-Ra) in chondrocytes, suggesting its role in the suppression of IL-1β-mediated inflammatory action. Matrilin-3 downregulates the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes, such as a disintegrin metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 (ADAMTS4) and ADAMTS5, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13), and collagen X, a hypertrophy marker during development and inflammatory conditions. Matrilin-3 essentially enhances collagen II and aggrecan expression, which are required to maintain the tensile strength and elasticity of cartilage, respectively. Interestingly, despite these attributes, matrilin-3 induces osteoarthritis-associated markers in chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Existing data provide insights into the critical role of matrilin-3 in inflammation, matrix degradation, and matrix formation in cartilage development and osteoarthritis.

  8. Strategies for Controlled Delivery of Biologics for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Johnny; Lu, Steven; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of biologics is an important component in the treatment of osteoarthritis and the functional restoration of articular cartilage. Numerous factors have been implicated in the cartilage repair process, but the uncontrolled delivery of these factors may not only reduce their full reparative potential and can also cause unwanted morphological effects. It is therefore imperative to consider the type of biologic to be delivered, the method of delivery, and the temporal as well as spatial presentation of the biologic to achieve the desired effect in cartilage repair. Additionally, the delivery of a single factor may not be sufficient in guiding neo-tissue formation, motivating recent research towards the delivery of multiple factors. This review will discuss the roles of various biologics involved in cartilage repair and the different methods of delivery for appropriate healing responses. A number of spatiotemporal strategies will then be emphasized for the controlled delivery of single and multiple bioactive factors in both in vitro and in vivo cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:24993610

  9. Imaging of artificial cartilage with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, K.; Schmitt, R.; Müller-Rath, R.

    2008-02-01

    Tissue Engineering methods have become more and more relevant for orthopedic applications, especially for cartilage repair with autologous chondrocytes. In order to monitor the healing process and bonding between cartilage and the artificial implant, the boundary zone must be imaged non-invasively, for example with OCT. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a short coherent light based measuring technique which allows the generation of cross-section images of semi-transparent media with a depth resolution of up to 5 μm and a measuring depth of 1-2 mm. Especially for the imaging of cartilage OCT offers new diagnostic possibilities, as conventional methods such as ultrasound and x-ray imaging often do not yield satisfactory resolution or contrast. In this paper, an OCT measurement setup for imaging of human cartilage tissue with OCT is demonstrated, allowing a detection of local damaging and lesions. Furthermore, both compressed and uncompressed collagen gel pads were implanted into human cartilage samples. OCT measurements are presented for samples in different stages of growth, focusing on the boundary zones. Comparisons with histologies are shown, demonstrating the ability of OCT to enable a monitoring of the healing progress in tissue engineering based therapy.

  10. In vivo cell tracking by bioluminescence imaging after transplantation of bioengineered cell sheets to the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Takaku, Yuko; Murai, Kunihiko; Ukai, Taku; Ito, Satoshi; Kokubo, Mami; Satoh, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeuchi, Mamoru; Mochida, Joji; Sato, Masato

    2014-02-01

    In our previous studies, we have demonstrated effective regeneration of cartilage through the creation and application of layered cell sheets that combine both chondrocytes and synovial cells. In this study, we were able to demonstrate that cells derived from cell sheets can survive for long periods after transplantation into rat knee joints having osteochondral defects. We established a method for generating cell sheets from firefly luciferase-expressing chondrocytes obtained from transgenic Lewis rats, and carried out allogenic transplantation of these cell sheets into wild-type Lewis rats. We then administered luciferin and monitored the survival of the transplanted cells by using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Our data showed that the transplanted cells survived and could be detected for more than 21 months, which was longer than expected. Furthermore, the BLI data showed that the transplanted cells remained in the knee joint and did not migrate to other parts of the body, thus confirming the safety of the cell sheets. In this study, we monitored the duration of survival of cell sheets composed of only chondrocytes, only synovial cells, or both chondrocytes and synovial cells, and found that all three types of cell sheets survived for an extended period of time.

  11. An in vitro assay system as a potential replacement for the histamine sensitisation test for acellular pertussis based combination vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Chun-Ting; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Asokanathan, Catpagavalli; Cook, Sarah; Douglas-Bardsley, Alexandra; Ochiai, Masaki; Corbel, Michael; Xing, Dorothy

    2010-05-07

    The histamine sensitisation test (HIST) for pertussis toxin is currently an official batch release test for acellular pertussis containing combination vaccines in Europe and North America. However, HIST, being a lethal endpoint assay, often leads to repeated tests due to large variations in test performance. Although a more precise HIST test based on measurement of temperature reduction after the histamine challenge is used in Asian countries, this test still uses animals. An in vitro test system based on a combination of enzyme coupled-HPLC and carbohydrate-binding assays with results analysed by a mathematical formula showed a good agreement with the in vivo HIST results based on measurement of temperature reduction after histamine challenge. The new in vitro test system was shown to be a potential alternative to the current in vivo HIST.

  12. Current concepts in the treatment of cartilage lesions with special regard to the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Widuchowski, Wojciech; Tomaszewski, Wiesław; Widuchowski, Jerzy; Czamara, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The last twenty years have been marked by a rapid development of articular cartilage treatment and regeneration techniques. We present current concepts in the treatment of cartilage lesions and injuries, including gene therapy and tissue engineering.

  13. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  14. Repair of massively defected hemi-joints using demineralized osteoarticular allografts with protected cartilage.

    PubMed

    Li, Siming; Yang, Xiaohong; Tang, Shenghui; Zhang, Xunmeng; Feng, Zhencheng; Cui, Shuliang

    2015-08-01

    Surgical replacement of massively defected joints necessarily relies on osteochondral grafts effective to both of bone and cartilage. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) retains the osteoconductivity but destroys viable chondrocytes in the cartilage portion essential for successful restoration of defected joints. This study prepared osteochondral grafts of DBM with protected cartilage. Protected cartilage portions was characterized by cellular and molecular biology and the grafts were allogenically used for grafting. Protected cartilage showed similar histomorphological structure and protected proteins estimated by total proteins and cartilage specific proteins as in those of fresh controls when DBMs were generated in bone portions. Such grafts were successfully used for simultaneously repair of bone and cartilage in massively defected osteoarticular joints within 16 weeks post-surgery. These results present an allograft with clinical potential for simultaneous restoration of bone and cartilage in defected joints.

  15. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

  16. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker

    1998-01-01

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

  17. Physicochemical properties of iron oxide nanoparticles that contribute to cellular ROS-dependent signaling and acellular production of hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Christoph F A; Charrier, Jessica G; Wu, Dalei; McFall, Alexander S; Li, Wen; Abid, Aamir; Kennedy, Ian M; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-01-01

    While nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used in a variety of consumer products and medical applications, some of these materials have potential health concerns. Macrophages are the primary responders to particles that initiate oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions. Here, we utilized six flame-synthesized, engineered iron oxide NPs with various physicochemical properties (e.g. Fe oxidation state and crystal size) to study their interactions with RAW 264.7 macrophages, their iron solubilities, and their abilities to produce hydroxyl radical in an acellular assay. Both iron solubility and hydroxyl radical production varied between NPs depending on crystalline diameter and surface area of the particles, but not on iron oxidation state. Macrophage treatment with the iron oxide NPs showed a dose-dependent increase of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO-1). The nuclear factor (NF)-erythroid-derived 2 (E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) modulates the transcriptional activity of antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven genes, such as HO-1 and NQO-1. Here, we show that the iron oxide NPs activate Nrf2, leading to its increased nuclear accumulation and enhanced Nrf2 DNA-binding activity in NP-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Iron solubility and acellular hydroxyl radical generation depend on the physical properties of the NPs, especially crystalline diameter; however, these properties are weakly linked to the activation of cellular signaling of Nrf2 and the expression of oxidative stress markers. Overall, our work shows for the first time that iron oxide nanoparticles induce cellular marker genes of oxidative stress and that this effect is transcriptionally mediated through the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway in macrophages.

  18. Cross-Species Protection Mediated by a Bordetella bronchiseptica Strain Lacking Antigenic Homologs Present in Acellular Pertussis Vaccines▿

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Neelima; Sloan, Gina Parise; Conover, Matt S.; Love, Cheraton F.; Mattoo, Seema; Kock, Nancy D.; Deora, Rajendar

    2010-01-01

    The Bordetella species are Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that are characterized by long-term colonization of the mammalian respiratory tract and are causative agents of respiratory diseases in humans and animals. Despite widespread and efficient vaccination, there has been a world-wide resurgence of pertussis, which remains the leading cause of vaccine-preventable death in developed countries. It has been proposed that current acellular vaccines (Pa) composed of only a few bacterial proteins may be less efficacious because of vaccine-induced antigenic shifts and adaptations. To gain insight into the development of a newer generation of vaccines, we constructed a Bordetella bronchiseptica strain (LPaV) that does not express the antigenic homologs included in any of the Pa vaccines currently in use. This strain also lacks adenylate cyclase toxin, an essential virulence factor, and BipA, a surface protein. While LPaV colonized the mouse nose as efficiently as the wild-type strain, it was highly deficient in colonization of the lower respiratory tract and was attenuated in induction of inflammation and injury to the lungs. Strikingly, to our surprise, we found that in an intranasal murine challenge model, LPaV elicited cross-species protection against both B. bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis. Our data suggest the presence of immunogenic protective components other than those included in the pertussis vaccine. Combined with the whole-genome sequences of many Bordetella spp. that are available, the results of this study should serve as a platform for strategic development of the next generation of acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:20176797

  19. Tissue engineering of autologous cartilage grafts in three-dimensional in vitro macroaggregate culture system.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Andreas; Dennis, James E; Aigner, Joachim; Coticchia, James; Arnold, James; Berghaus, Alexander; Kastenbauer, Ernst R; Caplan, Arnold I

    2004-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering, techniques have been described to generate cartilage tissue with isolated chondrocytes and bioresorbable or nonbioresorbable biomaterials serving as three-dimensional cell carriers. In spite of successful cartilage engineering, problems of uneven degradation of biomaterial, and unforeseeable cell-biomaterial interactions remain. This study represents a novel technique to engineer cartilage by an in vitro macroaggregate culture system without the use of biomaterials. Human nasoseptal or auricular chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated and amplified in conventional monolayer culture before the cells were seeded into a cell culture insert with a track-etched membrane and cultured in vitro for 3 weeks. The new cartilage formed within the in vitro macroaggregates was analyzed by histology (toluidine blue, von Kossa-safranin O staining), and immunohistochemistry (collagen types I, II, V, VI, and X and elastin). The total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of native and engineered auricular as well as nasal cartilage was assayed colorimetrically in a safranin O assay. The biomechanical properties of engineered cartilage were determined by biphasic indentation assay. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes synthesized new cartilage with the typical appearance of hyaline nasal cartilage and elastic auricular cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining of cartilage samples showed a characteristic pattern of staining for collagen antibodies that varied in location and intensity. In all samples, intense staining for cartilage-specific collagen types I, II, and X was observed. By the use of von Kossa-safranin O staining a few positive patches-a possible sign of beginning mineralization within the engineered cartilages-were detected. The unique pattern for nasoseptal cartilage is intense staining for type V collagen, whereas auricular cartilage is only weakly positive for collagen types V and VI. Engineered nasal

  20. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  1. Systems Integration Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Systems Integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The Systems Integration subprogram enables the widespread deployment of safe, reliable, and cost-effective solar energy technologies by addressing the associated technical and non-technical challenges. These include timely and cost-effective interconnection procedures, optimal system planning, accurate prediction of solar resources, monitoring and control of solar power, maintaining grid reliability and stability, and many more. To address the challenges associated with interconnecting and integrating hundreds of gigawatts of solar power onto the electricity grid, the Systems Integration program funds research, development, and demonstration projects in four broad, interrelated focus areas: grid performance and reliability, dispatchability, power electronics, and communications.

  2. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  3. Soft Costs Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the systems integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. Soft costs can vary significantly as a result of a fragmented energy marketplace. In the U.S., there are 18,000 jurisdictions and 3,000 utilities with different rules and regulations for how to go solar. The same solar equipment may vary widely in its final installation price due to process and market variations across jurisdictions, creating barriers to rapid industry growth. SunShot supports the development of innovative solutions that enable communities to build their local economies and establish clean energy initiatives that meet their needs, while at the same time creating sustainable solar market conditions.

  4. Cutting Guide for Fibrous Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, A., D.

    1985-01-01

    Tool facilitates repetitive cutting of fibrous sheets. Flexible aluminum tape allows metal strips folded back on themselves, exposing fresh material for cutting. More than one strip folded back, and cutting width therefore increased in multiples of strip width. Developed for cutting strips of alumina-fiber matting, tool also used on such materials as felts, textiles, and sheet metals.

  5. Silicone Coating on Polyimide Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Silicone coatings applied to polyimide sheeting for variety of space-related applications. Coatings intended to protect flexible substrates of solar-cell blankets from degradation by oxygen atoms, electrons, plasmas, and ultraviolet light in low Earth orbit and outer space. Since coatings are flexible, generally useful in forming flexible laminates or protective layers on polyimide-sheet products.

  6. Communication Fact Sheets for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stremel, Kathleen; Bixler, Betsy; Morgan, Susanne; Layton, Kristen

    This booklet contains 28 fact sheets on communication written primarily for parents and families with a child who is deaf-blind. They attempt to address fundamental but complex issues related to the communication needs of children with vision and hearing impairments. Each fact sheet targets a specific area, including: (1) communication; (2)…

  7. The amphoteric effect on friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage surfaces under slightly sheared hydration lubrication mode.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Zenon; Gadomski, Adam; Sojka, Michal; Urbaniak, Wieslaw; Bełdowski, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    The amphoteric effect on the friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage contacts has been found to be highly sensitive to the pH of an aqueous solution. The cartilage surface was characterized using a combination of the pH, wettability, as well as the interfacial energy and friction coefficient testing methods to support lamellar-repulsive mechanism of hydration lubrication. It has been confirmed experimentally that phospholipidic multi-bilayers are essentially described as lamellar frictionless lubricants protecting the surface of the joints against wear. At the hydrophilicity limit, the low friction would then be due to (a) lamellar slippage of bilayers and (b) a short-range (nanometer-scale) repulsion between the interfaces of negatively charged (PO4(-)) cartilage surfaces, and in addition, contribution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) collagen fibers, hyaluronate, proteoglycans aggregates (PGs), glycoprotein termed lubricin and finally, lamellar PLs phases. In this paper we demonstrate experimentally that the pH sensitivity of cartilage to friction provides a novel concept in joint lubrication on charged surfaces.

  8. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair. PMID:27642587

  9. Surface smoothness: cartilage biomarkers for knee OA beyond the radiologist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummala, Sudhakar; Dam, Erik B.

    2010-03-01

    Fully automatic imaging biomarkers may allow quantification of patho-physiological processes that a radiologist would not be able to assess reliably. This can introduce new insight but is problematic to validate due to lack of meaningful ground truth expert measurements. Rather than quantification accuracy, such novel markers must therefore be validated against clinically meaningful end-goals such as the ability to allow correct diagnosis. We present a method for automatic cartilage surface smoothness quantification in the knee joint. The quantification is based on a curvature flow method used on tibial and femoral cartilage compartments resulting from an automatic segmentation scheme. These smoothness estimates are validated for their ability to diagnose osteoarthritis and compared to smoothness estimates based on manual expert segmentations and to conventional cartilage volume quantification. We demonstrate that the fully automatic markers eliminate the time required for radiologist annotations, and in addition provide a diagnostic marker superior to the evaluated semi-manual markers.

  10. Effects of hormones and drugs on cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Franchimont, P; Bassleer, C; Henrotin, Y

    1989-08-01

    When cartilage is attacked, either by an excess of charges or by biochemical agents, its morphological and functional impairment is associated with a local homeostatic reaction; this includes a proliferative response (assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation) and a stimulation of proteoglycan and type II collagen (II coll) synthesis. This homeostatic reaction may be studied in vitro using tridimensional culture of human chondrocytes. Cartilage clusters are formed after 4 days' culture and chondrocytes multiply for the first 15 days of culture. Furthermore, human cartilage proteoglycans and II coll, assayed by specific radioimmunoassays, are released into the culture medium and constitute the new matrix of the clusters. Moreover, it appears that these human chondrocytes are targets for several hormones capable of stimulating a proliferative response without affecting proteoglycan and II coll synthesis.

  11. Multifunctional chondroitin sulphate for cartilage tissue-biomaterial integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-An; Varghese, Shyni; Sharma, Blanka; Strehin, Iossif; Fermanian, Sara; Gorham, Justin; Fairbrother, D. Howard; Cascio, Brett; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2007-05-01

    A biologically active, high-strength tissue adhesive is needed for numerous medical applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Integration of biomaterials or implants with surrounding native tissue is crucial for both immediate functionality and long-term performance of the tissue. Here, we use the biopolymer chondroitin sulphate (CS), one of the major components of cartilage extracellular matrix, to develop a novel bioadhesive that is readily applied and acts quickly. CS was chemically functionalized with methacrylate and aldehyde groups on the polysaccharide backbone to chemically bridge biomaterials and tissue proteins via a twofold covalent link. Three-dimensional hydrogels (with and without cells) bonded to articular cartilage defects. In in vitro and in vivo functional studies this approach led to mechanical stability of the hydrogel and tissue repair in cartilage defects.

  12. Ganges Chasma Sand Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    Today's sand sheet is located in the Ganges Chasma portion of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, note that the dune forms are seen only at the margin and that the interior of the sand sheet at this resolution appears to completely lack dune forms.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6.4, Longitude 310.7 East (49.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Cell bricks-enriched platelet-rich plasma gel for injectable cartilage engineering - an in vivo experiment in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Bolei; Ma, Qin; Chen, Fulin; Wu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Clinical application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP)-based injectable tissue engineering is limited by weak mechanical properties and a rapid fibrinolytic rate. We proposed a new strategy, a cell bricks-stabilized PRP injectable system, to engineer and regenerate cartilage with stable morphology and structure in vivo. Chondrocytes from the auricular cartilage of rabbits were isolated and cultured to form cell bricks (fragmented cell sheet) or cell expansions. Fifteen nude mice were divided evenly (n = 5) into cells-PRP (C-P), cell bricks-PRP (CB-P) and cell bricks-cells-PRP (CB-C-P) groups. Cells, cell bricks or a cell bricks/cells mixture were suspended in PRP and were injected subcutaneously in animals. After 8 weeks, all the constructs were replaced by white resilient tissue; however, specimens from the CB-P and CB-C-P groups were well maintained in shape, while the C-P group appeared distorted, with a compressed outline. Histologically, all groups presented lacuna-like structures, glycosaminoglycan-enriched matrices and positive immunostaining of collagen type II. Different from the uniform structure presented in CB-C-P samples, CB-P presented interrupted, island-like chondrogenesis and contracted structure; fibrous interruption was shown in the C-P group. The highest percentage of matrix was presented in CB-C-P samples. Collagen and sGAG quantification confirmed that the CB-C-P constructs had statistically higher amounts than the C-P and CB-P groups; statistical differences were also found among the groups in terms of biomechanical properties and gene expression. We concluded that cell bricks-enriched PRP gel sufficiently enhanced the morphological stability of the constructs, maintained chondrocyte phenotypes and favoured chondrogenesis in vivo, which suggests that such an injectable, completely biological system is a suitable cell carrier for cell-based cartilage repair.

  14. Vertically scanned laser sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Di; Arranz, Alicia; Zhu, Shouping; Yang, Yujie; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Shen, Chen; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Laser sheet microscopy is a widely used imaging technique for imaging the three-dimensional distribution of a fluorescence signal in fixed tissue or small organisms. In laser sheet microscopy, the stripe artifacts caused by high absorption or high scattering structures are very common, greatly affecting image quality. To solve this problem, we report here a two-step procedure which consists of continuously acquiring laser sheet images while vertically displacing the sample, and then using the variational stationary noise remover (VSNR) method to further reduce the remaining stripes. Images from a cleared murine colon acquired with a vertical scan are compared with common stitching procedures demonstrating that vertically scanned light sheet microscopy greatly improves the performance of current light sheet microscopy approaches without the need for complex changes to the imaging setup and allows imaging of elongated samples, extending the field of view in the vertical direction.

  15. Tibiofemoral cartilage contact biomechanics in patients after reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Ali; Van de Velde, Samuel; Gill, Thomas J; Li, Guoan

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint in patients after reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A dual fluoroscopic and MR imaging technique was used to investigate the cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint during in vivo weight-bearing flexion of the knee in eight patients 6 months following clinically successful reconstruction of an acute isolated ACL rupture. The location of tibiofemoral cartilage contact, size of the contact area, cartilage thickness at the contact area, and magnitude of the cartilage contact deformation of the ACL-reconstructed knees were compared with those previously measured in intact (contralateral) knees and ACL-deficient knees of the same subjects. Contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral cartilage after ACL reconstruction were similar to those measured in intact knees. However, at lower flexion, the abnormal posterior and lateral shift of cartilage contact location to smaller regions of thinner tibial cartilage that has been described in ACL-deficient knees persisted in ACL-reconstructed knees, resulting in an increase of the magnitude of cartilage contact deformation at those flexion angles. Reconstruction of the ACL restored some of the in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint to normal. Clinically, recovering anterior knee stability might be insufficient to prevent post-operative cartilage degeneration due to lack of restoration of in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics.

  16. Percutaneous cartilage injection: A prospective animal study on a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cartilage grafting is a useful technique in nasal reconstruction. Implantation of a whole graft is usually done through an incision. Crushed cartilage can also be used. Injection of cartilage could be an alternative to implantation. The objective of this study is to compare the long-term viability of percutaneously injected crushed auricular cartilage to surgically implanted cartilage in the rabbit. Methods Auricular cartilage was harvested bilaterally in 10 New Zealand white rabbits. A 1 cm2 cartilage graft was implanted surgically on the upper nasal dorsum. The remaining cartilage was crushed and percutaneously injected on the lower nasal dorsum. Volume and mass of each graft were compared between pre-implantation and after 3 months of observation. A histological study was conducted to evaluate chondrocyte viability and degree of fibrosis on pre and post-implantation cartilage. Results Mass and volume remained similar for surgically implanted cartilage grafts. Mass and volume diminished by an average of 47% and 40% respectively after 3 months for the injected crushed cartilage grafts. Chondrocyte viability was an average of 25% lower in the injected grafts. Conclusions Cartilage injection is a promising technique that must be refined to increase chondrocyte viability. Developing an appropriate injection apparatus would improve this technique. PMID:23663241

  17. Ultrasonographic Measurement of the Femoral Cartilage Thickness in Hemiparetic Patients after Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunc, Hakan; Oken, Oznur; Kara, Murat; Tiftik, Tulay; Dogu, Beril; Unlu, Zeliha; Ozcakar, Levent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the femoral cartilage thicknesses of hemiparetic patients after stroke using musculoskeletal ultrasonography and to determine whether there is any correlation between cartilage thicknesses and the clinical characteristics of the patients. Femoral cartilage thicknesses of both knees were measured in 87 (33…

  18. An immunohistochemical study of matrix proteins in the craniofacial cartilage in midterm human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Shibata, S; Sakamoto, Y; Baba, O; Qin, C; Murakami, G; Cho, B H

    2013-12-02

    Immunohistochemical localization of collagen types I, II, and X, aggrecan, versican, dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1, martix extracellular phosphoprotein (MEPE) were performed for Meckel's cartilage, cranial base cartilage, and mandibular condylar cartilage in human midterm fetuses; staining patterns within the condylar cartilage were compared to those within other cartilaginous structures. Mandibular condylar cartilage contained aggrecan; it also had more type I collagen and a thicker hypertrophic cell layer than the other two types of cartilage; these three characteristics are similar to those of the secondary cartilage of rodents. MEPE immunoreactivity was first evident in the cartilage matrix of all types of cartilage in the human fetuses and in Meckel's cartilage of mice and rats. MEPE immunoreactivity was enhanced in the deep layer of the hypertrophic cell layer and in the cartilaginous core of the bone trabeculae in the primary spongiosa. These results indicated that MEPE is a component of cartilage matrix and may be involved in cartilage mineralization. DMP-1 immunoreactivity first became evident in human bone lacunae walls and canaliculi; this pattern of expression was comparable to the pattern seen in rodents. In addition, chondroid bone was evident in the mandibular (glenoid) fossa of the temporal bone, and it had aggrecan, collagen types I and X, MEPE, and DMP-1 immunoreactivity; these findings indicated that chondroid bone in this region has phenotypic expression indicative of both hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocytes.

  19. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  20. An Immunohistochemical Study of Matrix Proteins in the Craniofacial Cartilage in Midterm Human Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Baba, O.; Qin, C.; Murakami, G.; Cho, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of collagen types I, II, and X, aggrecan, versican, dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1, martix extracellular phosphoprotein (MEPE) were performed for Meckel’s cartilage, cranial base cartilage, and mandibular condylar cartilage in human midterm fetuses; staining patterns within the condylar cartilage were compared to those within other cartilaginous structures. Mandibular condylar cartilage contained aggrecan; it also had more type I collagen and a thicker hypertrophic cell layer than the other two types of cartilage; these three characteristics are similar to those of the secondary cartilage of rodents. MEPE immunoreactivity was first evident in the cartilage matrix of all types of cartilage in the human fetuses and in Meckel’s cartilage of mice and rats. MEPE immunoreactivity was enhanced in the deep layer of the hypertrophic cell layer and in the cartilaginous core of the bone trabeculae in the primary spongiosa. These results indicated that MEPE is a component of cartilage matrix and may be involved in cartilage mineralization. DMP-1 immunoreactivity first became evident in human bone lacunae walls and canaliculi; this pattern of expression was comparable to the pattern seen in rodents. In addition, chondroid bone was evident in the mandibular (glenoid) fossa of the temporal bone, and it had aggrecan, collagen types I and X, MEPE, and DMP-1 immunoreactivity; these findings indicated that chondroid bone in this region has phenotypic expression indicative of both hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocytes. PMID:24441192

  1. Mechanical properties of native and tissue-engineered cartilage depend on carrier permeability: a bioreactor study.

    PubMed

    Hoenig, Elisa; Leicht, Uta; Winkler, Thomas; Mielke, Gabriela; Beck, Katharina; Peters, Fabian; Schilling, Arndt F; Morlock, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    The implantation of osteochondral constructs-tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage on a bone substitute carrier-is a promising method to treat defects in articular cartilage. Currently, however, the TE cartilage's mechanical properties are clearly inferior to those of native cartilage. Their improvement has been the subject of various studies, mainly focusing on growth factors and physical loading during cultivation. With the approach of osteochondral constructs another aspect arises: the permeability of the carrier materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether and how the permeability of the subchondral bone influences the properties of native cartilage and whether the bone substitute carrier's permeability influences the TE cartilage of osteochondral constructs accordingly. Consequently, the influence of the subchondral bone's permeability on native cartilage was determined: Native porcine cartilage-bone cylinders were cultivated for 2 weeks in a bioreactor under mechanical loading with and without restricted permeability of the bone. For the TE cartilage these two permeability conditions were investigated using permeable and impermeable tricalciumphosphate carriers under equivalent cultivation conditions. All specimens were evaluated mechanically, biochemically, and histologically. The restriction of the bone's permeability significantly decreased the Young's modulus of native cartilage in vitro. No biochemical differences were found. This finding was confirmed for TE cartilage: While the biochemical parameters were not affected, a permeable carrier improved the cell morphology and mechanical properties in comparison to an impermeable one. In conclusion, the carrier permeability was identified as a determining factor for the mechanical properties of TE cartilage of osteochondral constructs.

  2. Analysis of cartilage-polydioxanone foil composite grafts.

    PubMed

    Kim, James H; Wong, Brian

    2013-12-01

    This study presents an analytical investigation into the mechanical behavior of a cartilage-polydioxanone (PDS) plate composite grafts. Numerical methods are used to provide a first-order, numerical model of the flexural stiffness of a cartilage-PDS graft. Flexural stiffness is a measure of resistance to bending and is inversely related to the amount of deformation a structure may experience when subjected to bending forces. The cartilage-PDS graft was modeled as a single composite beam. Using Bernoulli-Euler beam theory, a closed form equation for the theoretical flexural stiffness of the composite graft was developed. A parametric analysis was performed to see how the flexural properties of the composite model changed with varying thicknesses of PDS foil. The stiffness of the cartilage-PDS composite using 0.15-mm-thick PDS was four times higher than cartilage alone. The composite with a 0.5-mm-thick PDS graft was only 1.7 times stiffer than the composite with the 0.15-mm-thick PDS graft. Although a thicker graft material will yield higher flexural stiffness for the composite, the relationship between composite stiffness and PDS thickness is nonlinear. After a critical point, increments in graft thickness produce gradually smaller improvements in flexural stiffness. The small increase in stiffness when using the thicker PDS foils versus the 0.15 mm PDS foil may not be worth the potential complications (prolonged foreign body reaction, reduction in nutrient diffusion to cartilage) of using thicker artificial grafts.

  3. Mechanical Impact Induces Cartilage Degradation via Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Heying, Emily; Nicholson, Nathan; Stroud, Nicolas J.; Homandberg, Gene A.; Guo, Danping; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the activation of MAP kinases in and around cartilage subjected to mechanical damage and to determine the effects of their inhibitors on impaction induced chondrocyte death and cartilage degeneration. Design The phosphorylation of MAP kinases was examined with confocal microscopy and immunoblotting. The effects of MAP kinase inhibitors on impaction-induced chondrocyte death and proteoglycan loss were determined with fluorescent microscopy and DMMB assay. The expression of catabolic genes at mRNA levels was examined with quantitative real time PCR. Results Early p38 activation was detected at 20 min and 1 hr post-impaction. At 24 hr, enhanced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 was visualized in chondrocytes from in and around impact sites. The phosphorylation of p38 was increased by 3.0-fold in impact sites and 3.3-fold in adjacent cartilage. The phosphorylation of ERK-1 was increased by 5.8-fold in impact zone and 5.4-fold in adjacent cartilage; the phosphorylation of ERK-2 increased by 4.0-fold in impacted zone and 3.6-fold in adjacent cartilage. Furthermore, the blocking of p38 pathway did not inhibit impaction-induced ERK activation. The inhibition of p38 or ERK pathway significantly reduced injury-related chondrocyte death and proteoglycan losses. Quantative Real-time PCR analysis revealed that blunt impaction significantly up-regulated MMP-13, TNF-α, and ADAMTS-5 expression. Conclusion These findings implicate p38 and ERK MAPKs in the post injury spread of cartilage degeneration and suggest that the risk of PTOA following joint trauma could be decreased by blocking their activities, which might be involved in up-regulating expressions of MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, and TNF-α. PMID:20813194

  4. MOLECULAR RESURFACING OF CARTILAGE WITH PROTEOGLYCAN 4 (PRG4)

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kanika; Ham, Hyun Ok; Nguyen, Trung; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2010-01-01

    Early loss of proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), a lubricating glycoprotein implicated in boundary lubrication, from the cartilage surface has been associated with degeneration of cartilage and early onset of osteoarthritis. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid and other macromolecules has been proposed as a treatment of osteoarthritis, however efficacy of viscosupplementation is variable and may be influenced by the short residence time of lubricant in the knee joint after injection. Recent studies have demonstrated the use of aldehyde (CHO) modified extracellular matrix proteins for targeted adherence to a biological tissue surface. We hypothesized that CHO could be exploited to enhance binding of lubricating proteoglycans to the surface of PRG4 depleted cartilage. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of molecular resurfacing of cartilage with aldehyde modified PRG4. PRG4 was chemically functionalized with aldehyde (PRG4-CHO), and aldehyde plus Oregon Green (OG) fluorophore (PRG4-OG-CHO) to allow for differentiation of endogenous and exogenous PRG4. Cartilage disks depleted of native PRG4 were then treated with solutions of PRG4, PRG4-CHO, or PRG4-OG-CHO and then assayed for the presence of PRG4 by immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and fluorescence imaging. Repletion of cartilage surfaces was significantly enhanced with the inclusion of CHO compared to repletion with unmodified PRG4. These findings suggest a generalized approach that may be used for molecular resurfacing of tissue surfaces with PRG4 and other lubricating biomolecules, perhaps leading in the future to a convenient method for overcoming loss of lubrication during the early stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:20338268

  5. Biofabricated soft network composites for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bas, Onur; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena; Meinert, Christoph; D'Angella, Davide; Baldwin, Jeremy; Bray, Laura; Wellard, R; Kollmannsberger, Stefan; Rank, Ernst; Werner, Carsten; Klein, Travis; Catelas, Isabelle; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner

    2017-04-04

    Articular cartilage from a material science point of view is a soft network composite that plays a critical role in load-bearing joints during dynamic loading. Its composite structure, consisting of a collagen fiber network and a hydrated proteoglycan matrix, gives rise to the complex mechanical properties of the tissue including viscoelasticity and stress relaxation. Melt Electrospinning Writing (MEW) allows the design and fabrication of medical grade polycaprolactone (mPCL) fibrous networks for the reinforcement of soft hydrogel matrices for cartilage tissue engineering. However, these fiber-reinforced constructs underperformed under dynamic and prolonged loading conditions, suggesting that more targeted design approaches and material selection are required to fully exploit the potential of fibers as reinforcing agents for cartilage tissue engineering. In this study, we emulate the proteoglycan matrix of articular cartilage by using highly negatively charged star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol)/heparin hydrogel (sPEG/Hep) as the soft matrix. These soft hydrogels combined with mPCL melt electrospun fibrous networks exhibit mechanical anisotropy, nonlinearity, viscoelasticity and morphology analogous to those of their native counterpart, and provide suitable microenvironment for in vitro human chondrocyte culture and neocartilage formation. In addition, a high-order finite element methods (p-FEM) was developed in order to gain further insights concerning the deformation mechanisms of the constructs in silico as well as to predict compressive moduli. To our knowledge, this is the first study presenting cartilage tissue-engineered constructs that capture the overall transient, equilibrium and dynamic biomechanical properties of human articular cartilage.

  6. Patient satisfaction following nipple reconstruction incorporating autologous costal cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Lipa, Joan E; Addison, Patrick D; Neligan, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nipple-areolar reconstruction completes post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. Many techniques for nipple reconstruction have been described, and each has their advocates and critics. One of the frequent failings of most designs is loss of nipple projection with time. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of including autologous costal cartilage on patient satisfaction with their nipple reconstruction. METHODS: Sixty-eight patients were identified who had undergone fishtail flap nipple reconstruction following autologous free flap breast reconstruction between 1990 and 2004. Qualitative questionnaires, using Likert scales, were sent to each patient to specifically assess their satisfaction with their nipple reconstruction. RESULTS: Of 26 respondents (mean ± SEM follow-up period 3.7±3.6 years), 13 had undergone nipple reconstruction incorporating costal cartilage banked at the time of initial breast reconstruction, and the other 13 had no cartilage in their nipple reconstructions. While both groups would opt for nipple reconstruction again, patients with cartilage grafts incorporated into their reconstructions had overall satisfaction ratings 1.92 grades higher on average (not significant, P=0.12) than those without. This difference increased to 3.2 grades when the satisfaction of the patient’s partner was taken into account (P<0.05). Improved satisfaction corresponded to higher scores for volume, consistency, texture, and particularly for projection and contour of the nipple (P<0.05). Although nipple morphology changed over time, there was a trend toward improved stability in the cartilage group. CONCLUSIONS: Patient satisfaction with nipple reconstruction can be improved by incorporating costal cartilage beneath the skin flaps. Superior contour and projection are sustained over time. PMID:19554171

  7. Quinolone arthropathy--acute toxicity to immature articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Gough, A W; Kasali, O B; Sigler, R E; Baragi, V

    1992-01-01

    A class effect of quinolone antibacterial agents observed during animal toxicity testing is a specific arthropathy (QAP). Despite the growing list of laboratory animals susceptible to QAP and reports of arthralgia in patients treated with quinolones, the potential for QAP development in humans remains unknown. This review discusses current concepts in the biology of articular cartilage and how these concepts elucidate QAP pathogenesis. Biomechanical forces within synovial joints and toxicokinetic properties of quinolones contribute to QAP induction. Since a limited number of mechanistic pathways exist for acute articular damage, QAP may serve as a research tool to probe the pathobiology of injury to articular cartilage.

  8. Expression of microRNA-146 in osteoarthritis cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Keiichiro; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Miyaki, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Deie, Masataka; Adachi, Nobuo; Yasunaga, Yuji; Asahara, Hiroshi; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    Objective A role of microRNAs, which are ∼22- nucleotide non coding RNAs, has recently been recognized in human diseases. The objective of this study was to identify the expression pattern of microRNA-146 (miR-146) in cartilage from patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods The expression of miR-146 in cartilage from 15 patients with OA was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and by in situ hybridization. Induction of the expression of miR-146 by cultures of normal human articular chondrocytes following stimulation with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results All cartilage samples were divided into three groups according to a modified Mankin scale; grade I: 0 - 5, grade II: 6 - 10, grade III: 11 - 14. In OA cartilage samples of grade I, the expression of miR-146a and Col2a1 was significantly higher than that of other groups (p<0.05). In OA cartilage of grades II and III, the expression of miR-146a and Col2a1 decreased while the expression of MMP13 was elevated in grade II. These data show that miR-146a is expressed intensely in cartilage with a low Mankin grade, and that miR-146a expression decreases in accordance with level of MMP13 expression. Section in situ hybridization of pri-miR-146a revealed that pri-miR-146a is expressed in chondrocytes in all layers, especially in the superficial layer where it is intensely expressed. The expression of miR-146 was markedly elevated by IL-1β stimulation in human chondrocytes in vitro. Conclusion This study shows that miR-146 is intensely expressed in low grade OA cartilage, and that its expression is induced by stimulation of IL-1β. MiR-146 might play a role in OA cartilage pathogenesis. PMID:19333945

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    PubMed Central

    Zilkens, Christoph; Miese, Falk; Jäger, Marcus; Bittersohl, Bernd; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage. PMID:22053256

  10. High-Resolution Methods for Diagnosing Cartilage Damage In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Novakofski, Kira D.; Pownder, Sarah L.; Koff, Matthew F.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Potter, Hollis G.; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in current clinical modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, allow for earlier diagnoses of cartilage damage that could mitigate progression to osteoarthritis. However, current imaging modalities do not detect submicrometer damage. Developments in in vivo or arthroscopic techniques, including optical coherence tomography, ultrasonography, bioelectricity including streaming potential measurement, noninvasive electroarthrography, and multiphoton microscopy can detect damage at an earlier time point, but they are limited by a lack of penetration and the ability to assess an entire joint. This article reviews current advancements in clinical and developing modalities that can aid in the early diagnosis of cartilage injury and facilitate studies of interventional therapeutics. PMID:26958316

  11. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and its binding partners in the cartilage extracellular matrix: interaction, regulation and role in chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chitrangada; Yik, Jasper H N; Kishore, Ashleen; Van Dinh, Victoria; Di Cesare, Paul E; Haudenschild, Dominik R

    2014-07-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are widely known as a family of five calcium-binding matricellular proteins. While these proteins belong to the same family, they are encoded by different genes, regulate different cellular functions and are localized to specific regions of the body. TSP-5 or Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) is the only TSP that has been associated with skeletal disorders in humans, including pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). The pentameric structure of COMP, the evidence that it interacts with multiple cellular proteins, and the recent reports of COMP acting as a 'lattice' to present growth factors to cells, inspired this review of COMP and its interacting partners. In our review, we have compiled the interactions of COMP with other proteins in the cartilage extracellular matrix and summarized their importance in maintaining the structural integrity of cartilage as well as in regulating cellular functions.

  12. Somatomedin-like peptide(s) isolated from fetal bovine cartilage (cartilage-derived factor): isolation and some properties.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Y; Nomura, Y; Tsuji, M; Kinoshita, M; Ohmae, H; Suzuki, F

    1981-01-01

    Fetal bovine cartilage contains a polypeptide(s) that has somatomedin-like effects on rat and rabbit costal chondrocytes in culture. This factor, named the cartilage-derived factor, was extracted from fetal bovine cartilage, fractionated with acetone, and purified by gel filtration on Toyopearl HW 55-F in 4 M guanidine hydrochloride, preparative isoelectric focusing, and subsequent gel filtration on Toyopearl HW 55-F in 1 M formic acid. The resulting preparation, which focused in the neutral pH region and eluted from a Toyopearl column in a fraction with apparent Mr 10,000--11,000, appeared homogenous by NaDodSO4 gel electrophoresis. The purified preparation markedly enhanced not only proteoglycan synthesis but also DNA synthesis in rabbit costal chondrocytes and, on a protein basis, it was 1000 times more active than insulin and 1,000,000 times more active than fetal calf serum in stimulating proteoglycan synthesis. Images PMID:6947256

  13. Associations between the properties of the cartilage matrix and findings from quantitative MRI in human osteoarthritic cartilage of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo; Du, Xiaotao; Liu, Jun; Mao, Fengyong; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Shuai; Xu, Yan; Zang, Fengchao; Wang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the properties of the cartilage matrix and the results of T2 mapping and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dGEMRIC) in human knee osteoarthritic cartilage. Osteochondral samples were harvested from the middle part of the femoral condyle and tibial plateaus of 20 patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) during total knee arthroplasty. Sagittal T2 mapping, T1pre, and T1Gd were performed using 7.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Gycosaminoglycan (GAG) distribution was evaluated by OARSI, collagen anisotropy was assessed by polarized light microscopy (PLM), and biochemical analyses measured water, GAG, and collagen content. Associations between properties of the cartilage matrix and T2 and ΔR1 (1/T1Gd-1/T1pre) values were explored using correlation analysis. T2 and ΔR1 values were significantly correlated with the degree of cartilage degeneration (OARSI grade; Ρ = 0.53 and 0.77). T2 values were significantly correlated with water content (r = 0.69; P < 0.001), GAG content (r = -0.43; P < 0.001), and PLM grade (r = 0.47; P < 0.001), but not with collagen content (r = -0.02; P = 0.110). ΔR1 values were significantly correlated with GAG content (r = -0.84; P < 0.001) and PLM grade (r = 0.41; P < 0.001). Taken together, T2 mapping and dGEMRIC results were correlated with the properties of the cartilage matrix in human knee osteoarthritic cartilage. Combination T2 mapping and dGEMRIC represents a potential non-invasive monitoring technique to detect the progress of knee OA. PMID:26097577

  14. Knee Cartilage Thickness, T1ρ and T2 Relaxation Time Are Related to Articular Cartilage Loading in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Van Rossom, Sam; Smith, Colin Robert; Zevenbergen, Lianne; Thelen, Darryl Gerard; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Van Assche, Dieter; Jonkers, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage is responsive to the loading imposed during cyclic routine activities. However, the local relation between cartilage in terms of thickness distribution and biochemical composition and the local contact pressure during walking has not been established. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relation between cartilage thickness, proteoglycan and collagen concentration in the knee joint and knee loading in terms of contact forces and pressure during walking. 3D gait analysis and MRI (3D-FSE, T1ρ relaxation time and T2 relaxation time sequence) of fifteen healthy subjects were acquired. Experimental gait data was processed using musculoskeletal modeling to calculate the contact forces, impulses and pressure distribution in the tibiofemoral joint. Correlates to local cartilage thickness and mean T1ρ and T2 relaxation times of the weight-bearing area of the femoral condyles were examined. Local thickness was significantly correlated with local pressure: medial thickness was correlated with medial condyle contact pressure and contact force, and lateral condyle thickness was correlated with lateral condyle contact pressure and contact force during stance. Furthermore, average T1ρ and T2 relaxation time correlated significantly with the peak contact forces and impulses. Increased T1ρ relaxation time correlated with increased shear loading, decreased T1ρ and T2 relaxation time correlated with increased compressive forces and pressures. Thicker cartilage was correlated with higher condylar loading during walking, suggesting that cartilage thickness is increased in those areas experiencing higher loading during a cyclic activity such as gait. Furthermore, the proteoglycan and collagen concentration and orientation derived from T1ρ and T2 relaxation measures were related to loading. PMID:28076431

  15. Informing future cartilage repair strategies: a comparative study of three different human cell types for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin B

    2013-06-01

    A major clinical need exists for cartilage repair and regeneration. Despite many different strategies having been pursued, the identification of an optimised cell type and of pre-treatment conditions remains a challenge. This study compares the cartilage-like tissue generated by human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and human neonatal and adult chondrocytes cultured on three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds under various conditions in vitro and in vivo with the aim of informing future cartilage repair strategies based upon tissue-engineering approaches. After 3 weeks in vitro culture, all three cell types showed cartilage-like tissue formation on 3D poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid scaffolds only when cultured in chondrogenic medium. After 6 weeks of chondro-induction, neonatal chondrocyte constructs revealed the most cartilage-like tissue formation with a prominent superficial zone-like layer, a middle zone-like structure and the thinnest fibrous capsule. HBMSC constructs had the thickest fibrous capsule formation. Under basal culture conditions, neonatal articular chondrocytes failed to form any tissue, whereas HBMSCs and adult chondrocytes showed thick fibrous capsule formation at 6 weeks. After in vivo implantation, all groups generated more compact tissues compared with in vitro constructs. Pre-culturing in chondrogenic media for 1 week before implantation reduced fibrous tissue formation in all cell constructs at week 3. After 6 weeks, only the adult chondrocyte group pre-cultured in chondrogenic media was able to maintain a more chondrogenic/less fibrocartilaginous phenotype. Thus, pre-culture under chondrogenic conditions is required to maintain a long-term chondrogenic phenotype, with adult chondrocytes being a more promising cell source than HBMSCs for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  16. The maturity of tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro affects the repairability for osteochondral defect.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng Zhe; Cho, Jae-Ho; Choi, Byung Hyune; Wang, Li Ming; Kim, Moon Suk; Park, So Ra; Yoon, Jeong Ho; Yun, Jung Ho; Oh, Hyun Ju; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2011-12-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering using cells and biocompatible scaffolds has emerged as a promising approach to repair of cartilage damage. To date, however, no engineered cartilage has proven to be equivalent to native cartilage in terms of biochemical and compression properties, as well as histological features. An alternative strategy for cartilage engineering is to focus on the in vivo regeneration potential of immature engineered cartilage. Here, we used a rabbit model to evaluate the extent to which the maturity of engineered cartilage influenced the remodeling and integration of implanted extracellular matrix scaffolds containing allogenous chondrocytes. Full-thickness osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of New Zealand white rabbits. Left knee defects were left untreated as a control (group 1), and right knee defects were implanted with tissue-engineered cartilage cultured in vitro for 2 days (group 2), 2 weeks (group 3), or 4 weeks (group 4). Histological, chemical, and compression assays of engineered cartilage in vitro showed that biochemical composition became more cartilagenous, and biomechanical property for compression gradually increased with culture time. In an in vivo study, gross imaging and histological observation at 1 and 3 months after implanting in vitro-cultured engineered cartilage showed that defects in groups 3 and 4 were repaired with hyaline cartilage-like tissue, whereas defects were only partially filled with fibrocartilage after 1 month in groups 1 and 2. At 3 months, group 4 showed striking features of hyaline cartilage tissue, with a mature matrix and a columnar arrangement of chondrocytes. Zonal distribution of type II collagen was most prominent, and the International Cartilage Repair Society score was also highest at this time. In addition, the subchondral bone was well ossified. In conclusion, in vivo engineered cartilage was remodeled when implanted; however, its extent to maturity varied with cultivation

  17. Microcomponent chemical process sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K.; Call, C.J.; Birmingham, J.G.; McDonald, C.E.; Kurath, D.E.; Friedrich, M.

    1998-09-22

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one chemical process unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 26 figs.

  18. Microcomponent chemical process sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Drost, M. Kevin; Call, Charles J.; Birmingham, Joseph G.; McDonald, Carolyn Evans; Kurath, Dean E.; Friedrich, Michele

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one chemical process unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  19. Current sheets in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical simulations of current sheets in solar flares are described, including new features such as the presence of a shock in Petschek's mechanism and impulsive burst-like reconnection due to secondary tearing and coalescence. The general properties of magnetic reconnection are discussed in connection with the basic requirements of numerical current sheet models. Emphasis is given to the need for realistic criteria for energy balance, the Lundquist number, and line tying in calculations of tearing and reconnection modes. The need for analytical models of current sheet processes to compare with the numerical simulations is also stressed.

  20. Acceleration of Regeneration of Large Gap-Peripheral Nerve Injuries Using Acellular Nerve Allografts Plus Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells (AFS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells (AFS). PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas L. Smith, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wake Forest University Health Sciences...Acellular Nerve Allografts plus amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells (AFS). 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0309 5b. GRANT NUMBER OR120157 5c...year include successful seeding of AFS into ANA. This accomplishment also documented that these cells remained viable up to 72 hours after seeding. The

  1. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  2. An in situ hybridization and histochemical study of development and postnatal changes of mouse mandibular angular cartilage compared with condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Shunichi; Fujimori, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Yasuo

    2006-03-01

    To investigate the origin and postnatal changes of mouse mandibular angular cartilage, in situ hybridization for cartilaginous marker proteins, histochemistry for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and bromodeoxyuridine (BrDU) analyses were performed. Chondrocytes of the mandibular angular cartilage were derived from ALP-positive progenitor cells and first detected at embryonic day (E) 15.5. Newly formed chondrocytes rapidly differentiated into hypertrophic chondrocytes and hypertrophic cell zone rapidly extended in subsequent a few days. During this period, bone sialoprotein mRNA was more widely expressed than osteopontin mRNA in cartilage. Endochondral bone formation started at E 17.5 with the resorption of the bone collar by osteoclasts. These characteristics were consistent with those of the condylar cartilage, although developmental process was 0.5-1.5 day delayed relative to the condylar cartilage. During the postnatal period, contrast to the condylar cartilage, the angular cartilage constantly decreased in volume with advancing age. Reduction of proliferating activity estimated by BrDU incorporation accounts for this phenomenon. We demonstrate new structural features of the mandibular angular cartilage that may contribute to a coming research for the secondary cartilage.

  3. Characterization of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered cartilage: analysis of its ultrastructure, cell density and chondrocyte phenotype compared to native adult and fetal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Hillel, Alexander T; Taube, Janis M; Cornish, Toby C; Sharma, Blanka; Halushka, Marc; McCarthy, Edward F; Hutchins, Grover M; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2010-01-01

    The production of engineered cartilage from mesenchymal stem cells is a rapidly developing field. Potential applications include the treatment of degenerative joint disease as well as the treatment of traumatic and surgical bone injury. Prior to clinical application, however, further characterization of the morphology, ultrastructure, biocompatibility, and performance of the engineered tissue is warranted. To achieve this, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were grown in vitro in pellet culture for 3 weeks in chondrogenic medium conditions. The resultant engineered cartilage was compared to native adult and fetal tissue. Routine histology, special stains, and ultrastructural and quantitative histomorphometric analyses were performed. The engineered tissue demonstrated a similar chondrocyte phenotype, collagen fibril appearance, and matrix distribution when compared to native cartilage. By histomorphometric analysis, the cell density of the engineered cartilage was between that of native fetal and adult cartilage. The cell-to-matrix ratio and cellular area fraction of engineered cartilage samples was significantly greater than in adult samples, but indistinguishable from fetal cartilage samples, supporting the hypothesis that hMSC-engineered cartilage regeneration may mimic fetal cartilage development.

  4. Rib cartilage characterization in patients affected by pectus excavatum.

    PubMed

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Calosi, Laura; Guasti, Daniele; Romagnoli, Paolo; Messineo, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Pectus excavatum (PE) is the most frequent anterior chest deformity which may be frequently associated with connective tissue disorders. We performed microscopic analyses to better understand cartilage behavior and obtain clues on its pathogenesis. In 37 PE patients, none with Marfan syndrome, we analyzed costal cartilage by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Control tissue specimens were harvested from four patients without any connective tissue disease. In both control and PE patients, chondrocytes were on the average <15 µm in diameter and occupied <10% of tissue volume; in most cases the extracellular matrix was stained by alcian blue, instead of safranin; no difference between PE and control samples was significant. All samples showed an uneven collagen type II immunolabeling both within the cells and pericellular matrix, and occasionally of the territorial matrix. In all cases numerous cells underwent apoptosis accompanied by matrix condensation as shown by electron microscopy. Our results suggest that matrix composition and the cell number and size of costal cartilage are dependent on the subject and not on the disease; the microscopic organization of cartilage is correlated with the stabilization of the defective shape rather than with the onset of the deformity.

  5. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation

    PubMed Central

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of